WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon support microstructure

  1. Electrochemical and microstructural characterization of platinum supported on glassy carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzić Sanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the electrochemical oxidation of glassy carbon on the deposition of platinum particles and the electrocatalytic activity of platinum supported on oxidized glassy carbon were studied for methanol oxidation in H2SO4 solution. Platinum was potentiostatically deposited from H2SO4 + 6mM H2PtCl6 solution. Glassy carbon was anodically polarized in 1 M NaOH at 1.41 V (SCE for 35 and 95 s and in 0.5 M H2SO4 at 2V (SCE for 35; 95 s and 2.25 V for 35 and 95 s. Electrochemical treatment of the GC support leads to a better distribution of platinum on the substrate and has remarkable effect on the activity. The activity of the Pt/GCox electrode for methanol oxidation is larger than that of polycrystalline Pt and by more than one order of magnitude larger than that of a Pt/GC electrode. This increase in activity indicates the pronounced role of the organic residues of the GC support on the properties of Pt particles deposited on glassy carbon.

  2. Understanding the Effects of Surface Chemistry and Microstructure on the Activity and Stability of Pt Electrocatalysts on Non-Carbon Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustain, William [Univ. of Conneticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-02-12

    The objective of this project is to elucidate the effects of the chemical composition and microstructure of the electrocatalyst support on the activity, stability and utilization of supported Pt clusters.

  3. Microstructural Properties and HDS Activity of CoMo Catalysts Supported on Activated Carbon, Al2O3, ZrO2 and TiO2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Karel; Procházka, Martin; Kaluža, Luděk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2015 (2015), s. 841-846 ISSN 1974-9791. [International Conference on Chemical and Process Engineering - ICheaP12 /12./. Milano, 19.05.2015-22.05.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/11/0902 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : CoMo catalysts * surface area * activated carbon Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  4. Carbons and carbon supported catalysts in hydroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, Edward

    2009-07-01

    This book is a comprehensive summary of recent research in the field and covers all areas of carbons and carbon materials. The potential application of carbon supports, particularly those of carbon black (CB) and activated carbon (AC) in hydroprocessing catalysis are covered. Novel carbon materials such as carbon fibers and carbon nano tubes (CNT) are also covered, including the more recent developments in the use of fullerenes in hydroprocessing applications. Although the primary focus of this book is on carbons and carbon supported catalysts, it also identifies the difference in the effect of carbon supports compared with the oxidic supports, particularly that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The difference in catalyst activity and stability was estimated using both model compounds and real feeds under variable conditions. The conditions applied during the preparation of carbon supported catalysts are also comprehensively covered and include various methods of pretreatment of carbon supports to enhance catalyst performance. The model compounds results consistently show higher hydrodesulfurization and hydrodeoxygenation activities of carbon supported catalysts than that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported catalysts. Also, the deactivation of the former catalysts by coke deposition was much less evident. Chapter 6.3.1.3 is on carbon-supported catalysts: coal-derived liquids.

  5. Adhered Supported Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dale F.; Craft, Benjamin J.; Jaffe, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (NTs) in excess of 200 μm long are grown by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon vapors. The nanotubes grow continuously without the typical extinction due to catalyst encapsulation. A woven metal mesh supports the nanotubes creating a metal supported nanotube (MSNT) structure. The 140 μm wide mesh openings are completely filled by 70 nm diameter multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs are straight, uniform and highly crystalline. Their wall thickness is about 10 nm (30 graphite layers). The adherent NTs are not removed from the support in a Scotch tape pull test. A 12.5 cm 2 capacitor made from two MSNT structures immersed in 1 M KCl has a capacitance of 0.35 F and an equivalent series resistance of 0.18 Ω. Water flows through the MSNT at a flow velocity of 1 cm/min with a pressure drop of 15 inches of water. With the support removed, the MWNTs naturally form a carbon nanocomposite (CNC) paper with a specific area of 80 m 2 /gm, a bulk density of 0.21 g/cm 3 , an open pore fraction of 0.81, and a resistivity of 0.16 Ω-cm

  6. Carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites: Microstructure and biocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Leilei, E-mail: zhangleilei1121@aliyun.com; Li, Hejun; Li, Kezhi; Zhang, Shouyang; Lu, Jinhua; Li, Wei; Cao, Sheng; Wang, Bin

    2013-12-01

    To improve the surface biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites, a carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was applied using a combination method of slurry procedure and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The biocompatibility of the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was investigated by osteoblast-like MG63 cell culture tests. The results showed that the carbon foam could provide a large number of pores on the surface of carbon/carbon composites. The hydroxyapatite crystals could infiltrate into the pores and form the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating. The coating covered the carbon/carbon composites fully and uniformly with slice morphology. The cell response tests showed that the MG63 cells on carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating had a better cell adhesion and cell proliferation than those on uncoated carbon/carbon composites. The carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coatings were cytocompatible and were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility. The approach presented here may be exploited for fabrication of carbon/carbon composite implant surfaces.

  7. Carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites: Microstructure and biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Leilei; Li, Hejun; Li, Kezhi; Zhang, Shouyang; Lu, Jinhua; Li, Wei; Cao, Sheng; Wang, Bin

    2013-01-01

    To improve the surface biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites, a carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was applied using a combination method of slurry procedure and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The biocompatibility of the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was investigated by osteoblast-like MG63 cell culture tests. The results showed that the carbon foam could provide a large number of pores on the surface of carbon/carbon composites. The hydroxyapatite crystals could infiltrate into the pores and form the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating. The coating covered the carbon/carbon composites fully and uniformly with slice morphology. The cell response tests showed that the MG63 cells on carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating had a better cell adhesion and cell proliferation than those on uncoated carbon/carbon composites. The carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coatings were cytocompatible and were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility. The approach presented here may be exploited for fabrication of carbon/carbon composite implant surfaces.

  8. Molecular modeling of the microstructure evolution during carbon fiber processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Saaketh; Li, Chunyu; Shen, Tongtong; Strachan, Alejandro

    2017-12-01

    The rational design of carbon fibers with desired properties requires quantitative relationships between the processing conditions, microstructure, and resulting properties. We developed a molecular model that combines kinetic Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques to predict the microstructure evolution during the processes of carbonization and graphitization of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers. The model accurately predicts the cross-sectional microstructure of the fibers with the molecular structure of the stabilized PAN fibers and physics-based chemical reaction rates as the only inputs. The resulting structures exhibit key features observed in electron microcopy studies such as curved graphitic sheets and hairpin structures. In addition, computed X-ray diffraction patterns are in good agreement with experiments. We predict the transverse moduli of the resulting fibers between 1 GPa and 5 GPa, in good agreement with experimental results for high modulus fibers and slightly lower than those of high-strength fibers. The transverse modulus is governed by sliding between graphitic sheets, and the relatively low value for the predicted microstructures can be attributed to their perfect longitudinal texture. Finally, the simulations provide insight into the relationships between chemical kinetics and the final microstructure; we observe that high reaction rates result in porous structures with lower moduli.

  9. Archaeologic analogues: Microstructural changes by natural ageing in carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, Esther Bravo; Fernandez, Jorge Chamon; Arasanz, Javier Guzman; Peces, Raquel Arevalo; Criado, Antonio Javier; Dietz, Christian; Martinez, Juan Antonio; Criado Portal, Antonio Jose

    2006-01-01

    When discussing the container material for highly active radionuclear waste, carbon steel is one of the materials most frequently proposed by the international scientific community. Evidently, security with respect to the container behaviour into deep geological deposits is fundamental. Among other parameters, knowledge about material mechanical properties is essential when designing the container. Time ageing of carbon steel, apart from possible alterations of the chemical composition (e.g. corrosion) involves important microstructural changes, at the scale of centuries and millenniums. The latter may cause variations of the mechanical properties of carbon steel storage containers, with the corresponding risk of possible leakage. In order to properly estimate such risk and to adjust the corresponding mathematical models to reality, the microstructural changes observed in this study on archaeologic samples are evaluated, comparing ancient and modern steels of similar chemical composition and fabrication processes

  10. Direct integration of carbon nanotubes in Si microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aasmundtveit, Knut E; Ta, Bao Q; Halvorsen, Einar; Hoivik, Nils; Lin, Liwei

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a low-cost, room-temperature process for integrating carbon nanotubes on Si microsystems. The process uses localized resistive heating by controlling current through suspended microbridges, to provide local temperatures high enough for CVD growth of carbon nanotubes. Locally grown carbon nanotubes make electrical connections through guidance by electric fields, thus eventually making circuits. The process is scalable to a wafer level batch process. Furthermore, it is controlled electrically, thus enabling automated control. Direct integration of carbon nanotubes in microstructures has great promise for nano-functional devices, such as ultrasensitive chemical sensors. Initial measurements demonstrate the Si–carbon nanotube–Si circuit's potential as a NH 3 sensor. (paper)

  11. Carbonation-Related Microstructural Changesin Long-Term Durability Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio A. Rigo da Silva

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the effects of carbonation on the microstructure of Portland cement concrete for long-term durability applications. A class C40 concrete (characteristic compression strength between 40 MPa and 44 MPa on the 28th day, according to Brazilian standard NBR 8953 was chosen for the experimental study of the carbonation effects, from which test samples were molded for accelerated test under a 100%-CO2 atmosphere after physical and mechanical characterization. It was observed that carbonation provoked a reduction of 5% to 12% of the concrete open porosity accessible to water. Flexural strength values obtained after the carbonation tests revealed a decrease of 12% and 25% in relation to the values obtained before tests on the 28th and 91st days, respectively.

  12. Microstructure, elastic and inelastic properties of partially graphitized biomorphic carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, T. S.; Kardashev, B. K.; Smirnov, B. I.; Gutierrez-Pardo, A.; Ramirez-Rico, J.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.

    2015-03-01

    The microstructural characteristics and amplitude dependences of the Young's modulus E and internal friction (logarithmic decrement δ) of biocarbon matrices prepared by beech wood carbonization at temperatures T carb = 850-1600°C in the presence of a nickel-containing catalyst have been studied. Using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, it has been shown that the use of a nickel catalyst during carbonization results in a partial graphitization of biocarbons at T carb ≥ 1000°C: the graphite phase is formed as 50- to 100-nm globules at T carb = 1000°C and as 0.5- to 3.0-μm globules at T carb = 1600°C. It has been found that the measured dependences E( T carb) and δ( T carb) contain three characteristic ranges of variations in the Young's modulus and logarithmic decrement with a change in the carbonization temperature: E increases and δ decreases in the ranges T carb 1300°C; in the range 1000 biocarbons carbonized in the presence of nickel correlates with the evolution of their microstructure. The largest values of E are obtained for samples with T carb = 1000 and 1600°C. However, the samples with T carb = 1600°C exhibit a higher susceptibility to microplasticity due to the presence of a globular graphite phase that is significantly larger in size and total volume.

  13. Carbon a support for sulfide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, J.P.R.; Lensing, T.J.; Mercx, F.P.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two types of carbon materials, carbon black composite and carbon covered alumina, were studied for-their use as support for sulfide catalysts. The following parameters were varied: type of carbon black, carbon coverage of the alumina and carbon pretreatment. Pore size distributions were determined

  14. Microstructural investigations of 0.2% carbon content steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollabimazraehno, Sajjad; Hingerl, Kurt

    2011-10-01

    The effect of thermal annealing to get different phases on low carbon steel was investigated. Steel sheets (0.2 wt. % C) of 900 μm thickness were heat treated to produce different structures. All the samples have the same starting point, transformation to coarse austenite at 900 degree Celsius. The nano indentation results revealed that samples have different hadness. By making conventional SEM micrographs, focus ion beam maps, and Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) the microstructural development and grain boundary variation of transformed phases martensite, biainte, tempered martensite and different combination of these phases were studied.

  15. Microstructures and mechanical properties of duplex low carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfirano; Eben, U. S.; Hidayat, M.

    2018-04-01

    The microstructures behavior of duplex cold-rolled low carbon steel for automotive applications has been investigated. Intercritical annealing treatment is commonly used to develop a duplex low carbon steel containing ferrite and martensite. To get a duplex phase ferrite and martensite, the specimens were heated at inter-critical annealing temperature of 775°C - 825°C, for heating time up to 20 minutes, followed by water-quenched. The hardness of specimens was studied. The optical microscopy was used to analyze the microstructures. The optimal annealing conditions (martensite volume fraction approaching 20%) at 775°C with a heating time of 10 minutes was achieved. The highest hardness value was obtained in cold-rolled specimens of 41% in size reduction for intercritical annealing temperature of 825°C. In this condition, the hardness value was 373 HVN. The correlation between intercritical annealing temperature and time can be expressed in the transformation kinetics as fγ/fe = 1-exp(-Ktn) wherein K and n are grain growth rate constant and Avrami’s exponent, respectively. From experiment, the value of K = 0.15 and n = 0.461. Using the relationship between temperatures and heating time, activation energy (Q) can be calculated that is 267 kJ/mol.

  16. Facile synthesis of B-type carbonated nanoapatite with tailored microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti, E-mail: magdalena.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Romagnoli, Marcello, E-mail: marcello.romagnoli@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Hanuskova, Miriam, E-mail: Miriam.hanuskova@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Fabbri, Elena, E-mail: Elena.fabbri@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Gualtieri, Alessandro F., E-mail: Alessandro.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41121 Modena (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    Nanolime and a phosphate-based chelating agent were used to synthesize B-type carbonated apatite. Developed Rietveld refinement strategies allowed one to determine process yield, product crystallinity as well as structural (unit cell) and microstructural (size, strain) parameters. The effect of synthesis temperature (20–60 °C) as well as Ca/P ratio (1.5–2.5) and solid content (10–30 wt%) of the starting batch on these properties were investigated. FTIR, TEM and gas adsorption data provided supporting evidence. The process yield was 42–60 wt% and found to be governed by the Ca/P ratio. The purified products had high specific surface area (107–186 m{sup 2}/g) and crystallinity (76–97%). The unit cell parameters, correlated to the degree of structural carbonate, were sensitive to the Ca/P ratio. Instead, temperature governed the microstructural parameters. Less strained and larger crystals were obtained at higher temperatures. Long-term aging up to 6 months at 20 °C compensated for higher crystal growth kinetics at higher temperature. - Graphical abstract: Controlled synthesis of carbonated apatite at moderate temperatures using nanolime and sodiumhexametaphosphate as starting reagent. - Highlights: • Chemical synthesis of nano-sized apatite with tailored microstructure was performed. • Colloidal Ca(OH){sub 2} and a phosphorus-based chelating agents were used as reagents. • The method is simple and reproducible which facilitate industrial process scale-up. • Rietveld refinement strategies for product characterization were developed. • Rietveld analyses provided yield, microstructural and structure information.

  17. Facile synthesis of B-type carbonated nanoapatite with tailored microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti; Romagnoli, Marcello; Hanuskova, Miriam; Fabbri, Elena; Gualtieri, Alessandro F.

    2014-01-01

    Nanolime and a phosphate-based chelating agent were used to synthesize B-type carbonated apatite. Developed Rietveld refinement strategies allowed one to determine process yield, product crystallinity as well as structural (unit cell) and microstructural (size, strain) parameters. The effect of synthesis temperature (20–60 °C) as well as Ca/P ratio (1.5–2.5) and solid content (10–30 wt%) of the starting batch on these properties were investigated. FTIR, TEM and gas adsorption data provided supporting evidence. The process yield was 42–60 wt% and found to be governed by the Ca/P ratio. The purified products had high specific surface area (107–186 m 2 /g) and crystallinity (76–97%). The unit cell parameters, correlated to the degree of structural carbonate, were sensitive to the Ca/P ratio. Instead, temperature governed the microstructural parameters. Less strained and larger crystals were obtained at higher temperatures. Long-term aging up to 6 months at 20 °C compensated for higher crystal growth kinetics at higher temperature. - Graphical abstract: Controlled synthesis of carbonated apatite at moderate temperatures using nanolime and sodiumhexametaphosphate as starting reagent. - Highlights: • Chemical synthesis of nano-sized apatite with tailored microstructure was performed. • Colloidal Ca(OH) 2 and a phosphorus-based chelating agents were used as reagents. • The method is simple and reproducible which facilitate industrial process scale-up. • Rietveld refinement strategies for product characterization were developed. • Rietveld analyses provided yield, microstructural and structure information

  18. Microstructure and Properties of Polypropylene/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Bikiaris

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, great attention has been paid to the preparation of polypropylene (PP nanocomposites using carbon nanotubes (CNTs due to the tremendous enhancement of the mechanical, thermal, electrical, optical and structural properties of the pristine material. This is due to the unique combination of structural, mechanical, electrical, and thermal transport properties of CNTs. However, it is well-known that the properties of polymer-based nanocomposites strongly depend on the dispersion of nanofillers and almost all the discussed properties of PP/CNTs nanocomposites are strongly related to their microstructure. PP/CNTs nanocomposites were, mainly, prepared by melt mixing and in situ polymerization. Young’s modulus, tensile strength and storage modulus of the PP/CNTs nanocomposites can be increased with increasing CNTs content due to the reinforcement effect of CNTs inside the polymer matrix. However, above a certain CNTs content the mechanical properties are reduced due to the CNTs agglomeration. The microstructure of nanocomposites has been studied mainly by SEM and TEM techniques. Furthermore, it was found that CNTs can act as nucleating agents promoting the crystallization rates of PP and the addition of CNTs enhances all other physical properties of PP. The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the existing literature related to PP/CNTs nanocomposite preparation methods and properties studies.

  19. Microstructure evolution of SiC sintered bodies activated by boron and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubernat, A.; Stobierski, L.

    2003-01-01

    Investigation on the role of sintering aids on densification of silicon carbide indicate that boron and carbon modify mass transport mechanisms. It leads to changes of microstructure of polycrystalline silicon carbide. In the present work the influence of varying proportions of sintering aids on the material microstructure was studied. The microstructural changes were related to the changes of the selected properties of the resulting materials. (author)

  20. Radiofrequency cold plasma nitrided carbon steel: Microstructural and micromechanical characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouanis, F.Z.; Bentiss, F.; Bellayer, S.; Vogt, J.B.; Jama, C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → C38 carbon steel samples were plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge. → RF plasma treatment enables nitriding for non-heated substrates. → The morphological and chemical analyses show the formation of a uniform thickness on the surface of the nitrided C38 steel. → Nitrogen plasma active species diffuse into the samples and lead to the formation of Fe x N. → The increase in microhardness values for nitrided samples with plasma processing time is interpreted by the formation of a thicker nitrided layer on the steel surface. - Abstract: In this work, C38 carbon steel was plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge on non-heated substrates. General characterizations were performed to compare the chemical compositions, the microstructures and hardness of the untreated and plasma treated surfaces. The plasma nitriding was carried out on non-heated substrates at a pressure of 16.8 Pa, using N 2 gas. Surface characterizations before and after N 2 plasma treatment were performed by means of the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Vickers microhardness measurements. The morphological and chemical analysis showed the formation of a uniform structure on the surface of the nitrided sample with enrichment in nitrogen when compared to untreated sample. The thickness of the nitride layer formed depends on the treatment time duration and is approximately 14 μm for 10 h of plasma treatment. XPS was employed to obtain chemical-state information of the plasma nitrided steel surfaces. The micromechanical results show that the surface microhardness increases as the plasma-processing time increases to reach, 1487 HV 0.005 at a plasma processing time of 8 h.

  1. Radiofrequency cold plasma nitrided carbon steel: Microstructural and micromechanical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouanis, F.Z. [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Bentiss, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination et d' Analytique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Chouaib Doukkali, B.P. 20, M-24000 El Jadida (Morocco); Bellayer, S.; Vogt, J.B. [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Jama, C., E-mail: charafeddine.jama@ensc-lille.fr [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2011-05-16

    Highlights: {yields} C38 carbon steel samples were plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge. {yields} RF plasma treatment enables nitriding for non-heated substrates. {yields} The morphological and chemical analyses show the formation of a uniform thickness on the surface of the nitrided C38 steel. {yields} Nitrogen plasma active species diffuse into the samples and lead to the formation of Fe{sub x}N. {yields} The increase in microhardness values for nitrided samples with plasma processing time is interpreted by the formation of a thicker nitrided layer on the steel surface. - Abstract: In this work, C38 carbon steel was plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge on non-heated substrates. General characterizations were performed to compare the chemical compositions, the microstructures and hardness of the untreated and plasma treated surfaces. The plasma nitriding was carried out on non-heated substrates at a pressure of 16.8 Pa, using N{sub 2} gas. Surface characterizations before and after N{sub 2} plasma treatment were performed by means of the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Vickers microhardness measurements. The morphological and chemical analysis showed the formation of a uniform structure on the surface of the nitrided sample with enrichment in nitrogen when compared to untreated sample. The thickness of the nitride layer formed depends on the treatment time duration and is approximately 14 {mu}m for 10 h of plasma treatment. XPS was employed to obtain chemical-state information of the plasma nitrided steel surfaces. The micromechanical results show that the surface microhardness increases as the plasma-processing time increases to reach, 1487 HV{sub 0.005} at a plasma processing time of 8 h.

  2. Bulk microstructure and local elastic properties of carbon nanocomposites studied by impulse acoustic microscopy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, V.; Petronyuk, Yu.; Morokov, E.; Chernozatonskii, L.; Kuzhir, P.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.; Bellucci, S.; Bistarelli, S.; Mastrucci, M.; Tabacchioni, I.

    2016-05-01

    Bulk microstructure and elastic properties of epoxy-nanocarbon nanocomposites for diverse types and different content of carbon nanofiller has been studied by using impulse acoustic microscopy technique. It has been shown occurrence of various types of mesoscopic structure formed by nanoparticles inside the bulk of nanocomposite materials, including nanoparticle conglomerates and nanoparticle aerogel systems. In spite of the bulk microstructure, nanocarbon composites demonstrate elastic uniformity and negligible influence of nanofiller on elastic properties of carbon nanocomposite materials.

  3. Morphological and microstructural studies on aluminizing coating of carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsu, Zaifol; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Daud, Abd Razak; Hussein, Hishammuddin [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Hot dip aluminizing is one of the most effective methods of surface protection for steels and is gradually gaining popularity. The morphology and microstructure of an inter-metallic layer form on the surface of low carbon steel by hot dip aluminization treatment had been studied in detail. This effect has been investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The result shows that the reaction between the steel and the molten aluminium leads to the formation of Fe–Al inter-metallic compounds on the steel surface. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopic studies showed that a two layer coating was formed consisting of an external Al layer and a (Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}) inter metallic on top of the substrate after hot dip aluminizing process. The inter-metallic layer is ‘thick’ and exhibits a finger-like growth into the steel. Microhardness testing shown that the intermetallic layer has high hardness followed by steel substrate and the lowest hardness was Al layer.

  4. Analysis of the Microstructure and Oxidation Behavior of Some Commercial Carbon Fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Bohye; Yang, Kap Seung; Im, Hun Kook; Bang, Yun Hyuk; Kim, Sung Ryong

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between the microstructure, mechanical properties, and oxidation behavior of pitch-, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-, and Rayon-based carbon fibers (CFs) has been studied in detail. Three types of carbon fiber were exposed to isothermal oxidation in air and the weight change was measured by thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) apparatus. After activation energy was gained according to the conversion at reacting temperature, the value of specific surface area and the surface morphology was compared, and the reaction mechanism of oxidation affecting development of pores of carbon fibers was examined. This study will lead to a new insight into the relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fibers

  5. Heating effect of substrate of pulsed laser ablation deposition technique towards the orientation of carbon microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choy, L.S.; Irmawati Ramli; Noorhana Yahya; Abdul Halim Shaari

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Carbon thin film has been successfully deposited by second harmonic Nd:YAG pulsed laser ablation deposition, PLAD. The topology and morphology of the deposited layers was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) whereas emission dispersion X-ray (EDX) was used to determine the existence of elements that constitutes the microstructure. Substrate heated at 500 degree Celsius during the laser ablation showed the most homogenous lollipop microstructure as compared to mainly pillars of microstructure ablated at lower substrate temperature. It is found that this also avoid further diffusion of carbon into catalyst in forming iron carbide. (author)

  6. Microstructure study of PAN-pitch-based carbon-carbon composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.J.; Chen, Z.Y.

    2003-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques have been used to characterize the normal surface and flank surface microstructure of a two-dimensional polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based fiber reinforced mesophase pitch-based matrix carbon-carbon (C-C) composite. Optical and SEM results indicate that the mesophase pitch appears generally well bonded to the fibers, as well as internal pores and cracks exist in both interbundle and intrabundle regions. TEM shows that matrix platelets were highly parallel to the fiber axis. Numerous microcracks, parallel to the fiber axis, were formed along fiber-matrix interface and within the matrix. The selected-area diffraction (SAD) patterns show that a random orientation of basal planes in the transverse fiber of flank surface and the domain near the fiber surface exhibited a better alignment

  7. Effect of particulate matrix inhibitors on microstructure and properties of 2-D carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlomak, P.; Takano, Shigeru; Wright, M.A.; Ju, Chien-Ping.

    1991-01-01

    Extended-life applications of structural carbon-carbon (C-C) composites involve multiple periods of operation in high-temperature oxidizing environments and as such require a reliable oxidation protection system (OPS). Advanced OPS's generally consist of an external ceramic coating combined with an in-depth matrix inhibitor. This work investigated the effects produced by particulate inhibitors doped on the matrix on the microstructure of 2D, PAN fiber-pitch matrix C-C's. Boron and zirconium-based particulate inhibitors were added to the matrix material prior to heat treatment. A process was developed to assure a uniform distribution of the inhibitors. Oxidation behavior of such matrix-inhibited composites was evaluated using isothermal oxidation tests. 5 refs

  8. Microstructure, elastic, and inelastic properties of biomorphic carbons carbonized using a Fe-containing catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, T. S.; Kardashev, B. K.; Smirnov, B. I.; Gutierrez-Pardo, A.; Ramirez-Rico, J.

    2016-12-01

    The microstructure and amplitude dependences of the Young's modulus E and internal friction (logarithmic decrement δ), and microplastic properties of biocarbon matrices BE-C(Fe) obtained by beech tree carbonization at temperatures T carb = 850-1600°C in the presence of an iron-containing catalyst are studied. By X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy, it is shown that the use of Fe-catalyst during carbonization with T carb ≥ 1000°C leads to the appearance of a bulk graphite phase in the form of nanoscale bulk graphite inclusions in a quasi-amorphous matrix, whose volume fraction and size increase with T carb. The correlation of the obtained dependences E( T carb) and δ( T carb) with microstructure evolution with increasing T carb is revealed. It is found that E is mainly defined by a crystalline phase fraction in the amorphous matrix, i.e., a nanocrystalline phase at T carb 1300°C. Maximum values E = 10-12 GPa are achieved for samples with T carb ≈ 1150 and 1600°C. It is shown that the microplasticity manifest itself only in biocarbons with T carb ≥ 1300°C (upon reaching a significant volume of the graphite phase); in this case, the conditional microyield stress decreases with increasing total volume of introduced mesoporosity (free surface area).

  9. Liquid spreading on ceramic-coated carbon nanotube films and patterned microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hangbo; Hart, A. John

    2015-11-01

    We study the capillary-driven liquid spreading behavior on films and microstructures of ceramic-coated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fabricated on quartz substrates. The nanoscale porosity and micro-scale dimensions of the CNT structures, which can be precisely varied by the fabrication process, enable quantitative measurements that can be related to analytical models of the spreading behavior. Moreover, the conformal alumina coating by atomic layer deposition (ALD) prevents capillary-induced deformation of the CNTs upon meniscus recession, which has complicated previous studies of this topic. Washburn-like liquid spreading behavior is observed on non-patterned CNT surfaces, and is explained using a scaling model based on the balance of capillary driving force and the viscous drag force. Using these insights, we design patterned surfaces with controllable spreading rates and study the contact line pinning-depinning behavior. The nanoscale porosity, controllable surface chemistry, and mechanical stability of coated CNTs provide significantly enhanced liquid-solid interfacial area compared to solid microstructures. As a result, these surface designs may be useful for applications such as phase-change heat transfer and electrochemical energy storage. Funding for this project is provided by the National Institutes of Health and the MIT Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy supported by the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals.

  10. Cf/C composites: correlation between CVI process parameters and Pyrolytic Carbon microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Burgio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapour Infiltration (CVI technique has been long used to produce carbon/carbon composites. The Pyrolytic Carbon (Py-C matrix infiltrated by CVI could have different microstructures, i.e. Rough Laminar (RL, Smooth Laminar (SL or Isotropic (ISO. These matrix microstructures, characterized by different properties, influence the mechanical behaviour of the obtained composites. Tailoring the process parameters, it is possible to direct the infiltration towards a specific Py-C type. However, the factors, influencing the production of a specific matrix microstructure, are numerous and interconnected, e.g. temperature, pressure, flow rates etc. Due to the complexity of the physical and chemical phenomena involved in CVI process, up to now it has not been possible to obtain a general correlation between CVI process parameters and Py–C microstructure. This study is aimed at investigating the relationship between infiltration temperature and the microstructure of obtained Py-C, for a pilot - sized CVI/CVD reactor. Fixing the other process parameters and varying only the temperature, from 1100°C to 1300°C, the Py-C infiltration was performed on fibrous preforms. Polarized light microscopy, with quantitative measurements of average extinction angle (Ae, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the obtained Py-C microstructures

  11. Cf/C composites: correlation between CVI process parameters and Pyrolytic Carbon microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Burgio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapour Infiltration (CVI technique has been long used to produce carbon/carbon composites. The Pyrolytic Carbon (Py-C matrix infiltrated by CVI could have different microstructures, i.e. Rough Laminar (RL, Smooth Laminar (SL or Isotropic (ISO. These matrix microstructures, characterized by different properties, influence the mechanical behaviour of the obtained composites. Tailoring the process parameters, it is possible to direct the infiltration towards a specific Py-C type. However, the factors, influencing the production of a specific matrix microstructure, are numerous and interconnected, e.g. temperature, pressure, flow rates etc. Due to the complexity of the physical and chemical phenomena involved in CVI process, up to now it has not been possible to obtain a general correlation between CVI process parameters and Py–C microstructure. This study is aimed at investigating the relationship between infiltration temperature and the microstructure of obtained Py-C, for a pilot - sized CVI/CVD reactor. Fixing the other process parameters and varying only the temperature, from 1100°C to 1300°C, the Py-C infiltration was performed on fibrous preforms. Polarized light microscopy, with quantitative measurements of average extinction angle (Ae, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the obtained Py-C microstructures.

  12. Effects of Processing Parameters on the Density and Microstructure of Pyrolytic Carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Weon Ju; Park, Jeong Nam; Park, Jong Hoon; Cho, Moon Sung; Lee, Young Woo; Park, Ji Yeon

    2007-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) has been applied to TRISO-coated fuel particles for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). The porous PyC coating layer, called the buffer layer, attenuates fission recoils and provides void volume for gaseous fission products and carbon monoxide. The inner PyC layer acts as a containment to gaseous products. The outer PyC layer protects the SiC coating layer by inducing a compressive stress and provides chemical compatibility with a graphite matrix in the fuel compact. The PyC layers undergo shrinkage due to neutron irradiation, affecting the design and modeling of fuel particles. Because the dimensional change of PyC depends on the detailed microstructure of PyC, it differs from one fabrication route to another one. This requires a new design of irradiation experiment applicable to spherical objects and leads to an international collaborative work called PYCASSO (PYrocarbon irradiation for Creep And Swelling/Shrinkage of Objects). KAERI proposed four different types of PyC layers coated on ZrO 2 particles, buffer with a density of 1.0 and dense PyCs with densities of 1.7, 1.9 and 2.1 g/cm 3 , for the irradiation experiment. In this study, we fabricated PyC-coated particles with various coating densities for supporting the PYCASSO experiment. We also investigated effects of processing parameters such as temperature, hydrocarbon concentration and gas flow rate on the density and microstructure of the PyC layer

  13. Subgenual Cingulum Microstructure Supports Control of Emotional Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedwell, Paul A.; Doidge, Amie N.; Meyer, Marcel; Lawrence, Natalia; Lawrence, Andrew D.; Jones, Derek K.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with specific difficulties in attentional disengagement from negatively valenced material. Diffusion MRI studies have demonstrated altered white matter microstructure in the subgenual cingulum bundle (CB) in individuals with MDD, though the functional significance of these alterations has not been examined formally. This study explored whether individual differences in selective attention to negatively valenced stimuli are related to interindividual differences in subgenual CB microstructure. Forty-six individuals (21 with remitted MDD, 25 never depressed) completed an emotional Stroop task, using happy and angry distractor faces overlaid by pleasant or unpleasant target words and a control gender-based Stroop task. CBs were reconstructed in 38 individuals using diffusion-weighted imaging and tractography, and mean fractional anisotropy (FA) computed for the subgenual, retrosplenial, and parahippocampal subdivisions. No significant correlations were found between FA and performance in the control gender-based Stroop task in any CB region. However, the degree of interference produced by angry face distractors on time to identify pleasant words (emotional conflict) correlated selectively with FA in the subgenual CB (r = −0.53; P = 0.01). Higher FA was associated with reduced interference, irrespective of a diagnosis of MDD, suggesting that subgenual CB microstructure is functionally relevant for regulating attentional bias toward negative interpersonal stimuli. PMID:27048427

  14. Subgenual Cingulum Microstructure Supports Control of Emotional Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedwell, Paul A; Doidge, Amie N; Meyer, Marcel; Lawrence, Natalia; Lawrence, Andrew D; Jones, Derek K

    2016-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with specific difficulties in attentional disengagement from negatively valenced material. Diffusion MRI studies have demonstrated altered white matter microstructure in the subgenual cingulum bundle (CB) in individuals with MDD, though the functional significance of these alterations has not been examined formally. This study explored whether individual differences in selective attention to negatively valenced stimuli are related to interindividual differences in subgenual CB microstructure. Forty-six individuals (21 with remitted MDD, 25 never depressed) completed an emotional Stroop task, using happy and angry distractor faces overlaid by pleasant or unpleasant target words and a control gender-based Stroop task. CBs were reconstructed in 38 individuals using diffusion-weighted imaging and tractography, and mean fractional anisotropy (FA) computed for the subgenual, retrosplenial, and parahippocampal subdivisions. No significant correlations were found between FA and performance in the control gender-based Stroop task in any CB region. However, the degree of interference produced by angry face distractors on time to identify pleasant words (emotional conflict) correlated selectively with FA in the subgenual CB (r = -0.53; P = 0.01). Higher FA was associated with reduced interference, irrespective of a diagnosis of MDD, suggesting that subgenual CB microstructure is functionally relevant for regulating attentional bias toward negative interpersonal stimuli. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Poly(propylene carbonate): Insight into the Microstructure and Enantioselective Ring-Opening Mechanism

    KAUST Repository

    Salmeia, Khalifah A.

    2012-11-13

    Different poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) microstructures have been synthesized from the alternating copolymerization of CO 2 with both racemic propylene oxide (PO) and various mixtures of PO enantiomers using chiral salen catalysts. The microstructures of the obtained copolymers as a function of polymerization time have been analyzed by a combination of chiral GC and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. The 13C NMR spectra of selected poly(propylene carbonate) samples were recorded using a 900 MHz ( 1H) spectrometer, showing a previously unreported fine splitting of the carbonate resonances. This allowed a detailed assignment of signals for various copolymer microstructures taking into account the specifics in their stereo- and regioirregularities. For example, the enantioselectivity preference of the (R,R-salen)Co catalyst for (S)-PO at the beginning of the copolymerization leads predominantly to (S)-PO insertion, with any (R)-PO misinsertion being followed by incorporation of (S)-PO, so that the microstructure features isolated stereoerrors. K rel calculations for the copolymerization showed around 5-fold enantioselectivity for (S)-PO over (R)-PO at short reaction time. Analysis of the copolymer microstructures obtained under various reaction conditions appears to be an additional approach to differentiate the occurrence of bimetallic and bifunctional copolymerization mechanisms that are widely discussed in the literature. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. Poly(propylene carbonate): Insight into the Microstructure and Enantioselective Ring-Opening Mechanism

    KAUST Repository

    Salmeia, Khalifah A.; Vagin, Sergei; Anderson, Carly E.; Rieger, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Different poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) microstructures have been synthesized from the alternating copolymerization of CO 2 with both racemic propylene oxide (PO) and various mixtures of PO enantiomers using chiral salen catalysts. The microstructures of the obtained copolymers as a function of polymerization time have been analyzed by a combination of chiral GC and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. The 13C NMR spectra of selected poly(propylene carbonate) samples were recorded using a 900 MHz ( 1H) spectrometer, showing a previously unreported fine splitting of the carbonate resonances. This allowed a detailed assignment of signals for various copolymer microstructures taking into account the specifics in their stereo- and regioirregularities. For example, the enantioselectivity preference of the (R,R-salen)Co catalyst for (S)-PO at the beginning of the copolymerization leads predominantly to (S)-PO insertion, with any (R)-PO misinsertion being followed by incorporation of (S)-PO, so that the microstructure features isolated stereoerrors. K rel calculations for the copolymerization showed around 5-fold enantioselectivity for (S)-PO over (R)-PO at short reaction time. Analysis of the copolymer microstructures obtained under various reaction conditions appears to be an additional approach to differentiate the occurrence of bimetallic and bifunctional copolymerization mechanisms that are widely discussed in the literature. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  17. Supported porous carbon and carbon-CNT nanocomposites for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, Dimitri; Es-Souni, Mohammed

    2016-03-01

    Supported porous carbon and porous carbon-MWCNT-nanocomposite films are produced by pyrolysis of porous polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) or porous PVDF-MWCNT-nanocomposite films on thermally resistant substrates. All films are characterized by SEM, RAMAN and XRD. The application of these films as supercapacitors is explored with outstanding supercapacitance values ranging from 80 to 120 F g-1 (up to 70 mF cm-2) in a three-electrode set-up in 1 M KOH, depending on microstructure. Additionally, the implementation of porous nanocarbon-MWCNT-nanocomposite films as electrodes in a symmetrical supercapacitor device is investigated. In all cases, long-term charge-discharge stability is demonstrated.

  18. Analysis of microstructures for Co/Pd multilayer perpendicular magnetic recording media with carbon underlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asahi, T.; Kuramochi, K.; Kawaji, J.; Onoue, T.; Osaka, T.; Saigo, M.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of amorphous carbon underlayer thickness on the microstructure of the Co/Pd multilayer perpendicular magnetic recording media was investigated. From the magnetic force microscopy observation in the AC-demagnetized state of the Co/Pd multilayer media, the magnetic cluster size was observed to effectively decrease with an increase in carbon underlayer thickness, where the higher coercivity and the higher S/N ratio of the Co/Pd multilayer media were obtained with the thicker underlayer. Furthermore, the distribution of [1 1 1] orientation of FCC-Pd became broader, and the grain size decreased with an increase in the carbon underlayer thickness. These effects caused the magnetic exchange decoupling of Co/Pd multilayer media. We suggested that the change of microstructure was directly related to the surface roughness of the amorphous carbon underlayer

  19. Effects of Nb Modification and Cooling Rate on the Microstructure in an Ultrahigh Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Matthew D.; Webler, Bryan A.; Picard, Yoosuf N.

    2018-06-01

    In this study, two different melting methods were used to investigate effects of Nb modification on microstructure in ultrahigh carbon steel (UHCS). Nb-free and Nb-modified UHCS samples were produced by melting and resolidifying an industrially produced base UHCS with and without addition of Nb powder. Microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron dispersive spectroscopy. Equilibrium computations of phase fractions and compositions were utilized to help describe microstructural changes caused by the Nb additions. Nb combined with C to form NbC structures before and during austenite solidification, reducing the effective amount of carbon available for the other phases. Cementite network spacing in the Nb-free samples was controlled by the cooling rate during solidification (faster cooling led to a more refined network). Network spacing in the Nb-modified UHCS could be enlarged by NbC structures that formed cooperatively with austenite.

  20. Microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    68

    Alumina; composites; carbon fiber reinforcement; sol; mechanical properties. 1. Introduction ... The reinforcement was 3D carbon fiber (T300 3k, ex-PAN carbon fiber ... where f(a/H) = 2.9(a/H)1/2 – 4.6(a/H)3/2 + 21.8(a/H)5/2. – 37.6(a/H)7/2 + ...

  1. CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance of carbon steel in relation with microstructure changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa, Nathalie, E-mail: nochoa@usb.ve [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad Simón Bolívar, Aptdo., 89000, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Vega, Carlos [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad Simón Bolívar, Aptdo., 89000, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Pébère, Nadine; Lacaze, Jacques [Université de Toulouse, CIRIMAT, UPS/INPT/CNRS, ENSIACET, 4 Allée Emile Monso, CS 44362, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Brito, Joaquín L. [Laboratorio de Físico-química de Superficies, Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas (IVIC), Carretera Panamericana, Km 11, Altos de Pipe, Estado Miranda (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The microstructural effects on the corrosion resistance of an API 5L X42 carbon steel in 0.5 M NaCl solution saturated with CO{sub 2} was investigated. Four microstructures were considered: banded (B), normalized (N), quenched and tempered (Q&T), and annealed (A). Electrochemical measurements (polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) were coupled with surface analyses (scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) to characterize the formation of the corrosion product layers. Electrochemical results revealed that corrosion resistance increased in the following order: B < N < Q&T < A. From the polarization curves it was shown that specifically, cathodic current densities were affected by microstructural changes. SEM images indicated that ferrite dissolved earlier than cementite and a thin layer of corrosion products was deposited on the steel surface. XPS analyses revealed that this layer was composed of a mixture of iron carbonate and non-dissolved cementite. It was also found that the quantity of FeCO{sub 3} content on the steel surface was greater for Q&T and A microstructures. These results, in agreement with the electrochemical data, indicate that the deposition mechanism of iron carbonate is closely related to the morphology of the non-dissolved cementite, determining the protective properties of the corrosion product layers. - Highlights: • The effect of change in microstructure on CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance was evaluated. • An API 5LX 42 carbon steel was immersed in a 0.5 M NaCl solution saturated with CO{sub 2}. • Banded, normalized, quenched-tempered and annealed microstructures were considered. • Electrochemical measurements were coupled with surface analysis. • Morphology and distribution of undissolved Fe{sub 3}C control corrosion kinetics.

  2. Thermal desorption of deuterium from modified carbon nanotubes and its correlation to the microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisowski, W.F.; Keim, Enrico G.; van den Berg, A.H.J.; Smithers, Mark A.; Smithers, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    The process of deuterium desorption from single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) modified by atomic (D) and molecular (D2) deuterium treatment was investigated in an ultrahigh vacuum environment using thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). Microstructural and chemical analyses of SWNT material,

  3. Carbon nanofibers: a versatile catalytic support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelize Maria de Almeida Coelho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is present an overview of the promising results obtained while using carbon nanofibers based composites as catalyst support for different practical applications: hydrazine decomposition, styrene synthesis, direct oxidation of H2S into elementary sulfur and as fuel-cell electrodes. We have also discussed some prospects of the use of these new materials in total combustion of methane and in ammonia decomposition. The macroscopic carbon nanofibers based composites were prepared by the CVD method (Carbon Vapor Deposition employing a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and ethane. The results showed a high catalytic activity and selectivity in comparison to the traditional catalysts employed in these reactions. The fact was attributed, mainly, to the morphology and the high external surface of the catalyst support.

  4. Microstructure and surface properties of lignocellulosic-based activated carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-García, P.; Centeno, T. A.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Ávila-Brande, D.; Otero-Díaz, L. C.

    2013-01-01

    Low cost activated carbons have been produced via chemical activation, by using KOH at 700 °C, from the bamboo species Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata and the residues from shells of the fruits of Castanea Sativa and Juglans Regia as carbon precursors. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs show the conservation of the precursor shape in the case of the Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata activated carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that these materials consist of carbon platelet-like particles with variable length and thickness, formed by highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp2 content ≈ 95% and average mass density of 1.65 g/cm3 (25% below standard graphite). Textural parameters indicate a high porosity development with surface areas ranging from 850 to 1100 m2/g and average pore width centered in the supermicropores range (1.3-1.8 nm). The electrochemical performance of the activated carbons shows specific capacitance values at low current density (1 mA/cm2) as high as 161 F/g in the Juglans Regia activated carbon, as a result of its textural parameters and the presence of pseudocapacitance derived from surface oxygenated acidic groups (mainly quinones and ethers) identified in this activated carbon.

  5. High methanol oxidation activity of electrocatalysts supported by directly grown nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes on carbon cloth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.-H.; Shih, H.-C.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Du, H.-Y.; Chen, L.-C.; Chen, K.-H.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure and electrochemical activity of the Pt-Ru supported by nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes (CN x NTs) directly grown on the carbon cloth have been investigated. The CN x NTs directly grown on the carbon cloth (CN x NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode) were synthesized using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition first and then use as the template to support the Pt-Ru nanoclusters subsequently sputtered on. The ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox reaction in cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements showed a faster electron transfer on the CN x NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode than the one with carbon cloth alone. Comparing their methanol oxidation abilities, it is found that the Pt-Ru nanoclusters supported by the CN x NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode have considerably higher electrocatalytic activity than the carbon cloth counterpart. This result suggests high performance of the CN x NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode, and demonstrates its suitability for direct methanol fuel cell applications

  6. High methanol oxidation activity of electrocatalysts supported by directly grown nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes on carbon cloth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.-H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Shih, H.-C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Institue of Materials Science and Nano Technology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Y.-T. [Institue of Materials Science and Nano Technology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Du, H.-Y. [Institue of Materials Science and Nano Technology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, L.-C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, K.-H. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) and Institue of Atomic and Molecular Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: chenkh@pub.iams.sinica.edu.tw

    2006-12-01

    The microstructure and electrochemical activity of the Pt-Ru supported by nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes (CN {sub x} NTs) directly grown on the carbon cloth have been investigated. The CN {sub x} NTs directly grown on the carbon cloth (CN {sub x} NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode) were synthesized using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition first and then use as the template to support the Pt-Ru nanoclusters subsequently sputtered on. The ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox reaction in cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements showed a faster electron transfer on the CN {sub x} NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode than the one with carbon cloth alone. Comparing their methanol oxidation abilities, it is found that the Pt-Ru nanoclusters supported by the CN {sub x} NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode have considerably higher electrocatalytic activity than the carbon cloth counterpart. This result suggests high performance of the CN {sub x} NTs-carbon cloth composite electrode, and demonstrates its suitability for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  7. Microstructure and surface properties of lignocellulosic-based activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González-García, P.; Centeno, T.A.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Ávila-Brande, D.; Otero-Díaz, L.C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Activated carbons were produced by KOH activation at 700 °C. ► The observed nanostructure consists of highly disordered graphene–like layers with sp 2 bond content ≈ 95%. ► Textural parameters show high surface area (≈ 1000 m 2 /g) and pore width of 1.3–1.8 nm. ► Specific capacitance reaches values as high as 161 F/g. - Abstract: Low cost activated carbons have been produced via chemical activation, by using KOH at 700 °C, from the bamboo species Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata and the residues from shells of the fruits of Castanea Sativa and Juglans Regia as carbon precursors. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs show the conservation of the precursor shape in the case of the Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata activated carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that these materials consist of carbon platelet–like particles with variable length and thickness, formed by highly disordered graphene–like layers with sp 2 content ≈ 95% and average mass density of 1.65 g/cm 3 (25% below standard graphite). Textural parameters indicate a high porosity development with surface areas ranging from 850 to 1100 m 2 /g and average pore width centered in the supermicropores range (1.3–1.8 nm). The electrochemical performance of the activated carbons shows specific capacitance values at low current density (1 mA/cm 2 ) as high as 161 F/g in the Juglans Regia activated carbon, as a result of its textural parameters and the presence of pseudocapacitance derived from surface oxygenated acidic groups (mainly quinones and ethers) identified in this activated carbon.

  8. Variations of microstructure and properties of 690 MPa grade low carbon bainitic steel after tempering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Rui [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); Li, Shengli, E-mail: lishengli@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); Li, Zhenshun; Tian, Lei [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China)

    2012-12-15

    The variations of microstructure, mechanical properties and electrical resistivity of 690 MPa grade low carbon bainitic steel tempered at different temperatures were investigated with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and double-arm Bridge. The results show that the appearance of granular bainite, decomposition of retained austenite, variations of dislocation density and solid solution of microalloying elements are the main reasons for variations of mechanical properties and electrical resistivity. Electrical resistivity reflects the solution content of microalloying elements and variations of dislocation density, which can be used as a fast and effective way to analyze the microstructure of materials.

  9. Microstructure evolution in carbon-ion implanted sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orwa, J. O.; McCallum, J. C.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Peng, J. L.; Rubanov, S.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon ions of MeV energy were implanted into sapphire to fluences of 1x10 17 or 2x10 17 cm -2 and thermally annealed in forming gas (4% H in Ar) for 1 h. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy results obtained from the lower dose implant showed retention of implanted carbon and accumulation of H near the end of range in the C implanted and annealed sample. Three distinct regions were identified by transmission electron microscopy of the implanted region in the higher dose implant. First, in the near surface region, was a low damage region (L 1 ) composed of crystalline sapphire and a high density of plateletlike defects. Underneath this was a thin, highly damaged and amorphized region (L 2 ) near the end of range in which a mixture of i-carbon and nanodiamond phases are present. Finally, there was a pristine, undamaged sapphire region (L 3 ) beyond the end of range. In the annealed sample some evidence of the presence of diamond nanoclusters was found deep within the implanted layer near the projected range of the C ions. These results are compared with our previous work on carbon implanted quartz in which nanodiamond phases were formed only a few tens of nanometers from the surface, a considerable distance from the projected range of the ions, suggesting that significant out diffusion of the implanted carbon had occurred.

  10. Microstructural Evolution During Cold Rolling and Subsequent Annealing in Low-Carbon Steel with Different Initial Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Toshio; Dannoshita, Hiroyuki; Maruoka, Kuniaki; Ushioda, Kohsaku

    2017-08-01

    Microstructural evolution during cold rolling and subsequent annealing of low-carbon steel with different initial microstructures was investigated from the perspective of the competitive phenomenon between recrystallization of ferrite and reverse phase transformation from ferrite to austenite. Three kinds of hot-rolled sheet specimens were prepared. Specimen P consisted of ferrite and pearlite, specimen B consisted of bainite, and specimen M consisted of martensite. The progress of recovery and recrystallization of ferrite during annealing was more rapid in specimen M than that in specimens P and B. In particular, the recrystallized ferrite grains in specimen M were fine and equiaxed. The progress of ferrite-to-austenite phase transformation during intercritical annealing was more rapid in specimen M than in specimens P and B. In all specimens, the austenite nucleation sites were mainly at high-angle grain boundaries, such as those between recrystallized ferrite grains. The austenite distribution was the most uniform in specimen M. Thus, we concluded that fine equiaxed recrystallized ferrite grains were formed in specimen M, leading to a uniform distribution of austenite.

  11. Formation of carbon nano- and micro-structures on C+1 irradiated copper surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Shoaib

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments has identified mechanisms of carbon nano- and micro-structure formation at room temperature, without catalyst and in the environment of immiscible metallic surroundings. The structures include threaded nano fibres, graphitic sheets and carbon onions. Copper as substrate was used due to its immiscibility with carbon. Energetic carbon ions (C + 1 ) of 0.2–2.0 MeV irradiated Cu targets. Cu substrates, apertures and 3 mm dia TEM Cu grids were implanted with the carbon. We observed wide range of μm-size structures formed on Cu grids and along the edges of the irradiated apertures. These are shown to be threaded nano fibers (TNF) of few μm thicknesses with lengths varying from 10 to 3000 μm. Secondary electron microscopy (SEM) identifies the μm-size structures while Confocal microscopy was used to learn about the mechanisms by which C + 1 irradiated Cu provides the growth environment. Huge carbon onions of diameters ranging from hundreds of nm to μm were observed in the as-grown and annealed samples. Transformations of the nanostructures were observed under prolonged electron irradiations of SEM and TEM. A mechanism for the formation of carbon nano- and micro-structures is proposed.

  12. Analysis of composition and microstructural uniformity of hybrid glass/carbon fibre composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauson, J.; Markussen, C.M.; Madsen, Bo

    2013-09-01

    In hybrid fibre composites, the intermixing of the two types of fibres imposes challenges to obtain materials with a well-defined and uniform microstructure. In the present paper, the composition and the microstructural uniformity of hybrid glass/carbon fibre composites mixed at the fibre bundle level are investigated. The different levels of compositions in the composites are defined and experimentally determined. The composite volume fractions are determined using an image analysis based procedure. The global fibre volume fractions are determined using a gravimetrical based method. The local fibre volume fractions are determined using volumetric calculations. A model is presented to predict the interrelation of volume fractions in hybrid fibre composites. The microstructural uniformity of the composites is analysed by the determined variation in composite volume fractions. Two analytical methods, a standard deviation based method and a fast Fourier transform method, are used to quantify the difference in microstructural uniformity between composites, and to detect and quantify any repeating pattern in the composite microstructure. (Author)

  13. Laser-Based Surface Modification of Microstructure for Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenfeng; Sun, Ting; Cao, Yu; Li, Shaolong; Liu, Chang; Tang, Qingru

    2018-05-01

    Bonding repair is a powerful feature of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP). Based on the theory of interface bonding, the interface adhesion strength and reliability of the CFRP structure will be directly affected by the microscopic features of the CFRP surface, including the microstructure, physical, and chemical characteristics. In this paper, laser-based surface modification was compared to Peel-ply, grinding, and polishing to comparatively evaluate the surface microstructure of CFRP. The surface microstructure, morphology, fiber damage, height and space parameters were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser confocal microscopy (LCM). Relative to the conventional grinding process, laser modification of the CFRP surface can result in more uniform resin removal and better processing control and repeatability. This decreases the adverse impact of surface fiber fractures and secondary damage. The surface properties were significantly optimized, which has been reflected such things as the obvious improvement of surface roughness, microstructure uniformity, and actual area. The improved surface microstructure based on laser modification is more conducive to interface bonding of CFRP structure repair. This can enhance the interfacial adhesion strength and reliability of repair.

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fibre-reinforced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-05-17

    May 17, 2018 ... was focussed on the characteristics of sol and the mechanical properties and high-temperature resistance of ... The reinforcement was 3D carbon fibre (T300 3k, ex-PAN ... where f (a/H) = 2.9(a/H)1/2−4.6(a/H)3/2+21.8(a/H)5/2.

  15. Microstructure and durability of Portland cement-carbon nanotube composites

    OpenAIRE

    MacLeod, Alastair James Neil

    2017-01-01

    The incorporation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), fibres with diameters less than 100 nanometres that exhibit a tensile strength in excess of ten times greater than steel, into Portland cement (OPC) is a relatively novel, yet promising, development for next-generation construction materials exhibiting enhanced strength and ductility, even multifunctionality. When added to Portland cement, creating a Portland cement-CNT nanocomposite material (OPC-CNT), CNTs promote the nucleation of the princi...

  16. Elaboration of a microstructured inkjet-printed carbon electrochemical capacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pech, David; Brunet, Magali; Fabre, Norbert; Mesnilgrente, Fabien; Conedera, Veronique; Durou, Hugo [LAAS-CNRS, Universite de Toulouse, 7 av. du Colonel Roche, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice [CIRIMAT-CNRS, Universite de Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2010-02-15

    Carbon-based micro-supercapacitors dedicated to energy storage in self-powered modules were fabricated with inkjet printing technology on silicon substrate. An ink was first prepared by mixing an activated carbon powder with a PTFE polymer binder in ethylene glycol stabilized with a surfactant then deposited by inkjet on patterned gold current collectors with the substrate heated at 140 C in order to assure a good homogeneity. Electrochemical micro-capacitors with electrodes in an interdigital configuration were fabricated, and characterized using electrochemical techniques in 1 M Et{sub 4}NBF{sub 4} propylene carbonate electrolyte. These micro-devices show an excellent capacitive behavior over a wide potential range of 2.5 V for a cell capacitance of 2.1 mF cm{sup -2}. The newly developed technology will allow the integration of the storage device as close as possible to the MEMS-based energy harvesting device, minimizing power losses through connections. (author)

  17. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Austempered Medium-Carbon Spring Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Hoon; Kim, Kwan-Ho; Bae, Chul-Min; Lee, Jae Sang; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2018-03-01

    Changes in microstructure and mechanical properties of medium-carbon spring steel during austempering were investigated. After austempering for 1 h at 290 °C or 330 °C, the bainite transformation stabilized austenite, and microstructure consisting of bainitic ferrite and austenite could be obtained after final cooling; the retained austenite fraction was smaller in the alloy austempered at 290 °C because carbon redistribution between bainitic ferrite and austenite slowed as the temperature decreased, and thereby gave persistent driving force for the bainite transformation. The products of tensile strength and reduction of area in the austempered alloy were much larger in the austempered steel than in quenched and tempered alloy, mainly because of significant increase in reduction of area in austempered alloy.

  18. Multiphase Microstructure in a Metastability-Assisted Medium Carbon Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Cui, Xixi; Yang, Chen

    2018-05-01

    A medium carbon alloy steel is processed by austenizing at 900 °C for 30 min, then rapid quenching into a patented quenching liquid and holding at 170 °C for 5 min, finally isothermally holding at 250 °C for different times. The morphology and mechanical properties are performed by using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A multiphase microstructure characterized by a mixture of lenticular prior martensite (PM), fine needle bainitic ferrite and filmy retained austenite (RA) is obtained. It is found that the PM formed firstly upon quenching can accelerate the subsequent bainitic transformation and promote refinement of multiphase colonies. The results show that an optimum mechanical property of a 4000.9 MPa bending strength and a 2030 MPa tensile strength is achieved at 250 °C for 120 min, which is attributed to the multiphase microstructural characteristics and a high product of the volume fraction of RA and the carbon content of austenite.

  19. Microstructure and mechanical properties of internal crack healing in a low carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Ruishan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ma, Qingxian, E-mail: maqxdme@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Weiqi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-04-26

    The behavior of internal crack healing in a low carbon steel at elevated temperatures was investigated. The internal cracks were introduced into low carbon steel samples via the drilling and compression method. The microstructure of crack healing zone was observed using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of crack healing zone at room temperature were tested. The results show that there are two mechanisms of crack healing in the low carbon steel. Crack healing is caused by atomic diffusion at lower temperatures, and mainly depends on recrystallization and grain growth at higher temperatures. The microstructural evolution of crack healing zone can be divided into four stages, and the fracture morphology of crack healing zone can be classified into five stages. At the initial healing stage, the fracture exhibits brittle or low ductile dimple fracture. The ultimate fracture mode is dimple and quasi-cleavage mixed fracture. Fine grain microstructures improve the ultimate tensile strength of crack healing zone, which is even higher than that of the matrix. The strength recovery rate is higher than that of the plasticity.

  20. Silicon and aluminum doping effects on the microstructure and properties of polymeric amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang, E-mail: lxq_suse@sina.com [Material Corrosion and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan province, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Hao, Junying, E-mail: jyhao@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Xie, Yuntao [Material Corrosion and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan province, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of nanostructure and properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films were firstly studied. • Si doping enhanced polymerization of the hydrocarbon chains and Al doping resulted in increase in the ordered carbon clusters of polymeric amorphous carbon films. • Soft polymeric amorphous carbon films exhibited an unconventional frictional behaviors with a superior wear resistance. • The mechanical and vacuum tribological properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films were significantly improved by Si and Al co-doping. - Abstract: Polymeric amorphous carbon films were prepared by radio frequency (R.F. 13.56 MHz) magnetron sputtering deposition. The microstructure evolution of the deposited polymeric films induced by silicon (Si) and aluminum(Al) doping were scrutinized through infrared spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The comparative results show that Si doping can enhance polymerization and Al doping results in an increase in the ordered carbon clusters. Si and Al co-doping into polymeric films leads to the formation of an unusual dual nanostructure consisting of cross-linked polymer-like hydrocarbon chains and fullerene-like carbon clusters. The super-high elasticity and super-low friction coefficients (<0.002) under a high vacuum were obtained through Si and Al co-doping into the films. Unconventionally, the co-doped polymeric films exhibited a superior wear resistance even though they were very soft. The relationship between the microstructure and properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films with different elements doping are also discussed in detail.

  1. The Influence of Carbon Content on the Microstructure, Mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    61

    microscope equipped with a microprobe and supported with INCA energy software. The thickness of the coatings was determined using a Bruker contact profilometer model Dektak. XT. Both the roughness and grain size were measured in triplicate by a computer controlled. Easyscan 2 Flex brand atom force microscope ...

  2. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Kai; Wang, Yibo [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Zhuguo, E-mail: lizg@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, 2.4 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, and 4.8 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation.

  3. Activated Carbon, Carbon Nanofiber and Carbon Nanotube Supported Molybdenum Carbide Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Santillan-Jimenez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum carbide was supported on three types of carbon support—activated carbon; multi-walled carbon nanotubes; and carbon nanofibers—using ammonium molybdate and molybdic acid as Mo precursors. The use of activated carbon as support afforded an X-ray amorphous Mo phase, whereas crystalline molybdenum carbide phases were obtained on carbon nanofibers and, in some cases, on carbon nanotubes. When the resulting catalysts were tested in the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO of guaiacol in dodecane, catechol and phenol were obtained as the main products, although in some instances significant amounts of cyclohexane were produced. The observation of catechol in all reaction mixtures suggests that guaiacol was converted into phenol via sequential demethylation and HDO, although the simultaneous occurrence of a direct demethoxylation pathway cannot be discounted. Catalysts based on carbon nanofibers generally afforded the highest yields of phenol; notably, the only crystalline phase detected in these samples was Mo2C or Mo2C-ζ, suggesting that crystalline Mo2C is particularly selective to phenol. At 350 °C, carbon nanofiber supported Mo2C afforded near quantitative guaiacol conversion, the selectivity to phenol approaching 50%. When guaiacol HDO was performed in the presence of acetic acid and furfural, guaiacol conversion decreased, although the selectivity to both catechol and phenol was increased.

  4. Annealing effect on the microstructure modification and tribological properties of amorphous carbon nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhou; Wang, Chengbing; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Junyan

    2008-10-01

    The influences of thermal annealing on the microstructural and tribological properties of amorphous carbon nitride films were investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer were utilized to characterize bond configuration and chemical state of the films. The results indicated that at low annealing temperatures (200 and 300 °C), the volatile species and surface contamination are easily dissociated without obvious bulk modification; while at high annealing temperatures (400 and 500 °C), the microstructure of carbon nitride films changed and favored a graphitization process, which indicated the growth of more graphitic film structures. The faint Raman signal of C≡N decreased with annealing temperature (TA) and completely disappeared at TA of 500 °C, indicating that nitrile bonds were thermal unstable under high temperature. Surprisingly, the tribological properties of the films showed a remarkably decreasing in friction coefficient as the TA increased; it is attributed to the graphitization of carbon nitride films during thermal annealing, which favored transfer film formation between the carbon nitride films and counterface materials. The transfer films benefit the decrease in coefficient of friction.

  5. Selective laser melting of carbon/AlSi10Mg composites: Microstructure, mechanical and electronical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xiao; Song, Bo, E-mail: bosong@hust.edu.cn; Fan, Wenrui; Zhang, Yuanjie; Shi, Yusheng

    2016-04-25

    Carbon nanotubes/AlSi10Mg composites has drawn lots of attention in structural engineering and functional device applications due to its extraordinary high elastic modulus and mechanical strength as well as excellent electrical and thermal conductivities. In this study, the CNTs/AlSi10Mg composites was firstly prepared and then processed by selective laser melting. The powder preparation, SLM process, and microstructure evolution, properties were clarified. The results showed that CNTs were decomposed due to the direct interaction with the laser beam. The SLMed composites displayed a similar microstructure to that of SLMed AlSi10Mg. The common brittleness phase Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} didn't form, and the carbon dispersion strengthening was observed. The electrical resistivity of the composites was reduced significantly and the hardness was improved. - Highlights: • Carbon nanotubes/AlSi10Mg powder were prepared by slurry ball milling process. • Carbon nanotubes/AlSi10Mg composites were firstly prepared by SLM. • The electrical resistivity of the composites was significantly reduced and hardness was improved.

