WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon support microstructure

  1. Preparation and Application of Carbon-Nanofiber Based Microstructured Materials as Catalyst Supports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chinthaginjala, J.K.; Seshan, K.; Lefferts, L.

    2007-01-01

    In the application of heterogeneous catalysts in liquid phase reactions, the rate of reaction as well as selectivity is often negatively influenced by mass transfer limitations in the stagnant liquid in the pores of the catalyst support. Internal mass transfer limitations can be reduced by maximizin

  2. Morphing Carbon Nanotube Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-20

    d) vertical twisting actuator. 2 independently from the microstructure geometry, representing a versatile principle for design and manufacturing...CNT yarn, causing the 2 composite to contract its length due to the mechanical anisotropy introduced by the twist of the CNTs about the yarn axis... Oliver , and Tom Serbowicz for contributions to the design and fabrication of the force control and imaging systems. Microfabrication was performed

  3. Understanding the Effects of Surface Chemistry and Microstructure on the Activity and Stability of Pt Electrocatalysts on Non-Carbon Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustain, William [Univ. of Conneticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-02-12

    The objective of this project is to elucidate the effects of the chemical composition and microstructure of the electrocatalyst support on the activity, stability and utilization of supported Pt clusters.

  4. Wafer-level microstructuring of glassy carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Loïc. E.; Prater, Karin; Kilchoer, Cédric; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Glassy carbon is used nowadays for a variety of applications because of its mechanical strength, thermal stability and non-sticking adhesion properties. One application is glass molding that allows to realize high resolution diffractive optical elements on large areas and at affordable price appropriate for mass production. We study glassy carbon microstructuring for future precision compression molding of low and high glass-transition temperature. For applications in optics the uniformity, surface roughness, edge definition and lateral resolution are very important parameters for a stamp and the final product. We study different methods of microstructuring of glassy carbon by etching and milling. Reactive ion etching with different protection layers such as photoresists, aluminium and titanium hard masks have been performed and will be compare with Ion beam etching. We comment on the quality of the structure definition and give process details as well as drawbacks for the different methods. In our fabrications we were able to realize optically flat diffractive structures with slope angles of 80° at typical feature sizes of 5 micron and 700 nm depth qualified for high precision glass molding.

  5. Oxidation Microstructure Studies of Reinforced Carbon/Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Curry, Donald M.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory oxidation studies of reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) are discussed with particular emphasis on the resulting microstructures. This study involves laboratory furnace (500-1500 C deg) and arc-jet exposures (1538 C deg) on various forms of RCC. RCC without oxidation protection oxidized at 800 and 1100 C deg exhibits pointed and reduced diameter fibers, due to preferential attack along the fiber edges. RCC with a SiC conversion coating exhibits limited attack of the carbon substrate at 500, 700 and 1500 C deg. However samples oxidized at 900, 1100, and 1300 C deg show small oxidation cavities at the SiC/carbon interface below through-thickness cracks in the SiC coating. These cavities have rough edges with denuded fibers and can be easily distinguished from cavities created in processing. Arc-jet tests at 1538 C deg show limited oxidation attack when the SiC coating and glass sealants are intact. When the SiC/sealant protection system is damaged, attack is extensive and proceeds through matrix cracks, creating denuded fibers on the edges of the cracks. Even at 1538 C deg, where diffusion control dominates, attack is non-uniform with fiber edges oxidizing in preference to the bulk fiber and matrix.

  6. Microstructural, Structural, and Thermal Characterization of Annealed Carbon Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Guevara, A.; Ortiz-Echeverri, C. J.; Rojas-Rodriguez, I.; Mosquera-Mosquera, J. C.; Ariza-Calderón, H.; Ayala-Garcia, I.; Rodriguez-García, M. E.

    2016-10-01

    As is well known, the metallurgical microstructure of carbon steel is formed by ferrite and pearlite after the annealing heat treatment. When the cooling rate increases, the diffusive process is interrupted causing a change in the metallurgical microstructure which will affect steel properties. The aim of this work was to study thermal, structural, and microstructural properties of annealed carbon steel samples with four different carbon contents. Crystalline structure and crystalline quality were studied by the X-ray diffraction technique, where the full width at half maximum analysis showed that as the carbon content increased, the crystalline quality decreased. The metallurgical microstructure morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The thermal diffusivity and the heat capacity were determined by the photoacoustic technique and by the thermal relaxation method, respectively. The thermal diffusivity and the thermal conductivity decreased as the carbon content increased. The amplitude signal of photothermal radiometry increased as the carbon content increased, while the phase signal of photothermal radiometry did not show significant differences among studied carbon steel types. The photoacoustic technique represents an important alternative in the steel characterization field.

  7. Archaeologic analogues: Microstructural changes by natural ageing in carbon steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, Esther Bravo [Dpto. de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, Jorge Chamon [Dpto. de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Arasanz, Javier Guzman [Dpto. de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Peces, Raquel Arevalo [Dpto. de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Criado, Antonio Javier [Dpto. de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Dietz, Christian [Dpto. de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Martinez, Juan Antonio [Dpto. de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Criado Portal, Antonio Jose [Dpto. de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: antoniocriado@quim.ucm.es

    2006-02-15

    When discussing the container material for highly active radionuclear waste, carbon steel is one of the materials most frequently proposed by the international scientific community. Evidently, security with respect to the container behaviour into deep geological deposits is fundamental. Among other parameters, knowledge about material mechanical properties is essential when designing the container. Time ageing of carbon steel, apart from possible alterations of the chemical composition (e.g. corrosion) involves important microstructural changes, at the scale of centuries and millenniums. The latter may cause variations of the mechanical properties of carbon steel storage containers, with the corresponding risk of possible leakage. In order to properly estimate such risk and to adjust the corresponding mathematical models to reality, the microstructural changes observed in this study on archaeologic samples are evaluated, comparing ancient and modern steels of similar chemical composition and fabrication processes.

  8. Microstructure transformation of carbon nanofibers during graphitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; TANG Yuan-hong; LIN Liang-wu; ZHANG En-lei

    2008-01-01

    The mierostructures of vapor-grown carbon nanofibers(CNFs) before and after graphitization process were analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy(HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry(XRD), near-edge-X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy(NEXAFS) and thermogravimetric analysis(TGA). The results indicate that although non-graphitized CNFs have the characteristics of higher disorder, a transformation is found in the inner layer of tube wall where graphite sheets become stiff, which demonstrates the characteristics of higher graphitization of graphitized CNFs. The defects in outer tube wall disappear because the amorphous carbon changes to perfect crystalline carbon after annealing treatment at about 2 800 ℃. TGA analysis in air indicates that graphitized CNFs have excellent oxidation resistance up to 857 ℃. And the graphitization mechanism including four stages was also proposed.

  9. Microstructure of C/C Composites with Different Matrix Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Hao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of carbon/carbon(C/C composites with different matrix carbon was studied by polarized light microscopy (PLM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and XRD techniques respectively. PLM results indicate that the different matrix carbon exhibits different optical reactivity, and the average optical reactivity is gradually enhanced from normal pitch carbon, smooth laminar of pyrocarbon, rough laminar of pyrocarbon to mesophase pitch carbon; SEM results show that the normal pitch carbon is mainly of grapy structure, the pyrocarbon exhibits like-crinkle lamellar structure, while the mesophase pitch carbon exhibits lamellar banded structure with different shapes. Under HRTEM, the lattice fringes of the mesophase pitch carbon are arranged regularly, is a long range ordered crystal structure, and the preferred orientation is high. The degree of the graphite and the interlayer spacing of the material B (mesophase pitch-based C/C composites are better than that of the material D (pyrocarbon-based C/C composites.

  10. Carbonation-Related Microstructural Changesin Long-Term Durability Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio A. Rigo da Silva

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the effects of carbonation on the microstructure of Portland cement concrete for long-term durability applications. A class C40 concrete (characteristic compression strength between 40 MPa and 44 MPa on the 28th day, according to Brazilian standard NBR 8953 was chosen for the experimental study of the carbonation effects, from which test samples were molded for accelerated test under a 100%-CO2 atmosphere after physical and mechanical characterization. It was observed that carbonation provoked a reduction of 5% to 12% of the concrete open porosity accessible to water. Flexural strength values obtained after the carbonation tests revealed a decrease of 12% and 25% in relation to the values obtained before tests on the 28th and 91st days, respectively.

  11. Microstructure and properties of pitch-based carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco; Santamaria; Bermejo; Bonhomme; Menendez

    1999-11-01

    Pitches prepared in the laboratory by thermal treatment and air-blowing of a commercial coal-tar pitch were used as matrix precursors of carbon composites using granular petroleum coke, foundry coke, amorphous graphite and anthracite. Pitches were characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis, softening point, solubility tests and carbon yield) and light microscopy (mesophase content). Pitch pyrolysis behaviour was monitored by thermogravimetric analysis and from the optical texture of cokes. Pitch wettability to the different carbons, at different temperatures, was also studied. Experimental conditions selected for the preparation of composites were based on pitch composition and properties. The main microstructural features of composites were determined by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Composite properties were described in terms of their density, porosity and compressive strength, and related to composite microstructure and the characteristics of the precursors. Thermal treatment and air-blowing of pitch improved carbon composite structure and properties. The lowest porosities and best mechanical properties were observed in those composites obtained with the thermally treated pitches combined with foundry coke and anthracite.

  12. Hot Deformation Behavior and Microstructural Evolution of a Medium Carbon Vanadium Microalloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrim, Rialberth M.; Rodrigues, Samuel F.; Reis, Gedeon S.; Silva, Eden S.; Aranas, Clodualdo; Balancin, Oscar

    2016-11-01

    Hot forging of steel requires application of large strains, under which conditions, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) is expected to take place. In this study, torsion tests were carried out on a medium carbon vanadium microalloyed steel (38MnSiVS5) to simulate hot forging. Deformations were applied isothermally in the temperature range 900-1200 °C at strain rates of 0.1-10 s-1 in order to observe for the occurrence of DRX and to investigate for the microstructural evolution during straining. The shape of the flow curves indicated that the recrystallization takes place during deformation. This was supported by optical microscopy performed on the quenched samples which displayed considerable amounts of recrystallized grains. It was shown that the grain size depends on straining conditions such as strain rate and temperature. Finally, it was revealed that these process parameters can considerably affect the evolution of microstructure of industrial grade steels by means of DRX.

  13. Preparation of flat carbon support films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, RI; Oostergetel, GT; Brisson, A

    2003-01-01

    Wrinkling of carbon support films is known to limit the resolution of electron microscopy images of protein two-dimensional crystals. The origin of carbon wrinkling during preparation of the support films was investigated by reflected light microscopy. We observed that carbon films go through severa

  14. Facile synthesis of B-type carbonated nanoapatite with tailored microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti, E-mail: magdalena.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Romagnoli, Marcello, E-mail: marcello.romagnoli@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Hanuskova, Miriam, E-mail: Miriam.hanuskova@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Fabbri, Elena, E-mail: Elena.fabbri@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Gualtieri, Alessandro F., E-mail: Alessandro.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41121 Modena (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    Nanolime and a phosphate-based chelating agent were used to synthesize B-type carbonated apatite. Developed Rietveld refinement strategies allowed one to determine process yield, product crystallinity as well as structural (unit cell) and microstructural (size, strain) parameters. The effect of synthesis temperature (20–60 °C) as well as Ca/P ratio (1.5–2.5) and solid content (10–30 wt%) of the starting batch on these properties were investigated. FTIR, TEM and gas adsorption data provided supporting evidence. The process yield was 42–60 wt% and found to be governed by the Ca/P ratio. The purified products had high specific surface area (107–186 m{sup 2}/g) and crystallinity (76–97%). The unit cell parameters, correlated to the degree of structural carbonate, were sensitive to the Ca/P ratio. Instead, temperature governed the microstructural parameters. Less strained and larger crystals were obtained at higher temperatures. Long-term aging up to 6 months at 20 °C compensated for higher crystal growth kinetics at higher temperature. - Graphical abstract: Controlled synthesis of carbonated apatite at moderate temperatures using nanolime and sodiumhexametaphosphate as starting reagent. - Highlights: • Chemical synthesis of nano-sized apatite with tailored microstructure was performed. • Colloidal Ca(OH){sub 2} and a phosphorus-based chelating agents were used as reagents. • The method is simple and reproducible which facilitate industrial process scale-up. • Rietveld refinement strategies for product characterization were developed. • Rietveld analyses provided yield, microstructural and structure information.

  15. Fractal characterization of pore microstructure evolution in carbon/carbon composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI MiaoLing; QI LeHua; LI HeJun; XU GuoZhong

    2009-01-01

    A fractal characterization approach was proposed to research pore microstructure evolution in carbon/carbon (C/C) composites during the chemical vapor infiltration process. The data obtained from mercury porosimetry determinations were analyzed using the sponge fractal model and the thermodynamics relation fractal model, respectively. The fractal dimensions of C/C composites at different densification stages were evaluated. The pore microstructure evolution with densification time was studied by fractal dimension analysis. The results showed that ClC composites belong to porous fractal structure. The fractal dimensions increase on the whole with decreasing porosity as the densification proceeds. The fractal dimensions are influenced by the texture of pyrocarbon and decrease with increasing anisotropy from isotropic pyrocarbon to high textural one. Both the complicacy of pore structure and the textural morphology of pyrocarbon can be represented simultaneously by the fractal dimension. The pore evolution of C/C composites in the densification process can be monitored using fractal dimension.

  16. Electrical Properties of Carbon Fiber Support Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, W; Demarteau, M; Fast, J; Hanagaki, K; Johnson, M; Kuykendall, W; Lubatti, H; Matulik, M; Nomerotski, A; Quinn, B; Wang, J

    2005-01-01

    Carbon fiber support structures have become common elements of detector designs for high energy physics experiments. Carbon fiber has many mechanical advantages but it is also characterized by high conductivity, particularly at high frequency, with associated design issues. This paper discusses the elements required for sound electrical performance of silicon detectors employing carbon fiber support elements. Tests on carbon fiber structures are presented indicating that carbon fiber must be regarded as a conductor for the frequency region of 10 to 100 MHz. The general principles of grounding configurations involving carbon fiber structures will be discussed. To illustrate the design requirements, measurements performed with a silicon detector on a carbon fiber support structure at small radius are presented. A grounding scheme employing copper-kapton mesh circuits is described and shown to provide adequate and robust detector performance.

  17. Formation of Foam-like Microstructural Carbon Material by Carbonization of Porous Coordination Polymers through a Ligand-Assisted Foaming Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongpatpanich, Kanokwan; Horike, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Yu-Ichi; Ogiwara, Naoki; Nishihara, Hirotomo; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2015-09-14

    Porous carbon material with a foam-like microstructure has been synthesized by direct carbonization of porous coordination polymer (PCP). In situ generation of foaming agents by chemical reactions of ligands in PCP during carbonization provides a simple way to create lightweight carbon material with a foam-like microstructure. Among several substituents investigated, the nitro group has been shown to be the key to obtain the unique foam-like microstructure, which is due to the fast kinetics of gas evolution during carbonization. Foam-like microstructural carbon materials showed higher pore volume and specific capacitance compared to a microporous carbon.

  18. Microstructure and Property of High Carbonic-Chromium Cast Steel with Different Hot Deformation Ratio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tao; WANG Jiu-liang; ZHANG Run-jun; CHAO Guo-hua; LIU Jian-hua

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure and properties of high carbonic-chromium cast steel subjected to different hot deformation ratios were studied. The experimental results show that the microstructure and properties of high carbonic-chromium cast steel are obviously improved after hot deformation, and the best mechanical properties of the cast steel can be obtained under hot deformation ratio of 40 %-50 %, which leads to the morphology change of eutectic carbide and the precipitation of granular carbides.

  19. Morphological and microstructural studies on aluminizing coating of carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsu, Zaifol; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Daud, Abd Razak; Hussein, Hishammuddin [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Hot dip aluminizing is one of the most effective methods of surface protection for steels and is gradually gaining popularity. The morphology and microstructure of an inter-metallic layer form on the surface of low carbon steel by hot dip aluminization treatment had been studied in detail. This effect has been investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The result shows that the reaction between the steel and the molten aluminium leads to the formation of Fe–Al inter-metallic compounds on the steel surface. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopic studies showed that a two layer coating was formed consisting of an external Al layer and a (Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}) inter metallic on top of the substrate after hot dip aluminizing process. The inter-metallic layer is ‘thick’ and exhibits a finger-like growth into the steel. Microhardness testing shown that the intermetallic layer has high hardness followed by steel substrate and the lowest hardness was Al layer.

  20. Microstructure, elastic, and inelastic properties of biomorphic carbons carbonized using a Fe-containing catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, T. S.; Kardashev, B. K.; Smirnov, B. I.; Gutierrez-Pardo, A.; Ramirez-Rico, J.

    2016-12-01

    The microstructure and amplitude dependences of the Young's modulus E and internal friction (logarithmic decrement δ), and microplastic properties of biocarbon matrices BE-C(Fe) obtained by beech tree carbonization at temperatures T carb = 850-1600°C in the presence of an iron-containing catalyst are studied. By X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy, it is shown that the use of Fe-catalyst during carbonization with T carb ≥ 1000°C leads to the appearance of a bulk graphite phase in the form of nanoscale bulk graphite inclusions in a quasi-amorphous matrix, whose volume fraction and size increase with T carb. The correlation of the obtained dependences E( T carb) and δ( T carb) with microstructure evolution with increasing T carb is revealed. It is found that E is mainly defined by a crystalline phase fraction in the amorphous matrix, i.e., a nanocrystalline phase at T carb carb > 1300°C. Maximum values E = 10-12 GPa are achieved for samples with T carb ≈ 1150 and 1600°C. It is shown that the microplasticity manifest itself only in biocarbons with T carb ≥ 1300°C (upon reaching a significant volume of the graphite phase); in this case, the conditional microyield stress decreases with increasing total volume of introduced mesoporosity (free surface area).

  1. Synthesis and characterization of lignin-based carbon materials with tunable microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sabornie [ORNL; Clingenpeel, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; McKenna, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Lignin-based carbons can be used as a low-cost alternative to graphite and petroleum-based carbons enabling the production of sustainable, functional carbon materials for various applications. The microstructure development of these carbons can be controlled through chemical modification of the lignin precursor and choice of carbonization parameters. In this work, microstructured carbon materials are synthesized from lignin using a combination of chemical modification and carbon fiber processing techniques. Lignin is modified by incorporating different ester groups which results in a precursor highly compatible with melt processing using the fiber extrusion technique and conversion into microstructured carbons by oxidative stabilization and subsequent carbonization. Furthermore, the impact of esterifications on precursor chemistry and carbonizations is investigated. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of modified lignins shows characteristic spectral changes as a result of esterifications. Ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry shows the modification process does not affect the polymeric character of the lignin backbone. Esterifications result in moderate shifts in O:C and H:C ratios. Thermogravimetric analysis of lignins reveals distinct differences in mass loss trends during oxidations and carbonizations.

  2. Liquid spreading on ceramic-coated carbon nanotube films and patterned microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hangbo; Hart, A. John

    2015-11-01

    We study the capillary-driven liquid spreading behavior on films and microstructures of ceramic-coated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fabricated on quartz substrates. The nanoscale porosity and micro-scale dimensions of the CNT structures, which can be precisely varied by the fabrication process, enable quantitative measurements that can be related to analytical models of the spreading behavior. Moreover, the conformal alumina coating by atomic layer deposition (ALD) prevents capillary-induced deformation of the CNTs upon meniscus recession, which has complicated previous studies of this topic. Washburn-like liquid spreading behavior is observed on non-patterned CNT surfaces, and is explained using a scaling model based on the balance of capillary driving force and the viscous drag force. Using these insights, we design patterned surfaces with controllable spreading rates and study the contact line pinning-depinning behavior. The nanoscale porosity, controllable surface chemistry, and mechanical stability of coated CNTs provide significantly enhanced liquid-solid interfacial area compared to solid microstructures. As a result, these surface designs may be useful for applications such as phase-change heat transfer and electrochemical energy storage. Funding for this project is provided by the National Institutes of Health and the MIT Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy supported by the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals.

  3. EFFECT OF CARBON CONTENT ON MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF HIGH STRENGTH AND HIGH ELONGATION STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y. Chen; X. Chen; P.H. Li; S.K. Pu; Z.X. Yuan; B.F. Xu; D.X. Lou; A.M. Guo; S.B.Zhou

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of new kind of hot-rolled high strengthand high elongation steels with retained austenite were studied by discussing the in-fluence of different carbon content. The research results indicate that carbon contenthas a significant effect on retaining austenite and consequently resulting in high elon-gation. Besides, new findings about relationship between carbon content and retainedaustenite as well as properties were discussed in the paper.

  4. EFFECT OF CARBON CONTENT ON MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF HIGH STRENGTH AND HIGH ELONGATION STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Chen; X.Chen; 等

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of new kind of hot-rolled high strength and high elongation steels with retained austenite were studied by discussing the in-fluence of different carbon content.The research results indicate that carbon content has a significant effect on retaining austenite and consequently resulting in high elon-gation.Besides,new findings about relationship between carbon content and retained austenite as well as properties were discussed in the paper.

  5. Cf/C composites: correlation between CVI process parameters and Pyrolytic Carbon microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Burgio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapour Infiltration (CVI technique has been long used to produce carbon/carbon composites. The Pyrolytic Carbon (Py-C matrix infiltrated by CVI could have different microstructures, i.e. Rough Laminar (RL, Smooth Laminar (SL or Isotropic (ISO. These matrix microstructures, characterized by different properties, influence the mechanical behaviour of the obtained composites. Tailoring the process parameters, it is possible to direct the infiltration towards a specific Py-C type. However, the factors, influencing the production of a specific matrix microstructure, are numerous and interconnected, e.g. temperature, pressure, flow rates etc. Due to the complexity of the physical and chemical phenomena involved in CVI process, up to now it has not been possible to obtain a general correlation between CVI process parameters and Py–C microstructure. This study is aimed at investigating the relationship between infiltration temperature and the microstructure of obtained Py-C, for a pilot - sized CVI/CVD reactor. Fixing the other process parameters and varying only the temperature, from 1100°C to 1300°C, the Py-C infiltration was performed on fibrous preforms. Polarized light microscopy, with quantitative measurements of average extinction angle (Ae, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the obtained Py-C microstructures

  6. Cf/C composites: correlation between CVI process parameters and Pyrolytic Carbon microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Burgio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapour Infiltration (CVI technique has been long used to produce carbon/carbon composites. The Pyrolytic Carbon (Py-C matrix infiltrated by CVI could have different microstructures, i.e. Rough Laminar (RL, Smooth Laminar (SL or Isotropic (ISO. These matrix microstructures, characterized by different properties, influence the mechanical behaviour of the obtained composites. Tailoring the process parameters, it is possible to direct the infiltration towards a specific Py-C type. However, the factors, influencing the production of a specific matrix microstructure, are numerous and interconnected, e.g. temperature, pressure, flow rates etc. Due to the complexity of the physical and chemical phenomena involved in CVI process, up to now it has not been possible to obtain a general correlation between CVI process parameters and Py–C microstructure. This study is aimed at investigating the relationship between infiltration temperature and the microstructure of obtained Py-C, for a pilot - sized CVI/CVD reactor. Fixing the other process parameters and varying only the temperature, from 1100°C to 1300°C, the Py-C infiltration was performed on fibrous preforms. Polarized light microscopy, with quantitative measurements of average extinction angle (Ae, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the obtained Py-C microstructures.

  7. Carbon Fiber Composite Monoliths as Catalyst Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Pickel, Joseph M [ORNL; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber composite monoliths are rigid bodies that can be activated to a large surface area, have tunable porosity, and proven performance in gas separation and storage. They are ideal as catalyst supports in applications where a rigid support, with open structure and easy fluid access is desired. We developed a procedure for depositing a dispersed nanoparticulate phase of molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) on carbon composite monoliths in the concentration range of 3 to 15 wt% Mo. The composition and morphology of this phase was characterized using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, and a mechanism was suggested for its formation. Molybdenum carbide is known for its catalytic properties that resemble those of platinum group metals, but at a lower cost. The materials obtained are expected to demonstrate catalytic activity in a series of hydrocarbon reactions involving hydrogen transfer. This project demonstrates the potential of carbon fiber composite monoliths as catalyst supports.

  8. Carbon Fiber Composite Monoliths for Catalyst Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Pickel, Joseph M [ORNL; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Carbon fiber composite monoliths are rigid bodies that can be activated to a large surface area, have tunable porosity, and proven performance in gas separation and storage. They are ideal as catalyst supports in applications where a rigid support, with open structure and easy fluid access is desired. We developed a procedure for depositing a dispersed nanoparticulate phase of molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) on carbon composite monoliths in the concentration range of 3 to 15 wt% Mo. The composition and morphology of this phase was characterized using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, and a mechanism was suggested for its formation. Molybdenum carbide is known for its catalytic properties that resemble those of platinum group metals, but at a lower cost. The materials obtained are expected to demonstrate catalytic activity in a series of hydrocarbon reactions involving hydrogen transfer. This project demonstrates the potential of carbon fiber composite monoliths as catalyst supports.

  9. Fractal characterization of pore microstructure evolution in carbon/carbon composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A fractal characterization approach was proposed to research pore microstructure evolution in car- bon/carbon (C/C) composites during the chemical vapor infiltration process. The data obtained from mercury porosimetry determinations were analyzed using the sponge fractal model and the thermo- dynamics relation fractal model, respectively. The fractal dimensions of C/C composites at different densification stages were evaluated. The pore microstructure evolution with densification time was studied by fractal dimension analysis. The results showed that C/C composites belong to porous frac- tal structure. The fractal dimensions increase on the whole with decreasing porosity as the densifica- tion proceeds. The fractal dimensions are influenced by the texture of pyrocarbon and decrease with increasing anisotropy from isotropic pyrocarbon to high textural one. Both the complicacy of pore structure and the textural morphology of pyrocarbon can be represented simultaneously by the fractal dimension. The pore evolution of C/C composites in the densification process can be monitored using fractal dimension.

  10. Microstructural analyses of amorphic diamond, i-C, and amorphous carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, C. B.; Davanloo, F.; Jander, D.R.;

    1992-01-01

    Recent experiments have identified the microstructure of amorphic diamond with a model of packed nodules of amorphous diamond expected theoretically. However, this success has left in doubt the relationship of amorphic diamond to other noncrystalline forms of carbon. This work reports...... the comparative examinations of the microstructures of samples of amorphic diamond, i-C, and amorphous carbon. Four distinct morphologies were found that correlated closely with the energy densities used in preparing the different materials. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute...

  11. Pore- and micro-structural characterization of a novel structural binder based on iron carbonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sumanta, E-mail: Sumanta.Das@asu.edu [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Stone, David, E-mail: dajstone@gmail.com [Iron Shell LLC, Tucson, AZ (United States); Convey, Diana, E-mail: Diana.Convey@asu.edu [LeRoy Eyring Center for Solid State Science, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Neithalath, Narayanan, E-mail: Narayanan.Neithalath@asu.edu [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The pore- and micro-structural features of a novel binding material based on the carbonation of waste metallic iron powder are reported in this paper. The binder contains metallic iron powder as the major ingredient, followed by additives containing silica and alumina to facilitate favorable reaction product formation. Compressive strengths sufficient for a majority of concrete applications are attained. The material pore structure is investigated primarily through mercury intrusion porosimetry whereas electron microscopy is used for microstructural characterization. Reduction in the overall porosity and the average pore size with an increase in carbonation duration from 1 day to 4 days is noticed. The pore structure features are used in predictive models for gas and moisture transport (water vapor diffusivity and moisture permeability) through the porous medium which dictates its long-term durability when used in structural applications. Comparisons of the pore structure with those of a Portland cement paste are also provided. The morphology of the reaction products in the iron-based binder, and the distribution of constituent elements in the microstructure are also reported. - Highlights: • Carbonation of iron produces a dense microstructure. • Pore volume in iron carbonate lower, critical size higher than those in OPC pastes • Reaction product contains iron, carbon, silicon, aluminum and calcium. • Power-law for porosity-moisture permeability relationship was established.

  12. Electroless preparation and ASAXS microstructural analysis of pseudocapacitive carbon manganese oxide supercapacitor electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christian; Reichenauer, Gudrun; Pflaum, Jens

    2015-01-20

    Anomalous small angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS) has been utilized as a noninvasive, integral tool to access the structural properties of carbon xerogel-manganese oxide electrodes with nanometer resolution. As these electrodes constitute the elementary functional units in supercapacitors and as their microstructure governs the macroscopic electrical performance, it is essential to gain a detailed morphological understanding of the underlying carbon particle scaffold coated with manganese oxide. We demonstrate that, in this regard, ASAXS provides a powerful technique and in combination with a theoretical core-shell model enables a quantitative estimation of the relevant structural parameters. As a result, we determined the thicknesses of the solution deposited MnO2 shells to range between 3 and 26 nm depending on the carbon particle size and thus on their effective surface area. By our core-shell modeling we conclude the revealed manganese oxide coatings on the carbon support to be rather thick, but nevertheless to show a high uniformity in thickness. At 1.8 ± 0.2 to 2.2 ± 0.1 g/cm(3) the related effective MnO2 densities of the shells are about 30% lower than the corresponding bulk density of 3.0 g/cm(3). This mainly originates from a substructure within the shell, whose growth is controlled by a pronounced reduction of the manganese precursor during layer formation. Finally, the presented ASAXS data are complemented by SEM and N2 sorption measurements, proving not only qualitatively the proposed flake-like MnO2 surface morphology but also confirming quantitatively the manganese shell thickness, complementary, on a local scale.

  13. Poly(propylene carbonate): Insight into the Microstructure and Enantioselective Ring-Opening Mechanism

    KAUST Repository

    Salmeia, Khalifah A.

    2012-11-13

    Different poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) microstructures have been synthesized from the alternating copolymerization of CO 2 with both racemic propylene oxide (PO) and various mixtures of PO enantiomers using chiral salen catalysts. The microstructures of the obtained copolymers as a function of polymerization time have been analyzed by a combination of chiral GC and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. The 13C NMR spectra of selected poly(propylene carbonate) samples were recorded using a 900 MHz ( 1H) spectrometer, showing a previously unreported fine splitting of the carbonate resonances. This allowed a detailed assignment of signals for various copolymer microstructures taking into account the specifics in their stereo- and regioirregularities. For example, the enantioselectivity preference of the (R,R-salen)Co catalyst for (S)-PO at the beginning of the copolymerization leads predominantly to (S)-PO insertion, with any (R)-PO misinsertion being followed by incorporation of (S)-PO, so that the microstructure features isolated stereoerrors. K rel calculations for the copolymerization showed around 5-fold enantioselectivity for (S)-PO over (R)-PO at short reaction time. Analysis of the copolymer microstructures obtained under various reaction conditions appears to be an additional approach to differentiate the occurrence of bimetallic and bifunctional copolymerization mechanisms that are widely discussed in the literature. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  14. Data of microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon foams derived from sucrose/polyacrylamide hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Yao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An easy method that combined gel casting and physical foaming was used to fabricate modified carbon foams. The design of carbon foams from sucrose/polyacrylamide hydrogel is a new concept for controlling the microstructure and improving the compressive properties of carbon foams. This article provides the micrographs obtained from optical and scanning electron microscope for foaming solution and carbon foams. Weight loss data used to construct the thermo-gravimetric curves are included. Load–displacement data constructing the stress–strain curves and the derived compressive properties are also included.

  15. CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance of carbon steel in relation with microstructure changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa, Nathalie, E-mail: nochoa@usb.ve [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad Simón Bolívar, Aptdo., 89000, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Vega, Carlos [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad Simón Bolívar, Aptdo., 89000, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Pébère, Nadine; Lacaze, Jacques [Université de Toulouse, CIRIMAT, UPS/INPT/CNRS, ENSIACET, 4 Allée Emile Monso, CS 44362, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Brito, Joaquín L. [Laboratorio de Físico-química de Superficies, Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas (IVIC), Carretera Panamericana, Km 11, Altos de Pipe, Estado Miranda (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The microstructural effects on the corrosion resistance of an API 5L X42 carbon steel in 0.5 M NaCl solution saturated with CO{sub 2} was investigated. Four microstructures were considered: banded (B), normalized (N), quenched and tempered (Q&T), and annealed (A). Electrochemical measurements (polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) were coupled with surface analyses (scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) to characterize the formation of the corrosion product layers. Electrochemical results revealed that corrosion resistance increased in the following order: B < N < Q&T < A. From the polarization curves it was shown that specifically, cathodic current densities were affected by microstructural changes. SEM images indicated that ferrite dissolved earlier than cementite and a thin layer of corrosion products was deposited on the steel surface. XPS analyses revealed that this layer was composed of a mixture of iron carbonate and non-dissolved cementite. It was also found that the quantity of FeCO{sub 3} content on the steel surface was greater for Q&T and A microstructures. These results, in agreement with the electrochemical data, indicate that the deposition mechanism of iron carbonate is closely related to the morphology of the non-dissolved cementite, determining the protective properties of the corrosion product layers. - Highlights: • The effect of change in microstructure on CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance was evaluated. • An API 5LX 42 carbon steel was immersed in a 0.5 M NaCl solution saturated with CO{sub 2}. • Banded, normalized, quenched-tempered and annealed microstructures were considered. • Electrochemical measurements were coupled with surface analysis. • Morphology and distribution of undissolved Fe{sub 3}C control corrosion kinetics.

  16. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez Martinez, Diego; Pei, Y.T.; Rudolf, P.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes

  17. Thermal desorption of deuterium from modified carbon nanotubes and its correlation to the microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisowski, W.; Keim, E.G.; Berg, van den A.H.J.; Smithers, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    The process of deuterium desorption from single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) modified by atomic (D) and molecular (D2) deuterium treatment was investigated in an ultrahigh vacuum environment using thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). Microstructural and chemical analyses of SWNT material, m

  18. Effect of Substrate Bias on Microstructure and Properties of Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaqi ZHU; Jiecai HAN; Songhe MENG; Qiang LI; Manlin TAN

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure and properties of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films deposited by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology has been investigated by visible Raman spectroscopy, AFM and Nano-indentor. The Raman spectra have been fitted with a s

  19. Formation and microstructure of carbon encapsulated superparamagnetic Co nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiang-Cheng; Reyes-Gasga, J.; Dong, X. L.

    Carbon encapsulated magnetic cobalt nanoparticles have been synthesized by the modified arc-discharge method. Both high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles reveal the presence of 8-15nm diameter crystallites coated with 1-3 carbon layers. In particular, HREM images indicate that the intimate and contiguous carbon fringe around those Co nanoparticles is good evidence for complete encapsulation by carbon shell layers. The encapsulated phases are identified as hcp α-Co, fcc β-Co and cobalt carbide (Co 3 C) nanocrystals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), nano-area electron diffraction (SAED) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). However, some fcc β-Co particles with a significant fraction of stacking faults are observed by HREM and confirmed by means of numerical fast Fourier transform (FFT) of HREM lattice images. The carbon encapsulation formation and growth mechanism are also reviewed.

  20. CONFORMATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF CARBON NANOFIBERS DEPOSITED ON FOAM Ni

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Bundles of pure carbon nanofibers were prepared by catalytic decomposition of acetylene on foam Ni. The morphological and structural characteristics of the carbon nanostructures, in the as-prepared state, were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HTEM). A special conformation of carbon nanofibers composed of segmented structures was found among the products by both SEM and TEM observations. Further HTEM ex amination indicated that the segments were stacked with well ordered graphite platelets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the filaments.

  1. Effect of microstructure of carbon steel on magnetite formation in simulated Hot Conditioning environment of nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Prafful Kumar, E-mail: prafful@barc.gov.in; Kiran Kumar, M.; Kain, Vivekanand

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Heat treatments used to tailor microstructure of a low and a high carbon steel. • Oxide growth rates established in Hot Conditioning simulated environment. • Only magnetite formed on all microstructural conditions of both the steels. • Growth rate was higher for all microstructures of high carbon steel upto 72 h. • After 72 h growth rate stabilized in narrow band for all microstructures of a steel. - Abstract: The objective of present investigation is to establish the role of starting microstructure of carbon steel on the magnetite formation behaviour in Hot Conditioning simulated environment. Two grades of carbon steel (low and high carbon) were subjected to selective heat-treatments to generate different microstructures: martensite, tempered martensite and modified ferrite–pearlite. Oxidation was carried out in lithiated water of pH 10–10.2 in a static autoclave at 270 °C. The results of the investigation clearly establish that: (a) high carbon steel (0.63% C) showed a relatively higher rate of oxidation over the low carbon (0.08% C) grade at all the test durations and (b) the oxidation rates for both the grades were sensitive to microstructural differences at initial stages of oxidation while the differences narrowed down after 72 h of exposure. The oxide formed was established to be magnetite on all the specimens.

  2. Microstructures and Hardness/Wear Performance of High-Carbon Stellite Alloys Containing Molybdenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Yao, J. H.; Zhang, Q. L.; Yao, M. X.; Collier, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    Conventional high-carbon Stellite alloys contain a certain amount of tungsten which mainly serves to provide strengthening to the solid solution matrix. These alloys are designed for combating severe wear. High-carbon molybdenum-containing Stellite alloys are newly developed 700 series of Stellite family, with molybdenum replacing tungsten, which are particularly employed in severe wear condition with corrosion also involved. Three high-carbon Stellite alloys, designated as Stellite 706, Stellite 712, and Stellite 720, with different carbon and molybdenum contents, are studied experimentally in this research, focusing on microstructure and phases, hardness, and wear resistance, using SEM/EDX/XRD techniques, a Rockwell hardness tester, and a pin-on-disk tribometer. It is found that both carbon and molybdenum contents influence the microstructures of these alloys significantly. The former determines the volume fraction of carbides in the alloys, and the latter governs the amount of molybdenum-rich carbides precipitated in the alloys. The hardness and wear resistance of these alloys are increased with the carbide volume fraction. However, with the same or similar carbon content, high-carbon CoCrMo Stellite alloys exhibit worse wear resistance than high-carbon CoCrW Stellite alloys.

  3. Microstructural investigations of carbon foams derived from modified coal-tar pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzvetkov, George; Tsyntsarski, Boyko; Balashev, Konstantin; Spassov, Tony

    2016-10-01

    This work reports the microstructural evaluation of carbon foams derived from coal-tar pitch precursors treated with H2SO4 and HNO3 and finally annealed at 1000°C and 2000°C. Our experimental investigations combine scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-spot near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (μ-NEXAFS) spectroscopy. This set of complementary techniques provides detailed structural and chemical information of the surface and the bulk of the carbon foams. The high-resolution microscopy data indicate the formation of carbonaceous amorphous microspheres (average diameters of 0.28±0.01μm) embedded in the partially graphitized carbon foam matrix at 1000°C. The microspheres are enriched with sp-bonded species and their microstructural characteristics depend on the reagent (nitric vs. sulfuric acid) used for pitch treatment. A complete chemical transformation of the microspheres at temperatures >1000°C occurs and at 2000°C they are spectroscopically identical with the bulk material (sp(2)- and sp(3)-hybridised forms of carbon). The microstructure-property relationship is exemplified by the compressive strength measurements. These results allow a better description of coal-tar pitch-derived carbon foams at the atomic level, and may account for a better understanding of the processes during graphitization step.

  4. Evaluation of the inelastic heat fraction in the context of microstructure supported dynamic plasticity modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Longère, Patrice; Dragon, A. André

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of the inelastic heat fraction in the context of microstructure supported dynamic plasticity modelling correspondence: Corresponding author. (Longere, Patrice) (Longere, Patrice) (Dragon, A. Andre) Laboratoire de Genie Mecanique et Materiaux ? Universite de Bretagne Sud ? Rue de Saint-Maude - BP 92116--> , 56321 LORIENT Cedex--> - FRANCE (Longere, Patrice)...

  5. Microstructure and surface properties of lignocellulosic-based activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, P., E-mail: pegonzal@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Centeno, T.A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon-CSIC, Apartado 73, E-33080 Oviedo (Spain); Urones-Garrote, E. [Centro Nacional de Microscopia Electronica, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Avila-Brande, D.; Otero-Diaz, L.C. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activated carbons were produced by KOH activation at 700 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed nanostructure consists of highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp{sup 2} bond content Almost-Equal-To 95%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Textural parameters show high surface area ( Almost-Equal-To 1000 m{sup 2}/g) and pore width of 1.3-1.8 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific capacitance reaches values as high as 161 F/g. - Abstract: Low cost activated carbons have been produced via chemical activation, by using KOH at 700 Degree-Sign C, from the bamboo species Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata and the residues from shells of the fruits of Castanea Sativa and Juglans Regia as carbon precursors. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs show the conservation of the precursor shape in the case of the Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata activated carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that these materials consist of carbon platelet-like particles with variable length and thickness, formed by highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp{sup 2} content Almost-Equal-To 95% and average mass density of 1.65 g/cm{sup 3} (25% below standard graphite). Textural parameters indicate a high porosity development with surface areas ranging from 850 to 1100 m{sup 2}/g and average pore width centered in the supermicropores range (1.3-1.8 nm). The electrochemical performance of the activated carbons shows specific capacitance values at low current density (1 mA/cm{sup 2}) as high as 161 F/g in the Juglans Regia activated carbon, as a result of its textural parameters and the presence of pseudocapacitance derived from surface oxygenated acidic groups (mainly quinones and ethers) identified in this activated carbon.

  6. Carbon xerogels as supports for catalysts and electrocatalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Job, Nathalie; Berthon-Fabry, Sandrine; Lambert, Stephanie; Chatenet, Marian; Maillard, Frédéric; Brigaudet, Mathilde; Pirard, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    International audience; In order to improve mass transport in the pore texture of carbon supported catalysts, the widely used supports (activated carbons or carbon blacks) can be replaced by carbon gels, i.e. texture-tailored materials obtained by drying and pyrolysis of organic gels. Carbon xerogels issued from resorcinol-formaldehyde aqueous gels were used as metal catalyst supports both in gas phase heterogeneous catalysis and in PEM fuel cell electrodes. These materials, composed of very ...

  7. Catalytic removal of carbon monoxide over carbon supported palladium catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Avanish Kumar [Defence Research and Development Establishment, Jhansi Road, Gwalior-474002 (MP) (India); Saxena, Amit [Centre for Fire Explosive and Environmental Safety, Timarpur, Delhi-110054 (India); Shah, Dilip; Mahato, T.H. [Defence Research and Development Establishment, Jhansi Road, Gwalior-474002 (MP) (India); Singh, Beer, E-mail: beerbs5@rediffmail.com [Defence Research and Development Establishment, Jhansi Road, Gwalior-474002 (MP) (India); Shrivastava, A.R.; Gutch, P.K. [Defence Research and Development Establishment, Jhansi Road, Gwalior-474002 (MP) (India); Shinde, C.P. [School of Studies in Chemistry, Jiwaji University, Gwalior-474002 (MP) (India)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon supported palladium (Pd/C) catalyst was prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalytic removal of CO over Pd/C catalyst was studied under dynamic conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of Pd %, CO conc., humidity, GHSV and reaction environment were studied. - Abstract: Carbon supported palladium (Pd/C) catalyst was prepared by impregnation of palladium chloride using incipient wetness technique, which was followed by liquid phase reduction with formaldehyde. Thereafter, Pd/C catalyst was characterized using X-ray diffractometery, scanning electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, thermo gravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and surface characterization techniques. Catalytic removal of carbon monoxide (CO) over Pd/C catalyst was studied under dynamic conditions. Pd/C catalyst was found to be continuously converting CO to CO{sub 2} through the catalyzed reaction, i.e., CO + 1/2O{sub 2} {yields} CO{sub 2}. Pd/C catalyst provided excellent protection against CO. Effects of palladium wt%, CO concentration, humidity, space velocity and reaction environment were also studied on the breakthrough behavior of CO.

  8. Effects of Carbon and Nitrogen on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Carbonitrided Low-Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taweejun, Nipon; Kanchanomai, Chaosuan

    2015-12-01

    Various carbonitriding processes have been applied to low-carbon steel. The carbon and nitrogen contents in the case of carbonitrided low-carbon steels have been evaluated, and their influences on microstructure, distortion, hardness, and strength have been investigated. The factor limiting the ferrite and pearlite formations with increasing nitrogen content was a mechanism that resulted in more retained austenite in the case of low-carbon steel treated using a high flow rate of ammonia. The high-nitrogen content and high amount of retained austenite in the case of carbonitrided low-carbon steel slightly reduced the hardness, case depth, and strength. However, the elongation was improved, and the distortion was reduced. In the case zones, fractures occurred along the grain boundaries, i.e., intergranular fractures, whereas the fracture surfaces in the core regions were typical ductile fractures, i.e., dimples were observed.

  9. Analysis of composition and microstructural uniformity of hybrid glass/carbon fibre composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beauson, Justine; Markussen, Christen Malte; Madsen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    In hybrid fibre composites, the intermixing of the two types of fibres imposes challenges to obtain materials with a well-defined and uniform microstructure. In the present paper, the composition and the microstructural uniformity of hybrid glass/carbon fibre composites mixed at the fibre bundle...... fibre volume fractions are determined using volumetric calculations. A model is presented to predict the interrelation of volume fractions in hybrid fibre composites. The microstructural uniformity of the composites is analysed by the determined variation in composite volume fractions. Two analytical...... level are investigated. The different levels of compositions in the composites are defined and experimentally determined. The composite volume fractions are determined using an image analysis based procedure. The global fibre volume fractions are determined using a gravimetrical based method. The local...

  10. Evolution of permeability and microstructure of tight carbonates due to numerical simulation of calcite dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin; Vanorio, Tiziana; Keehm, Youngseuk

    2017-06-01

    The current study concerns fundamental controls on fluid flow in tight carbonate rocks undergoing CO2 injection. Tight carbonates exposed to weak carbonic acid exhibit order of magnitude changes in permeability while maintaining a nearly constant porosity with respect to the porosity of the unreacted sample. This study aims to determine—if not porosity—what are the microstructural changes that control permeability evolution in these rocks? Given the pore-scale nature of chemical reactions, we took a digital rock physics approach. Tight carbonate mudstone was imaged using X-ray microcomputed tomography. We simulated calcite dissolution using a phenomenological numerical model that stands from experimental and microstructural observations under transport-limited reaction conditions. Fluid flow was simulated using the lattice-Boltzmann method, and the pore wall was adaptively eroded at a rate determined by the local surface area and velocity magnitude, which we use in place of solvent flux. We identified preexisting, high-conductivity fluid pathways imprinted in the initial microstructure. Though these pathways comprise a subset of the total connected porosity, they accommodated 80 to 99% of the volumetric flux through the digital sample and localized dissolution. Porosity-permeability evolution exhibited two stages: selective widening of narrow pore throats that comprised preferential pathways and development and widening of channels. We quantitatively monitored attributes of the pore geometry, namely, porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity, and average hydraulic diameter, which we qualitatively linked to permeability. This study gives a pore-scale perspective on the microstructural origins of laboratory permeability-porosity trends of tight carbonates undergoing transport-limited reaction with CO2-rich fluid.

  11. Influence of pore formers on physical properties and microstructures of supporting cathodes of solid oxide electrolysis cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingyi, Liu; Bo, Yu.; Jingming, Xu; Jing, Chen [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-04-15

    High-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) systems using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) provided a promising method for highly efficient large-scale hydrogen production, which was one of the most potential hydrogen production technologies to meet the hydrogen economy demand in the future. The physical properties and microstructures of supporting cathodes are crucial for the performances of the entire SOECs. For this reason, four different pore formers (polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), potato starch, ammonium oxalate, ammonium carbonate) were considered for its optimization. Their influence on the amount of porosity and on the pore shape and distribution as well as the effect on the electronic conductivity was analyzed. The results showed that PMMA was the most promising pore former, which had high porosity and uniform pore size distribution. The optimum weight percent concentration was 10%, correspondingly, porosity was 45% and electronic conductivity was 6726S cm{sup -1}, which was suitable for supporting cathodes for SOEC application. The pore former of potato starch was better than the inorganic pore formers of ammonium oxalate and ammonium carbonate. The optimum weight percent concentration was 10%, correspondingly, porosity was 40% and electronic conductivity was 5827S cm{sup -1}, which was not suitable for supporting cathodes for SOEC application, while, It was suitable for supporting anodes for SOFC application. (author)

  12. Microstructural and Mechanical Evolution of a Low Carbon Steel by Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekban, Dursun Murat; Aktarer, Semih Mahmut; Zhang, Hao; Xue, Peng; Ma, Zongyi; Purcek, Gencaga

    2017-08-01

    A low carbon steel (Grade A) was subjected to friction stir processing (FSP), and the effect of FSP on the microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated systematically. It was found that two distinct zones called stir zone (SZ) and heat-effected zone (HAZ) were formed during FSP. The SZ and HAZ consist mainly of ferrite, widmanstatten ferrite, ferrite+cementite aggregates, and martensite. FSP considerably refined the microstructure of the steel by means of dynamic recrystallization mechanism and formed a volumetric defect-free basin-like processed region. The ferritic grain size of the steel decreased from 25 µm in the coarse-grained state to about 3 µm in the fine-grained state, and the grains formed were separated mostly by high angle of misorientation with low density of dislocations. This microstructural evolution brought about a considerable increase in both hardness and strength values without a considerable decrease in ductility. Ultrafine-grained microstructure formed around and just beneath the pin increased the hardness of the steel from 140 Hv0.3 to about 245 Hv0.3. However, no hardness uniformity was formed throughout the processed zone due to the changes in deformation- and temperature-induced microstructure. Both yield and tensile strength values of processed zone increased from 256 and 435 MPa to about 334 and 525 MPa, respectively.

  13. Elaboration of a microstructured inkjet-printed carbon electrochemical capacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pech, David; Brunet, Magali; Fabre, Norbert; Mesnilgrente, Fabien; Conedera, Veronique; Durou, Hugo [LAAS-CNRS, Universite de Toulouse, 7 av. du Colonel Roche, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice [CIRIMAT-CNRS, Universite de Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2010-02-15

    Carbon-based micro-supercapacitors dedicated to energy storage in self-powered modules were fabricated with inkjet printing technology on silicon substrate. An ink was first prepared by mixing an activated carbon powder with a PTFE polymer binder in ethylene glycol stabilized with a surfactant then deposited by inkjet on patterned gold current collectors with the substrate heated at 140 C in order to assure a good homogeneity. Electrochemical micro-capacitors with electrodes in an interdigital configuration were fabricated, and characterized using electrochemical techniques in 1 M Et{sub 4}NBF{sub 4} propylene carbonate electrolyte. These micro-devices show an excellent capacitive behavior over a wide potential range of 2.5 V for a cell capacitance of 2.1 mF cm{sup -2}. The newly developed technology will allow the integration of the storage device as close as possible to the MEMS-based energy harvesting device, minimizing power losses through connections. (author)

  14. Microstructure of carbon fiber preform and distribution of pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor infiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建勋; 黄伯云

    2004-01-01

    The carbon/carbon composites were made by chemical vapor infiltration(CVI) with needled felt preform. The distribution of the pyrolytic carbon in the carbon fiber preform was studied by polarized light microscope(PLM) and scanning electronic microscope(SEM). The experimental results indicate that the amount of pyrolytic carbon deposited on the surface of chopped carbon fiber is more than that on the surface of long carbon fiber. The reason is the different porosity between the layer of chopped carbon fiber and long carbon fiber. The carbon precursor gas which passes through the part of chopped carbon fibers decomposes and deposits on the surface of chopped carbon fiber. The pyrolytic carbon on the surface of long carbon fibers is produced by the carbon precursor gas diffusing from the chopped fiber and the Z-d fiber. Uniform pore distribution and porosity in preform are necessary for producing C/C composites with high properties.

  15. Nanostructured Multifilamentary Carbon-Copper Composites: Fabrication, Microstructural Characterization, and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evarice Yama Nzoma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is part of research on the emerging techniques to produce bulk nanostructured composites materials by severe plastic deformation and their characterization. Based on the Levi work, we present a new method to synthesize a composite wire-containing carbon-nanosized filaments (graphite and C60 fullerenes embedded in a copper matrix. The originality of this process is using powder media as fiber. Microstructures and electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties are presented.

  16. Silicon and aluminum doping effects on the microstructure and properties of polymeric amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang, E-mail: lxq_suse@sina.com [Material Corrosion and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan province, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Hao, Junying, E-mail: jyhao@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Xie, Yuntao [Material Corrosion and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan province, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of nanostructure and properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films were firstly studied. • Si doping enhanced polymerization of the hydrocarbon chains and Al doping resulted in increase in the ordered carbon clusters of polymeric amorphous carbon films. • Soft polymeric amorphous carbon films exhibited an unconventional frictional behaviors with a superior wear resistance. • The mechanical and vacuum tribological properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films were significantly improved by Si and Al co-doping. - Abstract: Polymeric amorphous carbon films were prepared by radio frequency (R.F. 13.56 MHz) magnetron sputtering deposition. The microstructure evolution of the deposited polymeric films induced by silicon (Si) and aluminum(Al) doping were scrutinized through infrared spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The comparative results show that Si doping can enhance polymerization and Al doping results in an increase in the ordered carbon clusters. Si and Al co-doping into polymeric films leads to the formation of an unusual dual nanostructure consisting of cross-linked polymer-like hydrocarbon chains and fullerene-like carbon clusters. The super-high elasticity and super-low friction coefficients (<0.002) under a high vacuum were obtained through Si and Al co-doping into the films. Unconventionally, the co-doped polymeric films exhibited a superior wear resistance even though they were very soft. The relationship between the microstructure and properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films with different elements doping are also discussed in detail.

  17. Numerical evaluation of micro-structural parameters of porous supports in metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Georg; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Brandstätter, Wilhelm; Weber, André

    2015-01-01

    Metallic supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are considered as a durable and cost effective alternative to the state-of-the-art ceramic supported cell designs. In order to understand the mass and charge transport in the metal-support of this new type of cell a novel technique involving X-ray tomography and micro-structural modelling is presented in this work. The simulation technique comprises a novel treatment of the boundary conditions, which leads to more accurate effective transport parameters compared to those, which can be achieved with the conventional homogenisation procedures. Furthermore, the porosity distribution in the metal-support was determined, which provided information about the inhomogeneous nature of the material. In addition to that, transport parameters for two identified, different dense layers of the metal-support are evaluated separately. The results of the evaluation show three significant findings. Firstly, that the effective transport parameters are up to a factor of 20 lower compared to other SOFC anodes. Secondly, that the micro-structure can have regions, which are much denser, especially the first 100 μm of the interface between gas-channel and support-structure. Thirdly, that the calculation of the transport parameters depends on the correct application of boundary conditions.

  18. Activated Carbon, Carbon Nanofiber and Carbon Nanotube Supported Molybdenum Carbide Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Santillan-Jimenez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum carbide was supported on three types of carbon support—activated carbon; multi-walled carbon nanotubes; and carbon nanofibers—using ammonium molybdate and molybdic acid as Mo precursors. The use of activated carbon as support afforded an X-ray amorphous Mo phase, whereas crystalline molybdenum carbide phases were obtained on carbon nanofibers and, in some cases, on carbon nanotubes. When the resulting catalysts were tested in the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO of guaiacol in dodecane, catechol and phenol were obtained as the main products, although in some instances significant amounts of cyclohexane were produced. The observation of catechol in all reaction mixtures suggests that guaiacol was converted into phenol via sequential demethylation and HDO, although the simultaneous occurrence of a direct demethoxylation pathway cannot be discounted. Catalysts based on carbon nanofibers generally afforded the highest yields of phenol; notably, the only crystalline phase detected in these samples was Mo2C or Mo2C-ζ, suggesting that crystalline Mo2C is particularly selective to phenol. At 350 °C, carbon nanofiber supported Mo2C afforded near quantitative guaiacol conversion, the selectivity to phenol approaching 50%. When guaiacol HDO was performed in the presence of acetic acid and furfural, guaiacol conversion decreased, although the selectivity to both catechol and phenol was increased.

  19. Regulation of Microstructure of Calcium Carbonate Crystals by Egg White Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wen-kun; LUO Xue-gang; ZHANG Chi; DUAN Tao; ZHOU Jian

    2012-01-01

    Crystal growth of calcium carbonate in biological simulation was investigated via egg white protein with different volume fractions,during which calcium carbonate was synthesized by calcium chloride and sodium carbonate.The morphology,thermal properties and microstructure of the calcium carbonate micro-to-nanoscale crystals were characterized by scanning electron microscopy(SEM),transmission electron microscopy(TEM),Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR),thermogravimetric analysis(TG)and X-ray diffraction(XRD)analysis.The results show that the volume fraction of egg white protein has great influence on the shape,size and morphology of calcium carbonate crystals.The calcium carbonate crystals were the mixtures of calcite-vaterite-like crystals including spherical and rough surface,which are different from that formed in pure water.With the increase of egg white protein concentration,the diameter of calcium carbonate crystals changed,the amount of formed spherical calcium carbonate particles decreased and that of vaterite increased.These results indicate that the coordination and electrostatic interaction between egg white protein and Ca2+ significantly affect the calcium carbonate crystalization.

  20. Optimization of interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via carbon nanotube sizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Hongwei; Sui, Xianhang; Zhao, Zhongbo; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Lei, E-mail: chenlei@tjpu.edu.cn; Deng, Hui; Liu, Ya; Qian, Xiaoming, E-mail: qianxiaoming@tjpu.edu.cn

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Multiple sizing treatments were used to modify the surface of carbon fiber with carbon nanotubes. • The distribution state of carbon nanotubes in interface had a great effect on the performance of carbon fiber composites. • Interfacial microstructure changes brought by sizing treatment were detected by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscope. • Gradient interphase composed of carbon nanotubes and epoxy was favorable to improve the mechanical properties of carbon composites. - Abstract: Repetitious sizing treatment was used to modify the carbon fiber (CF) surface with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for improving interfacial properties of CF/epoxy composites. Interlaminar shear and flexural results showed that mechanical properties of composites were significantly depended on the dispersion state and contents of CNTs in interfacial regions. Increases of 13.45% in interlaminar shear strength and 20.31% in flexural strength were achieved in quintuple sized-CF/epoxy composites, whereas excessive CNTs led to decrease of interfacial performance due to defects induced by agglomerated CNTs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and force modulation atomic force microscope were used to detect the structure of interfacial phase and results indicated that gradient interfacial structure with various thicknesses was formed due to CNT incorporation. This means that such a simple and efficient method to improve interfacial performance of composites via regulating the fiber–matrix interphase structure was developed and showed great commercial application potential.

  1. Mechanical properties and microstructural analysis of Al–Si–Mg/carbonized maize stalk waste particulate composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Oghenevweta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties and morphological analysis of Al–Si–Mg/carbonized maize stalk particulate composites was investigated. The compositions of the composite include a matrix of Al–Si–Mg and the carbonized maize stalk particulates as reinforcement ranging from 2% to 10% at an interval of 2%. Properties such as mechanical behaviour of the composites were examined and these include tensile strength, tensile modulus, hardness value, impact energy, percentage elongation and percentage reduction in area. Besides, the microstructures of the developed Al–Si–Mg/carbonized maize stalk particulate composites were investigated. The results of the microstructures of the composite show a uniform dispersion of the reinforcement along the grain boundaries of the alloy. The tensile strength and hardness values increase to 85.60 N/mm2 and 24HRB at 8 and 10 wt% of carbonized maize stalk respectively, but there is a slight decrease in the impact energy values, values of percentage elongation and percentage reduction in area as the reinforcement increases. From these results of investigation, we concluded that the carbonized reinforcing maize particulates can be used to enhance the properties of Al–Si–Mg alloy for engineering applications.

  2. Mechanical Properties with High Temperature and the Microstructure of Carbon/Phenolic Ablative Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tianbo; ZHOU Changsheng; JU Yutao; CHEN Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced phenolic based composites were prepared by laminating molding.The variation in mechanical characteristics of composites was evaluated with heating temperature and procedure.The microstructures of composites at different temperatures were observed by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope,respectively.The results showed that the main weight loss range of carbon/phenolic is from 300 to 800 ℃,before 700 ℃ the weight loss was resulted from pyrolysis and after that the weight loss was mainly by oxidation in the fiber phase; with the heat treatment temperature rising,the bonding at the interface of carbon fibers and resin matrix weakened; in the pyrolysis temperature range,the interlaminar shear strength(ILSS) of carbon/phenolic showed a rapid drop with temperature rising,and then decrease in the rate of ILSS became relatively slower; the fiber oxidation had little influence on the ILSS.

  3. Microstructural study of oxidation of carbon-rich amorphous boron carbide coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin ZENG; Zu-de FENG; Si-wei LI; Yong-sheng LIU

    2008-01-01

    Carbon-rich amorphous boron carbide (BxC) coatings were annealed at 400℃, 700℃, 1000℃ and 1200℃ for 2 h in air atmosphere. The microstructure and composition of the as-deposited and annealed coat-ings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-Raman spectro-scopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). All of the post-anneal characterizations demonstrated the ability of carbon-rich BxC coatings to protect the graphite substrate against oxidation. Different oxidation modes of the coatings were found at low temperature (400℃), moderate temperature (700℃) and high temper-ature (1000℃ and 1200℃). Finally, the feasibility of the application of carbon-rich BxC instead of pyrolytic car-bon (PyC) as a fiber/matrix interlayer in ceramics-matrix composites (CMCs) is discussed here.

  4. The microstructure and electrochemical characteristics of LiFePO4/carbon-network composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y X; Lu, Z L; Mi, C H

    2012-08-01

    LiFePO4/carbon-network composite was synthesized by a high temperature solid-state method using the natural sawdust as carbon precursor. The microstructure of the as-synthesized sample was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), respectively. The results revealed that the LiFePO4 particles with diameters ranging from 30 to 150 nm were well connected by carbon networks. The electrochemical performance of the composite was characterized using galvanostatic charge-discharge technique. The initial discharge capacity of LiFePO4/carbon-network cathode reached 126 mAh x g(-1) with 0.2 C rate.

  5. Composition and Microstructure of Magnetron Sputtering Deposited Ti-containing Amorphous Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ti-containing carbon films were deposited by using magnetron sputtering deposition. The composition and microstructure of the carbon films were characterized in detail by combining the techniques of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is found that carbon films contain Ti 18 at pct; after Ti incorporation, the films consist of titanium carbide; C1s peak appears at 283.4 eV and it could be divided into 283.29 and 284.55 eV, representing sp2 and sp3, respectively, and sp2 is superior to sp3. This Ti-containing film with dominating sp2 bonds is nanocomposites with nanocrystalline TiC clusters embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix, which could be proved by XRD and TEM.

  6. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as a metal catalyst support

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabena, LF

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available in the catalysis industry due to cost issues and properties that are not found in their bulk state. An efficient way to produce and stabilise noble metal nanoparticles is by dispersion on a suitable support. Carbon-based supports, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon...

  7. Effect of cerium addition on microstructures of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sriram; R Balasubramaniam; M N Mungole; S Bharagava; R G Baligidad

    2005-10-01

    The effect of Ce addition on the microstructure of carbon-alloyed Fe3Al-based intermetallic has been studied. Three different alloys of composition, Fe–18.5Al–3.6C, Fe–20.0Al–2.0C and Fe–19.2Al–3.3C–0.07Ce (in at%), were prepared by electroslag remelting process. Their microstructures were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopies. Stereological methods were utilized to understand the observed microstructures. All the alloys exhibited a typical two-phase microstructure consisting of Fe3AlC carbides in an iron aluminide matrix. In the alloy without Ce addition, large bulky carbides were equally distributed throughout the matrix with many smaller precipitates interspersed in between. In the alloy with Ce addition, the carbide grain sizes were finer and uniformly distributed throughout the matrix. The effect of Ce addition on the carbide morphology has been explained based on the known effect of Ce in modifying carbide morphology in cast irons.

  8. The effect of the reinforcing carbon on the microstructure of pitch-based granular composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, A; Santamaría, R; Granda, M; Menéndez, R

    2003-02-01

    Carbon composites were prepared with four pitches (a commercial impregnating coal-tar pitch, two thermally treated pitches and an air-blown pitch) and four granular carbons (anthracite, graphite, green petroleum coke and foundry coke). Granular carbon/pitch proportions were optimized for each composite and differed in the characteristics of the single components. Interactions of the pitch with the granular carbons during pyrolysis and their subsequent effects on the microstructure of the final composite were monitored by light microscopy. The results show that the light texture of the matrix and the porosity of the composite depend not only on the chemical composition of the pitch but also on the specific granular carbon used as reinforcing material. The same pitch may generate different light textures depending on the characteristics of the carbon. Composites from thermally treated pitches and graphite show highly ordered matrices orientated in the direction of graphite planes. Graphite particles seem to exert a huge influence on mesophase development during the pyrolysis of the treated pitches, affecting not only the orientation of the mesophase, but also reducing the rate of mesophase formation. On the other hand, when green petroleum coke is used with the thermally treated pitches, matrices show a small size light texture, due to the high reactivity of the pitch in the presence of this granular carbon. The porosity of the composites is controlled by both the pitch and the granular carbon.

  9. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-03-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered ``solid-cored'' CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process.

  10. Magnetic-field-induced microstructural features in a high carbon steel during diffusional phase transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoxue, E-mail: zhangxiaoxue1213@gmail.com [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mecanique des Materiaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Universite de Lorraine UL 57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Universite de Lorraine (France); Zhang, Yudong, E-mail: yudong.zhang@univ-metz.fr [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mecanique des Materiaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Universite de Lorraine UL 57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Universite de Lorraine (France); Gong, Minglong, E-mail: gml@mail.neuq.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Esling, Claude, E-mail: claude.esling@univ-metz.fr [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mecanique des Materiaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Universite de Lorraine UL 57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Universite de Lorraine (France); Zhao, Xiang, E-mail: zhaox@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zuo, Liang, E-mail: lzuo@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2012-12-15

    In this work, a high purity, high carbon steel was heat treated without and with a 12-T magnetic field. The microstructural features induced by magnetic field during its diffusion-controlled austenite decomposition were investigated by means of optical microscopy and SEM/EBSD. It is found that the magnetic field increases the amount of the abnormal structure, which is composed of proeutectoid cementite along the prior austenite boundaries and ferrite around it, because magnetic field increases the austenite grain size and promotes the transformation of carbon-depleted austenite to ferrite. No specific orientation relationship between abnormal ferrite and cementite has been found in the non-field- or the field-treated specimens. Magnetic field evidently promotes the spheroidization of pearlite, due to its effect of enhancing carbon diffusion through raising the transformation temperature and its effect of increasing the relative ferrite/cementite interface energy. As magnetic field favors the nucleation of the high magnetization phase-pearlitic ferrite, the occurrence of the P-P2 OR that corresponds to the situation that ferrite nucleates prior to cementite during pearlitic transformation is enhanced by the magnetic field. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The field-induced microstructural features in a high carbon steel during diffusional phase transformation has been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic field increases the amount of the abnormal structure and promotes the spheroidization of pearlite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic field enhances the occurrence of the P-P2 OR.

  11. Effect of Al on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of the Ultrahigh Carbon Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huifen PENG; Baoqi WANG; Jianjun ZHANG; Xiaoyan SONG; Xiaoli MA; Nanju GU

    2004-01-01

    In this research, we tried to find a simple processing method to break up the network carbides in ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCS). Our results revealed that Al addition was favorable to the decrease in the proeutectoid carbides, the pearlite-colony size and the pearlitic interlamellar spacing of the forged microstructures, and that a fully-pearlitic structure was obtained in the UHCS containing 1.6 wt pct Al. The quenching-and-tempering process resulted in fine microstructure in those steels. On the other hand, the strength of the UHCSs increased with the increase of the Al content, and the highest strength was obtained at the UHCS with 1.6 wt pct Al. The UHCSs with Al contents higher than 1.3 wt pct showed a high tensile strength of more than σb=1000 MPa and good ductility of higher than δ5=10% at ambient temperature.

  12. Effects of laser pulse energy on surface microstructure and mechanical properties of high carbon steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊毅; 贺甜甜; 李鹏燕; 陈路飞; 任凤章; Alex A. Volinsky

    2015-01-01

    Surface microstructure and mechanical properties of pearlitic Fe–0.8%C (mass fraction) steel after laser shock processing (LSP) with different laser pulse energies were investigated by scanning electron microscopy(SEM), transmission electron microscopy(TEM), X-ray diffraction(XRD) and microhardness measurements. After LSP, the cementite lamellae were bent, kinked and broken into particles. Fragmentation and dissolution of the cementite lamellae were enhanced by increasing the laser pulse energy. Due to the dissolution of carbon atoms in the ferritic matrix, the lattice parameter ofα-Fe increased. The grain size of the surface ferrite was refined, and the microstructure changed from lamellae to ultrafine micro-duplex structure (ferrite (α)+cementite (θ)) with higher laser pulse energy, accompanied by the residual stress and microhardness increase.

  13. Influence of high deformation on the microstructure of low-carbon steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Florin Popa; Ionel Chicina; Dan Frunz; Ioan Nicodim; Dorel Banabic

    2014-01-01

    Low-carbon steel sheets DC04 used in the automotive industry were subjected to cold rolling for thickness reduction from 20%to 89%. The desired thickness was achieved by successive reductions using a rolling mill. The influence of thickness reduction on the micro-structure was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Microstructure evolution was characterized by the distortion of grains and the occur-rence of the oriented grain structure for high cold work. A mechanism of grain restructuring for high cold work was described. The occur-rence of voids was discussed in relation with cold work. The evolution of voids at the grain boundaries and inside the grains was also consid-ered. To characterize the grain size, the Feret diameter was measured and the grain size distribution versus cold work was discussed. The chemical homogeneity of the sample was also analyzed.

  14. Effect of Mo Content on Microstructure and Property of Low-Carbon Bainitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijiang Hu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, three low-carbon bainitic steels, with different Mo contents, were designed to investigate the effects of Mo addition on microstructure and mechanical properties. Two-step cooling, i.e., initial accelerated cooling and subsequent slow cooling, was used to obtain the desired bainite microstructure. The results show that the product of strength and elongation first increases and then shows no significant change with increasing Mo. Compared with Mo-free steel, bainite in the Mo-containing steel tends to have a lath-like morphology due to a decrease in the bainitic transformation temperature. More martensite transformation occurs with the increasing Mo, resulting in greater hardness of the steel. Both the strength and elongation of the steel can be enhanced by Mo addition; however, the elongation may decrease with a further increase in Mo. From a practical viewpoint, the content of Mo could be ~0.14 wt. % for the composition design of low-carbon bainitic steels in the present work. To be noted, an optimal scheme may need to consider other situations such as the role of sheet thickness, toughness behavior and so on, which could require changes in the chemistry. Nevertheless, these results provide a reference for the composition design and processing method of low-carbon bainitic steels.

  15. Effects of Carbon Nanotubes on Mechanical and 2D-3D Microstructure Properties of Cement Mortar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qiaoling; SUN Wei; JIANG Hao; WANG Caihui

    2014-01-01

    To study the influence of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the mechanical and microstructural properties of cementitious composites, 0.00, 0.02, 0.08, 0.10, and 0.20 wt% of multi-wall carbon nanotubes were added into cement mortar, in which the cement-sand ratio was 1:1.5. The flexural and compressive strengths of cement mortar at the age of 3, 7, 28 and 90 d and the fracture performance at the age of 28 d were determined, its 2D micrograph was tested by means of SEM, and the 3D defects distribution was firstly determined with or without CNTs by means of XCT (X-ray computerized tomography). The results showed that 0.08 wt% of CNTs improved the compressive strength and flexural strength by 18% and 19%, respectively, and a significant improvement of its fracture property was observed. Moreover lower addition of carbon nanotubes to cement mortars can improve its microstructure and decrease the defects significantly compared to the cement mortar without CNTs. With the increase of the content of CNTs, the mechanical properties of cement mortars presented to be declined largely due to the agglomeration of CNTs.

  16. Microstructural characteristics of an AZ91 matrix-glassy carbon particle composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszowka-Myalska, Anita; Myalski, Jerzy; Botor-Probierz, Agnieszka [Faculty of Materials Sciences and Metallurgy, Silesian University of Technology (Poland)

    2010-07-15

    This paper presents the results of a microstructural investigation of a new type of ultralight glassy carbon particles (C{sub p})-AZ91 magnesium alloy matrix composite manufactured by the powder metallurgy method. Glassy C{sub p} with unmodified surfaces and surfaces modified with SiO{sub 2} amorphous nanocoating were used in the experiment. The composite microstructure, with an emphasis given on the interface, was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), TEM, and HRTEM microscopy. Uniform distribution of the particles in the matrix and their good bonding with the metal matrix were observed. A continuous very thin MgO oxide layer containing needle-like Al{sub 2}MgO{sub 4} phase was detected at the glassy carbon-AZ91 interface. An increase of aluminum concentration at the interface as a result of Mg and Al diffusion into the SiO{sub 2} nanolayer was observed in the case of particles modified with SiO{sub 2}. Crystalline phases containing carbon were not detected at the interface. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Carbonate microstructure determination by inversion of acoustic and electrical data: Application to a south Florida aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazatchenko, E.; Markov, M.; Mousatov, A.; Parra, J.

    2006-05-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a petrophysical inversion technique to reconstruct the secondary pore-space microstructure in carbonate double-porosity aquifers. This technique consists of the joint inversion of acoustic (P- and S-wave velocities) and electrical resistivity well logs using a unified pore-space model and a self-consistent effective media approximation for theoretically calculating the elastic moduli and electrical conductivity. We invert experimental well log data from a South Florida aquifer in the western Hillsboro Basin of Palm Beach County, Florida. The inversion results allow us to find the detailed vertical distribution of primary and secondary porosities in the carbonate aquifer formation associated with high total porosity. The secondary-porosity system of this formation has a complex microstructure and corresponds to a model with two types of pore shapes: cracks approximated by flattered ellipsoids, and spheroid-shaped vugs. The quantitative pore-structure characteristics agreed with the qualitative description of computed tomography core images and optical microscope thin sections. The relationship between primary and secondary porosities is an important and informative characteristic of carbonate formations that demonstrates a good correlation with nuclear magnetic resonance-derived permeability. This suggests that knowledge of a formation's different porosities can be used to infer relative formation permeability, based on a joint inversion of acoustic and resistivity well logs.

  18. Carbon dioxide gas sensor derived from a 547-hole microstructured polymer optical fiber preform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Lili

    2010-10-01

    In this Letter, we report a carbon dioxide gas sensor having 547 pieces of thin-film modified capillaries, which are derived from a microstructured polymer optical fiber preform. Compared with the conventional absorption-based sensor, the monolithic polymer capillary waveguide arrays have better sensitivity, because the huge sensing surfaces, composed of 547 pieces of dye-indicator-doped porous ethyl cellulose layers, interact directly with the gas molecules. As far as we know, a gas sensor based on multichannel capillary waveguide arrays has not been reported before.