  6. Growth of carbon nanotubes in arc plasma treated graphite disc: microstructural characterization and electrical conductivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, B. B.; Sahu, R. K.; Dash, T.; Pradhan, S.

    2018-03-01

    Circular graphite discs were treated in arc plasma by varying arcing time. Analysis of the plasma treated discs by field emission scanning electron microscope revealed globular grain morphologies on the surfaces, but when the same were observed at higher magnification and higher resolution under transmission electron microscope, growth of multiwall carbon nanotubes of around 2 nm diameter was clearly seen. In situ growth of carbon nanotube bundles/bunches consisting of around 0.7 nm tube diameter was marked in the case of 6 min treated disc surface. Both the untreated and the plasma treated graphite discs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectra of X-ray, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, micro Raman spectroscopy and BET surface area measurement. From Raman spectra, BET surface area and microstructure observed in transmission electron microscope, growth of several layers of graphene was identified. Four-point probe measurements for electrical resistivity/conductivity of the graphite discs treated under different plasma conditions showed significant increase in conductivity values over that of untreated graphite conductivity value and the best result, i.e., around eightfold increase in conductivity, was observed in the case of 6 min plasma treated sample exhibiting carbon nanotube bundles/bunches grown on disc surface. By comparing the microstructures of the untreated and plasma treated graphite discs, the electrical conductivity increase in graphite disc is attributed to carbon nanotubes (including bundles/bunches) growth on disc surface by plasma treatment.

  7. Surface Modification by Friction Stir Processing of Low-Carbon Steel: Microstructure Investigation and Wear Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattari, Behnoosh; Shamanian, Morteza; Salimijazi, Farshid; Salehi, Mehdi

    2018-02-01

    A low-carbon steel sheet with a thickness of 5 mm was subjected to friction stir processing (FSP) by one to four different passes. The microstructures of different regions were characterized using the optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The Vickers micro-harness was measured at the distance of 200 μm below the processed surfaces. The influence of pass numbers (PNs) on wear resistance was studied in terms of coefficients of friction (CoFs), weight losses and wear rates. SEM topographies of the worn surfaces were also studied to evaluate the wear mechanisms. Microstructure observations showed that Widmänstatten ferrite plates were formed in stir zones (SZs) and heat affected zones. As PN increased, these grains were widened due to the increment of the carbon diffusivity and lengthened because of the high heat input and microstructure anisotropy. Besides, increasing the PN causes increasing of the hardness and wear resistance, simultaneously. Specifically, the wear rate in the SZ was reduced from 2.8 × 10-2 mm3 m-1 in base metal to 0.3 × 10-2 mm3 m-1 in sample which was subjected to 4 FSP passes. However, variation in PN had no considerable effect on CoFs. Oxidative wear mechanism was observed on the worn surface of the steel and the FSPed samples while more debris was formed by increasing the PNs.

  8. Short and long carbon fibre reinforced Cu-matrix composites: microstructural results and structural origin of properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchgraber, W.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites possess properties of copper, i.e. excellent thermal and electrical conductivities, and properties of carbon fibre, i.e. a small thermal expansion coefficient. Since the desirable properties of the composite can be obtained by selecting the amount, type and orientation of the carbon fibres, it is considered to be suitable for use as electric and electronic materials. This lecture focuses on two-dimensional isotropic carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites with long or short carbon fibres. Short carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites have been produced by hot-pressing of copper coated short carbon fibres. During hot-pressing, the carbon fibres take on a preferred orientation in a plane perpendicular to the hot pressing direction. Within this plane the fibre orientation is random. Long carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites have been made by hot pressing of monolayers consisting of copper coated long carbon fibres. Different orientations of the monolayers will be compared. Both the physical and mechanical properties of the discussed composites are strongly influenced not only by the properties of its individual constituents, but also by the microstructure and properties of the fibre matrix interface. The problem of poor wettability of the carbon fibre by the copper matrix will be discussed. The microstructure of several types of carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites will be discussed. Their thermophysical properties will be compared with microstructural results. (author)

  9. Effects of deformation and boron on microstructure and continuous cooling transformation in low carbon HSLA steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, H.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, J.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, D.H. [Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, Pohang 545-090 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, K.B. [Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, Pohang 545-090 (Korea, Republic of); Park, C.G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: cgpark@postech.ac.kr

    2006-04-25

    The continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram and continuous cooled microstructure were investigated for low carbon (0.05 wt.% C) high strength low alloy steels with/without boron. Microstructures observed in continuous cooled specimens were composed of pearlite, quasi-polygonal ferrite, granular bainite, acicular ferrite, bainitic ferrite, lower bainite, and martensite depending on cooling rate and transformation temperature. A rapid cooling rate depressed the formation of pearlite and quasi-polygonal ferrite, which resulted in higher hardness. However, hot deformation slightly increased transformation start temperature, and promoted the formation of pearlite and quasi-polygonal ferrite. Hot deformation also strongly promoted the acicular ferrite formation which did not form under non-deformation conditions. Small boron addition effectively reduced the formation of pearlite and quasi-polygonal ferrite and broadened the cooling rate region for bainitic ferrite and martensite.

  10. Influence of the microstructure on the supercapacitive behavior of polyaniline/single-wall carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Vinay; Miura, Norio [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Environment and Energy, KASTEC, Kyushu University, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2006-06-19

    Polyaniline/single-wall carbon nanotube (PANI/SWCNT) composites were prepared by in situ potentiostatic deposition of PANI onto SWCNTs at the potential of 0.75V versus SCE, with the aim to investigate the influence of microstructure on the specific capacitance of PANI/SWCNT composites. It was found that the specific capacitance of the PANI/SWCNT composites is strongly influenced by their microstructure, which is correlated to the wt.% of the PANI deposited onto the SWCNTs. The optimum condition, corresponding to the highest specific capacitance, 463Fg{sup -1} (at 10mAcm{sup -2}), was obtained for 73wt.% PANI deposited onto SWCNTs. The specific capacitance of the PANI/SWCNT composite electrode was highly stable, with a capacitive decrease of 5% during the first 500 cycles and just 1% during the next 1000 cycles, indicative of the excellent cyclic stability of the composite for supercapacitor applications. (author)

  11. Characterisation of Microstructure of We43 Magnesium Matrix Composites Reinforced with Carbon Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gryc A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the microstructures of WE43 matrix composites reinforced with carbon fibres have been characterised. The influence of reinforcement type and T6 heat treatment (a solution treatment at 525°C for 8 h, a hot water quench and a subsequent ageing treatment at 250°C for 16 h on microstructure have been evaluated. The light microscope and scanning electron microscope investigations have been carried out. No significant differences in samples reinforced with non-coated textiles have been reported. The substantial changes in sample reinforced with nickel-coated textile have been observed. The segregation of alloying elements to the matrix-reinforcement layer has been identified. The T6 heat treatment caused the appearance of disperse precipitates of β phase, but the process cannot be considered as satisfactory (irregular distribution, low volume fraction, relatively large size.

  12. Effect of zirconium addition on the microstructure and performance of carbon foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Wanqian [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Zhang Hongbo, E-mail: wanqian20089@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Xiong Xiang; Xiao Feng [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2010-05-15

    A novel carbon foam was prepared from mixtures of mesophase pitch and dopant (zirconium), followed by foaming, carbonization and graphitization. The influence of Zr on the microstructure and properties of these foams was analyzed. Results have shown that Zr can promote the graphitization degree of carbon foams, which lead to an increase of thermal conductivity. The high bulk thermal conductivity of 63 W/m K was achieved with an addition of 3 wt% at heat treatment temperature of 2573 K. The d{sub 002} spacings of graphitic foams are found to decrease with the increase of dopant concentration in the pitch. SEM analysis also showed micro-cracks at the ligament of the doped graphitic foam, which might be responsible for the decrease of the compressive strength.

  13. Microstructural Evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT Weld Metal for Clad Carbon Steel Linepipe Joints: A Comparator Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltin, Charles A.; Galloway, Alexander M.; Mweemba, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Microstructural evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT filler metals, used for the fusion welding of clad carbon steel linepipe, has been investigated and compared. The effects of iron dilution from the linepipe parent material on the elemental segregation potential of the filler metal chemistry have been considered. The results obtained provide significant evidence to support the view that, in Inconel 686CPT weld metal, the segregation of tungsten is a function of the level of iron dilution from the parent material. The data presented indicate that the incoherent phase precipitated in the Inconel 686CPT weld metal has a morphology that is dependent on tungsten enrichment and, therefore, iron dilution. Furthermore, in the same weld metal, a continuous network of finer precipitates was observed. The Charpy impact toughness of each filler metal was evaluated, and the results highlighted the superior impact toughness of the Inconel 625 weld metal over that of Inconel 686CPT.

  14. Microstructural development during the quenching and partitioning process in a newly designed low-carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santofimia, M.J., E-mail: m.j.santofimianavarro@tudelft.nl [Materials Innovation Institute (M2i), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Zhao, L. [Materials Innovation Institute (M2i), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Petrov, R. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Ghent (Belgium); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Kwakernaak, C.; Sloof, W.G.; Sietsma, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-09-15

    This paper presents a detailed characterization of the microstructural development of a new quenching and partitioning (Q and P) steel. Q and P treatments, starting from full austenitization, were applied to the developed steel, leading to microstructures containing volume fractions of retained austenite of up to 0.15. The austenite was distributed as films in between the martensite laths. Analysis demonstrates that, in this material, stabilization of austenite can be achieved at significantly shorter time scales via the Q and P route than is possible via a bainitic isothermal holding. The results showed that the thermal stabilization of austenite during the partitioning step is not necessarily accompanied by a significant expansion of the material. This implies that the process of carbon partitioning from martensite to austenite occurs across low-mobility martensite-austenite interfaces. The amount of martensite formed during the first quench has been quantified. Unlike martensite formed in the final quench, this martensite was found to be tempered during partitioning. Measured volume fractions of retained austenite after different treatments were compared with simulations using model descriptions for carbon partitioning from martensite to austenite. Simulation results confirmed that the carbon partitioning takes place at low-mobility martensite-austenite interfaces.

  15. Effect of Mo Content on Microstructure and Property of Low-Carbon Bainitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijiang Hu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, three low-carbon bainitic steels, with different Mo contents, were designed to investigate the effects of Mo addition on microstructure and mechanical properties. Two-step cooling, i.e., initial accelerated cooling and subsequent slow cooling, was used to obtain the desired bainite microstructure. The results show that the product of strength and elongation first increases and then shows no significant change with increasing Mo. Compared with Mo-free steel, bainite in the Mo-containing steel tends to have a lath-like morphology due to a decrease in the bainitic transformation temperature. More martensite transformation occurs with the increasing Mo, resulting in greater hardness of the steel. Both the strength and elongation of the steel can be enhanced by Mo addition; however, the elongation may decrease with a further increase in Mo. From a practical viewpoint, the content of Mo could be ~0.14 wt. % for the composition design of low-carbon bainitic steels in the present work. To be noted, an optimal scheme may need to consider other situations such as the role of sheet thickness, toughness behavior and so on, which could require changes in the chemistry. Nevertheless, these results provide a reference for the composition design and processing method of low-carbon bainitic steels.

  16. Numerical evaluation of micro-structural parameters of porous supports in metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Georg; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Brandstätter, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Metallic supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are considered as a durable and cost effective alternative to the state-of-the-art ceramic supported cell designs. In order to understand the mass and charge transport in the metal-support of this new type of cell a novel technique involving X......-ray tomography and micro-structural modelling is presented in this work. The simulation technique comprises a novel treatment of the boundary conditions, which leads to more accurate effective transport parameters compared to those, which can be achieved with the conventional homogenisation procedures....... Furthermore, the porosity distribution in the metal-support was determined, which provided information about the inhomogeneous nature of the material. In addition to that, transport parameters for two identified, different dense layers of the metal-support are evaluated separately. The results...

  17. Microstructure and tribology of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen implanted ferrous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Nitrogen, carbon, and oxygen ions have been implanted into ferrous materials under unusual conditions of elevated temperatures and very high dose rates. The tribological durabilities of the resulting surfaces are examined with a special type of pin-on-disc wear test apparatus and found in most cases to be dramatically improved compared to surfaces prepared with conventional implantation conditions. Near-surface microstructures and compositions are characterized after implantation and after wear testing by backscatter Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy. These data provide evidence for the predominant mechanisms responsible for the observed sliding wear behavior induced by each of the three species. (orig.)

  18. Electrochemical, morphological and microstructural characterization of carbon film resistor electrodes for application in electrochemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouveia-Caridade, Carla; Soares, David M.; Liess, Hans-Dieter; Brett, Christopher M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical and microstructural properties of carbon film electrodes made from carbon film electrical resistors of 1.5, 15, 140 Ω and 2.0 kΩ nominal resistance have been investigated before and after electrochemical pre-treatment at +0.9 V vs SCE, in order to assess the potential use of these carbon film electrodes as electrochemical sensors and as substrates for sensors and biosensors. The results obtained are compared with those at electrodes made from previously investigated 2 Ω carbon film resistors. Cyclic voltammetry was performed in acetate buffer and phosphate buffer saline electrolytes and the kinetic parameters of the model redox system Fe(CN) 6 3-/4- obtained. The 1.5 Ω resistor electrodes show the best properties for sensor development with wide potential windows, similar electrochemical behaviour to those of 2 Ω and close-to-reversible kinetic parameters after electrochemical pre-treatment. The 15 and 140 Ω resistor electrodes show wide potential windows although with slower kinetics, whereas the 2.0 kΩ resistor electrodes show poor cyclic voltammetric profiles even after pre-treatment. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy related these findings to the interfacial properties of the electrodes. Microstructural and morphological studies were carried out using contact mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Confocal Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. AFM showed more homogeneity of the films with lower nominal resistances, related to better electrochemical characteristics. X-ray diffraction and Confocal Raman spectroscopy indicate the existence of a graphitic structure in the carbon films

  19. Effect of tempering on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a medium carbon bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, J. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Zhang, F.C., E-mail: zfc@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Equipment and Technology of Cold Strip Rolling, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Yang, X.W. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Lv, B. [College of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wu, K.M. [International Research Institute for Steel Technology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-16

    The effect of tempering on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a medium carbon bainitic steel has been investigated through optical microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses. A nano-level microstructure containing plate-like bainitic ferrite and film-like retained austenite is obtained by isothermal transformation at Ms+10 °C followed by tempering within 240–450 °C. Results show that the sample tempered at 340 °C occupies the optimal balance of strength and toughness by maintaining a certain level of plasticity; samples tempered at 320 °C and 360 °C with low and high yield ratio come second. The microstructure of the steel is not sensitive to tempering temperatures before 360 °C. When the temperature is increased to 450 °C, the significantly coarsened bainitic ferrite plate and the occurrence of a small quantity of carbide precipitation account for its low toughness. The amount of retained austenite increases with the tempering temperature before 400 °C, followed by decreasing with further increase in the temperature. This behavior is related to the competition between retained austenite further transforming into bainite and decomposing into carbide during tempering.

  20. Influence of microstructure on the low and high cycle fatigue behaviour of a medium carbon microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, V.; Padmanabhan, K.A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the room temperature monotonic and cyclic stress-strain (CSS) response, the low and high cycle fatigue behaviour of a medium carbon microalloyed (MA) steel in different microstructural conditions obtained by isothermal transformation at 973, 773 and 573 K following austenitizing at 1123 K. The isothermal transformations resulted in coarse pearlite (CP), fine pearlite (FP), and acicular ferrite/bainite (AF/B) microstructures, respectively. In low cycle fatigue, the CP and FP microstructures exhibited cyclic softening at low total strain amplitudes ( cys ) of the material and was approximately equal to 0.7σ cys . (orig.)

  1. Measurement of carbon nanotube microstructure relative density by optical attenuation and observation of size-dependent variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sei Jin; Schmidt, Aaron J; Bedewy, Mostafa; Hart, A John

    2013-07-21

    Engineering the density of carbon nanotube (CNT) forest microstructures is vital to applications such as electrical interconnects, micro-contact probes, and thermal interface materials. For CNT forests on centimeter-scale substrates, weight and volume can be used to calculate density. However, this is not suitable for smaller samples, including individual microstructures, and moreover does not enable mapping of spatial density variations within the forest. We demonstrate that the relative mass density of individual CNT microstructures can be measured by optical attenuation, with spatial resolution equaling the size of the focused spot. For this, a custom optical setup was built to measure the transmission of a focused laser beam through CNT microstructures. The transmittance was correlated with the thickness of the CNT microstructures by Beer-Lambert-Bouguer law to calculate the attenuation coefficient. We reveal that the density of CNT microstructures grown by CVD can depend on their size, and that the overall density of arrays of microstructures is affected significantly by run-to-run process variations. Further, we use the technique to quantify the change in CNT microstructure density due to capillary densification. This is a useful and accessible metrology technique for CNTs in future microfabrication processes, and will enable direct correlation of density to important properties such as stiffness and electrical conductivity.

  2. Microstructure of carbon derived from mangrove charcoal and its application in Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tao; Luo Ruiying; Qiao Wenming; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Mochida, Isao

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the microstructure of mangrove-charcoal-derived carbon (MC) was studied using XRD, STM and TEM. MC was found to consist of aligned quasi-spherical structural units with diameters of around 5-20 nm. It shows typical hard carbon characteristics, including a strongly disoriented single graphene layer and BSU, formed by two or three graphene layers stacked nearly parallel. Some curved and faceted graphene layers, especially closed carbon nanoparticles with fullerene-like, were observed in the as-prepared samples. MC was also evaluated as an anodic material for Li-ion batteries. MC carbonized at 1000 deg. C possessed the highest available discharge capacity (below 0.5 V) of 335 mAh g -1 , the high first-cycle coulombic efficiency of 73.7%, good rate and cyclic capability and PC-based electrolyte compatibility. 7 Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of fully lithiated mangrove charcoal-derived carbons indicated the co-existence of three Li species.

  3. Microstructure of carbon derived from mangrove charcoal and its application in Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Tao [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100083 (China); Luo Ruiying, E-mail: ryluo@buaa.edu.c [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100083 (China); Qiao Wenming [College of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Yoon, Seong-Ho; Mochida, Isao [Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2010-02-01

    In this study, the microstructure of mangrove-charcoal-derived carbon (MC) was studied using XRD, STM and TEM. MC was found to consist of aligned quasi-spherical structural units with diameters of around 5-20 nm. It shows typical hard carbon characteristics, including a strongly disoriented single graphene layer and BSU, formed by two or three graphene layers stacked nearly parallel. Some curved and faceted graphene layers, especially closed carbon nanoparticles with fullerene-like, were observed in the as-prepared samples. MC was also evaluated as an anodic material for Li-ion batteries. MC carbonized at 1000 deg. C possessed the highest available discharge capacity (below 0.5 V) of 335 mAh g{sup -1}, the high first-cycle coulombic efficiency of 73.7%, good rate and cyclic capability and PC-based electrolyte compatibility. {sup 7}Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of fully lithiated mangrove charcoal-derived carbons indicated the co-existence of three Li species.

  4. Preparation, microstructure and hydrogen sorption properties of nanoporous carbon aerogels under ambient drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, H. Y.; Buckley, C. E.; Mulè, S.; Paskevicius, M.; Dhal, B. B.

    2008-11-01

    Organic aerogels are prepared by the sol-gel method from polymerization of resorcinol with furfural. These aerogels are further carbonized in nitrogen in order to obtain their corresponding carbon aerogels (CA); a sample which was carbonized at 900 °C was also activated in a carbon dioxide atmosphere at 900 °C. The chemical reaction mechanism and optimum synthesis conditions are investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermoanalyses (thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyses) with a focus on the sol-gel process. The carbon aerogels were investigated with respect to their microstructures, using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen adsorption measurements at 77 K. SAXS studies showed that micropores with a radius of gyration of adsorption showed that larger mesopores were also present. Hydrogen storage properties of the CA were also investigated. An activated sample with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of 1539 ± 20 m2 g-1 displayed a reasonably high hydrogen uptake at 77 K with a maximum hydrogen sorption of 3.6 wt% at 2.5 MPa. These results suggest that CA are promising candidate hydrogen storage materials.

  5. Preparation, microstructure and hydrogen sorption properties of nanoporous carbon aerogels under ambient drying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, H Y; Buckley, C E; Mule, S; Paskevicius, M; Dhal, B B

    2008-01-01

    Organic aerogels are prepared by the sol-gel method from polymerization of resorcinol with furfural. These aerogels are further carbonized in nitrogen in order to obtain their corresponding carbon aerogels (CA); a sample which was carbonized at 900 deg. C was also activated in a carbon dioxide atmosphere at 900 deg. C. The chemical reaction mechanism and optimum synthesis conditions are investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermoanalyses (thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyses) with a focus on the sol-gel process. The carbon aerogels were investigated with respect to their microstructures, using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen adsorption measurements at 77 K. SAXS studies showed that micropores with a radius of gyration of 2 g -1 displayed a reasonably high hydrogen uptake at 77 K with a maximum hydrogen sorption of 3.6 wt% at 2.5 MPa. These results suggest that CA are promising candidate hydrogen storage materials.

  6. Controllable synthesis of spongy carbon nanotube blocks with tunable macro- and microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui Xuchun; Lin Zhiqiang; Zeng Zhiping; Tang Zikang; Wang Kunlin; Wu Dehai

    2013-01-01

    Macroscopic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with uniform structures are in great demand for use in composites and environmental materials. Here we demonstrate the controlled synthesis of spongy CNT blocks with isotropic properties and flexible, freestanding structures. The formation mechanism of the isotropic CNT sponges is discussed, based on its open-ended structure and initial formation in the vapor phase. The microstructure of the CNT sponges can be tuned by changing the flow rate of the carrier gas, resulting in CNT sponges with diameters ranging from 30.2 to 47.8 nm and wall thicknesses from 7 to 16 nm. The bulk density (5–25 mg cm −3 ), mechanical strength of the CNT sponges, and filling rate of ferromagnetic catalyst in the CNT sponges can also be modulated by controlling the supply rate of the carbon source, suggesting potential applications in mechanical energy absorption and environmental materials. (paper)

  7. Effects of ion beam irradiation on the microstructures and strengths of different carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo; Kurumada, Akira; Kawamata, Kiyohiro; Inagaki, Michio

    1998-01-01

    The high energy argon ion was irradiated to different carbon fibers with various microstructures. The cross-sectional structures and strengths properties have been evaluated before and after ion irradiation. As a result, the diameter of fibers decreased due to ion irradiation, except for the fiber with dual structure. The tensile strength also decreased due to ion irradiation, except for fibers which were not heat-treated. This suggests that it is necessary to consider not only the defects in the vertical cross-section but also changes in defect structures in the axial direction. The results of computer simulation indicated that argon ion with 175MeV/1μA produced homogeneous defects in the carbon fibers with the diameter of about 20 μm. (author)

  8. Micro-CT in situ study of carbonate rock microstructural evolution for geologic CO2 storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yi; Yang, Yan; Rogowska, M.

    2017-01-01

    to achieve this is to find a suitable condition to create a stable 3D space in carbonate rock by injecting liquid to prepare space for the later CO2 injection. Micro-CT imaging is a non-destructive 3D method that can be used to study the property changes of carbonate rocks during and after CO2 injection....... The advance in lab source based micro-CT has made it capable of in situ experiments. We used a commercial bench top micro-CT (Zeiss Versa XRM410) to study the microstructure changes of chalk during liquid injection. Flexible temporal CT resolution is essential in this study because that the time scales...... of coupled physical and chemical processes can be very different. The results validated the feasibility of using a bench top CT system with a pressure cell to monitor the mesoscale multiphase interactions in chalk....

  9. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  10. Effect of boron and carbon addition on microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-15-3 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, R.; Ghosal, P.; Muraleedharan, K.; Nandy, T.K.; Ray, K.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Development of β Ti alloys with B and C addition for improved mechanical properties. → Detailed characterization of microstructural constituents using electron microscopy. → Microstructure-mechanical property correlation in this new class of alloys. → Strengthening mechanism in β Ti alloy in the presence of hard and non-deformable phases. - Abstract: A detailed microstructure-mechanical property correlation was carried out in beta titanium alloys (Ti-15V-3Al-3Sn-3Cr) with boron and carbon additions. The alloys were prepared by non-consumable vacuum arc melting followed by hot rolling. Microstructural characterization was carried out using an optical microscope, a scanning electron microscope (SEM), a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a high resolution TEM (HRTEM). Addition of boron and carbon resulted in the precipitation of TiB and TiC, respectively, and these phases acted as reinforcements. Evaluation of mechanical properties in solution treated and solution treated plus aged condition showed strengthening in the boron and carbon containing alloy with respect to the base. Strengthening in solution treated condition was attributed to a synergistic effect of grain refinement and load transfer in the presence of non-deformable phases. On the other hand, higher strength in boron and carbon containing alloys on aging was ascribed to the presence of finer aged microstructures.

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of CVI carbon fiber/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, T.; Araki, H.; Abe, F.; Okada, M.

    1992-01-01

    Microstructures and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/SiC composites prepared with chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) were examined to optimize the process conditions such as reactant and infiltration temperature. Ethyl-trichloro-silane (ETS) and methyl-trichloro-silane (MTS) were used as a source of SiC. CVI was conducted for 108 ks at maximum under a pressure of 13.3 kPa at 1273-1573 K. The composite with a density higher than 80% was obtained at 1373-1423 K and 1423-1374 K from ETS and MTS, respectively. The main matrix formed was β SiC for both reactants. However, silicon also deposited in SiC matrix for MTS. Preferential wettability of SiC to the carbon fiber was observed, and graphite was detected in the interface between the matrix and the carbon fiber by TEM. Mechanical properties were evaluated by bend tests at room temperature. High strength of around 800 MPa was obtained for the composites if the thickness of the surface coated layer was less than 50 μm. Apparent fracture thoughness of the present carbon fiber/SiC composite was 6-10 MPa m 1/2 at room temperature. (orig.)

  12. Mechano-Physical Properties and Microstructure of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Cement Paste after Thermal Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeląg, Maciej

    2017-09-11

    The article presents the results obtained in the course of a study on the use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the modification of a cement matrix. Carbon nanotubes were introduced into a cement paste in the form of an aqueous dispersion in the presence of a surfactant (SDS-sodium dodecyl sulfate), which was sonicated. The selected physical and mechanical parameters were examined, and the correlations between these parameters were determined. An analysis of the local microstructure of the modified cement pastes has been carried out using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray microanalysis (EDS). In addition, the effect of carbon nanotubes on the change in characteristics of the cementitious material exposed to the sudden, short-term thermal load, was determined. The obtained material was characterized by a much lower density than a traditional cement matrix because the phenomenon of foaming occurred. The material was also characterized by reduced durability, higher shrinkage, and higher resistance to the effect of elevated temperature. Further research on the carbon nanotube reinforced cement paste, with SDS, may contribute to the development of a modified cement binder for the production of a lightweight or an aerated concrete.

  13. Mechano-Physical Properties and Microstructure of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Cement Paste after Thermal Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the results obtained in the course of a study on the use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the modification of a cement matrix. Carbon nanotubes were introduced into a cement paste in the form of an aqueous dispersion in the presence of a surfactant (SDS—sodium dodecyl sulfate), which was sonicated. The selected physical and mechanical parameters were examined, and the correlations between these parameters were determined. An analysis of the local microstructure of the modified cement pastes has been carried out using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray microanalysis (EDS). In addition, the effect of carbon nanotubes on the change in characteristics of the cementitious material exposed to the sudden, short-term thermal load, was determined. The obtained material was characterized by a much lower density than a traditional cement matrix because the phenomenon of foaming occurred. The material was also characterized by reduced durability, higher shrinkage, and higher resistance to the effect of elevated temperature. Further research on the carbon nanotube reinforced cement paste, with SDS, may contribute to the development of a modified cement binder for the production of a lightweight or an aerated concrete. PMID:28891976

  14. Microstructure and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films machined by femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Chunhui [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Liu, Yongsheng, E-mail: yongshengliu@nwpu.edu.cn [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Cheng, Laifei [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Li, Weinan [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China); Zhang, Qing [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Yang, Xiaojun [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. • The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. And the number of nanoparticles increased with the processing power as well. • It revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. • It showed that a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser is of great interest for machining high melting point and hardness materials such as diamond-like carbon, SiC ceramic, et al. In present work, the microstructural and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films were investigated using electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques after machined by diverse femtosecond laser power in air. The results showed the machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. Considering the D and G Raman band parameters on the laser irradiation, it revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment.

  15. Magnesium substitution in carbonated hydroxyapatite: Structural and microstructural characterization by Rietveld's refinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lala, S. [Materials Science Division, Department of Physics, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, M.; Das, P.K. [Department of Biological Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Das, D. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata 700098 (India); Kar, T. [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Pradhan, S.K., E-mail: skpradhan@phys.buruniv.ac.in [Materials Science Division, Department of Physics, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India)

    2016-02-15

    Four stoichiometric compositions of nanocrystalline Mg doped carbonated hydroxyapatite (cHAp) powders are synthesized by mechanical alloying (ball milling) the powder mixtures of CaCO{sub 3}, CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O and MgO in open air at room temperature. FTIR analysis confirms the A-type carbonation in all milled HAp powder samples (A-cHAp). Microstructure characterization in terms of lattice imperfections and phase quantification of ball milled samples are made by analyzing XRD patterns employing Rietveld's structure refinement method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of 15 mol % Mg doped A-cHAp sample reveals microstructure similar to that obtained from XRD pattern analysis. Cumulative effect of Mg substitution and mechanical alloying results in amorphization of a major part of crystalline A-cHAp, analogous to native bone mineral. Rietveld analysis reveals that the Ca2 vacancy site is energetically more favorable for occupation of Mg substitution. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay test reveals sufficiently high percentage cell viability confirming the cytocompatibility of the sample. - Graphical abstract: Mg substitution for Ca2 site. - Highlights: • Single phase Mg doped A-cHAp synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA). • FTIR analysis confirms A-type carbonation in HAp. • Amorphization of a part of crystalline A-cHAp due to MA and Mg insertion. • Mg{sup 2+} ions substitute the Ca2 vacancy site. • High cell viability under MTT assay.

  16. Highest recorded electrical conductivity and microstructure in polypropylene-carbon nanotubes composites and the effect of carbon nanofibers addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Herrera, C. A.; Pérez-González, J.; Solorza-Feria, O.; Romero-Partida, N.; Flores-Vela, A.; Cabañas-Moreno, J. G.

    2018-04-01

    In the last decade, numerous investigations have been devoted to the preparation of polypropylene-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PP/MWCNT) nanocomposites having enhanced properties, and in particular, high electrical conductivities (> 1 S cm-1). The present work establishes that the highest electrical conductivity in PP/MWCNT nanocomposites is limited by the amount of nanofiller content which can be incorporated in the polymer matrix, namely, about 20 wt%. This concentration of MWCNT in PP leads to a maximum electrical conductivity slightly lower than 8 S cm-1, but only by assuring an adequate combination of dispersion and spatial distribution of the carbon nanotubes. The realization of such an optimal microstructure depends on the characteristics of the production process of the PP/MWCNT nanocomposites; in our experiments, involving composite fabrication by melt mixing and hot pressing, a second re-processing cycle is shown to increase the electrical conductivity values by up to two orders of magnitude, depending on the MWCNT content of the nanocomposite. A modest increase of the highest electrical conductivity obtained in nanocomposites with 21.5 wt% MWCNT content has been produced by the combined use of carbon nanofibers (CNF) and MWCNT, so that the total nanofiller content was increased to 30 wt% in the nanocomposite with PP—15 wt% MWCNT—15 wt%CNF.

  17. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inconel 625 Alloy on Low Carbon Steel by Heat Treatment after Overlay Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seungpil; Jang, Jaeho; Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Byung Jun; Sohn, Keun Yong; Nam, Dae-Geun

    2016-01-01

    Overlay welding technique is one of methods used to improve metal mechanical properties such as strength, toughness and corrosion resistance. Generally, Inconel 625 alloy is used for overlay welding layer on low carbon steels for economic consideration. However, the method produces some problems in the microstructure of the cast structure and some defects, caused by the elevated temperatures of the overlay process. To resolve these problems, heat treatments are required. In this study, Inconel 625 alloy was welded on a low carbon steel by the overlay welding process to investigate the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties. A double heat treatment was performed to improve the mechanical properties of the welding and substrate layers. It was found that Inconel 625 alloy had an austenite microstructure after the first heat treatment, but the low carbon steel had a ferrite-pearlite microstructure after the second heat treatment. After the double heat treatment, the sample showed the optimum hardness because of grain refinement and homogenization of the microstructure.

  18. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inconel 625 Alloy on Low Carbon Steel by Heat Treatment after Overlay Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seungpil; Jang, Jaeho; Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Byung Jun; Sohn, Keun Yong; Nam, Dae-Geun [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Overlay welding technique is one of methods used to improve metal mechanical properties such as strength, toughness and corrosion resistance. Generally, Inconel 625 alloy is used for overlay welding layer on low carbon steels for economic consideration. However, the method produces some problems in the microstructure of the cast structure and some defects, caused by the elevated temperatures of the overlay process. To resolve these problems, heat treatments are required. In this study, Inconel 625 alloy was welded on a low carbon steel by the overlay welding process to investigate the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties. A double heat treatment was performed to improve the mechanical properties of the welding and substrate layers. It was found that Inconel 625 alloy had an austenite microstructure after the first heat treatment, but the low carbon steel had a ferrite-pearlite microstructure after the second heat treatment. After the double heat treatment, the sample showed the optimum hardness because of grain refinement and homogenization of the microstructure.

  19. Dechlorination of Environmental Contaminants Using a Hybrid Nanocatalyst: Palladium Nanoparticles Supported on Hierarchical Carbon Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Vijwani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of a new type of hybrid nanocatalyst material that combines the high surface area of nanoparticles and nanotubes with the structural robustness and ease of handling larger supports. The hybrid material is made by fabricating palladium nanoparticles on two types of carbon supports: as-received microcellular foam (Foam and foam with carbon nanotubes anchored on the pore walls (CNT/Foam. Catalytic reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride with these materials has been investigated using gas chromatography. It is seen that while both palladium-functionalized carbon supports are highly effective in the degradation of carbon tetrachloride, the rate of degradation is significantly increased with palladium on CNT/Foam. However, there is scope to increase this rate further if the wettability of these structures can be enhanced in the future. Microstructural and spectroscopic analyses of the fresh and used catalysts have been compared which indicates that there is no change in density or surface chemical states of the catalyst after prolonged use in dechlorination test. This implies that these materials can be used repeatedly and hence provide a simple, powerful, and cost-effective approach for dechlorination of water.

  20. Cathode deposits in fullerene formation — microstructural evidence for independent pathways of pyrolytic carbon and nanobody formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. H.; Gerald, J. D. Fitz; Pang, L.; Wilson, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Microstructures in cathode deposits formed during fullerene production by electrical arcing in helium have been examined in detail. This has provided new information about the mechanisms by which nanobodies (nanotubes and nanoparticles) and pyrolytic carbon are deposited. Nanobodies and pyrolytic carbon form independently; the former probably grow in the plasma then deposit on the electrode but much of the latter deposits directly on the electrode surface.

  1. Model for the interaction between interface migration and carbon diffusion during annealing of martensite-austenite microstructures in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santofimia, M.J.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between carbon partitioning from martensite to austenite and interface migration during annealing of martensite-austenite microstructures is modeled, assuming the same chemical potential of carbon in martensite and austenite at the interface and allowing the motion of the phase interface when a free-energy difference occurs. The simulations show that the motion of the martensite-austenite interface can be significant and can takes place in either direction

  2. Influence of Austempering Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Medium Carbon High Silicon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaksha, P. A.; Ravishankar, K. S.

    2017-08-01

    In the present investigation, the influence of austempering heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of medium carbon high silicon steel was evaluated. The test specimens were machined from the as-received steel and were first austenitised at 900 °C for 45 minutes, followed by austempering heat treatment in salt bath at various temperatures 300 °C, 350 °C and 400 °C for a fixed duration of two hours, after that those specimens were air-cooled to room temperature. The characterization studies were carried out using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffractometer (XRD) and then correlated to the hardness and tensile properties. Results indicate that, the specimens austempered at lower temperature i.e. at 300 °C, which offered high hardness, tensile strength and lower ductility (1857 MPa and 13.3 %) due to the presence of acicular bainite i.e. lower bainite and also some martensite in the microstructure. At 350 °C, reduction in the tensile strength and hardness was observed, but comparatively higher ductility, which was favored by the presence of bainite laths i.e. upper bainitic structure along with higher retained austenite content. Finally at 400 °C, reduction in both ductility and tensile strength was observed, which is due to the precipitation of carbides between the banite laths, however good strain hardening response was observed at austempering temperatures of 350 °C and 400 °C.

  3. Study on microstructure and mechanical characteristics of low-carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkari Khorrami, Mahmoud; Mostafaei, Mohammad Ali; Pouraliakbar, Hesam, E-mail: hpouraliakbar@alum.sharif.edu; Kokabi, Amir Hossein

    2014-07-01

    In this work, examinations on the microstructure and mechanical properties of plain carbon steel and AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel dissimilar welds are carried out. Welding is conducted in both autogenous and using ER309L austenitic filler rod conditions through gas tungsten arc welding process. The results indicate that fully-ferritic and duplex ferritic–martensitic microstructures are formed for autogenous and filler-added welds, respectively. Carbide precipitation and formation of martensite at ferrite grain boundaries (intergranular martensite) as well as grain growth occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of AISI 430 steel. It is found that weld heat input can strongly affect grain growth phenomenon along with the amount and the composition of carbides and intergranular martensite. Acquired mechanical characteristics of weld in the case of using filler metal are significantly higher than those of autogenous one. Accordingly, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), hardness, and absorbed energy during tensile test of weld metal are increased from 662 MPa to 910 MPa, 140 Hv to 385 Hv, and 53.6 J m{sup −3} to 79 J m{sup −3}, respectively by filler metal addition. From fracture surfaces, predominantly ductile fracture is observed in the specimen welded with filler metal while mainly cleavage fracture occurs in the autogenous weld metal.

  4. Carbon-Supported Iron Oxide Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meaz, T.; Mørup, Steen; Koch, C. Bender

    1996-01-01

    A carbon black ws impregnated with 6 wt% iron using an aqueous solution of iron nitrate. The impregnated carbon was initially dried at 125 C. The effect of heating of the iron oxide phase was investigated at temperatures between 200 and 600 C using Mossbauer spectroscopy. All heat treatments were...... done in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. Ferrihydrite is formed and is stable at and below a temperature of 300 C. At 600 C small particles of maghemite is the dominant iron oxide. A transformation reaction is suggested....

  5. Microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum alloy composites produced by ball milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raviathul Basariya, M.; Srivastava, V.C.; Mukhopadhyay, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 6082 Al alloy composite with 2 wt% multiwalled carbon nanotubes prepared by milling. • Effect of milling time on structure and property evolution has been studied. • The reinforced composite powders showed a drastic crystallite size refinement. • The presence of carbon nanotube led to a two fold increase in the hardness and modulus. • The composite powder showed good thermal stability studied by DTA. - Abstract: The influence of milling time on the structure, morphology and thermal stability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reinforced EN AW6082 aluminum alloy powders has been studied. After structural and microstructural characterization of the mechanically milled powders micro- and nano-hardness of the composite powder particles were evaluated. The morphological and X-ray diffraction studies on the milled powders revealed that the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were uniformly distributed and embedded within the aluminum matrix. No reaction products were detected even after long milling up to 50 h. Nanotubes became shorter in length as they fractured under the impact and shearing action during the milling process. A high hardness of about 436 ± 52 HV is achieved for the milled powders, due to the addition of MWCNTs, after milling for 50 h. The increased elastic modulus and nanohardness can be attributed to the finer grain size evolved during high energy ball milling and to the uniform distribution of hard CNTs in the Al-alloy matrix. The hardness values of the composite as well as the matrix alloy compares well with that predicted by the Hall–Petch relationship

  6. Study of different nanostructured carbon supports for fuel cell catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabile Gattia, Daniele; Antisari, Marco Vittori; Giorgi, Leonardo; Marazzi, Renzo; Piscopiello, Emanuela; Montone, Amelia; Bellitto, Serafina; Licoccia, Silvia; Traversa, Enrico

    Pt clusters were deposited by an impregnation process on three carbon supports: multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT), single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNH), and Vulcan XC-72 carbon black to investigate the effect of the carbon support structure on the possibility of reducing Pt loading on electrodes for direct methanol (DMFC) fuel cells without impairing performance. MWNT and SWNH were in-house synthesised by a DC and an AC arc discharge process between pure graphite electrodes, respectively. UV-vis spectrophotometry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and cyclic voltammetry measurements were used to characterize the Pt particles deposited on the three carbon supports. A differential yield for Pt deposition, not strictly related to the surface area of the carbon support, was observed. SWNH showed the highest surface chemical activity toward Pt deposition. Pt deposited in different forms depending on the carbon support. Electrochemical characterizations showed that the Pt nanostructures deposited on MWNT are particularly efficient in the methanol oxidation reaction.

  7. Microstructure changes and properties of TiC-coated carbon fiber-reinforced carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kunjie; Guo Quangui; Zhang Guobing; Shi Jingli; Zhang Hua; Liu Lang

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to study distortion of TiC crystals after thermal cycles in plasma environment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe morphology changes and penetrating cracks in TiC/C coatings. To avoid the cracks and enhance properties of coated carbon fiber-reinforced carbon (C/C) composites, TiC/C composites were prepared as buffer layer to relieve thermal stresses. Thermal cycles indicated that the buffer layer could effectively improve thermal shock resistance of pure TiC coated C/C composites. To study the reason, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results suggested that TiC particles were uniformly imbedded in pyrocarbon in the buffer layer, which was advantageous to relieve mismatch of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) between pure TiC and C/C. Moreover, thermal conductivity tests showed that the buffer layer was in favor of transferring heat loading

  8. Effect of volume ratio of liquid to solid on the interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of high chromium cast iron and medium carbon steel bimetal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Bowen; Cai Changchun; Lu Baiping

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Volume ratio of liquid to solid affects significantly the interfacial microstructure. → Elemental diffusion activity is increased by increasing volume ratio. → Mechanical property is improved by increasing volume ratio. - Abstract: The high chromium cast iron and medium carbon steel bimetal was fabricated by liquid-solid casting technology. The effect of volume ratios of liquid to solid (6:1, 10:1 and 12:1) on the interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of bimetal was investigated. The interfacial microstructure was analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The shear strength and microhardness in as-cast condition were studied at room temperature. The results show that the volume ratios of liquid to solid affect significantly the interfacial microstructure. When liquid-solid volume ratio was 6:1, the unbonded region was detected in interface region because the imported heat energy cannot support effectively the diffusion of element, whereas, when liquid-solid volume ratios reach 10:1 and 12:1, a sound interfacial microstructure was achieved by the diffusion of C, Cr, Mo, Cu and Mn, and metallurgical bonding without unbonded region, void and hole, etc. was detected. With the increase of liquid-solid volume ratio, the elemental diffusion activity improves, resulting in the increase of width of interface transition region. At the same distance from interface, with the increase of liquid-solid volume ratio, the microhardness is degraded in HCCI, but increased in MCS. The shear strength is also improved with the increase of liquid-solid volume ratio.

  9. Hydrogenation of carbon monoxide over supported palladium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kunugi, T.

    1978-03-01

    An alumina-supported 2% palladium catalyst had higher activity for carbon monoxide hydrogenation than a silica-supported 2% palladium catalyst, at 250/sup 0/-400/sup 0/C and 1 atm. The addition of lanthanum oxide or thorium oxide, but not of potassium oxide, to the silica-supported catalyst increased the conversion at 350/sup 0/C from 1.1% to 81.0% with a selectivity of 56.1% for methane, 1.4% for C/sub 2/ compounds, 0.1% for C/sub 3/ compounds, and 42.5% for carbon dioxide. Temperature-programed desorption of carbon monoxide in a hydrogen stream showed that of two desorption peaks observed for carbon monoxide, the one at higher temperature corresponded to the carbon monoxide species which hydrogenates to methane and that the area of this peak increased with increasing thorium content of the catalyst. Graphs, tables, and 12 references.

  10. The microstructure, mechanical and friction properties of protective diamond like carbon films on magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Y. S.; Wu, Y. F.; Yang, H.; Cang, K.; Song, G. H.; Li, Z. X.; Zhou, K.

    2011-12-01

    Protective hard coatings deposited on magnesium alloys are believed to be effective for overcoming their poor wear properties. In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films as hard protective films were deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy by arc ion plating under negative pulse bias voltages ranging from 0 to -200 V. The microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the DLC films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nanoindentation. The tribological behavior of uncoated and coated AZ91 magnesium alloy was investigated using a ball-on-disk tribotester. The results show that the negative pulse bias voltage used for film deposition has a significant effect on the sp3 carbon content and mechanical properties of the deposited DLC films. A maximum sp3 content of 33.3% was obtained at -100 V, resulting in a high hardness of 28.6 GPa and elastic modulus of 300.0 GPa. The DLC films showed very good adhesion to the AZ91 magnesium alloy with no observable cracks and delamination even during friction testing. Compared with the uncoated AZ91 magnesium alloy, the magnesium alloy coated with DLC films exhibits a low friction coefficient and a narrow, shallow wear track. The wear resistance and surface hardness of AZ91 magnesium alloy can be significantly improved by coating a layer of DLC protective film due to its high hardness and low friction coefficient.

  11. The microstructure, mechanical and friction properties of protective diamond like carbon films on magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Y.S.; Wu, Y.F.; Yang, H.; Cang, K.; Song, G.H.; Li, Z.X.; Zhou, K.

    2011-01-01

    Protective hard coatings deposited on magnesium alloys are believed to be effective for overcoming their poor wear properties. In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films as hard protective films were deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy by arc ion plating under negative pulse bias voltages ranging from 0 to -200 V. The microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the DLC films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nanoindentation. The tribological behavior of uncoated and coated AZ91 magnesium alloy was investigated using a ball-on-disk tribotester. The results show that the negative pulse bias voltage used for film deposition has a significant effect on the sp 3 carbon content and mechanical properties of the deposited DLC films. A maximum sp 3 content of 33.3% was obtained at -100 V, resulting in a high hardness of 28.6 GPa and elastic modulus of 300.0 GPa. The DLC films showed very good adhesion to the AZ91 magnesium alloy with no observable cracks and delamination even during friction testing. Compared with the uncoated AZ91 magnesium alloy, the magnesium alloy coated with DLC films exhibits a low friction coefficient and a narrow, shallow wear track. The wear resistance and surface hardness of AZ91 magnesium alloy can be significantly improved by coating a layer of DLC protective film due to its high hardness and low friction coefficient.

  12. The microstructure, mechanical and friction properties of protective diamond like carbon films on magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Y.S., E-mail: yshzou75@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210094 (China); Wu, Y.F.; Yang, H.; Cang, K. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210094 (China); Song, G.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang, Liaoning, 110178 (China); Li, Z.X.; Zhou, K. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210094 (China)

    2011-12-01

    Protective hard coatings deposited on magnesium alloys are believed to be effective for overcoming their poor wear properties. In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films as hard protective films were deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy by arc ion plating under negative pulse bias voltages ranging from 0 to -200 V. The microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the DLC films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nanoindentation. The tribological behavior of uncoated and coated AZ91 magnesium alloy was investigated using a ball-on-disk tribotester. The results show that the negative pulse bias voltage used for film deposition has a significant effect on the sp{sup 3} carbon content and mechanical properties of the deposited DLC films. A maximum sp{sup 3} content of 33.3% was obtained at -100 V, resulting in a high hardness of 28.6 GPa and elastic modulus of 300.0 GPa. The DLC films showed very good adhesion to the AZ91 magnesium alloy with no observable cracks and delamination even during friction testing. Compared with the uncoated AZ91 magnesium alloy, the magnesium alloy coated with DLC films exhibits a low friction coefficient and a narrow, shallow wear track. The wear resistance and surface hardness of AZ91 magnesium alloy can be significantly improved by coating a layer of DLC protective film due to its high hardness and low friction coefficient.

  13. Electrochemical characteristics and microstructure of activated carbon powder supercapacitors for energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonsalves, T.C.; Faria, R.N.; Silva, F. M.; Vieira, L.S.; Casini, J.C.S.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, extensive investigations have concentrated on the study and improvement of supercapacitors electrode materials. The electric devices produced with these materials are used for stored energy over time periods ranging from seconds to several days. The main factor determining the energy storage time of a supercapacitor is its self-discharge rate. This property concerns to the gradual decrease in the electric potential that occurs when the supercapacitor terminals are left unconnected to either a charging circuit or an electric load. Self-discharge is attenuated with a decrease in room temperature and lifetime is enhanced. This paper addresses this aspect and reports the results of a work carried out on a systematic study with supercapacitors with nominal capacitance of 1.0 rated at a DC potential of 5.5 V and 10.0 F at 2,7 V. The specific capacitance, internal resistance and self-discharge of commercial activated carbon electrode supercapacitors have been investigated. Specific capacitances were measured in this study using cyclic voltammetry (CV). Specific capacitances of 44.4 and 66.7 Fg-1 were determined for distinct carbon electrodes supercapacitors. Self-discharge were carried out at room temperature and close to the freezing point. Internal resistances of the supercapacitors were calculated using the discharge curve at room temperature. The microstructures of the electrode material have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). (author)

  14. Electrochemical characteristics and microstructure of activated carbon powder supercapacitors for energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, T.C.; Faria, R.N. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Silva, F. M.; Vieira, L.S.; Casini, J.C.S., E-mail: julio.casini@ifro.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Rondonia (IFRO), Calama, RO (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, extensive investigations have concentrated on the study and improvement of supercapacitors electrode materials. The electric devices produced with these materials are used for stored energy over time periods ranging from seconds to several days. The main factor determining the energy storage time of a supercapacitor is its self-discharge rate. This property concerns to the gradual decrease in the electric potential that occurs when the supercapacitor terminals are left unconnected to either a charging circuit or an electric load. Self-discharge is attenuated with a decrease in room temperature and lifetime is enhanced. This paper addresses this aspect and reports the results of a work carried out on a systematic study with supercapacitors with nominal capacitance of 1.0 rated at a DC potential of 5.5 V and 10.0 F at 2,7 V. The specific capacitance, internal resistance and self-discharge of commercial activated carbon electrode supercapacitors have been investigated. Specific capacitances were measured in this study using cyclic voltammetry (CV). Specific capacitances of 44.4 and 66.7 Fg-1 were determined for distinct carbon electrodes supercapacitors. Self-discharge were carried out at room temperature and close to the freezing point. Internal resistances of the supercapacitors were calculated using the discharge curve at room temperature. The microstructures of the electrode material have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). (author)

  15. Carbon Nanofibers as Catalyst Support for Noble Metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toebes, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    In the quest for new and well-defined support materials for heterogeneous catalysts we explored the potential of carbon nanofibers (CNF). CNF belongs to the by now extensive family of synthetic graphite-like carbon materials with advantageous and tunable physico-chemical properties. Aim of the work

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum matrix composites synthesized via equal-channel angular pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, Hassan [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jahedi, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammad.jahedi@unh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Meratian, Mahmoud [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Knezevic, Marko [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2016-07-18

    In this work, 2 vol% carbon nanotubes (CNTs) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composites of superior microstructural homogeneity are successfully synthesized using Bc equal-channel angular extrusion (ECAP) route. The key step in arriving at high level of homogeneous distribution of CNTs within Al was preparation of the powder using simultaneous attrition milling and ultra-sonication processes. Microstructure as revealed by electron microscopy and absence of Vickers hardness gradients across the material demonstrate that the material reached the homogeneous state in terms of CNT distribution, porosity distribution, and grain structure after eight ECAP passes. To facilitate comparison of microstructure and hardness, samples of Al were processed under the same ECAP conditions. Significantly, the composite containing only 2 vol% exhibits 20% increase in hardness relative to the Al samples.

  17. Constitution, microstructure, mechanical properties, and performance of magnetron-sputtered carbon films with additions of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, C. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institut fuer Materialforschung I, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Leiste, H.; Stueber, M.; Ulrich, S.; Holleck, H.

    2003-11-01

    Amorphous carbon films with additions of silicon were deposited by non-reactive magnetron sputtering on WC-Co hard metal and on silicon substrates. The targets were hot-pressed, homogenous mixtures of graphite and silicon carbide powder. Additional argon ion bombardment of the growing film was applied by a substrate bias varied between 0V and -800 V. The deposited amorphous carbon films with two different silicon contents (5 at.% and 23 at.% respectively) were characterised with respect to their microstructure, density, thickness, residual stress, Vickers hardness, Young's modulus, critical load of failure, friction coefficient, and wear behaviour. The residual stress of the carbon films could be remarkably lowered by silicon additions (23 at.%). The hardness reached high values (2200 HV0.05) and the friction coefficient for unlubricated sliding friction against a steel (1.3505) counterpart was as low as 0.06. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Amorphe Kohlenstoffschichten mit Zusaetzen von Silizium wurden nichtreaktiv durch Magnetronzerstaeubung auf Substraten aus WC-Co Hartmetall und Silizium abgeschieden. Die neuartigen Targets wurden durch Heisspressen einer homogenen Mischung aus Graphit- und Siliziumcarbidpulver hergestellt. Durch Anlegen einer elektrischen Substratvorspannung von 0 V bis -800 V wurden die aufwachsenden Schichten zusaetzlich mit Argonionen unterschiedlicher Energie beschossen. Die abgeschiedenen amorphen Kohlenstoffschichten mit Zusaetzen von Silizium (5 at% bzw. 23 at%) wurden hinsichtlich Struktur, Dichte, Dicke, Eigenspannungen, Vickershaerte, reduziertem Elastizitaetsmodul, kritischer Last des Versagens im Ritztest, Reibwert und Verschleissverhalten untersucht. Fuer Schichten mit hohem Siliziumgehalt (23 at%) erfolgte eine erhebliche Reduzierung der Eigenspannung, die Haerte wurde bei sehr hohen Werten stabilisiert (2200 HV0,05) und der Reibungskoeffizient fuer ungeschmierte Gleitreibung gegen Stahl (1

  18. Carbon Contamination During Ion Irradiation - Accurate Detection and Characterization of its Effect on Microstructure of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Kruska, Karen; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Edwards, Danny J.; Zhu, Zihua; Zhang, Jiandong

    2017-11-17

    Accelerator-based ion beam techniques have been used to study radiation effects in materials for decades. Although carbon contamination induced by ion beam in target materials is a well-known issue, it has not been fully characterized nor quantified for studies in ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels that are candidate materials for applications such as core structural components in advanced nuclear reactors. It is an especially important issue for this class of material because of the effect of carbon level on precipitate formation. In this paper, the ability to quantify carbon contamination using three common techniques, namely time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS), atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is compared. Their effectiveness and short-comings in determining carbon contamination will be presented and discussed. The corresponding microstructural changes related to carbon contamination in ion irradiated F/M steels are also presented and briefly discussed.

  19. Effect of Carbon Content on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of NbC-Ni Based Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuigen Huang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to correlate the overall carbon content in NbC-Ni, NbC-Ni-VC and NbC-Ni-Mo starting powders with the resulting microstructure, hardness, and fracture toughness of Ni-bonded NbC cermets. A series of NbC-Ni, NbC-Ni-VC and NbC-Ni-Mo cermets with different carbon content were prepared by conventional liquid phase sintering for 1 h at 1420 °C in vacuum. Microstructural analysis of the fully densified cermets was performed by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA to assess the effect of carbon and VC or Mo additions on the NbC grain growth and morphology. A decreased carbon content in the starting powder mixtures resulted in increased dissolution of Nb, V, and Mo in the Ni binder and a decreased C/Nb ratio in the NbC based carbide phase. The Vickers hardness (HV30 and Palmqvist indentation toughness were found to decrease significantly with an increasing carbon content in the Mo-free cermets, whereas an antagonistic correlation between hardness and toughness was obtained as a function of the Mo-content in Mo-modified NbC cermets. To obtain optimized mechanical properties, methods to control the total carbon content of NbC-Ni mixtures were proposed and the prepared cermets were investigated in detail.

  20. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part I: Micro-structural characterization and geometric modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei; Azdoud, Yan; Lubineau, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    A computational strategy to predict the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites is proposed in this two-part paper. In Part I, the micro-structural characteristics of these nano-composites are discerned

  1. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as a metal catalyst support

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabena, LF

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available ., which are among the most commonly used heterogeneous catalyst supports (Mart??nez-Me?ndez et al. 2006). Catalyst activity depends on the particle size and appropriate dis- tance between each particle. These catalysts deposited on a support... supported Pt electrodes. Appl Catal B Environ 80:286?295 Maldonado S, Morin S, Stevenson KJ (2006) Structure, composition, and chemical reactivity of carbon nanotubes by selective nitrogen doping. Carbon 44:1429?1437 Mart??nez-Me?ndez S, Henr??quez Y...

  2. On the Growth and Microstructure of Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handuja Sangeeta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were deposited on various substrates namely untreated silicon and quartz, Fe-deposited silicon and quartz, HF-treated silicon, silicon nitride-deposited silicon, copper foil, and stainless steel mesh using thermal chemical vapor deposition technique. The optimum parameters for the growth and the microstructure of the synthesized CNTs on these substrates are described. The results show that the growth of CNTs is strongly influenced by the substrate used. Vertically aligned multi-walled CNTs were found on quartz, Fe-deposited silicon and quartz, untreated silicon, and on silicon nitride-deposited silicon substrates. On the other hand, spaghetti-type growth was observed on stainless steel mesh, and no CNT growth was observed on HF-treated silicon and copper. Silicon nitride-deposited silicon substrate proved to be a promising substrate for long vertically aligned CNTs of length 110–130 μm. We present a possible growth mechanism for vertically aligned and spaghetti-type growth of CNTs based on these results.

  3. Microstructural characterization of PAN based carbon fiber reinforced nylon 6 polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirathnamma, L. M.; Ningaraju, S.; Kumar, K. V. Aneesh; Ravikumar, H. B.

    2018-04-01

    Microstructural characterization of nylon 6/polyacrolonitrile based carbon fibers (PAN-CFs) of 10 to 40 wt% has been performed by positron lifetime technique (PLT). The positron lifetime parameters viz., o-Ps lifetime (τ3), o-Ps intensity (I3) and fractional free volume (Fv) of nylon 6/PAN-CF composites are correlated with the mechanical properties viz., Tensile strength and Young's modulus. The Fv show negative deviation with the reinforcement of 10 to 40 wt% of PAN-CF from the linear additivity relation. The negative deviation in nylon 6/PAN-CF composite suggests the induced molecular packing due to the chemical interaction between the polymeric chains of nylon 6 and PAN-CF. This is evident from Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) studies. The FTIR results suggests that observed negative deviation in PALS results of nylon 6/PAN-CF reinforced polymer composites is due to the induced chemical interaction at N-H-O sites. The improved tensile strength (TS) and Young's modulus (YM) in nylon 6/PAN-CF reinforced polymer composites is due to AS4C (surface treated and epoxy coated) PAN-CF has shown highest adhesion level due to better stress transfer between nylon 6 and PAN-CF.

  4. Understanding the microstructure of coal during carbonization using rheometry and {sup 1}H NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen M. Steel; Miguel C. Diaz; John W. Patrick; Colin E. Snape [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2005-07-01

    High-temperature rheometry and {sup 1}H NMR have been combined to assess the microstructural changes taking place during carbonization of four coals with varying volatile matter contents. A linear relationship exists between the logarithm of the material's complex viscosity and the fraction of hydrogen present in rigid structures for the resolidification region in which the material is liquid-like with small amounts of dispersed solid. The Krieger-Dougherty suspension equation fits the data, however, the fit parameters are not realistic. This is thought to be due to the fact that the solid which forms does not entirely behave like a suspension, as the solid regions join together rather than pack together. The relationship is best characterized by the Arrhenius viscosity equation and bears similarity with thermosetting polymer networks. Results suggest that resolidification occurs through progressive crosslinking and cyclization reactions within the liquid medium, giving rise to a network structure leading to a gel point. Horizontal positioning of the curves depends on the relative proportions of solid material arising from unsoftened coal and from resolidified structures. Correcting the curves to neglect the contribution from unsoftened coal indicates that while the unsoftened material has a fairly equant shape, the resolidified material has a much higher hydrodynamic volume. The gel point occurs when the ratio of hydrogen present in resolidified structures to that still present in liquid form is 2:3. 27 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Interfacial charge distributions in carbon-supported palladium catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, Radhika G.; Blume, Raoul; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2017-01-01

    Controlling the charge transfer between a semiconducting catalyst carrier and the supported transition metal active phase represents an elite strategy for fine turning the electronic structure of the catalytic centers, hence their activity and selectivity. These phenomena have been theoretically...... and experimentally elucidated for oxide supports but remain poorly understood for carbons due to their complex nanoscale structure. Here, we combine advanced spectroscopy and microscopy on model Pd/C samples to decouple the electronic and surface chemistry effects on catalytic performance. Our investigations reveal...... treatments can be used to tune the interfacial charge distribution, hereby providing a strategy to rationally design carbon-supported catalysts.Control over charge transfer in carbon-supported metal nanoparticles is essential for designing new catalysts. Here, the authors show that thermal treatments...

  6. Mechanical properties and hot-rolled microstructures of a low carbon bainitic steel with Cu-P alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, W.F.; Zhang, S.X.; Jiang, Y.; Dong, J.; Liu, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Mechanical properties and microstructures of low carbon bainite steel are examined. → Cu-P alloying promotes strengthening and uniform plastic deformation. → Cu-P alloying delays recovery process during rolling interval. → Lowering rolling temperature is favorable to increasing toughness. - Abstract: A low carbon bainitic steel with Cu-P alloying was developed. The new steel aims to meet the demand of high strength, high toughness and resistance to chloride ion corrosion for the components used in the environment of sea water and oceanic atmosphere. Mechanical properties of the steel were tested and strengthening and toughening mechanisms were analyzed by comparing hot-rolled microstructures of the low carbon bainitic steels with and without Cu-P alloying. The results show that Cu-P alloying provided strong solution strengthening with weak effect on ductility. The toughness loss caused by Cu-P alloying could be balanced by increasing the amount of martensite/remained austenite (M/A island) at lower finishing temperature. The static recovery process during rolling interval was delayed by the interaction of phosphorous, copper atoms with dislocations, which was favorable to the formation of bainitic plates. Super-fine Nb(C, N) particles precipitated on dislocations had coherency with bainite ferrite at 830 deg. C finishing temperature. Raising finishing temperature to 880 deg. C, Nb(C, N) particles were prone to coarsening and losing coherency. It was also found that no accurate lattice match relationship among retained austenite, martensite and bainite in granular bainitic microstructure.

  7. Mechanical properties and hot-rolled microstructures of a low carbon bainitic steel with Cu-P alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, W.F., E-mail: wenfangcui@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zhang, S.X. [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Technology Center of Laiwu Iron and Steel (Group) Co. Ltd., Laiwu 271104 (China); Jiang, Y. [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072 (Australia); Dong, J. [Technology Center of Laiwu Iron and Steel (Group) Co. Ltd., Laiwu 271104 (China); Liu, C.M. [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Mechanical properties and microstructures of low carbon bainite steel are examined. {yields} Cu-P alloying promotes strengthening and uniform plastic deformation. {yields} Cu-P alloying delays recovery process during rolling interval. {yields} Lowering rolling temperature is favorable to increasing toughness. - Abstract: A low carbon bainitic steel with Cu-P alloying was developed. The new steel aims to meet the demand of high strength, high toughness and resistance to chloride ion corrosion for the components used in the environment of sea water and oceanic atmosphere. Mechanical properties of the steel were tested and strengthening and toughening mechanisms were analyzed by comparing hot-rolled microstructures of the low carbon bainitic steels with and without Cu-P alloying. The results show that Cu-P alloying provided strong solution strengthening with weak effect on ductility. The toughness loss caused by Cu-P alloying could be balanced by increasing the amount of martensite/remained austenite (M/A island) at lower finishing temperature. The static recovery process during rolling interval was delayed by the interaction of phosphorous, copper atoms with dislocations, which was favorable to the formation of bainitic plates. Super-fine Nb(C, N) particles precipitated on dislocations had coherency with bainite ferrite at 830 deg. C finishing temperature. Raising finishing temperature to 880 deg. C, Nb(C, N) particles were prone to coarsening and losing coherency. It was also found that no accurate lattice match relationship among retained austenite, martensite and bainite in granular bainitic microstructure.