  19. Fabrication method and microstructural characteristics of coal-tar-pitch-based 2D carbon/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeeli, Mohammad; Khosravi, Hamed; Mirhabibi, Alireza

    2015-02-01

    The lignin-cellulosic texture of wood was used to produce two-dimensional (2D) carbon/carbon (C/C) composites using coal tar pitch. Ash content tests were conducted to select two samples among the different kinds of woods present in Iran, including walnut, white poplar, cherry, willow, buttonwood, apricots, berry, and blue wood. Walnut and white poplar with ash contents of 1.994wt% and 0.351wt%, respectively, were selected. The behavior of these woods during pyrolysis was investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermo gravimetric (TG) analysis. The bulk density and open porosity were measured after carbonization and densification. The microstructural characteristics of samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The results indicate that the density of both the walnut and white poplar is increased, and the open porosity is decreased with the increasing number of carbonization cycles. The XRD patterns of the wood charcoal change gradually with increasing pyrolysis temperature, possibly as a result of the ultra-structural changes in the charcoal or the presence of carbonized coal tar pitch in the composite's body.

  20. Electrochemical, morphological and microstructural characterization of carbon film resistor electrodes for application in electrochemical sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouveia-Caridade, Carla [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal); Soares, David M. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Unicamp, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Liess, Hans-Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Fakultaet fuer Elektrotechnik, Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Brett, Christopher M.A. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal)], E-mail: brett@ci.uc.pt

    2008-08-15

    The electrochemical and microstructural properties of carbon film electrodes made from carbon film electrical resistors of 1.5, 15, 140 {omega} and 2.0 k{omega} nominal resistance have been investigated before and after electrochemical pre-treatment at +0.9 V vs SCE, in order to assess the potential use of these carbon film electrodes as electrochemical sensors and as substrates for sensors and biosensors. The results obtained are compared with those at electrodes made from previously investigated 2 {omega} carbon film resistors. Cyclic voltammetry was performed in acetate buffer and phosphate buffer saline electrolytes and the kinetic parameters of the model redox system Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-/4-} obtained. The 1.5 {omega} resistor electrodes show the best properties for sensor development with wide potential windows, similar electrochemical behaviour to those of 2 {omega} and close-to-reversible kinetic parameters after electrochemical pre-treatment. The 15 and 140 {omega} resistor electrodes show wide potential windows although with slower kinetics, whereas the 2.0 k{omega} resistor electrodes show poor cyclic voltammetric profiles even after pre-treatment. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy related these findings to the interfacial properties of the electrodes. Microstructural and morphological studies were carried out using contact mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Confocal Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. AFM showed more homogeneity of the films with lower nominal resistances, related to better electrochemical characteristics. X-ray diffraction and Confocal Raman spectroscopy indicate the existence of a graphitic structure in the carbon films.

  1. SUPPORTED CATALYST WITHOUT EXTERNAL ELECTRON DONOR FOR PROPYLENE POLYMERIZATION Ⅱ. TACTICITY DISTRIBUTION AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF POLYPROPYLENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Propylene was polymerized with a novel supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst containing 2,2-di-iso-butyl-1,3-dimethoxy-propane (DIBDMP) as internal donor and in the absence of external donor. The tacticity distribution of polypropylene was obtained by using temperature rising elution fractionation (TREF) technique and microstructure of fractions was studied with 13C-NMR. Compared with the catalyst without electron donor, this catalyst gives a considerably narrower tacticity distribution. Fractionation data demonstrate that DIBDMP shows better performance than aromatic diester DNBP (di-n-butyl phthalate). Chemically inverted propylene units and less stereoblockiness are found in the first fraction. Possible reasons for these were presented.

  2. Microstructure of carbon derived from mangrove charcoal and its application in Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Tao [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100083 (China); Luo Ruiying, E-mail: ryluo@buaa.edu.c [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100083 (China); Qiao Wenming [College of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Yoon, Seong-Ho; Mochida, Isao [Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2010-02-01

    In this study, the microstructure of mangrove-charcoal-derived carbon (MC) was studied using XRD, STM and TEM. MC was found to consist of aligned quasi-spherical structural units with diameters of around 5-20 nm. It shows typical hard carbon characteristics, including a strongly disoriented single graphene layer and BSU, formed by two or three graphene layers stacked nearly parallel. Some curved and faceted graphene layers, especially closed carbon nanoparticles with fullerene-like, were observed in the as-prepared samples. MC was also evaluated as an anodic material for Li-ion batteries. MC carbonized at 1000 deg. C possessed the highest available discharge capacity (below 0.5 V) of 335 mAh g{sup -1}, the high first-cycle coulombic efficiency of 73.7%, good rate and cyclic capability and PC-based electrolyte compatibility. {sup 7}Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of fully lithiated mangrove charcoal-derived carbons indicated the co-existence of three Li species.

  3. 2D SAXS/WAXD ANALYSIS OF PAN CARBON FIBER MICROSTRUCTURE IN ORGANIC/INORGANIC TRANSFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai-zhen Zhu; Xiao-lan Yu; Xiao-fang Liu; Yun-zen Mao; Rui-gang Liu; Ning Zhao; Xiao-li Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Structure of PAN fibers during pre-oxidation and carbonization was studied using two dimensional small angle X-ray scattering/wide angle X-ray diffraction (2D SAXS/WAXD).The SAXS results show that during pre-oxidation between 180 ℃ and 275 ℃,the volume content of microvoids increases with the temperature increasing,which may be one of reasons for the decrease of tensile strength of pre-oxidized fibers.253 ℃ was the critical transition temperature,the length,diameter,aspect ratio and orientation distribution of microvoids increased with temperature before this temperature and decreased after this temperature.After the high temperature carbonization,lots of spindly microvoids formed.WAXD patterns demonstrate that the crystallite size of PAN fibers first increased before 230 ℃ and then decreased with the increase of temperature during the pre-oxidation.The diffraction peak of PAN fibers at 2θ ≈ 17 almost disappeared at the end of preoxidation while the diffraction peak of aromatic structure at 2θ ≈ 25 appeared at 253 ℃.During carbonization,the peak intensity at 2θ ≈ 25 increased apparently due to the formation of graphite structure.The results obtained give a deep understanding of the microstructure development in the PAN fibers during pre-oxidation and carbonization,which is important for the preparation of high performance carbon fibers.

  4. Controllable synthesis of spongy carbon nanotube blocks with tunable macro- and microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Xuchun; Lin, Zhiqiang; Zeng, Zhiping; Wang, Kunlin; Wu, Dehai; Tang, Zikang

    2013-03-01

    Macroscopic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with uniform structures are in great demand for use in composites and environmental materials. Here we demonstrate the controlled synthesis of spongy CNT blocks with isotropic properties and flexible, freestanding structures. The formation mechanism of the isotropic CNT sponges is discussed, based on its open-ended structure and initial formation in the vapor phase. The microstructure of the CNT sponges can be tuned by changing the flow rate of the carrier gas, resulting in CNT sponges with diameters ranging from 30.2 to 47.8 nm and wall thicknesses from 7 to 16 nm. The bulk density (5-25 mg cm(-3)), mechanical strength of the CNT sponges, and filling rate of ferromagnetic catalyst in the CNT sponges can also be modulated by controlling the supply rate of the carbon source, suggesting potential applications in mechanical energy absorption and environmental materials.

  5. Microstructure and properties of pure iron/copper composite cladding layers on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Long; Huang, Yong-xian; Lü, Shi-xiong; Huang, Ti-fang; Lü, Zong-liang

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, pure iron/copper composite metal cladding was deposited onto carbon steel by tungsten inert gas welding. The study focused on interfacial morphological, microstructural, and mechanical analyses of the composite cladding layers. Iron liquid-solid-phase zones were formed at copper/steel and iron interfaces because of the melting of the steel substrate and iron. Iron concentrated in the copper cladding layer was observed to exhibit belt, globule, and dendrite morphologies. The appearance of iron-rich globules indicated the occurrence of liquid phase separation (LPS) prior to solidification, and iron-rich dendrites crystallized without the occurrence of LPS. The maximum microhardness of the iron/steel interface was lower than that of the copper/steel interface because of the diffusion of elemental carbon. All samples fractured in the cladding layers. Because of a relatively lower strength of the copper layer, a short plateau region appeared when shear movement was from copper to iron.

  6. Effect of boron doping in the carbon support on platinum nanoparticles and carbon corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Chethan K.; Li, Wei; Kwon, Gihan; Heath Turner, C.; Lane, Alan M.; Klein, Tonya [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Liu, Zhufang; Nikles, David [Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Weaver, Mark [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Carbon supported catalysts can lose their activity over a period of time due to the sintering of the nanometer-sized catalyst particles. The sintering of metal clusters on carbon supports can occur due to the weak interaction between the metal and the support and also due to the corrosion of carbon, especially in fuel cell electrocatalysts. The sintering may be reduced by increasing the interaction between the metal and the support and also by increasing the corrosion resistance of carbon supports. In an effort to mitigate the growth of the nanoparticles, carbon-substituted boron defects were introduced in the carbon lattice. The interaction between the Pt nanoparticles on the pure and boron-doped carbon supports was examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that the interaction between the Pt nanoparticles and the boron-doped carbon support was slightly stronger than the interaction between the Pt nanoparticles and the pure carbon support. Also, by using accelerated aging tests, the boron-doped system was found to be more resistant to carbon corrosion when compared to the pristine carbon-supported Pt catalyst. (author)

  7. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Resistance Spot Welding Joints of Carbonitrided Low-Carbon Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taweejun, Nipon; Poapongsakorn, Piyamon; Kanchanomai, Chaosuan

    2017-04-01

    Carbonitrided low-carbon steels are resistance welded in various engineering components. However, there are no reports on the microstructure and mechanical properties of their resistance spot welding (RSW) joints. Therefore, various carbonitridings were performed on the low-carbon steel sheets, and then various RSWs were applied to these carbonitrided sheets. The metallurgical and mechanical properties of the welding joint were investigated and discussed. The peak load and failure energy increased with the increases of welding current and fusion zone (FZ) size. At 11 kA welding current, the carbonitrided steel joint had the failure energy of 16 J, i.e., approximately 84 pct of untreated steel joint. FZ of carbonitrided steel joint consisted of ferrite, Widmanstatten ferrite, and untempered martensite, i.e., the solid-state transformation products, while the microstructure at the outer surfaces consisted of untempered martensite and retained austenite. The surface hardening of carbonitrided steel after RSW could be maintained, i.e., approximately 810 HV. The results can be applied to carbonitriding and RSW to achieve a good welding joint.

  8. Microstructural evidence for seismic and aseismic slips along clay-bearing, carbonate faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeraglia, Luca; Bettucci, Andrea; Billi, Andrea; Carminati, Eugenio; Cavallo, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio; Natali, Marco; Passeri, Daniele; Rossi, Marco; Spagnuolo, Elena

    2017-05-01

    In this multimethodological study, microstructural observations of fault rocks are combined with micromechanical property analyses (contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM)) and with rotary friction experiments (Slow- to High-Velocity rotary-shear friction Apparatus apparatus) to find evidence of seismic to aseismic slip and understand the nanoscale rheology of clay-bearing, carbonate-hosted faults. Fluidized structures, truncated clasts, pores and vesicles, and phyllosilicate nanosized spherules and tubes suggest fast deformation events occurred during seismic slip, whereas clay-assisted pressure-solution processes, clumped clasts, foliation surfaces, and mantled clasts indicate slow deformation events occurred during postseismic/interseismic periods. CR-AFM measurements show that the occurrence of 5 wt % of clay within the carbonate-hosted gouges can significantly reduce the fault core stiffness at nanoscale. In addition, during high-velocity friction experiments simulating seismic slip conditions, the presence of ultrathin phyllosilicate-bearing (≤3 wt %) layers within calcite gouges, as those observed in the natural fault, show faster dynamic weakening than that of pure calcite gouges. The weak behavior of such layers could facilitate the upward propagation of seismic slip during earthquakes, thus possibly enhancing surface faulting. Microstructural observations and experimental evidence fit some well-known geophysical and geodetic observations on the short- to long-term mechanical behavior of faults such as postseismic/interseismic aseismic creep, interseismic fault locking, and seismic slip propagation up to the Earth's surface.

  9. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  10. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huan [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Tang, Xiaobin, E-mail: tangxiaobin@nuaa.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing (China); Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Chen, Da [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • Various incident sites of CNTs are classified into three types for the first time. • Different ion energies and fluences are considered to study the radiation damage. • CNTs have ability to heal the radiation-induced damage at higher temperature. • Stability of a large-diameter tube excels in a slim one under the same conditions. - Abstract: The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  11. Evaluation of Microstructure and Wear Properties of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy Plasma Carbonized at Different Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; WEI Qiulan; XING Yazhe; JIANG Chaoping; LI Xinghang; ZHAO Zhiyu

    2015-01-01

    Ti-6Al-4V (TC4) alloys were plasma carbonized at different temperatures (900, 950, and 1 000ć) for duration of 3 h. Graphite rod was employed as carbon supplier to avoid the hydrogen brittleness which is ubiquitous in traditional gas carbonizing process. Two distinguished structures including a thin compound layer (carbides layer) and a thick layer with the mixed microstructure of TiC and theα-Ti in carburing layer were formed during carburizing. Furthermore, it was found that the microstructure and the properties of TC4 alloy were signifi cantly related to the carbonizing temperature. The specimen plasma carbonized at 950ć obtained maximum value both in the hardness and wear resistance.

  12. Production of Carbon Nanofibers Using a CVD Method with Lithium Fluoride as a Supported Cobalt Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Manafi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofibers (CNFs have been synthesized in high yield (>70% by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD on Co/LiF catalyst using acetylene as carbon source. A novel catalyst support (LiF is reported for the first time as an alternative for large-scale production of carbon nanofibers while purification process of nanofibers is easier. In our experiment, the sealed furnace was heated at 700∘C for 0.5 hour (the heating rate was 10∘C/min and then cooled to room temperature in the furnace naturally. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition is of interest for fundamental understanding and improvement of commercial synthesis of carbon nanofibers (CNFs. The obtained sample was sequentially washed with ethanol, dilutes acid, and distilled water to remove residual impurities, amorphous carbon materials, and remaining of catalyst, and then dried at 110∘C for 24 hours. The combined physical characterization through several techniques, such as high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM, scanning electron microscope (SEM, thermogarvimetric analysis (TGA, and zeta-sizer and Raman spectroscopy, allows determining the geometric characteristic and the microstructure of individual carbon nanofibers. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition is of interest for fundamental understanding and improvement of commercial synthesis of carbon nanofibers (CNFs. As a matter of fact, the method of CCVD guarantees the production of CNFs for different applications.

  13. Microstructure and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films machined by femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Chunhui [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Liu, Yongsheng, E-mail: yongshengliu@nwpu.edu.cn [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Cheng, Laifei [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Li, Weinan [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China); Zhang, Qing [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Yang, Xiaojun [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. • The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. And the number of nanoparticles increased with the processing power as well. • It revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. • It showed that a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser is of great interest for machining high melting point and hardness materials such as diamond-like carbon, SiC ceramic, et al. In present work, the microstructural and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films were investigated using electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques after machined by diverse femtosecond laser power in air. The results showed the machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. Considering the D and G Raman band parameters on the laser irradiation, it revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment.

  14. Magnesium substitution in carbonated hydroxyapatite: Structural and microstructural characterization by Rietveld's refinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lala, S. [Materials Science Division, Department of Physics, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, M.; Das, P.K. [Department of Biological Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Das, D. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata 700098 (India); Kar, T. [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Pradhan, S.K., E-mail: skpradhan@phys.buruniv.ac.in [Materials Science Division, Department of Physics, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India)

    2016-02-15

    Four stoichiometric compositions of nanocrystalline Mg doped carbonated hydroxyapatite (cHAp) powders are synthesized by mechanical alloying (ball milling) the powder mixtures of CaCO{sub 3}, CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O and MgO in open air at room temperature. FTIR analysis confirms the A-type carbonation in all milled HAp powder samples (A-cHAp). Microstructure characterization in terms of lattice imperfections and phase quantification of ball milled samples are made by analyzing XRD patterns employing Rietveld's structure refinement method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of 15 mol % Mg doped A-cHAp sample reveals microstructure similar to that obtained from XRD pattern analysis. Cumulative effect of Mg substitution and mechanical alloying results in amorphization of a major part of crystalline A-cHAp, analogous to native bone mineral. Rietveld analysis reveals that the Ca2 vacancy site is energetically more favorable for occupation of Mg substitution. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay test reveals sufficiently high percentage cell viability confirming the cytocompatibility of the sample. - Graphical abstract: Mg substitution for Ca2 site. - Highlights: • Single phase Mg doped A-cHAp synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA). • FTIR analysis confirms A-type carbonation in HAp. • Amorphization of a part of crystalline A-cHAp due to MA and Mg insertion. • Mg{sup 2+} ions substitute the Ca2 vacancy site. • High cell viability under MTT assay.

  15. Carbon-Supported Iron Oxide Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meaz, T.; Mørup, Steen; Koch, C. Bender

    1996-01-01

    A carbon black ws impregnated with 6 wt% iron using an aqueous solution of iron nitrate. The impregnated carbon was initially dried at 125 C. The effect of heating of the iron oxide phase was investigated at temperatures between 200 and 600 C using Mossbauer spectroscopy. All heat treatments were...... done in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. Ferrihydrite is formed and is stable at and below a temperature of 300 C. At 600 C small particles of maghemite is the dominant iron oxide. A transformation reaction is suggested....

  16. Carbon-Supported Iron Oxide Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meaz, T.; Mørup, Steen; Koch, C. Bender

    1996-01-01

    A carbon black ws impregnated with 6 wt% iron using an aqueous solution of iron nitrate. The impregnated carbon was initially dried at 125 C. The effect of heating of the iron oxide phase was investigated at temperatures between 200 and 600 C using Mossbauer spectroscopy. All heat treatments were...... done in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. Ferrihydrite is formed and is stable at and below a temperature of 300 C. At 600 C small particles of maghemite is the dominant iron oxide. A transformation reaction is suggested....

  17. Effect of carbon on microstructure of CrAlCχN1-χ coatings by hybrid coating system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung-Kyu AHN; Se-Hun KWON; Kwang-Ho KIM

    2011-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the microstructure of CrAICχN1-χ coatings as a function of carbon contents was conducted.Quaternary CrAICχN1-χ coatings were deposited on Si wafers by a hybrid coating system combining an arc-ion plating technique and a DC reactive magnetron sputtering technique using Cr and Al targets in the Ar/N2/CH4 gaseous mixture. The effect of carbon content on microstructure of CrAICχN1-χ coatings was investigated with instrumental analyses of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the carbon content of CrAICχN1-χ coatings linearly increases with increasing CH4/(CH4/N2) gas flow rate ratio. The surface roughness of the CrAICχN 1-χ coating layer decreases with the increase of carbon content.

  18. What Carbon Sources Support Groundwater Microbial Activity in Riparian Forests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurwick, N. P.; Groffman, P. M.; McCorkle, D. C.; Stolt, M. H.; Kellogg, D. Q.; Gold, A. J.

    2004-05-01

    A major question in riparian research is the source of energy to support subsurface microbial denitrification activity. The supply of microbially-available carbon frequently limits microbial activity in the subsurface. Therefore, identifying the relative importance of carbon sources in the riparian subsurface helps explain the sustainability and spatial heterogeneity of denitrification rates. We have investigated the importance of buried, carbon-rich soil horizons, deep roots and dissolved organic carbon as potential carbon sources to support groundwater denitrification in riparian forests in Rhode Island. We used field observations, laboratory incubations and in-situ experiments to evaluate these sources at four sites in different geomorphic settings. In particular, we measured the 14C-DIC signature and DIC concentration of ambient groundwater and groundwater that had been degassed, re-introduced into the well, and incubated in-situ. Buried horizons appear to be an important source of carbon in the subsurface, as shown by active respiration in laboratory incubations; greater microbial biomass in buried carbon-rich soils compared to surrounding carbon-poor soils; and the presence of very old carbon (>1,000 ybp) in DIC 225 cm beneath the surface. DIC collected from shallower wells showed no clear evidence of ancient carbon. Roots also appear to be important, creating hotspots of carbon availability and denitrification in the generally carbon poor subsurface matrix. Dissolved organic carbon did not stimulate denitrification in aquifer microcosms in the laboratory, suggesting that this was not an important carbon source for denitrification in our sites. Determining which carbon source is fueling denitrification has practical implications. Where buried horizons are the key source, surface management of the riparian zone will likely have little direct influence on groundwater denitrification. Where roots are the key source, changes in the plant community are likely to

  19. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Warm-Sprayed Titanium Coating on Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Amirthan; Takuma, Okada; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Polymer materials are increasingly dominating various engineering fields. Recently, polymer-based composite materials' surface performances—in particular, surface in relative motion—have been improved markedly by thermal spray coating. Despite this recent progress, the deposition of high-strength materials—producing a coating thickness of the order of more than 500 μm—remains highly challenging. In the present work, a highly dense and thick titanium coating was successfully deposited onto the carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) substrate using a newly developed high-pressure warm spray (WS) system. The coating properties, such as hardness (300 ± 20 HV) and adhesion strength (8.1 ± 0.5 MPa), were evaluated and correlated with the microstructures of the coating. In addition, a wipe-test and in situ particle velocity and temperature measurement were performed to validate the particle deposition behavior as a function of the nitrogen flow rate in the WS system. It was found that the microstructures, deposition efficiency, and mechanical properties of the coatings were highly sensitive to nitrogen flow rates. The coating porosity increased with increasing nitrogen flow rates; however, the highest density was observed for nitrogen flow rate of 1000 standard liters per minute (SLM) samples due to the high fraction of semi-molten particles in the spray stream.

  20. Effect of casting technology on microstructure and phases of high carbon high speed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tianming

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The as-cast microstructures of high carbon high speed steels (HC-HSS made by sand casting, centrifugal casting and electromagnetic centrifugal casting, respectively, were studied by using of optical microscopy (OM and D/max2200pc X-ray diffraction. The results show that the microstructure of as-cast HC-HSS is dominated by alloy carbides (W2C, VC, Cr7C3, martensite and austenite. The centrifugal casting and electromagnetic centrifugal casting apparently improve the solidification structure of HC-HSS. With the increase of magnetic intensity (B, the volume fraction of austenite in the HC-HSS solidification structure increases significantly while the eutectic ledeburite decreases. Moreover, the secondary carbides precipitated from the austenite are finer with more homogeneous distribution in the electromagnetic centrifugal castings. It has also been found that the lath of eutectic carbide in ledeburite becomes finer and carbide phase spacing in eutectic ledeburite increases along with the higher magnetic field strength.

  1. Microstructure and performance of multiwalled carbon nanotube/m-aramid composite films as electric heating elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Young Gyu; Jeon, Gil Woo

    2013-07-24

    We report microstructure of thermomechanically stable multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) (m-aramid) composite films containing 0.0-10.0 wt % MWCNTs and their performance as electric heating elements. FE-SEM images show that the MWCNTs are well dispersed in the composite films and are wrapped with m-aramid chains and that the interfacial thickness of m-aramid wrapped MWCNTs decreases with the MWCNT content. The electrical resistivity of films varies from ∼10(13) Ω cm for the neat m-aramid to ∼10(0) Ω cm of the film with 10.0 wt % MWCNT owing to the formation of a conductive three-dimensional network of MWCNTs. Accordingly, the performance of MWCNT/m-aramid films as electric heating elements is strongly dependent on MWCNT content as well as applied voltage. For the composite film with 10.0 wt % MWCNT, a maximum temperature of ∼176 °C is attained even at a low applied voltage of 10 V. The excellent performance such as rapid temperature response and high electric power efficiency at given applied voltages is found to be related with the microstructural features of the MWCNT/m-aramid films.

  2. Microstructure and texture evolution during tensile deformation of symmetric/asymmetric-rolled low carbon microalloyed steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Minghui, E-mail: minghui.cai@deakin.edu.au [Institute for Frontier Materials (IFM), Deakin University, Geelong VIC 3217 (Australia); Wei, Xing [R & D Centre of Wuhan Iron & Steel (Group) Corp (WISCO), Wuhan 430080 (China); Rolfe, Bernard [Institute for Frontier Materials (IFM), Deakin University, Geelong VIC 3217 (Australia); Hodgson, Peter D., E-mail: minghui.cai@deakin.edu.au [Institute for Frontier Materials (IFM), Deakin University, Geelong VIC 3217 (Australia)

    2015-08-12

    The deformation and fracture mechanisms of a low carbon microalloyed steel processed by asymmetric rolling (AsR) and symmetric rolling (SR) were compared by microstructural and texture evolutions during uniaxial tensile deformation. A realistic microstructure-based micromechanical modeling was involved as well. AsR provides more effective grain refinement and beneficial shear textures, leading to higher ductility and extraordinary strain hardening with improved yield and ultimate tensile stresses as well as promoting the occurrence of ductile fracture. This was verified and further explained by means of the different fracture modes during quasi-static uniaxial deformation, the preferred void nucleation sites and crack propagation behavior, and the change in the dislocation density based on the kernel average misorientation (KAM) distribution. The equivalent strain/stress partitioning during tensile deformation of AsR and SR specimens was modeled based on a two-dimensional (2D) representative volume element (RVE) approach. The trend of strain/stress partitioning in the ferrite matrix agrees well with the experimental results.

  3. Microstructural Characterization of Aluminum-Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites Produced Using Different Dispersion Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Sónia; Viana, Filomena; Reis, Marcos A L; Vieira, Manuel F

    2016-06-01

    This research focuses on characterization of the impact of dispersion methods on aluminum-carbon nanotubes (Al-CNTs) nanocomposite structure. Nanocomposites were produced by a conventional powder metallurgy process after the dispersion of the CNTs on the Al powders, using two approaches: (1) the dispersion of CNTs and mixture with Al powders were performed in a single step by ultrasonication; and (2) the CNTs were previously untangled by ultrasonication and then mixed with Al powders by ball milling. Microstructural characterization of Al-CNT nanocomposites was performed by optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Microstructural characterization revealed that the use of ball milling for mixing CNTs with Al powders promoted the formation of CNT clusters of reduced size, more uniformly dispersed in the matrix, and a nanocomposite of smaller grain size. However, the results of HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy show that ball milling causes higher damage to the CNT structure. The strengthening effect of the CNT is attested by the increase in hardness and tensile strength of the nanocomposites.

  4. Self-assembly of biomorphic carbon/sulfur microstructures in sulfidic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmidis, Julie; Templeton, Alexis S.

    2016-09-01

    In natural and laboratory-based environments experiencing sustained counter fluxes of sulfide and oxidants, elemental sulfur (S0)--a key intermediate in the sulfur cycle--can commonly accumulate. S0 is frequently invoked as a biomineralization product generated by enzymatic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides. Here we show the formation of S0 encapsulated in nanometre to micrometre-scale tubular and spherical organic structures that self-assemble in sulfide gradient environments in the absence of any direct biological activity. The morphology and composition of these carbon/sulfur microstructures so closely resemble microbial cellular and extracellular structures that new caution must be applied to the interpretation of putative microbial biosignatures in the fossil record. These reactions between sulfide and organic matter have important implications for our understanding of S0 mineralization processes and sulfur interactions with organic carbon in the environment. They furthermore provide a new pathway for the synthesis of carbon-sulfur nanocomposites for energy storage technologies.

  5. Super-elastic and fatigue resistant carbon material with lamellar multi-arch microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huai-Ling; Zhu, Yin-Bo; Mao, Li-Bo; Wang, Feng-Chao; Luo, Xi-Sheng; Liu, Yang-Yi; Lu, Yang; Pan, Zhao; Ge, Jin; Shen, Wei; Zheng, Ya-Rong; Xu, Liang; Wang, Lin-Jun; Xu, Wei-Hong; Wu, Heng-An; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-09-01

    Low-density compressible materials enable various applications but are often hindered by structure-derived fatigue failure, weak elasticity with slow recovery speed and large energy dissipation. Here we demonstrate a carbon material with microstructure-derived super-elasticity and high fatigue resistance achieved by designing a hierarchical lamellar architecture composed of thousands of microscale arches that serve as elastic units. The obtained monolithic carbon material can rebound a steel ball in spring-like fashion with fast recovery speed (~580 mm s-1), and demonstrates complete recovery and small energy dissipation (~0.2) in each compress-release cycle, even under 90% strain. Particularly, the material can maintain structural integrity after more than 106 cycles at 20% strain and 2.5 × 105 cycles at 50% strain. This structural material, although constructed using an intrinsically brittle carbon constituent, is simultaneously super-elastic, highly compressible and fatigue resistant to a degree even greater than that of previously reported compressible foams mainly made from more robust constituents.

  6. Microstructure of polyacrylonitrile-based activated carbon fibers prepared from solvent-free coagulation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norhaniza Yusof

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylonitrile precursor fibers prepared using a solvent-free coagulation process were stabilized, carbonized, and physically activated by carbon dioxide into activated carbon fibers (ACFs. The activation temperature varied from 600 to 900 °C while the activation time was 1 h. Atomic force microscopy was used to observe the surface morphology, as well as the surface roughness of the ACFs. Higher pyrolysis temperature formed rougher surfaces, and increased the pore sizes. Meanwhile, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed more conversion of oxygen containing functional groups to carbonaceous materials as the activation temperature increased. Moreover, the microstructure properties were thoroughly characterized by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and X-ray diffraction (XRD studies. XRD analysis showed that the activation of the ACFs shrank the ordered structure, reducing the D-spacing from 0.358 to 0.347 nm for the fibers prepared at activation temperatures of 600 to 900 °C. Meanwhile, XPS analysis concluded that that the oxygen containing functional groups were still retained even at high activation temperatures while the nitrogen containing functional groups were reduced during the high temperature activation in the CO2 atmosphere.

  7. The effect of metal microstructure on the initial attachment of Escherichia coli to 1010 carbon steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, M A; Stoddart, P R; McArthur, S L; Wade, S A

    2013-09-01

    Metallurgical features have been shown to play an important role in the attachment of microorganisms to metal surfaces. In the present study, the influence of the microstructure of as-received (AR) and heat-treated (HT) 1010 carbon steel on the initial attachment of bacteria was investigated. Heat treatment was carried out with the aim of increasing the grain size of the carbon steel coupons. Mirror-polished carbon steel coupons were immersed in a minimal medium inoculated with Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) to investigate the early (15, 30 and 60 min) and relatively longer-term (4 h) stages of bacterial attachment. The results showed preferential colonisation of bacteria on the grain boundaries of the steel coupons. The bacterial attachment to AR steel coupons was relatively uniform compared to the HT steel coupons where an increased number of localised aggregates of bacteria were found. Quantitative analysis showed that the ratio of the total number of isolated (i.e., single) bacteria to the number of bacteria in aggregates was significantly higher on the AR coupons than the HT coupons. Longer-term immersion studies showed production of extracellular polymeric substances by the bacteria and corrosion at the grain boundaries on both types of steel coupon tested.

  8. Effects of tantalum content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of low-carbon RAFM steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianguo; Liu, Chenxi; Liu, Yongchang; Yan, Biyu; Li, Huijun

    2016-10-01

    In order to explore the influence of tantalum content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of low carbon RAFM (reduced activation ferritic/martensitic) steels, three low carbon RAFM steels with different tantalum contents (0%, 0.027%, 0.073%) were designed. The precipitation behavior and effect of precipitates on the mechanical properties of the Low-C RAFM steel were investigated. The results indicate that increase of tantalum content causes decrease of the prior austenite grain size and the amount of M23C6 carbides precipitated along prior austenite grain boundaries and packet boundaries as well as increase of the amount of MX nano-sized particles within intragranular regions. The impact properties of low carbon RAFM steels are excellent regardless of the tantalum content. The impact properties and hardness are obviously improved by increasing tantalum content, which may be related to increase of the number of MX and decrease of M23C6. Furthermore, the tensile properties at elevated temperature below 600 °C are hardly changed with increase of tantalum content, yet those at 800 °C are improved with increasing tantalum content. This implies that MX carbides would be more important for tensile properties at higher temperature.

  9. Microstructural characterization of nanocrystalline gold particles supported on CoCr2O4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małecka, M A; Kepiński, L

    2010-03-01

    This work presents results of high-resolution transmission electron microscope investigations of microstructure evolution of Au/CoCr(2)O(4) catalyst subjected to various chemical treatments (reduction in hydrogen, reaction of propane oxidation and reaction of CO oxidation). Crystallites of CoCr(2)O(4) support have octahedral or truncated octahedral shape and exhibit well-developed faces, mostly (111). No change in the support morphology was noticed in catalyst samples after various chemical treatments. Small (approximately 8 nm) nanocrystals of gold supported on crystalline CoCr(2)O(4) were observed for the fresh sample. The nanoparticles grow at the surface of CoCr(2)O(4) as thin, disk-like crystallites, in the preferred (111)Au parallel(111)CoCr(2)O(4) epitaxial orientation. Further treatment in hydrogen and in reaction conditions (CO and propane oxidation) did not change noticeably the size of Au particles, but modified slightly their shape. A main reason why Au particles retain small size despite heat treatment is their epitaxial contact with the CoCr(2)O(4) support established during the catalyst preparation.

  10. Effects of oxygen and carbon on the magnetic properties and microstructure of Sm2Co17 permanent magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Jianjun; ZHANG Shengen; QU Xuanhui

    2007-01-01

    The research on the sintered Sm2Co17 permanent magnets prepared by metal injection molding is still at the exploratory stage. Carbon and oxygen are two key factors that influence the magnetic properties. In this article, the effects of oxygen and carbon on the properties and microstructure of the magnets have been studied. The results indicate that oxygen consumes the effective Sm content of the magnets and forms Sm2O3-the non-magnetism phase, which result in the deterioration of the magnetic properties. Besides, the magnetic properties decrease in evidence with increasing carbon content. The main factor that affects the magnetic properties is the deterioration of the microstructure of the magnets. The Sm(Co, Cu)5 phase decreases, whereas the cell size increases with the increase of the carbon content. When the carbon content is above 0.43 wt.%, the Sm(Co, Cu)5 phase is not enough to form a uniform cellular microstructure. Thus the magnetic properties disappear. ZrC is detected in the magnets by XRD when the carbon content is above 0.21 wt.%. ZrC also reduces the properties of the magnets.

  11. Electrical Resistance and Microstructure of Latex Modified Carbon Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Jian; CHENG Feng; YUAN Hudie

    2012-01-01

    The electrical resistance,flexural strength,and microstructure of carbon fiber reinforced cement composites (CFRC) were improved greatly by adding water-redispersible latex powder.The electrical resistance of CFRC was investigated by two-probe method.The input range of CFRC based strain sensors was therefore increased,whereas electrical resistance was increased and remained in the perfect range of CFRC sensors.The analysis of scanning electron microscopy indicated that elastic latex bridges and a latex layer existed among the interspaces of the adjacent cement hydration products which were responsible for the enhancement of the flexural strength and electrical resistance.The formation mechanism of the elastic latex bridges was also discussed in detail.The continuous moving of two opposite interfaces of the latex solution-air along the interspaces of the adjacent hydrated crystals or colloids was attributed to the formation of the elastic latex bridges.

  12. INFLUENCE OF THERMAL CYCLING ON MICROSTRUCTURE AND THERMAL EXPANSION OF CARBON FIBRES/COPPER COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Štefánik

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of copper matrix reinforced by high modulus carbon fibres (Thornel K1100 as well as the microstructure and dilatation changes during thermocycling is presented.Unidirectional composites with two types of matrix - pure copper and/or copper alloy with 0.2 wt. % of chromium - were thermally cycled between 30-600 °C three times.The composite with pure Cu exhibited larger voids and weak interfacial bonding. Due to the chemical reaction with K1100 fibres a reactive interfacial bonding has been formed. During thermocycling the hysteresis, but no large disintegration was observed. The coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs strongly depend on fibre orientation. In direction parallel to the fibre orientation in the temperature range of 220-500°C CTEs were very low (0.7-1.0x10-6/K, but in perpendicular direction the CTEs were higher than that of pure copper.

  13. Characterization of microstructure and mechanical behavior of sputter deposited Ti-containing amorphous carbon coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, B.; Cao, D. M.; Meng, W. J.; Xu, J.; Tittsworth, R. C.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Doll, G. L.; Materials Science Division; Louisiana State Univ.; The Timken Company

    2001-12-03

    We report on the characterization of microstructure and mechanical properties of sputter deposited Ti-containing amorphous carbon (Ti-aC) coatings as a function of Ti composition. Ti-aC coatings have been deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition, in an industrial-scale four-target coating deposition system. The composition and microstructure of the Ti-aC coatings have been characterized in detail by combining the techniques of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and hydrogen elastic recoil detection (ERD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. At Ti compositions <4at.%, Ti atoms dissolve in an amorphous carbon (a-C) matrix. The dissolution limit of Ti atoms in an a-C matrix is determined to be between 4 and 8 at.%. At Ti compositions >8 at.%, XANES and EXAFS data indicate that the average Ti atomic bonding environment in Ti-aC coatings resembles that in cubic B1-TiC, consistent with TEM observation of precipitation of TiC nanocrystallites in the a-C matrix. Beyond the Ti dissolution limit, the Ti-aC coatings are nanocomposites with nanocrystalline TiC clusters embedded in an a-C matrix. A large scale, quasi one-dimensional composition modulation in the Ti-aC coatings was observed due to the particular coating deposition geometry. Elastic stiffness and hardness of the Ti-aC coatings were measured by instrumented nanoindentation and found to vary systematically as a function of Ti composition. Unlubricated friction coefficient of Ti-aC coatings against WC-Co balls was found to increase as the Ti composition increases. As Ti composition increases, the overall mechanical behavior of the Ti-aC coatings becomes more TiC-like.