  8. Processing and refinement of steel microstructure images for assisting in computerized heat treatment of plain carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shubhank; Panda, Aditi; Naskar, Ruchira; Mishra, Dinesh Kumar; Pal, Snehanshu

    2017-11-01

    Steels are alloys of iron and carbon, widely used in construction and other applications. The evolution of steel microstructure through various heat treatment processes is an important factor in controlling properties and performance of steel. Extensive experimentations have been performed to enhance the properties of steel by customizing heat treatment processes. However, experimental analyses are always associated with high resource requirements in terms of cost and time. As an alternative solution, we propose an image processing-based technique for refinement of raw plain carbon steel microstructure images, into a digital form, usable in experiments related to heat treatment processes of steel in diverse applications. The proposed work follows the conventional steps practiced by materials engineers in manual refinement of steel images; and it appropriately utilizes basic image processing techniques (including filtering, segmentation, opening, and clustering) to automate the whole process. The proposed refinement of steel microstructure images is aimed to enable computer-aided simulations of heat treatment of plain carbon steel, in a timely and cost-efficient manner; hence it is beneficial for the materials and metallurgy industry. Our experimental results prove the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  9. Numerical evaluation of oxide growth in metallic support microstructures of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and its influence on mass transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Georg; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Persson, Åsa Helen

    2015-01-01

    is evaluated by determining an effective diffusion coefficient and the equivalent electrical area specific resistance (ASR) due to diffusion over time. It is thus possible to assess the applicability (in terms of corrosion behaviour) of potential metallic supports without costly long-term experiments......-temperature corrosion theory, and the required model parameters can be retrieved by standard corrosion weight gain measurements. The microstructure is reconstructed from X-ray computed tomography, and converted into a computational grid. The influence of the changing microstructure on the fuel cell performance...

  10. Microstructure and failure behavior of dissimilar resistance spot welds between low carbon galvanized and austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marashi, P.; Pouranvari, M.; Amirabdollahian, S.; Abedi, A.; Goodarzi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Resistance spot welding was used to join austenitic stainless steel and galvanized low carbon steel. The relationship between failure mode and weld fusion zone characteristics (size and microstructure) was studied. It was found that spot weld strength in the pullout failure mode is controlled by the strength and fusion zone size of the galvanized steel side. The hardness of the fusion zone which is governed by the dilution between two base metals, and fusion zone size of galvanized carbon steel side are dominant factors in determining the failure mode

  11. Cyclic voltammetric investigations of microstructured and platinum-covered glassy carbon electrodes in contact with a polymer electrolyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, G G; Veziridis, Z; Staub, M [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Freimuth, H [Inst. fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz IMM, Mainz (Germany)

    1997-06-01

    Model gas diffusion electrodes were prepared by microstructuring glassy carbon surfaces with high aspect ratios and subsequent deposition of platinum. These electrodes were characterized by hydrogen under-potential deposition (H-upd) in contact with a polymer electrolyte membrane employing cyclic voltametry. H-upd was found on platinum areas not in direct contact to the solid electrolyte, as long as a continuous platinum-path existed. A carbon surface between platinum acts as barrier for H-upd. (author) 4 figs., 5 refs.

  12. Preparation of supported electrocatalyst comprising multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-08-27

    A process for preparing a durable non-precious metal oxygen reduction electrocatalyst involves heat treatment of a ball-milled mixture of polyaniline and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the presence of a Fe species. The catalyst is more durable than catalysts that use carbon black supports. Performance degradation was minimal or absent after 500 hours of operation at constant cell voltage of 0.40 V.

  13. Microstructure and grain size effects on irradiation hardening of low carbon steel for reactor tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milasin, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-05-15

    Irradiation hardening of steel for reactor pressure vessels has been studied extensively during the past few years. A great number of experimental results concerning the behaviour of these steels in the radiation field and several review papers (1,2) have been published. Most of the papers deal with the effects of specific metallurgical factors or irradiation conditions (temperature, flux) on irradiation hardening and embrittlement. In addition, a number of experiments are performed to give evidence on the mechanism of irradiation hardening of these steels. However, this mechanism is still unknown due to the complexity of steel as a system. Among different methods used in radiation damage studies, the changes of mechanical properties have been mainly investigated. By using Hall-Petch's empirical relation, {sigma}{sub y}={sigma}{sub i}+k{sub y} d{sup -1/2} between lower yield stress, {sigma}{sub y}, and grain size, 2d, the information about the effect of irradiation on the parameters {sigma}{sub i} and k{sub y} is obtained. Taking as a base interpretation of {sigma}{sub i} and k{sub y} given by Petch and his co-workers it has been concluded that radiation does not change the stress to start slip but that it increase the friction that opposes the passage of free dislocations across a slip plane. In attempting to apply Hall-Petch's relation to one unirradiated ferritic steel with a carbon content higher than 0.15% some difficulties were encountered. The results obtained indicate that the influence of grain size can not be isolated from other factors introduced by the treatments used to produce different grain sizes. This paper deals with a similar problem in the case of irradiated steel. The results obtained give the changes of the mechanical properties of steel in neutron irradiation field as a function of microstructure and grain size. In addition, the mechanical properties of irradiated steel are measured after annealing at 150 deg C and 450 deg C. On the basis of

  14. Microstructure and grain size effects on irradiation hardening of low carbon steel for reactor tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milasin, N.

    1964-05-01

    Irradiation hardening of steel for reactor pressure vessels has been studied extensively during the past few years. A great number of experimental results concerning the behaviour of these steels in the radiation field and several review papers (1,2) have been published. Most of the papers deal with the effects of specific metallurgical factors or irradiation conditions (temperature, flux) on irradiation hardening and embrittlement. In addition, a number of experiments are performed to give evidence on the mechanism of irradiation hardening of these steels. However, this mechanism is still unknown due to the complexity of steel as a system. Among different methods used in radiation damage studies, the changes of mechanical properties have been mainly investigated. By using Hall-Petch's empirical relation, σ y =σ i +k y d -1/2 between lower yield stress, σ y , and grain size, 2d, the information about the effect of irradiation on the parameters σ i and k y is obtained. Taking as a base interpretation of σ i and k y given by Petch and his co-workers it has been concluded that radiation does not change the stress to start slip but that it increase the friction that opposes the passage of free dislocations across a slip plane. In attempting to apply Hall-Petch's relation to one unirradiated ferritic steel with a carbon content higher than 0.15% some difficulties were encountered. The results obtained indicate that the influence of grain size can not be isolated from other factors introduced by the treatments used to produce different grain sizes. This paper deals with a similar problem in the case of irradiated steel. The results obtained give the changes of the mechanical properties of steel in neutron irradiation field as a function of microstructure and grain size. In addition, the mechanical properties of irradiated steel are measured after annealing at 150 deg C and 450 deg C. On the basis of the experimental results obtained the relative microstructure and

  15. Anti-aging Friction of Carbonate Fault Mirror and its Microstructural Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y.; Ree, J. H.; Hirose, T.

    2017-12-01

    In our slide-hold-slide (SHS) friction tests on carbonate fault rocks, fault mirror (FM), light reflective mirror-like fault surface, shows almost zero or slightly negative aging rate of friction (`anti-aging' friction), whereas carbonate faults without FM exhibit a positive aging rate. We analyzed microstructures from three types of carbonate faults to explore the cause of the anti-aging friction of FM. The three types of fault rocks before SHS tests were made from Carrara marble; (i) FM, (ii) crushed gouge of former FM (CF), and (iii) gouge produced by pre-shearing of Carrara marble (PR). The fault zone of FM before SHS tests consists of sintered nanograin patches smeared into negative asperities of wall rocks (thickness up to 150 μm) and a sintered gouge layer between wall rocks (thickness up to 200 μm) that is composed of tightly-packed nanograins (50-500 nm in size) with triple junctions and angular-subangular fragments (a few-100 μm) of sintered nanograin aggregates. A straight and discrete Y-shear surface defines a boundary between the gouge layer and the nanograin patches or between the layer and wall rock. CF specimens before SHS tests are composed of patches of sintered nanograins as in FM specimens and a porous gouge layer with finer nanograins (a few-20 nm in size) and angular fragments of former FM. PR specimens before SHS tests are composed of damaged wall rocks and porous gouge with finer nanograins (a few-tens of μm). After SHS tests, sintered appearance of grains within the fault zones of CF and PR indicates the increase in interparticle bonding and also in contact area by grain aggregation. In contrast, the gouge layer of FM specimens after SHS tests consists mostly of angular fragments of sintered nanograin aggregates. The angular shape of the fragments indicates little increase in bonding and contact area between the fragments. Tightly sintered nanograins in FM specimens would have a lower chemical reactivity with their size coarser and

  16. The carbon footprint of behavioural support services for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anna Jo Bodurtha; Tennison, Imogen; Roberts, Ian; Cairns, John; Free, Caroline

    2013-09-01

    To estimate the carbon footprint of behavioural support services for smoking cessation: text message support, telephone counselling, group counselling and individual counselling. Carbon footprint analysis. Publicly available data on National Health Service Stop Smoking Services and per unit carbon emissions; published effectiveness data from the txt2stop trial and systematic reviews of smoking cessation services. Carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) per 1000 smokers, per lifetime quitter, and per quality-adjusted life year gained, and cost-effectiveness, including social cost of carbon, of smoking cessation services. Emissions per 1000 participants were 8143 kg CO2e for text message support, 8619 kg CO2e for telephone counselling, 16 114 kg CO2e for group counselling and 16 372 kg CO2e for individual counselling. Emissions per intervention lifetime quitter were 636 (95% CI 455 to 958) kg CO2e for text message support, 1051 (95% CI 560 to 2873) kg CO2e for telephone counselling, 1143 (95% CI 695 to 2270) kg CO2e for group counselling and 2823 (95% CI 1688 to 6549) kg CO2e for individual counselling. Text message, telephone and group counselling remained cost-effective when cost-effectiveness analysis was revised to include the environmental and economic cost of damage from carbon emissions. All smoking cessation services had low emissions compared to the health gains produced. Text message support had the lowest emissions of the services evaluated. Smoking cessation services have small carbon footprints and were cost-effective after accounting for the societal costs of greenhouse gas emissions.

  17. Formation of Medium Carbon TRIP Steel Microstructure During Annealing in the Intercritical Temperature Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokosza A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research conducted on austenite formation in the microstructure of 41MnSi6-5 TRIP steel during annealing in the intercritical temperature range. The influence of the annealing temperature on the volume fraction of retained austenite in the microstructure of the investigated steel after water quenching was also determined.

  18. Cathode-supported hybrid direct carbon fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Gurauskis, Jonas; Deleebeeck, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The direct conversion of coal to heat and electricity by a hybrid direct carbon fuel cell (HDCFC) is a highly efficient and cleaner technology than the conventional combustion power plants. HDCFC is defined as a combination of solid oxide fuel cell and molten carbonate fuel cell. This work...... investigates cathode-supported cells as an alternative configuration for HDCFC, with better catalytic activity and performance. This study aims to define the best processing route to manufacture highly efficient cathode-supported cells based on La0.75Sr0.25MnO3/yttria-stabilized zirconia infiltrated backbones...

  19. Effect of starting microstructure upon the nucleation sites and distribution of graphite particles during a graphitising anneal of an experimental medium-carbon machining steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inam, A., E-mail: aqil.ceet@pu.edu.pk; Brydson, R., E-mail: mtlrmdb@leeds.ac.uk; Edmonds, D.V., E-mail: d.v.edmonds@leeds.ac.uk

    2015-08-15

    The potential for using graphite particles as an internal lubricant during machining is considered. Graphite particles were found to form during graphitisation of experimental medium-carbon steel alloyed with Si and Al. The graphite nucleation sites were strongly influenced by the starting microstructure, whether ferrite–pearlite, bainite or martensite, as revealed by light and electron microscopy. Favourable nucleation sites in the ferrite–pearlite starting microstructure were, not unexpectedly, found to be located within pearlite colonies, no doubt due to the presence of abundant cementite as a source of carbon. In consequence, the final distribution of graphite nodules in ferrite–pearlite microstructures was less uniform than for the bainite microstructure studied. In the case of martensite, this study found a predominance of nucleation at grain boundaries, again leading to less uniform graphite dispersions. - Highlights: • Metallography of formation of graphite particles in experimental carbon steel. • Potential for using graphite in steel as an internal lubricant during machining. • Microstructure features expected to influence improved machinability studied. • Influence of pre-anneal starting microstructure on graphite nucleation sites. • Influence of pre-anneal starting microstructure on graphite distribution. • Potential benefit is new free-cutting steel compositions without e.g. Pb alloying.

  20. Micrograph evidence of meniscus solidification and sub-surface microstructure evolution in continuous-cast ultralow-carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, J.; Shin, H.-J.; Thomas, B.G.; Kim, S.-H.

    2006-01-01

    Hooks and other sub-surface features in continuous-cast ultralow-carbon steel samples were examined using optical microscopy, electron backscattering diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electron probe microanalysis techniques. Special etching reagents revealed dendrites growing from both sides of the line of hook origin. This line was found to represent the frozen meniscus and persisted into the final microstructure, as revealed by grain orientation measurements. A broken hook tip was observed in one micrograph, which explains the characteristic truncated shape of most hooks. Mold powder was found entrapped along the frozen meniscus. These results provide evidence of both solidification and subsequent overflow of the liquid steel meniscus. Thus, the instantaneous meniscus shape governs the shape and microstructure of the final hook, and the extent of the liquid steel overflow determines the shape of oscillation marks. This mechanism has important implications for the entrapment of inclusions and other surface defects

  1. Impact of Cutting Forces and Chip Microstructure in High Speed Machining of Carbon Fiber – Epoxy Composite Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Y. Allwin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced polymeric (CFRP composite materials are widely used in aerospace, automobile and biomedical industries due to their high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance and durability. High speed machining (HSM of CFRP material is needed to study the impact of cutting parameters on cutting forces and chip microstructure which offer vital inputs to the machinability and deformation characteristics of the material. In this work, the orthogonal machining of CFRP was conducted by varying the cutting parameters such as cutting speed and feed rate at high cutting speed/feed rate ranges up to 346 m/min/ 0.446 mm/rev. The impact of the cutting parameters on cutting forces (principal cutting, feed and thrust forces and chip microstructure were analyzed. A significant impact on thrust forces and chip segmentation pattern was seen at higher feed rates and low cutting speeds.

  2. Effects of carbon nanotubes on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the wrought Mg–2.0Zn alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Xiao-shu; Liu, Yong; Huang, Qiu-yu; Zeng, Gang; Zhou, Guo-hua

    2013-01-01

    The effects of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of wrought Mg alloys with of 2.0 wt% of Zn content (Mg–2.0Zn) are investigated by the optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and uniaxial tensile test. Different contents of CNTs are added separately in the as-cast ingots and as-extruded samples. The results showed that CNTs could greatly refine the microstructure of both as-cast alloy and as-extruded alloy. The tensile strength, yield strength, elongation and elasticity modulus of the alloy with CNTs were improved to different extents. Remarkably, the increase of elongation reached approximately 80%. The fracture surface of the alloy with CNTs mainly consisted of dimples with toughness rupture modes. Therefore, it suggests that CNTs could enhance the plasticity of wrought Mg–2.0Zn alloy without the reduction of strength

  3. Highly Loaded Carbon Black Supported Pt Catalysts for Fuel Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaluža, Luděk; Larsen, M.J.; Zdražil, Miroslav; Gulková, Daniela; Vít, Zdeněk; Šolcová, Olga; Soukup, Karel; Koštejn, Martin; Bonde, J.L.; Maixnerová, Lucie; Odgaard, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 256, NOV 1 (2015), s. 375-383 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7HX13003 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 303466 - IMMEDIATE Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : carbon black * fuell cell * electrocatalyst Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry , Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 4.312, year: 2015

  4. Sulfidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.; Hadders, R.H.; Gerkema, E.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Oers, van E.M.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The sulfidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalysts was studied by means of in-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy at temperatures down to 4.2 K. The catalysts were dried in two different ways and then sulfided in a flow of 10% H2S in H2 at temperatures between 293 and 773 K. Thiophene

  5. Microstructural properties of non-supported microporous ceramic membrane top-layers obtained by the sol-gel process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, Rob; de Lange, R.S.A.; Hekkink, J.H.A.; Hekkink, J.H.A.; Keizer, Klaas; Burggraaf, Anthonie; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    Dried and calcined non-supported membrane top-layers of SiO2, SiO2/TiO2, SiO2/ZrO2 (10, 20 and 30 mol% TiO2 and ZrO2, respectively) and SiO2/Al2O3 (10 mol% AlO1.5) were prepared using acid catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of alkoxides in ethanol. The microstructure was determined using nitrogen

  6. Analysis of composition and microstructural uniformity of hybrid glass/carbon fibre composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beauson, Justine; Markussen, Christen Malte; Madsen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    level are investigated. The different levels of compositions in the composites are defined and experimentally determined. The composite volume fractions are determined using an image analysis based procedure. The global fibre volume fractions are determined using a gravimetrical based method. The local...... methods, a standard deviation based method and a fast Fourier transform method, are used to quantify the difference in microstructural uniformity between composites, and to detect and quantify any repeating pattern in the composite microstructure....

  7. Gauging citizen support for a low carbon fuel standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, Ekaterina; Axsen, Jonn; Jaccard, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Since 2007, several variations of a low carbon fuel standard (LCFS) have been implemented around the world. While emerging research tends to focus on greenhouse gas emission reductions from an LCFS, no studies have assessed the policy's political acceptability—a critical component of implementation. We elicit public support for an existing LCFS in British Columbia and a hypothetical (proposed) LCFS for the rest of Canada using survey data collected from a representative sample of Canadian citizens (n=1306). Specifically, we assess: (1) citizen awareness of British Columbia's LCFS, (2) stated citizen support for the LCFS, and (3) how individual characteristics relate to levels of citizen support. We find that British Columbia's LCFS is almost unknown among British Columbia respondents, but once explained, 90% of respondents support it. We refer to this combination of low knowledge and high support as “passive support.” We find similarly broad support in all other Canadian provinces, implying that citizen opposition is unlikely in jurisdictions considering an LCFS. Statistical analysis identifies some individual characteristics associated with LCFS support, including attitudes, demographics, and contextual factors. Results indicate where policymakers might anticipate opposition if it arises due to increased policy stringency or media coverage. - Highlights: • Most citizens are unaware of British Columbia's low carbon fuel standard (LCFS). • We observe passive support: low awareness and high support of the policy. • An LCFS achieves broad support among British Columbia's and Canadian citizens. • Households relying on single occupancy vehicles are less likely to support an LCFS

  8. Effect of carbon content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of superfine Ti(C, N)-based cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ning; Liu Xuesong; Zhang Xiaobo; Zhu Longwei

    2008-01-01

    As a new kind of tool materials which appeared in the seventies last century, the Ti (C, N)-based cermets have been widely used in recent years due to many of its good properties. The microstructure of Ti(C, N)-based cermets with various carbon content were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Vickers hardness and transverse rupture strength (TRS) were also measured. An increased carbon content resulted in the finer grain size, decreased solution strength of tungsten and molybdenum in the binder phase, and a higher volume fraction of heavy (Ti, Mo, W)(C,N) cores. If the addition of carbon content is too little or too much, the phase composition of material will deviate from the normal dual phase section and lead to the formation of the third phase: η-phase if the carbon content is too low or dissociative carbon if the carbon content is too high. And the formation of the third phase will remarkably deteriorate the mechanical properties of cermets

  9. Effect of Austempering Time on the Microstructure and Carbon Partitioning of Ultrahigh Strength Steel 56NiCrMoV7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanshun Luo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrahigh strength steel 56NiCrMoV7 was austempered at 270 °C for different durations in order to investigate the microstructure evolution, carbon partitioning behaviour and hardness property. Detailed microstructure has been characterised using optical microscopy and field emission gun scanning electron microscopy. A newly developed X-ray diffraction method has been employed to dissolve the bainitic/martensitic ferrite phase as two sub-phases of different tetragonal ratios, which provides quantitative analyses of the carbon partitioning between the resultant ferrites and the retained austenite. The results show that, a short-term austempering treatment was in the incubation period of the bainite transformation, which resulted in maximum hardness being equivalent to the oil-quenching treatment. The associated microstructure comprises fine carbide-free martensitic and bainitic ferrites of supersaturated carbon contents as well as carbon-rich retained austenite. In particular, the short-term austempering treatment helped prevent the formation of lengthy martensitic laths as those being found in the microstructure of oil-quenched sample. When the austempering time was increased from 20 to 80 min, progressive decrease of the hardness was associated with the evolution of the microstructure, including progressive coarsening of bainitic ferrite, carbide precipitating inside high-carbon bainitic ferrite and its subsequent decarbonisation.

  10. Ameliorated Austenite Carbon Content Control in Austempered Ductile Irons by Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Yun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron has emerged as a notable material in several engineering fields, including marine applications. The initial austenite carbon content after austenization transform but before austempering process for generating bainite matrix proved critical in controlling the resulted microstructure and thus mechanical properties. In this paper, support vector regression is employed in order to establish a relationship between the initial carbon concentration in the austenite with austenization temperature and alloy contents, thereby exercising improved control in the mechanical properties of the austempered ductile irons. Particularly, the paper emphasizes a methodology tailored to deal with a limited amount of available data with intrinsically contracted and skewed distribution. The collected information from a variety of data sources presents another challenge of highly uncertain variance. The authors present a hybrid model consisting of a procedure of a histogram equalizer and a procedure of a support-vector-machine (SVM- based regression to gain a more robust relationship to respond to the challenges. The results show greatly improved accuracy of the proposed model in comparison to two former established methodologies. The sum squared error of the present model is less than one fifth of that of the two previous models.

  11. Carbon Dioxide Separation with Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebke, D.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Myers, C.R.; Pennline, H.W.

    2007-04-01

    Supported liquid membranes are a class of materials that allow the researcher to utilize the wealth of knowledge available on liquid properties as a direct guide in the development of a capture technology. These membranes also have the advantage of liquid phase diffusivities higher than those observed in polymeric membranes which grant proportionally greater permeabilities. The primary shortcoming of the supported liquid membranes demonstrated in past research has been the lack of stability caused by volatilization of the transport liquid. Ionic liquids, which possess high carbon dioxide solubility relative to light gases such as hydrogen, are an excellent candidate for this type of membrane since they have negligible vapor pressure and are not susceptible to evaporation. A study has been conducted evaluating the use of several ionic liquids, including 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifuoromethylsulfonyl)imide, 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium nitrate, and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium sulfate in supported ionic liquid membranes for the capture of carbon dioxide from streams containing hydrogen. In a joint project, researchers at the University of Notre Dame lent expertise in ionic liquid synthesis and characterization, and researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory incorporated candidate ionic liquids into supports and evaluated the resulting materials for membrane performance. Initial results have been very promising with carbon dioxide permeabilities as high as 950 barrers and significant improvements in carbon dioxide/hydrogen selectivity over conventional polymers at 37C and at elevated temperatures. Results include a comparison of the performance of several ionic liquids and a number of supports as well as a discussion of innovative fabrication techniques currently under development.

  12. Effect of carbon nanofillers on the microstructure and electromechanical properties of electroactive polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigamani, Nirmal Shankar

    electroactive polymers, the relatively high electrical conductivity and low breakdown limits their use for practical applications. So next step was to exploit the advantages of a conductive carbon nanostructure while controlling its network to better impact its electrical properties which could also lead to higher breakdown strength. Based on the promising impact of hybrid nanofillers on the ferroelectric polymer PVDF, a similar polymer with a relaxor ferroelectric character is considered owing to its higher inherent electroactive response and higher breakdown strength. Given that it is not broadly studied, there was a need to understand structure-property relationship of the PVDF TrFE CTFE terpolymer. Hence, the effect of processing conditions (such as annealing times and isothermal crystallization temperatures) on the microstructure and the subsequent electromechanical properties were analyzed. This structure-property analysis helped to understand the relation between the different types of crystalline phases and the degrees of crystallinity as well as to observe crystal sizes as they relate to the electric field induced strain. As a final step, the effect of the hybrid SWNT/GO on both microstructure and electromechanical properties of the terpolymer were studied. The hybrid nanofillers were chemically modified to form a covalent bond between them to improve their interaction. The morphology of the hybrid nanofillers after the chemical modification was studied for two different chemical modification routes: one using thionyl chloride, other using NHS and EDAC as catalysts. Of the two methods, the NHS and EDAC catalyst method showed a strong uniform interaction, confirmed by SEM images and FTIR results, with a shift in the peak to 1630 cm-1. Finally, the effect of hybrid SWNT and GO on the electromechanical properties were studied and, interestingly, the hybrid terpolymer nanocomposite film showed a lower electroactive strain compared to pure terpolymer at the same applied

  13. Effect of carbon content on microstructure and mechanical properties of hot-rolled low carbon 12Cr-Ni stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, H.; Ye, X.N.; Li, J.D.; Jiang, L.Z.; Liu, Z.Y.; Wang, G.D.; Wang, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Hot-rolled ultra low carbon martensite is characterized by dislocation cells substructure. → The formation of dislocation cells is attributed to high Ms and low interstitial atoms content. → Hot-rolled ultra low carbon 12Cr-Ni stainless steel has excellent impact toughness. → Delta ferrite deteriorates the impact toughness of hot-rolled 12Cr-Ni stainless steel. - Abstract: 12Cr-Ni stainless steels containing different carbon contents from 0.004 wt.% to 0.034 wt.% were hot-rolled and air-cooled. Their corresponding microstructures were observed with optical microscope and transmission electron microscope, and the Vickers hardness, tensile and impact tests were also carried out. It was found that the martensitic morphology was significantly influenced by carbon content. The as-received ultra low carbon martensite in the steel containing 0.004 wt.% C is characterized by dislocation cells substructure. The formation of dislocation cells is attributed to high martensite finishing point (above 400 deg. C) and low interstitial atoms content. On the other hand, the martensite in the steel containing 0.034 wt.% C consists mainly of typical martensite laths because of low martensite finishing point and high interstitial atoms content which hinder dislocation motion. Furthermore, carbon content has an evident effect on the mechanical properties of 12Cr-Ni steels. The hardness and strength of the as-received steels increase with an increase in carbon content, but their elongation and impact toughness decrease with the carbon content. The steel containing 0.004 wt.% C has excellent impact toughness due to the ultra low carbon content in the martensite composed of dislocation cells.

  14. Phase-field modelling of microstructure formation during the solidification of continuously cast low carbon and HSLA steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2012-07-01

    Cracking in continuous casting of steels has been one of the main problems for decades. Many of the cracks that occur during solidification are hot tears. To better understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low carbon (LCAK) and two high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel grades during the initial stage of the process where the first solidified shell is formed inside the mould and where breakouts typically occur. 2D simulation is performed using the multiphase-field software MICRESS [1], which is coupled to the thermodynamic database TCFE6 [2] and the mobility database MOB2 [2], taking into account all elements which may have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during or subsequent to solidification. The use of a moving-frame boundary condition allows travelling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. A heterogeneous nucleation model is included to permit the description of morphological transitions between the initial solidification and the subsequent columnar growth region. Furthermore, a macroscopic one-dimensional temperature solver is integrated to account for the transient and nonlinear temperature field during the initial stage of continuous casting. The external heat flux boundary conditions for this process were derived from thermal process data of the industrial slab caster. The simulation results for the three steel grades have been validated by thickness measurements of breakout shells and microstructure observation of the corresponding grades. Furthermore, the primary dendrite spacing has been measured across the whole thickness of the shell and compared with the simulated microstructures. Significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are discussed and correlated with their hot-cracking behavior.

  15. Phase-field modelling of microstructure formation during the solidification of continuously cast low carbon and HSLA steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böttger, B; Apel, M; Santillana, B; Eskin, D G

    2012-01-01

    Cracking in continuous casting of steels has been one of the main problems for decades. Many of the cracks that occur during solidification are hot tears. To better understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low carbon (LCAK) and two high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel grades during the initial stage of the process where the first solidified shell is formed inside the mould and where breakouts typically occur. 2D simulation is performed using the multiphase-field software MICRESS, which is coupled to the thermodynamic database TCFE6 and the mobility database MOB2, taking into account all elements which may have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during or subsequent to solidification. The use of a moving-frame boundary condition allows travelling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. A heterogeneous nucleation model is included to permit the description of morphological transitions between the initial solidification and the subsequent columnar growth region. Furthermore, a macroscopic one-dimensional temperature solver is integrated to account for the transient and nonlinear temperature field during the initial stage of continuous casting. The external heat flux boundary conditions for this process were derived from thermal process data of the industrial slab caster. The simulation results for the three steel grades have been validated by thickness measurements of breakout shells and microstructure observation of the corresponding grades. Furthermore, the primary dendrite spacing has been measured across the whole thickness of the shell and compared with the simulated microstructures. Significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are discussed and correlated with their hot-cracking behavior.

  16. Study creep in 4340 steels with different microstructure and plasma carbon nitridation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, A.J.; Carrer, I.R.; Barboza, M.J.R.; Baggio-Scheid, V.H.; Moura Neto, C.; Reis, D.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    From the AISI 4340 bars specimens were made-for-test of creep, they were subjected to different heat treatments for the formation of multiphase microstructures. After this initial treatment, a lot of the specimens were tested in creep. One second batch of specimens was treated with a plasma carbonitriding, and later, were also tested. The carbonitriding layer and microstructure were characterized with X-ray analysis, laser confocal microscopy and hardness testing. Tests showed that the hardness in the steel was reduced due to thermochemical treatment at 500 deg C. We observed variation in creep behavior due to different microstructures formed. After the plasma treatment, there was a considerable reduction in the rate of creep and an increase in the time required for fracture. (author)

  17. Carbon price and wind power support in Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavard, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims at characterizing the conditions of wind power deployment in order to infer a carbon price level that would provide wind power with comparable advantage over fossil fuel technologies as effective wind support policies. The analysis is conducted on Denmark after the electricity market liberalization. Probit and tobit techniques are employed to take account of a potential threshold effect. I find that the level and type of the support policy are the dominant drivers of deployment. A feed-in tariff significantly brings more wind power in than a premium policy. The additional capacity installed monthly increases by more than 1 MW for each additional €/MWh of support. This is compared to the effect of the electricity price, investment cost, interest rate and general economic activity. If the policy is a premium, I find that 23€/MWh of support in addition to electricity price is needed to observe the connection of new turbines to the grid with a 0.5 probability. I convert this support level into a carbon price of 27€/ton if wind power competes with coal, and 48€/t if it competes with gas. - Highlights: •I analyze wind power development in Denmark between 2000 and 2010. •I use probit and tobit techniques to assess the determinants of this deployment. •The level and policy type of wind power support are the main drivers. •I deduct the critical level of premium needed to trigger wind power. •I convert this into an equivalent carbon price and I find that it is below 50€/ton.

  18. Understanding the role of carbon atoms on microstructure and phase transformation of high Nb containing TiAl alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zeen; Hu, Rui; Zhang, Tiebang, E-mail: tiebangzhang@nwpu.edu.cn; Zhang, Fan; Kou, Hongchao; Li, Jinshan

    2017-02-15

    The microstructure and solidification behavior of high Nb containing TiAl alloys with the composition of Ti-46Al-8Nb-xC (x = 0.1, 0.7, 1.4, 2.5 at.%) prepared by arc-melting method have been investigated in this work. The results give evidence that the addition of carbon changes the solidification behavior from solidification via the β phase to the peritectic solidification. And carbon in solid solution enriches in the α{sub 2} phase and increases the microhardness. As the carbon content increases to 1.4 at.%, plate-shape morphology carbides Ti{sub 2}AlC (H phase) precipitate from the TiAl matrix which leads to the refinement microstructure. By aging at 1173 K for 24 h after quenching treatment, fine needle-like and granular shape Ti{sub 3}AlC (P phase) carbides are observed in the matrix of Ti-46Al-8Nb-2.5C alloy, which distribute along the lamellar structure or around the plate-shape Ti{sub 2}AlC. Transmission electron microscope observation shows that the Ti{sub 3}AlC carbides precipitate at dislocations. The phase transformation in-situ observations indicate that the Ti{sub 2}AlC carbides partly precipitate during the solid state phase transformation process. - Highlights: •Carbon changes the solidification behavior from β phase to peritectic solidification. •Dislocations in solution treated γ phase act as nucleation sites of Ti{sub 3}AlC precipitations. •Ti{sub 3}AlC precipitates as fine needle-like or granular shape in the solution treated matrix. •Ti{sub 2}AlC carbides precipitate during the solid state phase transformation process.

  19. Microstructure and partitioning behavior characteristics in low carbon steels treated by hot-rolling direct quenching and dynamical partitioning processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yun-jie; Li, Xiao-lei; Yuan, Guo; Kang, Jian; Chen, Dong; Wang, Guo-dong

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a new process and composition design are proposed for “quenching and partitioning” or Q&P treatment. Three low carbon steels were treated by hot-rolling direct quenching and dynamical partitioning processes (DQ&P). The effects of proeutectoid ferrite and carbon concentration on microstructure evolution and mechanical properties were investigated. The present work obtained DQ&P prototype steels with good mechanical properties and established a new notion on compositions for Q&P processing. Microstructures were characterized by means of electro probe microanalyzer (EPMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), especially the morphology and size of retained austenite. Mechanical properties were measured by uniaxial tensile tests. The results indicated that introducing proeutectoid ferrite can increase the volume fraction of retained austenite and thus improve mechanical properties. TEM observation showed that retained austenite included the film-like inter-lath austenite and blocky austenite located in martensite/ferrite interfaces or surrounded by ferrites. It was interesting that when the carbon concentration is as low as ~ 0.078%, the film-like inter-lath untransformed austenite cannot be stabilized to room temperature and almost all of them transformed into twin martensite. The blocky retained austenite strengthened the interfaces and transformed into twin martensite during the tensile deformation process. The PSEs of specimens all exceeded 20 GPa.%. - Highlights: •This study focused on a new process: Q&P process applying dynamical partitioning. •Ferrite can increase the volume fraction of retained austenite. •The film-like austenite and the blocky austenite were observed. •The low carbon steels treated by new process reached PSEs higher than 20 GPa.%.

  20. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of low-carbon steel treated by a two-step quenching and partitioning process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Shu [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling & Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, Xianghua, E-mail: liuxh@mail.neu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling & Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Research Academy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, Wayne J [Research Academy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Lan, Huifang; Wu, Hongyan [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling & Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2015-07-29

    The quenching and partitioning (Q&P) process is studied in Ti-bearing low-carbon steel. Detailed characterization of the microstructural evolution is performed by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results indicate that the investigated steel subjected to the Q&P process forms a multiphase microstructure of primarily lath martensite, with small amounts of plate-type martensite and retained austenite. The distribution and morphology of the retained austenite are observed; moreover the relationship between the phase fraction of the retained austenite, its carbon concentration, and the partitioning conditions is established. Carbides preferentially precipitate within the plate-type martensite at first, and gradually form in the martensitic laths over time during the partitioning step. Additionally, titanium precipitations contribute to both the refinement of prior austenite grains and the improvement of strength by precipitation strengthening. The results of mechanical properties testing indicate that the samples partitioned at 400 °C exhibit a superior combination of strength and elongation, with products of the two properties ranging between 19.6 and 20.9 GPa%. Based on analysis of work hardening behavior it is determined that the higher ductility is closely related to the higher phase fraction and/or stability of retained austenite.

  1. Carbon fiber microelectrodes modified with carbon nanotubes as a new support for immobilization of glucose oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, H.; Nallathambi, V.; Chakraborty, D.; Barton, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Carboxylated carbon nanotubes were coated onto carbon microfiber electrodes to create a micron-scale bioelectrode. This material has a high surface area and can serve as a support for immobilization of enzymes such as glucose oxidase. A typical carbon nanotube loading of 13 μg cm -1 yields a coating thickness of 17 μm and a 2000-fold increase in surface capacitance. The modified electrode was further coated with a biocatalytic hydrogel composed of a conductive redox polymer, glucose oxidase, and a crosslinker to create a glucose bioelectrode. The current density on oxidation of glucose is 16.6 mA cm-2 at 0.5 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) in oxygen-free glucose solution. We consider this approach to be useful for designing and characterizing surface treatments for carbon mats and papers by mimicking their local microenvironment. (author)

  2. Self-supported carbon electrodes obtained by tape casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubio-Marcos, F.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the preparation and electrochemical response of self-supported carbon electrodes prepared by tape casting. The dc electrical conductivity, σ, of the electrodes was determined by four-wire resistance measurements and a relation between the graphite/organic additives ratio and the electrical conductivity was established. The application of these self-supported carbon electrodes as working electrodes in analytical techniques was also evaluated using norepinephrine as electroactive substance in cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The results were compared with the traditional electrodes, carbon paste electrodes (CPEs, showing that the new self-supported carbon electrodes had both lower background noise and higher analytical response.

    Este artículo describe la preparación y respuesta electroquímica de electrodos de carbono autosoportados preparados mediante colado en cinta. La conductividad eléctrica en corriente continua de este nuevo tipo de electrodos de carbono se ha determinado usando el método de cuatro puntas y se ha establecido una relación ente la relación grafito/aditivos orgánicos y la conductividad eléctrica. La aplicación de estos electrodos autosoportados como electrodos de trabajo en diversas técnicas electroanalíticas también se ha evaluado, empleando norepinefrina como analito en voltametría cíclica y en cronoamperometría. Los resultados se compararon con los obtenidos empleando los electrodos de pasta de carbono tradicionales como electrodos de trabajo, viéndose que la señal de los nuevos electrodos autosoportados poseía menor ruido de fondo y mayor respuesta analítica.

  3. Advanced microstructures based on poly(trimethylene carbonate) microfabrication and stereolithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schüller-Ravoo, S.

    2011-01-01

    There is an evident need in the biomedical field to develop (new) materials with tailored properties for specific applications. In addition it is essential to be able to process these materials into desired two- and three-dimensional shapes and (micro)structures. Microfabrication, and especially

  4. Microstructure and wear behavior of austempered high carbon high silicon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharya Palaksha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, the influence of austempering temperature and time on the microstructure and dry sliding wear behavior of high silicon steel was studied. The test specimens were initially austenitised at 900°C for 30 minutes, thereafter austempered at various temperatures 280°C, 360°C and 400°C, for varying duration from 30 to 120 minutes. These samples after austempering heat treatment were subsequently air cooled to room temperature, to generate typical ausferritic microstructures and then correlated with the wear property. The test outcomes demonstrate the slight increase in specific wear rate with increase in both austempering temperature and time. Specific wear rate was found to be minimum at an austempering temperature of 280°C, that exhibits lower bainite microstructure with high hardness, on the other hand specific wear rate was found to be slightly high at increased austempering temperatures at 360°C and 400°C, due to the upper bainite structure that offered lower hardness to the matrix. The sample austempered at 280°C for 30 minutes offered superior wear resistance when compared to other austempering conditions, mainly due to the presence of fine acicular bainitic ferrite along with stabilized retained austenite and also some martensite in the microstructure.

  5. Effect of cerium addition on microstructures of carbon-alloyed iron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    All the alloys exhibited a typical two-phase microstructure consisting of Fe3AlC carbides in an iron aluminide matrix. In the alloy without Ce addition, large bulky carbides were equally distributed throughout the matrix with many smaller precipitates interspersed in between. In the alloy with Ce addition, the carbide grain sizes ...

  6. EFFECT OF STRAIN RATE ON MICROSTRUCTURE OF A LOW CARBON STEEL WIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H BOUHALAIS

    2011-12-01

    microstructure of the material in as received and deformed conditions. It is found that tensile properties depend on the wiredrawing area reduction (τw. The annealing temperatures and the grain size are determined; they also vary with τw .

  7. Activated carbon-supported CuO nanoparticles: a hybrid material for carbon dioxide adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruban, Cansu; Esenturk, Emren Nalbant

    2018-03-01

    Activated carbon-supported copper(II) oxide (CuO) nanoparticles were synthesized by simple impregnation method to improve carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption capacity of the support. The structural and chemical properties of the hybrid material were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray diffraction (https://www.google.com.tr/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CCsQFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.intertek.com%2Fanalytical-laboratories%2Fxrd%2F&ei=-5WZVYSCHISz7Aatqq-IAw&usg=AFQjCNFBlk-9wqy49foh8tskmbD-GGbG9g&sig2=eKrhYjO75rl_Id2sLGpq4w&bvm=bv.96952980,d.bGg) (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses. The analyses showed that CuO nanoparticles are well-distributed on the activated carbon surface. The CO2 adsorption behavior of the activated carbon-supported CuO nanoparticles was observed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and BET analyses. The results showed that CuO nanoparticle loading on activated carbon led to about 70% increase in CO2 adsorption capacity of activated carbon under standard conditions (1 atm and 298 K). The main contributor to the observed increase is an improvement in chemical adsorption of CO2 due to the presence of CuO nanoparticles on activated carbon.

  8. Multi-Scale Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of High Carbon Eutectic Tantalum Carbide Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    found to increase with SPS temperature in other materials such as hydroxyapatite [35]. At the SPS temperature of 1850 ◦C, the grain size was found to...sample. Hardness and elasticmodulus are found to increase by 22% and 18% respectively for 100MPa samples by addition of long CNTs. Raman spectroscopy...accelerating voltage of 300kV was used to study the microstructure. To study the effect of the processing conditions on the CNT structure, micro- Raman

  9. Effect of oxygen and hydrogen on microstructure of pyrolytic carbon deposited from thermal decomposition of methane and ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Biyun; Zhang, Shouyang; He, LiQun; Gu, Shengyue

    2018-05-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is the most extensive industrial preparation of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites. Precursor affects the CVI process considerably. In the present study, using carbon fiber bundles as preforms, methane and ethanol as precursors, the C/C composites were densified by decomposition of various gases in CVI. The thickness and texture of deposited pyrolytic carbon (PyC) were characterized by polarized light microscopy (PLM). The microstructure of PyC was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. The morphologies of PyC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The composition of PyC was detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Adding hydrogen in methane precursor resulted in a sharp decrease in the deposition rate and texture of PyC. Mixture of methane and ethanol as the precursor improved the deposition rate and texture remarkably. Besides, O element in ethanol was not remained as a constitution of PyC, and it was removed before the formation of PyC.

  10. Characterization of a surface modified carbon cryogel and a carbon supported Pt catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BILJANA M. BABIĆ

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A carbon cryogel, synthesized by carbonization of a resorcinol/formaldehyde cryogel and oxidized in nitric acid, was used as catalyst support for Pt nano-particles. The Pt/C catalyst was prepared by a modified polyol synthesis method in an ethylene glycol (EG solution. Characterization by nitrogen adsorption showed that the carbon cryogel support and the Pt/C catalyst were mesoporous materials with high specific surface areas (SBET > 400 m2 g-1 and large mesoporous volumes. X-Ray diffraction of the catalyst demonstrated the successful reduction of the Pt precursor to metallic form. TEM Images of the Pt/C catalyst and Pt particle size distribution showed that the mean Pt particle size was about 3.3 nm. Cyclic voltammetry (CV experiments at various scan rates (from 2 to 200 mV s-1 were performed in 0.5 mol dm-3 HClO4 solution. The large capacitance of the oxidized carbon cryogel electrode, which arises from a combination of the double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance, associated with the participation of surface redox-type reactions was demonstrated. For the oxidized carbon cryogel, the total specific capacitance determined by 1/C vs. ν0.5 extrapolation method was found to be 386 F g-1. The hydrogen oxidation reaction at the investigated Pt/C catalyst proceeded as an electrochemically reversible, two-electron direct discharge reaction.

  11. Microstructure Evolution and Chemical Analysis on Carbon Steels and Fe-Cr-Mo Alloys after FAC Simulation Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seunghyun; Kim, Taeho; Lee, Yun Ju; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) is an environment assisted degradation of structural materials, which usually occurs in pipelines of power plants. There have been many studies to investigate the fundamental mechanism and corresponding countermeasures against FAC, and recently the carbon steels have been replaced by ASTM A 335 P22, which contains approximately 2.2 wt.% of Cr and 1 wt.% of Mo. By enhancing passivity of P22 by Cr, it is reported that FAC rate has been greatly reduced. However, while corrosion behavior of Fe-based alloys is relatively well known, their behavior under high-temperature flowing water is not well investigated. In other words, effects of Cr and its corrosion and oxidation behavior is not clearly revealed. Furthermore, it is known that Mo enhances the pitting corrosion resistance of alloys however its mechanism is not clearly investigated. Recently, replacement of Mo in alloy contents has been widely studied because of the cost of Mo. Carbon steels undergo severe environmental-assisted degradation behavior so called FAC, and as its countermeasure the carbon steel has been replaced by P22 which contains Cr and Mo. It is generally known that Cr and Mo enhances passivity of Fe-based alloys however their corrosion and oxidation behavior has not been fully investigated especially in high-temperature flowing water environments. In this study, we employed HRTEM and synchrotron XAS techniques in order to investigate detailed microstructure evolution and chemical bonding of the commercialized carbon steel and the Fe-Cr-Mo alloys. From the analysis, it is found that while carbon steels exhibit porous oxide P22 exhibit oxide structures with thin Cr-rich oxide and spinel. Therefore, carbon steel undergoes severe FAC compared to P22 however effects of Cr and Mo and their behavior in high-temperature flowing water will be investigated.

  12. Microstructural investigations of zirconium oxide—on core–shell structure of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Kaushik; Kang, Dong Jin; Kim, Jin Kuk

    2011-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotubes/ZrO 2 nanocomposites were obtained by isothermal hydrolyzing and chemical precipitation method for both the carbon nanotubes. The coating was taken place by dispersion of both the carbon nanotubes in ZrOCl 2 ·8H 2 O aqueous solution. However, a highly conformal and uniform monoclinic zirconia coating was deposited on multi-walled carbon nanotubes rather than single-walled carbon nanotubes by this new and simple method. Also, it has been observed that the thickness of the individual carbon nanotube after zirconia coating was increased by isothermal hydrolyzing process rather than traditional chemical precipitation method and it has been confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study.

  13. Microstructure and mechanical properties of nickel coated multi walled carbon nanotube reinforced stainless steel 316L matrix composites by laser sintering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanthesha, P.; Mohankumar, G. C.

    2018-04-01

    Electroless Ni coated Multi-walled Carbon nanotubes reinforced with Stainless Steel 316L matrix composite was developed by Direct Metal Laser Sintering process (DMLS). Homogeneous mixture of Stainless Steel 316L powder and carbon nanotubes in different vol. % was obtained by using double cone blender machine. Characterization of electroless Ni coated carbon nanotubes was done by using X-ray diffraction, FESEM and EDS. Test samples were fabricated at different laser scan speeds. Effect of process parameters and CNT vol. % content on solidification microstructure and mechanical properties of test samples was investigated by using Optical microscopy, FESEM, and Hounsfield tensometer. Experimental results reveal DMLS process parameters affect the density and microstructure of sintered parts. Dense parts with minimum porosity when processed at low laser scan speeds and low CNT vol. %. Tensile fractured surface of test specimens evidences the survival of carbon nanotubes under high temperature processing condition.

  14. Microstructural characteristics and toughness of the simulated coarse grained heat affected zone of high strength low carbon bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan Liangyun; Qiu Chunlin; Zhao Dewen; Gao Xiuhua; Du Linxiu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Total toughness can be separated into crack initiation energy and crack propagation energy. → Small effective grain size of lath martensite can improve the crack propagation energy. → MA constituent is mainly responsible for the low toughness of coarse bainite specimens. → High angle packet boundary in coarser bainite has few contributions to improving crack propagation energy. - Abstract: The correlation of microstructural characteristics and toughness of the simulated coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ) of low carbon bainitic steel was investigated in this study. The toughness of simulated specimens was examined by using an instrumented Charpy impact tester after the simulation welding test was conducted with different cooling times. Microstructure observation and crystallographic feature analysis were conducted by means of optical microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) system, respectively. The main microstructure of simulated specimen changes from lath martensite to coarse bainite with the increase in cooling time. The deterioration of its toughness occurs when the cooling time ranges from 10 to 50 s compared with base metal toughness, and the toughness becomes even worse when the cooling time increases to 90 s or more. The MA (martensite-austenite) constituent is primary responsible for the low toughness of simulated CGHAZ with high values of cooling time because the large MA constituent reduces the crack initiation energy significantly. For crack propagation energy, the small effective grain size of lath martensite plays an important role in improving the crack propagation energy. By contrast, high misorientation packet boundary in coarse bainite seems to have few contributions to the improvement of the toughness because cleavage fracture micromechanism of coarse bainite is mainly controlled by crack initiation.

  15. Microstructural characteristics and toughness of the simulated coarse grained heat affected zone of high strength low carbon bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan Liangyun, E-mail: lly.liangyun@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Qiu Chunlin; Zhao Dewen; Gao Xiuhua; Du Linxiu [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2011-11-25

    Highlights: {yields} Total toughness can be separated into crack initiation energy and crack propagation energy. {yields} Small effective grain size of lath martensite can improve the crack propagation energy. {yields} MA constituent is mainly responsible for the low toughness of coarse bainite specimens. {yields} High angle packet boundary in coarser bainite has few contributions to improving crack propagation energy. - Abstract: The correlation of microstructural characteristics and toughness of the simulated coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ) of low carbon bainitic steel was investigated in this study. The toughness of simulated specimens was examined by using an instrumented Charpy impact tester after the simulation welding test was conducted with different cooling times. Microstructure observation and crystallographic feature analysis were conducted by means of optical microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) system, respectively. The main microstructure of simulated specimen changes from lath martensite to coarse bainite with the increase in cooling time. The deterioration of its toughness occurs when the cooling time ranges from 10 to 50 s compared with base metal toughness, and the toughness becomes even worse when the cooling time increases to 90 s or more. The MA (martensite-austenite) constituent is primary responsible for the low toughness of simulated CGHAZ with high values of cooling time because the large MA constituent reduces the crack initiation energy significantly. For crack propagation energy, the small effective grain size of lath martensite plays an important role in improving the crack propagation energy. By contrast, high misorientation packet boundary in coarse bainite seems to have few contributions to the improvement of the toughness because cleavage fracture micromechanism of coarse bainite is mainly controlled by crack initiation.

  16. Effect of carbon additive on microstructure evolution and magnetic properties of epitaxial FePt (001) thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Y.F.; Chen, J.S.; Liu, E.; Lim, B.C.; Hu, J.F.; Liu, B.

    2009-01-01

    FePt:C thin films were deposited on CrRu underlayers by DC magnetron co-sputtering. The effects of C content, FePt:C film thickness and substrate temperature on the microstructural and magnetic properties of the epitaxial FePt (001) films were studied. Experimental results showed that even with 30 vol.% C doping, the FePt films could keep a (001) preferred orientation at 350 deg. C . When a FePt:C film was very thin (< 5 nm), the film had a continuous microstructure instead of a granual structure with C diffused onto the film surface. With further increased film thickness, the film started to nucleate and formed a column microstructure over continuous FePt films. A strong exchange coupling in the FePt:C films was believed to be due to the presence of a thin continuous FePt layer attributed to the carbon diffusion during the initial stage of the FePt:C film growth. Despite the presence of a strong exchange coupling in the FePt:C (20 vol.% C) film, the SNR ratio of the FePt:C media was about 10 dB better than that of the pure FePt media. The epitaxial growth of the FePt:C films on the Pt layers was observed from high resolution TEM cross sectional images even for the films grown at about 200 deg. C . The TEM images did not show an obvious change in the morphology of the FePt:C films deposited at different temperatures (from 200 deg. C to 350 deg. C ), though the ordering degree and coercivity of the films increased with increased substrate temperature

  17. Nitrogen: Unraveling the Secret to Stable Carbon-Supported Pt-Alloy Electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    release; distribution is unlimited. Nitrogen: unraveling the secret to stable carbon-supported Pt- alloy electrocatalysts The views, opinions and/or...Nitrogen: unraveling the secret to stable carbon-supported Pt-alloy electrocatalysts Report Title Nitrogen functionalities significantly improve...design and optimization of next generation high performance catalyst materials. Nitrogen: unraveling the secret to stable carbon-supported Pt-alloy

  18. Analysis of microstructural variation and mechanical behaviors in submerged arc welded joint of high strength low carbon bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Liangyun, E-mail: lly.liangyun@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Qiu, Chunlin; Zhao, Dewen; Gao, Xiuhua; Du, Linxiu [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Microstructural variation in high strength low carbon bainitic steel weldment was investigated in detail by means of optical microscope, transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with electron backscattered diffraction. The results showed that the welded joint has various microstructures such as acicular ferrite, coarse granular ferrite and fine polygonal ferrite. The martensite-austenite (MA) constituent has a variable structure in each sub-zone, which includes fully martensite and fully retained austenite. Meanwhile, the fine grained heat affected zone has higher content of retained austenite than the welded metal (WM) and coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ). The orientation relationship between retained austenite and product phases in the WM and CGHAZ is close to Kurdjumov-Sachs relationship. However, the polygonal ferrite in the fine grained HAZ has no specific orientation relationship with the neighboring retained austenite. The toughness of the coarse grained region is much lower than that of the WM because the coarse bainite contains many large MA constituents to assist the nucleation of microcracks and coarse cleavage facet lowers the ability to inhibit the crack propagation.

  19. Effect of supercritical carbon dioxide pasteurization on natural microbiota, texture, and microstructure of fresh-cut coconut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrentino, Giovanna; Balzan, Sara; Dorigato, Andrea; Pegoretti, Alessandro; Spilimbergo, Sara

    2012-05-01

    The objective of the present study was the evaluation of the effectiveness of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) as a nonthermal technology for the pasteurization of fresh-cut coconut, as an example of ready-to-eat and minimally processed food. First, the inactivation kinetics of microbiota on coconut were determined using SC-CO(2) treatments (pressures at 8 and 12 MPa, temperatures from 24 to 45 °C, treatment times from 5 to 60 min). Second, the effects of SC-CO(2) on the hardness and microstructure of fresh-cut coconut processed at the optimal conditions for microbial reduction were investigated. SC-CO(2) treatment of 15 min at 45 °C and 12 MPa induced 4 log CFU/g reductions of mesophilic microorganisms, lactic acid bacteria, total coliforms, and yeasts and molds. The hardness of coconut was not affected by the treatment but the samples developed an irregular and disorderly microstructure. Results suggested the potential of SC-CO(2) in preserving fresh-cut fruits and ready-to-eat products. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Effect of microstructure on the cleavage fracture strength of low carbon Mn-Ni-Mo bainitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Young-Roc; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Oh, Yong Jun; Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, Hu-Chul

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the microstructure on the cleavage fracture strength of low carbon Mn-Ni-Mo bainitic steels were examined. A four-point bend test and double-notched bend specimens were used to measure the cleavage fracture strength of the alloys and identify the cleavage initiating micro-cracks, respectively. The cleavage fracture strength and DBTT of Mn-Ni-Mo bainitic steels were strongly affected by the alloy carbon content. The decrease in the alloy carbon content resulted in a decrease in the inter-lath cementite-crowded layers and higher cleavage fracture strength. Micro-cracks that formed across the inter-lath cementite-crowded layers were observed to initiate cleavage fracture. The width of these inter-lath cementite-crowded layers was accepted as a cleavage initiating micro-crack size in the micro-mechanical modeling of the cleavage fracture, and the measured cleavage strength values of the bainitic Mn-Ni-Mo steels were well represented by the modified Griffith relationship

  1. Modeling and Synthesis Support for the North American Carbon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, L.; Cook, R. B.; Thornton, P. E.; Post, W. M.; Wilson, B. E.; Dadi, U.

    2007-12-01

    The Modeling and Synthesis Thematic Data Center (MAST-DC) supports the North American Carbon Program by providing data products and data management services needed for modeling and synthesis activities. The overall objective of MAST-DC is to provide advanced data management support to NACP investigators doing modeling and synthesis, thereby freeing those investigators from having to perform data management functions. MAST-DC has compiled a number of data products for North America, including sub-pixel land-water content, daily meteorological data, and soil, land cover, and elevation data. In addition, we have developed an internet-based WebGIS system that enables users to browse, query, display, subset, and download spatial data using a standard web browser. For the mid-continent intensive, MAST-DC is working with a group of data assimilation modelers to generate a consistent set of meteorological data to drive bottom-up models.

  2. Effect of carbon and manganese on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Rong, Lijian; Li, Dianzhong; Lu, Shanping

    2017-03-01

    Six 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals with different carbon and manganese contents have been studied to reveal the role of major elements, which guide for the design of welding consumables for reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel and meet for the requirements of accelerator driven systems-lead fusion reactors. The typical microstructure for the 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals is the lath martensite along with the fine stripe δ-ferrite. The chemical compositions influence the solidification sequence and therefore, change the δ-ferrite content in the deposited metal. The impact toughness for the 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals decreases remarkably when the δ-ferrite content is more than 5.2 vol%, also the impact toughness decreases owing to the high quenching martensite formation. Increasing the level of manganese addition, α phase of each alloy shifts to the bottom right according to the CCT diagram.

  3. Effect of Deformation Temperature on Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Low-Carbon High-Mn Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Grajcar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the influence of deformation temperature in a range from −40°C to 200°C on the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of a low-carbon high-manganese austenitic steel. The temperature range was chosen to cope at the time during sheet processing or car crash events. Experimental results show that yield stress and ultimate tensile strength gradually deteriorate with an increase in the tensile testing temperature. The dominant mechanism responsible for the strain hardening of steel changes as a function of deformation temperature, which is related to stacking fault energy (SFE changes. When the deformation temperature rises, twinning decreases while a role of dislocation slip increases.

  4. Microstructural research on hot strips of low carbon steel produced by a compact strip production line under different thermal histories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hao; Chen Qixiang; Kang Yonglin; Sun Yi

    2005-01-01

    Coupons with the same composition and thickness (4.0 mm nominal gauge) obtained from hot strips of low carbon steel underwent a series of investigations to analyze the microstructural characteristics and mechanisms responsible for their differences in mechanical properties. Two different industrial technologies were adopted, although the strips used in this research were produced on the same Compact Strip Production (CSP) line. One of the strips was produced with a routine γ→α CSP thermal history, but the other with a γ→α→γ* conventional thermal history. The only difference between them was that one technology had a α→γ* thermal history. Different specimens of both types of strips were prepared for metallographic observation, tensile tests, electron back-scattered diffraction tests and positron annihilation technique tests. Experimental results showed that the differences in mechanical properties could be ascribed to dissimilarities not only in the grain size and textural components but also in dislocation density

  5. Effects of heat treatment influencing factors on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shaohong; Yuan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Wen; Sun, Hudai; Li, Jun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Zhao, Kunyu, E-mail: zhaokunyu.kmust@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Yang, Maosheng [Department of Structural Materials, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-05-01

    The effects of different heat treatment parameters and cryogenic treatment (−75 °C) on microstructural changes and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel were investigated. These analyses were performed via the optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results showed that the execution of cryogenic treatment on quenched and tempered bearing steel increases hardness, tensile strength and decreases toughness with the increment of cryogenic treatment and tempering cycles. This paper also showed that the cryogenic cycle's treatment incorporating tempering can refine the martensite laths resulting in improvement of tensile strength. In addition, cryogenic treatment further reduces the retained austenite content but it cannot make retained austenite transform into martensite completely even tempering at high temperature.

  6. Effects of heat treatment influencing factors on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shaohong; Yuan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Wen; Sun, Hudai; Li, Jun; Zhao, Kunyu; Yang, Maosheng

    2014-01-01

    The effects of different heat treatment parameters and cryogenic treatment (−75 °C) on microstructural changes and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel were investigated. These analyses were performed via the optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results showed that the execution of cryogenic treatment on quenched and tempered bearing steel increases hardness, tensile strength and decreases toughness with the increment of cryogenic treatment and tempering cycles. This paper also showed that the cryogenic cycle's treatment incorporating tempering can refine the martensite laths resulting in improvement of tensile strength. In addition, cryogenic treatment further reduces the retained austenite content but it cannot make retained austenite transform into martensite completely even tempering at high temperature

  7. Micro-structural evolution and biomineralization behavior of carbon nanofiber/bioactive glass composites induced by precursor aging time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaolong; Tang, Tianhong; Cheng, Dan; Zhang, Cuihua; Zhang, Ran; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2015-12-01

    Bioactive glass (BG)-containing carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are promising orthopaedic biomaterials. Herein, CNF composites were produced from electrospinning of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/BG sol-gel precursor solution, followed by carbonization. Choosing 58S-type BG (mol%: 58.0% SiO2-26.3% CaO-15.7% P2O5) as the model, micro-structural evolution of CNF/BG composites was systematically evaluated in relating to aging times of BG precursor solution. With aging time prolonging, BG precursors underwent morphological changes from small sol clusters with loosely and randomly branched structure to highly crosslinked Si-network structure, showing continuous increase in solution viscosity. BG precursor solution with low viscosity could mix well with PAN solution, resulting in CNF composite with homogeneously distributed BG component. Whereas, BG precursor gel with densely crosslinked Si-network structure led to uneven distribution of BG component along final CNFs due to its significant phase separation from PAN component. Meanwhile, BG nanoparticles in CNFs demonstrated micro-structural evolution that they transited from weak to strong crystal state along with longer aging time. Biomineralization in simulated body fluid and in vitro osteoblasts proliferation were then applied to determine the bioactivity of CNF/BG composites. CNF/BG composites prepared from shorter aging time could induce both faster apatite deposition and cell proliferation rate. It was suggested weakly crystallized BG nanoparticles along CNFs dissolved fast and was able to provide numerous nucleation sites for apatite deposition, which also favored the proliferation of osteoblasts cells. Aging time could thus be a useful tool to regulate the biological features of CNF/BG composites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Micro-CT in situ study of carbonate rock microstructural evolution for geologic CO2 storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yi; Yang, Yan; Rogowska, M.

    2017-01-01

    settings such as the carbonate reservoirs in the North Sea. The final aim of our project is to find out how to control the evolution of petrophysical parameters during CO2 injection using an optimal combination of flow rate, injection pressure and chemical composition of the influent. The first step...... to achieve this is to find a suitable condition to create a stable 3D space in carbonate rock by injecting liquid to prepare space for the later CO2 injection. Micro-CT imaging is a non-destructive 3D method that can be used to study the property changes of carbonate rocks during and after CO2 injection...

  9. The microstructure and morphology of carbon black: A study using small angle neutron scattering and contrast variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjelm, R.P. Jr.; Seeger, P.A.; Wampler, W.A.; Gerspacher, M.

    1994-01-01

    This is a study of the microstructure of particles of an experimental high surface area carbon black (HSA) and of the morphology of the particle aggregates using small-angle neutron scattering and the method of contrast variation. Contrast variation was effected by studying suspensions of the carbon black in cyclohexane containing different fractions of deuterocyclohexane. We find that the approximately 29 nm diameter HSA particles are arranged as small, linear aggregates with average aggregation number between 4 and 6. The structure averaged over the particle population is best represented by a prolate ellipsoid of revolution with semi axes 14.5 and 76.4 nm. The surface of the aggregates appears smooth over length scales longer than 1 nm, which places an upper limit on the surface roughness observed by other methods. The intemal structure of the aggregates is described by a shell-core model, with the shell density being consistent with a graphitic structure and the core being of lower density, more like amorphous carbon. Some fraction of the core volume (0.1 to 0.2) is taken up by voids that are not accessible to the solvent. An estimate of the shell thickness gives 1 to 2 nm along the ellipsoid minor axis and 6 to 10 nm along the major axis. The particles of the aggregate appear to be fused so that the less dense amorphous core is continuous through the inner parts of the aggregate. The information that can be obtained on the internal structure using contrast variation is limited by nonheterogeneity in the chemical composition of carbon black aggregates

  10. Influence of Nitrogen Gas Flow Rate on The Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Tin Deposited Carbon Steel Synthesized by Cae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mubarak

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the preparation of titanium nitride (TiN thin films on carbon steel plates, using cathodic arc evaporation CAE PVD technique. We studied and discussed the effect of various nitrogen gas flow rates on microstructural and mechanical properties of TiN-coated carbon steel plates. The coating properties investigated in this work included the surface morphology, thickness of deposited coating, adhesion between the coating and substrate, coating composition, coating crystallography, hardness and surface characterization using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX, Xray diffraction (XRD with glazing incidence angle (GIA technique, scratch tester, hardness testing machine, surface roughness tester and atomic force microscope (AFM. SEM analyses showed that all the films had columnar and dense structures with clearly defined substrate-film interfacial layers. The hardness of TiN-coated carbon steel was noted six times more than the hardness of uncoated one. An increase in nitrogen gas flow rate showed; decrease in the formation of macro-droplets, average roughness (Ra and root-mean-square (RMS values in CAE PVD technique. During XRD-GIA studies, it was observed that by increasing the nitrogen gas flow rate, the main peak [1,1,1] shifted toward the lower angular position. Microhardness of TiN-coated carbon steel showed about six times increase in hardness than the uncoated one. Scratch tester results showed an average adhesion between the coating material and substrate. Thanks to the high resolution power could be observed that by increasing nitrogen gas flow rate there was percentage increase in the bearing ratio while percentage decrease in histogram.

  11. Effect of carbon content on formation of bimodal microstructure and mechanical properties of low-carbon steels subjected to heavy-reduction single-pass hot/warm deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyung-Won, E-mail: wonipark@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Komaba 4-6-1, Meguro-ku 153-8505, Tokyo (Japan); Yanagimoto, Jun [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Komaba 4-6-1, Meguro-ku 153-8505, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    A compression test simulating heavy-reduction single-pass rolling was conducted to investigate the microstructural evolution based on the formation of a bimodal structure and the mechanical properties of 0.01% and 0.1% carbon steels and niobium steel. When thermomechanical processing was conducted near and above the critical transformation temperature (A{sub c3}), microstructures of all steels were significantly refined and consisted of equiaxed grains without elongated grains. Nevertheless, these microstructures showed weak or no formation of the bimodal structure or coarse grains with decreasing carbon content, while they showed bimodal structure formation when 0.2% carbon steel was used in our previous research. The average grain size of Nb steel was about 2 μm and its microstructure was uniformly refined. These may be attributed to a decrease in the number of nucleation sites with decreasing carbon content in low-carbon steels and the occurrence of nucleation at grain boundaries as well as in grain interiors in Nb steel during processing. Mechanical properties of all steels deformed above the critical transformation temperature exhibited high performance characteristics with superior strength and marked elongation. Their fractographs indicated ductile fracture, which was revealed by SEM observation after a tensile test.

  12. Microstructure and mechanical performance of modified mortar using hemp fibres and carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Rabah; Guessasma, Sofiane; Mecheri, Boubakeur; Eshtiaghi, Amir M.; Bennabi, Abdelkrim

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical performance of modified mortar using hemp fibres is studied following various processing conditions. Hemp fibres combined with carbon nanotubes (CNT) are introduced in mortar and their effect is studied as function of curing time

  13. Mechanical, Microstructure and Surface Characterizations of Carbon Fibers Prepared from Cellulose after Liquefying and Curing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Ma

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Cellulose-based carbon fibers (CBCFs were prepared from cellulose after phenol liquefaction and curing. The characteristics and properties of CBCFs were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The results showed that, with increasing carbonization temperature, the La, Lc, and Lc/d(002 of CBCFs increased gradually, whereas the degree of disorder R decreased. The –OH, –CH2–, –O–C– and phenyl group characteristic absorption peaks of CBCFs reduced gradually. The cross-linked structure of CBCFs was converted into a graphite structure with a six-ring carbon network during carbonization. The surface of CBCFs were mainly comprised of C–C, C–O, and C=O. The tensile strength, carbonization yield and carbon content of CBCFs obtained at 1000 °C were 1015 MPa, 52%, and 95.04%, respectively.

  14. Nano carbon supported platinum catalyst interaction behavior with perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer and their interface structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    2016-01-01

    behavior of Nafion ionomer on platinized carbon nano fibers (CNFs), carbon nano tubes (CNTs) and amorphous carbon (Vulcan). The interaction is affected by the catalyst surface oxygen groups as well as porosity. Comparisons between the carbon supports and platinized equivalents are carried out. It reveals......The interaction between perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer and supported platinum catalyst is essential. It directly influences platinum accessibility, stability of carbon support and platinum, proton conductivity and electron conductivity in an electrode. In this study, we compare the adsorption...... that the platinization step modifies the surface nature of the carbon supports in terms of specific surface area, crystallinity and especially porosity; therefore, ionomer adsorption over carbon is not always representative for the ionomer adsorption over carbon supported catalyst, though indicative. Moreover...

  15. Relationship between carbon microstructure, adsorption energy and hydrogen adsorption capacity at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacek Jagiello; Matthias Thommes

    2005-01-01

    Various microporous materials such as activated carbons, nano-tubes, synthetic microporous carbons as well as metal organic framework materials are being considered for hydrogen storage applications by means of physical adsorption. To develop materials of practical significance for hydrogen storage it is important to understand the relationships between pore sizes, adsorption energies and adsorption capacities. The pore size distribution (PSD) characterization is traditionally obtained from the analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms measured at 77 K. However, a portion of the pores accessible to H 2 may not be accessible to N 2 at this temperature. Therefore, it was recently proposed to use the DFT analysis of H 2 adsorption isotherms to characterize pore structure of materials considered for hydrogen storage applications. In present work, adsorption isotherms of H 2 and N 2 at cryogenic temperatures are used for the characterization of carbon materials. Adsorption measurements were performed with Autosorb 1 MP (Quantachrome Instruments, Boynton Beach, Florida, USA). As an example, Fig 1 compares PSDs calculated for the activated carbon sample (F400, Calgon Carbon) using combined H 2 and N 2 data, and using N 2 isotherm only. The nitrogen derived PSD does not include certain amount of micropores which are accessible to H 2 but not to N 2 molecules. Obviously, the difference in the calculated PSDs by the two methods will depend on the actual content of small micropores in a given sample. Carbon adsorption properties can also be characterized by the isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, related to the adsorption energy and dependent on the carbon pore/surface structure. Fig 2 shows Qst data calculated using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation from H 2 isotherms measured at 77 K and 87 K for the carbon molecular sieve CMS 5A (Takeda), oxidized single wall nano-tubes (SWNT), and graphitized carbon black (Supelco). The Qst values decrease with increasing pore sizes. The

  16. Electroreduction of oxygen on carbon-supported gold catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erikson, Heiki; Juermann, Gea; Sarapuu, Ave; Potter, Robert J.; Tammeveski, Kaido

    2009-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of oxygen was studied on Au/C catalysts (20 and 30 wt%) in 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 and 0.1 M KOH solutions using the rotating disk electrode (RDE) method. The thickness of the Au/C-Nafion layers was varied between 1.5 and 10 μm. The specific activity of Au was independent of catalyst loading in both solutions, indicating that the transport of reactants through the catalyst layer does not limit the process of oxygen reduction under these conditions. The mass activity of 20 wt% Au/C catalysts was higher due to smaller particle size. The number of electrons involved in the reaction and the Tafel slopes were found; the values of these parameters are similar to that of bulk polycrystalline gold and indicate that the mechanism of O 2 reduction is not affected by carbon support or the catalyst configuration.

  17. The Effect of Prestrain Temperature on Kinetics of Static Recrystallization, Microstructure Evolution, and Mechanical Properties of Low Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Edris; Karimi Taheri, Kourosh; Karimi Taheri, Ali

    2018-05-01

    In this research, the samples of a low carbon steel sheet were rolled up to a thickness prestrain of 67% at three different temperatures consisted of room, blue brittleness, and subzero temperature. Microhardness, SEM, and tensile tests were carried out to evaluate the static recrystallization kinetics defined by the Avrami equation, microstructural evolution, and mechanical properties. It was found that the Avrami exponent is altered with change in prestrain temperature and it achieves the value of 1 to 1. 5. Moreover, it was indicated that prestraining at subzero temperature followed by annealing at 600 °C leads to considerable enhancement in tensile properties and kinetics of static recrystallization compared to room and blue brittleness temperatures. The prestraining at blue brittleness temperature followed by annealing treatment caused, however, a higher strength and faster kinetics compared with that at room temperature. It was concluded that although from the steel ductility point of view, the blue brittleness temperature is called an unsuitable temperature, but it can be used as prestraining temperature to develop noticeable combination of strength and ductility in low carbon steel.

  18. Microstructure and Property of Mn-Nb-B Low Carbon Bainite High Strength Steel Under Ultra-fast Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Bing-xing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the Mn-Nb-B low carbon bainite high strength steel with the reducing production technology as the research target, the deformation behavior and phase transformation behavior were studied by the thermal simulation testing machine. Combining with the characteristics of the medium and heavy plate production line, the controlled rolling and controlled cooling technology based on ultra-fast cooling were designed to produce low cost high strength construction machinery steel with superior comprehensive mechanical properties. The strengthening mechanisms such as grain refinement strengthening, precipitation strengthening are effective to produce the Mn-Nb-B low carbon bainite high strength steel. The yield strength and tensile strength of the product reach to 678MPa and 756 MPa respectively, the elongation A50 is 33% and the impact energy at -20℃ is 261J. The microstructure of the steel is composed of granular bainite, acicular ferrite and lath bainite. A large number of fine, point, granular M/A constituents and dislocation structures dispersively distributed inside the matrix, and also tiny and dispersed (Nb,Ti (C,N precipitates are observed by transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Synthesis of SiC microstructures in Si technology by high dose carbon implantation: Etch-stop properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serre, C.; Perez-Rodriguez, A.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.; Calvo-Barrio, L.; Morante, J.R.; Esteve, J.; Acero, M.C.; Skorupa, W.; Koegler, R.

    1997-01-01

    The use of high dose carbon ion implantation in Si for the production of membranes and microstructures is investigated. Si wafers were implanted with carbon doses of 10 17 and 5 x 10 17 cm -2 , at an energy of 300 keV and a temperature of 500 C. The structural analysis of these samples revealed the formation of a highly stable buried layer of crystalline β-SiC precipitates aligned with the Si matrix. The etch-stop properties of this layer have been investigated using tetramethyl-ammonium hydroxide as etchant solution. Secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements performed on the etched samples have allowed an estimate of the minimum dose needed for obtaining an etch-stop layer to a value in the range 2 to 3 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 . This behavior has been explained assuming the existence of a percolation process in a SiC/Si binary system. Finally, very thin crystalline membranes and self-standing structures with average surface roughness in the range 6 to 7 nm have been obtained

  20. The microstructure of type 304 stainless steel implanted with titanium and carbon and its relation to friction and wear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Pope, L.E.; Knapp, J.A.; Picraux, S.T.; Yost, F.G.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have used transmission electron microscopy to examine the microstructure of type 304 stainless steel which was ion implanted with high doses (2 X 10 17 atoms cm -2 ) of titanium and carbon. It is found that the resulting surface alloy is an amorphous phase similar to that observed when pure iron is identically implanted. This result is important for identifying the mechanisms by which the coefficient of friction and the wear depth are reduced in unlubricated pin-on-disc tests of type 304 stainless steel implanted with titanium and carbon. The effect of temperature on the amorphous alloy during annealing in the microscope has also been examined. It is found that devitrification begins after 15 min at 500 0 C and that the alloy fully crystallizes into f.c.c., b.c.c. and TiC phases after 15 min at 650 0 C. A comparison of mechanical test results from devitrified specimens with results from amorphous specimens demonstrates that the reduction in the coefficient of friction correlates with the presence of the amorphous layer, whereas the reduction in the wear depth is obtained for both amorphous and crystalline alloys. (Auth.)

  1. Methanol and ethanol electrooxidation on Pt and Pd supported on carbon microspheres in alkaline media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Changwei; Cheng, Liqiang; Liu, Yingliang [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Nanochemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Shen, Peikang [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2007-05-15

    Noble metal (Pt, Pd) electrocatalysts supported on carbon microspheres (CMS) are used for methanol and ethanol oxidation in alkaline media. The results show that noble metal electrocatalysts supported on carbon microspheres give better performance than that supported on carbon black. It is well known that palladium is not a good electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation, but it shows excellently higher activity and better steady-state electrolysis than Pt for ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline media. The results show a synergistic effect by the interaction between Pd and carbon microspheres. The Pd supported on carbon microspheres in this paper possesses excellent electrocatalytic properties and may be of great potential in direct ethanol fuel cells. (author)

  2. Morphology, Microstructure, and Hydrogen Content of Carbon Nanostructures Obtained by PECVD at Various Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Acosta Gentoiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures were obtained by acetylene injection into an argon plasma jet in the presence of hydrogen. The samples were synthesized in similar conditions, except that the substrate deposition temperatures TD were varied, ranging from 473 to 973 K. A strong dependence of morphology, structure, and graphitization upon TD was found. We obtained vertical aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs at low temperatures as 473 K, amorphous carbon nanoparticles (CNPs at temperatures from about 573 to 673 K, and carbon nanowalls (CNWs at high temperatures from 773 to 973 K. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used to substantiate the differences in these material types. It is known that hydrogen concentration modifies strongly the properties of the materials. Different concentrations of hydrogen-bonded carbon could be identified in amorphous CNP, VA-CNT, and CNW. Also, the H : C ratios along depth were determined for the obtained materials.

  3. A high-performance mesoporous carbon supported nitrogen-doped carbon electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingjing; Lu, Shiyao; Chen, Xu; Wang, Jianan; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xinyu; Xiao, Chunhui; Ding, Shujiang

    2017-12-01

    Investigating low-cost and highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) is of crucial importance for energy conversion and storage devices. Herein, we design and prepare mesoporous carbon supported nitrogen-doped carbon by pyrolysis of polyaniline coated on CMK-3. This electrocatalyst exhibits excellent performance towards ORR in alkaline media. The optimized nitrogen-doped mesoporous electrocatalyst show an onset potential (E onset) of 0.95 V (versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) and half-wave potential (E 1/2) of 0.83 V (versus RHE) in 0.1 M KOH. Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst presents superior durability and methanol tolerance compared to commercial Pt/C indicating its potential applications in fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

  4. Effect of microstructural variation on the Cu/CK45 carbon steel friction weld joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.B.; Jung, S.B. [Advanced Materials and Process Research Center for IT, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Gyounggi-do (Korea)

    2003-12-01

    The mechanical properties of friction-welded pure Cu/CK45 carbon steel joints have been studied. The joint strength increased with increasing upset pressure till it reached a critical value. However, the joint strength was fixed at a low strength with increasing friction time, compared to that of the Cu base metal. The hardness near the interface at the Cu side was softer than that of the base metal due to the dynamically recrystallized and annealed grain. The width of the softened region became wider with increasing friction time and decreasing upset pressure. But the hardness of the CK45 carbon steel side showed a slightly higher value than that of the base metal. This result was explained by the formation of martensite structure at the CK45 carbon steel side during the welding process. (orig.)

  5. Flexible and self-powered temperature-pressure dual-parameter sensors using microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Zang, Yaping; Huang, Dazhen; di, Chong-An; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-09-01

    Skin-like temperature- and pressure-sensing capabilities are essential features for the next generation of artificial intelligent products. Previous studies of e-skin and smart elements have focused on flexible pressure sensors, whereas the simultaneous and sensitive detection of temperature and pressure with a single device remains a challenge. Here we report developing flexible dual-parameter temperature-pressure sensors based on microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric (MFSOTE) materials. The effective transduction of temperature and pressure stimuli into two independent electrical signals permits the instantaneous sensing of temperature and pressure with an accurate temperature resolution of cost and large-area fabrication, make MFSOTE materials possess promising applications in e-skin and health-monitoring elements.

  6. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of aluminum reinforced with carbon-coated silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Sanchez, R.; Reyes-Gasga, J.; Caudillo, R.; Garcia-Gutierrez, D.I.; Marquez-Lucero, A.; Estrada-Guel, I.; Mendoza-Ruiz, D.C.; Jose Yacaman, M.

    2007-01-01

    Composites of pure aluminum with carbon-coated silver nanoparticles (Ag-C NP) of 10 nm in size were prepared by the mechanical milling process. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the Ag-C NP are homogeneously dispersed into the Al matrix, silver nanoparticles do not coalesce, grow or dissolve in the aluminum matrix due the carbon shell. The values of yield strength (σ y ), maximum strength (σ max ) and micro-hardness Vickers (HVN) of the composites were evaluated and reported as a function of Ag-C NP content. It has been found that the introduction of this type of particles in aluminum strengthen it, increasing all the previous parameters

  7. Effects of carbon and molybdenum on the microstructures of high chromium white cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinatora, Amilton; Ambrosio Filho, Francisco; Goldenstein, Helio; Fuoco, Ricardo; Albertin, Eduardo; Mei, Paulo Roberto

    1992-01-01

    The effects of 3 levels of carbon and 1.5% Mo addition on the solidification structures of a 15% chromium white cast iron were studied. The volume fraction of primary austenite and of eutectic carbides, as well as the number of carbide particles per unit length and the mean secondary dendrite arm spacing were measured. By means of thermal analysis, thermal arrest corresponding to the formation of the primary austenite and of the eutectic were determined. The increase in the carbon content and the addition of Mo led to lowering of the thermal arrests and to coarsening of the particles. (author)

  8. Preparation and electrochemistry of graphene nanosheets–multiwalled carbon nanotubes hybrid nanomaterials as Pd electrocatalyst support for formic acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Sudong; Shen Chengmin; Lu Xiangjun; Tong Hao; Zhu Jiajia; Zhang Xiaogang; Gao Hongjun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Graphene nanosheets–MWCNTs (GNS–CNTs) composites as Pd electrocatalysts support were synthesized by in situ reduction method. ► The direct electrooxidation of HCOOH is improved on the GNS–CNTs based catalyst. ► Both activity and durability of GNS–CNTs based catalyst are improved greatly. ► Pd/GNS–CNTs catalysts exhibit excellent performance when the mass ratio of GO to CNTs is 5:1. - Abstract: Graphene nanosheets–MWCNTs (GNS–CNTs) composites were synthesized by in situ reduction method, and then palladium nanoparticles (NPs) were supported on the GNS–CNTs by a microwave-assisted polyol process. Microstructure measurements showed that the graphene nanosheets and the CNTs formed a uniform nanocomposite with CNTs absorbed on the graphene nanosheets surface and/or filled between the graphene nanosheets. Compared to Pd/Vulcan XC-72R carbon, Pd/GNS, or Pd/CNTs catalysts, the Pd/GNS–CNTs catalysts exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity and stability for formic acid electro-oxidation when the mass ratio of GO to CNTs is 5:1. The superior performance of Pd/GNS–CNTs catalysts may arise from large surface area utilization for NPs and enhanced electronic conductivity of the supports. Therefore, the GNS–CNTs composite should be a promising carbon material for application as electrocatalyst support in fuel cells.

  9. Relationship between carbon microstructure, adsorption energy and hydrogen adsorption capacity at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagiello, J.; Thommes, M.

    2005-01-01

    Various microporous materials such as activated carbons, nano-tubes, synthetic micro-porous carbons as well as metal organic framework materials are being considered for hydrogen storage applications by means of physical adsorption. To develop materials of practical significance for hydrogen storage it is important to understand the relationships between pore sizes, adsorption energies and adsorption capacities. The pore size distribution (PSD) characterization is traditionally obtained from the analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms measured at 77 K. However, a portion of the pores accessible to H 2 may not be accessible to N 2 at this temperature. Therefore, it was recently proposed to use the DFT analysis of H 2 adsorption isotherms to characterize pore structure of materials considered for hydrogen storage applications [1]. In present work, adsorption isotherms of H 2 and N 2 at cryogenic temperatures are used for the characterization of carbon materials. Adsorption measurements were performed with Autosorb 1 MP [Quantachrome Instruments, Boynton Beach, Florida, USA]. As an example, Fig 1 compares PSDs calculated for the activated carbon sample (F400, Calgon Carbon) using combined H 2 and N 2 data, and using N 2 isotherm only. The nitrogen derived PSD does not include certain amount of micro-pores which are accessible to H 2 but not to N 2 molecules. Obviously, the difference in the calculated PSDs by the two methods will depend on the actual content of small micro-pores in a given sample. Carbon adsorption properties can also be characterized by the isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, related to the adsorption energy and dependent on the carbon pore/surface structure. Fig 2 shows Qst data calculated using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation from H 2 isotherms measured at 77 K and 87 K for the carbon molecular sieve CMS 5A (Takeda), oxidized single wall nano-tubes (SWNT) [2], and graphitized carbon black (Supelco). The Qst values decrease with increasing pore

  10. Magnetic Carbon Supported Palladium Nanoparticles: An Efficient and Sustainable Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; the catalyst can be used for the hydrogenation of alkenes and reduction of aryl nitro compounds.

  11. Stability of retained austenite in multi-phase microstructure during austempering and its effect on the ductility of a low carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Z.J.; Ren, Y.Q.; Zhou, W.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Yang, J.R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shang, C.J., E-mail: cjshang@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, Institute for Material Research and Innovation, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The contribution of multi-phase microstructure and retained austenite on mechanical properties of austempered and intercritical annealed Fe–0.23C–1.8Mn–1.35Si (wt%) steel was studied. The multi-phase microstructure comprised of intercritical ferrite (IF), bainite/martensite, and retained austenite. During austempering, the retained austenite was stabilized, which was studied using a combination of experimental (XRD, TEM) and thermodynamic analysis. The termination of bainitic transformation combined with carbon rejection into residual austenite during the second step austempering treatment is believed to be the underlying basis for stabilization of retained austenite. This led to significant increase in uniform and total elongation (25% and 36%, respectively) and the product of tensile strength and % elongation was 33 GPa%. The work hardening behavior of retained austenite exhibited a three-stage process such that necking was delayed. The increased work hardening rate is attributed to the multi-phase microstructure and TRIP effect.

  12. Effects of carbon concentration on microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast nickel-free Co–28Cr–9W-based dental alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Kenta; Mori, Manami; Chiba, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    We determined the effects of carbon concentration on the microstructures and tensile properties of the Ni-free Co–29Cr–9W–1Si–C (mass%) cast alloys used in dental applications. Alloy specimens prepared with carbon concentrations in the range 0.01–0.27 mass% were conventionally cast. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) revealed that precipitates had formed in all the alloy specimens. The σ phase, a chromium-rich intermetallic compound, had formed in the region between the dendrite arms of the low-carbon-content (e.g., 0.01C) alloys. Adding carbon to the alloys increased the amount of interdendritic precipitates that formed and changed the precipitation behavior; the precipitated phase changed from the σ phase to the M 23 C 6 carbide with increasing carbon concentration. Adding a small amount of carbon (i.e., 0.04 mass%) to the alloys dramatically enhanced the 0.2% proof stress, which subsequently gradually increased with increasing content of carbon in the alloys. Elongation-to-failure, on the other hand, increased with increasing carbon content and showed a maximum at carbon concentrations of ∼ 0.1 mass%. The M 23 C 6 carbide formed at the interdendritic region may govern the tensile properties of the as-cast Co–Cr–W alloys similar to how it governed those of the hot-rolled alloys prepared in our previous study. - Highlights: • Microstructure and tensile properties of C-doped Co–Cr–W cast alloys was studied. • Adding carbon stabilized the γ matrix and changed the precipitation behavior. • Formation of carbide precipitates strengthened C-doped Co–Cr–Mo alloys. • A maximum tensile elongation was obtained at carbon concentrations of ∼0.1 mass%

  13. Microstructure and tribological behavior of tungsten-containing diamondlike carbon coated rubbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Zhou, Xiao; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2008-01-01

    Tungsten-containing diamondlike carbon (W-DLC) coatings have been deposited on FKM (fluorocarbon), ACM (acrylate), and HNBR (hydrogenated nitrile butadiene) rubbers via unbalanced magnetron reactive sputtering from a WC target in C2H2/Ar plasma. The surface morphology and, fracture cross sections of

  14. Microstructural investigations on carbonate fault core rocks in active extensional fault zones from the central Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinovis, Silvia; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Storti, Fabrizio

    2017-04-01

    The study of the microstructural and petrophysical evolution of cataclasites and gouges has a fundamental impact on both hydraulic and frictional properties of fault zones. In the last decades, growing attention has been payed to the characterization of carbonate fault core rocks due to the nucleation and propagation of coseismic ruptures in carbonate successions (e.g., Umbria-Marche 1997, L'Aquila 2009, Amatrice 2016 earthquakes in Central Apennines, Italy). Among several physical parameters, grain size and shape in fault core rocks are expected to control the way of sliding along the slip surfaces in active fault zones, thus influencing the propagation of coseismic ruptures during earthquakes. Nevertheless, the role of grain size and shape distribution evolution in controlling the weakening or strengthening behavior in seismogenic fault zones is still not fully understood also because a comprehensive database from natural fault cores is still missing. In this contribution, we present a preliminary study of seismogenic extensional fault zones in Central Apennines by combining detailed filed mapping with grain size and microstructural analysis of fault core rocks. Field mapping was aimed to describe the structural architecture of fault systems and the along-strike fault rock distribution and fracturing variations. In the laboratory we used a Malvern Mastersizer 3000 granulometer to obtain a precise grain size characterization of loose fault rocks combined with sieving for coarser size classes. In addition, we employed image analysis on thin sections to quantify the grain shape and size in cemented fault core rocks. The studied fault zones consist of an up to 5-10 m-thick fault core where most of slip is accommodated, surrounded by a tens-of-meters wide fractured damage zone. Fault core rocks consist of (1) loose to partially cemented breccias characterized by different grain size (from several cm up to mm) and variable grain shape (from very angular to sub

  15. Preparation of Pt–Ru bimetallic catalyst supported on carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of carbon nanotube (Iijima 1991) was first based on the carbon-arc method, though the carbon nanotube prepared by this method are more graphitic, the low yield and rela- tively small length (< 1 m) make the production cost very high. The template synthesis method (Martin 1994) and catalytic production methods (Jose et ...

  16. Platinum/ceria/alumina catalysts on microstructures for carbon monoxide conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germani, G.; Schuurman, Y.; Mirodatos, C. [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse, CNRS, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne (France); Alphonse, P.; Courty, M. [CIRIMAT, UMR-CNRS 5085, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)

    2005-12-15

    Platinum/ceria/alumina catalysts have been prepared by a sol-gel method and coated in the microchannels of stainless steel platelets. These catalysts are very active for the water-gas shift reaction between 300 and 400{sup o}C. Moreover, they are non-pyrophoric and thus well suited for the purification of hydrogen for PEM fuel cells. The obtained coatings show good adherence and catalytic activity. The influence of the amount of platinum and ceria as well as the effect of a binder on the catalytic performance has been investigated. The samples have been characterized before reaction by XRD, SEM and by N{sub 2} adsorption measurements. The kinetics, free from internal diffusion limitations, over these thin films have been described by a power law rate equation. An activation energy of 86kJ/mol has been found and at 260{sup o}C the TOF corresponds to 0.6+/-0.1s{sup -1} for all investigated samples. The superior activity of the platelets compared to the powder samples is attributed to the diffusion limitations inside the powder pellets. Thus catalysts deposited on microstructured platelets lead to a better platinum utilization.

  17. The microstructure and mechanical properties of multilayer diamond-like carbon films with different modulation ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhaoying; Zheng, Y.J.; Jiang, F.; Leng, Y.X.; Sun Hong; Huang Nan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The multilayer DLC films with different modulation ratios have been fabricated by FCVA. ► The multilayer DLC films can effectively decrease the residual stress of the DLC films. ► The multilayer DLC film with modulation ratio of 1:1 shows the best wear resistance. - Abstract: The multilayer DLC films consisting of sp 2 -rich DLC layers (soft DLC) and sp 3 -rich DLC layers (hard DLC) with different modulation ratios (thickness ratio of the hard DLC to soft DLC) ranging from 2:1, 1:1 to 1:2 had been deposited on Si (1 0 0) wafer and Ti–6Al–4V alloy substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition. The effect of modulation ratio on the microstructure and properties of the multilayer DLC films including sp 3 content, residual stress, mechanical properties, adhesion strength and wear resistance were studied by Raman spectroscopy, profilometry technique, nanoindenter, Vickers indentation test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ball-on-disc reciprocating friction test. The results showed that the sp 3 content and the hardness of the multilayer DLC films decreased with modulation ratios decreasing. The stress of the multilayer DLC films could be effectively reduced and the stress decreased with the modulation ratio decreasing. The multilayer DLC film with modulation ratio of 1:1 had the best wear resistance due to a balance between hardness and residual stress.

  18. Basic metal carbonate supported gold nanoparticles: enhanced performance in aerobic alcohol oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, J.; Guan, Y.; Verhoeven, M.W.G.M.; Santen, van R.A.; Li, Can; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles supported by basic hydrozincite or bismuth carbonate are excellent catalysts for liquid-phase aerobic alcohol oxidation: the performance of a series of metal (Zn, Bi, Ce, La, Zr) carbonate supported gold catalysts depends strongly on the basicity of the support material.

  19. Underground coal gasification with integrated carbon dioxide mitigation supports Bulgaria's low carbon energy supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaten, Natalie; Kempka, Thomas; Azzam, Rafig

    2013-04-01

    Underground coal gasification allows for the utilisation of coal reserves that are economically not exploitable due to complex geological boundary conditions. The present study investigates underground coal gasification as a potential economic approach for conversion of deep-seated coals into a high-calorific synthesis gas to support the Bulgarian energy system. Coupling of underground coal gasification providing synthesis gas to fuel a combined cycle gas turbine with carbon capture and storage is considered to provide substantial benefits in supporting the Bulgarian energy system with a competitive source of energy. In addition, underground voids originating from coal consumption increase the potential for geological storage of carbon dioxide resulting from the coupled process of energy production. Cost-effectiveness, energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions of this coupled process are investigated by application of a techno-economic model specifically developed for that purpose. Capital (CAPEX) and operational expenditure (OPEX) are derived from calculations using six dynamic sub-models describing the entire coupled process and aiming at determination of the levelised costs of electricity generation (COE). The techno-economic model is embedded into an energy system-modelling framework to determine the potential integration of the introduced low carbon energy production technology into the Bulgarian energy system and its competitiveness at the energy market. For that purpose, boundary conditions resulting from geological settings as well as those determined by the Bulgarian energy system and its foreseeable future development have to be considered in the energy system-modelling framework. These tasks comprise integration of the present infrastructure of the Bulgarian energy production and transport system. Hereby, the knowledge on the existing power plant stock and its scheduled future development are of uttermost importance, since only phasing-out power

  20. Microstructure and mechanical performance of modified mortar using hemp fibres and carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Rabah

    2014-04-01

    Mechanical performance of modified mortar using hemp fibres is studied following various processing conditions. Hemp fibres combined with carbon nanotubes (CNT) are introduced in mortar and their effect is studied as function of curing time. The cement phase is replaced by different percentages of dry or wet hemp fibres ranging from 1.1. wt% up to 3.1. wt% whereas carbon nanotubes are dispersed in the aqueous solution. Our experimental results show that compressive and flexural strengths of wet fibres modified mortar are higher than those for dry hemp-mortar material. The achieved optimal percentage of wet hemp fibres is 2.1. wt% allowing a flexural strength higher than that of reference mortar. The addition of an optimal CNT concentration (0.01. wt%) combined with wet hemp has a reinforcing effect which turns to be related to an improvement of compressive and flexural strengths by 10% and 24%, respectively, in comparison with reference condition. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Microstructural analysis of carbon nanotubes produced from pyrolysis/combustion of styrene-butadiene rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Joner O.; Zhuo, Chuanwei; Levendis, Yannis A. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Coll. of Engineering. Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Tenorio, Jorge A.S. [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Polytechnic School. Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Styrene-Butadiene-Rubber (SBR) is a synthetic rubber copolymer used to fabricate several products. This study aims to demonstrate the use of SBR as feedstock for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) growth, and therefore to establish a novel process for destination for wastes produced from SBR. Pellets of this rubber were controlled burned at temperature of 1000 deg C, and a catalyst system was used to synthesize the nanomaterials. CNTs are materials with a wide range of potential applications due to their extraordinary mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Produced materials were characterized by SEM and TEM, and the hydrocarbons emissions were measured using GC. Results showed that materials with diameters of 30-100 nm and lengths of about 30 {mu}m were formed. That materials presented similar structures of multi-walled CNTs. Therefore, the use of SBR to produce carbon nanotubes showed quite satisfactory and an interesting field for future investments. (author)

  2. Effect of carbon additions on the as-cast microstructure and defect formation of a single crystal Ni-based superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jarba, K.A.; Fuchs, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to reduce grain defects in large single crystal Ni-base superalloy components, carbon is intentionally added. In this study, the effect of carbon additions on the microstructure and solidification defect formation of a model Ni-based superalloy, LMSX-1, was examined. The results show that the tendency of the alloy to form all types of solidification defects decreased as the carbon content increased. The as-cast microstructures also exhibited a decrease in the amount of γ-γ' eutectic structure and an increase in the volume fraction of carbides and porosity, as the carbon content was increased. The carbides formed in these alloys were mostly of script-type MC carbides which formed continuous, dendritic networks in the interdendritic region. Microprobe analysis of the as-cast structures showed that the partitioning coefficients did not change with carbon additions. Therefore, the reduction in defect formation with increasing carbon content could not be attributed to changes in segregation behavior of alloying elements. Instead, the presence of these carbides in the interdendritic regions of the alloy appeared to have prevented the thermosolutal fluid flow

  3. Study on microstructure of transition zone and its strong contrast of single T700 carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xinshuang; Zhang, Kexiang [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Fan, Zhen; Feng, Zhihai [National Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Composite Materials, Aerospace Research Institute of Materials and Processing Technology, Beijing 100076 (China); He, LianLong, E-mail: llhe@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • The transition zone of T700 carbon fiber was first identified with higher density in addition to higher orientation. • The higher sample density still existed while the higher orientation disappeared after heat treatment at 2800 °C. • The strong contrast of the transition zone mainly results from its higher density. • The transition zone with higher density and orientation may exist not only in the T700 but other PAN-based carbon fibers. - Abstract: The transition zone (TZ) between the skin and core of Toray T700 carbon fiber was investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The higher basal-plane orientation was identified in the TZ compared with the skin and core, but it disappeared after heat treatment at 2800 °C. Plasmon peak energy in the TZ was higher than that in the skin and core about 0.7–0.8 eV, indicating the TZ with higher density. No element concentration existed in the TZ. The TZ with strong contrast manifests itself before and after heat treatment, and formation mechanism of its strong contrast was proposed.

  4. Functionalized Natural Carbon-Supported Nanoparticles as Excellent Catalysts for Hydrocarbon Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Guo, Lisheng; Ma, Qingxiang; Gao, Xinhua; Yamane, Noriyuki; Xu, Hengyong; Tsubaki, Noritatsu

    2017-02-01

    We report a one-pot and eco-friendly synthesis of carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles, achieved by carbonization of waste biomass (rice bran) with a cobalt source. The functionalized biomass provides carbon microspheres as excellent catalyst support, forming a unique interface between hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups. The latter, involving hydroxyl and amino groups, can catch much more active cobalt nanoparticles on surface for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis than chemical carbon. The loading amount of cobalt on the final catalyst is much higher than that prepared with a chemical carbon source, such as glucose. The proposed concept of using a functionalized natural carbon source shows great potential compared with conventional carbon sources, and will be meaningful for other fields concerning carbon support, such as heterogeneous catalysis or electrochemical fields. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Metal oxide coating of carbon supports for supercapacitor applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Tribby, Louis, J (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Lakeman, Charles D. E. (TPL, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Han, Sang M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Lambert, Timothy N.; Fleig, Patrick F. (TPL, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-07-01

    The global market for wireless sensor networks in 2010 will be valued close to $10 B, or 200 M units. TPL, Inc. is a small Albuquerque based business that has positioned itself to be a leader in providing uninterruptible power supplies in this growing market with projected revenues expected to exceed $26 M in 5 years. This project focused on improving TPL, Inc.'s patent-pending EnerPak{trademark} device which converts small amounts of energy from the environment (e.g., vibrations, light or temperature differences) into electrical energy that can be used to charge small energy storage devices. A critical component of the EnerPak{trademark} is the supercapacitor that handles high power delivery for wireless communications; however, optimization and miniaturization of this critical component is required. This proposal aimed to produce prototype microsupercapacitors through the integration of novel materials and fabrication processes developed at New Mexico Technology Research Collaborative (NMTRC) member institutions. In particular, we focused on developing novel ruthenium oxide nanomaterials and placed them into carbon supports to significantly increase the energy density of the supercapacitor. These improvements were expected to reduce maintenance costs and expand the utility of the TPL, Inc.'s device, enabling New Mexico to become the leader in the growing global wireless power supply market. By dominating this niche, new customers were expected to be attracted to TPL, Inc. yielding new technical opportunities and increased job opportunities for New Mexico.

  6. Microstructure and high-temperature tribological properties of Si-doped hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng Fei; Wan, Zhi Xin; Ding, Ji Cheng; Zhang, Shihong; Wang, Qi Min; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2018-03-01

    Si-doped DLC films have attracted great attention for use in tribological applications. However, their high-temperature tribological properties remain less investigated, especially in harsh oxidative working conditions. In this study, Si-doped hydrogenated DLC films with various Si content were synthesized and the effects of the addition of Si on the microstructural, mechanical and high-temperature tribological properties of the films were investigated. The results indicate that Si doping leads to an obvious increase in the sp3/sp2 ratio of DLC films, likely due to the silicon atoms preferentially substitute the sp2-hybridized carbon atoms and augment the number of sp3 sites. With Si doping, the mechanical properties, including hardness and adhesion strength, were improved, while the residual stress of the DLC films was reduced. The addition of Si leads to higher thermal and mechanical stability of DLC films because the Si atoms inhibit the graphitization of the films at an elevated temperature. Better high-temperature tribological properties of the Si-DLC films under oxidative conditions were observed, which can be attributed to the enhanced thermal stability and formation of a Si-containing lubricant layer on the surfaces of the wear tracks. The nano-wear resistance of the DLC films was also improved by Si doping.

  7. Effect of carbon and manganese on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 110016, Shenyang (China); Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 110016, Shenyang (China); Rong, Lijian [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 110016, Shenyang (China); Li, Dianzhong [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 110016, Shenyang (China); Lu, Shanping, E-mail: shplu@imr.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 110016, Shenyang (China); Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 110016, Shenyang (China)

    2017-03-15

    Six 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals with different carbon and manganese contents have been studied to reveal the role of major elements, which guide for the design of welding consumables for reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel and meet for the requirements of accelerator driven systems-lead fusion reactors. The typical microstructure for the 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals is the lath martensite along with the fine stripe δ-ferrite. The chemical compositions influence the solidification sequence and therefore, change the δ-ferrite content in the deposited metal. The impact toughness for the 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals decreases remarkably when the δ-ferrite content is more than 5.2 vol%, also the impact toughness decreases owing to the high quenching martensite formation. Increasing the level of manganese addition, α phase of each alloy shifts to the bottom right according to the CCT diagram. - Highlights: • The typical deposited metals is the lath martensite with the fine stripe δ-ferrite. • The impact toughness is dependent on the δ-ferrite and the high quenching martensite. • The chemical compositions influence the solidification sequence.

  8. Influence of deposition temperature and amorphous carbon on microstructure and oxidation resistance of magnetron sputtered nanocomposite Crsbnd C films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, Kristian; Andersson, Matilda; Högström, Jonas; Fredriksson, Wendy; Edström, Kristina; Nyholm, Leif; Jansson, Ulf

    2014-06-01

    It is known that mechanical and tribological properties of transition metal carbide films can be tailored by adding an amorphous carbon (a-C) phase, thus making them nanocomposites. This paper addresses deposition, microstructure, and for the first time oxidation resistance of magnetron sputtered nanocomposite Crsbnd C/a-C films with emphasis on studies of both phases. By varying the deposition temperature between 20 and 700 °C and alternating the film composition, it was possible to deposit amorphous, nanocomposite, and crystalline Crsbnd C films containing about 70% C and 30% Cr, or 40% C and 60% Cr. The films deposited at temperatures below 300 °C were X-ray amorphous and 500 °C was required to grow crystalline phases. Chronoamperometric polarization at +0.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl (sat. KCl) in hot 1 mM H2SO4 resulted in oxidation of Crsbnd C, yielding Cr2O3 and C, as well as oxidation of C. The oxidation resistance is shown to depend on the deposition temperature and the presence of the a-C phase. Physical characterization of film surfaces show that very thin C/Cr2O3/Crsbnd C layers develop on the present material, which can be used to improve the oxidation resistance of, e.g. stainless steel electrodes.

  9. Tools to support GHG emissions reduction : a regional effort, part 1 - carbon footprint estimation and decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Tools are proposed for carbon footprint estimation of transportation construction projects and decision support : for construction firms that must make equipment choice and usage decisions that affect profits, project duration : and greenhouse gas em...

  10. Effect of Q&P heat treatment on fine microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-alloy medium-carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Rahim; Kheirandish, Shahram; Mirdamadi, Shamsoddin

    2018-01-01

    The current research investigates the effect of ultrafine microstructure resulted from Quench and Partitioning (Q&P) process on obtaining ultra-high strengths in a low-alloy steel with 4wt.% carbon. The purpose of Q&P heat treatment is to enrich the austenite with carbon by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to austenite, in order to stabilize it to the room temperature. The microstructure, consequently, is consists of martensite, retained austenite and in some conditions bainite. Two-step Q&P heat treatment with quench and partitioning temperatures equal to 120°C and 300°C respectively were applied to the samples at different times. Mechanical behavior was studied by tensile test. The microstructure of the samples was observed using SEM, and TEM and to quantify the amount of retained austenite X-ray diffraction was used. The retained austenite grain size was estimated to be about 0.5 µm and the highest amount of retained austenite obtained was 10 vol%. All samples showed a yield strength and a tensile strength of above 900MPa and 1500MP respectively. The yield strength increased with increase in partitioning time, whereas tensile strength showed an inverse behavior. The elongation in samples varied from 5% to 9% which seemed to not have a direct connection with the amount of retained austenite, but instead it was related to the ferritic structures formed during partitioning such as coalesced martensite, bainite and tempered martensite.

  11. The effect of double steps heat treatment on the microstructure of nanostructure bainitic medium carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foughani, Milad; Kolahi, Alireza; Palizdar, Yahya

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, Nano structure bainitic steel have attracted attention mostly because of its special mechanical properties such as high tensile strength, hardness, appropriate toughness and low manufacturing cost. The main concern for the mass production of this type of steels is prolong austempering process which increases the production costs as well as time. In this research, in order to accelerate the bainitic transformation and decrease the production time, a medium carbon steel has been prepared and two steps austempering process was employed to prevent the bainite laths thickening. The Samples were austenetized at 1000°C for 15 min and were kept in the salt bath between 1 - 12 hours at 290°C in one step and between 1 - 12 hours at the temperature range of 250°C - 300°C in two steps bainite transformation. The obtained micro structures were studied by the optical and scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and the mechanical properties were investigated by using tensile and hardness tests. The results show that the two steps austempering process and lower carbon concentration lead to lower austempering time as well as the formation of more stable retained austenite and nanostructured bainite lath which results in higher mechanical properties.

  12. Deposition and microstructure of Ti-containing diamond-like carbon nanocomposite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Won Jae; Sekino, Tohru; Shim, Kwang Bo; Niihara, Koichi; Auh, Keun Ho

    2005-01-01

    Ti-containing diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by plasma decomposition of CH 4 /Ar gas mixtures with an introduction of tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium (TDMAT, Ti[(CH 3 ) 2 N] 4 ), which was used as a precursor of titanium. The films deposited were found to be nanocomposite coatings consisting of TiN nanocrystalline clusters and amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:H), indicating that the nanocrystalline clusters were embedded in the DLC matrix. The crystallinity of TiN clusters, as well as the Ti atomic concentrations in the films, increased with an increase of substrate temperature. The substrate temperature applied to form a crystalline phase in the DLC matrix induced a graphitization of amorphous hydrocarbon matrix. The increase of volume fraction of TiN nanocrystalline clusters in the DLC matrix enhanced the mechanical properties of nanostructured coatings, although the graphite-like structural transition of DLC matrix happened due to the applied heating

  13. Preparation of Pt–Ru bimetallic catalyst supported on carbon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The template carbonization of polyphenyl acetylene yields hollow, uniform cylindrical carbon nanotubes with outer diameter almost equal to pore diameter of the template used. High resolution transmission electron microscopic investigation reveals that Pt–Ru nanoparticles are highly dispersed inside the tube with an ...

  14. Hydrogenation of surface carbon on alumina-supported nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mccarthy, J.G.; Wise, H.

    1979-05-01

    The methanation of carbon deposited by CO or ethylene decomposition on Girdler G-65 catalyst (25Vertical Bar3< nickel, 8Vertical Bar3< alkali, mostly CaO, 4Vertical Bar3< C as graphite, on alumina) was studied by temperature-programed desorption and temperature-programed surface reaction. Four types of carbon were identified: ..cap alpha..-carbon consisted of isolated carbon atoms bonded to nickel and reacting with hydrogen at 470/sup 0/ +/- 20/sup 0/K; ..gamma..-carbon was probably a bulk carbide, most likely Ni/sub 3/C, which had a reaction peak at 550/sup 0/K; ..beta..-carbon consisted of amorphous, polymerized carbon, which had a reaction peak at 680/sup 0/K; and an unreactive crystalline graphite-like species. The ..cap alpha..-form was thermally unstable and transformed into the ..beta..-form above 600/sup 0/K. Both ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-forms slowly converted to inert graphite above 600/sup 0/K. The evidence suggested that synthesis gas methanation proceeds by dissociative adsorption of CO as the rate-determining step which forms a very reactive carbon adatom state (..cap alpha..') which converts to the ..cap alpha..-state in the absence of hydrogen and to methane in the presence of hydrogen.

  15. Microstructure and Creep Behavior of Fe-27Al-1Nb Alloys with Added Carbon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dobeš, Ferdinand; Kratochvíl, P.; Pešička, J.; Vodičková, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2015), s. 1580-1587 ISSN 1073-5623 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1452 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : creep * iron aluminides * threshold stress Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.749, year: 2015

  16. Thermal stability and microstructure of catalytic alumina composite support with lanthanum species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Masakuni; Nishio, Yoshitoyo

    2016-09-01

    Lanthanum (La) modified γ-alumina composite was examined for application toward thermostable catalytic support at elevated temperature. La added alumina was prepared through an aqueous process using lanthanum (III) nitrate and then characterized by surface area measurement, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and surface desorption of CO2. It was found that the properties depended on the La content and heat treatment temperatures. The characterization of the surface, structural and chemical properties of La-Al2O3 showed the existence of a strong interaction between the La species and alumina via formation of new phase and modified surface in Al2O3 samples. LaAlO3 nanoparticle formed among alumina particles by the solid phase reaction of Al2O3 and La2O3. The increase of the surface basicity of La modified alumina was demonstrated using CO2 temperature programmed desorption experiments. The controlled surface interaction between La oxide and alumina provide the unique surface and structural properties of the resulting mixed oxides as catalysts and catalytic supports.

  17. Study of Microstructure of Poly(ethylene terephthalate Fibers by Exposing to Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baseri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available POY PET fiber samples were uniaxially drawn below the glass transition temperature (Tg at various draw ratios to obtain filaments with different transient structures. The transient structure was composed of polymeric chains with para-crystalline or mesomorphic order and played a key role on the ultimate properties of fibers. Therefore, the study of the post-treatment mesomorphic structural changes would be of great interest. Initially the samples were exposed to supercritical CO2 under tension and tension-free conditions to induce morphological changes in their structures. The evolution of micro-structural changes under exposure to supercritical CO2 was investigated by conventional methods such as DSC, FTIR, birefringence and mechanical properties. A good correlation was obtained between the results of various analytical studies. Analyzing the results of DSC and FTIR showed that the amount of extended chains and transient structure developing during cold-drawing increased with the draw ratio. The results showed that exposure to supercritical CO2 led to the absorption of CO2 molecules into the free volumes of amorphous phase of the samples and increasing the crystalline phase and lowering the transient structures in the treated fibers. Sample treatment conditions play important role on the structural changes and in transforming the oriented chains of the mesophase into the crystalline or non-crystalline domains. PET fibers exposed to supercritical CO2 under tension present higher degree of crystallinity and molecular compactness in the amorphous domains but lower values of transient structures than the non-tension exposed samples. Exposure to supercritical CO2 gave rise to such structural changes as crystallization, orientation, and mesomorphic transitions. Hence, this method is a promising approach for tailoring structural changes in PET samples.In this paper, samples of POY PET fibers were uniaxially drawn below the glass transition temperature

  18. CTAB assisted microwave synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon supported Pt nanoparticles for hydrogen electro-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jian-Hua; He, Jian-Ping; Ji, Ya-Jun; Dang, Wang-Juan; Liu, Xiao-Lei; Zhao, Gui-Wang; Zhang, Chuan-Xiang; Zhao, Ji-Shuang; Fu, Qing-Bin; Hu, Huo-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Mesoporous carbon with ordered hexagonal structure derived from the co-assembly of triblock copolymer F127 and resol was employed as the carbon support of Pt catalysts for hydrogen electro-oxidation. Structural characterizations revealed that the mesoporous carbon exhibited large surface area and uniform mesopores. The Pt nanoparticles supported on the novel mesoporous carbon were fabricated by a facile CTAB assisted microwave synthesis process, wherein CTAB was expected to improve the wettability of carbon support as well as the dispersion of Pt nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were applied to characterize the Pt catalysts. It was found that the Pt nanoparticles were uniform in size and highly dispersed on the mesoporous carbon supports. The cyclic voltammograms in sulfuric acid demonstrated that the electrochemical active surface area of Pt catalysts prepared with CTAB was two times than that without CTAB

  19. Microstructural characterization of material used as supporter in pre hispanic paints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva V, Y.; Zorrilla, C.; Canetas, J.; Hernandez, R.; Aguilar F, M.; Arenas A, J.; Martinez, G.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is to show the characterization of pre hispanic paintings mainly of the materials that support the pigments. The samples come from three different archaeological sites, Palenque-Chiapas (two specimens), Teotihuacan-Estado de Mexico (one specimen) and Mitla-Oaxaca (one specimen); Mayan, Teotihuacan and Mixtec-Zapotec culture respectively. The samples were analyzed by Sem, EDS, Tem, XRD and IR. The results show calcite as common phase for all the samples, however exist other phases identified depending on the site as dolomite, ankerite, calcium silicon chloride, etc. The origin of the red color of the analyzed pigments were cinnabar (HgS) by a sample of Palenque and hematite (Fe 2 O 3 ) by the other specimen, this last crystalline phase also present in the Mitla and Teotihuacan samples. By IR were identified some organic compounds in all the samples, but not copal. (Author)

  20. Thermal stability and microstructure of catalytic alumina composite support with lanthanum species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Masakuni, E-mail: ozawa@numse.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Nishio, Yoshitoyo

    2016-09-01

    Highlights: • Thermal stability of La-modified γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with nanometer-scaled structure. • LaAlO{sub 3} particles are dispersed in the aggregated particles of alumina. • Increase of the surface basicity of La modified alumina using CO{sub 2}-TPD. - Abstract: Lanthanum (La) modified γ-alumina composite was examined for application toward thermostable catalytic support at elevated temperature. La added alumina was prepared through an aqueous process using lanthanum (III) nitrate and then characterized by surface area measurement, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and surface desorption of CO{sub 2}. It was found that the properties depended on the La content and heat treatment temperatures. The characterization of the surface, structural and chemical properties of La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed the existence of a strong interaction between the La species and alumina via formation of new phase and modified surface in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples. LaAlO{sub 3} nanoparticle formed among alumina particles by the solid phase reaction of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The increase of the surface basicity of La modified alumina was demonstrated using CO{sub 2} temperature programmed desorption experiments. The controlled surface interaction between La oxide and alumina provide the unique surface and structural properties of the resulting mixed oxides as catalysts and catalytic supports.

  1. Phosphorus poisoning of molybdenum sulfide hydrodesulfurization catalysts supported on carbon and alumina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwens, S.M.A.M.; Vissers, J.P.R.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1988-01-01

    Phosphorus-containing Mo sulfide catalysts supported on ¿-Al2O3 and activated carbon were evaluated for their thiophene HDS activities. Phosphorus was added as phosphoric acid to the carrier material prior to the molybdenum component. The thiophene HDS activity of the carbon-supported catalysts was

  2. Analysis of partially pulsating fatigue process on carbon steel with microstructural observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimano, Hiroyuki; Faiz, M. Khairi; Hara, Asato; Yoshizumi, Kyoko; Yoshida, Makoto; Horibe, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Pulsating low-cycle fatigue processes, up to the present, have been divided into three states: the transient state, steady state, and accelerating state of ratcheting. In our previous work, we suggested that fatigue behavior of pulsating fatigue process should be classified into five stages in which the plastic strain amplitude and the ratcheting strain rate are plotted on the X and Y axis, respectively. In this study, at the condition of R=−0.3 (partially pulsating fatigue), the change in the plastic strain amplitude and ratcheting strain rate for each cycle to failure was examined on AISI 1025 carbon steel. The dislocation substructure was examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for each stage, except for stage I. It was also demonstrated that the fatigue process can be divided into five stages: stage I corresponds to the un-pinning of dislocations from the Cottrell atmosphere and propagation of the Luders band. Stage II corresponds to the restriction of dislocation movement by dislocation tangles. Stage III corresponds to the formation of dislocation cells. Stage IV corresponds to the promotion of the to-and-fro (back-and-forth) motion of dislocations by a re-arrangement of the dislocations in the cells. Stage V corresponds to the release of dislocation movement by the collapse of dislocation cells.

  3. Analysis of partially pulsating fatigue process on carbon steel with microstructural observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimano, Hiroyuki, E-mail: tales-of-destiny@akane.waseda.jp [Department of Modern Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Shinjyuku-ku Okubo, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Faiz, M. Khairi; Hara, Asato; Yoshizumi, Kyoko [Department of Modern Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Shinjyuku-ku Okubo, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Makoto [Department of Modern Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Shinjyuku-ku Okubo, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kagami Memorial Research Institute for Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, 2-8-26, Nishi-Waseda, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan); Horibe, Susumu [Department of Modern Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Shinjyuku-ku Okubo, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2016-01-10

    Pulsating low-cycle fatigue processes, up to the present, have been divided into three states: the transient state, steady state, and accelerating state of ratcheting. In our previous work, we suggested that fatigue behavior of pulsating fatigue process should be classified into five stages in which the plastic strain amplitude and the ratcheting strain rate are plotted on the X and Y axis, respectively. In this study, at the condition of R=−0.3 (partially pulsating fatigue), the change in the plastic strain amplitude and ratcheting strain rate for each cycle to failure was examined on AISI 1025 carbon steel. The dislocation substructure was examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for each stage, except for stage I. It was also demonstrated that the fatigue process can be divided into five stages: stage I corresponds to the un-pinning of dislocations from the Cottrell atmosphere and propagation of the Luders band. Stage II corresponds to the restriction of dislocation movement by dislocation tangles. Stage III corresponds to the formation of dislocation cells. Stage IV corresponds to the promotion of the to-and-fro (back-and-forth) motion of dislocations by a re-arrangement of the dislocations in the cells. Stage V corresponds to the release of dislocation movement by the collapse of dislocation cells.

  4. Microstructure and Strengthening Mechanisms of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Magnesium Matrix Composites Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seong Jin; Kim, Woo Jin

    2014-01-01

    A combination of accumulative roll bonding (ARB) and high-energy ball milling was used to fabricate carbon nano tube (CNT)-reinforced Mg composites in sheet form. CNT-Al composite powders synthesized using the high-energy ball-milling process, were coated on the surface of Mg sheets using either spraying or dipping methods. The coated sheets were stacked and then subjected to ARB. Formation of CNT-intermetallic compounds through inter-diffusion between Al and Mg, fragmentation of the CNTintermetallic compounds, and their dispersion into the matrix by plastic flow; as well as dissolution of the intermetallic compound particles into the matrix while leaving CNTs in the matrix, occurred in sequence during the ARB process. This eventually resulted in the uniform distribution of nano-sized CNT particles in the Mg matrix. As the thickness of the Mg sheet and of the coating layer of Al-CNT powder on the surface of the Mg sheet were similar, the dispersion of CNTs into the Mg matrix occurred more uniformly and the strengthening effect of adding CNTs was greater. The strengthening gained by adding CNTs was attributed to Orowan strengthening and dislocation-density increase due to a thermal mismatch between the matrix and the CNTs.

  5. Investigating Linear and Nonlinear Viscoelastic behaviour and microstructures of Gelatine-Multiwalled carbon nanotubes composites

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the linear and nonlinear rheology of various gelatine-multiwalled carbon nanotube (gel-MWNT) composites, namely physically-crosslinked-gelatine gel-MWNT composites, chemically-crosslinked-gelatine gel-MWNT composites, and chemically-physically-crosslinked-gelatine gel-MWNT composites. Further, the internal structures of these gel-MWNT composites were characterized by ultra-small angle neutron scattering and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption of gelatine onto the surface of MWNT is also investigated to understand gelatine-assisted dispersion of MWNT during ultrasonication. For all gelatine gels, addition of MWNT increases their complex modulus. The dependence of storage modulus with frequency for gelatine-MWNT composites is similar to that of the corresponding neat gelatine matrix. However, by incorporating MWNT, the dependence of the loss modulus on frequency is reduced. The linear viscoelastic region is decreased approximately linearly with the increase of MWNT concentration. The pre-stress results demonstrate that the addition of MWNT does not change the strain-hardening behaviour of physically-crosslinked gelatine gel. However, the addition of MWNT can increase the strain-hardening behaviour of chemically-crosslinked gelatine gel, and chemically-physically crosslinked gelatine gel. Results from light microscopy, cryo-SEM, and USANS demonstrate the hierarchical structures of MWNT, including that tens-of-micron scale MWNT agglomerates are present. Furthermore, the adsorption curve of gelatine onto the surface of MWNT follows two-stage pseudo-saturation behaviour.

  6. The Effect of Simulated Thermomechanical Processing on the Transformation Behavior and Microstructure of a Low-Carbon Mo-Nb Linepipe Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizek, P.; Wynne, B. P.; Davies, C. H. J.; Hodgson, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    The present work investigates the transformation behavior of a low-carbon Mo-Nb linepipe steel and the corresponding transformation product microstructures using deformation dilatometry. The continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams have been constructed for both the fully recrystallized austenite and that deformed in uniaxial compression at 1148 K (875 °C) to a strain of 0.5 for cooling rates ranging from 0.1 to about 100 K/s. The obtained microstructures have been studied in detail using electron backscattered diffraction complemented by transmission electron microscopy. Heavy deformation of the parent austenite has caused a significant expansion of the polygonal ferrite transformation field in the CCT diagram, as well as a shift in the non-equilibrium ferrite transformation fields toward higher cooling rates. Furthermore, the austenite deformation has resulted in a pronounced refinement in both the effective grain (sheaf/packet) size and substructure unit size of the non-equilibrium ferrite microstructures. The optimum microstructure expected to display an excellent balance between strength and toughness is a mix of quasi-polygonal ferrite and granular bainite (often termed "acicular ferrite") produced from the heavily deformed austenite within a processing window covering the cooling rates from about 10 to about 100 K/s.

  7. Flexible and self-powered temperature-pressure dual-parameter sensors using microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Zang, Yaping; Huang, Dazhen; Di, Chong-an; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-09-21

    Skin-like temperature- and pressure-sensing capabilities are essential features for the next generation of artificial intelligent products. Previous studies of e-skin and smart elements have focused on flexible pressure sensors, whereas the simultaneous and sensitive detection of temperature and pressure with a single device remains a challenge. Here we report developing flexible dual-parameter temperature-pressure sensors based on microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric (MFSOTE) materials. The effective transduction of temperature and pressure stimuli into two independent electrical signals permits the instantaneous sensing of temperature and pressure with an accurate temperature resolution of pressure-sensing sensitivity of up to 28.9 kPa(-1). More importantly, these dual-parameter sensors can be self-powered with outstanding sensing performance. The excellent sensing properties of MFSOTE-based devices, together with their unique advantages of low cost and large-area fabrication, make MFSOTE materials possess promising applications in e-skin and health-monitoring elements.

  8. Carbon nanofiber/polyethylene nanocomposite: Processing behavior, microstructure and electrical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Saleh, Mohammed H.; Gelves, Genaro A.; Sundararaj, Uttandaraman

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrically conductive CNF/HDPE nanocomposite were prepared by melt compounding. • The effect of processing on the nanocomposites macro and micro structures was analyzed. • 1.4 vol% CNF were required to construct a conductive network within the HDPE matrix. • An EMI SE of 42 dB was reported for 15 vol% CNF/HDPE nanocomposite. • An empirical model was developed to estimate the EMI SE. - Abstract: Electrically conductive polymer nanocomposite of high density polyethylene (HDPE) filled with carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were prepared by melt compounding in a batch mixer. The nanocomposite processing behavior was studied by monitoring the mixing torque vs. time as function of filler content. Scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy were used to investigate the nanocomposite dispersion of nanofiller and the adhesion between the nanofiller and polymer matrix. The electrical and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding behaviors of the nanocomposite were reported as function of nanofibers concentration, and an empirical correlation related the EMI SE to the nanocomposite’s electrical resistivity was developed. Good level of CNF dispersion was evident despite the poor adhesion exhibited between the nanofibers and the HDPE matrix. At 1.5 vol% CNF loading, the nanocomposite exhibited an electrical volume resistivity of 10 5 Ω·cm. EMI shielding effectiveness was found to increase with increase in nanofiller concentration. In the 0.1–1.5 GHz frequency range, 2 mm thick plate made of 5 vol% CNF/HDPE nanocomposite exhibits an EMI shielding effectiveness of 20 dB

  9. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Low-Carbon Steel with Magnesium-Based Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Feng, Pei-Hsien; Pan, Yan-Chi; Hwang, Weng-Sing; Su, Yen-Hao; Lu, Muh-Jung

    2016-10-01

    The effects of heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg-containing (7 ppm), low-carbon commercial steel (SS400) were investigated. Twenty different heat treatment paths were performed using a Gleeble 1500 thermomechanical simulator. It was observed by using an optical microscope that as the cooling rate increased and holding temperature decreased, the volume fractions of pearlite, Widmanstätten ferrite, and grain boundary allotriomorphs ferrite fell, whereas that of acicular ferrite (AF) increased. Quantifying the fractions of AF and other phases by using electron backscatter diffraction shows that the heat treatment path with a cooling rate of 20 K/s and holding temperature of 723 K (450 °C) induced the highest volume fraction (44 pct) of AF. As such, the toughness of the sample was increased 12.4 times compared with that observed in the sample containing 4 pct AF. Typical inclusions were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results showed that the magnesium-based complex inclusions could act as nucleation sites of AF. Inclusions with a size of about 5 μm can serve as heterogeneous nucleation sites for AF. Mg-containing SS400 steel also has excellent hot-ductility in the temperature range of 973 K to 1273 K (700 °C to 1000 °C), and the minimum percentage reduction in area (R.A pct) value of around 63 pct at 1073 K (800 °C).

  10. N-Doped Carbon Xerogels as Pt Support for the Electro-Reduction of Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinthia Alegre

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Durability and limited catalytic activity are key impediments to the commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Carbon materials employed as catalyst support can be doped with different heteroatoms, like nitrogen, to improve both catalytic activity and durability. Carbon xerogels are nanoporous carbons that can be easily synthesized in order to obtain N-doped materials. In the present work, we introduced melamine as a carbon xerogel precursor together with resorcinol for an effective in-situ N doping (3–4 wt % N. Pt nanoparticles were supported on nitrogen-doped carbon xerogels and their activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR was evaluated in acid media along with their stability. Results provide new evidences of the type of N groups aiding the activity of Pt for the ORR and of a remarkable stability for N-doped carbon-supported Pt catalysts, providing appropriate physico-chemical features.