  14. On the Effect of Carbon Content to the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Green Compacts Formed at above Ambient Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mujibur Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction force is generated during the generation of green compacts from metal powder, which obviously gives adverse effect to the mechanical properties and microstructure of the green compacts. In this study, fine carbon powder is used to minimize the interparticle as well as die wall frictions and as alloying element hence high density yet defect-free near-net shape or net shape mechanical components can be produced. Powder forming at elevated temperature is a relatively new technology hence the effect of carbon content is not fully explored yet. Therefore, a lab scale warm compaction rig is designed and fabricated which enabled the generation of green compacts at different forming load and temperature. The powder mass was prepared by mechanically mixing iron ASC 100.29 powder with different weight percent of fine carbon powder for different duration of time. The prepared powder mass was formed at different compaction temperature to generate green compacts for the purpose of mechanical testing and microstructure evaluation. The results revealed that the mechanical properties and microstructures of green compacts are affected by the carbon content, mixing time, as well as forming temperature. From this study, the suitable carbon content, mixing time, and forming temperature are identified for the production of high quality mechanical components.

  15. An Electron Microscopy Study of Vein-like Grain Boundary Microstructure in Nitrocarburized Low Carbon Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanglin Chen; Cuilan Wu; Jianghua Chen; Aigui He

    2013-01-01

    The coarsened grain boundaries (GBs) with vein-like morphology frequently appear in the nitrogen diffusion layer of nitrocarburized carbon steels.The electron probe X-ray microanalysis shows that such vein-like GBs are rich in nitrogen and carbon atoms.Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy further reveal that the coarsened GBs consist of γ'-nitrocarbide (Fe4(C,N)) and ε-nitrocarbide lamellas that are formed during nitrocarburizing due to high nitrogen concentration at GBs.it is shown that many of {111}<112> micro twins exist in the γ'-phase lamellas and thin ε-phase slices prefer to nucleate at their twin boundaries with the orientation relationship of {O001}ε//{111}γ'.Upon growing large γ'-lamellas may become faceted and thin ε-lamellas may grow thicker and become the main portions in the vein-like GBs.The microstructure evolution occurring in the vein-like GBs can be depicted as:α + [N]/[C] → γ' + [C,N] → ε-nitrocarbides.

  16. Microstructure and high temperature properties of the dissimilar weld between ferritic stainless steel and carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Kil; Hong, Seung Gab; Kang, Ki Bong; Kang, Chung Yun

    2009-10-01

    Dissimilar joints between STS441, a ferritic stainless steel, and SS400, a carbon steel, were welded by GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) using STS430LNb as a welding wire. The fracture behavior of the dissimilar weld was analyzed by a microstructural observation and thermo-mechanical tests. Martensite was formed at the region between SS400 and the weld metal because the Cr and Nb content in this region decreased due to the dilution of SS400 carbon steel during welding. According to results from a high temperature tensile test with a specimen aged at 900 °C, it was found that the tensile strength of the dissimilar weld at high temperature was equal to that of STS441 base metal and the formation of martensite had little influence on tensile strength of the dissimilar weld at high temperature. However, in the case of thermal fatigue resistance, the dissimilar weld had an inferior thermal fatigue life to STS441 because of the presence of martensite and the softened region around the interface between the dissimilar weld metal and SS400.

  17. Microstructure and properties of pure iron/copper composite cladding layers on carbon steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Wan; Yong-xian Huang; Shi-xiong L; Ti-fang Huang; Zong-liang L

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, pure iron/copper composite metal cladding was deposited onto carbon steel by tungsten inert gas welding. The study focused on interfacial morphological, microstructural, and mechanical analyses of the composite cladding layers. Iron liq-uid–solid-phase zones were formed at copper/steel and iron interfaces because of the melting of the steel substrate and iron. Iron concentrated in the copper cladding layer was observed to exhibit belt, globule, and dendrite morphologies. The appearance of iron-rich globules indicated the occurrence of liquid phase separation (LPS) prior to solidification, and iron-rich dendrites crystallized without the occurrence of LPS. The maximum microhardness of the iron/steel interface was lower than that of the copper/steel interface because of the diffusion of elemental carbon. All samples fractured in the cladding layers. Because of a relatively lower strength of the copper layer, a short plateau region ap-peared when shear movement was from copper to iron.

  18. Microstructural Phase Changes of DPPC-Ergosterol Supported Membranes Stressed by Ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, Juan; Block, David; Faller, Roland; Longo, Marjorie

    2010-03-01

    Microstructure of DPPC-Ergosterol supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) stressed by ethanol is examined at the nanoscopic level using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Alcohols such as ethanol are known to cause changes in the phase behavior of phospholipids as well as inducing the formation of an interdigitated phase of reduced thickness, where the hydrophobic tails of the top and bottom lipids intercalate causing an increase in the area per lipid as well as the solvent exposed surface of the headgroups. SLBs composed of 75-100 mole % 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DPPC) and 0-25 mole % ergosterol were deposited on mica through the vesicle deposition method. In order to observe the ethanol-induced phase changes that can be observed in free bilayers, the vesicles must be prepared in buffer solution containing ethanol. The presence of salt is required to reduce the effect of the strong interaction between the bilayers and the support, which in the absence of ethanol and salt induces the formation of a tilted phase similar to the interdigitated phase in DPPC bilayers deposited above the melting temperature. As previously observer by other groups, ethanol-induced changes in SLBs often require heating above the transition temperature after addition of ethanol, or sample preparation in the presence of the alcohol. The later method was used as it produces more consistent results and the observations agree well with the previously reported phase diagram of DPPC-Ergosterol with ethanol.

  19. The microstructural evolution, crystallography, and thermal processing of ultrahigh carbon Fe-1.85 pct C melt-spun ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, G.; Ayers, J. D.; Vold, C. L.; Locci, I. E.

    1993-01-01

    A study is presented to determine if fine microstructures could be achieved using rapid solidification to produce a fine-grained fully austenitic starting structure and then using thermal processing cycles to produce an even finer ferrite-cementite structure. The evolution, mechanisms of grain refinement, and crystallography of the resultant microstructures were examined by TEM. A thermal processing cycle consisted of quenching the ribbon in liquid nitrogen, tempering at 600 C for 10 sec, 'upquenching' to 750 C for 10 sec, and subsequently quenching again in liquid nitrogen. The heat-treatment resulted in martensite grains with sizes of about 1 micron or less in both length and thickness and cementite particles of 0.4 micron or less. It is concluded that these microstructures could be used for producing fine-grained ultrahigh carbon steels of very high strength without the brittleness associated with the formation of coarse carbide particles of the loss of strength due to graphite formation.

  20. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, J.P. van der [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Martinez-Martinez, D., E-mail: d.martinez.martinez@rug.nl [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Pei, Y.T., E-mail: y.pei@rug.nl [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Rudolf, P. [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); De Hosson, J.Th.M. [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes of the bias voltage. Raman measurements show a similar bonding regardless of the voltages used. A columnar growth and a tile-like microstructure of the DLC films were identified by scanning electron microscopy. Patch sizes can be correlated with the deposition conditions. The coefficient of friction (CoF) of DLC film coated HNBR was found to be much lower than that of the unprotected rubber, and more reduced for the DLC films with smaller patch sizes, which is explained by a better flexibility and conformity of the film during testing. In one of the samples, unexpected low CoF was observed, which was attributed to a modification of the mechanical properties of the rubber during the plasma treatment at high voltage. This issue was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which indicated a modification of the cross linking in the rubber. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bias voltage does not vary the chemical bonding and surface morphology of films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Film structure is patched, whose size depends on the etching and deposition voltages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frictional behavior can be correlated with the patch size of the films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface analysis showed that rubber x-linking is modified by etching at high voltage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modification of rubber x-linking leads to a different frictional behavior.

  1. Effect of Carbon Steel Composition and Microstructure on CO2 Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeer, Emad S.

    The environmental conditions encountered in oil and gas wells and pipelines can cause severe localized corrosion to mild steel. The utility of carbon steel in oil and gas pipelines depends on formation of protective corrosion product layers. However, the microstructure and chemical composition of steel are considered to be important variables that affect the ability of these layers to protect steel from corrosion. The present study investigated the effect of alloying elements and metallurgy of five different pipeline steels, with different chemical composition and microstructure, on CO2 corrosion in flowing conditions with focus on the iron carbonate layer formed and related corrosion phenomena that could lead to localized corrosion. The microstructure of tested steels was examined using optical microscopy and etching. Preliminary experiments were conducted using a glass cell, which is a very well known and widely used apparatus. Then a comparison was done with the newly developed thin channel flow cell (TCFC) to validate whether the TCFC can be used instead of glass cell in this study, which required very high velocity and wall shear stresses. It was found that there are no significant effects of alloying elements and steel microstructure on corrosion rate in experiments done at pH 4.0 at 25°C and 80°C. Further experiments were then conducted in the TCFC to study the effect of alloying elements and microstructure under conditions where a protective FeCO3 4 corrosion product layer forms, using very high liquid flow rates. For each of the studied steels, an FeCO3 corrosion product layer was formed within two days of exposure at low wall shear stress at 80°C, pH 6.6, and partial pressure of CO2 of 1.5 bar (1.5 bar pCO 2). For all tested steels, the FeCO3 layer reduced the general corrosion rate to less than 1.0 mm/y. These "pre-formed" FeCO3 layers were then exposed to high liquid flow velocity and wall shear stress (535 Pa) for 3 days. This caused partial loss of

  2. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of a low-carbon quenching and partitioning steel after partial and full austenitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-song Li; Hong-ye Gao; Hideharu Nakashima; Satoshi Hata; Wen-huai Tian

    2016-01-01

    In this work, low-carbon steel specimens were subjected to the quenching and partitioning process after being partially or fully austenitized to investigate their microstructural evolution and mechanical properties. According to the results of scanning electron micros-copy and transmission electron microscopy observations, X-ray diffraction analysis, and tensile tests, upper bainite or tempered martensite appears successively in the microstructure with increasing austenitization temperature or increasing partitioning time. In the partially austeni-tized specimens, the retained austenite grains are carbon-enriched twice during the heat treatment, which can significantly stabilize the phases at room temperature. Furthermore, after partial austenitization, the specimen exhibits excellent elongation, with a maximum elongation of 37.1%. By contrast, after full austenitization, the specimens exhibit good ultimate tensile strength and high yield strength. In the case of a specimen with a yield strength of 969 MPa, the maximum value of the ultimate tensile strength reaches 1222 MPa. During the partitioning process, carbon partitioning and carbon homogenization within austenite affect interface migration. In addition, the volume fraction and grain size of retained austenite observed in the final microstructure will also be affected.

  3. Microstructure effect on nanohardness distribution for medium-carbon martensitic steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Jinxu; OHMURA; Takahito; TSUZAKI; Kaneaki

    2006-01-01

    Nanoindentation measurement was performed to evaluate the local hardness distribution for quenched and tempered martensitic steel with ferrite-cementite constituent. The ratio of standard deviation to the average nanohardness was 15.4% when nanoindentation tests were carried out at the peak load of 1000 μN, while that of the Vickers hardness was only 1.5% at 9.8 N. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis and SEM observation all showed that the large scattering of nanohardness did not depend on the crystallographic orientation of each grain but from the inhomogeneous microstructure in the sub-micron scale such as cementite distribution. Compared with the results on tungsten single crystals with different surface orientations as well as another martensite processed by modified-ausforming with the same chemical composition but more homogeneous cementite distribution, the nanohardness showed smaller scattering, supporting the conclusion.

  4. Carbon support oxidation in PEM fuel cell cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, S.; Finsterwalder, F.; Frank, G.; Hartmann, R.; Merten, C.

    Oxidation of the cathode carbon catalyst support in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEMFC) has been examined. For this purpose platinum supported electrodes and pure carbon electrodes were fabricated and tested in membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEAs) in air and nitrogen atmosphere. The in situ experiments account for the fuel cell environment characterized by the presence of a solid electrolyte and water in the gas and liquid phases. Cell potential transients occurring during automotive fuel cell operation were simulated by dynamic measurements. Corrosion rates were calculated from CO 2 and CO concentrations in the cathode exhaust measured by non-dispersive infrared spectroscopy (NDIR). Results from these potentiodynamic measurements indicate that different potential regimes relevant for carbon oxidation can be distinguished. Carbon corrosion rates were found to be higher under dynamic operation and to strongly depend on electrode history. These characteristics make it difficult to predict corrosion rates accurately in an automotive drive cycle.

  5. Nanoporous carbon supported metal particles: their synthesis and characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yunxia, E-mail: yunxia.yang@csiro.au; Tang Liangguang; Burke, Nick; Chiang, Ken [CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering (Australia)

    2012-08-15

    In the current work, a simplified hard templating approach is used to synthesise metal (Ag, Rh, Ir and Pt) containing structured carbon. The target metals are first introduced into the NaY zeolite template by wetness impregnation. The metals are carried in the super cages of the zeolite and subsequently embedded in the final structures after the steps of carbonisation and the template removal. Scanning electron microscopy images have confirmed that the carbon structures produced by this method retain the morphology of the original template. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the presence of dispersed metal particles in all the carbon structures produced. The metal loadings in these templated structures can reach 35 wt% without significant losses of surface areas and pore volumes. Selected carbon supported metals are tested for their catalytic activity for the methanation of carbon monoxide. The finding suggested that this method is effective in preparing metal nanoparticles for use as catalysts.

  6. Preparation of supported electrocatalyst comprising multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-08-27

    A process for preparing a durable non-precious metal oxygen reduction electrocatalyst involves heat treatment of a ball-milled mixture of polyaniline and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the presence of a Fe species. The catalyst is more durable than catalysts that use carbon black supports. Performance degradation was minimal or absent after 500 hours of operation at constant cell voltage of 0.40 V.

  7. Microstructural morphology of the semi-solid high carbon steel T12 before and after rheo-rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiguang Li; Yonglin Kang; Aimin Zhao; Yi Sun; Man Cheng

    2005-01-01

    The semi-solid high carbon steel T12 was rolled in a closed box groove under a certain condition by the rheo-rolling equipment, and the microstructural morphology of the semi-solid T12 before and after deformation was investigated by optical microscope to analyze and summarize the microstructure evolution law of T12 deformed in semi-solid state. The experiment results show that the grain shape before deformation of the semi-solid T12 steel displays globule or ellipse by the electromagnetic stirring,the distribution of solid and liquid phases is homogeneous. But the microstructure of semi-solid product after rheo-rolling exhibits macrosegregation that the distribution of liquid and solid phases changes, the liquid phases divorce from the solid phases. In the transverse section, most of the solid phases get together in the center of the specimen, the liquid phases flow to the surface or the edge of the specimen, and the grains occur plastic deformation while reduction increased. In longitudinal section, the middle microstructure of the specimen is more homogeneous than that at the head or tail, the head microstructure is similar to the tail and the size of the grains is not homogeneous.

  8. The carbon footprint of behavioural support services for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anna Jo Bodurtha; Tennison, Imogen; Roberts, Ian; Cairns, John; Free, Caroline

    2013-09-01

    To estimate the carbon footprint of behavioural support services for smoking cessation: text message support, telephone counselling, group counselling and individual counselling. Carbon footprint analysis. Publicly available data on National Health Service Stop Smoking Services and per unit carbon emissions; published effectiveness data from the txt2stop trial and systematic reviews of smoking cessation services. Carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) per 1000 smokers, per lifetime quitter, and per quality-adjusted life year gained, and cost-effectiveness, including social cost of carbon, of smoking cessation services. Emissions per 1000 participants were 8143 kg CO2e for text message support, 8619 kg CO2e for telephone counselling, 16 114 kg CO2e for group counselling and 16 372 kg CO2e for individual counselling. Emissions per intervention lifetime quitter were 636 (95% CI 455 to 958) kg CO2e for text message support, 1051 (95% CI 560 to 2873) kg CO2e for telephone counselling, 1143 (95% CI 695 to 2270) kg CO2e for group counselling and 2823 (95% CI 1688 to 6549) kg CO2e for individual counselling. Text message, telephone and group counselling remained cost-effective when cost-effectiveness analysis was revised to include the environmental and economic cost of damage from carbon emissions. All smoking cessation services had low emissions compared to the health gains produced. Text message support had the lowest emissions of the services evaluated. Smoking cessation services have small carbon footprints and were cost-effective after accounting for the societal costs of greenhouse gas emissions.

  9. Evaluation of porous carbon and ceramic supports for hyperfiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabellon, J.B.; Padia, A.K.; Whitesides, L.E. Jr.

    1971-03-24

    Porous carbon and ceramic tubes were evaluated as supports for dynamically formed zirconium (IV) hydrous oxide-polycarboxylic acid hyperfiltration membranes. The most promising membranes were formed on Union Carbide 6-C carbon tubes using a 150,000 molecular weight polyacrylic acid. Sodium chloride rejections as high as 97% were obtained at water fluxes of 80 gpd/ft{sup 2} compared with rejections of 90 to 95% and fluxes of 130 gpd/ft{sup 2} using the porous stainless steel-Acropor/Millipore supports. The effects of pressure, circulation velocity, and temperature on membrane flux and sodium chloride and Coalinga water rejections were studied. A small industrial module containing 6-C carbon supports with a 3.04 ft{sup 2} filtration surface gave a salt rejection of 86% and a product water flux of 60 gpd/ft{sup 2}.

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of railway wheels manufactured with low-medium carbon Si-Mn-Mo-V steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingru Zhang; Haicheng Gu

    2008-01-01

    The suitability of carbide-free bainite steel as railway wheel materials was investigated. The low-medium carbon Si-Mn-Mo-V steel was designed to make railway wheels by forging and rolling. The slack quenching with water was conducted on the tread of rim section by programmed control to simulate isothermal heat treatment after being austenitized. Microstructures and mechanical properties have been studied. The results indicate that the microstructure of the rim is mainly carbide-free bainite, and the mixed mi- crostructure of bainitic ferrite and granular bainite is observed in web and hub. The mechanical properties are superior to both the standard requirements and the commercial production, such as CL60 plain carbon. The Charpy impact energy is relatively high at room and/or subzero temperatures. The force-displacement curves and fractographies reveal the excellent ability of resistance to crack initiation and propagation.

  11. Simulation for Carbon Nanotube Dispersion and Microstructure Formation in CNTs/AZ91D Composite Fabricated by Ultrasonic Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuansheng; Zhao, Fuze; Feng, Xiaohui

    2017-10-01

    The dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in AZ91D melt by ultrasonic processing and microstructure formation of CNTs/AZ91D composite were studied using numerical and physical simulations. The sound field and acoustic streaming were predicted using finite element method. Meanwhile, optimal immersion depth of the ultrasonic probe and suitable ultrasonic power were obtained. Single-bubble model was used to predict ultrasonic cavitation in AZ91D melt. The relationship between sound pressure amplitude and ultrasonic cavitation was established. Physical simulations of acoustic streaming and ultrasonic cavitation agreed well with the numerical simulations. It was confirmed that the dispersion of carbon nanotubes was remarkably improved by ultrasonic processing. Microstructure formation of CNTs/AZ91D composite was numerically simulated using cellular automation method. In addition, grain refinement was achieved and the growth of dendrites was changed due to the uniform dispersion of CNTs.

  12. On the Effect of Carbon Content to the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Green Compacts Formed at above Ambient Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Mujibur Rahman; Sany Shahriman Md Nor; Hendri Yani Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Friction force is generated during the generation of green compacts from metal powder, which obviously gives adverse effect to the mechanical properties and microstructure of the green compacts. In this study, fine carbon powder is used to minimize the interparticle as well as die wall frictions and as alloying element hence high density yet defect-free near-net shape or net shape mechanical components can be produced. Powder forming at elevated temperature is a relatively new technology henc...

  13. Evolution of permeability and microstructure of tight carbonates due to numerical simulation of calcite dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. J.; Vanorio, T.; Keehm, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The current study concerns fundamental controls on fluid flow in tight carbonate rocks during CO2 injection, which has implications for understanding carbonate diagenesis, enhanced hydrocarbon recovery, and CO2 sequestration. Experimental CO2-injection studies find that initial pore geometry is important to the trajectory of permeability-porosity trends. For example, Vanorio et al., [2014] observed over an order of magnitude increase in permeability over <1% increase in connected porosity. The focus of this study is to understand the microstructural origins for these changes and determine - if not porosity - the primary controls on permeability during CO2-injection. Given the grain-scale nature of chemical reactions, we took a digital rock physics approach. A 4.5-mm tight carbonate core was imaged using X-ray micro-computed tomography. Fluid flow was simulated using the Lattice-Boltzmann Method (LBM) [Keehm, 2003]. Dissolution was modeled using a simple, phenomenological approach that coupled the local surface area and velocity to the local reaction rate. Though our model does not include diffusion, it builds upon basic physicochemical principles that underpin transport-limited reaction behavior, namely: (a) the reaction in in non-percolating pathways is fully buffered and (b) the reaction is most rapid in regions where solvent flux is high. The results of our dissolution model mimic experimental CO2-injection: increasing permeability by 300 mD over <1% increase in connected porosity. An analysis of the fluid flux distribution showed that fluid flow tended to channelize, localizing dissolution to paths of least hydraulic resistance. These so-called percolation pathways [Martys and Garboczi, 1992; David, 1993] constituted less than half of the connected pore volume, yet accommodated 90% of the volumetric flux. Interestingly, the percolation porosity exhibited two stages of evolution: (1) decrease at the onset of dissolution until channels were established; (2

  14. Microstructures, textures and geothermometry of graphitic carbon in low- to high-grade mylonites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz; Lv, Meixia; Li, Junyu; Dong, Yanlong

    2017-04-01

    Graphitization differs from most mineral transformations occurring during diagenesis and metamorphism in that is an irreversible process. Graphitic carbon exhibits a large range of structures and chemical compositions, ranging from amorphous-like compounds (e.g. soot, low-grade coal), through a myriad of turbostratic structures (e.g. carbonaceous materials in metamorphic rocks), to rather rare crystalline flaky graphite. Graphitic material has a number of properties and the most significant one is the structural change of the graphitic materials with increase of temperature in the fault zones as well as in very low-grade to high-grade metamorphic terrains. During metamorphic processes, organic matter is progressively transformed into graphite and the degree of maturation or graphitization of graphitic materials is a potential tool, therefore, considered as a reliable indicator of peak conditions of the metamorphic grade in metamorphic petrology. In mylonites and brittle fault zones, graphitic material is rheologically very weak, a phenomenon, which results in shear concentration along zones rich in graphitic material. The characteristics and metamorphic peak conditions of graphitic material-bearing mylonites from fault zones are studied using optical microscopy, SEM, Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Raman microspectroscopy and carbon isotopic analysis. The graphite grains are distributed parallel to the mylonitic foliation and present coarse to very fine-grained microstructures. The deformation includes dislocation glide. The deformed graphite lattice-preferred orientation by EBSD measured records presents intracrystalline slip system, which is easy in the direction of the -axes and, in fact, nearly in any direction within the basal planes. The thermometry of graphitic material by Raman spectroscopy was calibrated for the temperature range from 360 to 650 °C. These structural analyses of graphitic material in mylonitic rocks allow unraveling the

  15. Influence of Fabric Parameters on Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Failure Mechanisms in Carbon-Fibre Reinforced Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Wielage; D.Richter; H.Mucha; Th.Lampke

    2008-01-01

    The effects of fibre/matrix bonding,fabric density,fibre volume fraction and bundle size on microstructure,mechanical properties and failure mechanisms in carbon fibre reinforced composites (plastic and carbon matrix) have been investigated.The microstructure of unloaded and cracked samples was studied by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM),respectively whereas the mechanical behaviour was examined by 3-point bending experiments.Exclusively one type of experimental resole type phenolic resin was applied.A strong fibre/matrix bonding,which is needed for high strength of carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials leads to severe composite damages during the pyrolysis resulting in low strength,brittle failure and a very low utilisation of the fibres strain to failure in C/C composites.Inherent fabric parameters such as an increasing fabric density or bundle size or a reduced fibre volume fraction introduce inhomogenities to the CFRP's microstructure.Results are lower strength and stiffness whereas the strain to failure increases or remains unchanged.Toughness is almost not affected.In C/C composites inhomogenities due to a reduced bundle size reduce strain to failure,strength,stiffness and toughness.Vice versa a declining fibre volume fraction leads to exactly the opposite behaviour.Increasing the fabric density (weight per unit area) causes similar effects as in CFRPs.

  16. Microstructure in adiabatic shear bands in a pearlitic ultrahigh carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syn, C.K.; Leseur, D.R.; Sherby, O.D.

    2005-03-15

    Adiabatic shear bands, obtained in compression deformation at a strain rate of 4000 s{sup -1}, in a pearlitic 1.3%C steel, were investigated. Shear bands initiated at 55% compression deformation with the width of the band equal to 14 {mu}m. Nano-indentor hardness of the shear band was 11.5 GPa in contrast to the initial matrix hardness of 3.5 GPa. The high strength of the shear band is attributed to its creation from two sequential events. First, large strain deformation, at a high strain rate, accompanied by adiabatic heating, led to phase transformation to austenite. Second, retransformation upon rapid cooling occurred by a divorced eutectoid transformation (DET). The result is a predicted microstructure consisting of nano size carbide particles within a matrix of fine ferrite grains. It is proposed that the DET occurs in iron-carbon steels during high rate deformation in ball milling, ball drop tests and in commercial wire drawing. (author)

  17. Microstructure and Electrical Conductivity of CNTs/PMMA Nanocomposite Foams Foaming by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Huan; XIONG Yuanlu; LUO Guoqiang; LI Meijuan; SHEN Qiang; ZHANG Lianmeng

    2016-01-01

    The carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/ polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) nanocomposite foams were prepared by the anti-solvent precipitation and supercritical foaming method. The morphology and the electrical conductivity of the foams with different kinds of CNTs were investigated. The experimental results showed that all the foams had uniform cell structure, and the cell size changed from 1.9 to 10 μm when the foaming temperature ranged from 50℃ to 95℃. With small cell size (1.9-4.0 μm), the conductivities of the foams were 3.34×10-6-4.16×10-6 S/cm compared with the solid matrix since the introduction of micro cells did not destroy the conductive network. However, when the cell size was biger (4.5-10 μm), the aspect ratio of the CNTs played the dominant role of the conductivity. The foams with short CNTs had higher conductivity, since the short CNTs were hard to stretch and snap by the cells and can well-dispersed in the cell wall and cell edges. The results of this work provided a novel material design method for conductive foams based on the rule of both microstructure and aspect ratio of the CNTs.

  18. Microstructural evolution and mechanical behaviour of surface hardened low carbon hot rolled steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewary, N.K. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Syed, B. [R and D Division, Tata Steel Limited, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Ghosh, S.K., E-mail: skghosh@metal.becs.ac.in [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Kundu, S. [R and D Division, Tata Steel Limited, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Shariff, S.M.; Padmanabham, G. [Centre for Laser Processing, ARCI-Hyderabad, Balapur PO, AP 500005 (India)

    2014-06-01

    Surface hardening of low carbon hot rolled C–Mn steel has been successfully performed by high power diode laser with an achievable case depth of about 300 μm. The laser treated samples have been characterised using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and X-ray diffraction techniques. Higher hardness level is achieved in laser surface hardened zone (≈300 HV) than in the base alloy region (≈140 HV). The variation in hardness as a function of distance across the laser tracks is observed during multi-track laser hardening. Laser hardened steel sheets show enhanced mechanical strength (YS: 383–443 MPa, UTS: 476–506 MPa) with the lowering of percentage total elongation (23–28%) compared to the base alloy (YS: 351 MPa, UTS: 450 MPa and total elongation is 32%). Strain hardening exponent (‘n’) has been evaluated from true tensile stress–strain diagram and it shows a similar nature for both base alloy and laser treated steels. The microstructure in the base alloy region consists of a mixture of ferrite and pearlite, whereas predominantly lath martensite is present in the laser hardened surface layer. The improvement of mechanical strength is discussed in terms of the formation of this hardened layer on the surface.

  19. Effect of RE-Modifier on Microstructure and Mechanical Property of High-Carbon Medium-Manganese Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The effect of RE-modifier on the microstructure and mechanical properties of high carbon-medium manganese steel has been investigated in present work. The results showed that the RE-modifier can refine the crystalline grain of high-carbon medium-manganese steel. The shape and distribution of carbides are improved and the columnar grains and phosphide in grain boundary are eliminated. Consequently, the impact toughness of the steel is increased by more than one time, compared with no addition of RE-modifier.

  20. Cyclic voltammetric investigations of microstructured and platinum-covered glassy carbon electrodes in contact with a polymer electrolyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, G.G.; Veziridis, Z.; Staub, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Freimuth, H. [Inst. fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz IMM, Mainz (Germany)

    1997-06-01

    Model gas diffusion electrodes were prepared by microstructuring glassy carbon surfaces with high aspect ratios and subsequent deposition of platinum. These electrodes were characterized by hydrogen under-potential deposition (H-upd) in contact with a polymer electrolyte membrane employing cyclic voltametry. H-upd was found on platinum areas not in direct contact to the solid electrolyte, as long as a continuous platinum-path existed. A carbon surface between platinum acts as barrier for H-upd. (author) 4 figs., 5 refs.

  1. Mathematical Modeling and Microstructure Analysis of Low Carbon Steel Strips Produced by Horizontal Single Belt Casting (HSBC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Sa; Chang, Sheng; Wang, Tong; Calzado, Luis E.; Isac, Mihaiela; Kozinski, Janusz; Guthrie, Roderick I. L.

    2016-06-01

    The horizontal single belt casting (HSBC) process has been proposed as an efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly alternative approach to the production of ferrous alloys. Low carbon steel strips were cast using the HSBC simulator apparatus to study the characteristics and properties of the as-cast steel strips. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations using ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 were also performed. Numerical predictions were validated against experimental casting results. Microstructural analyses and as-cast surface texture studies were conducted on low carbon steels.

  2. Oxygen reduction catalyzed by gold nanoclusters supported on carbon nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiannan; Wang, Likai; Tang, Zhenghua; Wang, Fucai; Yan, Wei; Yang, Hongyu; Zhou, Weijia; Li, Ligui; Kang, Xiongwu; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-03-01

    Nanocomposites based on p-mercaptobenzoic acid-functionalized gold nanoclusters, Au102(p-MBA)44, and porous carbon nanosheets have been fabricated and employed as highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Au102(p-MBA)44 clusters were synthesized via a wet chemical approach, and loaded onto carbon nanosheets. Pyrolysis at elevated temperatures led to effective removal of the thiolate ligands and the formation of uniform nanoparticles supported on the carbon scaffolds. The nanocomposite structures were characterized by using a wide range of experimental techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and BET nitrogen adsorption/desorption. Electrochemical studies showed that the composites demonstrated apparent ORR activity in alkaline media, and the sample with a 30% Au mass loading was identified as the best catalyst among the series, with a performance comparable to that of commercial Pt/C, but superior to those of Au102 nanoclusters and carbon nanosheets alone, within the context of onset potential, kinetic current density, and durability. The results suggest an effective approach to the preparation of high-performance ORR catalysts based on gold nanoclusters supported on carbon nanosheets.Nanocomposites based on p-mercaptobenzoic acid-functionalized gold nanoclusters, Au102(p-MBA)44, and porous carbon nanosheets have been fabricated and employed as highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Au102(p-MBA)44 clusters were synthesized via a wet chemical approach, and loaded onto carbon nanosheets. Pyrolysis at elevated temperatures led to effective removal of the thiolate ligands and the formation of uniform nanoparticles supported on the carbon scaffolds. The nanocomposite structures were characterized by using a wide range of experimental techniques such as

  3. Structure and properties of carbon nanofibers. application as electrocatalyst support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. del Rio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to gain an insight into the physical-chemical properties of carbon nanofibers and the relationship between those properties and the electrocatalytic behavior when used as catalyst support for their application in fuel cells.

  4. Carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles : Cellulose at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Jacco; Versluijs-Helder, Marjan; Vlietstra, Edward J.; Geus, John W.; Jenneskens, Leonardus W.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis of base metal salt loaded microcrystalline cellulose spheres gives a facile access to carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles, which have been characterized with temperature-dependent XRD, SEM, TEM, ICP-MS and elemental analysis. The role of cellulose is multifaceted: 1) it facilitates a

  5. The Effect of Excess Carbon on the Crystallographic, Microstructural, and Mechanical Properties of CVD Silicon Carbide Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzik, J V; Croft, W J; Staples, R J; MoberlyChan, W J

    2006-12-05

    Silicon carbide (SiC) fibers made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are of interest for organic, ceramic, and metal matrix composite materials due their high strength, high elastic modulus, and retention of mechanical properties at elevated processing and operating temperatures. The properties of SCS-6{trademark} silicon carbide fibers, which are made by a commercial process and consist largely of stoichiometric SiC, were compared with an experimental carbon-rich CVD SiC fiber, to which excess carbon was added during the CVD process. The concentration, homogeneity, and distribution of carbon were measured using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The effect of excess carbon on the tensile strength, elastic modulus, and the crystallographic and microstructural properties of CVD silicon carbide fibers was investigated using tensile testing, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  6. Carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles: cellulose at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Jacco; Versluijs-Helder, Marjan; Vlietstra, Edward J; Geus, John W; Jenneskens, Leonardus W

    2015-03-01

    Pyrolysis of base metal salt loaded microcrystalline cellulose spheres gives a facile access to carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles, which have been characterized with temperature-dependent XRD, SEM, TEM, ICP-MS and elemental analysis. The role of cellulose is multifaceted: 1) it facilitates a homogeneous impregnation of the aqueous base metal salt solutions, 2) it acts as an efficacious (carbonaceous) support material for the uniformly dispersed base metal salts, their oxides and the metal nanoparticles derived therefrom, and 3) it contributes as a reducing agent via carbothermal reduction for the conversion of the metal oxide nanoparticles into the metal nanoparticles. Finally, the base metal nanoparticles capable of forming metastable metal carbides catalytically convert the carbonaceous support into a mesoporous graphitic carbon material.

  7. Effects of rare earth oxide on hardfacing metal microstructure of medium carbon steel and its refinement mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Feifei; LIAO Bo; LI Da; LIU Ligang; DAN Ting; REN Xuejun; YANG Qingxiang

    2011-01-01

    The electrodes for hardfacing medium carbon steel with six additions of rare earth oxide were developed in this work. By means of optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, the microstructure, inclusion and the fractograph of the hardfacing metal were observed. Then, the effects of rare earth oxide on microstructure and inclusions in hardfacing metal were analyzed. The effectiveness of rare earth oxide as heterogeneous nuclei of δ-Fe was calculated with the misfit theory. The results showed that, the microstructure of hardfacing metal was composed of ferrite and small amount of pearlite. The microstructure was refined at first and then coarsened with the increase of rare earth oxide addition. The fractograph was changed from brittle to equiaxed dimples, then became quasi-cleavage and cleavage gradually.The calculated results showed that, the ferrite grain size could be refined because that LaA1O3 as heterogeneous nuclei ofδ-Fe was moderately effective, and the ferrite grain size was coarsened because the misfits between Ce2O3 and δ-Fe, Ce2O2S and δ-Fe were increased with futher increase of rare earth oxide addition.

  8. Formation of Medium Carbon TRIP Steel Microstructure During Annealing in the Intercritical Temperature Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokosza A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research conducted on austenite formation in the microstructure of 41MnSi6-5 TRIP steel during annealing in the intercritical temperature range. The influence of the annealing temperature on the volume fraction of retained austenite in the microstructure of the investigated steel after water quenching was also determined.

  9. Sustainable catalyst supports for carbon dioxide gas adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlee, M. N.

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) become the prime attention nowadays due to the fact that increasing CO2 emissions has been identified as a contributor to global climate change. Major sources of CO2 emissions are thermoelectric power plants and industrial plants which account for approximately 45% of global CO2 emissions. Therefore, it is an urgent need to develop an efficient CO2 reduction technology such as carbon capture and storage (CCS) that can reduce CO2 emissions particularly from the energy sector. A lot of sustainable catalyst supports have been developed particularly for CO2 gas adsorbent applications.

  10. Ameliorated Austenite Carbon Content Control in Austempered Ductile Irons by Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Yun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron has emerged as a notable material in several engineering fields, including marine applications. The initial austenite carbon content after austenization transform but before austempering process for generating bainite matrix proved critical in controlling the resulted microstructure and thus mechanical properties. In this paper, support vector regression is employed in order to establish a relationship between the initial carbon concentration in the austenite with austenization temperature and alloy contents, thereby exercising improved control in the mechanical properties of the austempered ductile irons. Particularly, the paper emphasizes a methodology tailored to deal with a limited amount of available data with intrinsically contracted and skewed distribution. The collected information from a variety of data sources presents another challenge of highly uncertain variance. The authors present a hybrid model consisting of a procedure of a histogram equalizer and a procedure of a support-vector-machine (SVM- based regression to gain a more robust relationship to respond to the challenges. The results show greatly improved accuracy of the proposed model in comparison to two former established methodologies. The sum squared error of the present model is less than one fifth of that of the two previous models.