  11. Single wall carbon nanotube supports for portable direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girishkumar, G; Hall, Timothy D; Vinodgopal, K; Kamat, Prashant V

    2006-01-12

    Single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes are employed as carbon supports in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). The morphology and electrochemical activity of single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes obtained from different sources have been examined to probe the influence of carbon support on the overall performance of DMFC. The improved activity of the Pt-Ru catalyst dispersed on carbon nanotubes toward methanol oxidation is reflected as a shift in the onset potential and a lower charge transfer resistance at the electrode/electrolyte interface. The evaluation of carbon supports in a passive air breathing DMFC indicates that the observed power density depends on the nature and source of carbon nanostructures. The intrinsic property of the nanotubes, dispersion of the electrocatalyst and the electrochemically active surface area collectively influence the performance of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). As compared to the commercial carbon black support, single wall carbon nanotubes when employed as the support for anchoring the electrocatalyst particles in the anode and cathode sides of MEA exhibited a approximately 30% enhancement in the power density of a single stack DMFC operating at 70 degrees C.

  12. Allotropic Carbon Nanoforms as Advanced Metal-Free Catalysts or as Supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermenegildo Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This perspective paper summarizes the use of three nanostructured carbon allotropes as metal-free catalysts (“carbocatalysts” or as supports of metal nanoparticles. After an introductory section commenting the interest of developing metal-free catalysts and main features of carbon nanoforms, the main body of this paper is focused on exemplifying the opportunities that carbon nanotubes, graphene, and diamond nanoparticles offer to develop advanced catalysts having active sites based on carbon in the absence of transition metals or as large area supports with special morphology and unique properties. The final section provides my personal view on future developments in this field.

  13. Processing of composites based on NiO, samarium-doped ceria and carbonates (NiO-SDCC as anode support for solid oxide fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Siong Mahmud

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available NiO-SDCC composites consisting of NiO mixed with Sm-doped ceria (SDC and carbonates (Li2CO3 and Na2CO3 were sintered at different temperatures and reduced at 550 °C. The influence of reduction on structure of the NiO-SDCC anode support for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs was investigated. Raman spectra of the NiO-SDCC samples sintered at 500, 600 and 700 °C showed that after reducing at 550 °C NiO was reduced to Ni. In addition, SDC and carbonates (Li2CO3 and Na2CO3 did not undergo chemical transformation after reduction and were still detected in the samples. However, no Raman modes of carbonates were identified in the NiO-SDCC pellet sintered at 1000 °C and reduced at 550 °C. It is suspected that carbonates were decomposed at high sintering temperature and eliminated due to the reaction between the CO32– and hydrogen ions during reduction in humidified gases at 550 °C. The carbonate decomposition increased porosity in the Ni-SDCC pellets and consequently caused formation of brittle and fragile structure unappropriated for SOFC application. Because of that composite NiO-SDC samples without carbonates were also analysed to determine the factors affecting the crack formation. In addition, it was shown that the different reduction temperatures also influenced the microstructure and porosity of the pellets. Thus, it was observed that Ni-SDC pellet reduced at 800 °C has higher electrical conductivity of well-connected microstructures and sufficient porosity than the pellet reduced at 550 °C.

  14. EBSD Analysis of Relationship Between Microstructural Features and Toughness of a Medium-Carbon Quenching and Partitioning Bainitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiangguo; Huang, Xuefei; Huang, Weigang

    2017-12-01

    A multiphase microstructure of bainite, martensite and retained austenite in a 0.3C bainitic steel was obtained by a novel bainite isothermal transformation plus quenching and partitioning (B-QP) process. The correlations between microstructural features and toughness were investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and the results showed that the multiphase microstructure containing approximately 50% bainite exhibits higher strength (1617 MPa), greater elongation (18.6%) and greater impact toughness (103 J) than the full martensite. The EBSD analysis indicated that the multiphase microstructure with a smaller average local misorientation (1.22°) has a lower inner stress concentration possibility and that the first formed bainitic ferrite plates in the multiphase microstructure can refine subsequently generated packets and blocks. The corresponding packet and block average size decrease from 11.9 and 2.3 to 8.4 and 1.6 μm, respectively. A boundary misorientation analysis indicated that the multiphase microstructure has a higher percentage of high-angle boundaries (67.1%) than the full martensite (57.9%) because of the larger numbers and smaller sizes of packets and blocks. The packet boundary obstructs crack propagation more effectively than the block boundary.

  15. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  16. Investigation of altenative carbon materials for fuel-cell catalyst support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mikkel Juul

    In order to ensure high utilization of the catalyst material in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) it is usually fixed in the form of nanoparticles on a supporting material. The catalyst is platinum or a platinum alloy, and the commonly used support is carbon black (CB). Although...... structured carbon forms such as graphitized CBs, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and carbon nanofibres (CNFs). This thesis concerns the investigation of an array of different materials which may prospec-tively replace the conventional materials used in the catalyst. The study comprised 13 carbon samples which...... nanotubes (GMWCNTs), and graphitized carbon nanofibre (CNF), while the Pt/C samples were platinized samples of some of the CNTs and CNFs (Pt/FWCNT, Pt/GMWCNT, and Pt/CNF, respectively) as well as two commercial Pt/CB reference catalysts. Comparative analyses have been performed in order to be able to assess...

  17. Carbon-Based Regenerable Sorbents for the Combined Carbon Dioxide and Ammonia Removal for the Primary Life Support System (PLSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Manthina, Venkata; Singh, Prabhakar; Chullen, Cinda

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). Since ammonia is the most important TC to be captured, data on TC sorption presented in this paper are limited to ammonia, with results relevant to other TCs to be reported at a later time. The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Furthermore, the current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is non-regenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using carbon sorbents for the reversible, concurrent sorption of carbon dioxide and ammonia. Several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested, and multiple adsorption/vacuum-regeneration cycles were demonstrated at room temperature, and also a carbon surface conditioning technique that enhances the combined carbon dioxide and ammonia sorption without impairing sorbent regeneration.

  18. Microstructure of Matrix in UHTC Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Stackpoole, Margaret; Gusman, Michael I.; Chavez-Garia Jose; Doxtad, Evan

    2011-01-01

    Approaches to controlling the microstructure of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) are described.. One matrix material has been infiltrated into carbon weaves to make composite materials. The microstructure of these composites is described.

  19. Pt-Ru nanoparticles supported on functionalized carbon as electrocatalysts for the methanol oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, J.R.C.; Fernandes, J.C.S.; Botelho do Rego, A.M.; Ferraria, A.M.; Duarte, R.G.; Ferreira, M.G.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The functionalized carbon using acid solutions contains surface oxygenated groups. → Uniform dispersion of PtRu nanoparticles on the carbon surface was achieved. → Physical analysis showed the formation of PtRu alloy catalysts on functionalized carbon. → PtRu alloy catalysts on functionalized carbon enhanced the methanol oxidation rate. - Abstract: Platinum-ruthenium alloy electrocatalysts, for methanol oxidation reaction, were prepared on carbons thermally treated in helium atmosphere or chemically functionalized in H 2 O 2 , or in HNO 3 + H 2 SO 4 or in HNO 3 solutions. The functionalized carbon that is produced using acid solutions contains more surface oxygenated functional groups than carbon treated with H 2 O 2 solution or HeTT. The XRD/HR-TEM analysis have showed the existence of a higher alloying degree for Pt-Ru electrocatalysts supported on functionalized carbon, which present superior electrocatalytic performance, assessed by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, as compared to electrocatalysts on unfunctionalized carbon. It also was found that Pt-Ru alloy electrocatalysts on functionalized carbon improve the reaction rate compared to Pt-Ru on carbons treated with H 2 O 2 solution and thermally. A mechanism is discussed, where oxygenated groups generated from acid functionalization of carbon and adsorbed on Pt-Ru electrocatalysts are considered to enhance the electrocatalytic activity of the methanol oxidation reaction.

  20. Synthesis of Mg2Cu nanoparticles on carbon supports with enhanced hydrogen sorption kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Au, Y.S.; Ponthieu, M.; van Zwienen, M.; Zlotea, C.; Cuevas, F.; de Jong, K.P.; de Jongh, P.E.

    2013-01-01

    The reaction kinetics and reversibility for hydrogen sorption were investigated for supported Mg2Cu nanoparticles on carbon. A new preparation method is proposed to synthesize the supported alloy nanoparticles. The motivation of using a support is to separate the nanoparticles to prevent sintering

  1. Transport of Carbonate Ions by Novel Cellulose Fiber Supported Solid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Gaikwad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Transport of carbonate ions was explored through fiber supported solid membrane. A novel fiber supported solid membrane was prepared by chemical modification of cellulose fiber with citric acid, 2′2-bipyridine and magnesium carbonate. The factors affecting the permeability of carbonate ions such as immobilization of citric acid-magnesium metal ion -2′2-bipyridine complex (0 to 2.5 mmol/g range over cellulose fiber, carbon-ate ion concentration in source phase and NaOH concentration in receiving phase were investigated. Ki-netic of carbonate, sulfate, and nitrate ions was investigated through fiber supported solid membrane. Transport of carbonate ions with/without bubbling of CO2 (0 to 10 ml/min in source phase was explored from source to receiving phase. The novel idea is to explore the adsorptive transport of CO2 from source to receiving phase through cellulose fiber containing magnesium metal ion organic framework. Copyright © 2012 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.Received: 25th November 2011; Revised: 17th December 2011; Accepted: 19th December 2011[How to Cite: A.G. Gaikwad. (2012. Transport of Carbonate Ions by Novel Cellulose Fiber Supported Solid Membrane. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (1: 49– 57.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1225.49-57][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1225.49-57 ] | View in 

  2. Graphitised Carbon Nanofibres as Catalyst Support for PEMFC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yli-Rantala, E.; Pasanen, A.; Kauranen, P.

    2011-01-01

    (PANI) precursor. The modified surfaces were studied by FTIR and XPS and the electrochemical characterization, including long-term Pt stability tests, was performed using a low-temperature PEMFC single cell. The performance and stability of the G-CNF supported catalysts were compared with a CB supported...

  3. Morphing Carbon Nanotube Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-20

    made consistently over large areas, and integrated with existing laminate and skin materials for use in vehicles such as aircraft . Liquid...most fibrous nanoscale aerogels and foams, having n=2-3, which is attributed to 2 low connectivity between the constituent struts 7. When comparing...CNTs incidentally resembles the Young’s moduli of isotropic CNT foams 30, CNT aerogels 31, and Si aerogels 32 which scale as ~ρ3, and commonly

  4. Fatigue crack growth behaviors in hot-rolled low carbon steels: A comparison between ferrite–pearlite and ferrite–bainite microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Mingfei; Yu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The roles of microstructure types in fatigue crack growth behaviors in ferrite–pearlite steel and ferrite–bainite steel were investigated. The ferrite–bainite dual-phase microstructure was obtained by intermediate heat treatment, conducted on ferrite–pearlite hot-rolled low carbon steel. This paper presents the results from investigation using constant stress-controlled fatigue tests with in-situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fatigue crack growth (FCG) rate tests, and fatigue fractography analysis. Microscopy images arrested by in-situ SEM showed that the fatigue crack propagation in F–P steel could become unstable more ealier compared with that in F–B steel. The fatigue cracks in ferrite–pearlite were more tortuous and could propagate more freely than that in ferrite–bainite microstructures. However, frequent crack branching were observed in ferrite–bainite steel and it indicated that the second hard bainite phase effectively retarded the crack propagation. The variation of FCG rate (da/dN) with stress intensity factor range (ΔK) for F–P and F–B steels was discussed within the Paris region. It was shown that FCG rate of F–P steel was higher than that of F–B steel. Moreover, the fatigue fracture surface analysis proved that grain boundaries could also play a role in the resistance of crack propagation.

  5. Microstructure and abrasive wear properties of M(Cr,Fe7C3 carbides reinforced high-chromium carbon coating produced by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner BUYTOZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, high-chromium ferrochromium carbon hypereutectic alloy powder was coated on AISI 4340 steel by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. The coating layers were analyzed by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Depending on the gas tungsten arc welding pa-rameters, either hypoeutectic or hypereutectic microstructures were produced. Wear tests of the coatings were carried out on a pin-on-disc apparatus as function of contact load. Wear rates of the all coating layers were decreased as a function of the loading. The improvement of abrasive wear resistance of the coating layer could be attributed to the high hardness of the hypereutectic M7C3 carbides in the microstruc-ture. As a result, the microstructure of surface layers, hardness and abrasive wear behaviours showed different characteristics due to the gas tungsten arc welding parameters.

  6. Carbon capture in vehicles : a review of general support, available mechanisms, and consumer-acceptance issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This survey of the feasibility of introducing carbon capture and storage (CCS) into light vehicles : started by reviewing the level of international support for CCS in general. While there have been : encouraging signs that CCS is gaining acceptance ...

  7. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, A. E.; Nikolaev, P.; Amama, P. B.; Zakharov, D.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Stach, E. A.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. With the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  8. Process intensification by combination of activated carbon supported catalysts and alternative energy sources

    OpenAIRE

    Calvino Casilda, Vanesa; Pérez-Mayoral, E.

    2014-01-01

    [EN] Activated carbons are well known for their catalytic properties and for being used as a catalyst support in heterogeneous catalysis. Activated carbons possess most of the desired properties of a catalyst support; inertness towards unwanted reactions, stability under regeneration and reaction conditions, suitable mechanical properties, tunable surface area, porosity, and the possibility of being manufactured in different size and shape. On the other hand, the in...

  9. Dehydrogenation of Ethylbenzene with Carbon Dioxide as Soft Oxidant over Supported Vanadium-Antimony Oxide Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Do Young; Vislovskiy, Vladislav P.; Yoo, Jin S.; Chang, Jong San [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Eon [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Min Seok [Mongolia International University, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia)

    2005-11-15

    This work presents that carbon dioxide, which is a main contributor to the global warming effect, could be utilized as a selective oxidant in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene. The dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene over alumina-supported vanadium-antimony oxide catalyst has been studied under different atmospheres such as inert nitrogen, steam, oxygen or carbon dioxide as diluent or oxidant. Among them, the addition of carbon dioxide gave the highest styrene yield (up to 82%) and styrene selectivity (up to 97%) along with stable activity. Carbon dioxide could play a beneficial role of a selective oxidant in the improvement of the catalytic behavior through the oxidative pathway.

  10. Effect of carbon content on the microstructure and creep properties of a 3rd generation single crystal nickel-base superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.W.; Liu, T. [Superalloys Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, L., E-mail: wangli@imr.ac.cn [Superalloys Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Liu, X.G.; Lou, L.H. [Superalloys Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, J. [Superalloys Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Effect of carbon content on the microstructure and creep properties of a 3rd generation single crystal nickel-base superalloy has been investigated by the scanning electron microscope, X-ray computed tomography and electron probe microanalyzer. With the increase of the carbon content, MC carbides evolve from octahedral to well-developed dendrite, which promotes the formation of microporosity. Moreover, the volume fraction of porosity increases in the experimental alloys after solution heat treatment. As a result, the increase in the size of MC carbides and the porosity has a detrimental effect on the low temperature and high stress creep behavior of the alloys. The specimen crept at 850 °C and 586 MPa with the carbon content of 430 ppm shows the shortest rupture life due to the largest primary creep strain. However, the creep behavior of the alloy at 1120 °C and 140 MPa gets better as the carbon content increases from 88 to 430 ppm. TCP phase is observed near the fracture surfaces of the alloys, which explores as a potential cause for the creep rupture. However, the formation of TCP phase is effectively suppressed for decreasing segregation of the alloying elements, which results in the improvement of the creep life in the alloy with 430 ppm carbon at 1120 °C and 140 MPa.

  11. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part I: Micro-structural characterization and geometric modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    A computational strategy to predict the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites is proposed in this two-part paper. In Part I, the micro-structural characteristics of these nano-composites are discerned. These characteristics include networks/agglomerations of carbon nanotubes and thick polymer interphase regions between the nanotubes and the surrounding matrix. An algorithm is presented to construct three-dimensional geometric models with large amounts of randomly dispersed and aggregated nanotubes. The effects of the distribution of the nanotubes and the thickness of the interphase regions on the concentration of the interphase regions are demonstrated with numerical results. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Palladium and palladium-tin supported on multi wall carbon nanotubes or carbon for alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldes, Adriana Napoleão; Furtunato da Silva, Dionisio; Martins da Silva, Júlio César; Antonio de Sá, Osvaldo; Spinacé, Estevam Vitório; Neto, Almir Oliveira; Coelho dos Santos, Mauro

    2015-02-01

    Pd and PdSn (Pd:Sn atomic ratios of 90:10), supported on Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) or Carbon (C), are prepared by an electron beam irradiation reduction method. The obtained materials are characterized by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), Transmission electron Microscopy (TEM) and Cyclic Voltammetry (CV). The activity for ethanol electro-oxidation is tested in alkaline medium, at room temperature, using Cyclic Voltammetry and Chronoamperometry (CA) and in a single alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC), in the temperature range of 60-90 °C. CV analysis finds that Pd/MWCNT and PdSn/MWCNT presents onset potentials changing to negative values and high current values, compared to Pd/C and PdSn/C electrocatalysts. ATR-FTIR analysis, performed during the CV, identifies acetate and acetaldehyde as principal products formed during the ethanol electro-oxidation, with low conversion to CO2. In single fuel cell tests, at 85 °C, using 2.0 mol L-1 ethanol in 2.0 mol L-1 KOH solutions, the electrocatalysts supported on MWCNT, also, show higher power densities, compared to the materials supported on carbon: PdSn/MWCNT, presents the best result (36 mW cm-2). The results show that the use of MWCNT, instead of carbon, as support, plus the addition of small amounts of Sn to Pd, improves the electrocatalytic activity for Ethanol Oxidation Reaction (EOR).

  13. A Silicon detector system on carbon fiber support at small radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Marvin E.

    2004-01-01

    The design of a silicon detector for a p(bar p) collider experiment will be described. The detector uses a carbon fiber support structure with sensors positioned at small radius with respect to the beam. A brief overview of the mechanical design is given. The emphasis is on the electrical characteristics of the detector. General principles involved in grounding systems with carbon fiber structures will be covered. The electrical characteristics of the carbon fiber support structure will be presented. Test results imply that carbon fiber must be regarded as a conductor for the frequency region of interest of 10 to 100 MHz. No distinction is found between carbon fiber and copper. Performance results on noise due to pick-up through the low mass fine pitch cables carrying the analogue signals and floating metal is discussed

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of in situ casting TiC/Ti6Al4V composites through adding multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ya, Bin; Zhou, Bingwen; Yang, Hongshuo; Huang, Bingkun; Jia, Fei; Zhang, Xingguo, E-mail: zxgwj@dlut.edu.cn

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Adding MWCNTs in situ casting fabricating TiC/Ti6Al4V composites is first reported. • The solidification process of in situ casting TiC/Ti6Al4V composites is discussed. • Microstructure shows remarkable correlations with adding MWCNTS. • Strength and plasticity show remarkable correlations with adding MWCNTs. - Abstract: In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were added as carbon sources to fabricate in situ casting TiC/Ti6Al4V (TC4) composites. The effects of MWCNTs on the microstructure and mechanical properties are studied. The composites are analyzed by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscope and electron probe microanalysis. The fracture behavior of TiC/TC4 composites are also studied. Smaller size of TiC particles and grain compared with TC4-graphite composites can be observed. The tensile strength of TC4-MWCNTs composites is about 1110.1 MPa, which is higher than that of TC4-graphite composites, about 1003.6 MPa. Fracture behavior also was changed by adding MWCNTs in situ casting TiC/TC4 composites.

  15. The effect of heat treatment on microstructure evolution in artificially aged carbon nanotube/Al2024 composites synthesized by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Bustamante, R.; Pérez-Bustamante, F.; Maldonado-Orozco, M.C.; Martínez-Sánchez, R.

    2017-01-01

    Although carbon nanotubes/aluminum (CNT/Al) composites are promising materials in the production of structural components, their mechanical behavior under overaging conditions has not been considered. In this paper the effect of CNTs on the microstructural and mechanical behavior of a 2024 aluminum alloy (Al2024) synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA) and powder metallurgy routes is discussed, as well as the effect of aging heat treatments at different temperatures and aging times. The mechanical behavior of composites was screened by hardness measurements as function of aging time. After 96 h of aging time, composites showed mechanical stability in their hardness performance. Images from transmission electron microscopy showed that the mechanical stability of composites was due to a homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in the aluminum matrix and a subsequent alteration in the kinetics of precipitation is due to their presence in the aluminum matrix. Even though strengthening precipitation took place during aging, this was not the main strengthening mechanism observed in composites. - Highlights: • Dispersion of carbon nanotubes during mechanical alloying • Microstructural evolution observed by HRTEM. • Mechanical performance evaluated through micro-hardness test. • Increased mechanical performance at high working temperatures • Acceleration of kinetics of precipitation due to CNTs, and milling conditions

  16. High-performance carbon-coated ZnMn2O4 nanocrystallite supercapacitors with tailored microstructures enabled by a novel solution combustion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahifar, Mozaffar; Huang, Sheng-Siang; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Yan-Cheng; Shih, Bing-Yi; Sheu, Hwo-Shuenn; Liao, Yen-Fa; Wu, Nae-Lih

    2018-02-01

    Although ZnMn2O4 is widely studied as Li-ion battery anodes, it remains a challenge to tailor suitable microstructures of the oxide for supercapacitor applications. Carbon-coated ZnMn2O4 (C@ZMO) nanocrystallites showing high-performance pseudocapacitor behaviours in neutral aqueous electrolyte are for the first time successfully synthesised via a novel solution combustion process using polyethylene glycol as a multifunctional microstructure-directing agent. Controlling the molecular weight and amount of the polymer in the combustion solution enables the formation of highly-crystalline C@ZMO having substantially higher, by more than 5 folds, specific surface areas with mesoporous structures and conformal carbon coating via the one-pot synthesis process. The resulting C@ZMO supercapacitor electrodes in Na2SO4(aq) electrolyte exhibit ideal capacitive behaviours with specific capacitances up to 150 F g-1 and cycle stability showing no capacitance fade after 10,000 cycles at 60% of full capacity and >99% Coulombic efficiency. This study not only illustrates a new powerful synthesis route capable of producing conductive mesoporous crystalline oxide-based nanomaterials for energy storage applications but also reveals a new class of high-performance pseudocapacitive materials for neutral aqueous electrolytes.

  17. The effect of heat treatment on microstructure evolution in artificially aged carbon nanotube/Al2024 composites synthesized by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Bustamante, R. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes No.120, C.P. 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Pérez-Bustamante, F. [Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua (UACH), Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Circuito No. 1 Nuevo Campus Universitario, C.P. 31125 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Maldonado-Orozco, M.C. [Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua (UACH), Facultad de Ingeniería, Circuito No. 1 Nuevo Campus Universitario, C.P. 31125 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Martínez-Sánchez, R., E-mail: roberto.martinez@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes No.120, C.P. 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico)

    2017-04-15

    Although carbon nanotubes/aluminum (CNT/Al) composites are promising materials in the production of structural components, their mechanical behavior under overaging conditions has not been considered. In this paper the effect of CNTs on the microstructural and mechanical behavior of a 2024 aluminum alloy (Al2024) synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA) and powder metallurgy routes is discussed, as well as the effect of aging heat treatments at different temperatures and aging times. The mechanical behavior of composites was screened by hardness measurements as function of aging time. After 96 h of aging time, composites showed mechanical stability in their hardness performance. Images from transmission electron microscopy showed that the mechanical stability of composites was due to a homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in the aluminum matrix and a subsequent alteration in the kinetics of precipitation is due to their presence in the aluminum matrix. Even though strengthening precipitation took place during aging, this was not the main strengthening mechanism observed in composites. - Highlights: • Dispersion of carbon nanotubes during mechanical alloying • Microstructural evolution observed by HRTEM. • Mechanical performance evaluated through micro-hardness test. • Increased mechanical performance at high working temperatures • Acceleration of kinetics of precipitation due to CNTs, and milling conditions.

  18. An investigation into carbon nanostructured materials as catalyst support in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veltzé, Sune

    acid treatment on the Vapour Grown Carbon Fibers™ manufactured by Showa Denko K. K. From these fibres, twelve platinised samples were investigated, of which one was platinised by a platinum phtalocyanine impregnation method, two were platinised by the polyol method and the remaining by the Bönnemann......Polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are among the key research areas concerning clean cost-effective energy. Carbon nano fibres (CNF), single walled carbon nano tubes (SWCNT), multi walled carbon nano tubes (MWCNT) and other related materials are among the possible successors to standard carbon...... black support materials for low platinum containing electrocatalyst. This is partly due to their high electronic conductivity. Partly due to their high surface area needed for the dispersion of nanoparticulate metal-clusters. In addition carbon nano-structures (CNF, SWCNT, MWCNT etc.) are more durable...

  19. Carbon Nitride Materials as Efficient Catalyst Supports for Proton Exchange Membrane Water Electrolyzers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belen Jorge

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nitride materials with graphitic to polymeric structures (gCNH were investigated as catalyst supports for the proton exchange membrane (PEM water electrolyzers using IrO2 nanoparticles as oxygen evolution electrocatalyst. Here, the performance of IrO2 nanoparticles formed and deposited in situ onto carbon nitride support for PEM water electrolysis was explored based on previous preliminary studies conducted in related systems. The results revealed that this preparation route catalyzed the decomposition of the carbon nitride to form a material with much lower N content. This resulted in a significant enhancement of the performance of the gCNH-IrO2 (or N-doped C-IrO2 electrocatalyst that was likely attributed to higher electrical conductivity of the N-doped carbon support.

  20. Sea urchin-like mesoporous carbon material grown with carbon nanotubes as a cathode catalyst support for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Ping-Lin; Hsu, Chun-Han; Li, Wan-Ting; Jhan, Jing-Yi; Chen, Wei-Fu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101 (China)

    2010-12-15

    A sea urchin-like carbon (UC) material with high surface area (416 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}), adequate electrical conductivity (59.6 S cm{sup -1}) and good chemical stability was prepared by growing carbon nanotubes onto mesoporous carbon hollow spheres. A uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles was then anchored on the UC, where the Pt nanoparticles were prepared using benzylamine as the stabilizer. For this Pt loaded carbon, cyclic voltammogram measurements showed an exceptionally high electrochemically active surface area (EAS) (114.8 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) compared to the commonly used commercial E-TEK catalyst (65.2 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}). The durability test demonstrates that the carbon used as a support exhibited minor loss in EAS of Pt. Compared to the E-TEK (20 wt%) cathode catalyst, this Pt loaded UC catalyst has greatly enhanced catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction, less cathode flooding and considerably improved performance, resulting in an enhancement of ca. 37% in power density compared with that of E-TEK. Based on the results obtained, the UC is an excellent support for Pt nanoparticles used as cathode catalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. (author)

  1. Effect of niobium addition on the microstructure and in the mechanical properties in steel with medium and high carbon content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, P.R.; Bresciani Filho, E.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of 0.03%Nb addition on the microstructure, hardness, tensile strength and austenite grain diameter, in steel with 0.2 - 0.8wt%C, thermal treated at different conditions was investigated. It is shown that niobium dissolved in the austenite can increases the tensile strength up to 130 MPa, without affecting seriously the ductility. (Author) [pt

  2. Durability of Carbon Nanofiber (CNF) & Carbon Nanotube (CNT) as Catalyst Support for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Borghei, Maryam; Lund, Peter

    2013-01-01

    a standard polyol method were prepared and fabricated as cathodes of Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEA) for PEMFC. Both the catalysts as such and the MEAs made out of them were evaluated regarding to thermal and electrochemical stability using traditional carbon black (Vulcan XC72) as a reference. Thermal...... gravimetric analysis (TGA), cyclic voltammetry (CV), polarization curve and impedance spectroscopy were applied on the samples under accelerated stress conditions. The carbon nano-materials demonstrated better stability as support for nano-sized platinum catalyst under PEMFC related operating conditions. Due...

  3. Graphitic Carbon Nitride as a Catalyst Support in Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansor, Noramalina; Miller, Thomas S.; Dedigama, Ishanka; Jorge, Ana Belen; Jia, Jingjing; Brázdová, Veronika; Mattevi, Cecilia; Gibbs, Chris; Hodgson, David; Shearing, Paul R.; Howard, Christopher A.; Corà, Furio; Shaffer, Milo; Brett, Daniel J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphitic carbon nitride (gCN) describes many materials with different structures. • gCNs can exhibit excellent mechanical, chemical and thermal resistance. • A major obstacle for pure gCN catalyst supports is limited electronic conductivity. • Composite/Hybrid gCN structures show excellent performance as catalyst supports. • gCNs have great potential for use in fuel calls and water electrolyzers. - Abstract: Electrochemical power sources, such as polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), require the use of precious metal catalysts which are deposited as nanoparticles onto supports in order to minimize their mass loading and therefore cost. State-of-the-art/commercial supports are based on forms of carbon black. However, carbon supports present disadvantages including corrosion in the operating fuel cell environment and loss of catalyst activity. Here we review recent work examining the potential of different varieties of graphitic carbon nitride (gCN) as catalyst supports, highlighting their likely benefits, as well as the challenges associated with their implementation. The performance of gCN and hybrid gCN-carbon materials as PEMFC electrodes is discussed, as well as their potential for use in alkaline systems and water electrolyzers. We illustrate the discussion with examples taken from our own recent studies.

  4. Active carbon supported molybdenum carbides for higher alcohols synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Chiarello, Gian Luca; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    This work provides an investigation of the high pressure CO hydrogenation to higher alcohols on K2CO3 promoted active carbon supported molybdenum carbide. Both activity and selectivity to alcohols over supported molybdenum carbides increased significantly compared to bulk carbides in literatures...

  5. Effect of carbon on the microstructure, mechanical properties and metal ion release of Ni-free Co-Cr-Mo alloys containing nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Manami; Yamanaka, Kenta; Kuramoto, Koji; Ohmura, Kazuyo; Ashino, Tetsuya; Chiba, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigated the effect of carbon addition on the microstructure and tensile properties of Ni-free biomedical Co-29Cr-6Mo (mass%) alloys containing 0.2 mass% nitrogen. The release of metal ions by the alloys was preliminarily evaluated in an aqueous solution of 0.6% sodium chloride (NaCl) and 1% lactic acid, after which samples with different carbon contents were subjected to hot rolling. All specimens were found to primarily consist of a γ-phase matrix due to nitrogen doping, with only the volume fraction of M23C6 increasing with carbon concentration. Owing to the very fine size of these carbide particles (less than 1 μm), which results from fragmentation during hot rolling, the increased formation of M23C6 increased the 0.2% proof stress, but reduced the elongation-to-failure. Carbon addition also increased the amount of Co and Cr released during static immersion; Co and Cr concentrations at the surfaces, which increased with increasing the bulk carbon concentrations, possibly enhanced the metal ion release. However, only a very small change in the Mo concentration was noticed in the solution. Therefore, it is not necessarily considered a suitable means of improving the strength of biomedical Co-Cr-Mo alloys, even though it has only to date been used in this alloy system. The results of this study revealed the limitations of the carbon strengthening and can aid in the design of biomedical Co-Cr-Mo-based alloys that exhibit the high durability needed for their practical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fuel cell testing of Pt–Ru catalysts supported on differently prepared and pretreated carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarz, Wojciech; Lota, Grzegorz; Frackowiak, Elzbieta; Czerwiński, Andrzej; Piela, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) testing of Pt–Ru catalysts supported on differently prepared multiwall carbon nanotube (MCNT) supports was performed to elucidate the influence of the different supports on the operating characteristics of the catalysts under real direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) anode and H 2 -PEMFC anode conditions. The MCNTs were either thin, entangled or thick, disentangled. Pretreatment of the MCNTs was also done and it was either high-temperature KOH etching or annealing (graphitization). The performance of the catalysts was compared against the performance of a commercial Pt–Ru catalyst supported on a high-surface-area carbon black. Among the different MCNT supports, the graphitized, entangled support offered the best performance in all tests, which was equal to the performance of the commercial catalyst, despite the MCNT catalyst layer was ca. 2.2 times thicker than the carbon black catalyst layer. Even for an MCNT catalyst layer, which was almost 7 times thicker than the carbon black catalyst layer, the transport limitations were not prohibitive. This confirmed the expected potential of nanotube supports for providing superior reactant transport properties of the PEMFC catalyst layers

  7. Processing parameters investigation for the fabrication of self-supported and freeform polymeric microstructures using ultraviolet-assisted three-dimensional printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farahani, R D; Lebel, L L; Therriault, D

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet-assisted three-dimensional (3D) printing (UV-3DP) was used to manufacture photopolymer-based microdevices with 3D self-supported and freeform features. The UV-3DP technique consists of the robotized deposition of extruded filaments, which are rapidly photopolymerized under UV illumination during the deposition process. This paper systematically studies the processing parameters of the UV-3DP technique using two photo-curable polymers and their associated nanocomposite materials. The main processing parameters including materials' rheological behavior, deposition speed and extrusion pressure, and UV illumination conditions were thoroughly investigated. A processing map was then defined in order to help choosing the proper parameters for the UV-3DP of microstructures with various geometries. Compared to self-supported features, the accurate fabrication of 3D freeform structures was found to take place in a narrower processing region since a higher rigidity of the extruded filament was required for structural stability. Finally, various 3D self-supported and freeform microstructures with high potential in micro electromechanical systems, micro-systems and organic electronics were fabricated to show the capability of the technique. (paper)

  8. A monetary plan for upgrading climate finance and support the low-carbon transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourcade, Jean Charles; Cassen, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how carbon finance can be part of a general reform of the financial system. Climate policies can indeed stimulate a sustainable and inclusive climate finance, in line with the call of the Cancun Agreement for a paradigm shift in climate negotiations. The mechanism described in this article is based on the adoption by Parties to the negotiations of a social value of carbon to trigger a wave of low-carbon investments in the world. Central banks offer credit lines for commercial banks backed by this social value of carbon, which are then used to cut the risk to invest in low- carbon investments. A future agreement in Paris next year should support this type of mechanisms.

  9. Structure and Reactivity of Zeolite- and Carbon-Supported Catalysts for the Oxidative Carbonylation of Alcohols

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, Daniel Neal

    2010-01-01

    AbstractStructure and Reactivity of Zeolite- and Carbon-Supported Catalysts for the Oxidative Carbonylation of AlcoholsbyDaniel Neal BriggsDoctor of Philosophy in Chemical EngineeringUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor Alexis T. Bell, Chair The oxidative carbonylation of alcohols to produce dialkyl carbonates is a process that takes place commercially in a slurry of cuprous chloride in the appropriate alcohol. While this process is chemically efficient, it incurs costs in terms of ene...

  10. Immersion Calorimetry for the Characterization of PD Catalysts Supported on Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Giraldo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons obtained from coconut peel were oxidized using hydrogen peroxide. Superficial characteristics of these carbons were determined through N2 and CO2 isotherms and functional groups were characterized by TPD. Finally, the microcalorimetry technique was used in order to obtain the immersion enthalpies in diverse liquids and established the relation between them and the results obtained by the other characterization techniques. The results suggested that the immersion calorimetry allow establishing the difference between the supports and the catalysts.

  11. Synthesis of gold nano-catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes by using electroless plating technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xicheng; Li Xia; Lun Ning; Wen Shulin

    2006-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes were prepared by using electroless plating technique. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has shown that spherical gold nanoparticles were homogeneously dispersed on the surfaces of the carbon nanotubes with a distribution of particle sizes sharply at around 3-4 nm in diameter. The results presented in this work will probably provide new catalysts with better performances

  12. Physicochemical investigations of carbon nanofiber supported Cu/ZrO2 catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Din, Israf Ud; Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Subbarao, Duvvuri; Naeem, A.

    2014-01-01

    Zirconia-promoted copper/carbon nanofiber catalysts (Cu‐ZrO 2 /CNF) were prepared by the sequential deposition precipitation method. The Herringbone type of carbon nanofiber GNF-100 (Graphite nanofiber) was used as a catalyst support. Carbon nanofiber was oxidized to (CNF-O) with 5% and 65 % concentration of nitric acid (HNO 3 ). The CNF activated with 5% HNO 3 produced higher surface area which is 155 m 2 /g. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and N 2 adsorption-desorption. The results showed that increase of HNO 3 concentration reduced the surface area and porosity of the catalyst

  13. Film of lignocellulosic carbon material for self-supporting electrodes in electric double-layer capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Funabashi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel thin, wood-based carbon material with heterogeneous pores, film of lignocellulosic carbon material (FLCM, was successfully fabricated by carbonizing softwood samples of Picea jezoensis (Jezo spruce. Simultaneous increase in the specific surface area of FLCM and its affinity for electrolyte solvents in an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC were achieved by the vacuum ultraviolet/ozone (VUV/O3 treatment. This treatment increased the specific surface area of FLCM by 50% over that of original FLCM. The results obtained in this study confirmed that FLCM is an appropriate self-supporting EDLC electrode material without any warps and cracks.

  14. Microstructural evaluation of a low carbon steel submitted to boriding treatment pre and post GTAW welding; Avaliacao microestrutural de um aco de baixo carbono submetido ao tratamento de boretacao pre e pos-soldagem GTAW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollnow, Edilson Nunes; Osorio, Alice Goncalves, E-mail: edilson.pollnow@hotmail.com, E-mail: osorio.alice@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (CDTec/UFPel), Pelotas, RS (Brazil). Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico; Araujo, Douglas Bezerra de, E-mail: dbaraujo@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (FEMEC/UFU), Uberlandia, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Passos, Thais Andrezza dos; Souza, Daniel, E-mail: thais.andrezza.passos@gmail.com, E-mail: danielsouza@furg.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (EE/FURG), Rio Grande, RS (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2017-04-15

    Studies on surface engineering area are given great importance due to the improvement that surface modifications provide to materials. With a global market that has the need to provide parts and equipment with extended service life and low cost, to support stringent requests and thus maintain its high performance, surface treatments may bring what was impossible into reality. Among the surface treatments that have received attention recently, we have the thermochemical process of boriding. The boriding process consists of saturate the surface of steels and metal alloys with boron. This saturation provides an increase in the surface properties not inherent to the base metal, such as hardness, resistance to abrasion and corrosion. Although the properties of boriding steels have already been studied, the effects that the boriding process perform on the steel during or after the welding processes are not known. Hence, it is the purpose of this study to evaluate the microstructure of a low carbon steel treated with boriding before and after GTAW welding. The results indicated poor metallurgical weldability of low carbon steel with boride layer, with the presence of solidification cracks. Nonetheless, the steel welded previous to boring treatment presented a more ductile nucleus, with harder surface. Although the values of hardness within the nucleus of the steel had dropped drastically at the welded zone after the boring, the surface of this steel showed higher values of hardness due to the boriding layer. This fact should be considered when applications where wear resistance is needed. (author)

  15. Effect of Nickel Contents on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties for Low-Carbon Bainitic Weld Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Gaojun; Cao, Rui; Yang, Jun; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Shuai; Guo, Xili; Yuan, Junjun; Zhang, Xiaobo; Chen, Jianhong

    2017-05-01

    Multi-pass weld metals were deposited on Q345 base steel using metal powder-flux-cored wire with various Ni contents to investigate the effects of the Ni content on the weld microstructure and property. The types of the microstructures were identified by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and micro-hardness tests. As a focusing point, the lath bainite and lath martensite were distinguished by their compositions, morphologies, and hardness. In particular, a number of black plane facets appearing between lath bainite or lath martensite packets were characterized by laser scanning confocal microscope. The results indicated that with the increase in Ni contents in the range of 0, 2, 4, and 6%, the microstructures in the weld-deposited metal were changed from the domination of the granular bainite to the majority of the lath bainite and/or the lath martensite and the micro-hardness of the weld-deposited metal increased. Meanwhile, the average width of columnar grain displays a decreasing trend and prior austenite grain size decreases while increases with higher Ni content above 4%. Yield strength and ultimate tensile strength decrease, while the reduction in fracture area increases with the decreasing Ni mass fraction and the increasing test temperature, respectively. And poor yield strength in Ni6 specimen can be attributed to elements segregation caused by weld defect. Finally, micro-hardness distribution in correspondence with specimens presents as a style of cloud-map.

  16. Reduced graphene oxide supported gold nanoparticles for electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saquib, Mohammad; Halder, Aditi

    2018-02-01

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide is one of the methods which have the capability to recycle CO2 into valuable products for energy and industrial applications. This research article describes about a new electrocatalyst "reduced graphene oxide supported gold nanoparticles" for selective electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide. The main aim for conversion of CO2 to CO lies in the fact that the latter is an important component of syn gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), which is then converted into liquid fuel via well-known industrial process called Fischer-Tropsch process. In this work, we have synthesized different composites of the gold nanoparticles supported on defective reduced graphene oxide to evaluate the catalytic activity of reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-supported gold nanoparticles and the role of defective RGO support towards the electrochemical reduction of CO2. Electrochemical and impedance measurements demonstrate that higher concentration of gold nanoparticles on the graphene support led to remarkable decrease in the onset potential of 240 mV and increase in the current density for CO2 reduction. Lower impedance and Tafel slope values also clearly support our findings for the better performance of RGOAu than bare Au for CO2 reduction.

  17. Ruthenium supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline electrolyte; Poster

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabena, LF

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available . Recently, several researchers have shown that nitrogen modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are good electrocatalyst supports and that they enhance the electrocatalytic activity for the ORR. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) prepared via thermal chemical...

  18. Product carbon footprint assessment supporting the green supply chain construction in household appliance manufacturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianhua; Sun, Liang; Guo, Huiting

    2017-11-01

    Supply chain carbon emission is one of the factors considered in the green supply chain management. A method was designed to support the green supply chain measures based on the carbon footprint assessment for products. A research for 3 typical household appliances carbon footprint assessment was conducted to explore using product carbon footprint assessment method to guide the green supply chain management of the manufacturers. The result could reflect the differences directions on green supply chain management of manufacturers of washing machine, air conditioner and microwave, respectively That is, the washing machine manufacturer should pay attention to the low carbon activities in upstream suppliers in highest priority, and also the promotion of product energy efficiency. The air conditioner manufacturer should pay attention to the product energy efficiency increasing in highest priority, and the improvement of refrigerant to decrease its GWP. And the microwave manufacture could only focus on the energy efficiency increasing because it contributes most of the carbon emission to its carbon footprint. Besides, the representativeness of product and the applicability of the method were also discussed. As the manufacturer could master the technical information on raw material and components of its products to conduct the product carbon footprint assessment, this method could help the manufacturer to identify the effective green supply chain measures in the preliminary stage.

  19. Simple preparation of tungsten supported carbon nanoreactors for specific applications: Adsorption, catalysis and electrochemical activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayani, Vishal J.; Mayani, Suranjana V.; Kim, Sang Wook, E-mail: swkim@dongguk.ac.kr

    2015-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Tungsten carbon composites have shown great recognition in catalysis and electrochemistry. • W-carbon composites are prepared by template replication and W-doping on carbon cage. • Nanocomposites offer enormous assurance as adsorbent, electrode and heterogeneous catalyst. - Abstract: Porous carbon supported tungsten carbide nanoreactors, two sizes (∼25 and 170 nm), were designed using economical petroleum pitch residue followed by tungsten (W) doping. X-ray diffractions showed both carbon tungsten composites (CTC-25 and CTC-170) contained tungsten subcarbide (W{sub 2}C) and monocarbide (WC) as the major and minor crystalline phases, respectively. The present study provides a multiple perspective of carbon tungsten composites (CTCs) for methanol oxidation (as an electrode), adsorption (as an adsorbent) and degradation (as a solid catalyst) of methylene blue (MB). The operational electrodes were designed from both CTCs and used as a catalyst in an electrocatalysis process. The electrocatalysts exhibited high and stable catalytic performance (CTCE-25 > CTCE-170) in methanol electro-oxidation. The newly synthesized W-doped carbon nanoreactors were used successfully as an adsorbent for MB and a heterogeneous catalyst for MB oxidation. Ordered CTC-25 and CTC-170 exhibited dynamic MB adsorption within 15 min and complete oxidation of MB in 25–40 min. A synergetic effect between tungsten carbide and the carbon cage framework was noted.

  20. Fabrication variables affecting the structure and properties of supported carbon molecular sieve membranes for hydrogen separation

    KAUST Repository

    Briceñ o, Kelly; Montané , Daniel; Garcia-Valls, Ricard; Iulianelli, Adolfo; Basile, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    A high molecular weight polyimide (Matrimid) was used as a precursor for fabricating supported carbon molecular sieve membranes without crack formation at 550-700°C pyrolysis temperature. A one-step polymer (polyimide) coating method as precursor of carbon layer was used without needing a prior modification of a TiO 2 macroporous support. The following fabrication variables were optimized and studied to determine their effect on the carbon structure: polymeric solution concentration, solvent extraction, heating rate and pyrolysis temperature. Two techniques (Thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy) were used to determine these effects on final carbon structure. Likewise, the effect of the support was also reported as an additional and important variable in the design of supported carbon membranes. Atomic force microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry quantified the degree of influence. Pure gas permeation tests were performed using CH 4, CO, CO 2 and H 2. The presence of a molecular sieving mechanism was confirmed after defects were plugged with PDMS solution at 12wt%. Gas selectivities higher than Knudsen theoretical values were reached with membranes obtained over 650°C, showing as best values 4.46, 4.70 and 10.62 for H 2/N 2, H 2/CO and H 2/CH 4 ratio, respectively. Permeance values were over 9.82×10 -9mol/(m 2Pas)during pure hydrogen permeation tests. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Fabrication variables affecting the structure and properties of supported carbon molecular sieve membranes for hydrogen separation

    KAUST Repository

    Briceño, Kelly

    2012-10-01

    A high molecular weight polyimide (Matrimid) was used as a precursor for fabricating supported carbon molecular sieve membranes without crack formation at 550-700°C pyrolysis temperature. A one-step polymer (polyimide) coating method as precursor of carbon layer was used without needing a prior modification of a TiO 2 macroporous support. The following fabrication variables were optimized and studied to determine their effect on the carbon structure: polymeric solution concentration, solvent extraction, heating rate and pyrolysis temperature. Two techniques (Thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy) were used to determine these effects on final carbon structure. Likewise, the effect of the support was also reported as an additional and important variable in the design of supported carbon membranes. Atomic force microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry quantified the degree of influence. Pure gas permeation tests were performed using CH 4, CO, CO 2 and H 2. The presence of a molecular sieving mechanism was confirmed after defects were plugged with PDMS solution at 12wt%. Gas selectivities higher than Knudsen theoretical values were reached with membranes obtained over 650°C, showing as best values 4.46, 4.70 and 10.62 for H 2/N 2, H 2/CO and H 2/CH 4 ratio, respectively. Permeance values were over 9.82×10 -9mol/(m 2Pas)during pure hydrogen permeation tests. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Effect of Strength and Microstructure on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior and Mechanism of X80 Pipeline Steel in High pH Carbonate/Bicarbonate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Du, Cuiwei; Li, Xiaogang; Liu, Zhiyong; Wang, Shengrong; Zhao, Tianliang; Jia, Jinghuan

    2014-04-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors and mechanisms of X80 pipeline steels with different strength and microstructure in high pH carbonate/bicarbonate solution were investigated by slow strain rate testing and electrochemical test. The results showed that the cracking mode of low strength X80 steel composed of bulky polygonal ferrite and granular bainite in high pH solution was intergranular (IGSCC), and the SCC mechanism was anodic dissolution (AD). While the mixed cracking mode of high strength X80 steel consisted of fine acicular ferrite and granular bainite was intergranular (IGSCC) in the early stage, and transgranular (TGSCC) in the later stage. The decrease of pH value of crack tip was probably the key reason for the occurrence of TGSCC. The SCC mechanism may be a mixed mode of AD and hydrogen embrittlement (HE), and the HE mechanism may play a significant role in the deep crack propagation at the later stage. The cracking modes and SCC mechanisms of the two X80 steels were associated with its microstructure and strength.

  3. Relationship Between Solidification Microstructure and Hot Cracking Susceptibility for Continuous Casting of Low-Carbon and High-Strength Low-Alloyed Steels: A Phase-Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2013-08-01

    Hot cracking is one of the major defects in continuous casting of steels, frequently limiting the productivity. To understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low-carbon and two high-strength low-alloyed steels. 2D simulation of the initial stage of solidification is performed in a moving slice of the slab using proprietary multiphase-field software and taking into account all elements which are expected to have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during solidification. To account for the correct thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the multicomponent alloy grades, the simulation software is online coupled to commercial thermodynamic and mobility databases. A moving-frame boundary condition allows traveling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. From the simulation results, significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are quantitatively evaluated and correlated with their hot cracking behavior according to the Rappaz-Drezet-Gremaud (RDG) hot cracking criterion. The possible role of the microalloying elements in hot cracking, in particular of traces of Ti, is analyzed. With the assumption that TiN precipitates trigger coalescence of the primary dendrites, quantitative evaluation of the critical strain rates leads to a full agreement with the observed hot cracking behavior.

  4. Effect of substrate bias voltage on tensile properties of single crystal silicon microstructure fully coated with plasma CVD diamond-like carbon film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlei; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    2018-06-01

    Tensile strength and strength distribution in a microstructure of single crystal silicon (SCS) were improved significantly by coating the surface with a diamond-like carbon (DLC) film. To explore the influence of coating parameters and the mechanism of film fracture, SCS microstructure surfaces (120 × 4 × 5 μm3) were fully coated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of a DLC at five different bias voltages. After the depositions, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS), surface profilometry, atomic force microscope (AFM) measurement, and nanoindentation methods were used to study the chemical and mechanical properties of the deposited DLC films. Tensile test indicated that the average strength of coated samples was 13.2-29.6% higher than that of the SCS sample, and samples fabricated with a -400 V bias voltage were strongest. The fracture toughness of the DLC film was the dominant factor in the observed tensile strength. Deviations in strength were reduced with increasingly negative bias voltage. The effect of residual stress on the tensile properties is discussed in detail.

  5. Tensile test of a silicon microstructure fully coated with submicrometer-thick diamond like carbon film using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlei; Uesugi, Akio; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports the tensile properties of single-crystal silicon (SCS) microstructures fully coated with sub-micrometer thick diamond like carbon (DLC) film using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). To minimize the deformations or damages caused by non-uniform coating of DLC, which has high compression residual stress, released SCS specimens with the dimensions of 120 µm long, 4 µm wide, and 5 µm thick were coated from the top and bottom side simultaneously. The thickness of DLC coating is around 150 nm and three different bias voltages were used for deposition. The tensile strength improved from 13.4 to 53.5% with the increasing of negative bias voltage. In addition, the deviation in strength also reduced significantly compared to bare SCS sample.

  6. The effect of the multi-pass non-circular drawing sequence on mechanical properties and microstructure evolution of low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Wan; Baek, Hyun Moo; Hwang, Sun Kwang; Son, Il-Heon; Bae, Chul Min; Im, Yong-Taek

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A multi-pass non-circular drawing sequence is proposed to make high-strength wires. • The sequence was designed and applied for a low-carbon steel wire up to the 10th pass. • Many LAGBs and small grain size of the wire produced by the sequence were obtained. • High plastic deformation was imposed on the wire, resulting in grain refinement. • The sequence made fine-grained wires with improved UTS, ductility and fatigue life. - Abstract: In this study, the multi-pass non-circular drawing sequence was investigated for manufacturing high-strength wires with better ductility in a simple continuous way without adding additional alloys and heat treatment considering the effect of microstructure evolution and die geometry of the sequence on the mechanical properties of low-carbon steel during the process. For this purpose, the non-circular drawing sequence was designed and applied up to the 10th pass at room temperature. Mechanical properties and microstructure evolution of the specimen processed by the sequence were investigated by tension, Vickers micro-hardness, electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD), and fatigue tests compared with those for the conventional wire-drawing process. From the EBSD results, the higher low angle grain boundaries length per unit area and smaller average grain size of the specimen processed by the non-circular drawing sequence were obtained than those of the specimen processed by the wire-drawing process for the 8th pass. These results indicated that more plastic deformation was imposed in the material by the non-circular drawing sequence, resulting in grain refinement of the deformed specimen compared to the wire-drawing process. It is demonstrated that the multi-pass non-circular drawing sequence could be beneficial in producing fine-grained wires with improved ultimate tensile strength, ductility, and fatigue property by simply changing drawing dies geometry of the conventional wire-drawing process

  7. Carbon isotopic record from Upper Devonian carbonates at Dongcun in Guilin, southern China, supporting the world-wide pattern of carbon isotope excursions during Frasnian-Famennian transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Two positive δ13C excursions are presented in records from the Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) marine carbonate sediments in Europe, America, Africa, and Australia, having been considered as a worldwide pattern, and attributed to enhanced organic carbon burial during the F-F biological mass extinction. However, this worldwide pattern has not been revealed from the well-deposited Late Devonian sequences in southern China. In this paper, a detailed investigation has been made on the Late Devonian section at Dongcun, Guilin, southern China to constrain perturbations in δ13C of carbonates in the F-F deposited sequence. The result from this section also indicates two positive δ13C excursions during the F-F transition. The first excursion with an amplitude of 1.5‰ occurred at the bottom of linguiformis Zone, later than the early excursion existing in the Late rhenana Zone of the Late Devonian profiles in other continents, especially, in central Europe. This difference has been expected to be a result as conodont Palmatolepis linguiformis occurred earlier in southern China than other sites. The second excursion with an amplitude of 2.1‰ is located at the F-F boundary, same as the records from other continents. This result strongly supports the view that two carbon isotope positive excursions during the F-F transition are common in carbonate sediments, resulting from worldwide increases of organic carbon burial intensity.

  8. METHANE DRY REFORMING OVER Ni SUPPORTED ON PINE SAWDUST ACTIVATED CARBON: EFFECTS OF SUPPORT SURFACE PROPERTIES AND METAL LOADING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael García

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of metal loading and support surface functional groups (SFG on methane dry reforming (MDR over Ni catalysts supported on pine-sawdust derived activated carbon were studied. Using pine sawdust as the catalyst support precursor, the smallest variety and lowest concentration of SFG led to best Ni dispersion and highest catalytic activity, which increased with Ni loading up to 3 Ni atoms nm-2. At higher Ni loading, the formation of large metal aggregates was observed, consistent with a lower "apparen" surface area and a decrease in catalytic activity. The H2/CO ratio rose with increasing reaction temperature, indicating that increasingly important side reactions were taking place in addition to MDR.

  9. Nanostructured Carbon Materials as Supports in the Preparation of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Lázaro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Different advanced nanostructured carbon materials, such as carbon nanocoils, carbon nanofibers, graphitized ordered mesoporous carbons and carbon xerogels, presenting interesting features such as high electrical conductivity and extensively developed porous structure were synthesized and used as supports in the preparation of electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs. The main advantage of these supports is that their physical properties and surface chemistry can be tailored to adapt the carbonaceous material to the catalytic requirements. Moreover, all of them present a highly mesoporous structure, diminishing diffusion problems, and both graphitic character and surface area can be conveniently modified. In the present work, the influence of the particular features of each material on the catalytic activity and stability was analyzed. Results have been compared with those obtained for commercial catalysts supported on Vulcan XC-72R, Pt/C and PtRu/C (ETEK. Both a highly ordered graphitic and mesopore-enriched structure of these advanced nanostructured materials resulted in an improved electrochemical performance in comparison to the commercial catalysts assayed, both towards CO and alcohol oxidation.

  10. Studies on the core-support carbon material for VHTR, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hideto; Saito, Tamotsu; Fukuda, Yasumasa; Sasaki, Yasuichi; Hasegawa, Takashi.

    1979-11-01

    To obtain information of core-support carbon material for VHTR, thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of three domestic carbon blocks were measured. Results indicated the need for development of carbon material with lower thermal conductivity for VHTR. These two were also measured of the samples heat-treated between 1000 0 C and 3040 0 C for one hour. Thermal conductivity increased with heat-treatment above 1200 0 C and resistivity stayed constant between 1500 0 C and 2000 0 C. The results should be useful in choosing the final heat-treatment temperature in carbon material production. The changes of Lorentz number with heat treatment were classified into three heat-treatment temperature regions of below 1500 0 C, 1500 0 C - 2500 0 C, and above 2500 0 C; the results are interpreted with a graphitization model. (author)

  11. Soil, environmental, and watershed measurements in support of carbon cycling studies in northwestern Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, T.G.; Harden, J.W.; Dabney, S.M.; Marion, D.A.; Alonso, C.; Sharpe, J.M.; Fries, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements including soil respiration, soil moisture, soil temperature, and carbon export in suspended sediments from small watersheds were recorded at several field sites in northwestern Mississippi in support of hillslope process studies associated with the U.S. Geological Survey's Mississippi Basin Carbon Project (MBCP). These measurements were made to provide information about carbon cycling in agricultural and forest ecosystems to understand the potential role of erosion and deposition in the sequestration of soil organic carbon in upland soils. The question of whether soil erosion and burial constitutes an important net sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide is one hypothesis that the MBCP is evaluating to better understand carbon cycling and climate change. This report contains discussion of methods used and presents data for the period December 1996 through March 1998. Included in the report are ancillary data provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) ARS National Sedimentation Laboratory and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) Center for Bottomland Hardwoods Research on rainfall, runoff, sediment yield, forest biomass and grain yield. Together with the data collected by the USGS these data permit the construction of carbon budgets and the calibration of models of soil organic matter dynamics and sediment transport and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has established cooperative agreements with the USDA and USFS to facilitate collaborative research at research sites in northwestern Mississippi.

  12. Airborne Measurements in Support of the NASA Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Byron; Davis, Ken; Barrick, John; Browell, Edward; Chen, Gao; Dobler, Jeremy; Fried, Alan; Lauvaux, Thomas; Lin, Bing; McGill, Matt; hide

    2015-01-01

    NASA announced the research opportunity Earth Venture Suborbital -2 (EVS-2) mission in support of the NASA's science strategic goals and objectives in 2013. Penn State University, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), and other academic institutions, government agencies, and industrial companies together formulated and proposed the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport -America (ACT -America) suborbital mission, which was subsequently selected for implementation. The airborne measurements that are part of ACT-America will provide a unique set of remote and in-situ measurements of CO2 over North America at spatial and temporal scales not previously available to the science community and this will greatly enhance our understanding of the carbon cycle. ACT -America will consist of five airborne campaigns, covering all four seasons, to measure regional atmospheric carbon distributions and to evaluate the accuracy of atmospheric transport models used to assess carbon sinks and sources under fair and stormy weather conditions. This coordinated mission will measure atmospheric carbon in the three most important regions of the continental US carbon balance: Northeast, Midwest, and South. Data will be collected using 2 airborne platforms (NASA Wallops' C-130 and NASA Langley's B-200) with both in-situ and lidar instruments, along with instrumented ground towers and under flights of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) satellite. This presentation provides an overview of the ACT-America instruments, with particular emphasis on the airborne CO2and backscatter lidars, and the, rationale, approach, and anticipated results from this mission.

  13. Three-dimensional structure of Au nanoparticles supported on amorphous silica and carbon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruma, A; Li, Z Y

    2012-01-01

    Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) has been employed to study the three-dimensional structure of gold (Au) nanoparticles deposited by means of thermal evaporation in high vacuum on amorphous silica (a-SiO 2 ) and amorphous carbon (a-C) supports. By performing quantitative analysis on the evolution of the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) images, we studied the influence of the nature and the temperature of support on the growth mode of gold nanoparticles.

  14. Composite Materials for Thermal Energy Storage: Enhancing Performance through Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhiwei; Ye, Feng; Ding, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    Chemical incompatibility and low thermal conductivity issues of molten-salt-based thermal energy storage materials can be addressed by using microstructured composites. Using a eutectic mixture of lithium and sodium carbonates as molten salt, magnesium oxide as supporting material, and graphite as thermal conductivity enhancer, the microstructural development, chemical compatibility, thermal stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal energy storage performance of composite materials are investigated. The ceramic supporting material is essential for preventing salt leakage and hence provides a solution to the chemical incompatibility issue. The use of graphite gives a significant enhancement on the thermal conductivity of the composite. Analyses suggest that the experimentally observed microstructural development of the composite is associated with the wettability of the salt on the ceramic substrate and that on the thermal conduction enhancer. PMID:24591286

  15. Composite materials for thermal energy storage: enhancing performance through microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhiwei; Ye, Feng; Ding, Yulong

    2014-05-01

    Chemical incompatibility and low thermal conductivity issues of molten-salt-based thermal energy storage materials can be addressed by using microstructured composites. Using a eutectic mixture of lithium and sodium carbonates as molten salt, magnesium oxide as supporting material, and graphite as thermal conductivity enhancer, the microstructural development, chemical compatibility, thermal stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal energy storage performance of composite materials are investigated. The ceramic supporting material is essential for preventing salt leakage and hence provides a solution to the chemical incompatibility issue. The use of graphite gives a significant enhancement on the thermal conductivity of the composite. Analyses suggest that the experimentally observed microstructural development of the composite is associated with the wettability of the salt on the ceramic substrate and that on the thermal conduction enhancer. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Carbon Support Surface Effects in the Gold-Catalyzed Oxidation of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donoeva, Baira; Masoud, Nazila; De Jongh, Petra E.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural into 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid is an important transformation for the production of bio-based polymers. Carbon-supported gold catalysts hold great promise for this transformation. Here we demonstrate that the activity, selectivity, and stability of the

  17. The role of Ni in sulfided carbon-supported Ni-Mo hydrodesulfurization catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwens, S.M.A.M.; Barthe-Zahir, N.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1991-01-01

    The thiophene hydrodesulfurization activities of Ni and Ni---Mo sulfide catalysts supported on activated carbon were measured at atmospheric pressure and the catalyst structures were studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, dynamic oxygen chemisorption, and chemical sulfur analysis. The

  18. Electrochemically controlled winding and unwinding of substrate-supported carbon nanoscrolls

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tarábková, Hana; Zelinger, Zdeněk; Janda, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 8 (2018), s. 5900-5908 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-05167s Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electrochemistry * carbon nanoscrolls * electrical energy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  19. Activated carbon supported CaO for conversion of palm oil to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, activated carbon supported CaO catalyst was used for the transesterification reaction of palm oil. The catalyst was prepared according to the conventional incipient witness impregnation method. Kinetic experiment was performed in a batch reactor in the presence of heterogeneous catalyst for a wide range of ...

  20. Highly Active, Carbon-supported, PdSn Nano-core, Partially ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbon-supported, Pt partially covered, PdSn alloy nanoparticles (Pt-PdSn/C) were synthesized via a metathetical reaction of PdSn alloy nanoparticles, and a platinum precursor. The electrochemical activity was evaluated by methanol oxidation. The Pt-PdSn/C catalysts were characterized by transmission electron ...

  1. Carbon Nanofiber Supported Transition-Metal Carbide Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, A.; Gosselink, R.W.; Dijkstra, J.; Bitter, J.H.; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) studies over carbon nanofiber-supported (CNF) W2C and Mo2C catalysts were performed on guaiacol, a prototypical substrate to evaluate the potential of a catalyst for valorization of depolymerized lignin streams. Typical reactions were executed at 55 bar hydrogen pressure

  2. Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts in high temperature polymer electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qingfeng, Li; Bergqvist, R. S.; Hjuler, H. A.

    1999-01-01

    Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts has been investigated in H3PO4, H3PO4-doped Nafion and PBI polymer electrolytes in a temperature range from 80 to 190°C. Compared with pure H3PO4, using the H3PO4 doped Nafion and PBI polymer electrolytes can significantly improve the oxygen...

  3. Microstructural characterization of low and high carbon CoCrMo alloy nanoparticles produced by mechanical milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, T. A.; Goode, A. E.; Porter, A. E.; Ryan, M. P.; Milne, S. J.; Brown, A. P.; Brydson, R. M. D.