  11. Effect of starting microstructure upon the nucleation sites and distribution of graphite particles during a graphitising anneal of an experimental medium-carbon machining steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inam, A., E-mail: aqil.ceet@pu.edu.pk; Brydson, R., E-mail: mtlrmdb@leeds.ac.uk; Edmonds, D.V., E-mail: d.v.edmonds@leeds.ac.uk

    2015-08-15

    The potential for using graphite particles as an internal lubricant during machining is considered. Graphite particles were found to form during graphitisation of experimental medium-carbon steel alloyed with Si and Al. The graphite nucleation sites were strongly influenced by the starting microstructure, whether ferrite–pearlite, bainite or martensite, as revealed by light and electron microscopy. Favourable nucleation sites in the ferrite–pearlite starting microstructure were, not unexpectedly, found to be located within pearlite colonies, no doubt due to the presence of abundant cementite as a source of carbon. In consequence, the final distribution of graphite nodules in ferrite–pearlite microstructures was less uniform than for the bainite microstructure studied. In the case of martensite, this study found a predominance of nucleation at grain boundaries, again leading to less uniform graphite dispersions. - Highlights: • Metallography of formation of graphite particles in experimental carbon steel. • Potential for using graphite in steel as an internal lubricant during machining. • Microstructure features expected to influence improved machinability studied. • Influence of pre-anneal starting microstructure on graphite nucleation sites. • Influence of pre-anneal starting microstructure on graphite distribution. • Potential benefit is new free-cutting steel compositions without e.g. Pb alloying.

  12. Effect of retained austenite on the hydrogen embrittlement of a medium carbon quenching and partitioning steel with refined microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jilan; Huang, Feng; Guo, Zhenghong, E-mail: zhenghongguo@sjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-05-17

    The effect of retained austenite on the hydrogen embrittlement of a medium carbon quenching and partitioning steel was investigated by comparison to a traditional quenching and tempering steel with an identical chemical composition. Electrochemical precharging reduces the plasticity, including the elongation and reduction in area, of both steels, and the embrittlement phenomenon is more severe in the quenching and tempering steel based on a slow strain rate tensile test. As a result, the ultimate tensile strength decreases, as well. The fracture mode was dominated by intergranular features in the areas containing hydrogen, suggesting the weakening of boundary cohesion. Retained austenite, which retards diffusion and increases the solubility of hydrogen, is stable under the attack of hydrogen, contributing to the high hydrogen embrittlement resistance of quenching and partitioning steel. Refining the microstructure further improves plasticity due to the lower hydrogen content per area. In general, the quenching and partitioning steel with a refined microstructure exhibits the lowest hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility.

  13. A Review on Nanomaterial Dispersion, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shama Parveen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Excellent mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and nanofibers (CNFs have motivated the development of advanced nanocomposites with outstanding and multifunctional properties. After achieving a considerable success in utilizing these unique materials in various polymeric matrices, recently tremendous interest is also being noticed on developing CNT and CNF reinforced cement-based composites. However, the problems related to nanomaterial dispersion also exist in case of cementitious composites, impairing successful transfer of nanomaterials' properties into the composites. Performance of cementitious composites also depends on their microstructure which is again strongly influenced by the presence of nanomaterials. In this context, the present paper reports a critical review of recent literature on the various strategies for dispersing CNTs and CNFs within cementitious matrices and the microstructure and mechanical properties of resulting nanocomposites.

  14. Microstructures relevant to brittle fracture initiation at the heat-affected zone of weldment of a low carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Kenji; Kim, Jongseop; Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Nagumo, Michihiko

    1996-09-01

    Charpy toughness of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of weldment of a low carbon steel has been investigated by means of an instrumented Charpy test and fractographic analysis. Microstructures were varied with thermal cycles simulating double-pass welding. The ductile-brittle transition temperature is the most deteriorated at an intermediate second-cycle heating temperature. The origin of the difference in the transition temperatures has been analyzed to exist in the brittle fracture initiation stage. Fractographic examination correlating with microstructural features has revealed that the brittle fracture initiation site is associated with the intersection of bainitic ferrite areas with different orientations rather than the martensite-austenite constituents. The role of the constraint of plastic deformation on the brittle fracture initiation is discussed.

  15. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Anant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Harvey, David; Dutta, Monica; Colbow, Vesna

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150oC and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metalic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  16. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; David Harvey; M. Dutta; V. Colbow; S. Wessel

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150 C and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metallic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  17. Carbon nanotubes/carbon fiber hybrid material: a super support material for sludge biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qijie; Dai, Guangze; Bao, Yanling

    2017-07-16

    Carbon fiber (CF) is widely used as a sludge biofilm support material for wastewater treatment. Carbon nanotubes/carbon fiber (CNTs/CF) hybrid material was prepared by ultrasonically assisted electrophoretic deposition (EPD). CF supports (CF without handling, CF oxidized by nitric acid, CNTs/CF hybrid material) were evaluated by sludge immobilization tests, bacterial cell adsorption tests and Derjaguin -Landau -Verwey -Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We found that the CNTs/CF hybrid material has a high capacity for adsorbing activated sludge, nitrifying bacterial sludge and pure strains (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus). CNTs deposited on CF surface easily wound around the curved surface of bacterial cell which resulted in capturing more bacterial cells. DLVO theory indicated the lowest total interaction energy of CNTs/CF hybrid material, which resulted in the highest bacteria cell adsorption velocity. Experiments and DLVO theory results proved that CNTs/CF hybrid material is a super support material for sludge biofilms.

  18. MATHEMATICAL FORMALISM AND SOFTWARE FOR PROCESSING OF IMAGES OF IRON-CARBON ALLOYS MICROSTRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Chichko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The description of mathematical apparatus, algorithms and software АОМ-1 and АОМ-2, used for computer processing and quantitative analysis of microstructures of pearlitic steels and grey irons, is given.

  19. Microstructure and strengthening parameters of ultra-thin hot strip of low carbon steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The microstructure and precipitation mechanism of ultra-thinhot strip produced by CSP technology were analyzed by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), H-800 transmission electron microscope (TEM) and thermodynamics theory. The EBSD results show that the finishing hot rolling microstructures are mixture of recrystallized and deformed austenite. After phase transformation, ferrite grains embody substructures and dislocations that led ultra-thin hot strip high strength and relatively low elongation rate. TEM observations show that there are a lot of fine and dispersive precipitates in microstructures. Most of aluminium nitrides are in grains, while coexisted precipitates of MnS along grain boundaries. Coexisted precipitates compose cation-vacancy type oxides such as Al2O3 in the core , while MnS at the fringe of surface. At the same time, reasons for microstructure refinement and strengthening effect were investigated.

  20. Carbon nanotube synthesis with different support materials and catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüş, Fatih; Yuca, Neslihan; Karatepe, Nilgün

    2013-09-01

    Having remarkable characteristics, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted a lot of interest. Their mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical properties make CNTs suitable for several applications such as electronic devices, hydrogen storage, textile, drug delivery etc. CNTs have been synthesized by various methods, such as arc discharge, laser ablation and catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). In comparison with the other techniques, CCVD is widely used as it offers a promising route for mass production. High capability of decomposing hydrocarbon formation is desired for the selected catalysts. Therefore, transition metals which are in the nanometer scale are the most effective catalysts. The common transition metals that are being used are Fe, Co, Ni and their binary alloys. The impregnation of the catalysts over the support material has a crucial importance for the CNT production. In this study, the influence of the support materials on the catalytic activity of metals was investigated. CNTs have been synthesized over alumina (Al2O3), silica (SiO2) and magnesium oxide (MgO) supported Fe, Co, Fe-Co catalysts. Catalyst - support material combinations have been investigated and optimum values for each were compared. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were produced at 800°C. The duration of synthesis was 30 minutes for all support materials. The synthesized materials were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  1. Effects of Rolling and Cooling Conditions on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Low Carbon Cold Heading Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhuang; WU Di; LV Wei

    2012-01-01

    Effects of rolling and cooling conditions on microstructure and mechanical properties of low carbon cold heading steel were investigated on a laboratory hot rolling mill. The results have shown that the mechanical proper ties of low carbon steels exceed the standard requirements of ML30, ML35, ML40, and ML45 steel, respectively due to thermomechanical controlled processing (TMCP). This is attributed to a significant amount of pearlite and the ferrite-grain refinement. Under the condition of relatively low temperature rolling, the mechanical properties exceed standard requirements of ML45 and ML30 steel after water cooling and air cooling, respectively. Fast cooling which leads to more pearlite and finer ferrite grains is more critical than finish rolling temperatures for low carbon cold heading steel. The specimen at high finish rolling temperature exhibits very good mechanical properties due to fast cooling. This result has great significance not only for energy saving and emission reduction, but also for low-carbon economy, because the goals of the replacement of medium-carbon by low-carbon are achieved with TMCP.

  2. Effect of Austempering Time on the Microstructure and Carbon Partitioning of Ultrahigh Strength Steel 56NiCrMoV7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanshun Luo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrahigh strength steel 56NiCrMoV7 was austempered at 270 °C for different durations in order to investigate the microstructure evolution, carbon partitioning behaviour and hardness property. Detailed microstructure has been characterised using optical microscopy and field emission gun scanning electron microscopy. A newly developed X-ray diffraction method has been employed to dissolve the bainitic/martensitic ferrite phase as two sub-phases of different tetragonal ratios, which provides quantitative analyses of the carbon partitioning between the resultant ferrites and the retained austenite. The results show that, a short-term austempering treatment was in the incubation period of the bainite transformation, which resulted in maximum hardness being equivalent to the oil-quenching treatment. The associated microstructure comprises fine carbide-free martensitic and bainitic ferrites of supersaturated carbon contents as well as carbon-rich retained austenite. In particular, the short-term austempering treatment helped prevent the formation of lengthy martensitic laths as those being found in the microstructure of oil-quenched sample. When the austempering time was increased from 20 to 80 min, progressive decrease of the hardness was associated with the evolution of the microstructure, including progressive coarsening of bainitic ferrite, carbide precipitating inside high-carbon bainitic ferrite and its subsequent decarbonisation.

  3. Self-supported carbon electrodes obtained by tape casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubio-Marcos, F.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the preparation and electrochemical response of self-supported carbon electrodes prepared by tape casting. The dc electrical conductivity, σ, of the electrodes was determined by four-wire resistance measurements and a relation between the graphite/organic additives ratio and the electrical conductivity was established. The application of these self-supported carbon electrodes as working electrodes in analytical techniques was also evaluated using norepinephrine as electroactive substance in cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The results were compared with the traditional electrodes, carbon paste electrodes (CPEs, showing that the new self-supported carbon electrodes had both lower background noise and higher analytical response.

    Este artículo describe la preparación y respuesta electroquímica de electrodos de carbono autosoportados preparados mediante colado en cinta. La conductividad eléctrica en corriente continua de este nuevo tipo de electrodos de carbono se ha determinado usando el método de cuatro puntas y se ha establecido una relación ente la relación grafito/aditivos orgánicos y la conductividad eléctrica. La aplicación de estos electrodos autosoportados como electrodos de trabajo en diversas técnicas electroanalíticas también se ha evaluado, empleando norepinefrina como analito en voltametría cíclica y en cronoamperometría. Los resultados se compararon con los obtenidos empleando los electrodos de pasta de carbono tradicionales como electrodos de trabajo, viéndose que la señal de los nuevos electrodos autosoportados poseía menor ruido de fondo y mayor respuesta analítica.

  4. Effect of niobium on microstructure and mechanical properties of high carbon Fe-10.5 wt.% Al alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baligidad, R.G

    2004-03-15

    The effect of niobium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of high carbon Fe-10.5 wt.% Al alloys has been investigated. The alloys were prepared by a combination of air induction melting with flux cover (AIMFC) and electroslag remelting (ESR). The ESR ingots were hot-forged and hot-rolled at 1373 K. The hot-rolled alloys were characterized. The ternary Fe-10.5 wt.% Al-(0.7 and 0.9 wt.%) C alloys exhibited two-phase microstructure of large volume fraction of Fe{sub 3}AlC{sub 0.5} precipitates in Fe-Al ({alpha}) matrix. Addition of niobium to Fe-10.5 wt.% Al-(0.7 and 0.9 wt.%) C alloys resulted in the precipitation of small volume fraction of niobium carbide precipitates in Fe-Al ({alpha}) matrix in addition to large volume fraction of Fe{sub 3}AlC{sub 0.5} precipitates. The addition of up to 2 wt.% Nb to high carbon Fe-10.5 wt.% Al alloys has no effect on the yield strength at both room temperature and 873 K as well as creep properties at 140 MPa and 873 K, but it has reduced the room temperature tensile elongation at higher (2 wt.%) concentration. In the present work, it has also been observed that alloys containing high (0.9 wt.%) carbon, exhibited higher yield strength at room temperature as compared to alloys containing low (0.7 wt.%) carbon. The increase in strength with small increase in carbon may be attributed to the significant increase in volume fraction of Fe{sub 3}AlC {sub 0.5} precipitates.

  5. Influence of tempered microstructures on the transformation behaviour of cold deformed and intercritically annealed medium carbon low alloy steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayo Alaneme

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is focused on understanding the role of microstructural variables and processing parameters in obtaining optimised dual phase structures in medium carbon low alloy steels. Tempered Martensite structures produced at 300, 500, and 650 °C, were cold rolled to varied degrees ranging from 20 to 80% deformation. Intercritical annealing was then performed at 740, 760, and 780 °C for various time duration ranging from 60 seconds to 60 minutes before quenching in water. The transformation behaviour was studied with the aid of optical microscopy and hardness curves. From the results, it is observed that microstructural condition, deformation, and intercritical temperatures influenced the chronological order of the competing stress relaxation and decomposition phase reactions which interfered with the rate of the expected α → γ transformation. The three unique transformation trends observed are systematically analyzed. It was also observed that the 300 and 500 °C tempered initial microstructures were unsuitable for the production of dual structures with optimized strength characteristics.

  6. Phase-field modelling of microstructure formation during the solidification of continuously cast low carbon and HSLA steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2012-07-01

    Cracking in continuous casting of steels has been one of the main problems for decades. Many of the cracks that occur during solidification are hot tears. To better understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low carbon (LCAK) and two high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel grades during the initial stage of the process where the first solidified shell is formed inside the mould and where breakouts typically occur. 2D simulation is performed using the multiphase-field software MICRESS [1], which is coupled to the thermodynamic database TCFE6 [2] and the mobility database MOB2 [2], taking into account all elements which may have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during or subsequent to solidification. The use of a moving-frame boundary condition allows travelling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. A heterogeneous nucleation model is included to permit the description of morphological transitions between the initial solidification and the subsequent columnar growth region. Furthermore, a macroscopic one-dimensional temperature solver is integrated to account for the transient and nonlinear temperature field during the initial stage of continuous casting. The external heat flux boundary conditions for this process were derived from thermal process data of the industrial slab caster. The simulation results for the three steel grades have been validated by thickness measurements of breakout shells and microstructure observation of the corresponding grades. Furthermore, the primary dendrite spacing has been measured across the whole thickness of the shell and compared with the simulated microstructures. Significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are discussed and correlated with their hot-cracking behavior.

  7. Co-sputtering C-Cu thin film synthesis: microstructural study of copper precipitates encapsulated into a carbon matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabioc'h, Thierry; Naudon, Andre; Jaouen, Michel; Thiaudiere, Dominique; Babonneau, David

    1999-03-01

    Co-sputtered C-Cu thin film depositions have been performed in the temperature range 80-873 K, the atomic carbon concentration varying from 16% to 96% . To characterize the microstructure of the C-Cu thin films, transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering experiments have been used. During the deposition process, a demixing occurs of the carbon and copper species due to their very low solubilities that leads to the formation of nanometric copper precipitates homogeneously distributed in a more or less graphitic matrix. These precipitates have an elongated shape in the direction of the thin film growth. When the deposition was performed at 273 K for copper atomic concentrations CCu > 55% , as well as for all thin films synthesized at 573 K whatever the CCu value, the formation of graphene layers parallel to the surface of the copper precipitates was observed so that an encapsulation of the Cu aggregates in carbon cages occurs. We propose that surface diffusion of the different species occurring during the deposition process leads to the demixing of carbon and copper. Thus, we suggest that the copper acts as a catalyst for graphitization of carbon to explain the formation of such structures at temperatures as low as those used in these experiments.

  8. Effect of temperature and time on microstructure and surface functional groups of activated carbon fibers prepared from liquefied wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon fibers were prepared from liquefied wood through stream activation. The effects of activation temperature and time on the microstructure and surface functional groups of the liquefied wood activated carbon fibers (LWACFs were studied using analysis of burning behavior, X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and SEM. The results showed that the burn-off value of the LWACFs increased gradually with the increase in temperature or time. All the LWACFs were far from being structurally graphitized, and in general, as temperature or time increased, the degree of graphitization and thickness of crystal structure increased. In addition, the LWACFs possessed rich micropores, and their specific surface area, pore volume, micropore size, and mesopore quantity were directly related to the activation temperature or time. The maximum specific surface area was found to be 2641 m2/g. The fractal dimension values of all samples were close to 3, indicating that their surfaces were very rough. Furthermore, with an increase in temperature or time, the elemental content of carbon increased, while that of oxygen decreased. Meanwhile, as the temperature or time increased, the relative content of graphitic carbon decreased, whereas that of carbon bonded to oxygen-containing functions increased. The surface of samples prepared at higher temperature or with longer time formed a considerable amount of holes.

  9. Synthesis of nanostructured and microstructured ZnO and Zn(OH)2 on activated carbon cloth by hydrothermal and microwave-assisted chemical bath deposition methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosayebi, Elham; Azizian, Saeid; Hajian, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured and microstructured ZnO and Zn(OH)2 loaded on activated carbon cloth were synthesized by microwave-assisted chemical bath deposition and hydrothermal methods. By hydrothermal method the deposited sample on carbon fiber is pure ZnO with dandelion-like nanostructures. By microwave-assisted chemical bath method the structure and composition of deposited sample depends on solution pH. At pH = 9.8 the deposited sample on carbon fiber is pure ZnO with flower-like microstructure; but at pH = 10.8 the sample is a mixture of ZnO and Zn(OH)2 with flower-like and rhombic microstructures, respectively. The mechanism of crystal grow by microwave-assisted chemical bath method was investigated by SEM method at both pH.

  10. Behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the porosity and microstructure of cement-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nochaiya, Thanongsak; Chaipanich, Arnon

    2011-01-01

    The porosity and microstructure of a Portland cement-multi-walled carbon nanotube composite were investigated. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), up to 1 wt.% of cement, synthesized by infusion chemical vapor deposition, and Portland cement type I (PC) were used to produce pastes with a water to cement ratio of 0.5. Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize Portland cement-CNTs systems. MIP analysis of the results indicates that total porosity of the mixes with CNTs was found to decrease with increasing CNTs content. Moreover, an important effect of additional CNTs was a reduction in the number of mesopores, while SEM technique showed dispersion of CNTs between the hydration phases of Portland cement pastes.

  11. Characterization of a surface modified carbon cryogel and a carbon supported Pt catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BILJANA M. BABIĆ

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A carbon cryogel, synthesized by carbonization of a resorcinol/formaldehyde cryogel and oxidized in nitric acid, was used as catalyst support for Pt nano-particles. The Pt/C catalyst was prepared by a modified polyol synthesis method in an ethylene glycol (EG solution. Characterization by nitrogen adsorption showed that the carbon cryogel support and the Pt/C catalyst were mesoporous materials with high specific surface areas (SBET > 400 m2 g-1 and large mesoporous volumes. X-Ray diffraction of the catalyst demonstrated the successful reduction of the Pt precursor to metallic form. TEM Images of the Pt/C catalyst and Pt particle size distribution showed that the mean Pt particle size was about 3.3 nm. Cyclic voltammetry (CV experiments at various scan rates (from 2 to 200 mV s-1 were performed in 0.5 mol dm-3 HClO4 solution. The large capacitance of the oxidized carbon cryogel electrode, which arises from a combination of the double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance, associated with the participation of surface redox-type reactions was demonstrated. For the oxidized carbon cryogel, the total specific capacitance determined by 1/C vs. ν0.5 extrapolation method was found to be 386 F g-1. The hydrogen oxidation reaction at the investigated Pt/C catalyst proceeded as an electrochemically reversible, two-electron direct discharge reaction.

  12. Chemical, strength and microstructure characterization of Balinese bamboos as activated carbon source for adsorbed natural gas application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra Negara, D. N. K.; Tirta Nindhia, T. G.; Surata, I. W.; Sucipta, M.

    2017-05-01

    Bamboo is one of promising biomass raw materials that has been widely researched, developed, manufactured as activated carbon (AC) and applied in many fields of life. However, there were only a few references associated to the use of bamboo AC as an adsorbent for Adsorbed Natural Gas (ANG) application. The purpose of this study was to characterize chemical, strength and microstructure of two types of local Balinese bamboo that were Tabah bamboo (Gigantochloc Nigrociliata) and Tamblang bamboo (Schizostachyum Brachycladum) as AC source. Characterization was carried out by undertaking proximate, ultimate, tensile tests, Van Soest analysis and microstructure observation. The results have showed that Tabah bamboo has 22.9151 % lignin, 44.9456 % cellulose, 84.56 % volatile and 44.47 % carbon, which were those characteristics higher than Tamblang bamboo. Furthermore, Tabah bamboo also has higher bond density vascular bundles, higher tensile strength (240.85 ± 17.53 Nmm-2) and fracture strength (182.39 ± 17.46 Nmm-2), lower ash (2.92 %), silica (1.84 %) and nitrogen (0.95 %) compared to Tamblang bamboo. Due to such characteristics, Tabah bamboo has greater potential as an AC precursor than Tamblang bamboo.

  13. Study on Utilization of Carboxyl Group Decorated Carbon Nanotubes and Carbonation Reaction for Improving Strengths and Microstructures of Cement Paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiantong Yan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have excellent mechanical properties and can be used to reinforce cement-based materials. On the other hand, the reaction product of carbonation with hydroxides in hydrated cement paste can reduce the porosity of cement-based materials. In this study, a novel method to improve the strength of cement paste was developed through a synergy of carbon nanotubes decorated with carboxyl group and carbonation reactions. The experimental results showed that the carboxyl group (–COOH of decorated carbon nanotubes and the surfactant can control the morphology of the calcium carbonate crystal of carbonation products in hydrated cement paste. The spindle-like calcium carbonate crystals showed great morphological differences from those observed in the conventional carbonation of cement paste. The spindle-like calcium carbonate crystals can serve as fiber-like reinforcements to reinforce the cement paste. By the synergy of the carbon nanotubes and carbonation reactions, the compressive and flexural strengths of cement paste were significantly improved and increased by 14% and 55%, respectively, when compared to those of plain cement paste.

  14. Numerical evaluation of micro-structural parameters of porous supports in metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Georg; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Brandstätter, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Metallic supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are considered as a durable and cost effective alternative to the state-of-the-art ceramic supported cell designs. In order to understand the mass and charge transport in the metal-support of this new type of cell a novel technique involving X-ray...

  15. EFFECT OF STRAIN RATE ON MICROSTRUCTURE OF A LOW CARBON STEEL WIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H BOUHALAIS

    2011-12-01

    microstructure of the material in as received and deformed conditions. It is found that tensile properties depend on the wiredrawing area reduction (τw. The annealing temperatures and the grain size are determined; they also vary with τw .

  16. The effects of addition of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jinhua, E-mail: lujinhua@nwpu.edu.cn; Yang, Binke; Li, Hejun; Fu, Qiangang; Zhang, Weiben

    2014-07-29

    For the purpose of comparison, C/C composites were prepared with and without lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) by thermal gradient chemical vapour infiltration (TCVI). Natural gas was used as the carbon source, and N{sub 2} was selected as the diluent gas and protected gas in the experiments. The effects of percentage composition of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. The microstructure was investigated via polarized light microscope (PLM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The mechanical properties were studied via three-point flexural testing. The results indicate that the addition of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a considerable effect on pyrocarbon texture, with the matrix of the pure C/C composite being composed of ISO and smooth laminar (SL) pyrocarbon, whereas the matrix of composites with La{sub 2}O{sub 3} was mainly dominated by SL pyrocarbon. The differences are the refinement of pyrocarbon texture and increase of the extinction angle with the increasing content of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Moreover, it was observed that the ultimate flexural strength of C/C composites with La{sub 2}O{sub 3} was significantly improved, from which it can be deduced that La{sub 2}O{sub 3} improves the interface roughness and interface bonding strength between carbon fibres and the pyrocarbon matrix by interfacial chemical reaction.

  17. Densification and microstructure of carbon/carbon composites prepared by chemical vapor infiltration using ethanol as precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration of carbon fiber felts with uniform initial bulk density of 0.47 g·cm-3 was investigated at the ethanol partial pressures of 5-20 kPa,as well as the temperatures of 1050,1100,1150 and 1200°C.Ethanol,diluted by nitrogen,was employed as the precursor of pyrolytic carbon.Polarized light microscopy(PLM),scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were adopted to study the texture of pyrolytic carbon deposited at various temperatures.A change from medium-to high-textured pyrolytic carbon was observed in the sample infiltrated at 1050°C.Whereas,homogeneous high-textured pyrolytic carbons were deposited at the temperatures of 1100,1150 and 1200°C.Extinction angles of 19°-21° were determined for different regions in the samples densified at the temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1200°C.Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surface after bending test indicated that the prepared carbon/carbon composite samples exhibited a pseudo-plastic fracture behavior.In addition,fracture behavior of the carbon/carbon samples was obviously effected by their infiltration temperature.The fracture mode of C/C composites was transformed from shearing failure to tensile breakage with increasing infiltration temperature. Results of this study show that ethanol is a promising carbon source to synthesize carbon/carbon composites with homogeneously high-textured pyrolytic carbon over a wide range of temperatures(from 1100 to 1200°C).

  18. Copper-cerium oxides supported on carbon nanomaterial for preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高美怡; 江楠; 赵宇宏; 徐长进; 苏海全; 曾尚红

    2016-01-01

    The CuxO-CeO2/Fe@CNSs, CuxO-CeO2/MWCNTs-Co and CuxO-CeO2/MWCNTs-Ni catalysts were prepared by the im-pregnation method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffrac-tion, H2-temperature programmed reduction and N2 adsorption-desorption techniques. It was found that the Fe nanoparticles were encapsulated into the multi-layered carbon nanospheres (CNSs). However, the multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) were generated on the Co/Al2O3 and Ni/Al2O3 precursor. The addition of carbon nanomaterial as supports could improve structural properties and low-temperature activity of the CuO-CeO2 catalyst, and save the used amount of metal catalysts in the temperature range with high selectivity for CO oxidation. The copper-cerium oxides supported on carbon nanomaterial had good resistence to H2O and CO2.

  19. Interfacial Microstructure and Enhanced Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber Composites Caused by Growing Generation 1-4 Dendritic Poly(amidoamine) on a Fiber Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Zhang, Ruliang; Gao, Fucheng; He, Maoshuai; Wang, Chengguo; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Lifen; Cui, Hongzhi

    2016-08-23

    In an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites, propagation of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers by in situ polymerization on a carbon fiber surface was performed. During polymerization processes, PAMAM was grafted on carbon fiber by repeated Michael addition and amidation reactions. The changes in surface microstructure and the chemical composition of carbon fibers before and after modification were investigated by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. All the results indicated that PAMAM was successfully grown on the carbon fiber surface. Such propagation could significantly increase the surface roughness and introduce sufficient polar groups onto the carbon fiber surface, enhancing the surface wettability of carbon fiber. The fractured surface of carbon fiber-reinforced composites showed a great enhancement of interfacial adhesion. Compared with those of desized fiber composites, the interlaminar shear strength and interfacial shear strength of PAMAM/fiber-reinforced composites showed increases of 55.49 and 110.94%, respectively.

  20. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide by carbon monoxide over iron oxide supported on activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The selective reduction of sulfur dioxide with carbon monoxide to elemental sulfur was studied over AC-supported transition-metal oxide catalysts. According to the study, Fe2O3/AC was the most active catalyst among the 4 AC-supported catalysts tested. By using Fe2O3/AC, the best catalyst, when the feed conditions were properly optimized (CO/SO2 molar ratio = 2:1; sulfidation temperature, 400 °C; Fe content, 20 wt%; GHSV = 7000 mL g-1 h-1), 95.43% sulfur dioxide conversion and 86.59% sulfur yi...

  1. Effect of underlying silicon layer on microstructure and photoluminescence of rapid-thermal-annealed carbon and C/Si nanofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, C.K., E-mail: ckchung@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lai, C.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wu, B.H. [Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •Photoluminescence (PL) of carbon films originated from recombination of confined electron–hole pairs. •Broad PL was an interesting topic using varied methods for Si and C reaction. •Asymmetrical broad PL of two-layer Si/C and three-layer Si/C/Si was demonstrated previously. •Here, another C/Si (underlying Si layer) films have further investigated for enhancement of symmetry-like PL. •The effect and mechanism of underlying Si layer thickness on microstructure and PL evolution of two-layer C/Si was studied. -- Abstract: A composite material for broad photoluminescence (PL) from asymmetry to more symmetry-like was proposed by the formation of Si nanocrystals (nc-Si), SiC nanoparticles (np-SiC) and sp{sup 2} carbon cluster which were made from the two-layer C/Si on Si(1 0 0) using rapid-thermal-annealing at 750 °C for 1 min. The effect of underlying Si layer thickness on the microstructure and broad PL of the annealed carbon and two-layer C/Si films has been investigated. Fourier-transform-infrared-absorption spectra indicated that very weak Si–C bonding peak was observed for the annealed single-C film and the enhanced intensity occurred at two-layer C/Si films with underlying thickness of 10–25 nm. Compared to the single-C film, the two-layer C/Si film was beneficial for formation of SiC which increased with Si thickness. A more symmetry-like broad PL band around 400–700 nm was observed at the annealed C/Si films with higher Si thickness of 25 nm while the annealed C film has weak and narrow band. Also, the enhanced symmetry-like PL band was attributed to more amount of np-SiC formation at the bottom of C/Si film together with reduced C thickness which can be potentially applied into white light emission material. The detailed mechanism of broad PL was proposed in terms of microstructure evolution.

  2. Carbon Aerogel-Supported Pt Catalysts for the Hydrogenolysis and Isomerization of n-Butane: Influence of the Carbonization Temperature of the Support and Pt Particle Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta B. Dawidziuk

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon aerogels prepared at different carbonization temperatures and with varying mesopore volumes were used as supports for Pt catalysts to study the n-C4H10/H2 reaction. Mean Pt particle size depended on the mesopore volume of the support, showing a linear decrease when the mesopore volume increased. The turnover frequency (TOF for hydrogenolysis was much higher than for isomerization in catalysts supported on carbon aerogels obtained at 900–950 °C. However, both TOF values were similar in catalysts supported on the carbon aerogel obtained at 500 °C. TOF for hydrogenolysis and isomerization were related to the mean Pt particle size in catalysts supported on carbon aerogels obtained at 900–950 °C. In addition, both reactions showed a compensation effect between the activation energy and pre-exponential factor, indicating that they have the same intermediate, i.e., the chemisorbed dehydrogenated alkane.

  3. Large Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanofibres on Sodium Chloride Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Rajarao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Large scale synthesis of carbon nanofibres (CNFs on a sodium chloride support has been achieved. CNFs have been synthesized using metal oxalate (Ni, Co and Fe as catalyst precursors at 680 C by chemical vapour deposition method. Upon pyrolysis, this catalyst precursors yield catalyst nanoparticles directly. The sodium chloride was used as a catalyst support, it was chosen because of its non‐toxic and water soluble nature. Problems, such as the detrimental effect of CNFs, the detrimental effects on the environment and even cost, have been avoided by using a water soluble support. The structure of products was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The purity of the grown products and purified products were determined by the thermal analysis and X‐ray diffraction method. Here we report the 7600, 7000 and 6500 wt% yield of CNFs synthesized over nickel, cobalt and iron oxalate. The long, curved and worm shaped CNFs were obtained on Ni, Co and Fe catalysts respectively. The lengthy process of calcination and reduction for the preparation of catalysts is avoided in this method. This synthesis route is simple and economical, hence, it can be used for CNF synthesis in industries.

  4. Review of carbon dioxide research staffing and academic support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S. B.; Howard, L.; Stevenson, W.; Trice, J.

    1985-04-01

    More than 60 percent of the staff on Carbon Dioxide Research Division (CDRD) projects were university affiliated, and over one third of project scientists and engineers also had university teaching responsibilities. Almost 20 percent of project staff were students. CO2 research is unlikely to affect the general labor market for scientists and engineers because it uses such a small portion of the total pool. On the other hand, anticipated tight labor markets in some disciplines important to CO2 research may make it advantageous for CDRD to expand its support of university faculty, students, and staff to ensure that competent, knowledgeable researchers and managers are available for eventual policy decisions on CO2 issues. Options for academic support that lend themselves readily to the diffuse nature of CO2 research, while providing flexibility in the identification and accomplishment of specific programmatic objectives, include modifying procurement procedures for research contracts to enhance academic involvement, sponsoring summer institutes tailored to specific participants and focused on issues of interest to CDRD, and supporting traveling lecture programs designed to bring information of concern to CDRD to technical and nontechnical audiences.

  5. Microstructure and properties of SiC-coated carbon fibers prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yong; Huang, Xiaozhong; Du, Zuojuan; Xiao, Jianrong; Zhou, Shan; Wei, Yongshan

    2016-04-01

    SiC-coated carbon fibers are prepared at room temperature with different radio-frequency magnetron sputtering powers. Results show that the coated carbon fibers have uniform, continuous, and flawless surfaces. The mean strengths of the coated carbon fibers with different sputtering powers are not influenced by other factors. Filament strength of SiC-coated carbon fibers increases by approximately 2% compared with that of uncoated carbon fibers at a sputtering power of coated fibers increase by 9.3% and 12% at sputtering powers of 250 and 300 W, respectively. However, the mean strength of the SiC-coated carbon fibers decreased by 8% at a sputtering power of 400 W.

  6. Fabrication of high-aspect-ratio polymer microstructures and hierarchical textures using carbon nanotube composite master molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copic, Davor; Park, Sei Jin; Tawfick, Sameh; De Volder, Michael F L; Hart, A John

    2011-05-21

    Scalable and cost effective patterning of polymer structures and their surface textures is essential to engineer material properties such as liquid wetting and dry adhesion, and to design artificial biological interfaces. Further, fabrication of high-aspect-ratio microstructures often requires controlled deep-etching methods or high-intensity exposure. We demonstrate that carbon nanotube (CNT) composites can be used as master molds for fabrication of high-aspect-ratio polymer microstructures having anisotropic nanoscale textures. The master molds are made by growth of vertically aligned CNT patterns, capillary densification of the CNTs using organic solvents, and capillary-driven infiltration of the CNT structures with SU-8. The composite master structures are then replicated in SU-8 using standard PDMS transfer molding methods. By this process, we fabricated a library of replicas including vertical micro-pillars, honeycomb lattices with sub-micron wall thickness and aspect ratios exceeding 50:1, and microwells with sloped sidewalls. This process enables batch manufacturing of polymer features that capture complex nanoscale shapes and textures, while requiring only optical lithography and conventional thermal processing.

  7. Electrochemical Behavior and Microstructure of Recyclable Aluminium-magmesium Alloy Hot-dip Coating Deposited on Low Carbon Steel Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Panomkorn KWAKHONG; Apichart ARTNASEAW; Chaiyaput KRUEHONG

    2015-01-01

    With the abundance and good corrosion resistance of aluminium, hot-dip technique was used to prepare the recycled Al with 8.2 mass% Mg alloy coating on low carbon steel substrates. Electrochemical behavior of this coating was investigated by an-odic polarization and open circuit potential measurement. Its microstructure and composition were observed by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, respectively. The long lasting corrosion performance of coated steels was in-vestigated under the salt fog spray test. From anodic polarization curves and open circuit potential, recycled Al with 8.2 mass% Mg coating performed adequate sacriifcial ability. At 0.40 V, current density of recycled Al with 8.2 mass% Mg alloy coating was about 200 000 times higher than that of pure recycled Al coating, and was about 0.5 times lower than that of Zn coating. The microstruc-ture of recycled Al with 8.2 mass% Mg alloy coating on the steel substrate consisted of Al3Mg2, Al-Fe intermetallic compound and Al matrix. The results from salt fog spray test showed that recycled Al with 8.2 mass% Mg alloy coated steel had similar corrosion resistance ability to Zn coated steel.

  8. Effect of supercritical carbon dioxide pasteurization on natural microbiota, texture, and microstructure of fresh-cut coconut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrentino, Giovanna; Balzan, Sara; Dorigato, Andrea; Pegoretti, Alessandro; Spilimbergo, Sara

    2012-05-01

    The objective of the present study was the evaluation of the effectiveness of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) as a nonthermal technology for the pasteurization of fresh-cut coconut, as an example of ready-to-eat and minimally processed food. First, the inactivation kinetics of microbiota on coconut were determined using SC-CO(2) treatments (pressures at 8 and 12 MPa, temperatures from 24 to 45 °C, treatment times from 5 to 60 min). Second, the effects of SC-CO(2) on the hardness and microstructure of fresh-cut coconut processed at the optimal conditions for microbial reduction were investigated. SC-CO(2) treatment of 15 min at 45 °C and 12 MPa induced 4 log CFU/g reductions of mesophilic microorganisms, lactic acid bacteria, total coliforms, and yeasts and molds. The hardness of coconut was not affected by the treatment but the samples developed an irregular and disorderly microstructure. Results suggested the potential of SC-CO(2) in preserving fresh-cut fruits and ready-to-eat products. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Modelling of Microstructural Evolution and Prediction of Mechanical Properties of Plain Carbon Strip Steel in Hot Rolling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaochun SHA; Chunli MO; Dianzhong LI; Yiyi LI

    2004-01-01

    Based on hot rolling production line of strip steel, the of-line in-house software, termed as ROLLAN (Rolling Analysis),is developed. The code is mainly used to predict the evolution of temperature, rolling force, fraction and grain size of recrystallization, fraction and grain size of phase transformation and final mechanical properties. Almost all the processing parameters affecting microstructure and mechanical properties in the schedule from reheating to the coiling process are considered in detail. Self-learning coefficient is adopted to adjust the deviation between predicted and measured temperatures, such as roughing exit temperature (RT2), finishing exit temperature (FT7) and coiling temperature (CT). Due to the application of low-speed-threading, increasing-speed-rolling and decreasing-speeddelivery process during finishing rolling and different cooling condition, after coiling the thermal-mechanical history of different position, along strip longitudinal direction is different resulting in inhomogeneous mechanical properties.So the segments are divided along longitudinal direction to identify the variation of microstructure and mechanical properties. An example of plain carbon strip steel Q235 with various thickness is used to compare the calculated mechanical properties with measured ones. For the specific grade of Q235, the maximum deviation of tensile strength is less than 10.3 MPa, the yield strength is less than 13.2 MPa, and elongation is less than 1.99%. Further work will focus on the on-line application and consider the effect of macrosegregation and sulfur content of cast slab.

  10. Effect of Precursor Microstructure on Retained Austenite and Mechanical Property of Low Carbon Steels with IQ&P Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Lian-sheng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure, retained austenite and mechanical property of low-carbon steels with different precursor microstructures were studied by means of intercritical reheating-quenching and partitioning (IQ&P processes. The results show that the structure of IQ&P-Ⅰ multiphase steel with precursor ferrite + pearlite (F+P is blocky ferrite, martensite (M. The blocky retained austenite(RA of IQ&P-Ⅰ multiphase steel exists in the boundary of ferrite and martensite and film-like retained austenite distributes around the lath martensite as the shape of thin slice. The transformation induced plastic effect of IQ&P-Ⅰ multiphase steel with less content of retained austenite is unapparent. The tensile strength of IQ&P-Ⅰ multiphase steel reaches 957 MPa, but the tensile elongation is only 20%, and the production of strength and elongation is 19905.6 MPa·%. The structure of IQ&P-Ⅱ multiphase steel with precursor martensite is needle or lath grey-black ferrite and martensite. The fine needle like martensite is distributed evenly on the ferrite matrix. The film-like retained austenite is only distributed on the ferrite matrix. The content of retained austenite of IQ&P-Ⅱ multiphase steel reaches 13.2% with more obvious TRIP effect and higher stability. The production of strength and elongation of IQ&P-Ⅱ multiphase steel is 21560 MPa·% with good combination of strength and plasticity.

  11. Carbon monoxide tolerant platinum electrocatalysts on niobium doped titania and carbon nanotube composite supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigdon, William A.; Huang, Xinyu

    2014-12-01

    In the anode of electrochemical cells operating at low temperature, the hydrogen oxidation reaction is susceptible to poisoning from carbon monoxide (CO) which strongly adsorbs on platinum (Pt) catalysts and increases activation overpotential. Adsorbed CO is removed by oxidative processes such as electrochemical stripping, though cleaning can also cause corrosion. One approach to improve the tolerance of Pt is through alloying with less-noble metals, but the durability of alloyed electrocatalysts is a critical concern. Without sacrificing stability, tolerance can be improved by careful design of the support composition using metal oxides. The bifunctional mechanism is promoted at junctions of the catalyst and metal oxides used in the support. Stable metal oxides can also form strong interactions with catalysts, as is the case for platinum on titania (TiOx). In this study, niobium (Nb) serves as an electron donor dopant in titania. The transition metal oxides are joined to functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotube (CNT) supports in order to synthesize composite supports. Pt is then deposited to form electrocatalysts which are characterized before fabrication into anodes for tests as an electrochemical hydrogen pump. Comparisons are made between the control from Pt-CNT to Pt-TiOx-CNT and Pt-Ti0.9Nb0.1Ox-CNT in order to demonstrate advantages.

  12. Effect of carbon and manganese on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Rong, Lijian; Li, Dianzhong; Lu, Shanping

    2017-03-01

    Six 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals with different carbon and manganese contents have been studied to reveal the role of major elements, which guide for the design of welding consumables for reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel and meet for the requirements of accelerator driven systems-lead fusion reactors. The typical microstructure for the 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals is the lath martensite along with the fine stripe δ-ferrite. The chemical compositions influence the solidification sequence and therefore, change the δ-ferrite content in the deposited metal. The impact toughness for the 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals decreases remarkably when the δ-ferrite content is more than 5.2 vol%, also the impact toughness decreases owing to the high quenching martensite formation. Increasing the level of manganese addition, α phase of each alloy shifts to the bottom right according to the CCT diagram.

  13. Assessment of the microstructure and torsional fatigue performance of an induction hardened vanadium microalloyed medium-carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothleutner, Lee M.

    Vanadium microalloying of medium-carbon bar steels is a common practice in industry for a number of hot rolled as well as forged and controlled-cooled components. However, use of vanadium microalloyed steels has expanded into applications beyond their originally designed controlled-cooled processing scheme. Applications such as transmission shafts often require additional heat-treatments such as quench and tempering and/or induction hardening to meet packaging or performance requirements. As a result, there is uncertainty regarding the influence of vanadium on the properties of heat-treated components, specifically the effect of rapid heat-treating such as induction hardening. In the current study, the microstructural evolution and torsional fatigue behavior of induction hardened 1045 and 10V45 (0.08 wt pct V) steels were examined. Torsional fatigue specimens specifically designed for this research were machined from the as-received, hot rolled bars and induction hardened using both scanning (96 kHz/72 kW) and single-shot (31 kHz/128 kW) methods. Four conditions were evaluated, three scan hardened to 25, 32, and 44 pct nominal effective case depths and one single-shot hardened to 44 pct. Torsional fatigue tests were conducted at a stress ratio of 0.1 and shear stress amplitudes of 550, 600, and 650 MPa. Physical simulations using the thermal profiles from select induction hardened conditions were conducted in the GleebleRTM 3500 to augment microstructural analysis of torsional fatigue specimens. Thermal profiles were calculated by a collaborating private company using electro-thermal finite element analysis. Residual stresses were evaluated for all conditions using a strain gage hole drilling technique. The results showed that vanadium microalloying has an influence on the microstructure in the highest hardness region of the induction-hardened case as well as the total case region. Vanadium microalloyed conditions consistently exhibited a greater amount of non

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties analysis of β-tricalcium phosphate/carbon nanotubes scaffold based on rapid prototyping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN; Liu-lan; SHEN; Ying-ying; ZHANG; Jia-feng; FANG; Min

    2009-01-01

    β-TCP ceramic scaffolds were fabricated with selective laser sintering(SLS)in this work. Carbon nanotubes(CNTs)were mixed with porous β-TCP matrix to enhance the mechanical performance of the bone tissue engineering scaffolds. Scaffold reconstruction and microstructure analysis were fulfilled based on micro-computed tomography(Micro-CT)scanning data.Results show that the strength of scaffold mixed with 0.2% CNTs reaches 0.819 MPa which has been improved by 85.7% compared with that without CNTs. Micro-CT analysis shows that the scaffold has a good interconnectivity, and pore size mainly distributes in the two regions of 60-340 μm and 500 620 μm.

  15. Effect of Batch Annealing Temperature on Microstructure and Resistance to Fish Scaling of Ultra-Low Carbon Enamel Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaiwang Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an ultra-low carbon enamel steel was batch annealed at different temperatures, and the effect of the batch annealing temperature on the microstructure and resistance to fish scaling was investigated by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and a hydrogen permeation test. The results show that the main precipitates in experimental steel are fine TiC and coarse Ti4C2S2 particles. The average sizes of both TiC and Ti4C2S2 increase with increasing the batch annealing temperature. The resistance to fish scaling decreases with increasing the annealing temperature, which is caused by the growth of ferrite grain and the coarsening of the TiC and Ti4C2S2 particles

  16. Interfacial microstructure and properties of carbon fiber composites modified with graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Fan, Xinyu; Yan, Chun; Li, Hongzhou; Zhu, Yingdan; Li, Xiaotuo; Yu, Liping

    2012-03-01

    The performance of carbon fiber-reinforced composites is dependent to a great extent on the properties of fiber-matrix interface. To improve the interfacial properties in carbon fiber/epoxy composites, we directly introduced graphene oxide (GO) sheets dispersed in the fiber sizing onto the surface of individual carbon fibers. The applied graphite oxide, which could be exfoliated to single-layer GO sheets, was verified by atomic force microscope (AFM). The surface topography of modified carbon fibers and the distribution of GO sheets in the interfacial region of carbon fibers were detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interfacial properties between carbon fiber and matrix were investigated by microbond test and three-point short beam shear test. The tensile properties of unidirectional (UD) composites were investigated in accordance with ASTM standards. The results of the tests reveal an improved interfacial and tensile properties in GO-modified carbon fiber composites. Furthermore, significant enhancement of interfacial shear strength (IFSS), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), and tensile properties was achieved in the composites when only 5 wt % of GO sheets introduced in the fiber sizing. This means that an alternative method for improving the interfacial and tensile properties of carbon fiber composites by controlling the fiber-matrix interface was developed. Such multiscale reinforced composites show great potential with their improved mechanical performance to be likely applied in the aerospace and automotive industries. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  17. Development of ferrous laminated composites with unique microstructures by control of carbon diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, D. W.; Oyama, T.; Ruano, O. A.; Sherby, O. D.

    1986-09-01

    A novel method is described for preparing ferrous laminated composites, containing ultrahigh carbon steel as one of the components, which results in hard and soft layers bounded by sharp and discrete interfaces. The method is based on increasing the activity of carbon in iron by silicon addition; in this manner, the carbon is made to segregate into specific layers by heat treatment at low temperatures (˜770 °C). The results are ferrous laminated composites with discrete and sharp interfaces that consist of hard layers containing spherical carbide particles embedded in a matrix of ultrafine martensite or ferrite adjoining soft layers of a coarse grained iron alloy. In addition, the high activity of carbon is shown to result in total depletion of carbon in a silicon containing UHC steel ribbon bonded to mild steel.

  18. The microstructural evolution of clay-bearing carbonate faults during high-velocity friction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Rachael; De Paola, Nicola; Holdsworth, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Seismicity in the Northern Apennines, Italy, nucleates within and propagates through a multilayer sequence comprising limestones with marl interbeds. Observations from the Gubbio fault (1984, Ms = 5.2) indicate that the majority of earthquake displacement is localized within principal slip zones (PSZs), thermal decomposition of calcite. Initial microstructure of the wet gouges, on the other hand, is characterized by a distributed and interconnected network of wet clay surrounding calcite grains. The microstructure of the sheared wet gouges is characterized by a diffuse PSS, limited fabric development, and no PSZ; deformation is much more distributed. In addition, grain-size reduction in the wet gouges is ~1 order of magnitude less than in dry gouge equivalents. Thus, we attribute the contrasting frictional behaviour and microstructural evolution in the dry vs. wet gouges to the fact that in the wet gouges, distributed slip preferentially occurs on the pre-existing, weak clay network. This reduces the need for grain-breakage to occur before slip is able to localize, explaining the lack of a slip-hardening phase. Shear induced compaction of the wet clay-bearing gouges is also likely to generate a considerable pore-fluid overpressure within the impermeable clay network, further contributing to their weak behaviour. The lack of resistance to frictional sliding shown by the wet clay-bearing gouges contrasts with the traditional concept that phyllosilicates, due to their velocity-strengthening nature, should have a stabilizing role in upper crustal fault zones, and has significant implications for seismic hazard in the Apennines.

  19. Magnetic Carbon Supported Palladium Nanoparticles: An Efficient and Sustainable Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; the catalyst can be used for the hydrogenation of alkenes and reduction of aryl nitro compounds.

  20. MICROSTRUCTURE CHARACTERIZATION OF LiCoO2 COATINGS FOR MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS COMPONENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The sol-gel process, using aqueous solutions, is used for dip coating onto substrates of 316L stainless steel. A suitable coating of LiCoO2 is achieved by varying the thickness and heat treating at 650 ℃ for 3 h. Thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis and SEM are carried out to characterize the microstructure of the coatings. The results show that the coating transforms from an amorphous gel to crystalline phases above 350 ℃, and show a porous structure. The phase transition mechanism is discussed.

  1. Carbon nitride supported copper nanoparticles: light-induced electronic effect of the support for triazole synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Debkumar; Taher, Abu; Ul Islam, Rafique; Siwal, Samarjeet; Choudhary, Meenakshi; Mallick, Kaushik

    2016-11-01

    The composite framework of graphitic carbon nitride (gCN) supported copper nanoparticle can act as a high-performance photoreactor for the synthesis of 1,2,3-triazole derivatives under light irradiation in the absence of alkaline condition. The photoactivity of gCN originates from an electron transition from the valence band to the conduction band, in the presence of photon energy, and the hot electron acts as a scavenger of the terminal proton of the alkyne molecule to facilitate the formation of copper acetanilide complex. In this study, we have performed the experiment under a different photonic environment, including dark condition, and in the presence and absence of base. A comparative study was also executed using Cu-TiO2 system, as a reference material, in the support of our proposed mechanism. The recycling performance and the photocorrosion effect of the catalyst have also been reported in this study.

  2. States of Carbon Nanotube Supported Mo-Based HDS Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Shang; Chenguang Liu; Yongqiang Xu; Jieshan Qiu; Fei Wei

    2006-01-01

    The dispersion of the active phase and loading capacity of the Mo species on carbon nanotube (CNT) was studied by the XRD technique. The reducibility properties of Co-Mo catalysts in the oxide state over CNTs were investigated by TPR, while the sulfided Co-Mo/CNT catalysts were characterized by means of the XRD and LRS techniques. The activity and selectivity with respect to the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) performances on carbon nanotube supported Co-Mo catalysts were evaluated. It was found that the main active molybdenum species in the oxide state MoO3/CNT catalysts were MoO2, but not MoO3, as generally expected. The maximum loading before the formation of the bulk phase was lower than 6% (percent by mass, based on MoO3). TPR studies revealed that the active species in the oxide state Co-Mo/CNT catalysts were reduced more easily at relatively lower temperatures in comparison to those of the Co-Mo/γ-Al2O3 catalysts, indicating that the CNT support promoted or favored the reduction of the active species. The active species of a Co-Mo-0.7/CNT catalyst were more easily reduced than those of the Co-Mo/CNT catalysts with Co/Mo atomic ratios of 0.2, 0.35, and 0.5, respectively, suggesting that the Co/Mo atomic ratio has a great effect on the reducibility of the active species. It was found that the incorporation of cobalt improved the dispersion of the molybdenum species on the support, and a phenomenon of mobilization and re-dispersion had occurred during the sulfurization process, resulting in low valence state Mo3S4 and Co-MoS2.17 active phases. HDS measurements showed that the Co-Mo/CNT catalysts were more active than the Co-Mo/γ-Al2O3 ones for the desulfurization of DBT, and the hydrogenolysis/hydrogenation selectivity of the Co-Mo/CNT catalysts was also much higher than those of the Co-Mo/γ-Al2O3. The Co-Mo/CNT catalyst with a Co/Mo atomic ratio of 0.7 showed the highest activity, whereas the catalyst with a Co/Mo atomic ratio of 0.35 had the highest selectivity.

  3. Relationship between surface microstructure and properties of supported catalyst Rh/Ys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳忠阳; 潘平来; 朱长城; 王晓筠; 袁国卿

    1997-01-01

    The inner structure of Rh/Ys,a novel high efficiency supported catalyst,and the spreading of Rh on the Ys surface were analyzed through electron transmission microscopy and scanning tunnel microscopy.The relationship between the distribution of Rh over the support and the preparation temperature of th catalyst was determined.The formation of Rh-C bond was confirmed by XPS and far-IR spectra.The loss of Rh from the surface of the support and the catalytic activity under different preparation conditions have been compared.The internal factors for the high activity and high stability of the novel Rh/Ys catalyst have been discussed.

  4. Effect of Carbon and Phosphorous on the Solidification Microstructure in a Cr-Ni-Mn-N Austenitic Hydrogen-resistant Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun TAN; Luming MA; Shouxin LI; Lijian RONG; Jincai YUAN; Yiyi LI

    2001-01-01

    The influence of carbon and phosphorus on the solidification microstructure of a Cr-Ni-Mn-N austenitic steel was studied. The button specimens were prepared by vacuum induction melting and magnetic convection. The experimental results show that the increase of C or P concentration in the steel can change the solidification modes of Cr-Ni-Mn-N austenitic steels and has a significant effect on the morphology of the dendrites. The content of δ-ferrite in the microstructure reduces with increasing the concentration of C or P in the steel, there is a gradient of the content of δ-ferrite formed from surface through the center of the specimens.

  5. High Performance Palladium Supported on Nanoporous Carbon under Anhydrous Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zehui; Ling, Ying; Zhang, Yunfeng; Xu, Guodong

    2016-11-01

    Due to the high cost of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), replacing platinum (Pt) with some inexpensive metal was carried out. Here, we deposited palladium nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) on nanoporous carbon (NC) after wrapping by poly[2,2‧-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5‧-bibenzimidazole] (PyPBI) doped with phosphoric acid (PA) and the Pd-NPs size was successfully controlled by varying the weight ratio between Pd precursor and carbon support doped with PA. The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) fabricated from the optimized electrocatalyst with 0.05 mgPd cm‑2 for both anode and cathode sides showed a power density of 76 mW cm‑2 under 120 °C without any humidification, which was comparable to the commercial CB/Pt, 89 mW cm‑2 with 0.45 mgPt cm‑2 loaded in both anode and cathode. Meanwhile, the power density of hybrid MEA with 0.45 mgPt cm‑2 in cathode and 0.05 mgPd cm‑2 in anode reached 188 mW cm‑2. The high performance of the Pt-free electrocatalyst was attributed to the porous structure enhancing the gas diffusion and the PyPBI-PA facilitating the proton conductivity in catalyst layer. Meanwhile, the durability of Pd electrocatalyst was enhanced by coating with acidic polymer. The newly fabricated Pt-free electrocatalyst is extremely promising for reducing the cost in the high-temperature PEFCs.

  6. The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and diffusion of silver in pyrolytic carbon coatings

    OpenAIRE

    CANCINO TREJOA F.; SÁENZ PADILLA M.; LOPEZ HONORATO Eddie; CARVAJAL NUNEZ URSULA; BOSHOVEN Jacobus; Somers, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    It is well accepted that TRISO (tristructural isotropic) coated nuclear fuel particles are capable of retaining fission products up to 1600 ºC, however above this temperature fission products can diffuse through the pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings that act as the containment barriers in this fuel. Despite decades of research and development, little is known on the origin of this fuel temperature limit. Since pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coatings are an integral part of the safety of ...

  7. Controllable-nitrogen doped carbon layer surrounding carbon nanotubes as novel carbon support for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, P.L.; Hsu, C.H.; Wu, H.M.; Hsu, W.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Kuo, D. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Novel nitrogen-doped carbon layer surrounding carbon nanotubes composite (NC-CNT) (N/C ratio 3.3-14.3 wt.%) as catalyst support has been prepared using aniline as a dispersant to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and as a source for both carbon and nitrogen coated on the surface of the CNTs, where the amount of doped nitrogen is controllable. The NC-CNT so obtained were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. A uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles (ca. 1.5-2.0 nm) was then anchored on the surface of NC-CNT by using aromatic amine as a stabilizer. For these Pt/NC-CNTs, cyclic voltammogram measurements show a high electrochemical activity surface area (up to 103.7 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) compared to the commercial E-TEK catalyst (55.3 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}). In single cell test, Pt/NC-CNT catalyst has greatly enhanced catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction, resulting in an enhancement of ca. 37% in mass activity compared with that of E-TEK. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Mechanical, Microstructure and Surface Characterizations of Carbon Fibers Prepared from Cellulose after Liquefying and Curing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Ma

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Cellulose-based carbon fibers (CBCFs were prepared from cellulose after phenol liquefaction and curing. The characteristics and properties of CBCFs were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The results showed that, with increasing carbonization temperature, the La, Lc, and Lc/d(002 of CBCFs increased gradually, whereas the degree of disorder R decreased. The –OH, –CH2–, –O–C– and phenyl group characteristic absorption peaks of CBCFs reduced gradually. The cross-linked structure of CBCFs was converted into a graphite structure with a six-ring carbon network during carbonization. The surface of CBCFs were mainly comprised of C–C, C–O, and C=O. The tensile strength, carbonization yield and carbon content of CBCFs obtained at 1000 °C were 1015 MPa, 52%, and 95.04%, respectively.

  9. Electrochemical corrosion studies of carbon supports and electrocatalysts and their effects on the durability of low-temperature PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowlapalli, Madhusudhana R.

    Performance of a PEM fuel cell relies heavily on the durability of the platinum and platinum-alloy based electrocatalysts supported on carbon blacks. Carbon corrosion has been widely accepted as an important issue affecting the degradation of the catalytic layer in PEMFCs. Traditional carbon blacks used in today's fuel cell industry are not tailored to suit the corrosive conditions encountered in PEMFCs. Advanced carbon supports should have excellent electrochemical corrosion resistance, good conductivity, high surface area and optimum hydrophilic properties. The principal objective of this work is to investigate the corrosive behavior of carbon blacks and electrocatalysts supported on such carbon blacks in conditions that are typical for fuel cells. Physical and chemical changes during oxidation of these carbon blacks have been reviewed along with methodology for studying their corrosion in a low-temperature fuel cell environment. This study provides an ex-situ corrosion measurement protocol and a gas diffusion electrode half-cell setup to study the electrochemical oxidation resistance behavior of standard carbon blacks, modified carbon blacks, and advanced carbon supports in acid electrolyte at 25°C. Corrosion current-time relationships were evaluated and transient mode of corrosion study was employed to simulate automobile startup/shutdown. The effects of various surface modifications on carbon corrosion behavior have been studied in detail. The aggravated corrosion of carbon supports at potentials higher than the thermodynamic stable regime of water was investigated and a mechanism is proposed to address the same. The role of the metal phase on carbon corrosion at the catalyst-support interphase has also been investigated. The corrosion current dependence on the microstructure and nature of surface groups present on these carbons was examined. Further, measuring carbon corrosion effects on the durability of a single membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) cathode

  10. Microstructure and Property of Mn-Nb-B Low Carbon Bainite High Strength Steel Under Ultra-fast Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Bing-xing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the Mn-Nb-B low carbon bainite high strength steel with the reducing production technology as the research target, the deformation behavior and phase transformation behavior were studied by the thermal simulation testing machine. Combining with the characteristics of the medium and heavy plate production line, the controlled rolling and controlled cooling technology based on ultra-fast cooling were designed to produce low cost high strength construction machinery steel with superior comprehensive mechanical properties. The strengthening mechanisms such as grain refinement strengthening, precipitation strengthening are effective to produce the Mn-Nb-B low carbon bainite high strength steel. The yield strength and tensile strength of the product reach to 678MPa and 756 MPa respectively, the elongation A50 is 33% and the impact energy at -20℃ is 261J. The microstructure of the steel is composed of granular bainite, acicular ferrite and lath bainite. A large number of fine, point, granular M/A constituents and dislocation structures dispersively distributed inside the matrix, and also tiny and dispersed (Nb,Ti (C,N precipitates are observed by transmission electron microscopy.

  11. Study of Microstructure Change of Carbon Nanofibers as Binder-Free Anode for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Shi, Shaojun; Li, Yuhong; Zhao, Mengxi; Chang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Di; Wang, Haiying; Peng, Luming; Wang, Peng; Yang, Gang

    2016-12-07

    Flexible and binder-free film of N, O-doped carbon nanofibers (CNFs) is the ideal anode for high-energy-density batteries. Here, CNFs flexible films which the N, O dopant give defect in graphite structure results in high specific surface area more than 500 m(2) g(-1). A flexible film of CNF800 carbonized at 800 °C delivers initial capacities of 2000 and 755 mAh g(-1) at the current densities of 5 and 10 A g(-1), respectively. After 500 cycles, CNF800 remains the capacities of 1251, 865, 702, and 305 mAh g(-1) at 0.5, 1, 5, and 10 A g(-1), respectively. The microstructures of CNFs under various state of charge are studied by HRTEM, XPS, (13)C NMR, and so forth. The lithiation/delithiation mainly happens to the interlayer of graphite domain of CNFs. The dopants of nitrogen and oxygen involve in lithiation, but much of Li-N is irreversible. The excellent performances of CNFs film can be attributed to the N, O doped structure of graphite domain that has increased the conductivity and lithium storage ability. Further development of N, O doped CNFs may enable practical applications as flexible anode in high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

  12. Oxidation of Carbon Supports at Fuel Cell Cathodes: Differential Electrochemical Mass Spectrometric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-fang; Tao, Qian; Liao, Ling-wen; Xu, Jie; Cai, Jun; Chen, Yan-xia

    2010-08-01

    The effects of O2 and the supported Pt nano-particles on the mechanisms and kinetics of the carbon support corrosion are investigated by monitoring the CO2 production using differential electrochemical mass spectrometry in a dual-thin layer flow cell. Carbon can be oxidized in different distinct potential regimes; O2 accelerates carbon oxidation, the rates of CO2 production from carbon oxidation in O2 saturated solution are two times of that in N2 saturated solution at the same potential; Pt can catalyze the carbon oxidation, with supported Pt nanoparticles, the overpotential for carbon oxidation is much smaller than that without loading in the carbon electrode. The mechanism for the enhanced carbon oxidation by Pt and O2 are discussed.

  13. Microstructural Characteristics of Pitch-Based Carbon-Carbon Composites%沥青基碳/碳复合材料的组织特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙乐民; 李贺军; 张守阳

    2000-01-01

    With 1K PAN-based carbon fibers as reinforcements and modulated middle-temperature coal-tar pitch as matrix precursor, pitch-based carbon-carbon composites were fabricated under low pressure and high pressure respectively. It was found that there was both domains and mosaics in the carbon matrix, through the examination of the microstructures under polarized light microscope. There were mainly fine-grained mosaics in the green coke. The SEM micrographs of the etched surfaces of samples show that it appears the characteristic of flows in the anisotropic field. The grains of the flow structure had relations with the pressure under which coal-tar pitch carbonized. The higher the carbonization pressure was, the denser and neater the grains were,which indicates a higher degree of orientation of basal planes of the carbon.%以1K PAN基碳纤维为增强体、以调制中温煤沥青为基体前躯体,分别在常压下和高压(40MPa、80MPa)下制备出了沥青基碳/碳复合材料.借助偏光显微镜对碳/碳复合材料试样进行的微观组织的观察发现,碳基体中既有域组织,也有镶嵌组织,而焦炭主要为细镶嵌组织.偏光试样经过酸液氧化腐蚀处理后,利用电子显微镜对其扫描观察,发现各向异性区域呈现出流线组织特征,流线纹路的疏密与沥青碳化时的压力有关.压力越高,纹路越密实,表明碳层面的取向性也就越好.

  14. Morphology, Microstructure, and Hydrogen Content of Carbon Nanostructures Obtained by PECVD at Various Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Acosta Gentoiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures were obtained by acetylene injection into an argon plasma jet in the presence of hydrogen. The samples were synthesized in similar conditions, except that the substrate deposition temperatures TD were varied, ranging from 473 to 973 K. A strong dependence of morphology, structure, and graphitization upon TD was found. We obtained vertical aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs at low temperatures as 473 K, amorphous carbon nanoparticles (CNPs at temperatures from about 573 to 673 K, and carbon nanowalls (CNWs at high temperatures from 773 to 973 K. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used to substantiate the differences in these material types. It is known that hydrogen concentration modifies strongly the properties of the materials. Different concentrations of hydrogen-bonded carbon could be identified in amorphous CNP, VA-CNT, and CNW. Also, the H : C ratios along depth were determined for the obtained materials.

  15. Platinum supported catalysts for carbon monoxide preferential oxidation: Study of support influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, R.; Rodriguez, L.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Daza, L. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Benito, M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study the influence of the addition of different oxides to an alumina support, on surface acidity and platinum reducibility in platinum-based catalysts, as well as their effect on the activity and selectivity in CO preferential oxidation, in presence of hydrogen. A correlation between surface acidity and acid strength of surface sites and metal reducibility was obtained, being Pt-support interaction a function of the acid sites concentration under a particular temperature range. In platinum supported on alumina catalysts, CO oxidation follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, where O{sub 2} and CO compete in the adsorption on the same type of active sites. It is noteworthy that the addition of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} modifies the reaction mechanism. In this case, CO is not only adsorbed on the Pt active sites but also on La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, forming bridge bonded carbonates which leads to high reactivity at low temperatures. An increase on temperature produces CO desorption from Pt surface sites and favours oxygen adsorption producing CO{sub 2}. CO oxidation with surface hydroxyl groups was activated producing simultaneously CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. (author)

  16. Influence of carbon nanofiber properties as electrocatalyst support on the electrochemical performance for PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian, D.; Suelves, I.; Moliner, R.; Lazaro, M.J. [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Energy and Environment, C/Miguel Luesma Castan 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Calderon, J.C.; Gonzalez-Exposito, J.A.; Pastor, E. [Universidad de La Laguna, Dpto de Quimica-Fisica, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Martinez-Huerta, M.V. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    Novel carbonaceous supports for electrocatalysts are being investigated to improve the performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Within several supports, carbon nanofibers blend two properties that rarely coexist in a material: a high mesoporosity and a high electrical conductivity, due to their particular structure. Carbon nanofibers have been obtained by catalytic decomposition of methane, optimizing growth conditions to obtain carbon supports with different properties. Subsequently, the surface chemistry has been modified by an oxidation treatment, in order to create oxygen surface groups of different nature that have been observed to be necessary to obtain a higher performance of the electrocatalyst. Platinum has then been supported on the as-prepared carbon nanofibers by different deposition methods and the obtained catalysts have been studied by different electrochemical techniques. The influence of carbon nanofibers properties and functionalization on the electrochemical behavior of the electrocatalysts has been studied and discussed, obtaining higher performances than commercial electrocatalysts with the highest electrical conductive carbon nanofibers as support. (author)

  17. Metal oxide coating of carbon supports for supercapacitor applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Tribby, Louis, J (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Lakeman, Charles D. E. (TPL, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Han, Sang M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Lambert, Timothy N.; Fleig, Patrick F. (TPL, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-07-01

    The global market for wireless sensor networks in 2010 will be valued close to $10 B, or 200 M units. TPL, Inc. is a small Albuquerque based business that has positioned itself to be a leader in providing uninterruptible power supplies in this growing market with projected revenues expected to exceed $26 M in 5 years. This project focused on improving TPL, Inc.'s patent-pending EnerPak{trademark} device which converts small amounts of energy from the environment (e.g., vibrations, light or temperature differences) into electrical energy that can be used to charge small energy storage devices. A critical component of the EnerPak{trademark} is the supercapacitor that handles high power delivery for wireless communications; however, optimization and miniaturization of this critical component is required. This proposal aimed to produce prototype microsupercapacitors through the integration of novel materials and fabrication processes developed at New Mexico Technology Research Collaborative (NMTRC) member institutions. In particular, we focused on developing novel ruthenium oxide nanomaterials and placed them into carbon supports to significantly increase the energy density of the supercapacitor. These improvements were expected to reduce maintenance costs and expand the utility of the TPL, Inc.'s device, enabling New Mexico to become the leader in the growing global wireless power supply market. By dominating this niche, new customers were expected to be attracted to TPL, Inc. yielding new technical opportunities and increased job opportunities for New Mexico.

  18. Structure and electrocatalytic performance of carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esparbe, Isaac; Brillas, Enric; Centellas, Francesc; Garrido, Jose Antonio; Rodriguez, Rosa Maria; Arias, Conchita; Cabot, Pere-Lluis [Laboratori d' Electroquimica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Quimica Fisica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    The structure of Pt nanoparticles and the composition of the catalyst-Nafion films strongly determine the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The effect of Nafion content in the catalyst ink, prepared with a commercially available carbon-supported Pt, in the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), has been studied by the thin layer rotating disk electrode technique. The kinetic parameters have been related to the catalyst nanoparticles structure, characterized by X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The size-shape analysis is consistent with the presence of 3D cubo-octahedral Pt nanoparticles with average size of 2.5 nm. The electrochemically active surface area, determined by CO stripping, appears to depend on the composition of the deposited Pt/C-Nafion film, with a maximum value of 73 m{sup 2} g{sub Pt}{sup -1} for 30 wt.% Nafion. The results of CO stripping indicate that the external Pt faces are mainly (1 0 0) and (1 1 1) terraces, thus confirming the cubo-octahedral structure of nanoparticles. Cyclic voltammetry combined with the RDE technique has been applied to study the kinetic parameters of HOR besides the ionomer resistance effect on the anode kinetic current at different ionomer contents. The kinetic parameters show that H{sub 2} oxidation behaves reversibly with an estimated exchange current density of 0.27 mA cm{sup -2}. (author)

  19. Stability of retained austenite in multi-phase microstructure during austempering and its effect on the ductility of a low carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Z.J.; Ren, Y.Q.; Zhou, W.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Yang, J.R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shang, C.J., E-mail: cjshang@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, Institute for Material Research and Innovation, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The contribution of multi-phase microstructure and retained austenite on mechanical properties of austempered and intercritical annealed Fe–0.23C–1.8Mn–1.35Si (wt%) steel was studied. The multi-phase microstructure comprised of intercritical ferrite (IF), bainite/martensite, and retained austenite. During austempering, the retained austenite was stabilized, which was studied using a combination of experimental (XRD, TEM) and thermodynamic analysis. The termination of bainitic transformation combined with carbon rejection into residual austenite during the second step austempering treatment is believed to be the underlying basis for stabilization of retained austenite. This led to significant increase in uniform and total elongation (25% and 36%, respectively) and the product of tensile strength and % elongation was 33 GPa%. The work hardening behavior of retained austenite exhibited a three-stage process such that necking was delayed. The increased work hardening rate is attributed to the multi-phase microstructure and TRIP effect.

  20. Optimization of interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via carbon nanotube sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongwei; Sui, Xianhang; Zhao, Zhongbo; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Lei; Deng, Hui; Liu, Ya; Qian, Xiaoming

    2015-08-01

    Repetitious sizing treatment was used to modify the carbon fiber (CF) surface with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for improving interfacial properties of CF/epoxy composites. Interlaminar shear and flexural results showed that mechanical properties of composites were significantly depended on the dispersion state and contents of CNTs in interfacial regions. Increases of 13.45% in interlaminar shear strength and 20.31% in flexural strength were achieved in quintuple sized-CF/epoxy composites, whereas excessive CNTs led to decrease of interfacial performance due to defects induced by agglomerated CNTs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and force modulation atomic force microscope were used to detect the structure of interfacial phase and results indicated that gradient interfacial structure with various thicknesses was formed due to CNT incorporation. This means that such a simple and efficient method to improve interfacial performance of composites via regulating the fiber-matrix interphase structure was developed and showed great commercial application potential.

  1. Effects of carbon concentration on microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast nickel-free Co–28Cr–9W-based dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Kenta, E-mail: k_yamanaka@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Mori, Manami [Department of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Sendai National College of Technology, 48 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiote, Natori 981-1239 (Japan); Chiba, Akihiko [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    We determined the effects of carbon concentration on the microstructures and tensile properties of the Ni-free Co–29Cr–9W–1Si–C (mass%) cast alloys used in dental applications. Alloy specimens prepared with carbon concentrations in the range 0.01–0.27 mass% were conventionally cast. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) revealed that precipitates had formed in all the alloy specimens. The σ phase, a chromium-rich intermetallic compound, had formed in the region between the dendrite arms of the low-carbon-content (e.g., 0.01C) alloys. Adding carbon to the alloys increased the amount of interdendritic precipitates that formed and changed the precipitation behavior; the precipitated phase changed from the σ phase to the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide with increasing carbon concentration. Adding a small amount of carbon (i.e., 0.04 mass%) to the alloys dramatically enhanced the 0.2% proof stress, which subsequently gradually increased with increasing content of carbon in the alloys. Elongation-to-failure, on the other hand, increased with increasing carbon content and showed a maximum at carbon concentrations of ∼ 0.1 mass%. The M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide formed at the interdendritic region may govern the tensile properties of the as-cast Co–Cr–W alloys similar to how it governed those of the hot-rolled alloys prepared in our previous study. - Highlights: • Microstructure and tensile properties of C-doped Co–Cr–W cast alloys was studied. • Adding carbon stabilized the γ matrix and changed the precipitation behavior. • Formation of carbide precipitates strengthened C-doped Co–Cr–Mo alloys. • A maximum tensile elongation was obtained at carbon concentrations of ∼0.1 mass%.