    2014-06-01

    CoCrMo alloys are utilised as the main material in hip prostheses. The link between this type of hip prosthesis and chronic pain remains unclear. Studies suggest that wear debris generated in-vivo may be related to post-operative complications such as inflammation. These alloys can contain different amounts of carbon, which improves the mechanical properties of the alloy. However, the formation of carbides could become sites that initiate corrosion, releasing ions and/or particles into the human body. This study analysed the mechanical milling of alloys containing both high and low carbon levels in relevant biological media, as an alternative route to generate wear debris. The results show that low carbon alloys produce significantly more nanoparticles than high carbon alloys. During the milling process, strain induces an fcc to hcp phase transformation. Evidence for cobalt and molybdenum dissolution in the presence of serum was confirmed by ICP-MS and TEM EDX techniques.

  4. Graphitized Carbon: A Promising Stable Cathode Catalyst Support Material for Long Term PEMFC Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Paritosh Kumar; Regnet, Fabian; Jörissen, Ludwig

    2018-05-28

    Stability of cathode catalyst support material is one of the big challenges of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) for long term applications. Traditional carbon black (CB) supports are not stable enough to prevent oxidation to CO₂ under fuel cell operating conditions. The feasibility of a graphitized carbon (GC) as a cathode catalyst support for low temperature PEMFC is investigated herein. GC and CB supported Pt electrocatalysts were prepared via an already developed polyol process. The physical characterization of the prepared catalysts was performed using transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) analysis, and their electrochemical characterizations were conducted via cyclic voltammetry(CV), rotating disk electrode (RDE) and potential cycling, and eventually, the catalysts were processed using membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) for single cell performance tests. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SEM) have been used as MEA diagonostic tools. GC showed superior stability over CB in acid electrolyte under potential conditions. Single cell MEA performance of the GC-supported catalyst is comparable with the CB-supported catalyst. A correlation of MEA performance of the supported catalysts of different Brunauer⁻Emmett⁻Teller (BET) surface areas with the ionomer content was also established. GC was identified as a promising candidate for catalyst support in terms of both of the stability and the performance of fuel cell.

  5. Carbon materials derived from chitosan/cellulose cryogel-supported zeolite imidazole frameworks for potential supercapacitor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zehui; Yang, Lan; Cao, Hongbin; Chang, Yu; Tang, Kexin; Cao, Zhiqin; Chang, Junjun; Cao, Youpeng; Wang, Wenbo; Gao, Meng; Liu, Chenming; Liu, Dagang; Zhao, He; Zhang, Yi; Li, Mingjie

    2017-11-01

    In order to promote sustainable development, green and renewable clean energy technologies continue to be developed to meet the growing demand for energy, such as supercapacitor, fuel cells and lithium-ion battery. It is urgent to develop appropriate nanomaterials for these energy technologies to reduce the volume of the device, improve the efficiency of energy conversion and enlarge the energy storage capacity. Here, chitosan/cellulose carbon cryogel (CCS/CCL) were designed and synthesized. Through the introduction of zeolite imidazole frameworks (ZIFs) into the chitosan/cellulose cryogels, the obtained materials showed a microstructure of ZIF-7 (a kind of ZIFs) coated chitosan/cellulose fibers (CS/CL). After carbonizing, the as-prepared carbonized ZIF-7@cellulose cryogel (NC@CCL, NC is carbonized ZIF-7) and carbonized ZIF-7@chitosan cryogel (NC@CCS) exhibited suitable microspore contents of 34.37% and 30%, respectively, and they both showed an internal resistance lower than 2Ω. Thereby, NC@CCL and NC@CCS exhibited a high specific capacitance of 150.4Fg -1 and 173.1Fg -1 , respectively, which were much higher than those of the original materials. This approach offers a facile method for improving the strength and electronic conductivity of carbon cryogel derived from nature polymers, and also efficiently inhibits the agglomeration of cryogel during carbonization in high temperature, which opens a novel avenue for the development of carbon cryogel materials for application in energy conversion systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Energy and climate hand-in-hand: Financing RES-E support with carbon revenues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verde, Stefano F.; Pazienza, Maria Grazia

    2016-01-01

    In Italy, the cost of support for renewable electricity (RES-E) is largely recovered through the “A3 surcharge”, which weighs heavily on electricity bills. Using household survey data, we show the A3 surcharge is markedly regressive. Carbon taxation in the non-ETS sector is envisaged as a means to reduce CO_2 emissions cost-effectively and generate revenue to lower the A3 surcharge. A non-ETS carbon tax would be less regressive than the A3 surcharge and its cost would be more evenly distributed across households. We calculate the revenue of a €20/tCO_2 non-ETS carbon tax would have allowed a cut in the A3 surcharge of about 68% in 2011, and 39% in 2012. The impact of the carbon tax plus the reduced A3 surcharge would have been less regressive, but the cost higher for most households. The restrictions imposed in the simulations mean the results are only appropriate to render first-round effects of the reform. Policy relevance: In the vast majority of the EU Member States, the cost of RES-E support is largely paid by electricity consumers, most often through specific surcharges. Rising electricity prices are a common concern given the implications for competitiveness and equity. The Member States facing this issue could conveniently address it through environmental tax reforms consistent with the Climate and Energy Package. Replacing RES-E surcharges with carbon taxes in the non-ETS sector would permit cost-effective reduction of CO_2 emissions while allocating the cost of RES-E support more equitably. The difference in regressivity would stem from the different consumption patterns of home fuels (including electricity) and motor fuels across income distribution. A cross-country comparison of energy household budget shares proves the structural nature of this difference between home fuels and motor fuels. Moreover, the notion that electricity consumers should pay for RES-E support is questioned on the grounds that electricity is a basic necessity good and RES

  7. Effect of caffeine inhibitor in corrosion rate and microstructure of KS01 carbon steel and AISI 1045 at media sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulistioso Giat S; Setyo Purwanto; Deswita; Ari Handayani; Berta Vidyananda

    2013-01-01

    Many synthetic materials are good inhibitors for the prevention of corrosion . Many inhibitors are toxic, because of the influence of these toxic properties, recently use organic materials as corrosion inhibitors, that are not hazardous and environmentally friendly. In this study caffeine compounds used as corrosion inhibitors. This compound could be used as corrosion inhibitor because of the existence of their chemical groups that containing free electron pair, that is nitrogen. Corrosion rate testing conducted in sea water medium taken from the Northern region of Indramayu with variations of the concentration of caffeine 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 ppm to determine the optimum concentration of caffeine in corrosion rate of carbon steel AISI 1045 and KS01 that a widely used on the cooling system in the industry. Corrosion rate of KS-01 steel before used in inhibitor media is 25,07 mpy that less than corrosion rate of carbon steel AISI 1045, is 45,82 mpy . The results of this study indicate that caffeine is able to inhibit the corrosion rate of both of samples with optimum efficiency KS01 for 64.38%, and AISI 1045 of 66.63%. The optimum concentration of caffeine to inhibited AISI 1045 is 150 ppm and for KS01 is 100 ppm,. Beside that analysis of microstructure for both samples have done, for media before and after inhibitor addition. (author)

  8. Noncovalently functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a stable support of Pt nanoparticles for oxygen reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Sheng; Kou, Rong; Wang, Chongmin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Lin, Yuehe [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Wang, Xiqing; Dai, Sheng [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2010-04-02

    We report a durable electrocatalyst support, highly graphitized mesoporous carbon (GMPC), for oxygen reduction in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. GMPC is prepared through graphitizing the self-assembled soft-template mesoporous carbon (MPC) under high temperature. Heat-treatment at 2800 C greatly improves the degree of graphitization while most of the mesoporous structures and the specific surface area of MPC are retained. GMPC is then noncovalently functionalized with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and loaded with Pt nanoparticles by reducing Pt precursor (H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}) in ethylene glycol. Pt nanoparticles of {proportional_to}3.0 nm in diameter are uniformly dispersed on GMPC. Compared to Pt supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black (Pt/XC-72), Pt/GMPC exhibits a higher mass activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the mass activity retention (in percentage) is improved by a factor of {proportional_to}2 after 44 h accelerated degradation test under the potential step (1.4-0.85 V) electrochemical stressing condition which focuses on support corrosion. The enhanced activity and durability of Pt/GMPC are attributed to the graphitic structure of GMPC which is more resistant to corrosion. These findings demonstrate that GMPC is a promising oxygen reduction electrocatalyst support for PEM fuel cells. The approach reported in this work provides a facile, eco-friendly promising strategy for synthesizing stable metal nanoparticles on hydrophobic support materials. (author)

  9. Influence of the Synthesis Method for Pt Catalysts Supported on Highly Mesoporous Carbon Xerogel and Vulcan Carbon Black on the Electro-Oxidation of Methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinthia Alegre

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Platinum catalysts supported on carbon xerogel and carbon black (Vulcan were synthesized with the aim of investigating the influence of the characteristics of the support on the electrochemical performance of the catalysts. Three synthesis methods were compared: an impregnation method with two different reducing agents, sodium borohydride and formic acid, and a microemulsion method, in order to study the effect of the synthesis method on the physico-chemical properties of the catalysts. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were applied. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were used for studying carbon monoxide and methanol oxidation. Catalysts supported on carbon xerogel presented higher catalytic activities towards CO and CH3OH oxidation than catalysts supported on Vulcan. The higher mesoporosity of carbon xerogel was responsible for the favored diffusion of reagents towards catalytic centers.

  10. On the mobility of carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles towards unveiling cathode degradation in water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciok, Paul; Schalenbach, Maximilian; Carmo, Marcelo; Stolten, Detlef

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates the influence of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) overpotential on the mobility of carbon-supported platinum particles. The migration of the platinum over the carbon support was analyzed by means of identical location transmission electron microscopy (IL-TEM). While at potentials of 0.1 and 0 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), no changes to the Pt/C material were observed. With a decrease of the overpotential to -0.1 V vs. RHE, an increase in the quantity of migrating platinum particles took place. At -0.2 V vs. RHE, a further rise in the particle migration was observed. The effect of the overpotential on the migration was explained by a higher hydrogen generation rate, the formation of a hydrogen monolayer on the platinum and the resulting changes of the platinum support distance. The mechanisms revealed in this study could describe a relevant source of degradation of PEM water electrolyzers.

  11. Carbon nanocages: a new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-03-24

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for "real world" application.

  12. The effect of immersion time to low carbon steel hardness and microstructure with hot dip galvanizing coating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, A. A.; Rajagukguk, T. O.; Sumardi, S.

    2018-01-01

    Along with developing necessities of metal materials, these rise demands of quality improvements and material protections especially the mechanical properties of the material. This research used hot dip galvanizing coating method. The objectives of this research were to find out Rockwell hardness (HRb), layer thickness, micro structure and observation with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) from result of coating by using Hot Dip Galvanizing coating method with immersion time of 3, 6, 9, and 12 minutes at 460°C. The result shows that Highest Rockwell hardness test (HRb) was at 3 minutes immersion time with 76.012 HRb. Highest thickness result was 217.3 μm at 12 minutes immersion. Microstructure test result showed that coating was formed at eta, zeta, delta and gamma phases, while Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) showed Fe, Zn, Mn, Si and S elements at the specimens after coating.

  13. Copolymerization of carbon monoxide and styrene catalyzed by resin-supported palladium polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyketone was prepared by the copolymerization of carbon monoxide (CO and styrene (ST catalyzed by o-phenylenediamine resin-supported palladium acetate. Effects of each catalytic system component such as 2,2’-bipyridine, 1,4-quinone and p-toluene-sulphonate on the copolymerization were investigated. The resin-supported catalyst and the copolymerization product were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetry (TG, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. Results indicated that the resin-supported catalyst has excellent catalytic property. Furthermore, partial catalytic activity was maintained after the catalyst was used for five times.

  14. Effect of carbonation on leachability, strength and microstructural characteristics of KMP binder stabilized Zn and Pb contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yan-Jun; Wei, Ming-Li; Reddy, Krishna R; Wu, Hao-liang

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a systematic investigation of effects of carbonation on the contaminant leachability and unconfined compressive strength of KMP stabilized contaminated soils. A field soil spiked with Zn and Pb individually and together is stabilized using a new KMP additive under standard curing conditions and also with carbonation. The KMP additive is composed of oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock, monopotassium phosphate and reactive magnesia. The stabilized soils are tested for acid neutralization capacity, toxic characteristics leaching characteristics, contaminant speciation and unconfined compression strength. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses are performed to assess reaction products. The results demonstrate that carbonation increases both acid buffer capacity index and unconfined compressive strength, but decreases leachability of KMP stabilized soils. These results are interpreted based on the changes in chemical speciation of Zn and Pb and also stability and solubility of the reaction products (metal phosphates and carbonates) formed in the soils. Overall, this study demonstrates that carbonation has positive effects on leachability and strength of the KMP stabilized soils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis of carbon-supported nickel catalysts for the dry reforming of CH{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidalgo, B.; Zubizarreta, L.; Bermudez, J.M.; Arenillas, A.; Menendez, J.A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    A series of carbon-based nickel (Ni) catalysts was prepared in order to investigate the effect of the preparation method on the dispersion of Ni and its final catalytic activity in the dry reforming of methane, i.e. CH{sub 4} + CO{sub 2} 2H{sub 2} + 2CO. Three parameters were studied: (i) the influence of the surface chemistry of the carbon used as support; (ii) the method of drying (conventional vs. microwave drying); and, (iii) the temperature of the reduction stage. In order to study the role of the surface chemistry of the commercial activated carbon used as support, the active carbon was tested as received and oxidized. Although a better Ni dispersion was achieved over the oxidized support, the conversions were much lower. It was also found that microwave drying offers various advantages over conventional drying, the main one being that less time is required to prepare the catalyst. Two reduction temperatures were used (300 and 500 C), being found that it is necessary to adjust this parameter to prevent the Ni particles from sintering. (author)

  16. Supported phosphate and carbonate salts for heterogeneous catalysis of triglycerides to fatty acid methyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Stephanie Lynne

    Fatty acid methyl esters made from vegetable oil, or biodiesel, have been identified as a substitute for diesel derived from crude oil. Biodiesel is currently made using a homogeneous base catalyst to perform the transesterification of triglycerides with methanol to generate fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). The use of a homogeneous catalyst necessitates additional purification of the product and byproducts before sale, and the catalyst is consumed and discarded. The development of a heterogeneous basic catalyst for the production of FAME is desirable. Tribasic phosphate salts and dibasic carbonate salts are active for the production of FAME but generally operate as homogeneous catalysts. Supporting these phosphate and carbonate salts on mesoporous MCM-41, microporous silica gel, and nonporous a-alumina proved successful to greater or lesser degrees depending on the identity of the support and pretreatment of the support. Although these salts were supported and were active for the production of FAME from canola oil, they proved to be operating as homogeneous catalysts due to leaching of the active species off the surface of the support. Further investigation of the active species present in the tribasic phosphate catalysts identified the active support as orthophosphate, and NMR studies revealed the phosphorus to be present as orthophosphate and diphosphate in varying proportions in each catalyst. Evaluation of the acid-washing support pretreatment process revealed that the exposure of the support to acid plays a large role in the development of activity on the surface of the catalyst, but manipulation of these parameters did not prevent leaching of the active site off the surface of the catalyst. Alternate methods of support pretreatment were no more effective in preventing leaching. Tribasic phosphate supported on silica gel is not effective as a heterogeneous catalyst for FAME production from triglycerides because of the lack of stability of the phosphate on the

  17. Synthesis of Carbon Nano tubes Using Anadara Granosa Shells as Catalyst Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Zobir Hussein; Mohd Zobir Hussein; Salwani Asyikin Zakarya; Siti Halimah Sarijo

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of carbon nano tubes (CNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using natural calcite prepared from Anadara granosa shells (CS), as metal catalyst support was studied. Hexane and iron were used as carbon precursor and catalyst, respectively. The as synthesised CNTs was characterized using XRD, TEM and FESEM. From the XRD patterns the CNTs peak can be seen more incisive after purification process and from the FESEM micrographs the CNTs can be seen as a bunch of rope-like structures. (author)

  18. Structure-activity relationships of carbon-supported platinum-bismuth and platinum-antimony oxidation catalysts

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maphoru, MV

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Compositional and morphological studies on supported platinum are important for the improvement and expanded use of catalysts for oxidative coupling reactions. Nanocomposites consisting of 5% Pt supported on activated carbon and promoted with 5% Bi...

  19. Effect of Spheroidizing Annealing on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of High-Carbon Martensitic Stainless Steel 8Cr13MoV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Tao; Li, Jing; Shi, Cheng-Bin; Zhu, Qin-Tian

    2017-02-01

    The effects of holding time during both austenitizing and spheroidizing on microstructure and mechanical properties of high-carbon martensitic stainless steel 8Cr13MoV were experimentally studied. The results showed that the amount of carbides and the proportion of fine carbides decrease first and then increase with the increase in austenitizing time ( t 1) in the case of short spheroidizing time ( t 2), whereas the amount of the lamellar carbides increases. In the case of long t 2, both the amount of carbides and the proportion of fine carbides decrease, and the amount of the lamellar carbides did not increase. The hardness of the steel decreases first and then increases with the increase of t 1. Under the conditions of different t 1, the change in the size of carbides and hardness of the steel show a same trend with the variation of t 2. The size of spheroidized carbides increases, whereas the hardness of the steel decreases with increasing t 2. The longer the holding time of austenitizing, the higher is the spheroidizing rate at the earlier stage. However, the spheroidizing rate shows an opposite trend with t 1 at the later stage of spheroidizing. The effect of cooling rate on microstructure is similar with t 2. With increasing cooling rate, the dimension of carbides became smaller, and the amount of lamellar carbides increased. The elongation of the sample fracture exhibits no corresponding relationship with holding time, whereas it is closely related to the precipitation of secondary carbides caused by the alloying elements segregation.

  20. Electrospun fibrous electrodes with tunable microstructure made of polyaniline/multi-walled carbon nanotube suspension for all-solid-state supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Junsheng; Su, Shijie; Fang, Xu; Wang, Dazhi; Xu, Shuangchao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrospun PANI/MWCNT fibrous electrodes for supercapacitor were prepared. • Microstructure of electrodes is tunable by changing the electrospin parameters. • Fiber-diameter dependence of the electrode performance was observed. • High performance and good stability of electrospun electrodes were obtained. - Abstract: Electrospinning technique was used to prepare high performance fibrous electrodes with tunable microstructure for all-solid-state electrochemical supercapacitor. Symmetrically sandwiched supercapacitors consisting of flexible electrospun polyaniline (PANI)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) electrodes and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/sulfuric acid (H_2SO_4) gel electrolyte were assembled. Tunable microstructure of the fibrous electrode was obtained by changing the electrospinning parameters including the collector–needle distance (CND) and the suspension flow rate (SFR). Results show that, higher CND combining with lower SFR can result in a smaller average diameter of the electrospun fibers and hence improve the electrode performance. When the CND changes from 80 to 140 mm, the average fiber diameter will decrease from 2.89 to 1.21 μm, and the specific surface area of the electrode can increase from 57 to 83 m"2·g"−"1. The corresponding specific capacitance of the electrospun electrode will therefore increase from 129.5 to 180 F·g"−"1, leading to a synchronous improvement of the energy density of the supercapacitor from 18 to 25 Wh·kg"−"1. On the other hand, the supercapacitors using fibrous electrodes in this work also show good rate capability and cycling stability. Using the electrode with an average fiber diameter of 1.21 μm, the specific capacitances can maintain 131 F·g"−"1 at a current density of 4 A·g"−"1, which is 73% of the specific capacitance of the same sample at a current density of 0.5 A·g"−"1. And the specific capacitance of the electrode can retain 89% after 1500 charge/discharge cycles.

  1. Electrospun fibrous electrodes with tunable microstructure made of polyaniline/multi-walled carbon nanotube suspension for all-solid-state supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Junsheng; Su, Shijie; Fang, Xu [Key Laboratory for Micro/Nano Technology and System of Liaoning Province, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Wang, Dazhi, E-mail: d.wang@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Micro/Nano Technology and System of Liaoning Province, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Xu, Shuangchao [Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Electrospun PANI/MWCNT fibrous electrodes for supercapacitor were prepared. • Microstructure of electrodes is tunable by changing the electrospin parameters. • Fiber-diameter dependence of the electrode performance was observed. • High performance and good stability of electrospun electrodes were obtained. - Abstract: Electrospinning technique was used to prepare high performance fibrous electrodes with tunable microstructure for all-solid-state electrochemical supercapacitor. Symmetrically sandwiched supercapacitors consisting of flexible electrospun polyaniline (PANI)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) electrodes and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) gel electrolyte were assembled. Tunable microstructure of the fibrous electrode was obtained by changing the electrospinning parameters including the collector–needle distance (CND) and the suspension flow rate (SFR). Results show that, higher CND combining with lower SFR can result in a smaller average diameter of the electrospun fibers and hence improve the electrode performance. When the CND changes from 80 to 140 mm, the average fiber diameter will decrease from 2.89 to 1.21 μm, and the specific surface area of the electrode can increase from 57 to 83 m{sup 2}·g{sup −1}. The corresponding specific capacitance of the electrospun electrode will therefore increase from 129.5 to 180 F·g{sup −1}, leading to a synchronous improvement of the energy density of the supercapacitor from 18 to 25 Wh·kg{sup −1}. On the other hand, the supercapacitors using fibrous electrodes in this work also show good rate capability and cycling stability. Using the electrode with an average fiber diameter of 1.21 μm, the specific capacitances can maintain 131 F·g{sup −1} at a current density of 4 A·g{sup −1}, which is 73% of the specific capacitance of the same sample at a current density of 0.5 A·g{sup −1}. And the specific capacitance of the electrode can retain 89

  2. Self-supporting activated carbon/carbon nanotube/reduced graphene oxide flexible electrode for high performance supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xing; Tang, Yao; Song, Junhua; Yang, Wei; Wang, Mingshan; Zhu, Chengzhou; Zhao, Wengao; Zheng, Jianming; Lin, Yuehe

    2018-04-30

    A self-supporting and flexible activated carbon/carbon nanotube/reduced graphene oxide (AC/CNT/RGO) film has been rationally designed for constructing high- performance supercapacitor. The AC/CNT/RGO film is prepared by anchoring the AC particles with a 3D and porous framework built by hierarchically weaving the 1 D CNT and 2D RGO using their intrinsic van der Waals force. The CNT network is beneficial for improving the electronic conductivity of the electrode, while the AC particles could effectively suppress the aggregation of RGO and CNT due to their blocking effect. The synergistic effects among the AC, CNT and RGO validate the AC/CNT/RGO as a promising electrode for supercapacitor, exhibiting greatly enhanced electrochemical performances in comparison with the pure RGO film, pure CNT film and AC electrode. The AC/CNT/RGO electrode delivers a high specific capacitance of 101 F g-1 at the current density of 0.2 A g-1, offering a maximum energy density of 30.0 W h kg-1 in organic electrolyte at the cut-off voltage range of 0.001~3.0 V. The findings of this work open a new avenue for the design of self-supporting electrodes for the development of flexible and light weight energy storage supercapacitor.

  3. thesis of high-purity carbon nanotubes over alumina and silica supported bimetallic catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Ratković

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were synthesized by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition method (CCVD of ethylene over alumina and silica supported bimetallic catalysts based on Fe, Co and Ni. The catalysts were prepared by a precipitation method, calcined at 600 °C and in situ reduced in hydrogen flow at 700 °C. The CNTs growth was carried out by a flow the mixture of C2H4 and nitrogen over the catalyst powder in a horizontal oven. The structure and morphology of as-synthesized CNTs were characterized using SEM. The as-synthesized nanotubes were purified by acid and basic treatments in order to remove impurities such as amorphous carbon, graphite nanoparticles and metal catalysts. XRD and DTA/TG analyses showed that the amounts of by-products in the purified CNTs samples were reduced significantly. According to the observed results, ethylene is an active carbon source for growing high-density CNTs with high yield but more on alumina-supported catalysts than on their silica- supported counterparts. The last might be explained by SMSI formed in the case of alumina-supported catalysts, resulting in higher active phase dispersion.

  4. Physicochemical investigations of carbon nanofiber supported Cu/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Din, Israf Ud, E-mail: drisraf@yahoo.com, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Shaharun, Maizatul S., E-mail: drisraf@yahoo.com, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Subbarao, Duvvuri, E-mail: duvvuri-subbarao@petronas.com.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Naeem, A., E-mail: naeeem64@yahoo.com [National Centre of Excellence in Physical Chemistry, University of Peshawar (Pakistan)

    2014-10-24

    Zirconia-promoted copper/carbon nanofiber catalysts (Cu‐ZrO{sub 2}/CNF) were prepared by the sequential deposition precipitation method. The Herringbone type of carbon nanofiber GNF-100 (Graphite nanofiber) was used as a catalyst support. Carbon nanofiber was oxidized to (CNF-O) with 5% and 65 % concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The CNF activated with 5% HNO{sub 3} produced higher surface area which is 155 m{sup 2}/g. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption. The results showed that increase of HNO{sub 3} concentration reduced the surface area and porosity of the catalyst.

  5. Recent progress in solution plasma-synthesized-carbon-supported catalysts for energy conversion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun Li, Oi; Lee, Hoonseung; Ishizaki, Takahiro

    2018-01-01

    Carbon-based materials have been widely utilized as the electrode materials in energy conversion and storage technologies, such as fuel cells and metal-air batteries. In these systems, the oxygen reduction reaction is an important step that determines the overall performance. A novel synthesis route, named the solution plasma process, has been recently utilized to synthesize various types of metal-based and heteroatom-doped carbon catalysts. In this review, we summarize cutting-edge technologies involving the synthesis and modeling of carbon-supported catalysts synthesized via solution plasma process, followed by current progress on the electrocatalytic performance of these catalysts. This review provides the fundamental and state-of-the-art performance of solution-plasma-synthesized electrode materials, as well as the remaining scientific and technological challenges for this process.

  6. Impacts of trace carbon on the microstructure of as-sintered biomedical Ti-15Mo alloy and reassessment of the maximum carbon limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, M; Qian, M; Kong, C; Dargusch, M S

    2014-02-01

    The formation of grain boundary (GB) brittle carbides with a complex three-dimensional (3-D) morphology can be detrimental to both the fatigue properties and corrosion resistance of a biomedical titanium alloy. A detailed microscopic study has been performed on an as-sintered biomedical Ti-15Mo (in wt.%) alloy containing 0.032 wt.% C. A noticeable presence of a carbon-enriched phase has been observed along the GB, although the carbon content is well below the maximum carbon limit of 0.1 wt.% specified by ASTM Standard F2066. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) identified that the carbon-enriched phase is face-centred cubic Ti2C. 3-D tomography reconstruction revealed that the Ti2C structure has morphology similar to primary α-Ti. Nanoindentation confirmed the high hardness and high Young's modulus of the GB Ti2C phase. To avoid GB carbide formation in Ti-15Mo, the carbon content should be limited to 0.006 wt.% by Thermo-Calc predictions. Similar analyses and characterization of the carbide formation in biomedical unalloyed Ti, Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-16Nb have also been performed. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Highly active carbon supported Pd cathode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A., E-mail: amikolajczuk@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Borodzinski, A.; Kedzierzawski, P.; Mierzwa, B. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, M. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, Warsaw (Poland); Stobinski, L. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, Warsaw (Poland); Ciecierska, E. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Zimoch, A.; Opałło, M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Palladium catalyst used on the cathode DFAFC is comparable to commercial platinum catalyst. • The treatment of carbon supports in nitric acid(V) increases the electrochemically available metal surface area and the catalytic activity in oxygen reduction reaction of catalysts. - Abstract: One of the drawbacks of low-temperature fuel cells is high price of platinum-based catalysts used for the electroreduction of oxygen at the cathode of the fuel cell. The aim of this work is to develop the palladium catalyst that will replace commonly used platinum cathode catalysts. A series of palladium catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared and tested on the cathode of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell (DFAFC). Palladium nanoparticles were deposited on the carbon black (Vulcan) and on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface by reduction of palladium(II) acetate dissolved in ethanol. Hydrazine was used as a reducing agent. The effect of functionalization of the carbon supports on the catalysts physicochemical properties and the ORR catalytic activity on the cathode of DFAFC was studied. The supports were functionalized by treatment in nitric acid for 4 h at 80 °C. The structure of the prepared catalysts has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Hydrophilicity of the catalytic layers was determined by measuring contact angles of water droplets. The performance of the prepared catalysts has been compared with that of the commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C (Premetek) catalyst. The maximum power density obtained for the best palladium catalyst, deposited on the surface of functionalized carbon black, is the same as that for the commercial Pt/C (Premetek). Palladium is cheaper than platinum, therefore the developed cathode catalyst is promising for future applications.

  8. Highly active carbon supported Pd cathode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A.; Borodzinski, A.; Kedzierzawski, P.; Mierzwa, B.; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, M.; Stobinski, L.; Ciecierska, E.; Zimoch, A.; Opałło, M.

    2016-12-01

    One of the drawbacks of low-temperature fuel cells is high price of platinum-based catalysts used for the electroreduction of oxygen at the cathode of the fuel cell. The aim of this work is to develop the palladium catalyst that will replace commonly used platinum cathode catalysts. A series of palladium catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared and tested on the cathode of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell (DFAFC). Palladium nanoparticles were deposited on the carbon black (Vulcan) and on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface by reduction of palladium(II) acetate dissolved in ethanol. Hydrazine was used as a reducing agent. The effect of functionalization of the carbon supports on the catalysts physicochemical properties and the ORR catalytic activity on the cathode of DFAFC was studied. The supports were functionalized by treatment in nitric acid for 4 h at 80 °C. The structure of the prepared catalysts has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Hydrophilicity of the catalytic layers was determined by measuring contact angles of water droplets. The performance of the prepared catalysts has been compared with that of the commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C (Premetek) catalyst. The maximum power density obtained for the best palladium catalyst, deposited on the surface of functionalized carbon black, is the same as that for the commercial Pt/C (Premetek). Palladium is cheaper than platinum, therefore the developed cathode catalyst is promising for future applications.

  9. Pd nanoparticles supported on ultrahigh surface area honeycomb-like carbon for alcohol electrooxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zaoxue; He, Guoqiang; Zhang, Guanghui; Meng, Hui; Shen, Pei Kang [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2010-04-15

    The honeycomb-like porous carbon was prepared using glucose as carbon source and solid core mesoporous shell (SCMS) silica as templates. The material was characterized by physical and electrochemical methods. The results showed that the honeycomb-like porous carbon was consisted of hollow porous carbon (HPC) which gave an ultrahigh BET surface area of 1012.97 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and pore volume of 2.19 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}. The porous walls of the HPC were formed in the mesoporous shells of the silica templates. The HPC was used as the support to load Pd nanoparticles (Pd/HPC) for alcohol electrooxidation. It was highly active for methanol, ethanol and isopropanol electrooxidation. The peak current density for ethanol electrooxidation on Pd/HPC electrode was five times higher than that on Pd/C electrode at the same Pd loadings. The mass activity for ethanol electrooxidation was 4000 A g{sup -1} which is much higher compared to the data reported in the literature. The highly porous structure of such HPC can be widely used as support for uniform dispersing metal nanoparticles to increase their utilization as electrocatalysts. (author)

  10. The structure of nano-palladium deposited on carbon-based supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikna, Ľubomír; Milkovič, Ondrej; Saksl, Karel; Heželová, Mária; Smrčová, Miroslava; Puliš, Pavel; Michalik, Štefan; Gamcová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Nano-palladium catalysts, prepared using the same procedure with the same metal content (3 wt%) and two different supports, activated carbon (Pd/C) and activated carbon—multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Pd/C/CNT), are discussed. The simple technique of deposition reduction was applied in the preparation of these two types of Pd catalysts. TEM, XRD analysis, EXAFS signal analysis, and XANES were used for sample characterization. In both samples, transmission electron microscopy identified nanosized Pd particles with nearly spherical morphology but different sizes. The mean diameters of the particles on Pd/C and Pd/C/CNT were estimated to be 5.4 nm and 7.8 nm, respectively. The EXAFS signal analysis showed that Pd atoms on the particle surfaces were coordinated by 4 oxygens to form a PdO monolayer covering a metallic core. The XANES signal analysis indicated a smaller particle size for Pd/C (∅ 5 nm) than for Pd/C/CNT (∅ 10 nm), in good agreement with the TEM observations. - Graphical abstract: Visualization of metallic core (left), oxide monolayer (middle) and nanoparticle of diameter 5 nm (right). - Highlights: • Pd catalysts were prepared on two types of supports: carbon and carbon nanotubes. • BET, TEM, XRD characterization of prepared catalysts. • XAFS: Concentration of Pd in samples Pd/C and Pd/C/CNT. • EXAFS and XANES signal analysis of catalysts. • Visualisation of atoms arrangement at the Pd nanoparticle surface

  11. Carbon price instead of support schemes: wind power investments by the electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitet, Marie; Finon, Dominique; Janssen, Tanguy

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we study the development of wind power by the electricity market without any usual support scheme which is aimed at subsidizing non mature renewables, with the sole incentive of a significant carbon price. Long term electricity market and investment decisions simulation by system dynamics modelling is used to trace the electricity generation mix evolution over a 20-year period in a pure thermal system. A range of stable carbon price, as a tax could be, is tested in order to determine the value above which wind power development by market forces becomes economically possible. Not only economic competitiveness in terms of cost price, but also profitability against traditional fossil fuel technologies are necessary for a market-driven development of wind power. Results stress that wind power is really profitable for investors only if the carbon price is very significantly higher than the price required for making wind power MWh's cost price competitive with CCGT and coal-fired plants on the simplistic basis of levelized costs. In this context, the market-driven development of wind power seems only possible if there is a strong commitment to climate policy, reflected by the preference for a stable and high carbon price rather than a fuzzy price of an emission trading scheme. Besides, results show that market-driven development of wind power would require a sky-rocketing carbon price if the initial technology mix includes a share of nuclear plants even with a moratorium on new nuclear development. (authors)

  12. Hydrogen storage behaviors of platinum-supported multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Lee, Seul-Yi [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253 Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    In this work, the hydrogen storage behaviors of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) loaded by crystalline platinum (Pt) particles were studied. The microstructure of the Pt/MWNTs was characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The pore structure and total pore volumes of the Pt/MWNTs were analyzed by N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherms. The hydrogen storage capacity of the Pt/MWNTs was evaluated at 298 K and 100 bar. From the experimental results, it was found that Pt particles were homogeneously distributed on the MWNT surfaces. The amount of hydrogen storage capacity increased in proportion to the Pt content, with Pt-5/MWNTs exhibiting the largest hydrogen storage capacity. The superior amount of hydrogen storage was linked to an increase in the number of active sites and the optimum-controlled micropore volume for hydrogen adsorption due to the well-dispersed Pt particles. Therefore, it can be concluded that Pt particles play an important role in hydrogen storage characteristics due to the hydrogen spillover effect. (author)

  13. Manganese Dioxide Supported on Porous Biomorphic Carbons as Hybrid Materials for Energy Storage Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Pardo, Antonio; Lacroix, Bertrand; Martinez-Fernandez, Julian; Ramirez-Rico, Joaquin

    2016-11-16

    A facile and low-cost method has been employed to fabricate MnO 2 /C hybrid materials for use as binder-free electrodes for supercapacitor applications. Biocarbon monoliths were obtained through pyrolysis of beech wood, replicating the microstructure of the cellulosic precursor, and serve as 3D porous and conductive scaffolds for the direct growth of MnO 2 nanosheets by a solution method. Evaluation of the experimental results indicates that a homogeneous and uniform composite material made of a carbon matrix exhibiting ordered hierarchical porosity and MnO 2 nanosheets with a layered nanocrystalline structure is obtained. The tuning of the MnO 2 content and crystallite size via the concentration of KMnO 4 used as impregnation solution allows to obtain composites that exhibit enhanced electrochemical behavior, achieving a capacitance of 592 F g -1 in electrodes containing 3 wt % MnO 2 with an excellent cyclic stability. The electrode materials were characterized before and after electrochemical testing.

  14. In situ TEM study of the coarsening of carbon black supported Pt nanoparticles in hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Wang, Yan; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2017-01-01

    The control of sizes and shapes of nanostructures is of tremendous importance for the catalytic activity in electrochemistry and in catalysis more generally. However, due to relatively large surface free energies, nanostructures often sinter to form coarser and more stable structures that may...... not have the intended physicochemical properties. Pt is known to be a very active catalyst in several chemical reactions and for example as carbon supported nanoparticles in fuel cells. The presentation focusses on coarsening mechanisms of Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon black during exposure...... to hydrogen. By means of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Pt nanoparticle coarsening was monitored in 6 mbar 20 % H2/Ar while ramping up the temperature to ca. 900 °C. Time-resolved TEM images directly reveal that separated ca. 3 nm sized Pt nanoparticles in the pure hydrogen environment...

  15. Turbostratic carbon supported palladium as an efficient catalyst for reductive purification of water from trichloroethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Kowalewski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the catalytic properties of turbostratic carbon supported Pd catalyst in hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE HDC in aqueous phase. 1.57 wt% Pd/C was thoroughly characterized by BET, TPHD, CO chemisorption, PXRD, STEM, XPS and used as the catalyst in removal of trichloroethylene from drinking water in batch and continuous-flow reactors. The studies showed that catalytic performance of Pd/C depended on the hydrophobicity and textural properties of carbon support, which influenced noble metal dispersion and increased catalyst tolerance against deactivation by chlorination. Palladium in the form of uniformly dispersed small (~3.5 nm nanoparticles was found to be very active and stable in purification of water from TCE both in batch and continuous-flow operation.

  16. Surface tailored single walled carbon nanotubes as catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireeti, Kota V. M. K.; Jha, Neetu

    2017-10-01

    A strategy for tuning the surface property of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) for enhanced methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) along with methanol tolerance is presented. The surface functionality is tailored using controlled acid and base treatment. Acid treatment leads to the attachment of carboxylic carbon (CC) fragments to SWNT making it hydrophilic (P3-SWNT). Base treatment of P3-SWNT with 0.05 M NaOH reduces the CCs and makes it hydrophobic (P33-SWNT). Pt catalyst supported on the P3-SWNT possesses enhanced MOR whereas that supported on P33-SWNT not only enhances ORR kinetics but also possess good tolerance towards methanol oxidation as verified by the electrochemical technique.

  17. Carbon dioxide capture using Sodium bicarbonate/Sodium carbonate supported on nanoporous Iron(III) oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutcher, Bryce

    Strong evidence exists suggesting that anthropogenic emissions of CO 2, primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels, have been contributing to global climate change, including warming of the atmosphere and acidification of the oceans. These, in turn, lead to other effects such as melting of ice and snow cover, rising sea levels, severe weather patterns, and extinction of life forms. With these detrimental shifts in ecosystems already being observed, it becomes imperative to mitigate anthropogenic CO2. CO2 capture is typically a costly operation, usually due to the energy required for regeneration of the capture medium. Na2CO3 is one potential capture medium with the potential to decrease this energy requirement. Extensively researched as a potential sorbent for CO2, Na2CO3 is well known for its theoretically low energy requirement, due largely to its relatively low heat of reaction compared to other capture technologies. Its primary pitfalls, however, are its extremely low reaction rate during sorption and slow regeneration of Na2CO 3. Before Na2CO3 can be used as a CO2 sorbent, then, it is critical to increase its reaction rate. In order to do so, this project studied nanoporous FeOOH as a potential supporting material for Na2CO3. Because regeneration of the sorbent is the most energy-intensive step when using Na2CO3 for CO 2 sorption, this project focused on the decomposition of NaHCO 3, which is equivalent to CO2 desorption. Using BET, FTIR, XRD, XPS, SEM, TEM, magnetic susceptibility tests, and Mossbauer spectroscopy, we show FeOOH to be thermally stable both with and without the presence of NaHCO3 at temperatures necessary for sorption and regeneration, up to about 200°C. More significantly, we observe that FeOOH not only increases the surface area of NaHCO3, but also has a catalytic effect on the decomposition of NaHCO3, reducing activation energy from 80 kJ/mol to 44 kJ/mol. This reduction in activation energy leads to a significant increase in the

  18. Effect of rare earth and titanium additions on the microstructures and properties of low carbon Fe-B cast steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Hanguang; Xiao Qiang; Kuang Jiacai; Jiang Zhiqiang; Xing Jiandong

    2007-01-01

    A new type of wear resistant low carbon Fe-B cast steel with granular borides can be obtained by alloying with titanium and cerium rare earth (RE). As a result, the as-cast eutectic boride structures of Fe-B cast steel are greatly refined and a blocky, less interconnected boride network is obtained from continuous ledeburite. After heat treatment, the boride eutectic in the modified Fe-B cast steel is in the form of a granular boride structure that appears to be isolated particles The guide rollers made of modified low carbon Fe-B cast steel show excellent wear resistance and thermal fatigue resistance in high speed wire mills

  19. Pre-differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in combination with a microstructured nerve guide supports peripheral nerve regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boecker, Arne Hendrik; van Neerven, Sabien Geraldine Antonia; Scheffel, Juliane; Tank, Julian; Altinova, Haktan; Seidensticker, Katrin; Deumens, Ronald; Tolba, Rene; Weis, Joachim; Brook, Gary Anthony; Pallua, Norbert; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Many bioartificial nerve guides have been investigated pre-clinically for their nerve regeneration-supporting function, often in comparison to autologous nerve transplantation, which is still regarded as the current clinical gold standard. Enrichment of these scaffolds with cells intended to support axonal regeneration has been explored as a strategy to boost axonal regeneration across these nerve guides Ansselin et al. (1998). In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were implanted with a cell-seeded microstructured collagen nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Under the influence of seeded, pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells, axons regenerated well into the Perimaix nerve guide. Myelination-related parameters, like myelin sheath thickness, benefitted from an additional seeding with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. Furthermore, both the number of retrogradely labelled sensory neurons and the axon density within the implant were elevated in the cell-seeded scaffold group with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. However, a pre-differentiation had no influence on functional recovery. An additional cell seeding of the Perimaix nerve guide with mesenchymal stromal cells led to an extent of functional recovery, independent of the differentiation status, similar to autologous nerve transplantation. These findings encourage further investigations on pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells as a cellular support for peripheral nerve regeneration. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Imaging brain tumour microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Markus; Englund, Elisabet; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; van Westen, Danielle; Sundgren, Pia C

    2018-05-08

    Imaging is an indispensable tool for brain tumour diagnosis, surgical planning, and follow-up. Definite diagnosis, however, often demands histopathological analysis of microscopic features of tissue samples, which have to be obtained by invasive means. A non-invasive alternative may be to probe corresponding microscopic tissue characteristics by MRI, or so called 'microstructure imaging'. The promise of microstructure imaging is one of 'virtual biopsy' with the goal to offset the need for invasive procedures in favour of imaging that can guide pre-surgical planning and can be repeated longitudinally to monitor and predict treatment response. The exploration of such methods is motivated by the striking link between parameters from MRI and tumour histology, for example the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient and cellularity. Recent microstructure imaging techniques probe even more subtle and specific features, providing parameters associated to cell shape, size, permeability, and volume distributions. However, the range of scenarios in which these techniques provide reliable imaging biomarkers that can be used to test medical hypotheses or support clinical decisions is yet unknown. Accurate microstructure imaging may moreover require acquisitions that go beyond conventional data acquisition strategies. This review covers a wide range of candidate microstructure imaging methods based on diffusion MRI and relaxometry, and explores advantages, challenges, and potential pitfalls in brain tumour microstructure imaging. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. A comparison of alumina, carbon and carbon-covered alumina as support for Ni-Mo-F additives: gas oil hydroprocessing studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorman, P.M.; Kydd, R.A.; Sorensen, T.S.; Chong, K.; Lewis, J.M.; Bell, W.S. (University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    Catalysts with 3 wt% NiO, 15 wt% MoO{sub 3} and 0-6.9 nominal wt% fluoride supported on alumina, carbon and carbon-covered alumina were studied to examine the role of fluoride and the influence of the support on hydroprocessing on Alberta gas oil. Experiments were carried out in a batch reactor at 410{degree}C and 6.9 MPa initial H{sub 2} pressure. It was found that fluoride promotion enhances cracking and hydrogenation reactions resulting in decreased aromatic and sulphur contents in the gas oil. The promotion is dependent on the type of support and is related to the strength of the fluoride-support interaction and the accessibility of the fluoride to the surface hydroxyl groups on the support. A maximum in activity at 3.6 wt% fluoride was observed for the alumina-supported catalysts whereas higher loadings of fluoride were required for carbon-covered alumina-supported catalysts to see an improvement over their carbon-supported counterparts. However, the carbon-covered alumina-supported catalysts seem to have a lower propensity for coke deposition than their alumina counterparts. 27 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. A comparison of alumina, carbon and carbon-covered alumina as supports for Ni-Mo-F additives: gas oil hydroprocessing studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorman, P.M.; Kydd, R.A.; Sorensen, T.S.; Chong, K.; Lewis, J.M.; Bell, W.S. (Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-01-01

    Catalysts with 3 wt% NiO, 15 wt% MoO{sub 3} and 0-6.9 nominal wt% fluoride supported on alumina, carbon and carbon-covered alumina were studied to examine the role of fluoride and the influence of the support on hydroprocessing on Alberta gas oil. Experiments were carried out in a batch reactor at 410{sup o}C and 6.9 MPa initial H{sub 2} pressure. It was found that fluoride promotion enhances cracking and hydrogenation reactions resulting in decreased aromatic and sulphur contents in the gas oil. The promotion is dependent on the type of support and is related to the strength of the fluoride-support interaction and the accessibility of the fluoride to the surface hydroxyl groups on the support. A maximum in activity at 3.6 wt% fluoride was observed for the alumina-supported catalysts whereas higher loadings of fluoride were required for carbon-covered alumina-supported catalysts to see an improvement over their carbon supported counterparts. However, the carbon-covered alumina supported catalysts seem to have a lower propensity for coke deposition than their alumina counterparts. (author).

  3. Carbon supported ultrafine gold phosphorus nanoparticles as highly efficient electrocatalyst for alkaline ethanol oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tongfei; Fu, Gengtao; Su, Jiahui; Wang, Yi; Lv, Yinjie; Zou, Xiuyong; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Xu, Lin; Sun, Dongmei; Tang, Yawen

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: We develop a new kind of carbon supported gold-phosphorus (Au-P/C) electrocatalyst by a facile and novel phosphorus reduction method, and demonstrate the Au-P/C is a highly active and stable electrocatalyst for the ethanol oxidation reaction. - Highlights: • Au-P/C catalyst is synthesized by a facile and novel white-phosphorus reduce method. • AuP particles with ultrafine particle-size are uniformly dispersed on carbon support. • Au-P/C catalyst exhibits much higher content of P 0 than reported metal/P catalysts. • Au-P/C catalysts show excellent catalytic properties for ethanol oxidation reaction. - Abstract: Herein, we develop a new kind of carbon supported gold-phosphorus (Au-P/C) electrocatalyst for the alkaline ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). The Au-P/C catalysts with different Au/P ratio (i.e., AuP/C, Au 3 P 2 /C and Au 4 P 3 /C) can be obtained by a facile and novel hot-reflux method with white phosphorus (P 4 ) as reductant and ethanol as solvent. The crystal structure, composition and particle-size of the Au-P/C catalysts are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), etc. The results demonstrate that Au-P/C catalysts present an alloy phase with the high content of P, ultrafine particle-size and high dispersity on carbon support, which results in excellent electrocatalytic activity and stability towards the EOR compared with that of the free-phosphorus Au/C catalyst. In addition, among the various Au-P/C catalysts with different Au/P ratio, the AuP/C sample exhibits the best electrocatalytic performance in comparison with other Au 3 P 2 /C and Au 4 P 3 /C samples.

  4. Large-area thin self-supporting carbon foils with MgO coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarz, Anna; Maier-Komor, Peter

    2002-03-01

    Large area self-supporting carbon foils in the thickness of range of 8-22 μg/cm 2, coated with approximately 4 μg/cm 2 MgO have been prepared by e-gun evaporation. They were mounted on frames with apertures of 130 cm 2. Problems related to the parting agent preparation, floating procedure, and mounting onto frames are discussed. Special precautions necessary to avoid damage during foil drying, storage and transportation are suggested.

  5. Bacterial biofilm supported on granular activated carbon and on natural zeolites- an application to wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lameiras, Sandra Raquel de Vasconcelos; Quintelas, C.; Tavares, M. T.

    2004-01-01

    The removal of many heavy metals from industrial wastewater is one of the most important environmental problems to be solved today. The retention of this contaminants by a biofilm supported on granular activated carbon or on natural zeolites is one of the promising technologies for the reduction of this problem, because it is cheap and it removes a broad range of substances, heavy metals and organic compounds. This study aims the development of a system of two mini-columns in series ...

  6. Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts in high temperature polymer electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qingfeng, Li; Hjuler, Hans Aage; Bjerrum, Niels

    2000-01-01

    Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts has been investigated in H3PO4, H3PO4-doped Nafion and polybenzimidazole (PBI) polymer electrolytes in a temperature range up to 190 degrees C. Compared with pure H3PO4, the combination of H3PO4 and polymer electrolytes can significantly...... membrane fuel cell based on H3PO4-doped PBI for operation at temperatures between 150 and 200 degrees C. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  7. Carbon-Supported PtRuMo Electrocatalysts for Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L.G. Fierro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The review article discusses the current status and recent findings of our investigations on the synthesis and characterization of carbon-supported PtRuMo electrocatalysts for direct alcohol fuel cells. In particular, the effect of the carbon support and the composition on the structure, stability and the activity of the PtRuMo nanoparticles for the electrooxidation of CO, methanol and ethanol have been studied. Different physicochemical techniques have been employed for the analysis of the catalysts structures: X-ray analytical methods (XRD, XPS, TXRF, thermogravimetry (TGA and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, as well as a number of electrochemical techniques like CO adsorption studies, current-time curves and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Furthermore, spectroscopic methods adapted to the electrochemical systems for in situ studies, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS, have been used to evaluate the oxidation process of CO, methanol and ethanol over the carbon-supported PtRuMo electrocatalysts.

  8. Supported zirconium sulfate on carbon nanotubes as water-tolerant solid acid catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan, Joon Ching; Jiang Yajie; Meng Xiujuan; Cao Weiliang; Yarmo, Mohd Ambar; Zhang Jingchang

    2007-01-01

    A new solid acid of zirconium sulfate (CZ) was successfully supported on carbon nanotube (CNT) for esterification reaction. Preparation conditions of the supported CZ have been investigated, to obtain highest catalytic activity for esterification reaction. XRD, TEM, BET, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and in situ FTIR analysis has also been carried out to understand the characteristics of the catalyst. In the esterification of acrylic acid with n-octanol, the supported CZ exhibited high catalytic activity and stability. The catalytic activity was nearly unchanged during four times of reuse. XRD and TEM analysis indicated that CZ was finely dispersed on CNT. XPS analysis shows that the CZ species was preserved and the chemical environment of the CZ has changed after loaded on CNT. This finding show that CNT as CZ support is an efficient water-tolerant solid acid

  9. Electrochemical Investigation of the Corrosion of Different Microstructural Phases of X65 Pipeline Steel under Saturated Carbon Dioxide Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng Yang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of metallurgy on the corrosion behaviour of separate weld zone (WZ and parent plate (PP regions of X65 pipeline steel in a solution of deionised water saturated with CO2, at two different temperatures (55 °C and 80 °C and at initial pH~4.0. In addition, a non-electrochemical immersion experiment was also performed at 80 °C in CO2, on a sample portion of X65 pipeline containing part of a weld section, together with adjacent heat affected zones (HAZ and parent material. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS was used to evaluate the corrosion behaviour of the separate weld and parent plate samples. This study seeks to understand the significance of the different microstructures within the different zones of the welded X65 pipe in CO2 environments on corrosion performance; with particular attention given to the formation of surface scales; and their composition/significance. The results obtained from grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD measurements suggest that, post immersion, the parent plate substrate is scale free, with only features arising from ferrite (α-Fe and cementite (Fe3C apparent. In contrast, at 80 °C, GIXRD from the weld zone substrate, and weld zone/heat affected zone of the non-electrochemical sample indicates the presence of siderite (FeCO3 and chukanovite (Fe2CO3(OH2 phases. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM on this surface confirmed the presence of characteristic discrete cube-shaped crystallites of siderite together with plate-like clusters of chukanovite.

  10. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/carbon fiber paper composite to support Pt nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yi, Xi-bin; Liu, Shuo; Fan, Hui-Li; Ju, Wei; Wang, Qi-Chun; Ma, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) grown on carbon fiber paper (CFP) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is introduced as a catalyst support material for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Well dispersed Pt nanoparticles on VACNTs surface are prepared by impregnation-reduction method. The VACNTs on CFP possess well-maintained alignment, large surface area and good electrical conductivity, which leading to the formation of Pt particles with a smaller size and enhance the Pt utilization rate. The structure and nature of resulting Pt/VACNTs/CFP catalysts for methanol oxidation are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). With the aid of VACNTs, well-dispersed Pt catalysts enable the reversibly rapid redox kinetic since electron transport efficiently passes through a one-dimensional pathway, which leads to enhance the catalytic activity and Pt utilization rate. Compared with the Pt/XC-72/CFP electrode, the electrochemical measurements results display that the Pt/VACNTs/CFP catalyst shows much higher electrocatalytic activity and better stability for methanol oxidation. In addition, the oxidation current from 200 to 1200 s decayed more slowly for the Pt/VACNTs/CFP than that of the Pt/XC-72/CFP catalysts, indicating less accumulation of adsorbed CO species. All those results imply that the Pt/VACNTs/CFP has a great potential for applications in DMFCs.

  11. N, P-codoped Mesoporous Carbon Supported PtCox Nanoparticles and Their Superior Electrochemical toward Methanol Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hangjun; Li, Yueming; Liu, Shimin

    2018-03-01

    In this report, a novel strategy by using the N, P co-doped mesoporous carbon structure as catalyst support to enhance the electrochemical catalytic activity of Pt-based catalysts is proposed. The as-synthesized PtCox@N, P-doped mesoporous carbon nanocomposties have been studied as an anode catalyst toward methanol oxidation, exhibiting greatly improved electrochemical activity and stability compared with Pt@mesoporous carbon. The synergistic effects of N, P dual-doping and porous carbon structure help to achieve better electron transport at the electrode surface, which eventually leads to greatly enhanced catalytic activity compared to the pristine Pt/mesoporous carbon.…

  12. The hydrogen and oxygen content of self-supporting carbon foils prepared by dc glow discharge in ethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, N.R.S.; Tolfree, D.W.L.; John, P.; Odeh, I.M.; Thomas, M.J.K.; Tricker, M.J.; Wilson, J.J.B.; England, J.B.A.; Newton, D.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrogen and oxygen content of self-supporting carbon films produced by dc glow discharge have been determined using a precise method involving the elastic scattering of 25 MeV α-particles. The number of carbon-hydrogen bonds has been determined for similar samples using infrared spectroscopy. The results are compared with those for samples made by the carbon arc process. Assuming that the glow discharge carbon contains graphitic regions surrounded by amorphous tetrahedrally bonded material to which hydrogen can attach, a simple estimate is made of the relative numbers of carbon atoms in the two forms. (orig.)

  13. Microstructural and optical properties of nanocrystalline ZnO deposited onto vertically aligned carbon nanotubes by physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkar, Tushar [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Center for Advanced Research and Technology, University of North Texas, Denton 76203 (United States); Chang, Won Seok [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 104 Sinseongno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jun Yeon, E-mail: Junyeon.Hwang@kist.re.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Center for Advanced Research and Technology, University of North Texas, Denton 76203 (United States); Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Jeonbuk 565-902 (Korea, Republic of); Shepherd, Nigel D.; Banerjee, Rajarshi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Center for Advanced Research and Technology, University of North Texas, Denton 76203 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Nanocrystalline ZnO films with thicknesses of 5 nm, 10 nm, 20 nm, and 50 nm were deposited via magnetron sputtering onto the surface of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The ZnO/CNTs heterostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction studies. No structural degradation of the CNTs was observed and photoluminescence (PL) measurements of the nanostructured ZnO layers show that the optical properties of these films are typical of ZnO deposited at low temperatures. The results indicate that magnetron sputtering is a viable technique for growing heterostructures and depositing functional layers onto CNTs.

  14. Tailoring the microstructure of porous MgO supports for asymmetric oxygen separation membranes: Optimization of thermoplastic feedstock systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothanda Ramachandran, Dhavanesan; Clemens, F.; Glasscock, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Porous magnesium oxide (MgO) structures were prepared by thermoplastic processing for use as supports in asymmetric thin film oxygen transport membranes (OTMs). The open porosity, pore size distribution, and resulting gas permeability of the MgO structures were measured for different feedstock...

  15. Ruthenium oxide/carbon composites with microporous or mesoporous carbon as support and prepared by two procedures. A comparative study as supercapacitor electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pico, F.; Morales, E.; Fernandez, J.A.; Centeno, T.A.; Ibanez, J.; Rojas, R.M.; Amarilla, J.M.; Rojo, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Composites are prepared by deposition of nanoparticles of RuO 2 .xH 2 O (1-4 nm) on two carbons: microporous carbon (1.3 nm of average micropore size) and mesoporous carbon (11 nm of average mesopore size). Two-preparation procedures are used: (i) procedure A consisting of repetitive impregnations of the carbons with RuCl 3 .0.5H 2 O solutions, and (ii) procedure B based on impregnation of the carbons with Ru(acac) 3 vapour. The procedure B leads to supported RuO 2 .xH 2 O particles that appear more crystalline than those obtained by the procedure A. Specific capacitance and specific surface area of the composites are discussed as functions of the RuO 2 content, and different dependences for the composites derived from the two carbons are found. Mesoporous carbon is better support than microporous carbon. Procedure A leads to supported RuO 2 .xH 2 O particles with higher specific capacitance than the particles deposited by procedure B

  16. Ruthenium oxide/carbon composites with microporous or mesoporous carbon as support and prepared by two procedures. A comparative study as supercapacitor electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pico, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049-Madrid (Spain); Morales, E. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Polimeros (ICTP), CSIC, Juan de la Cierva 3, E-28006-Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, J.A.; Centeno, T.A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR), CSIC, Francisco Pintado Fe 26, E-33011-Oviedo (Spain); Ibanez, J. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM), CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, E-28040-Madrid (Spain); Rojas, R.M.; Amarilla, J.M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049-Madrid (Spain); Rojo, J.M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049-Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jmrojo@icmm.csic.es

    2009-03-01

    Composites are prepared by deposition of nanoparticles of RuO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O (1-4 nm) on two carbons: microporous carbon (1.3 nm of average micropore size) and mesoporous carbon (11 nm of average mesopore size). Two-preparation procedures are used: (i) procedure A consisting of repetitive impregnations of the carbons with RuCl{sub 3}.0.5H{sub 2}O solutions, and (ii) procedure B based on impregnation of the carbons with Ru(acac){sub 3} vapour. The procedure B leads to supported RuO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O particles that appear more crystalline than those obtained by the procedure A. Specific capacitance and specific surface area of the composites are discussed as functions of the RuO{sub 2} content, and different dependences for the composites derived from the two carbons are found. Mesoporous carbon is better support than microporous carbon. Procedure A leads to supported RuO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O particles with higher specific capacitance than the particles deposited by procedure B.

  17. Baseline map of organic carbon in Australian soil to support national carbon accounting and monitoring under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscarra Rossel, Raphael A; Webster, Richard; Bui, Elisabeth N; Baldock, Jeff A

    2014-09-01

    We can effectively monitor soil condition-and develop sound policies to offset the emissions of greenhouse gases-only with accurate data from which to define baselines. Currently, estimates of soil organic C for countries or continents are either unavailable or largely uncertain because they are derived from sparse data, with large gaps over many areas of the Earth. Here, we derive spatially explicit estimates, and their uncertainty, of the distribution and stock of organic C in the soil of Australia. We assembled and harmonized data from several sources to produce the most comprehensive set of data on the current stock of organic C in soil of the continent. Using them, we have produced a fine spatial resolution baseline map of organic C at the continental scale. We describe how we made it by combining the bootstrap, a decision tree with piecewise regression on environmental variables and geostatistical modelling of residuals. Values of stock were predicted at the nodes of a 3-arc-sec (approximately 90 m) grid and mapped together with their uncertainties. We then calculated baselines of soil organic C storage over the whole of Australia, its states and territories, and regions that define bioclimatic zones, vegetation classes and land use. The average amount of organic C in Australian topsoil is estimated to be 29.7 t ha(-1) with 95% confidence limits of 22.6 and 37.9 t ha(-1) . The total stock of organic C in the 0-30 cm layer of soil for the continent is 24.97 Gt with 95% confidence limits of 19.04 and 31.83 Gt. This represents approximately 3.5% of the total stock in the upper 30 cm of soil worldwide. Australia occupies 5.2% of the global land area, so the total organic C stock of Australian soil makes an important contribution to the global carbon cycle, and it provides a significant potential for sequestration. As the most reliable approximation of the stock of organic C in Australian soil in 2010, our estimates have important applications. They could support

  18. NiMo-sulfide supported on activated carbon to produce renewable diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Y Acelas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to their weak polarity and large surface area, activated carbon supports have the potential to enhance the dispersion of metal-sulfides. It is expected that the absence of a strong metal-support interaction can result in the formation of a very active and stable Ni-Mo-S phase. In this study, catalysts with different amounts of nickel and molybdenum supported on a commercial activated carbon were prepared by a co-impregnation method and characterized by BET, XRF, and SEM techniques. The catalytic activity for hydroprocessing of Jatropha oil was evaluated in a batch reactor, and the composition of the liquid and gaseous products were determined. Results showed that gaseous products are mainly composed of high amounts of propane and small amounts of other light hydrocarbons (C1 to C5. Liquid hydrocarbon products consisted of a mixture containing mainly n-paraffins of C15-C18 and some oxygenated compounds. The catalysts with a mass fraction of 3 % Ni, 15 % Mo (Ni3Mo15/AC presented the highest selectivity toward C17-C18 hydrocarbons, with a product distribution similar to a commercial alumina-supported Ni-Mo-S catalyst.

  19. Hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on WO/sub 3/-Supported ruthenium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinari, Tomohiro; Suganuma, Fujio; Sera, Chikara

    1988-01-01

    In this study, a WO/sub 3/-supported catalyst was prepared to conduct hydrogenation of CO for examining the product distribution and composition of hydrocarbons, using a gamma-alumina-supported catalyst for comparison. These catalysts were used under pressure to conduct a distributive reaction and the desorbing behavior of CO or H/sub 2/ at elevated temperature was measured to examine the influence of the type of carrier or the method of preparation on the activity and the distribution of products formed. The WO/sub 3/-supported catalyst gave a carbon chain length distribution that did not comply with the rule of Schulz-Flory, giving a composition richer in the isomers. Carbon number distribution is affected by Ru-dispersion, and the selectivity of isomers depends on the acidity of the carrier. Formed products distribution of the WO/sub 3/-supported reaction is attributable to the secondary reaction, which relates to the acidic point of the carrier, of the primary product formed on the metal. (7 figs, 4 tabs, 18 refs)

  20. Synthesis of carbon-supported copper catalyst and its catalytic performance in methanol dehydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelepova, Ekaterina V. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av., 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Vedyagin, Aleksey A., E-mail: vedyagin@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av., 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Ilina, Ludmila Yu.; Nizovskii, Alexander I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Tsyrulnikov, Pavel G. [Institute of Hydrocarbon Processing SB RAS, Neftezavodskaya st., 54, Omsk, 644040 (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Carbon-supported copper catalyst was studied in dehydrogenation of methanol. • Reduction temperature affected size of Cu particles and Cu{sup 0}/Cu{sup 2+} ratio. • Reduction at 400 °C was required to obtain high methyl formate yield. - Abstract: Carbon-supported copper catalyst was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of Sibunit with an aqueous solution of copper nitrate. Copper loading was 5 wt.%. Temperature of reductive pretreatment was varied within a range of 200–400 °C. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. Catalytic activity of the samples was studied in a reaction of methanol dehydrogenation. Silica-based catalyst with similar copper loading was used as a reference. It was found that copper is distributed over the surface of support in the form of metallic and partially oxidized particles of about 12–17 nm in size. Diminished interaction of copper with support was supposed to be responsible for high catalytic activity.

  1. Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays as Efficient Supports for Faradaic Capacitive Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguntoye, Moses; Holleran, Mary-Kate; Roberts, Katherine; Pesika, Noshir

    Supercapacitors are notable for their ability to deliver energy at higher power (compared to batteries) and store energy at higher density (compared to capacitors) as well as exhibit a long cycle life. In our efforts to further the development of supercapacitors, our focus is on using vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT) as supports for faradaic capacitive electrode materials. The objective is to develop electrodes functioning in an inexpensive aqueous environment with small potential windows, that store energy at a higher density than carbon materials alone. We describe the different approaches explored to overcome the challenges of non-uniform deposition, poor wetting and array collapse. Materials that are electrochemically anchored to VACNT supports include NiCo2O4, VOx, Fe2O3 and Co-Mn mixed oxides. In each case, the specific capacitance obtained using the VACNT arrays as supports is significantly more than that obtained by direct deposition onto current collectors or by using VACNT alone. The ease of VACNT growth and the degree of coating control achievable using electrodeposition means there is much potential in exploring them as supports for capacitive electrode materials.

  2. Methanol Electro-Oxidation on Pt-Ru Alloy Nanoparticles Supported on Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangchuan Xing

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been investigated in recent years as a catalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Improved catalyst activities were observed and attributed to metal-support interactions. We report a study on the kinetics of methanol electro-oxidation on CNT supported Pt-Ru alloy nanoparticles. Alloy catalysts with different compositions, Pt53Ru47/CNT, Pt69Ru31/CNT and Pt77Ru23/CNT, were prepared and investigated in detail. Experiments were conducted at various temperatures, electrode potentials, and methanol concentrations. It was found that the reaction order of methanol electro-oxidation on the PtRu/CNT catalysts was consistent with what has been reported for PtRu alloys with a value of 0.5 in methanol concentrations. However, the electro-oxidation reaction on the PtRu/CNT catalysts displayed much lower activation energies than that on the Pt-Ru alloy catalysts unsupported or supported on carbon black (PtRu/CB. This study provides an overall kinetic evaluation of the PtRu/CNT catalysts and further demonstrates the beneficial role of CNTs.

  3. 3D Analysis of Fuel Cell Electrocatalyst Degradation on Alternate Carbon Supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, Brian T; Cullen, David A; Reeves, Kimberly S; Dyck, Ondrej E; Langlois, David A; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L; More, Karren L

    2017-09-06

    Understanding the mechanisms associated with Pt/C electrocatalyst degradation in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cathodes is critical for the future development of higher-performing materials; however, there is a lack of information regarding Pt coarsening under PEMFC operating conditions within the cathode catalyst layer. We report a direct and quantitative 3D study of Pt dispersions on carbon supports (high surface area carbon (HSAC), Vulcan XC-72, and graphitized carbon) with varied surface areas, graphitic character, and Pt loadings ranging from 5 to 40 wt %. This is accomplished both before and after catalyst-cycling accelerated stress tests (ASTs) through observations of the cathode catalyst layer of membrane electrode assemblies. Electron tomography results show Pt nanoparticle agglomeration occurs predominantly at junctions and edges of aggregated graphitized carbon particles, leading to poor Pt dispersion in the as-prepared catalysts and increased coalescence during ASTs. Tomographic reconstructions of Pt/HSAC show much better initial Pt dispersions, less agglomeration, and less coarsening during ASTs in the cathode. However, a large loss of the electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) is still observed and is attributed to accelerated Pt dissolution and nanoparticle coalescence. Furthermore, a strong correlation between Pt particle/agglomerate size and measured ECSA is established and is proposed as a more useful metric than average crystallite size in predicting degradation behavior across different catalyst systems.

  4. Improved hydrogen generation from alkaline NaBH{sub 4} solution using cobalt catalysts supported on modified activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Dongyan; Guo, Qingjie; Yue, Xuehai [College of Chemical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Dai, Ping [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061 (China)

    2008-12-15

    Hydrogen production from alkaline sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) solution via hydrolysis process over activated carbon supported cobalt catalysts is studied. Activated carbons are used in their original form and after liquid phase oxidation with HNO{sub 3}. The changes in surface functional groups of the activated carbon are detected by FTIR spectroscopy. The effects of HNO{sub 3} oxidation on the properties of the activated carbon and the resulting catalyst performance are investigated. FTIR analysis reveals that the oxidative treatment leads to the formation of various functional groups on the surface of the activated carbon. Cobalt catalysts supported on the modified activated carbon are found to exhibit higher activity and stability. (author)

  5. Carbon nanostructures as catalyst support for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, S.K.; Hamelin, J. [Quebec Univ., Trois Rivieres, PQ (Canada). Inst. de recherche sur l' hydrogene

    2008-07-01

    This paper reported on a study that investigated potential alternatives to Vulcan XC-72 as a catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). These included carbon nanostructures (CNS) prepared by high energy ball milling of graphite and transition metal catalysts, followed by heat treatment. Among the key factors discussed were the graphitic content, high surface area, microporous structure, good electrical conductivity and the ability of the material to attach functional groups. Some graphic results supporting the usage of CNS as catalyst support for PEMFCs were presented. Upon chemical oxidation, surface functional groups such as carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl were populated on the surface of CNS. Nanosized platinum particles with particle size distribution between 3 nm and 5 nm were reduced on the functionalized sites of CNS in a colloidal medium. The paper also presented cyclic voltammograms, XPS, HRTEM and PSD results. 3 refs.

  6. Microwave heated polyol synthesis of carbon supported PtAuSn/C nanoparticles for ethanol electrooxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hong; Han, Kefei [School of Science, State key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Liu, Yingli; Chang, Zhaorong [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan (China); Shen, Liangbo [Beijing No.4 High School, Beijing (China); Wei, Yongsheng; Guo, Zhijun (School of Science Beijing Jiaotong University Beijing P. R. China); Wang, Haijiang [Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation, National Research Council of (Canada)

    2010-04-15

    Carbon-supported PtAuSn/C nanoparticle catalyst was synthesized by a microwave-assisted polyol process. The process is a quick process that only requires a few minutes to complete. The catalyst thus obtained was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The electrochemical performance of the catalyst, for the ethanol oxidation reaction, was also investigated. The results indicated that the PtAuSn/C catalyst was uniformly dispersed on carbon and was in the nano-size range. The electrochemical measurements indicated that PtAuSn/C nanoparticle catalyst synthesized by the microwave-assisted polyol method demonstrated a significantly higher electrochemically active area and higher catalytic activity than Pt/C for the ethanol oxidation reaction. (author)

  7. Electro-catalytic oxidation of ethanol on platinum-iridium mixtures supported on glassy carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Henry; Hoyos Bibian

    2004-01-01

    Electro-catalytic oxidation of ethanol on platinum-iridium mixtures supported on glassy carbon was studied, in acid media at different temperatures and concentrations. During the maturation time of deposited iridium, the surface is covered by an irreversible oxide formation, which affects the behavior of the catalytic mixture. The Pt 7 0 Ir 3 0 and Pt 9 0 Ir 1 0 mixtures seem to be a little more active than the Pt/C electrode at potentials below 800 mV (vs. HRE). In all electrodes appears two reactions: partial ethanol oxidation to produce acetaldehyde (main path of reaction at low temperatures and high electrode coverage with ethanol adsorption residues) and the total oxidation to carbon dioxide which is considerable at potential above 800 mV and it is increased with increasing temperature

  8. Effect of the reaction time on the microstructure and porous texture of carbon materials obtained by chlorination of Ti(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})Cl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo-Pérez, D.J. [Centro de Investigación en Micro y Nanotecnología, Universidad Veracruzana, 94294, Boca del Río, Veracruz (Mexico); González-García, P., E-mail: pedro.gonzalez@cidesi.edu.mx [CONACYT Research Fellow – Centro de Ingeniería y Desarrollo Industrial, 76130, Querétaro, Querétaro (Mexico); Poisot, M. [Instituto de Química Aplicada, Universidad del Papaloapan, 68301, San Juan Bautista Tuxtepec, Oaxaca (Mexico); García-González, L. [Centro de Investigación en Micro y Nanotecnología, Universidad Veracruzana, 94294, Boca del Río, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Carbon materials have been obtained by the chlorination reaction of Ti(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})Cl{sub 2} at 900 °C, varying the reaction time at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min. The average microstructure, studied by X ray powder diffraction, suggest that these materials consist mainly of disordered carbon with low graphitization degree (from 13.5 to 16.5%). These results are in agreement with the Raman data since the D band (at ≈ 1350 cm{sup −1}) indicates that disordered carbon networks have appeared. The calculated in-plane correlation length increases from 4.04 to 4.70 nm as the chlorination time increases from 30 to 120 min. The textural analyses reveal adsorption isotherms type 1 with hysteresis H4, microporous areas as high as 855 m{sup 2}/g and pore volume of 0.55 cm{sup 3}/g. Additionally, an important contribution of mesoporosity, around 3.6 nm, was also detected. - Highlights: • Micro-mesoporous carbon materials were obtained by chlorination of Ti(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2} at 900 °C. • The effect of chlorination exposure time on the microstructure and textural properties was studied. • Microstructural analysis by XRD and Raman showed that carbon samples are mainly disordered. • N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms showed isotherms type 1 with hysteresis H4. • Micropore size increases at longer chlorination time; in contrast, pore volume decreases.

  9. Microstructural homogeneity of support silk spun by Eriophora fuliginea (C.L. Koch) determined by scanning X-ray microdiffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riekel, C.; Craig, C. L.; Burghammer, M.; Müller, M.

    2001-01-01

    Scanning X-ray microdiffraction (SXD) permits the 'imaging' in-situ of crystalline phases, crystallinity and texture in whole biopolymer samples on the micrometre scale. SXD complements transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, which reach sub-nanometre lateral resolution but require thin sections and a vacuum environment. This is demonstrated using a support thread from a web spun by the orb-weaving spider Eriophora fuliginea (C.L. Koch). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows a central thread composed of two fibres to which thinner fibres are loosely attached. SXD of a piece of support thread approximately 60 µm long shows in addition the presence of nanometre-sized crystallites with the β-poly(L-alanine) structure in all fibres. The crystallinity of the thin fibres appears to be higher than that of the central thread, which probably reflects a higher polyalanine content of the fibroins. The molecular axis of the polymer chains in the central thread is orientated parallel to the macroscopic fibre axis, but in the thin fibres the molecular axis is tilted by about 71° to the macroscopic fibre axis. A helical model is tentatively proposed to describe this morphology. The central thread has a homogeneous distribution of crystallinity along the macroscopic fibre axis.

  10. Catalytic transformation of carbon dioxide and methane into syngas over ruthenium and platinum supported hydroxyapatites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rêgo De Vasconcelos, Bruna; Zhao, Lulu; Sharrock, Patrick; Nzihou, Ange; Pham Minh, Doan, E-mail: doan.phamminh@mines-albi.fr

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Formation of nanoparticles of Pt and Ru on hydroxyapatite surface support (HAP). • Pt catalyst more active and stable than Ru catalyst in dry reforming of methane (DRM). • Low carbon deposition on the surface of Pt catalyst after reaction. • Quantification of water as by-product of the reaction for the first time. • Good mass balance of the reaction. - Abstract: This work focused on the catalytic transformation of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into syngas (mixture of CO and H{sub 2}). Ruthenium- and platinum-based catalysts were prepared using hydroxyapatite (HAP) as catalyst support. Different methods for metal deposition were used including incipient wetness impregnation (IWI), excess liquid phase impregnation (LIM), and cationic exchange (CEX). Metal particle size varied in large range from less than 1 nm to dozens nm. All catalysts were active at 400–700 °C but only Pt catalyst prepared by IWI method (Pt/HAP IWI) was found stable. The catalytic performance of Pt/HAP IWI could be comparable with the literature data on noble metal-based catalysts, prepared on metal oxide supports. For the first time, water was experimentally quantified as a by-product of the reaction. This helped to correctly buckle the mass balance of the process.

  11. Catalytic transformation of carbon dioxide and methane into syngas over ruthenium and platinum supported hydroxyapatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rêgo De Vasconcelos, Bruna; Zhao, Lulu; Sharrock, Patrick; Nzihou, Ange; Pham Minh, Doan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Formation of nanoparticles of Pt and Ru on hydroxyapatite surface support (HAP). • Pt catalyst more active and stable than Ru catalyst in dry reforming of methane (DRM). • Low carbon deposition on the surface of Pt catalyst after reaction. • Quantification of water as by-product of the reaction for the first time. • Good mass balance of the reaction. - Abstract: This work focused on the catalytic transformation of methane (CH 4 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into syngas (mixture of CO and H 2 ). Ruthenium- and platinum-based catalysts were prepared using hydroxyapatite (HAP) as catalyst support. Different methods for metal deposition were used including incipient wetness impregnation (IWI), excess liquid phase impregnation (LIM), and cationic exchange (CEX). Metal particle size varied in large range from less than 1 nm to dozens nm. All catalysts were active at 400–700 °C but only Pt catalyst prepared by IWI method (Pt/HAP IWI) was found stable. The catalytic performance of Pt/HAP IWI could be comparable with the literature data on noble metal-based catalysts, prepared on metal oxide supports. For the first time, water was experimentally quantified as a by-product of the reaction. This helped to correctly buckle the mass balance of the process.

  12. Hydrodeoxygenation of phenols as lignin models under acid-free conditions with carbon-supported platinum catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Hidetoshi; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Hara, Kenji; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2011-11-28

    Carbon-supported Pt catalysts are highly active and reusable for the aqueous-phase hydrodeoxygenation of phenols as lignin models without adding any acids. It is suggested that Pt/carbon facilitates the hydrogenation of phenols and the hydrogenolysis of the resulting cyclohexanols.

  13. O2 electrocatalysis in acid media on iron naphthalocyanine impregnations. Effect of nitric acid treatment on different carbon black supports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coowar, F.; Contamin, O.; Savy, M.; Scarbeck, G.; van den Ham, D.; Riga, J.; Verbist, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    O2 electrocatalysis on (2,3)FeNPc impregnations on different carbon blacks was investigated in H2SO4 medium. The effect of nitric acid treatment on the carbon black support is to enhance both the activity and stability of the catalyst. Moreover, as seen by XPS, the dissolution of iron is impeded by

  14. Carbon/H-ZSM-5 composites as supports for bi-functional Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valero-Romero, M.J.; Sartipi, S.; Sun, X.; Rodríguez-Mirasol, J.; Cordero, T.; Kapteijn, F.; Gascon, J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesoporous H-ZSM-5–carbon composites, prepared via tetrapropylammonium hydroxide (TPAOH) post treatment of H-ZSM-5 followed by deposition of pyrolytic carbon, have been used as the support for the preparation of Co-based Fischer–Tropsch catalysts. The resulting catalysts display an improved

  15. Nanostructured carbon-supported Pd electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation: synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gacutan, E M; Tongol, B J; Climaco, M I; Telan, G J; Malijan, F; Hsu, H Y; Garcia, J; Fulo, H

    2012-01-01

    The need to lower the construction cost of fuel cells calls for the development of non-Pt based electrocatalysts. Among others, Pd has emerged as a promising alternative to Pt for fuel cell catalysis. This research aims to investigate the synthesis and characterization of nanostructured Pd-based catalysts dispersed on carbon support as anode materials in direct ethanol fuel cells. For the preparation of the first Pd-based electrocatalyst, palladium nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via oleylamine (OAm)-mediated synthesis and precursor method with a mean particle size of 3.63 ± 0.59 nm as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Carbon black was used as a supporting matrix for the OAm-capped Pd NPs. Thermal annealing and acetic acid washing were used to remove the OAm capping agent. To evaluate the electrocatalytic activity of the prepared electrocatalyst towards ethanol oxidation, cyclic voltammetry (CV) studies were performed using 1.0 M ethanol in basic medium. The CV data revealed the highest peak current density of 11.05 mA cm −2 for the acetic acid-washed Pd/C electrocatalyst. Meanwhile, the fabrication of the second Pd-based electrocatalyst was done by functionalization of the carbon black support using 3:1 (v/v) H 2 SO 4 :HNO 3 . The metal oxide, NiO, was deposited using precipitation method while polyol method was used for the deposition of Pd NPs. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the estimated particle size of the synthesized catalysts was at around 9.0–15.0 nm. CV results demonstrated a 36.7% increase in the catalytic activity of Pd–NiO/C (functionalized) catalyst towards ethanol oxidation compared to the non-functionalized catalyst. (paper)

  16. Nanostructured carbon-supported Pd electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation: synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacutan, E. M.; Climaco, M. I.; Telan, G. J.; Malijan, F.; Hsu, H. Y.; Garcia, J.; Fulo, H.; Tongol, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    The need to lower the construction cost of fuel cells calls for the development of non-Pt based electrocatalysts. Among others, Pd has emerged as a promising alternative to Pt for fuel cell catalysis. This research aims to investigate the synthesis and characterization of nanostructured Pd-based catalysts dispersed on carbon support as anode materials in direct ethanol fuel cells. For the preparation of the first Pd-based electrocatalyst, palladium nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via oleylamine (OAm)-mediated synthesis and precursor method with a mean particle size of 3.63 ± 0.59 nm as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Carbon black was used as a supporting matrix for the OAm-capped Pd NPs. Thermal annealing and acetic acid washing were used to remove the OAm capping agent. To evaluate the electrocatalytic activity of the prepared electrocatalyst towards ethanol oxidation, cyclic voltammetry (CV) studies were performed using 1.0 M ethanol in basic medium. The CV data revealed the highest peak current density of 11.05 mA cm-2 for the acetic acid-washed Pd/C electrocatalyst. Meanwhile, the fabrication of the second Pd-based electrocatalyst was done by functionalization of the carbon black support using 3:1 (v/v) H2SO4:HNO3. The metal oxide, NiO, was deposited using precipitation method while polyol method was used for the deposition of Pd NPs. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the estimated particle size of the synthesized catalysts was at around 9.0-15.0 nm. CV results demonstrated a 36.7% increase in the catalytic activity of Pd-NiO/C (functionalized) catalyst towards ethanol oxidation compared to the non-functionalized catalyst.

  17. Carbon fiber cloth supported interwoven WS{sub 2} nanosplates with highly enhanced performances for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Xiao; Chi, Jing-Qi [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Lu, Shan-Shan [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); College of Science, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Gou, Jian-Xia [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Dong, Bin, E-mail: dongbin@upc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); College of Science, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Li, Xiao; Liu, Yan-Ru; Yan, Kai-Li; Chai, Yong-Ming [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Liu, Chen-Guang, E-mail: cgliu@upc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • WS{sub 2} nanoplates supported on carbon fiber cloth (WS{sub 2}/CFC) have been synthesized. • WS{sub 2}/CFC has the good dispersion and interwoven structure of WS{sub 2}. • CFC as substrate contributes to enhanced conductivity and close combination. • WS{sub 2}/CFC exhibits ultra-high activity and stability owing to CFC as support. - Abstract: The interwoven WS{sub 2} nanoplates supported on carbon fiber cloth (WS{sub 2}/CFC) have been successfully synthesized by a facile solvothermal process. XRD and XPS confirm the formation of WS{sub 2}/CFC. SEM images show the good dispersion of WS{sub 2} nanoplates with interwoven structures on the surface of CFC. Thanks to the 3D framework of CFC, WS{sub 2} nanoplates realize overall excellent-dispersion interwoven on the surface of CFC compared with pristine bulk WS{sub 2} with severe aggregation. Moreover, CFC not only serves as excellent conductive substrate to accelerate electron transport rate, but also contributes to the close combination between WS{sub 2} and CFC for long-term stability. The electrochemical measurements show that WS{sub 2}/CFC exhibit a high specific capacitance of 399 F g{sup −1} at 1.0 A g{sup −1}, demonstrating the obviously enhanced capability compared with pristine bulk WS{sub 2}. Furthermore, WS{sub 2}/CFC realizes ultra-stable cycling stability with 99% of retention of capacitance after 500 charge-discharge cycles. It may provide novel access of designing carbon-based transition metal disulfides composites for excellent super capacitive properties.

  18. Relationships between structure and activity of carbon as a multifunctional support for electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanović, Sanja I; Panić, Vladimir V; Dekanski, Aleksandar B; Tripković, Amalija V; Jovanović, Vladislava M

    2012-07-14

    We report on new insights into the relationships between structure and activity of glassy carbon (GC), as a model material for electrocatalyst support, during its anodization in acid solution. Our investigation strongly confirms the role of CFGs in promotion of Pt activity by the "spill-over" effect related to CO(ads) for methanol electrooxidation (MEO) on a carbon-supported Pt catalyst. Combined analysis of voltammetric and impedance behaviour as well as changes in GC surface morphology induced by intensification of anodizing conditions reveal an intrinsic influence of the carbon functionalization and the structure of a graphene oxide (GO) layer on the electrical and electrocatalytic properties of activated GC. Although GO continuously grows during anodization, it structurally changes from being a graphite inter-layer within graphite ribbons toward a continuous GO surface layer that deteriorates the native structure of GC. As a consequence of the increased distance between GO-spaced graphite layers, the GC conductivity decreases until the case of profound GO exfoliation under drastic anodizing conditions. This exposes the native, yet abundantly functionalized, GC texture. While GC capacitance continuously increases with intensification of anodizing conditions, the surface nano-roughness and GO resistance reach the highest values at modest anodizing conditions, and then decrease upon drastic anodization due to the onset of GO exfoliation. We found for the first time that the activity of a GC-supported Pt catalyst in MEO, as one of the promising half-reactions in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, strictly follows the changes in GC nano-roughness and GO-induced GC resistance. The highest GC/Pt MEO activity is reached when optimal distance between graphite layers and optimal degree of GC functionalization bring the highest amount of CFGs into intimate contact with the Pt surface. This confirms the promoting role of CFGs in MEO catalysis.

  19. Stability, carbon resistance, and reactivity toward autothermal reforming of nickel on ceria-based supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutthisripok, W.; Laosiripojana, N.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) normally requires a reformer unit, where the fuel such as natural gas, methane, methanol, or ethanol can be reformed to hydrogen before introducing to the main part of fuel cell. Nickel on commercial supports such as Al2O3, MgO, ZrO2 has been widely reported to be used as the reforming catalyst commercially. Carbon formation and catalyst deactivation are always the main problems of using this type of catalyst. It is well established that CeO2 and CeO2-ZrO2 have been applied as the catalysts in a wide variety of reactions involving oxidation or partial oxidation of hydrocarbons (e.g. automotive catalysis). In order to quantify the performance of nickel on CeO2 and CeO2-ZrO2 supports for reformer application, the stabilities toward methane steam reforming and the carbon formation resistance were studied. After 18 hours, nickel on CeO2-ZrO2 with the Ce/Zr ratio of 3/1 presented the best performance in term of stability and activity. It also provided excellent resistance toward carbon formation compared to commercial Ni/Al2O3. The autothermal reforming of methane over Ni catalyst on CeO2 and CeO2-ZrO2 supports were also investigated. Ni/Ce-ZrO2 with the Ce/ Zr ratio of 3/1 also showed the best performance. The kinetics of this reaction was also studied. In the temperature range of 750-900C, the reaction order in methane was always closed to 1. The catalyst showed a slight positive effect of hydrogen and a negative effect of steam on the steam reforming rate. The addition of oxygen increased the steam reforming rate. However, the productions of CO and H2 decreased with increasing oxygen partial pressure. (author)

  20. Continuous cooling transformations and microstructures in a low-carbon, high-strength low-alloy plate steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, S. W.; Vin, D. J., Col; Krauss, G.

    1990-06-01

    A continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram was determined for a high-strength low-alloy plate steel containing (in weight percent) 0.06 C, 1.45 Mn, 1.25 Cu, 0.97 Ni, 0.72 Cr, and 0.42 Mo. Dilatometric measurements were supplemented by microhardness testing, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The CCT diagram showed significant suppression of polygonal ferrite formation and a prominent transformation region, normally attributed to bainite formation, at temperatures intermediate to those of polygonal ferrite and martensite formation. In the intermediate region, ferrite formation in groups of similarly oriented crystals about 1 μm in size and containing a high density of dislocations dominated the transformation of austenite during continuous cooling. The ferrite grains assumed two morphologies, elongated or acicular and equiaxed or granular, leading to the terms “acicular ferrite” and “granular ferrite,” respectively, to describe these structures. Austenite regions, some transformed to martensite, were enriched in carbon and retained at interfaces between ferrite grains. Coarse interfacial ledges and the nonacicular morphology of the granular ferrite grains provided evidence for a phase transformation mechanism involving reconstructive diffusion of substitutional atoms. At slow cooling rates, polygonal ferrite and Widmanstätten ferrite formed. These latter structures contained low dislocation densities and e-copper precipitates formed by an interphase transformation mechanism.

  1. Properties and microstructure of the Ru-coated carbon nano tube counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jeungjo; Yu, Byungkwan; Noh, Yunyoung; Suh, Young Joon; Kim, Moon J; Yoo, Kicheon; Ko, Min Jae; Song, Ohsung

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with the ruthenium (Ru) coated multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) on the counter electrode (CE). High purity MWCNT (0.01~0.06 g) was sprayed on glass/fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO). Then 30 nm-thick Ru thin films were coated on a MWCNT template at low temperature by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using RuDi and O2 as precursor to prepare Ru-CNT CE and the 0.45 cm2 DSSC device of glass/FTO/TiO2/Dye (N719)/electrolyte (C6DMII, GSCN)/Ru-CNT CE was fabricated. The surface morphology of CEs and the energy conversion efficiency of the DSSC device were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and photocurrent-voltage (I-V) measurement. We confirmed that effective surface of the CE increased linearly as the amount of MWCNT spray increased and the crystallized Ru was deposited very conformally around the MWCNT nano template. Moreover, the efficiency of the DSSC increased up to 3.3% as the amount of MWCNT increased.

  2. Effects of Graphene Oxide and Oxidized Carbon Nanotubes on the Cellular Division, Microstructure, Uptake, Oxidative Stress, and Metabolic Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiangang; Ouyang, Shaohu; Mu, Li; An, Jing; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-09-15

    Nanomaterial oxides are common formations of nanomaterials in the natural environment. Herein, the nanotoxicology of typical graphene oxide (GO) and carboxyl single-walled carbon nanotubes (C-SWCNT) was compared. The results showed that cell division of Chlorella vulgaris was promoted at 24 h and then inhibited at 96 h after nanomaterial exposure. At 96 h, GO and C-SWCNT inhibited the rates of cell division by 0.08-15% and 0.8-28.3%, respectively. Both GO and C-SWCNT covered the cell surface, but the uptake percentage of C-SWCNT was 2-fold higher than that of GO. C-SWCNT induced stronger plasmolysis and mitochondrial membrane potential loss and decreased the cell viability to a greater extent than GO. Moreover, C-SWCNT-exposed cells exhibited more starch grains and lysosome formation and higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels than GO-exposed cells. Metabolomics analysis revealed significant differences in the metabolic profiles among the control, C-SWCNT and GO groups. The metabolisms of alkanes, lysine, octadecadienoic acid and valine was associated with ROS and could be considered as new biomarkers of ROS. The nanotoxicological mechanisms involved the inhibition of fatty acid, amino acid and small molecule acid metabolisms. These findings provide new insights into the effects of GO and C-SWCNT on cellular responses.

  3. High quality bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass over alumina-supported sodium carbonate

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali; Bramer, Eddy A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    Performance of a novel alumina-supported sodium carbonate catalyst was studied to produce a valuable bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. Post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was investigated in a catalyst fixed

  4. High Performance Nanocatalysts Supported on Micro/Nano Carbon Structures Using Ethanol Immersion Pretreatment for Micro DMFCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Liang-You; Wu, Yi-Shiuan; Chang, Chaun; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, highly dense platinum (Pt) nanocatalysts were successfully deposited on the hydrophilically-treated nano/micro carbon supports with an ethanol (EtOH) immersion pretreatment and an acidic treatment for the performance improvement of methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). In order to thoroughly immerse the three-dimensional, interwoven structures of the carbon cloth fibers with a 6 M sulfuric acid surface modification, which increasing more oxygen-containing functional groups on the surfaces of the carbon supports, the EtOH immersion pretreatment of the carbon supports was utilized prior to the sulfuric acid treatment. Subsequently, Pt catalysts were reduced on the modified carbon supports by a homemade open-loop reduction system (OLRS) [1] For comparisons, carbon cloth (CC) and carbon nanotube on CC (CNT/CC) supports were employed with and without EtOH immersion pretreatments before Pt catalyst reduction. In the cyclic voltammetry (CV) curves, the electrosorption charges of hydrogen ion (Q H ) and the peak current density (I P ) of the fabricated Pt/CC and Pt/CNT/CC electrodes with the EtOH immersion pretreatments can efficiently be enhanced due to more active Pt sites for electrocatalytic reactions

  5. Large-area thin self-supporting carbon foils with MgO coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Stolarz, A

    2002-01-01

    Large area self-supporting carbon foils in the thickness of range of 8-22 mu g/cm sup 2 , coated with approximately 4 mu g/cm sup 2 MgO have been prepared by e-gun evaporation. They were mounted on frames with apertures of 130 cm sup 2. Problems related to the parting agent preparation, floating procedure, and mounting onto frames are discussed. Special precautions necessary to avoid damage during foil drying, storage and transportation are suggested.

  6. Large-area thin self-supporting carbon foils with MgO coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolarz, Anna E-mail: anna@slcj.uw.edu.pl; Maier-Komor, Peter

    2002-03-11

    Large area self-supporting carbon foils in the thickness of range of 8-22 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}, coated with approximately 4 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} MgO have been prepared by e-gun evaporation. They were mounted on frames with apertures of 130 cm{sup 2}. Problems related to the parting agent preparation, floating procedure, and mounting onto frames are discussed. Special precautions necessary to avoid damage during foil drying, storage and transportation are suggested.

  7. Rapid Reduction of Alkenes and Alkynes over Pd Nanoparticles Supported on Sulfonated Porous Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Shokrolahi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method has been introduced for rapid reduction of alkenes and alkynes, which may be attractive for chemical industries. This method has some advantages such as simplicity and low cost of reactants. Pd supported on sulfonated porous carbon (SPC was used as a new catalyst for reduction of alkenes and alkynes to the corresponding alkanes using sodium borohydride. The heterogeneous reaction was conducted in open air at room temperature to produce the desired saturated compounds in high yields (over 96% and in short reaction time (15 minutes.

  8. Microstructural study of Ni/γ-Al2O3 catalyst: addition effects of CeO2 on carbon dioxide reforming of methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Antoninho; Probst, Luiz Fernando Dias; Carreno, Neftali L. V.; Leite, Edson R.; Pontes, Fenelon M.; Longo, Elson; Schreiner, Wido H.; Lisboa-Filho, Paulo N.

    2003-01-01

    The carbon dioxide reforming of methane was carried out over nickel catalysts supported on the γ-Al 2 O 3 /CeO 2 system prepared by wet impregnation. With the increase of the Co2 weight in the catalyst, a higher stability was observed in the catalytic activity, together with an excellent resistance to carbon deposition and a better Ni dispersion. The catalysts were characterized by means of surface area measurements, TPR, H 2 chemisorption, XRD, SEM, EDX, XPS and TEM. An interaction between Ni and CeO 2 was observed to the Ni/CeO 2 sample after activation in a H 2 atmosphere above 300 deg C. Such behavior has a significantly influence on the catalytic activity. (author)

  9. Palaeoecology of a 3-kyr biosedimentary record of a coral reef-supporting carbonate shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Carine M.; Barbosa, Catia Fernandes; Cordeiro, Renato C.; Seoane, José Carlos S.; Fermino, Gerson M.; Silva, Patricia O.; Turcq, Bruno J.

    2013-11-01

    This study assesses the 3-kyr paleoecology and sedimentary evolution of the Abrolhos carbonate shelf, Bahia, Brazil, using a two-meter-long core collected in a carbonate muddy sediment. The paleoecology was based on the distribution of benthic foraminifer functional groups associated with grain size, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), C/N and δ13C. The results identified three biosedimentary units showing that symbiont-bearing foraminifers (Peneroplis and Archaias) decrease in abundance. However, other small taxa (Miliolinella and Cornuspira) and stress-tolerant genera (Bolivina, Elphidium and Ammonia) increase in abundance toward the core top. Grain size decreases toward the top of the core, suggesting a weakening of hydrodynamic winnowing toward recent time. The TOC and TN concentrations increase, and the C/N ratios decrease, suggesting an increase of marine productivity from nearby goblet-shaped structures called "chapeirões". Changes in the benthic foraminifer community can be linked to the sedimentological and organic matter input, which are the result of climatic and oceanographic variations at different spatial and time scales, thus illustrating reduced potential to support symbiont-bearing foraminifer communities to the end of the Holocene.

  10. The effect of microstructure and texture evolution on mechanical properties of low-carbon steel processed by the continuous hybrid process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Sun Kwang; Baek, Hyun Moo; Son, Il-Heon; Im, Yong-Taek; Bae, Chul Min

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the continuous hybrid process is newly designed and applied for producing grain-refined long and large cross-section wires of low-carbon steel at high speed at room temperature. The initial specimen, with a diameter of 13 mm, continuously passes through the rolls, equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) dies, and wire-drawing dies in sequence during the process. The specimens deformed by the continuous hybrid process without and with the wire-drawing dies were obtained to investigate the role in the deformation separately. Their microstructures, textures, and mechanical properties were investigated by optical microscopy (OM), electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD), tension, and Vickers micro-hardness tests and were compared with those for the case processed by the conventional wire-drawing process. According to the present investigation, the continuous hybrid process can more efficiently manufacture fine-grained wires with a strong shear texture in a continuous way than the conventional wire-drawing process can. In addition, the ultimate tensile strength value of the specimen processed by the continuous hybrid process was 23.9% higher, although the elongation was slightly lower than the one produced by the conventional wire-drawing process. The plastic deformation was mainly imposed by the ECAP dies, and the wire-drawing dies improve the dimensional accuracy and increase the local strain homogeneity in the continuous hybrid process. It is demonstrated that the continuous hybrid process might be beneficial in commercializing a continuous application of the severe plastic deformation process for producing grain-refined wires for industrial applications

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a Ti-microalloyed low-carbon stainless steel treated by quenching-partitioning-tempering process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, S.T., E-mail: xst-2007@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, Z.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Z. [Research Institute, Baoshan Iron & Steel Co. Ltd., Shanghai 201900 (China); Wang, G.D. [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) process was used to treat a Ti-microalloyed low-carbon stainless steel after cold rolling. In addition to martensite, ferrite and retained austenite, TiN, coarse TiC, fine TiC, (Fe,Cr){sub 3}C and ultra-fine TiC precipitates were formed after the Q-P-T treatment. Based on field emission-scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations, thermodynamic, crystallographic and statistical analyses were used to reveal the precipitation behaviors of these particles. The effects of partitioning-tempering (P-T) temperature and time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Q-P-T treated specimens were specially studied. The coarsening and spheroidization of (Fe,Cr){sub 3}C particles during P-T stage were obviously retarded by large Cr addition. The retained austenite was obtained significantly with appropriate P-T parameters. The precipitation of ultra-fine TiC particles in the martensite during the P-T stage at 500 °C induced a secondary hardening. - Highlights: • Some fine TiC with 30–70 nm precipitated in austenite during partial austenization. • A part of fine TiC had K-S OR with martensite after Q-P-T treatment. • A part of fine TiC had a OR specially deviating from K-S OR with martensite. • Coarsening and spheroidization of (Fe,Cr){sub 3}C were retarded during P-T stage. • Ultra-fine TiC with < 10 nm precipitated in martensite during P-T stage at 500 °C.

  12. Low temperature growth of ultra-high mass density carbon nanotube forests on conductive supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugime, Hisashi; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Yang, Junwei; D'Arsié, Lorenzo; Robertson, John; Oliver, Rachel A.; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Cepek, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    We grow ultra-high mass density carbon nanotube forests at 450 °C on Ti-coated Cu supports using Co-Mo co-catalyst. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows Mo strongly interacts with Ti and Co, suppressing both aggregation and lifting off of Co particles and, thus, promoting the root growth mechanism. The forests average a height of 0.38 μm and a mass density of 1.6 g cm −3 . This mass density is the highest reported so far, even at higher temperatures or on insulators. The forests and Cu supports show ohmic conductivity (lowest resistance ∼22 kΩ), suggesting Co-Mo is useful for applications requiring forest growth on conductors

  13. Wet catalyst-support films for production of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Noe T; Hamilton, Christopher E; Pint, Cary L; Orbaek, Alvin; Yao, Jun; Frosinini, Aldo L; Barron, Andrew R; Tour, James M; Hauge, Robert H

    2010-07-01

    A procedure for vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) production has been developed through liquid-phase deposition of alumoxanes (aluminum oxide hydroxides, boehmite) as a catalyst support. Through a simple spin-coating of alumoxane nanoparticles, uniform centimer-square thin film surfaces were coated and used as supports for subsequent deposition of metal catalyst. Uniform VA-CNTs are observed to grow from this film following deposition of both conventional evaporated Fe catalyst, as well as premade Fe nanoparticles drop-dried from the liquid phase. The quality and uniformity of the VA-CNTs are comparable to growth from conventional evaporated layers of Al(2)O(3). The combined use of alumoxane and Fe nanoparticles to coat surfaces represents an inexpensive and scalable approach to large-scale VA-CNT production that makes chemical vapor deposition significantly more competitive when compared to other CNT production techniques.

  14. Deformation microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Hughes, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Microstructural characterization and modeling has shown that a variety of metals deformed by different thermomechanical processes follows a general path of grain subdivision, by dislocation boundaries and high angle boundaries. This subdivision has been observed to very small structural scales...... of the order of 10 nm, produced by deformation under large sliding loads. Limits to the evolution of microstructural parameters during monotonic loading have been investigated based on a characterization by transmission electron microscopy. Such limits have been observed at an equivalent strain of about 10...

  15. The effect of promoters on the electronic structure of ruthenium catalysts supported on carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guraya, Monica; Sprenger, Susanne; Rarog-Pilecka, Wioletta; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Kowalczyk, Zbigniew; Muhler, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Alkali- and earth-alkali-promoted ruthenium catalysts supported on graphitized carbon were investigated by means of X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) in order to study the effect of promoters on the electronic structure of this metal-support system. Samples were measured as prepared and after thorough reduction in hydrogen. The C 1s spectra of reduced alkali-promoted catalysts showed a shift towards higher binding energies and an asymmetric broadening. Neither non-promoted nor Ba-promoted Ru/C samples exhibited such a behaviour after similar treatments. The most important feature in the UP spectra of the reduced alkali-promoted catalysts was the appearance of a well defined Fermi edge absent in the semimetal-like electronic structure of graphite. No significant effects appeared in the case of non-promoted or Ba-promoted catalysts. The increase in the density of occupied states at the Fermi energy indicates a shift of this level into the conduction band, due to a charge transfer from the promoter to the support. This interpretation also provides an explanation for the observed higher C 1s binding energy and asymmetric broadening, due to the off-set introduced in the binding energy scale and the increasing probability of inelastic excitations near the Fermi level. In addition to photoelectron spectroscopy, low energy ion scattering (ISS) was used to obtain information about the localisation of the promoters. Based on the mild sputtering effect during prolonged series of spectra, it was possible to conclude that potassium covers both the carbon support and the Ru metal particles

  16. Microstructure and property of diamond-like carbon films with Al and Cr co-doping deposited using a hybrid beams system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Wei; Liu, Jingmao; Geng, Dongsen; Guo, Peng; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Qimin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Diamond-like carbon films with Al and Cr doping were deposited. • Alternate multilayered structure consisted of Al-poor layer and Al-rich layer was formed. • The periodic Al-rich layers can greatly improve the residual stress and elastic resilience of the films. - Abstract: DLC films with weak carbide former Al and carbide former Cr co-doping (Al:Cr-DLC) were deposited by a hybrid beams system comprising an anode-layer linear ion beam source (LIS) and high power impulse magnetron sputtering using a gas mixture of C 2 H 2 and Ar as the precursor. The doped Al and Cr contents were controlled via adjusting the C 2 H 2 fraction in the gas mixture. The composition, microstructure, compressive stress, mechanical properties and tribological behaviors of the Al:Cr-DLC films were researched carefully using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, stress-tester, nanoindentation and ball-on-plate tribometer as function of the C 2 H 2 fraction. The results show that the Al and Cr contents in the films increased continuously as the C 2 H 2 fraction decreased. The doped Cr atoms preferred to bond with the carbon while the Al atoms mainly existed in metallic state. Structure modulation with alternate multilayer consisted of Al-poor DLC layer and Al-rich DLC layer was found in the films. Those periodic Al-rich DLC layers can effectively release the residual stress of the films. On the other hand, the formation of the carbide component due to Cr incorporation can help to increase the film hardness. Accordingly, the residual stress of the DLC films can be reduced without sacrificing the film hardness though co-doping Al and Cr atoms. Furthermore, it was found that the periodic Al-rich layer can greatly improve the elastic resilience of the DLC films and thus decreases the film friction coefficient and wear rate significantly. However, the existence of the carbide component would cause abrasive wear and thus

  17. Microstructure and property of diamond-like carbon films with Al and Cr co-doping deposited using a hybrid beams system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Wei, E-mail: popdw@126.com [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Liu, Jingmao; Geng, Dongsen [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guo, Peng [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Zheng, Jun [Science and Technology on Surface Engineering Laboratory, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Qimin, E-mail: qmwang@gdut.edu.cn [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Diamond-like carbon films with Al and Cr doping were deposited. • Alternate multilayered structure consisted of Al-poor layer and Al-rich layer was formed. • The periodic Al-rich layers can greatly improve the residual stress and elastic resilience of the films. - Abstract: DLC films with weak carbide former Al and carbide former Cr co-doping (Al:Cr-DLC) were deposited by a hybrid beams system comprising an anode-layer linear ion beam source (LIS) and high power impulse magnetron sputtering using a gas mixture of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and Ar as the precursor. The doped Al and Cr contents were controlled via adjusting the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} fraction in the gas mixture. The composition, microstructure, compressive stress, mechanical properties and tribological behaviors of the Al:Cr-DLC films were researched carefully using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, stress-tester, nanoindentation and ball-on-plate tribometer as function of the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} fraction. The results show that the Al and Cr contents in the films increased continuously as the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} fraction decreased. The doped Cr atoms preferred to bond with the carbon while the Al atoms mainly existed in metallic state. Structure modulation with alternate multilayer consisted of Al-poor DLC layer and Al-rich DLC layer was found in the films. Those periodic Al-rich DLC layers can effectively release the residual stress of the films. On the other hand, the formation of the carbide component due to Cr incorporation can help to increase the film hardness. Accordingly, the residual stress of the DLC films can be reduced without sacrificing the film hardness though co-doping Al and Cr atoms. Furthermore, it was found that the periodic Al-rich layer can greatly improve the elastic resilience of the DLC films and thus decreases the film friction coefficient and wear rate significantly. However, the existence of the carbide component would

  18. Enhanced Activity and Selectivity of Carbon Nanofiber Supported Pd Catalysts for Nitrite Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng; Choe, Jong Kwon; Shapley, John R.; Werth, Charles J.

    2012-01-01

    Pd-based catalyst treatment represents an emerging technology that shows promise to remove nitrate and nitrite from drinking water. In this work we use vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports in order to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). Results show that nitrite reduction activity increases by 3.1-fold and selectivity decreases by 8.0-fold, with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size from 1.4 to 9.6 nm. Both activity and selectivity are not significantly influenced by Pd interior versus exterior CNF loading. Consequently, turnover frequencies (TOFs) among all CNF catalysts are similar, suggesting nitrite reduction is not sensitive to Pd location on CNFs nor Pd structure. CNF-based catalysts compare favorably to conventional Pd catalysts (i.e., Pd on activated carbon or alumina) with respect to nitrite reduction activity and selectivity, and they maintain activity over multiple reduction cycles. Hence, our results suggest new insights that an optimum Pd nanoparticle size on CNFs balances faster kinetics with lower ammonia production, that catalysts can be tailored at the nanoscale to improve catalytic performance for nitrite, and that CNFs hold promise as highly effective catalyst supports in drinking water treatment. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  19. Influence of surface morphology on methanol oxidation at a glassy carbon-supported Pt catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. STEVANOVIC

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Platinum supported on glassy carbon (GC was used as a model system for studying the influence of the surface morphology of a Pt catalyst on methanol oxidation in alkaline and acidic solutions. Platinum was deposited by the potential step method on GC samples from H2SO4 + H2PtCl6 solution under the same conditions with loadings from 10 to 80 mg cm-2. AFM and STM images of the GC/Pt electrodes showed that the Pt was deposited in the form of 3D agglomerates composed of spherical particles. Longer deposition times resulted in increased growth of Pt forms and a decrease in the specific area of the Pt. The real surface area of Pt increased with loading but the changes were almost negligible at higher loadings. Nevertheless, both the specific and mass activity of platinum supported on glassy carbon for methanol oxidation in acidic and in alkaline solutions exhibit a volcanic dependence with respect to the platinum loading. The increase in the activity can be explained by the increasing the particle size with the loading and thus an increase in the contiguous Pt sites available for adsorption and decomposition of methanol. However, the decrease in the activity of the catalyst with further increase of loading and particle size after reaching the maximum is related to the decrease of active sites available for methanol adsorption and their accessibility as a result of more close proximity and pronounced coalescence of the Pt particles.

  20. Enhanced Activity and Selectivity of Carbon Nanofiber Supported Pd Catalysts for Nitrite Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng

    2012-03-06

    Pd-based catalyst treatment represents an emerging technology that shows promise to remove nitrate and nitrite from drinking water. In this work we use vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports in order to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). Results show that nitrite reduction activity increases by 3.1-fold and selectivity decreases by 8.0-fold, with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size from 1.4 to 9.6 nm. Both activity and selectivity are not significantly influenced by Pd interior versus exterior CNF loading. Consequently, turnover frequencies (TOFs) among all CNF catalysts are similar, suggesting nitrite reduction is not sensitive to Pd location on CNFs nor Pd structure. CNF-based catalysts compare favorably to conventional Pd catalysts (i.e., Pd on activated carbon or alumina) with respect to nitrite reduction activity and selectivity, and they maintain activity over multiple reduction cycles. Hence, our results suggest new insights that an optimum Pd nanoparticle size on CNFs balances faster kinetics with lower ammonia production, that catalysts can be tailored at the nanoscale to improve catalytic performance for nitrite, and that CNFs hold promise as highly effective catalyst supports in drinking water treatment. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  1. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of ciprofloxacin in water with carbon nanotube supported manganese oxides as catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Minghao, E-mail: suiminghao.sui@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Xing, Sichu; Sheng, Li; Huang, Shuhang; Guo, Hongguang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ciprofloxacin in water was degraded by heterogeneous catalytic ozonation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx were supported on MWCNTs to serve as catalyst for ozonation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx/MWCNT exhibited highly catalytic activity on ozonation of ciprofloxacin in water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx/MWCNT resulted in effective antibacterial activity inhibition on ciprofloxacin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx/MWCNT promoted the generation of hydroxyl radicals. - Abstract: Carbon nanotube-supported manganese oxides (MnOx/MWCNT) were used as catalysts to assist ozone in degrading ciprofloxacin in water. Manganese oxides were successfully loaded on multi-walled carbon nanotube surfaces by simply impregnating the carbon nanotube with permanganate solution. The catalytic activities of MnOx/MWCNT in ciprofloxacin ozonation, including degradation, mineralization effectiveness, and antibacterial activity change, were investigated. The presence of MnOx/MWCNT significantly elevated the degradation and mineralization efficiency of ozone on ciprofloxacin. The microbiological assay with a reference Escherichia coli strain indicated that ozonation with MnOx/MWCNT results in more effective antibacterial activity inhibition of ciprofloxacin than that in ozonation alone. The effects of catalyst dose, initial ciprofloxacin concentration, and initial pH conditions on ciprofloxacin ozonation with MnOx/MWCNT were surveyed. Electron spin resonance trapping was applied to assess the role of MnOx/MWCNT in generating hydroxyl radicals (HO{center_dot}) during ozonation. Stronger 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide-OH signals were observed in the ozonation with MnOx/MWCNT compared with those in ozonation alone, indicating that MnOx/MWCNT promoted the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The degradation of ciprofloxacin was studied in drinking water and wastewater process samples to gauge the potential effects of water background matrix on

  2. Novel carbon nanosheets as support for ultrahigh-resolution structural analysis of nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottbohm, Christoph T.; Beyer, Andre; Sologubenko, Alla S.; Ennen, Inga; Huetten, Andreas; Roesner, Harald; Eck, Wolfgang; Mayer, Joachim; Goelzhaeuser, Armin

    2008-01-01

    The resolution in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has reached values as low as 0.08 nm. However, these values are not accessible for very small objects in the size range of a few nanometers or lower, as they have to be placed on some support, which contributes to the overall electron-scattering signal, thereby blurring the contrast. Here, we report on the use of nanosheets made from cross-linked aromatic self-assembled monolayers as TEM sample supports. When transferred onto a copper grid, a single 1.6-nm-thick nanosheet can cover the grid and is free standing within the micron-sized openings. Despite its thinness, the sheet is stable under the impact of the electron beam. Micrographs taken from nanoclusters onto these nanosheets show highly increased contrast in comparison to the images taken from amorphous carbon supports. In scanning transmission electron microscopy with nanosheet support, a size analysis of sub-nanometer Au clusters was performed and single Au atoms were resolved

  3. KOH-activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes as platinum supports for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chaoxiong; Song, Shuqin; Liu, Jinchao; Maragou, Vasiliki; Tsiakaras, Panagiotis

    In the present investigation, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) thermally treated by KOH were adopted as the platinum supporting material for the oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts. FTIR and Raman spectra were used to investigate the surface state of MWCNTs treated by KOH at different temperatures (700, 800, and 900 °C) and showed MWCNTs can be successfully functionalized. The structural properties of KOH-activated MWCNTs supported Pt were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their electrochemical performance was evaluated by the aid of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry. According to the experimental findings of the present work, the surrface of MWCNTs can be successfully functionalized with oxygen-containing groups after activation by KOH, favoring the good dispersion of Pt nanoparticles with narrow size distribution. The as-prepared Pt catalysts supported on KOH treated MWCNTs at higher temperature, possess higher electrochemical surface area and exhibit desirable activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). More precisely, it has been found that the electrochemical active area of Pt/MWCNTs-900 is approximately two times higher than that of Pt/MWCNTs. It can be concluded that KOH activation is an effective way to decorate MWCNTs' surface with oxygen-containing groups and bigger surface area, which makes them more suitable as electrocatalyst support materials.

  4. Ultrasound-assisted oxidation of dibenzothiophene with phosphotungstic acid supported on activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liyan; Zhang, Yu; Tan, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Phosphotungstic acid (HPW) supported on activated carbon (AC) was applied to catalyze deep oxidation desulfurization of fuel oil with the assist of ultrasound. The sulfur-conversion rate was evaluated by measuring the concentration of dibenzothiophene (DBT) in n-octane before and after the oxidation. Supporting HPW on AC has been verified to play a positive role in UAOD process by a series of contrast tests, where only HPW, AC or a mixture of free HPW and AC was used. The influences of catalyst dose, ultrasound power, reaction temperature, H2O2:oil volume ratio and the reuse of catalyst on the catalytic oxidation desulfurization kinetics were investigated. The DBT conversion rate of the reaction catalyzed by supported HPW under ultrasound irradiation was higher than the summation of the reactions with HPW only and AC only as catalyst. With the increase of loading amount of HPW on AC, ultrasound power, H2O2:oil volume ratio and reaction temperature, the catalytic oxidation reactivity of DBT would be enhanced. The optimum loading amount of HPW was 10%, exceed which DBT conversion would no longer increase obviously. DBT could be completely converted under the optimized conditions (volume ratio of H2O2 to model oil: 1:10, mass ratio of the supported HPW to model oil: 1.25%, temperature: 70°C) after 9 min of ultrasound irradiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of support matrices for immobilization of anaerobic consortia for efficient carbon cycling in waste regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Ashvini; Ogram, Andrew

    2005-02-18

    Efficient metabolism of fatty acids during anaerobic waste digestion requires development of consortia that include "fatty acid consuming H(2) producing bacteria" and methanogenic bacteria. The objective of this research was to optimize methanogenesis from fatty acids by evaluating a variety of support matrices for use in maintaining efficient syntrophic-methanogenic consortia. Tested matrices included clays (montmorillonite and bentonite), glass beads (106 and 425-600mum), microcarriers (cytopore, cytodex, cytoline, and cultispher; conventionally employed for cultivation of mammalian cell lines), BioSep beads (powdered activated carbon), and membranes (hydrophilic; nylon, polysulfone, and hydrophobic; teflon, polypropylene). Data obtained from headspace methane (CH(4)) analyses as an indicator of anaerobic carbon cycling efficiency indicated that material surface properties were important in maintenance and functioning of the anaerobic consortia. Cytoline yielded significantly higher CH(4) than other matrices as early as in the first week of incubation. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis from crushed cytoline matrix showed the presence of Syntrophomonas spp. (butyrate oxidizing syntrophs) and Syntrophobacter spp. (propionate oxidizing syntrophs), with Methanosaeta spp. (acetate utilizing methanogen), and Methanospirillum spp. (hydrogen utilizing methanogen) cells. It is likely that the more hydrophobic surfaces provided a suitable surface for adherence of cells of syntrophic-methanogenic consortia. Cytoline also appeared to protect entrapped consortia from air, resulting in rapid methanogenesis after aerial exposure. Our study suggests that support matrices can be used in anaerobic digestors, pre-seeded with immobilized or entrapped consortia on support matrices, and may be of value as inoculant-adsorbents to rapidly initiate or recover proper system functioning following perturbation.

  6. Operational multi-sensor design for forest carbon monitoring to support REDD+ in Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braswell, B. H.; Hagen, S. C.; Harris, N.; Saatchi, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) have been requested to establish robust and transparent national forest monitoring systems (NFMS) that use a combination of remote sensing and ground-based forest carbon inventory approaches to estimate anthropogenic forest-related greenhouse gas emissions and removals, reducing uncertainties as far as possible. A country's NFMS should also be used for data collection to inform the assessment of national or subnational forest reference emission levels and/or forest reference levels (RELs/RLs). In this way, the NFMS forms the link between historical assessments and current/future assessments, enabling consistency in the data and information to support the implementation of REDD+ activities in countries. The creation of a reliable, transparent, and comprehensive NFMS is currently limited by a dearth of relevant data that are accurate, low-cost, and spatially resolved at subnational scales. We are developing, evaluating, and validating several critical components of an NFMS in Kalimantan, Indonesia, focusing on the use of LiDAR and radar imagery for improved carbon stock and forest degradation information. Our goal is to evaluate sensor and platform tradeoffs systematically against in situ investments, as well as provide detailed tracking and characterization of uncertainty in a cost-benefit framework. Kalimantan is an ideal area to evaluate the use of remote sensing methods because measuring forest carbon stocks and their human caused changes with a high degree of certainty in areas of dense tropical forests has proven to be difficult. While the proposed NFMS components are being developed at the subnational scale for Kalimantan, we are targeting these methods for applicability across broader geographies and for implementation at various scales. Our intention is for this research to advance the state of the art of Measuring, Reporting, and Verification (MRV) system methodologies in ways

  7. Fermentation as a first step in carbon and nutrient recovery in regenerative life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Amanda; Lasseur, Christophe; Rebeyre, Pierre; Clauwaert, Peter; Rabaey, Korneel; Ronsse, Frederik; Zhang, Dong Dong; López Barreiro, Diego; Prins, Wolter

    2016-07-01

    Long term manned space missions, such as the establishment of a base on Mars, will require a regenerative means of supplying the basic resources (i.e., food, water, oxygen) necessary to support human life. The MELiSSA-loop is a closed loop compartmentalized artificial aquatic ecosystem designed to recover water, carbon, and nutrients from solid organic wastes (e.g., inedible food waste and feces) for the regeneration of food and oxygen for humans. The first step in this loop is a strictly anaerobic fermentation unit operated as a membrane bioreactor. In this step the aim is to maximize the hydrolysis of complex organic compounds into simple molecules (CO2, ammonia, volatile fatty acids, …) which can be consumed by plants and bacteria downstream to produce food again. Optimal steady state fermentation of a standardized homogeneous mixture of beets, lettuce, wheat straw, toilet paper, feces, and water was demonstrated to recover approximately 50% of the influent carbon as soluble organics in the effluent through anaerobic fermentation. Approximately 10% of the influent COD was converted to CO2, with the remaining ~40% retained as a mixture of undigested solids and biomass. Approximately 50% of the influent nitrogen was recovered in the effluent, 97% of which was in the form of ammonia. Similar results have been obtained at both lab and pilot scale. With only 10% of the carbon driven to CO2 through this fermentation, a major challenge at this moment for the MELiSSA-loop is closing the carbon cycle, by completely oxidizing the carbon in the organic waste and non-edible parts of the plant into CO2 for higher plants and algae to fix again for food production. To further improve the overall degradation we are investigating the integration of a high temperature and pressure, sub- or near critical water conditions to improve the degradation of fibrous material with the addition of an oxidant (hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) under sub- or near critical conditions to further

  8. A review of carbon-based and non-carbon-based catalyst supports for the selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthonysamy, Shahreen Binti Izwan; Afandi, Syahidah Binti; Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman Bin

    2018-01-01

    Various types of carbon-based and non-carbon-based catalyst supports for nitric oxide (NO) removal through selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with ammonia are examined in this review. A number of carbon-based materials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), activated carbon (AC), and graphene (GR) and non-carbon-based materials, such as Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5), TiO 2 , and Al 2 O 3 supported materials, were identified as the most up-to-date and recently used catalysts for the removal of NO gas. The main focus of this review is the study of catalyst preparation methods, as this is highly correlated to the behaviour of NO removal. The general mechanisms involved in the system, the Langmuir-Hinshelwood or Eley-Riedeal mechanism, are also discussed. Characterisation analysis affecting the surface and chemical structure of the catalyst is also detailed in this work. Finally, a few major conclusions are drawn and future directions for work on the advancement of the SCR-NH 3 catalyst are suggested.

  9. Carbon fibers with a nano-hydroxyapatite coating as an excellent biofilm support for bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qijie; Zhang, Chao; Bao, Yanling; Dai, Guangze

    2018-06-01

    A biofilm support with high biocompatibility is needed for bioreactors. A nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on carbon fibers (CFs) was prepared by electrochemical deposition (ECD). The sludge immobilization assays, bacterial cells adhesion assays and Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory were used to evaluate the capacity of CF supports to immobilize activated sludge and bacterial cells. The sludge immobilization and bacterial cells adhesion assays illustrated that HA coating could enhance the capacity of CFs to immobilize microorganisms. SEM images showed that HA and bacterial cells formed a dense film on CFs surface. In addition, HA, acting as a glue, could combine CFs with bacterial cells or between cells, which helped CFs capture more bacterial cells. DLVO theory illustrated that CFs with HA coating had a lower total interaction energy than CFs without handling, explaining the higher capacity of CFs with HA coating to immobilize bacterial cells. This result was owning to the less negative zeta potential and higher hydrophilicity of CFs with HA coating, and the hydrophilicity made a greater contribution to the lower total interaction energy. Experiments and theory reveal that HA coating could enhance the biocompatibility of CFs, and CFs with HA coating could be used as an excellent biofilm support for bioreactors.

  10. Comparison study of catalyst nanoparticle formation and carbon nanotube growth: Support effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yunyu; Luo Zhiquan; Li Bin; Ho, Paul S.; Yao Zhen; Shi Li; Bryan, Eugene N.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    A comparison study has been conducted on the formation of catalyst nanoparticles on a high surface tension metal and low surface tension oxide for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth via catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). Silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) and tantalum have been deposited as supporting layers before deposition of a thin layer of iron catalyst. Iron nanoparticles were formed after thermal annealing. It was found that densities, size distributions, and morphologies of iron nanoparticles were distinctly different on the two supporting layers. In particular, iron nanoparticles revealed a Volmer-Weber growth mode on SiO 2 and a Stranski-Krastanov mode on tantalum. CCVD growth of CNTs was conducted on iron/tantalum and iron/SiO 2 . CNT growth on SiO 2 exhibited a tip growth mode with a slow growth rate of less than 100 nm/min. In contrast, the growth on tantalum followed a base growth mode with a fast growth rate exceeding 1 μm/min. For comparison, plasma enhanced CVD was also employed for CNT growth on SiO 2 and showed a base growth mode with a growth rate greater than 2 μm/min. The enhanced CNT growth rate on tantalum was attributed to the morphologies of iron nanoparticles in combination with the presence of an iron wetting layer. The CNT growth mode was affected by the adhesion between the catalyst and support as well as CVD process

  11. Hierarchical nanostructured hollow spherical carbon with mesoporous shell as a unique cathode catalyst support in proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Baizeng; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Minsik; Kim, Minwoo; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2009-03-07

    Hierarchical nanostructured spherical carbon with hollow macroporous core in combination with mesoporous shell has been explored to support Pt cathode catalyst with high metal loading in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The hollow core-mesoporous shell carbon (HCMSC) has unique structural characteristics such as large specific surface area and mesoporous volume, ensuring uniform dispersion of the supported high loading (60 wt%) Pt nanoparticles with small particle size, and well-developed three-dimensionally interconnected hierarchical porosity network, facilitating fast mass transport. The HCMSC-supported Pt(60 wt%) cathode catalyst has demonstrated markedly enhanced catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction and greatly improved PEMFC polarization performance compared with carbon black Vulcan XC-72 (VC)-supported ones. Furthermore, the HCMSC-supported Pt(40 wt%) or Pt(60 wt%) outperforms the HCMSC-supported Pt(20 wt%) even at a low catalyst loading of 0.2 mg Pt cm(-2) in the cathode, which is completely different from the VC-supported Pt catalysts. The capability of supporting high loading Pt is supposed to accelerate the commercialization of PEMFC due to the anticipated significant reduction in the amount of catalyst support required, diffusion layer thickness and fabricating cost of the supported Pt catalyst electrode.

  12. Oxygen reduction reaction on carbon-supported CoSe2 nanoparticles in an acidic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yongjun; He Ting; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effect of CoSe 2 /C nanoparticle loading rate on oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and H 2 O 2 production using the rotating disk electrode and the rotating ring-disk electrode techniques. We prepared carbon-supported CoSe 2 nanoparticles with different nominal loading rates and evaluated these samples by means of powder X-ray diffraction. All the catalysts had an OCP value of 0.81 V vs. RHE. H 2 O 2 production during the ORR process decreased with an increase in catalytic layer thickness. This decrease was related to the CoSe 2 loading on the disk electrode. H 2 O 2 production also decreased with increasing catalytic site density, a phenomenon related to the CoSe 2 loading rate on the carbon substrate. The cathodic current density significantly increased with increasing catalytic layer thickness, but decreased with increasing catalytic site density. In the case of 20 wt% CoSe 2 /C nanoparticles at 22 μg cm -2 , we determined that the transfer process involves about 3.5 electrons.

  13. Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etherton, B.P.

    1980-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts which were examined by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The metal particle size and number of particles per area of catalyst increased with increasing metal loading. The particles were approx. 10 A. in diameter, cubo-octahedral shaped, and approx. 80-90% disperse. The STEM electron beam caused negligible damage to the samples. Hydrogen adsorption measurements showed that the hydrogen-iridium atom ratio was 1.2:1-1.3:1 and increased with decreasing metal loading. Temperature-programed desorption showed four types of adsorbed hydrogen desorbing at -90/sup 0/C (I), 15/sup 0/C (IV), 115/sup 0/C (II), and 245/sup 0/C (III). Types II and IV desorb from single atom sites and Types I and III from multiple atom sites. Type I is in rapid equilibrium with the gas phase. All desorption processes appear to be first order. Carbon monoxide adsorbed nondissociatively at 25/sup 0/C with approx. 0.7:1 CO/Ir atom ratio. It adsorbed primarily in linear forms at low coverage, but a bridged form appeared at high coverage.