  2. States of carbon nanotube supported Mo-based HDS catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Hongyan; Liu, Chenguang; Xu, Yongqiang [Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CNPC, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Petroleum, Dongying 257061 (China); Qiu, Jieshan [Carbon Research Laboratory, Center for Nano Materials and Science, Dalian University of Technology, 158 Zhongshan Road, P. O. Box 49, Dalian 116012 (China); Wei, Fei [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Being, 100084 (China)

    2007-02-15

    As HDS catalysts, the supported catalysts including oxide state Mo, Co-Mo and sulfide state Mo on carbon nanotube (CNT) were prepared, while the corresponding supported catalysts on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared as comparison. Firstly, the dispersion of the active phase and loading capacity of Mo species on CNT was studied by XRD and the reducibility properties of Co-Mo catalysts in oxide state over CNTs were investigated by TPR while the sulfide Co-Mo/CNT catalysts were characterized by XRD and LRS techniques. Secondly, the activity and selectivity of hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene with Co-Mo/CNT and Co-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were studied. It has been found that the main active molybdenum species in the oxide state MoO{sub 3}/CNT catalysts were MoO{sub 2}, rather than MoO{sub 3} as generally expected. The maximum loading before formation of the bulk phase was lower than 6%m (calculated in MoO{sub 3}). The TPR studies revealed that that active species in oxide state Co-Mo/CNT catalysts were more easily reduced at relatively lower temperatures in comparison to those in Co-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, indicating that the CNT support promoted the reduction of active species. Among 0-1.0 Co/Mo atomic ratio on Co-Mo/CNT, 0.7 has the highest reducibility. It shows that the Co/Mo atomic ratio has a great effect on the reducibility of active species on CNT and their HDS activities and that the incorporation of cobalt improved the dispersion of molybdenum species on CNT and mobilization. It was also found that re-dispersion could occur during the sulfiding process, resulting in low valence state Mo{sub 3}S{sub 4} and Co-MoS{sub 2.17} active phases. The HDS of DBT showed that Co-Mo/CNT catalysts were more active than Co-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the hydrogenolysis/hydrogenation selectivity of Co-Mo/CNT catalyst was also much higher than Co-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. For the Co-Mo/CNT catalysis system, the catalyst with Co/Mo atomic

  3. Microstructure of a Mo-Si-C-N multi-layered anti-oxidation coating on carbon/carbon composites by fused slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Zhonghong; MENG Songhe; ZHU Jingchuan; JEON Jaeho

    2009-01-01

    A Mo-Si-C-N multi-layered anti-oxidation coating was in-situ fabricated by introducing nitrogen atmosphere during the fused sintering of Mo-Si slurry pre-layer on carbon/carbon composites. The phase composition and microstructure of the Mo-Si-C-N coating were character-ized by X-ray diffractometry, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The Mo-Si-C-N coating exhibited a three-layered structure. Besides the MoSi2/Si main-layer and the SiC bonding-layer, a surface layer of about 10 μm in thickness was synthesized on the coating surface. The surface layer mainly consisted of SiC nanowires and contained some Si3N4 and Si phases. SiC nanowires of 10 to 200 nm in diameter presented a terrace and distortion structure. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the SiC nanowires grew along the preferred direction. Dur-ing oxidation test, SiC nanowires transmuted into Sit2 glass, which can play an important role in improving the oxidation resistance of C/C composites.

  4. Influence of carbon addition on mechanical properties and microstructures of Ni-free Co-Cr-W alloys subjected to thermomechanical processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Kenta; Mori, Manami; Chiba, Akihiko

    2014-09-01

    We report the effects of carbon concentration on the microstructures and tensile deformation behaviors of thermomechanically processed Ni-free Co-29Cr-9W-1Si-C (mass%) alloys designed for use as disk materials in CAD/CAM dental technology. The alloy specimens, which contained carbon in different concentrations, were prepared by casting and subsequent hot rolling. Overall, the developed Ni-free alloys with added carbon showed an excellent combination of high strength and high ductility. The precipitates were identified in all of the alloy specimens. Intermetallic compounds, i.e., the Laves and σ phases, were formed in the low-carbon alloys, whereas the precipitates changed to M23C6 carbide when the carbon concentration exceeded 0.1mass%. Carbon concentrations less than 0.1mass% exhibited minimal contribution to strengthening, but the formation of the M23C6 carbide particles increased the alloy strength. On the other hand, elongation-to-failure increased with increasing carbon content when the carbon concentration is relatively low. However, the coarse M23C6 carbide particles formed by higher concentrations of carbon were detrimental to ductility. Thus, a maximum elongation-to-failure was obtained at carbon concentrations of around 0.1mass%. The results of the current study can aid in the design of biomedical Co-28Cr-9W-1Si-based alloys containing carbon.

  5. Characterization of dual-phase steel microstructure by combined submicrometer EBSD and EPMA carbon measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinard, Philippe T; Schwedt, Alexander; Ramazani, Ali; Prahl, Ulrich; Richter, Silvia

    2013-08-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) measurements are combined to characterize an industrial produced dual-phase steel containing some bainite fraction. High-resolution carbon mappings acquired on a field emission electron microprobe are utilized to validate and improve the identification of the constituents (ferrite, martensite, and bainite) performed by EBSD using the image quality and kernel average misorientation. The combination eliminates the ambiguity between the identification of bainite and transformation-induced dislocation zones, encountered if only the kernel average misorientation is considered. The detection of carbon in high misorientation regions confirms the presence of bainite. These results are corroborated by secondary electron images after nital etching. Limitations of this combined method due to differences between the spatial resolution of EBSD and EPMA are assessed. Moreover, a quantification procedure adapted to carbon analysis is presented and used to measure the carbon concentration in martensite and bainite on a submicrometer scale. From measurements on reference materials, this method gives an accuracy of 0.02 wt% C and a precision better than 0.05 wt% C despite unavoidable effects of hydrocarbon contamination.

  6. Microstructure and tribological behavior of tungsten-containing diamondlike carbon coated rubbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Zhou, Xiao; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2008-01-01

    Tungsten-containing diamondlike carbon (W-DLC) coatings have been deposited on FKM (fluorocarbon), ACM (acrylate), and HNBR (hydrogenated nitrile butadiene) rubbers via unbalanced magnetron reactive sputtering from a WC target in C2H2/Ar plasma. The surface morphology and, fracture cross sections of

  7. Nano carbon supported platinum catalyst interaction behavior with perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer and their interface structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    2016-01-01

    behavior of Nafion ionomer on platinized carbon nano fibers (CNFs), carbon nano tubes (CNTs) and amorphous carbon (Vulcan). The interaction is affected by the catalyst surface oxygen groups as well as porosity. Comparisons between the carbon supports and platinized equivalents are carried out. It reveals......, the ionomer may have an adsorption preference to the platinum nano particle rather than to the overall catalyst. This was verified by a close examination on the decomposition temperature of the carbon support and the ionomer. The electrochemical stability of the catalyst ionomer composite electrode suggests...

  8. Microstructural investigations on carbonate fault core rocks in active extensional fault zones from the central Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinovis, Silvia; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Storti, Fabrizio

    2017-04-01

    The study of the microstructural and petrophysical evolution of cataclasites and gouges has a fundamental impact on both hydraulic and frictional properties of fault zones. In the last decades, growing attention has been payed to the characterization of carbonate fault core rocks due to the nucleation and propagation of coseismic ruptures in carbonate successions (e.g., Umbria-Marche 1997, L'Aquila 2009, Amatrice 2016 earthquakes in Central Apennines, Italy). Among several physical parameters, grain size and shape in fault core rocks are expected to control the way of sliding along the slip surfaces in active fault zones, thus influencing the propagation of coseismic ruptures during earthquakes. Nevertheless, the role of grain size and shape distribution evolution in controlling the weakening or strengthening behavior in seismogenic fault zones is still not fully understood also because a comprehensive database from natural fault cores is still missing. In this contribution, we present a preliminary study of seismogenic extensional fault zones in Central Apennines by combining detailed filed mapping with grain size and microstructural analysis of fault core rocks. Field mapping was aimed to describe the structural architecture of fault systems and the along-strike fault rock distribution and fracturing variations. In the laboratory we used a Malvern Mastersizer 3000 granulometer to obtain a precise grain size characterization of loose fault rocks combined with sieving for coarser size classes. In addition, we employed image analysis on thin sections to quantify the grain shape and size in cemented fault core rocks. The studied fault zones consist of an up to 5-10 m-thick fault core where most of slip is accommodated, surrounded by a tens-of-meters wide fractured damage zone. Fault core rocks consist of (1) loose to partially cemented breccias characterized by different grain size (from several cm up to mm) and variable grain shape (from very angular to sub

  9. Effect of molybdenum addition on microstructure and mechanical properties of plain carbon steel weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Menghani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation has two main objectives; first is optimization of welding process parameters of submerged arc welding (SAW using Taguchi philosophy and second is to improve the mechanical properties such as strength and microhardness of weld joint by alloying with varying amounts of molybdenum. For optimization of welding process, parameters Taguchi philosophy have been applied on a mild steel plate (AISI C- 1020 of 10 mm thickness with 60o groove angle with arc voltage and welding speed as variables and bead width as output variables. A mathematical relationship between bead width, arc voltage and welding speed has also been found using multiple regression analysis for the present base metal plate geometry. After optimizing welding parameters, molybdenum has been added individually to the welding area in varying percentages. The properties of alloyed and unalloyed weld metal bead are compared. The mechanical characterization of weld has been done in terms of microhardness, tensile strength, whereas microstructural characterization has been performed using optical microscopy, XRD and EDS. The presence of molybdenum resulted in bainite structure in weld bead having a refined grain structure, enhancement in tensile strength and microhardness. The XRD results showed the formation of molybdenum carbides justifying the increase in microhardness value.

  10. Thermal stability and microstructure of catalytic alumina composite support with lanthanum species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Masakuni; Nishio, Yoshitoyo

    2016-09-01

    Lanthanum (La) modified γ-alumina composite was examined for application toward thermostable catalytic support at elevated temperature. La added alumina was prepared through an aqueous process using lanthanum (III) nitrate and then characterized by surface area measurement, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and surface desorption of CO2. It was found that the properties depended on the La content and heat treatment temperatures. The characterization of the surface, structural and chemical properties of La-Al2O3 showed the existence of a strong interaction between the La species and alumina via formation of new phase and modified surface in Al2O3 samples. LaAlO3 nanoparticle formed among alumina particles by the solid phase reaction of Al2O3 and La2O3. The increase of the surface basicity of La modified alumina was demonstrated using CO2 temperature programmed desorption experiments. The controlled surface interaction between La oxide and alumina provide the unique surface and structural properties of the resulting mixed oxides as catalysts and catalytic supports.

  11. Tailoring the Microstructure of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode Support by Calcination and Milling of YSZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanifi, Amir Reza; Laguna-Bercero, Miguel A.; Sandhu, Navjot Kaur; Etsell, Thomas H.; Sarkar, Partha

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the effects of calcination and milling of 8YSZ (8 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia) used in the nickel-YSZ anode on the performance of anode supported tubular fuel cells were investigated. For this purpose, two different types of cells were prepared based on a Ni-YSZ/YSZ/Nd2NiO4+δ-YSZ configuration. For the anode preparation, a suspension was prepared by mixing NiO and YSZ in a ratio of 65:35 wt% (Ni:YSZ 50:50 vol.%) with 30 vol.% graphite as the pore former. As received Tosoh YSZ or its calcined form (heated at 1500 °C for 3 hours) was used in the anode support as the YSZ source. Electrochemical results showed that optimization of the fuel electrode microstructure is essential for the optimal distribution of gas within the support of the cell, especially under electrolysis operation where the performance for an optimized cell (calcined YSZ) was enhanced by a factor of two. In comparison with a standard cell (containing as received YSZ), at 1.5 V and 800 °C the measured current density was -1380 mA cm-2 and -690 mA cm-2 for the cells containing calcined and as received YSZ, respectively. The present study suggests that the anode porosity for improved cell performance under SOEC is more critical than SOFC mode due to more complex gas diffusion under electrolysis mode where large amount of steam needs to be transfered into the cell.

  12. Effect of Cr, Mo and W on the Microstructure of Al Hot Dipped Carbon Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trung, Trinh Van [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Kim, Min Jung; Park, Soon Yong; Vadav, Poonam; Abro, Muhammad Ali; Lee, Dong Bok [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    A low carbon steel, Fe-2.25%Cr steel (ASTM T22), and Fe-2.25%Cr-1.6%W steel (ASTM T23) were aluminized by hot dipping into molten Al baths. After hot-dipping, a thin Al-rich topcoat and a thick alloy layer formed on the surface. The topcoat consisted primarily of a thin Al layer that contained a small amount of Fe, whereas the alloy layer consisted of Al-Fe intermetallics such as Al{sub 5}Fe{sub 2} and AlFe. Cr, Mo, and W in T22 and T23 steels reduced the thickness of the topcoat and the alloy layer, and flattened the reaction front of the aluminized layer, when compared to the low carbon steel.

  13. Microstructure and mechanical performance of modified mortar using hemp fibres and carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Rabah

    2014-04-01

    Mechanical performance of modified mortar using hemp fibres is studied following various processing conditions. Hemp fibres combined with carbon nanotubes (CNT) are introduced in mortar and their effect is studied as function of curing time. The cement phase is replaced by different percentages of dry or wet hemp fibres ranging from 1.1. wt% up to 3.1. wt% whereas carbon nanotubes are dispersed in the aqueous solution. Our experimental results show that compressive and flexural strengths of wet fibres modified mortar are higher than those for dry hemp-mortar material. The achieved optimal percentage of wet hemp fibres is 2.1. wt% allowing a flexural strength higher than that of reference mortar. The addition of an optimal CNT concentration (0.01. wt%) combined with wet hemp has a reinforcing effect which turns to be related to an improvement of compressive and flexural strengths by 10% and 24%, respectively, in comparison with reference condition. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Microstructural analysis of carbon films obtained from C{sub 60} fullerene ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huck, H.; Halac, E.B.; Reinoso, M.; Dall' Asen, A.G.; Somoza, A.; Deng, W.; Brusa, R.S.; Karwasz, G.P.; Zecca, A

    2003-04-30

    Carbon films have been produced by accelerating C{sub 60}{sup +} ions on silicon substrates with energies between 100 and 800 eV. Furthermore some samples have been vacuum-annealed at 600 deg. C. The samples have been characterized by Raman and positron annihilation spectroscopies (RS-PAS). The measurements for the as-deposited material show that there is a coexistence of polymerized fullerenes and amorphous-carbon islands and that the structure depends on the energy of the incident ions. At low energies, fullerenes are deposited preserving the molecular identity and some intermolecular covalent bonds begin to insinuate; at higher energies, the amount of these covalent bonds increases and the amorphous islands predominate. After the annealing process, the amorphous phase organizes in graphitic clusters and the unbroken C{sub 60} cages are transformed back to pristine and slightly polymerized C{sub 60}.

  15. Microstructural analysis of carbon nanotubes produced from pyrolysis/combustion of styrene-butadiene rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Joner O.; Zhuo, Chuanwei; Levendis, Yannis A. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Coll. of Engineering. Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Tenorio, Jorge A.S. [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Polytechnic School. Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Styrene-Butadiene-Rubber (SBR) is a synthetic rubber copolymer used to fabricate several products. This study aims to demonstrate the use of SBR as feedstock for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) growth, and therefore to establish a novel process for destination for wastes produced from SBR. Pellets of this rubber were controlled burned at temperature of 1000 deg C, and a catalyst system was used to synthesize the nanomaterials. CNTs are materials with a wide range of potential applications due to their extraordinary mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Produced materials were characterized by SEM and TEM, and the hydrocarbons emissions were measured using GC. Results showed that materials with diameters of 30-100 nm and lengths of about 30 {mu}m were formed. That materials presented similar structures of multi-walled CNTs. Therefore, the use of SBR to produce carbon nanotubes showed quite satisfactory and an interesting field for future investments. (author)

  16. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of aluminum reinforced with carbon-coated silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Sanchez, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico)]. E-mail: roberto.martinez@cimav.edu.mx; Reyes-Gasga, J. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Caudillo, R. [Texas Materials Institute and Chemical Engineering Department, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1063 (United States); Garcia-Gutierrez, D.I. [Texas Materials Institute and Chemical Engineering Department, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1063 (United States); Marquez-Lucero, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico); Estrada-Guel, I. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico); Mendoza-Ruiz, D.C. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico); Jose Yacaman, M. [Texas Materials Institute and Chemical Engineering Department, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1063 (United States)

    2007-07-12

    Composites of pure aluminum with carbon-coated silver nanoparticles (Ag-C NP) of 10 nm in size were prepared by the mechanical milling process. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the Ag-C NP are homogeneously dispersed into the Al matrix, silver nanoparticles do not coalesce, grow or dissolve in the aluminum matrix due the carbon shell. The values of yield strength ({sigma} {sub y}), maximum strength ({sigma} {sub max}) and micro-hardness Vickers (HVN) of the composites were evaluated and reported as a function of Ag-C NP content. It has been found that the introduction of this type of particles in aluminum strengthen it, increasing all the previous parameters.

  17. Ultrasonic absorption characteristics of porous carbon-carbon ceramics with random microstructure for passive hypersonic boundary layer transition control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Alexander; Hannemann, Klaus; Kuhn, Markus

    2014-06-01

    Preceding studies in the high enthalpy shock tunnel Göttingen of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) revealed that carbon fibre reinforced carbon ceramic (C/C) surfaces can be utilized to damp hypersonic boundary layer instabilities leading to a delay of boundary layer transition onset. To assess the ultrasonic absorption properties of the material, a test rig was set up to measure the reflection coefficient at ambient pressures ranging from 0.1 × 105 to 1 × 105 Pa. For the first time, broadband ultrasonic sound transducers with resonance frequencies of up to 370 kHz were applied to directly cover the frequency range of interest with respect to the second-mode instabilities observed in previous experiments. The reflection of ultrasonic waves from three flat plate test samples with a porous layer thickness between 5 and 30 mm was investigated and compared to an ideally reflecting surface. C/C was found to absorb up to 19 % of the acoustic power transmitted towards the material. The absorption characteristics were investigated theoretically by means of the quasi-homogeneous absorber theory. The experimental results were found to be in good agreement with the theory.

  18. Functionalization and characterization of pyrolyzed polymer based carbon microstructures for bionanoelectronics platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Mieko; Mehta, Beejal; Vahidi, Nasim W.; Khosla, Ajit; Kassegne, Sam

    2013-11-01

    In this study, the investigation of surface-treatment of chemically inert graphitic carbon microelectrodes (derived from pyrolyzed photoresist polymer) for improving their attachment chemistry with DNA molecular wires and ropes as part of a bionanoelectronics platform is reported. Polymer microelectrodes were fabricated on a silicon wafer using standard negative lithography procedures with negative-tone photoresist. These microelectrode structures were then pyrolyzed and converted to a form of conductive carbon that is referred to as PP (pyrolyzed polymer) carbon throughout this paper. Functionalization of the resulting pyrolyzed structures was done using nitric, sulfuric, 4-amino benzoic acids (4-ABA), and oxygen plasma etching and the surface modifications confirmed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and electron dispersion x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Post surface-treatment analysis of microelectrodes with FTIR and Raman spectroscopy showed signature peaks characteristics of carboxyl functional groups while EDS showed an increase in oxygen content in the surface-treatment procedures (except 4-ABA) indicating an increase in carboxyl functional group. These functional groups form the basis for peptide bond with aminated oligonucleotides that in turn could be used as molecular wires and interconnects in a bionanoelectronics platform. Post-pyrolysis analysis using EDS showed relatively higher oxygen concentrations at the edges and location of defects compared to other locations on these microelectrodes. In addition, electrochemical impedance measurements showed metal-like behavior of PP carbon with high conductivity (|Z| characteristic. In general, characterization results—taken together—indicated that oxygen plasma surface-treatment produced more reliable, less damaging, and consistently repeatable generation of carboxyl functional groups than diazonium salt and strong acid treatments.

  19. Microstructural analysis of carbon nanomaterials produced from pyrolysis/combustion of Styrene-Butadiene-Rubber (SBR)

    OpenAIRE

    Joner Oliveira Alves; Chuanwei Zhuo; Yiannis Angelo Levendis; Jorge Alberto Soares Tenório

    2011-01-01

    Styrene-Butadiene-Rubber (SBR) is a synthetic rubber copolymer used to fabricate several products. This study aims to demonstrate the use of SBR as feedstock for carbon nanomaterials (nanofibers and nanotubes) growth, and therefore to establish a novel process for destination of waste products containing SBR. A three stage electrically heated flow reactor was used. Small pellets of rubber were pyrolyzed at a temperature of 1000 ºC. The pyrolyzates were mixed with oxygen-containing gases and w...

  20. Cathode-supported hybrid direct carbon fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Gurauskis, Jonas; Deleebeeck, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The direct conversion of coal to heat and electricity by a hybrid direct carbon fuel cell (HDCFC) is a highly efficient and cleaner technology than the conventional combustion power plants. HDCFC is defined as a combination of solid oxide fuel cell and molten carbonate fuel cell. This work...

  1. Graphitic mesoporous carbon based on aromatic polycondensation as catalyst support for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Kong, Jiangrong; Liu, Yaru; Liu, Qicheng; Zhu, Hongze

    2015-03-01

    Mesoporous carbon is constructed by monolithic polyaromatic mesophase deriving from the hexane insoluble of coal-tar pitch. This carbon material exhibits spherical morphology and layered crystallite, and thereby can be graphitized at 900 °C without destroying the mesoporous structure. Electrochemical measurements indicate that graphitic mesoporous carbon (GMC) support not only improves the activity of Pt electrocatalyst to oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), but also shows higher corrosion resistance than commercial XC-72 carbon black in the acid cathode environment.

  2. Coupling dehydrogenation of isobutane in the presence of carbon dioxide over chromium oxide supported on active carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Fei Ding; Zhang Feng Qin; Xue Kuan Li; Guo Fu Wang; Jian Guo Wang

    2008-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of isobutane (IB) to produce isobutene coupled with reverse water gas shift in the presence of carbon dioxide was investigated over the catalyst Cr2O3 supported on active carbon (Cr2O3/AC). The results illustrated that isobutane c onversion and isobutene yield can be enhanced through the reaction coupling in the presence of carbon dioxide. Moreover, carbon dioxide can partially eliminate carbonaceous deposition on the catalyst and keep the active phase (Cr2O3), which are then helpful to alleviate the catalyst deactivation.

  3. The Effect of Catalyst Support on the Decomposition of Methane to Hydrogen and Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif Hussein Sharif Zein Abdul Rahman Mohamed

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition of methane into carbon and hydrogen over Cu/Ni supported catalysts was investigated. The catalytic activities and the lifetimes of the catalysts were studied. Cu/Ni supported on TiO2 showed high activity and long lifetime for the reaction. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM studies revealed the relationship between the catalyst activity and the formation of the filamentous carbon over the catalyst after methane decomposition. While different types of filamentous carbon formed on the various Cu/Ni supported catalysts, an attractive carbon nanotubes was observed in the Cu/Ni supported on TiO2. Key Words:  Methane decomposition, carbon nanotube, Cu/Ni supported catalysts.

  4. Effect of PEG additive on anode microstructure and cell performance of anode-supported MT-SOFCs fabricated by phase inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Cong; Liu, Tong; Maturavongsadit, Panita; Luckanagul, Jittima Amie; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-04-01

    Anode-supported micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs) have been fabricated by phase inversion method. For the anode support preparation, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), polyethersulfone (PESf) and poly ethylene glycol (PEG) were applied as solvent, polymer binder and additive, respectively. The effect of molecular weight and amount of PEG additive on the thermodynamics of the casting solutions was characterized by measuring the coagulation value. Viscosity of the casting slurries was also measured and the influence of PEG additive on viscosity was studied and discussed. The presence of PEG in the casting slurry can significantly influence the final anode support microstructure. Based on the microstructure result and the measured gas permeation value, two anode supports were selected for cell fabrication. For cell with the anode support fabricated using slurry with PEG additive, a maximum cell power density of 704 mW cm-2 is obtained at 750 °C with humidified hydrogen as fuel and ambient air as oxidant; cell fabricated without any PEG additive shows the peak cell power density of 331 mW cm-2. The relationship between anode microstructure and cell performance was discussed.

  5. Effect of heat treatment temperature on microstructure and electrochemical properties of hollow carbon spheres prepared in high-pressure argon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boyang Liu; Yun Zhou; Dechang Jia; Pengjian Zuo; Yingfeng Shao; Jingwei Zhang

    2011-12-01

    Heat treatment was carried out between 800 and 1200°C to investigate its effects on the microstructure and electrochemical properties of the hollow carbon spheres (HCSs) prepared in high-pressure argon. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and N2 adsorption–desorption isotherms. The graphitization of the HCSs was improved with increase of heat treatment temperature. Mesopores of . 4 nm in diameter were created on the HCSs after the heat treatment. The results of electrochemical performance measurements for the HCSs as anode material for lithium ion batteries indicate that the discharge capacity of the HCSs is improved after heat treatment at 800°C compared with the as-prepared HCSs and have a maximum value of 357 mAh/g and still retains 303 mAh/g after 40 cycles. However, the discharge capacity of the HCSs decreases and the cycling performance is improved with the increase of heat treatment temperature.

  6. Effect of Hot Forging on Microstructural Evolution and Impact Toughness in Ultra-high Carbon Low Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kang, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of a hot forging ratio on the microstructural variation and tensile properties of ultra-high carbon low alloy steel was investigated. Scanning electron microscopic analyses depict that with an increase in the hot forging ratio, the thickness of the network and acicular proeutectoid cementite decreased. Moreover, the lamella spacing and thickness of the eutectoid cementite decreased and broke up into particle shapes, which then became spheroidized as the hot forging ratio increased. Furthermore, when the forging ratio exceeded 65%, the network and acicular shape of the as-cast state disappeared. By increasing the hot forging ratio, the tensile strength and elongation remained below 50%, but they increased rapidly with an increase in the forging ratio. Strength and elongation were not affected by the thickness of the proeutectoid and eutectoid cementites, but were greatly affected by the shape of the proeutectoid cementite. Due to the decrease in the austenite grain size, as well as the spheroidization of the cementite, the tensile strength and elongation sharply increased.

  7. TiO2/activated carbon fibers photocatalyst: effects of coating procedures on the microstructure, adhesion property, and photocatalytic ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian-Wen; Cui, Hao-Jie; Chen, Jian-Wei; Fu, Ming-Lai; Xu, Bin; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Ye, Zhi-Long

    2012-12-15

    In order to more easily separate TiO(2) photocatalyst from the treated wastewater, TiO(2) film was immobilized on the surface of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) by employing two kinds of coating procedures, dip-coating, and hydrothermal treatment. The effects of coating procedures on microstructure of TiO(2)-coated ACFs (TiO(2)/ACFs), such as morphology, porous property, crystal structure, and light absorption characteristics were investigated in detail. The adhesion property between TiO(2) film and ACFs was evaluated by ultrasonic vibration, and the photocatalytic activity of TiO(2)/ACFs was tested by the photocatalytic decoloration of methylene blue solution. The results show that hydrothermal treatment presented many advantages to obtain high-performance TiO(2)/ACFs photocatalyst in comparison with dip-coating. Hydrothermal treatment could improve the binding property between TiO(2) films and ACFs, which endowed the as-obtained TiO(2)/ACFs photocatalyst with improved reusable performance, and TiO(2)/ACFs synthesized by hydrothermal treatment presented higher photocatalytic activity.

  8. Phase and microstructural stability of electrolyte matrix materials for molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, H.J.; Lee, J.J. [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea); Lim, H.C. [KEPRI, Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 103-16, 305-380 (Korea); Hyun, S.H.

    2010-08-15

    LiAlO{sub 2} powder is used as a material for molten-carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) matrices. The physical and chemical stabilities of LiAlO{sub 2} powder during MCFC operation determine the performance and lifetimes of the cells. Change to the phase and particle size in the allotropic phase of LiAlO{sub 2} was examined with long-term stability tests on pure {alpha}-LiAlO{sub 2} matrix, Al-reinforced {alpha}-LiAlO{sub 2} matrix, Al-reinforced {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} matrix, aqueous {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} matrix and an {alpha}-/{beta}-LiAlO{sub 2} mixture powder in molten carbonate at 650 C in air. In the {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} and {alpha}-/{beta}-LiAlO{sub 2} mixture, the particle growth was continuous from the early stages of heat-treatment to 20,000 h. Crystalline phase transformation ({gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} and {beta}-LiAlO{sub 2} to {alpha}-LiAlO{sub 2} and {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2}, respectively) of these powders and matrices also occurred, and {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} made the third phase like LiAl{sub 5}O{sub 8}. By contrast, the sizes of these particles and the crystalline phase of {alpha}-LiAlO{sub 2} did not change during immersion tests. These results show that, among {alpha}-/{beta}- and {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2}, {alpha}-LiAlO{sub 2} is the most stable phase in molten carbonate. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Impact of carbon on the surface and activity of silica-carbon supported copper catalysts for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassova, I.; Stoeva, N.; Nickolov, R.; Atanasova, G.; Khristova, M.

    2016-04-01

    Composite catalysts, prepared by one or more active components supported on a support are of interest because of the possible interaction between the catalytic components and the support materials. The supports of combined hydrophilic-hydrophobic type may influence how these materials maintain an active phase and as a result a possible cooperation between active components and the support material could occur and affects the catalytic behavior. Silica-carbon nanocomposites were prepared by sol-gel, using different in specific surface areas and porous texture carbon materials. Catalysts were obtained after copper deposition on these composites. The nanocomposites and the catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, TG, XRD, TEM- HRTEM, H2-TPR, and XPS. The nature of the carbon predetermines the composite's texture. The IEPs of carbon materials and silica is a force of composites formation and determines the respective distribution of the silica and carbon components on the surface of the composites. Copper deposition over the investigated silica-carbon composites leads to formation of active phases in which copper is in different oxidation states. The reduction of NO with CO proceeds by different paths on different catalysts due to the textural differences of the composites, maintaining different surface composition and oxidation states of copper.

  10. Pt supported on carbon nanofibers as electrocatalyst for low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaide, Francisco; Alvarez, Garbine; Miguel, Oscar [Dpto. de Energia, CIDETEC, Paseo Miramon, 196, 20009 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain); Lazaro, Maria Jesus; Moliner, Rafael [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Lopez-Cudero, Ana; Solla-Gullon, Jose; Herrero, Enrique; Aldaz, Antonio [Instituto de Electroquimica, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    Carbon nanofibers synthesized via the thermo catalytic decomposition of methane were investigated for the first time as an electrocatalyst support in PEMFC cathodes. Their textural and physical properties make them a highly efficient catalyst support for cathodic oxygen reduction in low temperature PEMFC. Tests performed in MEAs showed that Pt supported on carbon nanofibers exhibited an enhancement of ca. 94% in power density at 0.600 V, in comparison with a commercial catalyst supported on conventional carbon black, Pt/Vulcan XC-72R. (author)

  11. [Surface modification and microstructure of single-walled carbon nanotubes for dental composite resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yang; Zhang, Feimin; Xu, Li'na; Gu, Ning

    2006-12-01

    In order to improve its dispersion condition in dental composite resin and enhance its interaction with the matrix, single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) were refluxed and oxidized, then treated by APTE. Their outer surface were coated by nano-SiO2 particles using sol-gel process, then further treated by organosilanes ATES. IR and TEM were used to analyze modification results. TEM pictures showed nano-particles were on the surface of SWNTs; IR showed characteristic adsorbing bands of SiO2. Composite resin specimen with modified SWNTs was prepared and examined by TEM. SWNTs were detected in composite resin matrix among other inorganic fillers.

  12. Microstructural analysis of carbon nanomaterials produced from pyrolysis/combustion of Styrene-Butadiene-Rubber (SBR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joner Oliveira Alves

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Styrene-Butadiene-Rubber (SBR is a synthetic rubber copolymer used to fabricate several products. This study aims to demonstrate the use of SBR as feedstock for carbon nanomaterials (nanofibers and nanotubes growth, and therefore to establish a novel process for destination of waste products containing SBR. A three stage electrically heated flow reactor was used. Small pellets of rubber were pyrolyzed at a temperature of 1000 ºC. The pyrolyzates were mixed with oxygen-containing gases and were burned. The products of combustion were used to synthesize the carbon nanomaterials (CNMs at the presence of a catalyst. CNMs have a wide range of potential applications due to their extraordinary mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Produced materials were characterized by SEM and TEM, whereas combustion products were assessed using GC. Results showed that CNMs with outer diameters of 30-100 nm and lengths of about 30 µm were formed. Therefore, it was demonstrated that waste products containing SBR can be used to generate CNMs which are value-added products of intense technological interest.

  13. Microstructure and activation characteristics of Mg-Ni alloy modified by multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aminorroaya, Sima; Liu, Hua Kun [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Fairy Meadow, NSW 2522 (Australia); CSIRO National Hydrogen Materials Alliance, CSIRO Energy Centre, 10 Murray Dwyer Circuit, Steel River Estate, Mayfield West, NSW 2304 (Australia); Cho, Younghee; Dahle, Arne [CSIRO National Hydrogen Materials Alliance, CSIRO Energy Centre, 10 Murray Dwyer Circuit, Steel River Estate, Mayfield West, NSW 2304 (Australia); Materials Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2010-05-15

    An Mg-6 wt% Ni alloy was fabricated by a casting technique and the drilled chips ball-milled by high energy ball milling to be examined for their hydrogenation modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The activation characteristics of ball-milled alloy are compared with those of the materials obtained by ball milling with 5 wt% MWCNTs for 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 h. MWCNTs enhanced the absorption kinetics considerably in all cases. The hydrogen content of the modified powder with MWCNTs reached maximum hydrogen capacity within 2 min of exposure to hydrogen at 370 C and 2 MPa pressure. X-ray diffraction analysis provided evidence that no carbon-containing phase was formed during milling. However, milling with MWCNTs reduced the crystallite size, even if the milling was carried out for only an hour. The rate-controlling steps of the hydriding reactions at different milling times were determined by fitting the respective kinetic equations. Evidence is provided that nucleation and growth of hydrides are accelerated drastically by a homogenous distribution of MWCNTs on the surface of the ball-milled powders. We show that MWCNTs are very effective at promoting the hydriding/dehydriding kinetics, as well as in increasing the hydrogen capacity of the magnesium alloy. (author)

  14. Microstructural evolution in laser deposited nickel-titanium-carbon in situ metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopagoni, S. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Hwang, J.Y., E-mail: Junyeon.Hwang@unt.edu [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Singh, A.R.P.; Mensah, B.A.; Bunce, N. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Tiley, J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Scharf, T.W.; Banerjee, R. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: > Laser deposition of Ni-TiC composites with a relatively low volume fraction of refined homogeneously distributed carbide precipitates resulting from an in situ reaction between elemental titanium and carbon (graphite) within the molten nickel pool. > Detailed characterization of the Ni/TiC interface using high resolution TEM. > Evaluation of the microhardness and tribological properties of this novel in situ composite with comparisons to laser deposited pure Ni. - Abstract: Laser deposition of a mixture of elemental nickel, titanium, and carbon (graphite) powders via the laser engineered net shaping (LENS) process results in an in situ titanium carbide reinforced nickel metal matrix composites. The composites have been characterized in detail using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (including energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping), Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission (including high resolution) electron microscopy. Both primary and eutectic titanium carbides, observed in this composite, exhibited the FCC-TiC structure (NaCl-type). Detailed characterization of the nickel/titanium carbide interface was carried out using high resolution TEM with the orientation relationship between the phases being <1 0 0> TiC//<1 1 0> Ni and (0 0 2) TiC//(1-bar 11) Ni. Mechanical and tribological testing determined that the composites exhibited a relatively high hardness of 370 VHN and a steady-state friction coefficient of {approx}0.5, both improvements in comparison to LENS deposited pure Ni.

  15. Ni supported on activated carbon as catalyst for flue gas desulfurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A series of Ni supported on activated carbon are prepared by excessive impregnation and the desulfurization activity is investigated. It has been shown that the activated carbon-supported Ni is an efficient solid catalyst for flue gas desulfurization. The activated carbon treated by HNO3 exhibits high desulfurization activity, and different amounts of loaded-Ni on activated carbon significantly influence the desulfurization activity. The catalysts are studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results of XRD and XPS indicate that the activated carbon treated by HNO3 can increase oxygen-containing functional groups. Ni on activated carbon after calcination at 800 °C shows major Ni phase and minor NiO phase, and with increasing Ni content on activated carbon, Ni phase increases and affects the desulfurization activity of the catalyst, which proves that Ni is the main active phase.