  14. A Data-Centered Collaboration Portal to Support Global Carbon-Flux Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Humphrey, Marty [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Beekwilder, Norm [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jackson, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Goode, Monte [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); van Ingen, Catharine [Microsoft. San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2009-04-07

    Carbon-climate, like other environmental sciences, has been changing. Large-scalesynthesis studies are becoming more common. These synthesis studies are often conducted by science teams that are geographically distributed and on datasets that are global in scale. A broad array of collaboration and data analytics tools are now available that could support these science teams. However, building tools that scientists actually use is hard. Also, moving scientists from an informal collaboration structure to one mediated by technology often exposes inconsistencies in the understanding of the rules of engagement between collaborators. We have developed a scientific collaboration portal, called fluxdata.org, which serves the community of scientists providing and analyzing the global FLUXNET carbon-flux synthesis dataset. Key things we learned or re-learned during our portal development include: minimize the barrier to entry, provide features on a just-in-time basis, development of requirements is an on-going process, provide incentives to change leaders and leverage the opportunity they represent, automate as much as possible, and you can only learn how to make it better if people depend on it enough to give you feedback. In addition, we also learned that splitting the portal roles between scientists and computer scientists improved user adoption and trust. The fluxdata.org portal has now been in operation for ~;;1.5 years and has become central to the FLUXNET synthesis efforts.

  15. From demonstration to deployment: An economic analysis of support policies for carbon capture and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahé, Max; Heidug, Wolf; Ward, John; Smale, Robin

    2013-01-01

    This paper argues that an integrated policy architecture consisting of multiple policy phases and economic instruments is needed to support the development of carbon capture and storage (CCS) from its present demonstration phase to full-scale deployment. Building on an analysis of the different types of policy instruments to correct market failures specific to CCS in its various stages of development, we suggest a way to combine these into an integrated policy architecture. This policy architecture adapts to the need of a maturing technology, meets the requirement of policymakers to maintain flexibility to respond to changing circumstances while providing investors with the policy certainty that is needed to encourage private sector investment. This combination of flexibility and predictability is achieved through the use of ‘policy gateways’ which explicitly define rules and criteria for when and how policy settings will change. Our findings extend to bioenergy-based CCS applications (BECCS), which could potentially achieve negative emissions. We argue that within a framework of correcting the carbon externality, the added environmental benefits of BECCS should be reflected in an extra incentive. - Highlights: • Sensible aim of current climate policy: secure option of future CCS deployment. • But policy makers require flexibility while private investors require predictability. • Integrating CCS policy into an overall policy architecture can overcome this antinomy. • We describe the key features of a good policy architecture and give an example

  16. Fabrication of graphene foam supported carbon nanotube/polyaniline hybrids for high-performance supercapacitor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hongxia; Wang, Nan; Xu, Qun; Chen, Zhimin; Ren, Yumei; Razal, Joselito M; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale, high-powered energy storage system is crucial for addressing the energy problem. The development of high-performance materials is a key issue in realizing the grid-scale applications of energy-storage devices. In this work, we describe a simple and scalable method for fabricating hybrids (graphene-pyrrole/carbon nanotube-polyaniline (GPCP)) using graphene foam as the supporting template. Graphene-pyrrole (G-Py) aerogels are prepared via a green hydrothermal route from two-dimensional materials such as graphene sheets, while a carbon nanotube/polyaniline (CNT/PANI) composite dispersion is obtained via the in situ polymerization method. The functional nanohybrid materials of GPCP can be assembled by simply dipping the prepared G-py aerogels into the CNT/PANI dispersion. The morphology of the obtained GPCP is investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed that the CNT/PANI was uniformly deposited onto the surfaces of the graphene. The as-synthesized GPCP maintains its original three-dimensional hierarchical porous architecture, which favors the diffusion of the electrolyte ions into the inner region of the active materials. Such hybrid materials exhibit significant specific capacitance of up to 350 F g −1 , making them promising in large-scale energy-storage device applications. (paper)

  17. Catalytic oxidation of albendazole using molybdenum supported on carbon nanotubes as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun-Kou, Maria del Rosario; Vega Carrasco, Edgar R.; Picasso Escobar, Gino I.

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation reaction of the thioether group (-S-) in the structure to the drug albendazole (C 12 H 15 N 3 O 2 S) was studied in order to obtain a pharmacologically active molecule known as albendazole sulfoxide. With this purpose, three heterogeneous catalysts were prepared using molybdenum (Mo) as active phase and carbon nanotubes as a multiple-layer catalyst support. The incorporation of the active phase was performed by wet impregnation, with subsequent calcination for 4 hours at 400 o C. For the catalytic oxidation reaction was employed hydrogen peroxide-urea (H 2 NCONH 2 ·H 2 O 2 ) as oxidizing agent and methanol (CH 3 OH) as reaction medium. The textural and morphology characterization of carbon nanoparticles and catalysts was carried out by adsorption-desorption of N 2 (BET) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The identification and quantification of the reaction products were followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. With the yield, selectivity and conversion higher than 90% after 60 minutes of reaction, albendazole sulphoxide was obtained as major product of oxidation reaction. (author)

  18. Novel type of carbon-supported catalysts. I.Preparation and characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, J.; Staugaard, P.; Moulijn, J.A.; Beer, de V.H.J.

    1989-01-01

    The exposure of CoO/Al2O3 catalysts to carbon monoxide leads, after reduction to cobalt metal, to the formation of filamentary carbon in addition to a less reactive form of deposited carbon. The filament diameters were determined by scanning electron microscopy. The carbon content was determined by

  19. Study of carbon-supported bimetallic PtCu nanoparticles by ASAXS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, N.V.; Avakyan, L.A; Pryadchenko, V.V.; Srabionyan, V.V.; Belenov, S.V.; Bugaev, L.A.

    2017-01-01

    Bimetallic platinum-copper nanoparticles on carbon support are studied as a perspective electrochemical catalyst by anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering near the Pt absorption L 3 -edge. The simultaneous fitting of several diffraction patterns measured at different photon energies lead to a satisfactory agreement between experimental and model curves in the assumption of core-shell structure of the particles with Pt-rich shell and Cu-rich core. It is shown that the average size of as prepared nanoparticles is about 6 nm with distribution spread of about ±2 nm and with thickness of Pt-rich shell approximately 1.6 nm. After annealing at 350o C the average size of the particles increased by two times with additional enlargement of the Pt-rich shell thickness. (paper)

  20. Self-supported supercapacitor membranes: Polypyrrole-coated carbon nanotube networks enabled by pulsed electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yueping; Liu, Jianwei; Li, Jun [Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Yu, Deok Jin; Wicksted, James P. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Kalkan, Kaan; Topal, C. Ozge [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Flanders, Bret N. [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Wu, Judy [Department of Physics, University of Kansas, Manhattan, KS 66044 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Self-supported supercapacitor electrodes with remarkably high specific capacitance have been developed by homogeneously coating polypyrrole (PPy) on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes. Polypyrrole can be deposited around the individual MWCNTs in a uniform manner throughout the MWCNT membrane via a pulsed electrochemical deposition method. This approach optimizes the pseudocapacitance of the membrane. Electrochemical data and Raman spectra indicate that the high specific capacitance is not only due to more uniform PPy coating, but also higher redox activity that is likely associated with a more ordered PPy packing. Such composite membranes can be directly used as supercapacitor electrodes without backing metal films or binders. A remarkable specific capacitance of 427 F g{sup -1} has been achieved using 5-s electrodeposition pulses. This technique provides a viable solution for developing high-performance electrical energy storage devices. (author)

  1. Ammonia synthesis with barium-promoted iron–cobalt alloys supported on carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Stefan; Barfod, Rasmus; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2003-01-01

    Iron–cobalt alloys supported on carbon were investigated as ammonia synthesis catalysts. Barium was found to have a promoting effect for Fe with an optimum atomic ratio Ba/Fe of 0.35. At this Ba loading, a local maximum for the NH3 synthesis activity was found at 4 wt% Co by varying the Fe/Co ratio....... Samples containing only Co and no Fe, however, yielded by far the most active catalysts (7.0 μmol (NH3) g−1 s−1, 673 K, 10 bar). Barium was a very efficient promoter for Co, increasing the NH3 synthesis activity by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the unpromoted Co samples, while...

  2. Enhanced life of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalysts using perfluorosulfonic acid stabilized carbon support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Niancai; Mu Shichun; Chen Xiaojing; Lv Haifeng; Pan Mu; Edwards, Peter P.

    2011-01-01

    We report a new and simple solution to increase life of Pt/C catalysts using the proton-conducting polymer (perfluorosulfonic acid, PFSA) stabilized carbon support (denoted these catalysts as Pt/NFC catalysts) as compared to conventional Pt/C catalysts commonly used in PEM fuel cells. A high catalytic activity of the catalyst is observed by both CV (cyclic voltammetry) and ORR (oxygen reduction reaction) measurements. Especially, our own catalysts have a 60% better life as compared to Pt/C under electrochemically accelerated durability test conditions. The loss rate of electrochemical active area (ECA) for Pt/NFC catalysts is only 0.007 m 2 g -1 cycle -1 , compared to a value of 0.011 m 2 g -1 cycle -1 for Pt/C.

  3. Enhanced life of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalysts using perfluorosulfonic acid stabilized carbon support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Niancai [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 430070 (China); Mu Shichun, E-mail: msc@whut.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 430070 (China); Department of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Chen Xiaojing; Lv Haifeng; Pan Mu [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 430070 (China); Edwards, Peter P. [Department of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, OX1 3QR (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    We report a new and simple solution to increase life of Pt/C catalysts using the proton-conducting polymer (perfluorosulfonic acid, PFSA) stabilized carbon support (denoted these catalysts as Pt/NFC catalysts) as compared to conventional Pt/C catalysts commonly used in PEM fuel cells. A high catalytic activity of the catalyst is observed by both CV (cyclic voltammetry) and ORR (oxygen reduction reaction) measurements. Especially, our own catalysts have a 60% better life as compared to Pt/C under electrochemically accelerated durability test conditions. The loss rate of electrochemical active area (ECA) for Pt/NFC catalysts is only 0.007 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} cycle{sup -1}, compared to a value of 0.011 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} cycle{sup -1} for Pt/C.

  4. Kinetics of carbon monoxide oxidation over modified supported CuO catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loc, Luu Cam; Tri, Nguyen; Cuong, Hoang Tien; Thoang, Ho Si [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam). Inst. of Chemical Technology; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Gaidai, N.A.; Lapidus, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry

    2013-11-01

    The following supported on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts: 10(wt.)%CuO (CuAl), 10%CuO+10%Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} (CuCrAl) and 10%CuO+20%CeO{sub 2} (CuCeAl) were under the investigation. Physico-chemical characteristics of the catalysts were determined by the methods of BET, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and Temperature-Programmed Reduction (TPR). A strong interaction of copper with support in CuAl resulted in the formation of low active copper aluminates. The bi-oxide CuCrAl was more active than CuAl owing to the formation of high catalytically active spinel CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The fact of very high activity of the sample CuCeAl can be explained by the presence of the catalytically active form of CuO-CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The kinetics of CO total oxidation was studied in a gradientless flow-circulating system at the temperature range between 200 C and 270 C. The values of initial partial pressures of carbon monoxide (P{sup o}{sub CO}), oxygen (P{sup o}{sub O2}), and specially added carbon dioxide (P{sup o}{sub CO{sub 2}}) were varied in ranges (hPa): 10 / 45; 33 / 100, and 0 / 30, respectively. (orig.)

  5. Investigating the effects of proton exchange membrane fuel cell conditions on carbon supported platinum electrocatalyst composition and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Anant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Colbow, Vesna; Dutta, Monica; Harvey, Davie; Wessel, Silvia

    2011-12-01

    Changes that carbon-supported platinum electrocatalysts undergo in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment were simulated by ex situ heat treatment of catalyst powder samples at 150 C and 100% relative humidity. In order to study modifications that are introduced to chemistry, morphology, and performance of electrocatalysts, XPS, HREELS and three-electrode rotating disk electrode experiments were performed. Before heat treatment, graphitic content varied by 20% among samples with different types of carbon supports, with distinct differences between bulk and surface compositions within each sample. Following the aging protocol, the bulk and surface chemistry of the samples were similar, with graphite content increasing or remaining constant and Pt-carbide decreasing for all samples. From the correlation of changes in chemical composition and losses in performance of the electrocatalysts, we conclude that relative distribution of Pt particles on graphitic and amorphous carbon is as important for electrocatalytic activity as the absolute amount of graphitic carbon present

  6. Investigating the effects of proton exchange membrane fuel cell conditions on carbon supported platinum electrocatalyst composition and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; V. Colbow; M. Dutta; D. Harvey; S. Wessel

    2012-04-30

    Changes that carbon-supported platinum electrocatalysts undergo in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment were simulated by ex situ heat treatment of catalyst powder samples at 150 C and 100% relative humidity. In order to study modifications that are introduced to chemistry, morphology, and performance of electrocatalysts, XPS, HREELS and three-electrode rotating disk electrode experiments were performed. Before heat treatment, graphitic content varied by 20% among samples with different types of carbon supports, with distinct differences between bulk and surface compositions within each sample. Following the aging protocol, the bulk and surface chemistry of the samples were similar, with graphite content increasing or remaining constant and Pt-carbide decreasing for all samples. From the correlation of changes in chemical composition and losses in performance of the electrocatalysts, we conclude that relative distribution of Pt particles on graphitic and amorphous carbon is as important for electrocatalytic activity as the absolute amount of graphitic carbon present

  7. Carbon nanotubes and other nanostructures as support material for nanoparticulate noble-metal catalysts in fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veltzé, Sune; Larsen, Mikkel Juul; Elina, Yli-Rantala

    or platinum-alloy catalysts in the electrodes are required. To maximize the utilization of the noble metal it is frequently deposited as nanoparticles (1–5 nm) on a stabilizing support of carbon black. Carbon black provides good anchoring of the catalyst particles, but is prone to severe destructive oxidation...... at high electrical potentials encountered occasionally in fuel cells. Other nanostructures of carbon are being investigated as alternatives to carbon black as they have several beneficial properties. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNT) are an example of one type of these promising materials. Like...... of the fuel-cell electrodes. However, the low concentration of structural defects also poses challenges with regard to anchoring of the catalyst particles on the CNT surface. Thus, activation treatments introducing surface functional groups may be necessary. Also, the surface properties are responsible...

  8. Graphene supported Sn-Sb rate at carbon core-shell particles as a superior anode for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shuangqiang; Chen, Peng; Wang, Yong [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University (China); Wu, Minghong; Pan, Dengyu [Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, Shanghai Univ. (China)

    2010-10-15

    This paper reports the preparation and Li-storage properties of graphene nanosheets(GNS), GNS supported Sn-Sb rate at carbon (50-150 nm) and Sn-Sb nanoparticles (5-10 nm). The best cycling performance and excellent high rate capabilities were observed for GNS-supported Sn-Sb rate at carbon core-shell particles, which exhibited initial capacities of 978, 850 and 668 mAh/g respectively at 0.1C, 2C and 5C (1C = 800 mA/g) with good cyclability. Besides the GNS support, the carbon skin around Sn-Sb particles is believed to be a key factor to improve electrochemical properties of Sn-Sb. (author)

  9. Game Changing Development Program - Next Generation Life Support Project: Oxygen Recovery From Carbon Dioxide Using Ion Exchange Membrane Electrolysis Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jiao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the Phase I research and development work performed during the March 13, 2015 to July 13, 2016 period. The proposal for this work was submitted in response to NASA Research Announcement NNH14ZOA001N, "Space Technology Research, Development, Demonstration, and Infusion 2014 (SpaceTech-REDDI-2014)," Appendix 14GCD-C2 "Game Changing Development Program, Advanced Oxygen Recovery for Spacecraft Life Support Systems Appendix" The Task Agreement for this Phase I work is Document Control Number: GCDP-02-TA-15015. The objective of the Phase I project was to demonstrate in laboratories two Engineering Development Units (EDU) that perform critical functions of the low temperature carbon dioxide electrolysis and the catalytic conversion of carbon monoxide into carbon and carbon dioxide. The low temperature carbon dioxide electrolysis EDU was built by the University of Delaware with Dr. Feng Jiao as the principal investigator in charge of this EDU development (under NASA Contract NNC15CA04C). The carbon monoxide catalytic conversion EDU was built by the NASA Glenn Research Center with Kenneth Burke as the principal investigator and overall project leader for the development of both EDUs. Both EDUs were successfully developed and demonstrated the critical functions for each process. The carbon dioxide electrolysis EDU was delivered to the NASA Johnson Space Center and the carbon monoxide catalytic conversion EDU was delivered to the NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center.

  10. Oxidation of CO and Methanol on Pd-Ni Catalysts Supported on Different Chemically-Treated Carbon Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Calderón

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, palladium-nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers were synthesized, with metal contents close to 25 wt % and Pd:Ni atomic ratios near to 1:2. These catalysts were previously studied in order to determine their activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction. Before the deposition of metals, the carbon nanofibers were chemically treated in order to generate oxygen and nitrogen groups on their surface. Transmission electron microscopy analysis (TEM images revealed particle diameters between 3 and 4 nm, overcoming the sizes observed for the nanoparticles supported on carbon black (catalyst Pd-Ni CB 1:2. From the CO oxidation at different temperatures, the activation energy Eact for this reaction was determined. These values indicated a high tolerance of the catalysts toward the CO poisoning, especially in the case of the catalysts supported on the non-chemically treated carbon nanofibers. On the other hand, apparent activation energy Eap for the methanol oxidation was also determined finding—as a rate determining step—the COads diffusion to the OHads for the catalysts supported on carbon nanofibers. The results here presented showed that the surface functional groups only play a role in the obtaining of lower particle sizes, which is an important factor in the obtaining of low CO oxidation activation energies.

  11. Graphene oxide vs. reduced graphene oxide as carbon support in porphyrin peroxidase biomimetic nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socaci, C; Pogacean, F; Biris, A R; Coros, M; Rosu, M C; Magerusan, L; Katona, G; Pruneanu, S

    2016-02-01

    The paper describes the preparation of supramolecular assemblies of tetrapyridylporphyrin (TPyP) and its metallic complexes with graphene oxide (GO) and thermally reduced graphene oxide (TRGO). The two carbon supports are introducing different characteristics in the absorption spectra of the investigated nanocomposites. Raman spectroscopy shows that the absorption of iron-tetrapyridylporphyrin is more efficient on GO than TRGO, suggesting that oxygen functionalities are involved in the non-covalent interaction between the iron-porphyrin and graphene. The biomimetic peroxidase activity is investigated and the two iron-containing composites exhibit a better catalytic activity than each component of the assembly, and their cobalt and manganese homologues, respectively. The main advantages of this work include the demonstration of graphene oxide as a very good support for graphene-based nanomaterials with peroxidase-like activity (K(M)=0.292 mM), the catalytic activity being observed even with very small amounts of porphyrins (the TPyP:graphene ratio=1:50). Its potential application in the detection of lipophilic antioxidants (vitamin E can be measured in the 10(-5)-10(-4) M range) is also shown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Polymeric carbon nitride/mesoporous silica composites as catalyst support for Au and Pt nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ping; Zhao, Yanxi; Wang, Tao; Zhan, Yingying; Wang, Huihu; Li, Jinlin; Thomas, Arne; Zhu, Junjiang

    2014-03-03

    Small and homogeneously dispersed Au and Pt nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared on polymeric carbon nitride (CNx )/mesoporous silica (SBA-15) composites, which were synthesized by thermal polycondensation of dicyandiamide-impregnated preformed SBA-15. By changing the condensation temperature, the degree of condensation and the loading of CNx can be controlled to give adjustable particle sizes of the Pt and Au NPs subsequently formed on the composites. In contrast to the pure SBA-15 support, coating of SBA-15 with polymeric CNx resulted in much smaller and better-dispersed metal NPs. Furthermore, under catalytic conditions the CNx coating helps to stabilize the metal NPs. However, metal NPs on CNx /SBA-15 can show very different catalytic behaviors in, for example, the CO oxidation reaction. Whereas the Pt NPs already show full CO conversion at 160 °C, the catalytic activity of Au NPs seems to be inhibited by the CNx support. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Carbon-supported cobalt catalyst for hydrogen generation from alkaline sodium borohydride solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Dongyan; Liu, Xinmin; Cao, Changqing; Guo, Qingjie [College of Chemical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Dai, Ping [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061 (China)

    2008-08-01

    Low cost transition metal catalysts with high performance are attractive for the development of on-board hydrogen generation systems by catalytic hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) in fuel cell fields. In this study, hydrogen production from alkaline NaBH{sub 4} via hydrolysis process over carbon-supported cobalt catalysts was studied. The catalytic activity of the supported cobalt catalyst was found to be highly dependent on the calcination temperatures. The hydrogen generation rate increases with calcination temperatures in the range of 200-400 C, but a high calcination temperature above 500 C led to markedly decreased activity. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the catalysts experience phase transition from amorphous Co-B to crystalline cobalt hydroxide with increase in calcination temperatures. The reaction performance is also dependent on the concentration of NaBH{sub 4}, and the hydrogen generation rate increases for lower NaBH{sub 4} concentrations and decreases after reaching a maximum at 10 wt.% of NaBH{sub 4}. (author)

  14. Self-supported supercapacitor membrane through incorporating MnO2 nanowires into carbon nanotube networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yueping; Liu, Jianwei; Li, Jun

    2010-08-01

    We report on a study on the development of a self-supported membrane of carbon nanotube (CNT) mixed with MnO2 nanowires as supercapacitors. Both single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) and multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) have been explored to serve as the electrically conductive networks to connect redox active MnO2 nanowires. High-quality alpha-MnO2 nanowires were synthesized using bulk alpha-MnO2 crystals as the precursor by a facile hydrothermal method. The morphology and structure of the as-prepared alpha-MnO2 nanowires were characterized by X-ray and electron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Supercapacitor membranes were prepared by filtration of mixture solutions of MnO2 nanowires and CNTs at various ratios, forming entangled networks which are self-supported and directly used as supercapacitor electrodes without binders or backing metals. Cyclic voltammetry at various scan rates and charge--discharging measurements are used to characterize the supercapacitance of the CNT-MnO2 nanowire membranes. The specific capacitance has been found to be increased by several times over that of pure CNT membranes after incorporation of MnO2 nanowires.

  15. Catalytic performance of activated carbon supported cobalt catalyst for CO2 reforming of CH4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojie; Su, Aiting; Du, Yannian; Qu, Jiangwen; Xu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Syngas production by CO2 reforming of CH4 in a fixed bed reactor was investigated over a series of activated carbon (AC) supported Co catalysts as a function of Co loading (between 15 and 30wt.%) and calcination temperature (Tc=300, 400 or 500°C). The catalytic performance was assessed through CH4 and CO2 conversions and long-term stability. XRD and SEM were used to characterize the catalysts. It was found that the stability of Co/AC catalysts was strongly dependent on the Co loading and calcination temperature. For the loadings (25wt.% for Tc=300°C), stable activities have been achieved. The loading of excess Co (>wt.% 25) causes negative effects not only on the performance of the catalysts but also on the support surface properties. In addition, the experiment showed that ultrasound can enhance and promote dispersion of the active metal on the carrier, thus improving the catalytic performance of the catalyst. The catalyst activity can be long-term stably maintained, and no obvious deactivation has been observed in the first 2700min. After analyzing the characteristics, a reaction mechanism for CO2 reforming of CH4 over Co/AC catalyst was proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Carbon-Supported Pd and PdFe Alloy Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Cathodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Rivera Gavidia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs are electrochemical devices that efficiently produce electricity and are characterized by a large flexibility for portable applications and high energy density. Methanol crossover is one of the main obstacles for DMFC commercialization, forcing the search for highly electro-active and methanol tolerant cathodes. In the present work, carbon-supported Pd and PdFe catalysts were synthesized using a sodium borohydride reduction method and physico-chemically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray techniques such as photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, diffraction (XRD and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX. The catalysts were investigated as DMFC cathodes operating at different methanol concentrations (up to 10 M and temperatures (60 °C and 90 °C. The cell based on PdFe/C cathode presented the best performance, achieving a maximum power density of 37.5 mW·cm−2 at 90 °C with 10 M methanol, higher than supported Pd and Pt commercial catalysts, demonstrating that Fe addition yields structural changes to Pd crystal lattice that reduce the crossover effects in DMFC operation.

  17. High Oxygen Reduction Reaction Performances of Cathode Materials Combining Polyoxometalates, Coordination Complexes, and Carboneous Supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuangshuang; Oms, Olivier; Hao, Long; Liu, Rongji; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Yaqin; He, Hong-Yan; Dolbecq, Anne; Marrot, Jérôme; Keita, Bineta; Zhi, Linjie; Mialane, Pierre; Li, Bin; Zhang, Guangjin

    2017-11-08

    A series of carbonaceous-supported precious-metal-free polyoxometalate (POM)-based composites which can be easily synthesized on a large scale was shown to act as efficient cathode materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in neutral or basic media via a four-electron mechanism with high durability. Moreover, exploiting the versatility of the considered system, its activity was optimized by the judicious choice of the 3d metals incorporated in the {(PW 9 ) 2 M 7 } (M = Co, Ni) POM core, the POM counterions and the support (thermalized triazine-based frameworks (TTFs), fluorine-doped TTF (TTF-F), reduced graphene oxide, or carbon Vulcan XC-72. In particular, for {(PW 9 ) 2 Ni 7 }/{Cu(ethylenediamine) 2 }/TTF-F, the overpotential required to drive the ORR compared well with those of Pt/C. This outstanding ORR electrocatalytic activity is linked with two synergistic effects due to the binary combination of the Cu and Ni centers and the strong interaction between the POM molecules and the porous and highly conducting TTF-F framework. To our knowledge, {(PW 9 ) 2 Ni 7 }/{Cu(ethylenediamine) 2 }/TTF-F represents the first example of POM-based noble-metal-free ORR electrocatalyst possessing both comparable ORR electrocatalytic activity and much higher stability than that of Pt/C in neutral medium.

  18. Study creep in 4340 steels with different microstructure and plasma carbon nitridation processing; Estudo de fluencia em acos 4340 com diferentes microestruturas e tratamento de carbonitretacao a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, A.J., E-mail: abdalla@ieav.cta.b [Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados; Carrer, I.R.; Barboza, M.J.R.; Baggio-Scheid, V.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EEL/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Moura Neto, C.; Reis, D.A.P. [Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial (ITA/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. Tecnologico de Aeronautica

    2010-07-01

    From the AISI 4340 bars specimens were made-for-test of creep, they were subjected to different heat treatments for the formation of multiphase microstructures. After this initial treatment, a lot of the specimens were tested in creep. One second batch of specimens was treated with a plasma carbonitriding, and later, were also tested. The carbonitriding layer and microstructure were characterized with X-ray analysis, laser confocal microscopy and hardness testing. Tests showed that the hardness in the steel was reduced due to thermochemical treatment at 500 deg C. We observed variation in creep behavior due to different microstructures formed. After the plasma treatment, there was a considerable reduction in the rate of creep and an increase in the time required for fracture. (author)

  19. Dynamics of carbon sources supporting burial in seagrass sediments under increasing anthropogenic pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Mazarrasa, Iné s; Marbà , Nú ria; Garcia-Orellana, Jordi; Masqué , Pere; Arias-Ortiz, Ariane; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2017-01-01

    , an increase in the contribution of sestonic carbon and a decrease in that of seagrass derived carbon toward present was observed in most of the meadows examined, coincident with the onset of the tourism industry development and coastal urbanization

  20. Pt and PtRu nanoparticles supported on N-doped carbons as electrocatalysts for methanol electro oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Viviane Santos; Silva, Julio Cesar Martins; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Spinace, Estevam Vitorio, E-mail: viviane_sp_saopaulo@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Methanol is a liquid transportation fuel that can be produced from fossil or renewable resources. Fuel cells employing methanol directly as fuel (Direct Methanol Fuel Cell - DMFC) are very attractive as power source for portable, mobile and stationary applications [1]. PtRu/C electrocatalyst has been considered the best electrocatalyst for methanol electro-oxidation, however, its performance is strongly dependent on the method of preparation and on the characteristics of the carbon support. N-doped carbons with different N contents (1, 2 and 5 wt%) were prepared by thermal treatment of carbon with urea at 800 deg C. Pt and PtRu nanoparticles were supported on N-doped carbons by coreduction of Pt(IV) and Ru(III) ions using an alcohol-reduction process [2]. The obtained materials were characterized by Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy and Cyclic Voltammetry. Pt and PtRu nanoparticles supported on N-doped carbons showed superior performance for methanol electro-oxidation when compared to the materials supported on non-modified carbon and to Pt/C and PtRu/C commercial electrocatalysts. Pt/C and PtRu/C prepared with the carbon modified with 2.5 wt% of N content showed the best activities. (author) [1] Y. Zhou, K. Neyerlin, T.S. Olson, S. Pylypenko, J. Bult, H.N. Dinh, T. Gennett, Z. Shao and R. O'Hayre, Energy Environ. Sci. 3, 1437 (2010); [2] E.V. Spinace, A.Oliveira Neto, T.R.R. Vasconcellos, M. Linardi, J. Power Sources 137, 17 (2004)

  1. Electrocatalytic activity of carbon-supported catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Varela, F.J. [CINVESTAV-Unidad Saltillo, Coahuila, (Mexico). Grupo de Investigacion en Energia; Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de nouveaux materiaux pour l' energie et l' electrochimie

    2008-07-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) can be fueled with hydrogen, alcohols, hydrocarbons and acetals. Ethanol is an important fuel candidate because it can be electro-oxidized to carbon dioxide on platinum (Pt)-based electrocatalysts in a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) at relatively low temperatures. This study investigated the electrocatalytic activity of some carbon-supported electrocatalysts towards the ethanol oxidation (EOR) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the presence of ethanol. Compared to other anode catalysts such as Pt, PtRu and Pt oxide, anodes based on PtSn alloys have a higher catalytic activity for the EOR. When tested in a DEFC, the current density at 0.4V and 90 degrees C based on a PtSn/C anode and a Pt/C cathode was 2 times higher than that of a cell based on a PtRu/C-Pt/C membrane electrode assembly (MEA) configuration. In addition, cathode catalysts based on Ru/C had good catalytic activity for the ORR and exhibited high selectivity for this reaction in the presence of ethanol. The results showed that in the presence of 0.125, 0.25 or 0.5 M ethanol concentrations, a decrease in onset potential of about 60, 62 and 68 mV emerged, respectively. These values were about 10 times lower than those measured for some Pt-based cathode catalysts tested in this study in the presence of 0.125 M EtOH. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Reactivity of a Carbon-Supported Single-Site Molybdenum Dioxo Catalyst for Biodiesel Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouat, Aidan R.; Lohr, Tracy L.; Wegener, Evan C.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Delferro, Massimiliano; Stair, Peter C.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2016-08-23

    A single-site molybdenum dioxo catalyst, (Oc)2Mo(=O)2@C, was prepared via direct grafting of MoO2Cl2(dme) (dme = 1,2-dimethoxyethane) on high-surface- area activated carbon. The physicochemical and chemical properties of this catalyst were fully characterized by N2 physisorption, ICP-AES/OES, PXRD, STEM, XPS, XAS, temperature-programmed reduction with H2 (TPR-H2), and temperature-programmed NH3 desorption (TPD-NH3). The single-site nature of the Mo species is corroborated by XPS and TPR-H2 data, and it exhibits the lowest reported MoOx Tmax of reduction reported to date, suggesting a highly reactive MoVI center. (Oc)2Mo(=O)2@C catalyzes the transesterification of a variety of esters and triglycerides with ethanol, exhibiting high activity at moderate temperatures (60-90 °C) and with negligible deactivation. (Oc)2Mo(=O)2@C is resistant to water and can be recycled at least three times with no loss of activity. The transesterification reaction is determined experimentally to be first order in [ethanol] and first order in [Mo] with ΔH = 10.5(8) kcal mol-1 and ΔS = -32(2) eu. The low energy of activation is consistent with the moderate conditions needed to achieve rapid turnover. This highly active carbon-supported single-site molybdenum dioxo species is thus an efficient, robust, and lowcost catalyst with significant potential for transesterification processes.

  3. Subscale Carbon-Carbon Nozzle Extension Development and Hot Fire Testing in Support of Upper Stage Liquid Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul; Valentine, Peter; Crisanti, Matthew; Greene, Sandy Elam

    2016-01-01

    Upper stage and in-space liquid rocket engines are optimized for performance through the use of high area ratio nozzles to fully expand combustion gases to low exit pressures increasing exhaust velocities. Due to the large size of such nozzles and the related engine performance requirements, carbon-carbon (C/C) composite nozzle extensions are being considered for use in order to reduce weight impacts. NASA and industry partner Carbon-Carbon Advanced Technologies (C-CAT) are working towards advancing the technology readiness level of large-scale, domestically-fabricated, C/C nozzle extensions. These C/C extensions have the ability to reduce the overall costs of extensions relative to heritage metallic and composite extensions and to decrease weight by 50%. Material process and coating developments have advanced over the last several years, but hot fire testing to fully evaluate C/C nozzle extensions in relevant environments has been very limited. NASA and C-CAT have designed, fabricated and hot fire tested multiple subscale nozzle extension test articles of various C/C material systems, with the goal of assessing and advancing the manufacturability of these domestically producible materials as well as characterizing their performance when subjected to the typical environments found in a variety of liquid rocket and scramjet engines. Testing at the MSFC Test Stand 115 evaluated heritage and state-of-the-art C/C materials and coatings, demonstrating the capabilities of the high temperature materials and their fabrication methods. This paper discusses the design and fabrication of the 1.2k-lbf sized carbon-carbon nozzle extensions, provides an overview of the test campaign, presents results of the hot fire testing, and discusses potential follow-on development work.

  4. The removal of uranium onto carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, Richard A., E-mail: richardandrewcrane@gmail.com; Scott, Thomas [University of Bristol, School of Physics, Interface Analysis Centre (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    In the current work carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron particles (CS nZVI), synthesised by the vacuum heat treatment of ferric citrate trihydrate absorbed onto carbon black, have been tested for the removal of uranium (U) from natural and synthetic waters. Two types of CS nZVI were tested, one vacuum annealed at 600 °C for 4 h and the other vacuum annealed at 700 °C for 4 h, with their U removal behaviour compared to nZVI synthesised via the reduction of ferrous iron using sodium borohydride. The batch systems were analysed over a 28-day reaction period during which the liquid and nanoparticulate solids were periodically analysed to determine chemical evolution of the solutions and particulates. Results demonstrate a well-defined difference between the two types of CS nZVI, with greater U removal exhibited by the nanomaterial synthesised at 700 °C. The mechanism has been attributed to the CS nZVI synthesised at 700 °C exhibiting (i) a greater proportion of surface oxide Fe{sup 2+} to Fe{sup 3+} (0.34 compared to 0.28); (ii) a greater conversion of ferric citrate trihydrate [2Fe(C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7})·H{sub 2}O] to Fe{sup 0}; and (iii) a larger surface area (108.67 compared to 88.61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}). Lower maximum U uptake was recorded for both types of CS nZVI in comparison with the borohydride-reduced nZVI. A lower decrease in solution Eh and DO was also recorded, indicating that less chemical reduction of U was achieved by the CS nZVI. Despite this, lower U desorption in the latter stages of the experiment (>7 days) was recorded for the CS nZVI synthesised at 700 °C, indicating that carbon black in the CS nZVI is likely to have contributed towards U sorption and retention. Overall, it can be stated that the borohydride-reduced nZVI were significantly more effective than CS nZVI for U removal over relatively short timescales (e.g. <48 h), however, they were more susceptible to U desorption over extended time periods.

  5. Influence of different carbon nanostructures on the electrocatalytic activity and stability of Pt supported electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamatin, Serban Nicolae; Borghei, Maryam; Andersen, Shuang Ma

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available graphitized carbon nanofibers and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, two carbon materials with very different structure, have been functionalized in a nitric–sulfuric acid mixture. Further on, the materials have been platinized by a microwave assisted polyol method. The relative...

  6. A carbon risk prediction model for Chinese heavy-polluting industrial enterprises based on support vector machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Zhifang; Xiao, Tian; Chen, Xiaohong; Wang, Chang

    2016-01-01

    Chinese heavy-polluting industrial enterprises, especially petrochemical or chemical industry, labeled low carbon efficiency and high emission load, are facing the tremendous pressure of emission reduction under the background of global shortage of energy supply and constrain of carbon emission. However, due to the limited amount of theoretic and practical research in this field, problems like lacking prediction indicators or models, and the quantified standard of carbon risk remain unsolved. In this paper, the connotation of carbon risk and an assessment index system for Chinese heavy-polluting industrial enterprises (eg. coal enterprise, petrochemical enterprises, chemical enterprises et al.) based on support vector machine are presented. By using several heavy-polluting industrial enterprises’ related data, SVM model is trained to predict the carbon risk level of a specific enterprise, which allows the enterprise to identify and manage its carbon risks. The result shows that this method can predict enterprise’s carbon risk level in an efficient, accurate way with high practical application and generalization value.

  7. Raman Spectroscopy and Electrochemical Investigations of Pt Electrocatalyst Supported on Carbon Prepared through Plasma Pyrolysis of Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Cristina Santos Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicochemical and electrochemical characterisations of Pt-based electrocatalysts supported on carbon (Vulcan carbon, C1, and carbon produced by plasma pyrolysis of natural gas, C2 toward ethanol electrooxidation were investigated. The Pt20/C180 and Pt20/C280 electrocatalysts were prepared by thermal decomposition of polymeric precursors at 350°C. The electrochemical and physicochemical characterisations of the electrocatalysts were performed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscope (TEM, Raman scattering, cyclic voltammetry, and chronoamperometry tests. The XRD results show that the Pt-based electrocatalysts present platinum metallic which is face-centered cubic structure. The results indicate that the Pt20/C180 electrocatalyst has a smaller particle size (10.1–6.9 nm compared with the Pt20/C280 electrocatalyst; however, the Pt20/C280 particle sizes are similar (12.8–10.4 nm and almost independent of the reflection planes, which suggests that the Pt crystallites grow with a radial shape. Raman results reveal that both Vulcan carbon and plasma carbon are graphite-like materials consisting mostly of sp2 carbon. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry data obtained in this study indicate that the deposition of Pt on plasma carbon increases its electrocatalytic activity toward ethanol oxidation reaction.

  8. Electrochemical behavior of platinum nanoparticles on a carbon xerogel support modified with a [(trifluoromethyl)-benzenesulfonyl]imide electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Mei, Hua; DesMarteau, Darryl; Creager, Stephen E

    2014-12-11

    A monoprotic [(trifluoromethyl)benzenesulfonyl]imide (SI) superacid electrolyte was used to covalently modify a mesoporous carbon xerogel (CX) support via reaction of the corresponding trifluoromethyl aryl sulfonimide diazonium zwitterion with the carbon surface. Electrolyte attachment was demonstrated by elemental analysis, acid-base titration, and thermogravimetric analysis. The ion-exchange capacity of the fluoroalkyl-aryl-sulfonimide-grafted carbon xerogel (SI-CX) was ∼0.18 mequiv g(-1), as indicated by acid-base titration. Platinum nanoparticles were deposited onto the SI-grafted carbon xerogel samples by the impregnation and reduction method, and these materials were employed to fabricate polyelectrolyte membrane fuel-cell (PEMFC) electrodes by the decal transfer method. The SI-grafted carbon-xerogel-supported platinum (Pt/SI-CX) was characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy to determine platinum nanoparticle size and distribution, and the findings are compared with CX-supported platinum catalyst without the grafted SI electrolyte (Pt/CX). Platinum nanoparticle sizes are consistently larger on Pt/SI-CX than on Pt/CX. The electrochemically active surface area (ESA) of platinum catalyst on the Pt/SI-CX and Pt/CX samples was measured with ex situ cyclic voltammetry (CV) using both hydrogen adsorption/desorption and carbon monoxide stripping methods and by in situ CV within membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The ESA values for Pt/SI-CX are consistently lower than those for Pt/CX. Some possible reasons for the behavior of samples with and without grafted SI layers and implications for the possible use of SI-grafted carbon layers in PEMFC devices are discussed.

  9. Three-dimensional carbon nanotube networks with a supported nickel oxide nanonet for high-performance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mao-Sung; Zheng, Yo-Ru; Lin, Guan-Wei

    2014-08-04

    A three-dimensional porous carbon nanotube film with a supported NiO nanonet was prepared by simple electrophoretic deposition and hydrothermal synthesis, which could deliver a high specific capacitance of 1511 F g(-1) at a high discharge current of 50 A g(-1) due to the significantly improved transport of the electrolyte and electrons.

  10. Carbon supported Pd-Ni and Pd-Ru-Ni nanocatalysts for the alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathe, MK

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon supported Pd-Ni and Pd-Ru-Ni nanocatalysts were prepared by the chemical reduction method, using sodium borohydride and ethylene glycol mixture as the reducing agent. The catalytic activity towards ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium...

  11. Development of monolith with a carbon-nanofiber-washcoat as a structured catalyst support in liquid phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarah nabeel abdul kareem amin, N.A.K.A.; Jarrah, Nabeel A.; van Ommen, J.G.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2003-01-01

    Washcoats with improved mass transfer properties are necessary to circumvent concentration gradients in case of fast reactions in liquid phase, e.g. nitrate hydrogenation. A highly porous, high surface area (180 m2/g) and thin washcoat of carbon fibers, was produced on a monolith support by methane

  12. Carbon supported Pd-Sn and Pd-Ru-Sn nanocatalysts for ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon supported Pd-Sn and Pd-Ru-Sn nanocatalysts were prepared by the chemical reduction method, using sodium borohydride and ethylene glycol mixture as the reducing agent. The catalytic activity towards ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium...

  13. Chelating agent-assisted heat treatment of a carbon-supported iron oxide nanoparticle catalyst for PEMFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shyh-Jiun; Huang, Chia-Hung; Huang, Chun-Kai; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2009-08-28

    Iron complexes were supported on commercial carbon black and heat treated to create FeO(x)/C catalysts that showed a larger normalized current density and normalized power density than commercial Pt/C catalysts; the coordination number of the iron complexes used affected the formation of the active site for oxygen reduction in PEMFC.

  14. High quality bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass over alumina-supported sodium carbonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Imran, A.; Bramer, Eduard A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    Performance of a novel alumina-supported sodium carbonate catalyst was studied to produce a valuable bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. Post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was investigated in a catalyst fixed bed reactor at the downstream of the pyrolysis

  15. EXAFS Determination of the Structure of Cobalt in Carbon-Supported Cobalt and Cobalt-Molybdenum Sulfide Hydrodesulfurization Catalysts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Bouwens, S.M.A.M.; Veen, J.A.R. van; Beer, V.H.J. de; Prins, R.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the cobalt present in carbon-supported Co and Co-Mo sulfide catalysts was studied by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Co K-edge and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thiophene hydrodesulfurization activities were used to measure the catalytic properties of

  16. A phenyl-sulfonic acid anchored carbon-supported platinum catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvarani, G.; Sahu, A.K.; Choudhury, N.A.; Sridhar, P.; Pitchumani, S.; Shukla, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    A method, to anchor phenyl-sulfonic acid functional groups with the platinum catalyst supported onto a high surface-area carbon substrate, is reported. The use of the catalyst in the electrodes of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) helps enhancing its performance. Characterization of the catalyst by Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and point-of-zero-charge (PZC) studies suggests that the improvement in performance of the PEFC is facilitated not only by enlarging the three-phase boundary in the catalyst layer but also by providing ionic-conduction paths as well as by imparting negative charge to platinum sites with concomitant oxidation of sulfur present in the carbon support. It is argued that the negatively charged platinum sites help repel water facilitating oxygen to access the catalyst sites. The PEFC with modified carbon-supported platinum catalyst electrodes exhibits 40% enhancement in its power density as compared to the one with unmodified carbon-supported platinum catalyst electrodes

  17. Synthesis of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on Silicalite-1 Monolayer-Supported Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Monodisperse magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs with the size of ca. 3.5 nm were prepared and used as the catalysts for the synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT arrays. A silicalite-1 microcrystal monolayer was used as the support layer between catalyst NPs and the silicon substrate. Compared to our previous report which used radio-frequency- (rf- sputtered Fe2O3 film as the catalyst, Fe3O4 NPs that were synthesized by wet chemical method showed an improved catalytic ability with less agglomeration. The silicalite-1 crystal monolayer acted as an effective “buffer” layer to prevent the catalyst NPs from agglomerating during the reaction process. It is believed that this is the first report that realizes the vertical alignment of CNTs over the zeolite monolayer, namely, silicalite-1 microcrystal monolayer, instead of using the intermediate anodic aluminum oxide (AAO scaffold to regulate the growth direction of CNT products.

  18. Architecture-dependent surface chemistry for Pt monolayers on carbon-supported Au.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shuang; Rettew, Robert E; Sauerbrey, Marc; Alamgir, Faisal M

    2011-10-01

    Pt monolayers were grown by surface-limited redox replacement (SLRR) on two types of Au nanostructures. The Au nanostructures were fabricated electrochemically on carbon fiber paper (CFP) by either potentiostatic deposition (PSD) or potential square wave deposition (PSWD). The morphology of the Au/CFP heterostructures, examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), was found to depend on the type of Au growth method employed. The properties of the Pt deposit, as studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV), were found to depend strongly on the morphology of the support. Specifically, it was found that smaller Au morphologies led to a higher degree of cationicity in the resulting Pt deposit, with Pt(4+) and Pt(2+) species being identified using XPS and XAS. For fuel-cell catalysts, the resistance of ultrathin catalyst deposits to surface area loss through dissolution, poisoning, and agglomeration is critical. This study shows that an equivalent of two monolayers (ML) is the low-loading limit of Pt on Au. At 1 ML or below, the Pt film decreases in activity and durability very rapidly due to presence of cationic Pt. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  19. Carbon-supported cubic CoSe2 catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yongjun; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cubic CoSe 2 a non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction in KOH. ► The catalyst shows four-electron transfer pathway in overall reaction. ► Catalyst has higher methanol tolerance than commercial Pt/C catalyst. - Abstract: A Carbon-supported CoSe 2 nanocatalyst has been developed as an alternative non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium. The catalyst was prepared via a surfactant-free route and its electrocatalytic activity for the ORR has been investigated in detail in 0.1 M KOH electrolyte at 25 °C using rotating disk electrode (RDE) and rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) techniques. The prepared catalyst showed promising catalytic activity towards ORR in a four-electron transfer pathway and higher tolerance to methanol compared to commercial Pt/C catalyst in 0.1 M KOH. To some extent, the increase of CoSe 2 loading on the electrode favors a faster reduction of H 2 O 2 intermediate to H 2 O.

  20. Pd supported on carbon containing nickel, nitrogen and sulfur for ethanol electrooxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-Rui; Wang, Shang-Qing; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Ai-Ju; Xu, Chang-Wei

    2017-11-13

    Carbon material containing nickel, nitrogen and sulfur (Ni-NSC) has been synthesized using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as precursor by annealing treatment with a size from 200 to 300 nm. Pd nanoparticles supported on the Ni-NSC (Pd/Ni-NSC) are used as electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media. Due to the synergistic effect between Pd and Ni, S, N, free OH radicals can form on the surface of Ni, N and S atoms at lower potentials, which react with CH 3 CO intermediate species on the Pd surface to produce CH 3 COO - and release the active sites. On the other hand, the stronger binding force between Pd and co-doped N and S is responsible for enhancing dispersion and preventing agglomeration of the Pd nanoparticles. The Pd(20 wt%)/Ni-NSC shows better electrochemical performance of ethanol oxidation than the traditional commercial Pd(20 wt%)/C catalyst. Onset potential on the Pd(20 wt%)/Ni-NSC electrode is 36 mV more negative compared with that on the commercial Pd(20 wt%)/C electrode. The Pd(20 wt%)/Ni-NSC in this paper demonstrates to have excellent electrocatalytic properties and is considered as a promising catalyst in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells.

  1. Crystal size effect on the electrochemical oxidation of formate on carbon-supported palladium nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Rayana Marcela Izidoro da Silva; Nakazato, Roberto Zenhei; Ciapina, Eduardo Goncalves

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The electrochemical oxidation of formate in alkaline electrolytes has emerged an a promising anodic reaction in the Direct Formate Fuel Cells[1]. Although palladium is considered to be one of the best electro catalyst for the oxidation of formate, important structure-activity relationships are still not understood. In the present work, we investigated the effect of the size of the palladium crystals in the electrochemical oxidation of formate in 0.1 mol L -1 KOH. Carbon-supported palladium nanoparticles (Pd/C) were prepared by chemical reduction of palladium (II) chloride in aqueous media by sodium borohydride in the presence of varying quantities of sodium citrate in the reaction media to obtain metallic crystals with distinct sizes. Analysis of the X-ray diffraction profile revealed the presence of palladium crystals in the range of 6 to 19 nm. Potentiostatic oxidation of formate on the distinct Pd/C samples revealed a volcano-like dependence of the specific activity with the size of the palladium crystals, presenting the highest activity for crystals around 7.5 nm. Reference: [1] A.M. Bartrom, J.L. Haan, The direct formate fuel cell with an alkaline anion exchange membrane, J. Power Sources. 214 (2012) 68-74. (author)

  2. Oxygen reduction at platinum nanoparticles supported on carbon cryogel in alkaline solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. ELEZOVIC

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxygen reduction reaction was investigated in 0.1 M NaOH solution, on a porous coated electrode formed of Pt particles supported on carbon cryogel. The Pt/C catalyst was characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and cyclic voltammetry techniques. The results demonstrated a successful reduction of Pt to metallic form and homogenous Pt particle size distribution with a mean particle size of about 2.7 nm. The ORR kinetics was investigated by linear sweep polarization at a rotating disc electrode. The results showed the existence of two E – log j regions, usually referred to polycrystalline Pt in acid and alkaline solution. At low current densities (lcd, the Tafel slope was found to be close to –2.3RT/F, while at high current densities (hcd it was found to be close to –2×2.3RT/F. It is proposed that the main path in the ORR mechanism on Pt particles was the direct four-electron process, with the transfer of the first electron as the rate determining step. If the activities are expressed through the specific current densities, a small enhancement of the catalytic activity for Pt/C was observed compared to that of polycrystalline Pt. The effect of the Pt particle size on the electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction was ascribed to the predominant (111 facets of the platinum crystallites.

  3. Kinetic study of methanol oxidation on carbon-supported PtRu electrocatalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gojkovic, S.Lj.; Vidakovic, T.R.; Durovic, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    Methanol electrooxidation was investigated on the carbon-supported PtRu electrocatalyst (1:1 atomic ratio) in acid media. X-ray diffraction measurement indicated alloying of Pt and Ru. Cyclic voltammetry of the sample reflects the amount of Ru in the catalyst and its ability to adsorb OH radicals. Tafel plots for the oxidation of 0.02-3 M methanol in the solutions containing 0.05-1 M HClO 4 and in the temperature range 27-40 deg. C showed reasonably well-defined linear region with the slope of about 115 mV dec -1 at the low currents, irrespective of the experimental conditions employed. Reaction order with respect to methanol was found to be 0.5. A correlation between methanol oxidation rate and pseudocapacitive current of OH adsorption on Ru sites was established. It was proposed that bifunctional mechanism is operative with the reaction between methanol residues adsorbed on Pt sites and OH radicals adsorbed on Ru sites as the rate-determining step

  4. Electrochemical Oxidation of EDTA in Nuclear Wastewater Using Platinum Supported on Activated Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Zhu, Wenkun; Mu, Tao; Hu, Zuowen; Duan, Tao

    2017-01-01

    A novel Pt/ACF (Pt supported on activated carbon fibers) electrode was successfully prepared with impregnation and electrodeposition method. Characterization of the electrodes indicated that the Pt/ACF electrode had a larger effective area and more active sites. Electrochemical degradation of ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) in aqueous solution with Pt/ACF electrodes was investigated. The results showed that the 3% Pt/ACF electrode had a better effect on EDTA removal. The operational parameters influencing the electrochemical degradation of EDTA with 3% Pt/ACF electrode were optimized and the optimal removal of EDTA and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were 94% and 60% after 100 min on condition of the electrolyte concentration, initial concentration of EDTA, current density and initial value of pH were 0.1 mol/L, 300 mg/L, 40 mA/cm2 and 5.0, respectively. The degradation intermediates of EDTA in electrochemical oxidation with 3% Pt/ACF electrode were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrum (GC-MS). PMID:28754016

  5. Applications of Advanced Technology for Monitoring Forest Carbon to Support Climate Change Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsey, R.; Hurtt, G. C.; Dubayah, R.; Hagen, S. C.; Vargas, R.; Nehrkorn, T.; Domke, G. M.; Houghton, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Measurement, Reporting, and Verification (MRV) is a broad concept guiding the application of monitoring technology to the needs of countries or entities for reporting and verifying reductions in greenhouse gas emissions or increases in greenhouse gas sinks. Credibility, cost-effectiveness, and compatibility are important features of global MRV efforts that can support implementation of climate change mitigation programs such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation and Sustainable Forest Management (REDD+). Applications of MRV technology may be tailored to individual country circumstances following guidance provided by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; hence, there is no single approach that is uniquely viable but rather a range of ways to integrate new MRV methods. MRV technology is advancing rapidly with new remote sensing and advanced measurement of atmospheric CO2, and in situ terrestrial and ocean measurements, coupled with improvements in data analysis, modeling, and assessing uncertainty. Here we briefly summarize some of the most application-ready MRV technologies being developed under NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) program, and illustrate how these technologies may be applied for monitoring forests using several case studies that span a range of scales, country circumstances, and stakeholder reporting requirements. We also include remarks about the potential role of advanced monitoring technology in the context of the global climate accord that is expected to result from the 21st session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which is expected to take place in December 2015, in Paris, France.

  6. Electrochemical Oxidation of EDTA in Nuclear Wastewater Using Platinum Supported on Activated Carbon Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Zhu, Wenkun; Mu, Tao; Hu, Zuowen; Duan, Tao

    2017-07-21

    A novel Pt/ACF (Pt supported on activated carbon fibers) electrode was successfully prepared with impregnation and electrodeposition method. Characterization of the electrodes indicated that the Pt/ACF electrode had a larger effective area and more active sites. Electrochemical degradation of ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) in aqueous solution with Pt/ACF electrodes was investigated. The results showed that the 3% Pt/ACF electrode had a better effect on EDTA removal. The operational parameters influencing the electrochemical degradation of EDTA with 3% Pt/ACF electrode were optimized and the optimal removal of EDTA and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were 94% and 60% after 100 min on condition of the electrolyte concentration, initial concentration of EDTA, current density and initial value of pH were 0.1 mol/L, 300 mg/L, 40 mA/cm² and 5.0, respectively. The degradation intermediates of EDTA in electrochemical oxidation with 3% Pt/ACF electrode were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrum (GC-MS).

  7. Hydrogenation of Anthracene in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Solvent Using Ni Supported on Hβ-Zeolite Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Aly Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic hydrogenation of anthracene was studied over Ni supported on Hβ-zeolite catalyst under supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2 solvent. Hydrogenation of anthracene in sc-CO2 yielded 100% conversion at 100 °C, which is attributed to the reduced mass transfer limitations, and increased solubility of H2 and substrate in the reaction medium. The total pressure of 7 MPa was found to be optimum for high selectivity of octahydroanthracene (OHA. The conversion and selectivity for OHA increased with an increase in H2 partial pressure, which is attributed to higher concentration of hydrogen atoms at higher H2 pressures. The selectivity reduced the pressure below 7 MPa because of enhanced desorption of the tetrahydro-molecules and intermediates from Ni active sites, due to higher solubility of the surface species in sc-CO2. The selectivity of OHA increased with the increase in catalyst weight and reaction time. The rate of hydrogenation of anthracene was compared with that found for napthalene and phenanthrene. The use of acetonitrile as co-solvent or expanded liquid with CO2 decreased the catalytic activity.

  8. Ag supported on carbon fiber cloth as the catalyst for hydrazine oxidation in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ran; Ye, Ke; Gao, Yinyi; Zhang, Wenping; Wang, Guiling; Cao, Dianxue

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CFC supported microspherical Ag is obtained by square-wave potential method. • Ag/CFC electrode has high catalytic activity toward hydrazine oxidation. • Hydrazine oxidation on the electrode proceeds by a near 4-electron pathway. - Abstract: Silver particles with microspheric structure are directly electrodeposited on carbon fiber cloth (CFC) substrate by square-wave potential electrodeposition method. The electrocatalytic behaviors of the Ag/CFC electrode toward hydrazine oxidation in alkaline solution are examined by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. An onset oxidation potential of -0.5 V and a peak current density of 30 mA cm −2 are achieved in the solution containing 1.0 mol L −1 KOH and 20.0 mmol L −1 hydrazine. The microspheric structure of the Ag/CFC electrode provides large electroactive surface area, hence, abundant active sites are vacant for hydrazine oxidation. The calculated apparent activation energies at different potentials show that hydrazine electro-oxidation at higher potential has faster kinetics than that at lower potential. In addition, the transfer electron number of hydrazine oxidation reaction on the Ag/CFC electrode is close to four, suggesting hydrazine is almost completely electrooxidized on the electrode and the full use of hydrazine fuel is basically achieved.

  9. Mass-produced multi-walled carbon nanotubes as catalyst supports for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, In Young; Park, Ki Chul; Jung, Yong Chae; Lee, Sun Hyung; Song, Sung Moo; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Kim, Yong Jung; Endo, Morinobu

    2011-01-01

    Commercially mass-produced multi-walled carbon nanotubes, i.e., VGNF (Showa Denko Co.), were applied to support materials for platinum-ruthenium (PtRu) nanoparticles as anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells. The original VGNFs are composed of high-crystalline graphitic shells, which hinder the favorable surface deposition of the PtRu nanoparticles that are formed via borohydride reduction. The chemical treatment of VGNFs with potassium hydroxide (KOH), however, enables highly dispersed and dense deposition of PtRu nanoparticles on the VGNF surface. This capability becomes more remarkable depending on the KOH amount. The electrochemical evaluation of the PtRu-deposited VGNF catalysts showed enhanced active surface areas and methanol oxidation, due to the high dispersion and dense deposition of the PtRu nanoparticles. The improvement of the surface deposition states of the PtRu nanoparticles was significantly due to the high surface area and mesorporous surface structure of the KOH-activated VGNFs.

  10. Single Pot Selective Hydrogenation of Furfural to 2-Methylfuran Over Carbon Supported Iridium Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Date, Nandan S; Hengne, Amol Mahalingappa; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Chikate, Rajeev C.; Rode, C. V.

    2018-01-01

    Various iridium supported carbon catalysts were prepared and screened for direct hydrogenation of furfural (FFR) to 2-methyl furan (2-MF). Amongest these, 5% Ir/C showed excellent results with complete FFR conversion and highest selectivity of 95% to 2-MF at very low H2 pressure of 100 psig. Metallic (Iro) and oxide ( IrO2) phases of Ir catalyzed first step hydrogenation involving FFR to FAL and subsequent hydrogenation to 2-MF,respecively. This was confirmed by XPS analysis and some controlled experiments. At low temperature of 140 oC, almost equal selectivities of FAL (42%) and 2-MF (43%) were observed, while higher temperature (220oC) favored selective hydrodeoxygenation. At optimized temperature, 2-MF formed selectively while higher pressure and higher catalyst loading favored ring hydrogenation of furfural rather than side chain hydrogenation. With combination of several control experimental results and detailed catalyst characterization, a plausible reaction pathway has been proposed for selective formation of 2-MF. The selectivity to various other products in FFR hydrogenation can be manipulated by tailoring the reaction conditions over the same catalyst.

  11. Structure and composition of single Pt–Ru electrocatalyst nanoparticles supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraguay-Delgado, Francisco; Malac, Marek; Alonso-Nuñez, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Individual Pt-Ru nanoparticles (NPs) supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) synthesized by microemulsion method were characterized by nano beam diffraction (NBD) and high resolution imaging in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Comparing the TEM images and NBD to simulations provided insight into particle composition, structure and morphology in three dimensions. In particular, the NBD allowed us to detect various components of the individual NPs that would be difficult to observe otherwise. We find that the NPs contain four different components: Pt–RuO 2 , Pt–Ru, RuO 2 and metallic Pt. Often an individual NP is composed of more than one component. The most frequently encountered external morphology is close to a spherical shape and ∼3.7 nm in diameter. The collective properties of NPs’ assemblies were studied by thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis and x-ray diffraction. The results allowed us to gain some insight into the relation of the NPs’ structure and composition with their catalytic performance, and revealed the presence of components not detectable by bulk methods. The electrocatalytic properties were evaluated by CO stripping, methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction. Bulk characterization methods miss many properties and structures present in the sample due to low volume fraction and due to overlap of reflections. Single NPs should be analyzed to obtain reliable indication of sample composition. (paper)

  12. Single Pot Selective Hydrogenation of Furfural to 2-Methylfuran Over Carbon Supported Iridium Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Date, Nandan S

    2018-03-20

    Various iridium supported carbon catalysts were prepared and screened for direct hydrogenation of furfural (FFR) to 2-methyl furan (2-MF). Amongest these, 5% Ir/C showed excellent results with complete FFR conversion and highest selectivity of 95% to 2-MF at very low H2 pressure of 100 psig. Metallic (Iro) and oxide ( IrO2) phases of Ir catalyzed first step hydrogenation involving FFR to FAL and subsequent hydrogenation to 2-MF,respecively. This was confirmed by XPS analysis and some controlled experiments. At low temperature of 140 oC, almost equal selectivities of FAL (42%) and 2-MF (43%) were observed, while higher temperature (220oC) favored selective hydrodeoxygenation. At optimized temperature, 2-MF formed selectively while higher pressure and higher catalyst loading favored ring hydrogenation of furfural rather than side chain hydrogenation. With combination of several control experimental results and detailed catalyst characterization, a plausible reaction pathway has been proposed for selective formation of 2-MF. The selectivity to various other products in FFR hydrogenation can be manipulated by tailoring the reaction conditions over the same catalyst.

  13. Dynamics of carbon sources supporting burial in seagrass sediments under increasing anthropogenic pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Mazarrasa, Inés

    2017-03-15

    Seagrass meadows are strong coastal carbon sinks of autochthonous and allochthonous carbon. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of coastal anthropogenic pressure on the variability of carbon sources in seagrass carbon sinks during the last 150 yr. We did so by examining the composition of the sediment organic carbon (Corg) stocks by measuring the δ13Corg signature and C : N ratio in 210Pb dated sediments of 11 Posidonia oceanica seagrass meadows around the Balearic Islands (Spain, Western Mediterranean) under different levels of human pressure. On average, the top meter sediment carbon deposits were mainly (59% ± 12%) composed by P. oceanica derived carbon whereas seston contribution was generally lower (41% ± 8%). The contribution of P. oceanica to the total sediment carbon stock was the highest (∼ 80%) in the most pristine sites whereas the sestonic contribution was the highest (∼ 40–80%) in the meadows located in areas under moderate to very high human pressure. Furthermore, an increase in the contribution of sestonic carbon and a decrease in that of seagrass derived carbon toward present was observed in most of the meadows examined, coincident with the onset of the tourism industry development and coastal urbanization in the region. Our results demonstrate a general increase of total carbon accumulation rate in P. oceanica sediments during the last century, mainly driven by the increase in sestonic Corg carbon burial, which may have important implications in the long-term carbon sink capacity of the seagrass meadows in the region examined.

  14. Branched carbon nanofiber network synthesis at room temperature using radio frequency supported microwave plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Boskovic, BO; Stolojan, V; Zeze, DA; Forrest, RD; Silva, SRP; Haq, S

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers have been grown at room temperature using a combination of radio frequency and microwave assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The nanofibers were grown, using Ni powder catalyst, onto substrates kept at room temperature by using a purposely designed water-cooled sample holder. Branched carbon nanofiber growth was obtained without using a template resulting in interconnected carbon nanofiber network formation on substrates held at room temperatur...

  15. Continued Advancement of Supported Liquid Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Control in Extravehicular Activity Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, David T.; Gleason, Kevin J.; Engel, Jeffrey R.; Cowley, Scott W.; Chullen, Cinda

    2015-01-01

    The Development of a new, robust, portable life support