  16. Electro-oxidation of methanol at the different carbon materials supported Pt nano-particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu.; Zhang, Guojie; Zhou, Yiming; Tang, Yawen; Lu, Tianhong [The Laboratory of Electrochemistry, College of Chemistry and Material Science, Nanjing Normal University, 1 Wenyuan Road, Nanjing 210046 (China); Ma, Juan [Institute of Electrochemical Power Sources, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Single-wall carbon nano-tubes (SWNTs), multi-wall carbon nano-tubes (MWNTs) and Vulcan XC-72 carbon (XC-72) are used as supporting carbon materials to prepare Pt/XC-72, Pt/SWNTs and Pt/MWNTs catalysts in tetrahydrofuran/water/ethanol mixture solution. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements demonstrate that the type of supporting carbon material affects significantly the morphology and the electronic structure of supported Pt nano-particles (NPs). Electrochemical measurements indicate that the Pt/SWNTs catalyst exhibited the highest current density, the lowest onset oxidation potential and the best stability for methanol electro-oxidation among the three samples, indicating SWNTs are an ideal anode catalyst supporting material for the practical application of direct methanol fuel cells. (author)

  17. On the microstructure of tungsten disulfide films alloyed with carbon and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nossa, A. [Escola Superior de Tecnologia e Gestao, Instituto Politecnico da Guarda, Guarda (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [ICEMS, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade de Coimbra, Engenharia Mecnica-GEMS, Polo II - Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030201, Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: albano.cavaleiro@dem.uc.pt; Carvalho, N.J.M. [Department of Applied Physics, Materials Science Centre and Netherlands Institute for Metals Research, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Kooi, B.J. [Department of Applied Physics, Materials Science Centre and Netherlands Institute for Metals Research, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Hosson, J.Th.M. de [Department of Applied Physics, Materials Science Centre and Netherlands Institute for Metals Research, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2005-07-22

    This work aimed at studying the effect of a Ti interlayer and the alloying with carbon and nitrogen of W-S-C(N) films on the mechanical and tribological properties. The W-S-C and W-S-N films were deposited by r.f. magnetron reactive sputtering with CH{sub 4} or N{sub 2} as reactive gases and analysed by high resolution electron microscopy techniques. The hardness showed an improvement with the addition of the alloying element, which was attributed to the densification of the morphology, the decrease of the grain size, and the precipitation of new phases harder than WS{sub 2}. The formation of either TiC or TiN at the interface between the Ti interlayer and the W-S-C(N) films promoted the enhancement of adhesion in the alloyed films. These improvements led to an enhanced tribological behaviour, in particularly the lowering of the wear coefficients.

  18. A COSSERAT-TYPE PLATE THEORY AND ITS APPLICATION TO CARBON NANOTUBE MICROSTRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellatif Selmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The predictive capabilities of plate and shell theories greatly depend on their underlying kinematic assumptions. In this study, we develop a Cosserat-type elastic plate theory which accounts for rotations around the normal to the mid-surface plane (so-called drilling rotations. Internal loads, equilibrium equations, boundary conditions and constitutive equations are derived. The case of a Single Walled carbon Nanotube (SWNT modelled as a Cosserat medium is taken here as a reference example. Material parameters are identified and the proposed theory is used to solve analytically the problem of a polymer-SWNT composite tube under torsion. Predictions such as an absolute size effect are compared to those of the classical Cauchy-de Saint-Venant results.

  19. Effect of Microstructure of Cementite on Interphase Stress State in Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHE Lei; GOTOH Masahide; HORIMOTO Yoshiaki; HIROSE Yukio

    2007-01-01

    The experiments related to stress states of ferrite and cementite in carbon steels were carried out including in situ four-point bending and tensile test by X-ray diffraction technique. Stresses in the cementite phase can be measured by conventional X-ray diffraction instrument after a specific treatment on the specimen surface. In order to estimate the stress states in two phases, the X-ray elastic constants of two phases in single-phase state (PXEC) are determined by the experimental X-ray elastic constants of them in composite state (CXEC). The effects of volume fraction and particle size of spheroidal cementite on the interphase stress state are estimated. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical relationships reported in the previous studies.

  20. Allotropic Carbon Nanoforms as Advanced Metal-Free Catalysts or as Supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermenegildo Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This perspective paper summarizes the use of three nanostructured carbon allotropes as metal-free catalysts (“carbocatalysts” or as supports of metal nanoparticles. After an introductory section commenting the interest of developing metal-free catalysts and main features of carbon nanoforms, the main body of this paper is focused on exemplifying the opportunities that carbon nanotubes, graphene, and diamond nanoparticles offer to develop advanced catalysts having active sites based on carbon in the absence of transition metals or as large area supports with special morphology and unique properties. The final section provides my personal view on future developments in this field.

  1. Mapping local microstructure and mechanical performance around carbon nanotube grafted silica fibres: Methodologies for hierarchical composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hui; Kalinka, Gerhard; Chan, K. L. Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G.; Greenhalgh, Emile S.; Bismarck, Alexander; Shaffer, Milo S. P.

    2011-11-01

    The introduction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) modifies bulk polymer properties, depending on intrinsic quality, dispersion, alignment, interfacial chemistry and mechanical properties of the nanofiller. These effects can be exploited to enhance the matrices of conventional microscale fibre-reinforced polymer composites, by using primary reinforcing fibres grafted with CNTs. This paper presents a methodology that combines atomic force microscopy, polarised Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques, to study the distribution, alignment and orientation of CNTs in the vicinity of epoxy-embedded micrometre-scale silica fibres, as well as, the resulting local mechanical properties of the matrix. Raman maps of key features in the CNT spectra clearly show the CNT distribution and orientation, including a `parted' morphology associated with long grafted CNTs. The hardness and indentation modulus of the epoxy matrix were improved locally by 28% and 24%, respectively, due to the reinforcing effects of CNTs. Moreover, a slower stress relaxation was observed in the epoxy region containing CNTs, which may be due to restricted molecular mobility of the matrix. The proposed methodology is likely to be relevant to further studies of nanocomposites and hierarchical composites.The introduction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) modifies bulk polymer properties, depending on intrinsic quality, dispersion, alignment, interfacial chemistry and mechanical properties of the nanofiller. These effects can be exploited to enhance the matrices of conventional microscale fibre-reinforced polymer composites, by using primary reinforcing fibres grafted with CNTs. This paper presents a methodology that combines atomic force microscopy, polarised Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques, to study the distribution, alignment and orientation of CNTs in the vicinity of epoxy-embedded micrometre-scale silica fibres, as well as, the resulting local mechanical properties of the matrix. Raman

  2. Microstructural evolution and formation mechanism of bimodal structure of 0.2% carbon steel subjected to the heavy-reduction controlled rolling process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyung-Won, E-mail: wonipark@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Komaba 4-6-1, Meguro-ku, 153-8505 Tokyo (Japan); Shimojima, Kei [Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Komaba 4-6-1, Meguro-ku, 153-8505 Tokyo (Japan); Sugiyama, Sumio; Komine, Hisanao; Yanagimoto, Jun [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Komaba 4-6-1, Meguro-ku, 153-8505 Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-01-29

    A heavy-reduction controlled rolling process with approximately 75% thickness reduction was carried out to investigate the microstructural evolution including texture development, focusing on the formation of a bimodal structure of 0.2% carbon steel with heating temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 °C. Upon increasing the heating temperature from 700 to 900 °C, the microstructure was refined and precipitates such as Fe{sub 3}C were uniformly distributed throughout the microstructure. For the microstructures control-rolled at heating temperatures of 900 and 1000 °C with average ferrite grain sizes of 1.34 and 1.63 μm, respectively, a bimodal structure could be observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which was very similar to the result of a plane-strain compression (PSC) test. Moreover, the 900 and 1000 °C-heated specimens had less well developed textures primarily consisting of {113}–{4 4 11}〈110〉 and {332}〈113〉 components, which usually developed by the transformation (γ→α), and the 1000 °C-heated specimen exhibited various textures and a low intensity of the {100}〈011〉 component, which was generally transformed from the {100}〈001〉 component of the recrystallized austenite.

  3. Carbon Cycle Science in Support of Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M. E.; West, T. O.; McGlynn, E.; Gurwick, N. P.; Duren, R. M.; Ocko, I.; Paustian, K.

    2016-12-01

    There has been an extensive amount of basic and applied research conducted on biogeochemical cycles, land cover change, watershed to earth system modeling, climate change, and energy efficiency. Concurrently, there continues to be interest in how to best reduce net carbon emissions, including maintaining or augmenting global carbon stocks and decreasing fossil fuel emissions. Decisions surrounding reductions in net emissions should be grounded in, and informed by, existing scientific knowledge and analyses in order to be most effective. The translation of scientific research to decision-making is rarely direct, and often requires coordination of objectives or intermediate research steps. For example, complex model output may need to be simplified to provide mean estimates for given activities; biogeochemical models used for climate change prediction may need to be altered to estimate net carbon flux associated with particular activities; or scientific analyses may need to aggregate and analyze data in a different manner to address specific questions. In the aforementioned cases, expertise and capabilities of researchers and decision-makers are both needed, and early coordination and communication is most effective. Initial analysis of existing science and current decision-making needs indicate that (a) knowledge that is co-produced by scientists and decision-makers has a higher probability of being usable for decision making, (b) scientific work in the past decade to integrate activity data into models has resulted in more usable information for decision makers, (c) attribution and accounting of carbon cycle fluxes is key to using carbon cycle science for decision-making, and (d) stronger, long-term links among research on climate and management of carbon-related sectors (e.g., energy, land use, industry, and buildings) are needed to adequately address current issues.

  4. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  5. Investigating Linear and Nonlinear Viscoelastic behaviour and microstructures of Gelatine-Multiwalled carbon nanotubes composites

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the linear and nonlinear rheology of various gelatine-multiwalled carbon nanotube (gel-MWNT) composites, namely physically-crosslinked-gelatine gel-MWNT composites, chemically-crosslinked-gelatine gel-MWNT composites, and chemically-physically-crosslinked-gelatine gel-MWNT composites. Further, the internal structures of these gel-MWNT composites were characterized by ultra-small angle neutron scattering and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption of gelatine onto the surface of MWNT is also investigated to understand gelatine-assisted dispersion of MWNT during ultrasonication. For all gelatine gels, addition of MWNT increases their complex modulus. The dependence of storage modulus with frequency for gelatine-MWNT composites is similar to that of the corresponding neat gelatine matrix. However, by incorporating MWNT, the dependence of the loss modulus on frequency is reduced. The linear viscoelastic region is decreased approximately linearly with the increase of MWNT concentration. The pre-stress results demonstrate that the addition of MWNT does not change the strain-hardening behaviour of physically-crosslinked gelatine gel. However, the addition of MWNT can increase the strain-hardening behaviour of chemically-crosslinked gelatine gel, and chemically-physically crosslinked gelatine gel. Results from light microscopy, cryo-SEM, and USANS demonstrate the hierarchical structures of MWNT, including that tens-of-micron scale MWNT agglomerates are present. Furthermore, the adsorption curve of gelatine onto the surface of MWNT follows two-stage pseudo-saturation behaviour.

  6. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of copper coated multiwall carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagannatham, M.; Sankaran, S.; Haridoss, Prathap, E-mail: prathap@iitm.ac.in

    2015-06-25

    Electroless copper coatings were performed on purified carbon nanotubes (CNT), with varying deposition time and the optimum deposition time in terms of uniform deposition was determined to be 45 min. Different amounts of optimized Cu coated CNT (CNT (Cu)) and Al powders were ball milled. CNT (Cu) reinforced Al (Al-CNT (Cu)) composites were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Pure CNT reinforced Al (Al-CNT) composites were also prepared by SPS. The ball milled powders and composites were characterized using X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Microhardness and compression properties of the composites were measured. TEM images of ball milled powders and composites revealed uniform distribution of CNT in matrix. Mechanical properties of Al-CNT (Cu) composites are superior to Al-CNT composites. The maximum enhancement in compressive strength of Al-CNT (Cu) composites is 154% for 2 wt% reinforcement; this enhancement is attributed to the copper coating on CNT surface.

  7. Mapping local microstructure and mechanical performance around carbon nanotube grafted silica fibres: methodologies for hierarchical composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hui; Kalinka, Gerhard; Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G; Greenhalgh, Emile S; Bismarck, Alexander; Shaffer, Milo S P

    2011-11-01

    The introduction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) modifies bulk polymer properties, depending on intrinsic quality, dispersion, alignment, interfacial chemistry and mechanical properties of the nanofiller. These effects can be exploited to enhance the matrices of conventional microscale fibre-reinforced polymer composites, by using primary reinforcing fibres grafted with CNTs. This paper presents a methodology that combines atomic force microscopy, polarised Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques, to study the distribution, alignment and orientation of CNTs in the vicinity of epoxy-embedded micrometre-scale silica fibres, as well as, the resulting local mechanical properties of the matrix. Raman maps of key features in the CNT spectra clearly show the CNT distribution and orientation, including a 'parted' morphology associated with long grafted CNTs. The hardness and indentation modulus of the epoxy matrix were improved locally by 28% and 24%, respectively, due to the reinforcing effects of CNTs. Moreover, a slower stress relaxation was observed in the epoxy region containing CNTs, which may be due to restricted molecular mobility of the matrix. The proposed methodology is likely to be relevant to further studies of nanocomposites and hierarchical composites.

  8. Supported mesoporous carbon ultrafiltration membrane and process for making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael; Foley, Henry C.; Agarwal, Hans

    2004-04-13

    A novel supported mesoporous carbon ultrafiltration membrane and process for producing the same. The membranes comprise a mesoporous carbon layer that exists both within and external to the porous support. A liquid polymer precursor composition comprising both carbonizing and noncarbonizing templating polymers is deposited on the porous metal support. The coated support is then heated in an inert-gas atmosphere to pyrolyze the polymeric precursor and form a mesoporous carbon layer on and within the support. The pore-size of the membranes is dependent on the molecular weight of the noncarbonizing templating polymer precursor. The mesoporous carbon layer is stable and can withstand high temperatures and exposure to organic chemicals. Additionally, the porous metal support provides excellent strength properties. The composite structure of the membrane provides novel structural properties and allows for increased operating pressures allowing for greater membrane flow rates. The invention also relates to the use of the novel ultrafiltration membrane to separate macromolecules from solution. An example is shown separating bovine serum albumin from water. The membrane functions by separating and by selective adsorption. Because of the membrane's porous metal support, it is well suited to industrial applications. The unique properties of the supported mesoporous carbon membrane also allow the membrane to be used in transient pressure or temperature swing separations processes. Such processes were not previously possible with existing mesoporous membranes. The present invention, however, possesses the requisite physical properties to perform such novel ultrafiltration processes.

  9. Effects of cobalt precursor on pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole as electrocatalyst toward oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xianxia; Hu, Xin-Xin; Ding, Xin-Long; Kong, Hai-Chuan; Sha, Hao-Dong; Lin, He; Wen, Wen; Shen, Guangxia; Guo, Zhi; Ma, Zi-Feng; Yang, Yong

    2013-11-01

    A series of non-precious metal electrocatalysts, namely pyrolyzed carbon-supported cobalt-polypyrrole, Co-PPy-TsOH/C, are synthesized with various cobalt precursors, including cobalt acetate, cobalt nitrate, cobalt oxalate, and cobalt chloride. The catalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is comparatively investigated with electrochemical techniques of cyclic voltammogram, rotating disk electrode and rotating ring-disk electrode. The results are analyzed and discussed employing physiochemical techniques of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, elemental analysis, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure. It shows that the cobalt precursor plays an essential role on the synthesis process as well as microstructure and performance of the Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts towards ORR. Among the studied Co-PPy-TsOH/C catalysts, that prepared with cobalt acetate exhibits the best ORR performance. The crystallite/particle size of cobalt and its distribution as well as the graphitization degree of carbon in the catalyst greatly affects the catalytic performance of Co-PPy-TsOH/C towards ORR. Metallic cobalt is the main component in the active site in Co-PPy-TsOH/C for catalyzing ORR, but some other elements such as nitrogen are probably involved, too.

  10. Novel Carbon Nanotubes-supported NiB Amorphors Alloy Catalyst for Benzene Hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Hua YANG; Rong Bin ZHANG; Feng Yi LI

    2004-01-01

    The NiB amorphous alloy catalysts supported on CNTs and alumina were prepared by impregnation and chemical reduction. The gas-phase benzene hydrogenation was used as a probe reaction to evaluate the catalytic activity. The result showed that the NiB amorphous alloy catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes exhibited higher activity than that supported on alumina.

  11. Inlfuence of carbon content on microstructure and mechanical properties of Mn13Cr2 and Mn18Cr2 cast steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Dingshan; Liu Zhongyi; Li Wei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a comparison study was carried out to investigate the inlfuence of carbon content on the microstructure, hardness, and impact toughness of water-quenched Mn13Cr2 and Mn18Cr2 cast steels. The study results indicate that both steels' water-quenched microstructures are composed of austenite and a smal amount of carbide. The study also found that, when the carbon contents are the same, there is less carbide in Mn18Cr2 steel than in Mn13Cr2 steel. Therefore, the hardness of Mn18Cr2 steel is lower than that of Mn13Cr2 steel but the impact toughness of Mn18Cr2 steel is higher than that of Mn13Cr2 steel. With increasing the carbon content, the hardness increases and the impact toughness decreases in these two kinds of steels, and the impact toughness of Mn18Cr2 steel substantialy exceeds that of Mn13Cr2 steel. Therefore, the water-quenched Mn18Cr2 steel with high carbon content could be applied to relatively high impact abrasive working conditions, while the as-cast Mn18Cr2 steel could be only used under working conditions of relatively low impact abrasive load due to lower impact toughness.

  12. Effect of processing routes in a multi-pass continuous hybrid process on mechanical properties, microstructure, and texture evolutions of low-carbon steel wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sun Kwang; Baek, Hyun Moo; Joo, Ho Seon; Im, Yong-Taek

    2015-03-01

    In this work, a multi-pass continuous hybrid (CH) process was experimentally applied with up to five passes with three processing routes, A, Bc, and C, to check the practicality of the processing routes and investigate their effect on the mechanical properties, microstructure, and texture evolutions of low-carbon steel wires. According to the present investigation, the wires processed by the 5th pass CH process with route A showed the highest ultimate tensile strength value (762 MPa) compared to those for routes Bc (718 MPa) and C (720 MPa), respectively. Based on the compression test results, the CH processed wire showed good workability when the aspect ratio was smaller than 2.4 for all the processing routes. According to the microstructure and texture evolutions, the grain sizes of the 5th pass CH processed wires decreased for all the processing routes than that of the initial specimen, and the wires showed mixed texture distribution of shear and drawing texture components. From the present investigation, it was concluded that the processing routes of the CH process could strongly affect the microstructure and texture evolutions, resulting in changes of the mechanical properties and workability of the low-carbon steel wires.

  13. Microstructure Examinations in Corners of the Low-Carbon Steel Slabs from Continuos Caster Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwinta G.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The exposed selvedge layers in slabs cast by the continuous process should be free from surface defects, which in most cases appear in the form of cracks on the casting surface and run to its interior. In addition to the parameters of the casting process, the occurrence of such defects depends on the chemical composition of cast steel, on the segregation of surface active elements and formation of the precipitates of carbides, nitrides and other phases. Due to the frequent occurrence of defects in corners of the slabs, non-destructive testing was performed on the mechanically cleaned surfaces of slabs. The test material was low-carbon API(American Petroleum Institute API 5L standard steel micro alloyed with Nb and Ti designed for the production of pipes to handle gas, oil and other liquid and gaseous fuels. Despite the use of different methods of inspection, i.e. ultrasonic, magnetic particle and penetrant, cracks were not traced in the examined material. Then, from the corners of the examined slabs, specimens were cut out for metallographic examinations. The main purpose of these examinations was to disclose the presence of possible cracks and micro cracks on the surfaces transversal and longitudinal to the direction of casting. At the same time, studies were conducted to establish the number and morphology of non-metallic inclusions in selvedge layers of the slab corners and axis. Additionally, hardness of the slabs was measured. The conducted studies revealed only some minor differences in the slab hardness along its axis (130 ÷ 135 HB and in selvedge layers (120 ÷ 123 HB.

  14. Methane carbon supports aquatic food webs to the fish level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Sanseverino

    Full Text Available Large amounts of the greenhouse gas methane (CH(4 are produced by anaerobic mineralization of organic matter in lakes. In spite of extensive freshwater CH(4 emissions, most of the CH(4 is typically oxidized by methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB before it can reach the lake surface and be emitted to the atmosphere. In turn, it has been shown that the CH(4-derived biomass of MOB can provide the energy and carbon for zooplankton and macroinvertebrates. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of specific fatty acids synthesized by MOB in fish tissues having low carbon stable isotope ratios. Fish species, zooplankton, macroinvertebrates and the water hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes were collected from a shallow lake in Brazil and analyzed for fatty acids (FA and carbon stable isotope ratios (δ(13C. The fatty acids 16:1ω8c, 16:1ω8t, 16:1ω6c, 16:1ω5t, 18:1ω8c and 18:1ω8t were used as signature for MOB. The δ(13C ratios varied from -27.7‰ to -42.0‰ and the contribution of MOB FA ranged from 0.05% to 0.84% of total FA. Organisms with higher total content of MOB FAs presented lower δ(13C values (i.e. they were more depleted in (13C, while organisms with lower content of MOB signature FAs showed higher δ(13C values. An UPGMA cluster analysis was carried out to distinguish grouping of organisms in relation to their MOB FA contents. This combination of stable isotope and fatty acid tracers provides new evidence that assimilation of methane-derived carbon can be an important carbon source for the whole aquatic food web, up to the fish level.

  15. Effect of Stress Relief Annealing on Microstructure & Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints Between Low Alloy Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivas, R.; Das, G.; Das, S. K.; Mahato, B.; Kumar, S.; Sivaprasad, K.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Two types of welded joints were prepared using low alloy carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel as base materials. In one variety, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 82. In another type, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 182. In case of Inconel 82, method of welding was GTAW. For Inconel 182, welding was done by SMAW technique. For one set of each joints after buttering, stress relief annealing was done at 923 K (650 °C) for 90 minutes before further joining with weld metal. Microstructural investigation and sub-size in situ tensile testing in scanning electron microscope were carried out for buttered-welded and buttered-stress relieved-welded specimens. Adjacent to fusion boundary, heat-affected zone of low alloy steel consisted of ferrite-pearlite phase combination. Immediately after fusion boundary in low alloy steel side, there was increase in matrix grain size. Same trend was observed in the region of austenitic stainless steel that was close to fusion boundary between weld metal-stainless steel. Close to interface between low alloy steel-buttering material, the region contained martensite, Type-I boundary and Type-II boundary. Peak hardness was obtained close to fusion boundary between low alloy steel and buttering material. In this respect, a minimum hardness was observed within buttering material. The peak hardness was shifted toward buttering material after stress relief annealing. During tensile testing no deformation occurred within low alloy steel and failure was completely through buttering material. Crack initiated near fusion boundary between low alloy steel-buttering material for welded specimens and the same shifted away from fusion boundary for stress relieved annealed specimens. This observation was at par with the characteristics of microhardness profile. In as welded condition, joints fabricated with Inconel 82 exhibited superior bond strength than the weld produced with Inconel 182. Stress relief annealing

  16. The Infinite Possible Growth Ambients that Support Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Forest Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroe; Goto, Jundai; Yasuda, Satoshi; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Yumura, Motoo; Futaba, Don N.; Hata, Kenji

    2013-11-01

    We report the virtually infinite possible carbon feedstocks which support the highly efficient growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using on the water-assisted chemical vapor deposition method. Our results demonstrate that diverse varieties of carbon feedstocks, in the form of hydrocarbons, spanning saturated rings (e.g. trans-deca-hydronaphthalene), saturated chains (e.g. propane), unsaturated rings (e.g. dicyclopentadiene), and unsaturated chains (e.g. ethylene) could be used as a carbon feedstocks with SWCNT forests with heights exceeding 100 ums. Further, we found that all the resultant SWCNTs possessed similar average diameter indicating that the diameter was mainly determined by the catalyst rather than the carbon feedstock within this synthetic system. A demonstration of the generality was the synthesis of a carbon nanotube forest from a highly unorthodox combination of gases where trans-decahydronaphthalene acted as the carbon feedstock and benzaldehyde acted as the growth enhancer.

  17. Carbon-Based Regenerable Sorbents for the Combined Carbon Dioxide and Ammonia Removal for the Primary Life Support System (PLSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Manthina, Venkata; Singh, Prabhakar; Chullen, Cinda

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). Since ammonia is the most important TC to be captured, data on TC sorption presented in this paper are limited to ammonia, with results relevant to other TCs to be reported at a later time. The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Furthermore, the current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is non-regenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using carbon sorbents for the reversible, concurrent sorption of carbon dioxide and ammonia. Several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested, and multiple adsorption/vacuum-regeneration cycles were demonstrated at room temperature, and also a carbon surface conditioning technique that enhances the combined carbon dioxide and ammonia sorption without impairing sorbent regeneration.

  18. Transport of Carbonate Ions by Novel Cellulose Fiber Supported Solid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Gaikwad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Transport of carbonate ions was explored through fiber supported solid membrane. A novel fiber supported solid membrane was prepared by chemical modification of cellulose fiber with citric acid, 2′2-bipyridine and magnesium carbonate. The factors affecting the permeability of carbonate ions such as immobilization of citric acid-magnesium metal ion -2′2-bipyridine complex (0 to 2.5 mmol/g range over cellulose fiber, carbon-ate ion concentration in source phase and NaOH concentration in receiving phase were investigated. Ki-netic of carbonate, sulfate, and nitrate ions was investigated through fiber supported solid membrane. Transport of carbonate ions with/without bubbling of CO2 (0 to 10 ml/min in source phase was explored from source to receiving phase. The novel idea is to explore the adsorptive transport of CO2 from source to receiving phase through cellulose fiber containing magnesium metal ion organic framework. Copyright © 2012 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.Received: 25th November 2011; Revised: 17th December 2011; Accepted: 19th December 2011[How to Cite: A.G. Gaikwad. (2012. Transport of Carbonate Ions by Novel Cellulose Fiber Supported Solid Membrane. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (1: 49– 57.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1225.49-57][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1225.49-57 ] | View in 

  19. Fabrication of ordered uniform porous carbon networks and their application to a catalyst supporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jong-Sung; Kang, Soonki; Yoon, Suk Bon; Chai, Geunseok

    2002-08-14

    Ordered uniform porous carbon frameworks showing interesting morphology variations were synthesized against removable colloidal silica crystalline templates through simply altering acid catalyst sites for acid-catalyzed polymerization. These highly ordered uniform porous carbons as a catalyst supporter resulted in much improved catalytic activity for methanol oxidation in a fuel cell.

  20. Effect of thermo-mechanical cycling on the microstructure and toughness in the weld CGHAZ of a novel high strength low carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, H. [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Du, L.-X., E-mail: dulx@ral.neu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Hu, J.; Sun, G.-S.; Wu, H.-Y. [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra2@utep.edu [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials Research and Innovation and Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    We have studied the microstructural evolution in the simulated coarse grain heat affected zone (CGHAZ) of novel low carbon microalloyed steel with yield strength of 1000 MPa using electron microscopy, while the crystallographic characteristics were studied by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The deterioration in low temperature toughness after the simulated welding cycle was attributed to the formation of coarse blocky M–A constituent. However, the lower bainite microstructure of the matrix was beneficial for low temperature impact toughness because of similarity in the crystal structure of variants of lath martensite, which were present in high proportion at the high angle grain boundaries. A high fraction of small M–A constituent also influenced impact toughness.

  1. Bio-Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Removal for Air Revitalization in Exploration Life Support Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An important aspect of the ISS air revitalization system for life support is the removal of carbon dioxide from cabin air and retrieves oxygen from CO2. The current...

  2. Nickel supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in alkaline electrolyte

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhuang, Zhongbin; Giles, Stephen A; Zheng, Jie; Jenness, Glen R; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    .... Here we report that a composite catalyst, nickel nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, has hydrogen oxidation activity similar to platinum-group metals in alkaline electrolyte...

  3. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes supported on carbon fiber paper synthesized by simple chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ya-hao [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhengzhou Research Institute of Chalco, Zhengzhou 450041 (China); Gao, Hong-quan [Zhengzhou Research Institute of Chalco, Zhengzhou 450041 (China); Yang, Jian-hong, E-mail: zyy_yjh@rilm.com.cn [Zhengzhou Research Institute of Chalco, Zhengzhou 450041 (China); Gao, Wen-liang; Xiang, Jia [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Li, Qing-yu, E-mail: 13975808173@126.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We deposited multi-wall carbon nanotubes on carbon fiber paper with a simple CVD. • We investigated the inherent mechanism of Ni particle's self-dispersion. • The MWCNTs/CFP composite possesses wonderful electrical conductivity. - Abstract: Aiming at developing a novel carbon/carbon composite as an electrode in the electrochemical capacitor applications, multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/carbon fiber paper (CFP) composite has been synthesized using a simple chemical vapor deposition, in which different metal catalysts such as Fe, Ni and Cu are used. However, randomly oriented MWCNTs were only obtained on Ni particles. The mechanism for this unique phenomenon is investigated in this article. The physical and electrochemical properties of as-prepared MWCNTs/CFP composite are characterized and the results show that the as-prepared composite is a promising substrate for electrochemical capacitor applications.

  4. Research and development of molten carbonate fuel cell power generation system. ; Supporting studies. Yoyu tansan'engata nenryo denchi hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu. ; Support kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    With an objective to develop a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power generation system, this paper discusses such supporting technologies as material and coal gas handling technologies, capacity increasing technologies, and CO2 separating technologies. Performance of generating a voltage of 0.825V has been obtained from a single cell using iron-based alloy powder materials when anode porosity is 70% and current density is 150 mA/cm[sup 2]. A separator material with aluminum electrolytically plated, and nickel dispersed showed superb corrosion resistance. Crack generation has been reduced in a ZrO2 fiber reinforced electrolyte plate. High-performance corrosion resistant electrolyte plates have been fabricated in the ceramic system by using the electrode microstructure controlling technology and alumina-based fiber reinforcement. Desulfurizing catalyst, TiO2-ZnO, for coal gas dry refining has been studied. Zinc ferrite, a regenerative desulfurizing agent, has been improved for the inorganic salt type gas refining. Discussions have been given on increasing capacity of a 500-MW class coal gasification MCFC power generation system. A CO2 separation testing equipment of a PSA system has been opened for inspection, but no anomalies such as corrosion, damages, and sludge generation have been discovered. 4 figs.

  5. The study on carbon nanotubes-supported Pt catalysts for PEMFC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱捷; 朱红; 康晓红; 葛奉娟; 杨玉国

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-supported-platinum (Pt/CNTs) and carbon-supported-platinum (Pt/C) catalysts were prepared by in situ chemical reduction method and analyzed by TEM and XRD. Then the experiments were carried out to test the performance of PEMFCs with the Pt electrodes. The results showed that in both catalyst, Pt was of small particle size (about 4 nm) and Pt/CNTs exhibited higher catalytic activity than Pt/C.

  6. Photocatalytic Characterization of TiO2 Supported on Active Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    he Photocatalytic characterization of TiO2 supported on active carbon was investigated for photocatalytic decomposition of dichloroacetic acid. It was found that TiO2 / AC exhibited a higher photocatalytic activity than pure TiO2. The reason is that active carbon acting as powerful adsorbent supports makes high concentration environments of organic pollutant molecules around TiO2 particles.

  7. Acid-base bifunctional catalysis of silica-alumina-supported organic amines for carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motokura, Ken; Tomita, Mitsuru; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Acid-base bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts were prepared by the reaction of an acidic silica-alumina (SA) surface with silane-coupling reagents possessing amino functional groups. The obtained SA-supported amines (SA-NR2) were characterized by solid-state 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The solid-state NMR spectra revealed that the amines were immobilized by acid-base interactions at the SA surface. The interactions between the surface acidic sites and the immobilized basic amines were weaker than the interactions between the SA and free amines. The catalytic performances of the SA-NR2 catalysts for various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as cyano-ethoxycarbonylation, the Michael reaction, and the nitro-aldol reaction, were investigated and compared with those of homogeneous and other heterogeneous catalysts. The SA-NR2 catalysts showed much higher catalytic activities for the carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions than heterogeneous amine catalysts using other supports, such as SiO2 and Al2O3. On the other hand, homogeneous amines hardly promoted these reactions under similar reaction conditions, and the catalytic behavior of SA-NR2 was also different from that of MgO, which was employed as a typical heterogeneous base. An acid-base dual-activation mechanism for the carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions is proposed.

  8. Carbon Xerogel-supported Iron as a Catalyst in Combustion Synthesis of Carbon Fibrous Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wojciech Kiciriski; Joanna Lasota

    2012-01-01

    The catalytically assisted self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of carbon fibrous nanostructures, where the iron-doped colloidal carbon xerogel is proposed as a catalyst system, was examined. The carbon xerogel was prepared through carbonization of an iron doped organic xerogel at temperatures ranging from 600 to 1050℃. The reaction between calcium carbide and hexachloroethane in the presence of sodium azide is exothermic enough to proceed at a high temperature, self-sustaining regime. The combustion reactions of those mixtures enriched with iron-doped carbon xerogels were conducted in a stainless steel reactor---calorimetric bomb under an initial pressure of 1 MPa of argon. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the combustion products revealed low yield of various type of carbon fibers (presumably nanotubes), which grew via the tip-growth mechanism. The fibrous nanostructures were found in the vicinity of the spot of ignition, while in the outer and cooler area of the reactor, dusty products with soot-like morphology dominated. No significant correlation between the pyrolysis temperature of the carbon xerogel and the morphology of the obtained carbon fibrous nanostructures was observed.

  9. Durability of Carbon Nanofiber (CNF) & Carbon Nanotube (CNT) as Catalyst Support for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Borghei, Maryam; Lund, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    gravimetric analysis (TGA), cyclic voltammetry (CV), polarization curve and impedance spectroscopy were applied on the samples under accelerated stress conditions. The carbon nano-materials demonstrated better stability as support for nano-sized platinum catalyst under PEMFC related operating conditions. Due...

  10. Palladium and palladium-tin supported on multi wall carbon nanotubes or carbon for alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldes, Adriana Napoleão; Furtunato da Silva, Dionisio; Martins da Silva, Júlio César; Antonio de Sá, Osvaldo; Spinacé, Estevam Vitório; Neto, Almir Oliveira; Coelho dos Santos, Mauro

    2015-02-01

    Pd and PdSn (Pd:Sn atomic ratios of 90:10), supported on Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) or Carbon (C), are prepared by an electron beam irradiation reduction method. The obtained materials are characterized by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), Transmission electron Microscopy (TEM) and Cyclic Voltammetry (CV). The activity for ethanol electro-oxidation is tested in alkaline medium, at room temperature, using Cyclic Voltammetry and Chronoamperometry (CA) and in a single alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC), in the temperature range of 60-90 °C. CV analysis finds that Pd/MWCNT and PdSn/MWCNT presents onset potentials changing to negative values and high current values, compared to Pd/C and PdSn/C electrocatalysts. ATR-FTIR analysis, performed during the CV, identifies acetate and acetaldehyde as principal products formed during the ethanol electro-oxidation, with low conversion to CO2. In single fuel cell tests, at 85 °C, using 2.0 mol L-1 ethanol in 2.0 mol L-1 KOH solutions, the electrocatalysts supported on MWCNT, also, show higher power densities, compared to the materials supported on carbon: PdSn/MWCNT, presents the best result (36 mW cm-2). The results show that the use of MWCNT, instead of carbon, as support, plus the addition of small amounts of Sn to Pd, improves the electrocatalytic activity for Ethanol Oxidation Reaction (EOR).

  11. Effect of Carbon Content on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 9 to 12 pct Cr Ferritic/Martensitic Heat-Resistant Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Feng-Shi; Tian, Li-Qian; Xue, Bing; Jiang, Xue-Bo; Zhou, Li

    2012-07-01

    Two heats of 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels were prepared. One has an ultralow carbon content of 0.01 wt pct, whereas another heat has a normal carbon content of 0.09 wt pct. The effect of carbon content on microstructure and mechanical properties of 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels was studied. The results show that the ultralow-carbon steel contains bimodal, nanosized MX precipitates with high density in the matrix but few M23C6 carbide particles in the normalized-and-tempered state. The smaller nanosized MX precipitates have two kinds of typical morphology: One is cubic and another is rectangular. The cubic MX precipitate contains Nb, Ti, and V, whereas the rectangular one only contains Nb and V. The normal carbon steel has abundant M23C6 carbide particles along the grain and lath boundaries and much less density of nanosized MX precipitates after the same heat treatments. After long-term aging at 923 K (650 °C) for 10,000 hours, the stress rupture properties of the ultralow carbon content steel degrades more significantly. The strength degradation mechanism of the 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels is discussed in this article.

  12. Effects of the pre-transformation microstructures on the grain refining of medium-carbon 5Cr-Mo-V steels; Chutanso 5Cr-Mo-V ko no gyaku hentai sairyuka ni oyobosu zenhentai soshiki no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukauda, Y.; Shibata, T.; Ono, S.; Ishiguro, T. [Nippon Steel Works, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    For the purpose of obtaining refined grains over full cross section for improved ductility in heavy-gage products of a medium carbon 5Cr- Mo-V steel, the effects of pre-transformation microstructures on the grain refining during austenitizing were investigated. Samples were prepared to possess either one of three different microstructures , pearlite, bainite and martensite. These samples were heated slowly to the desired austenitizing temperature followed by rapid cooling, and the formation of new austenite grains was examined. Though austenite grains were not refined in cases of martensite and bainite microstructures, these were remarkably refined in case of pearlite. Portions of pearlite were enriched with carbon, where the transformation temperature into austenite was lower, and this is considered to be the reason that finer austenite grains were formed.Above results show that arranging pearlite microstructure before quenching heat treatment is effective for obtaining refined grains over full cross section in heavy-gage products. (author)

  13. Graphitised Carbon Nanofibres as Catalyst Support for PEMFC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yli-Rantala, E.; Pasanen, A.; Kauranen, P.

    2011-01-01

    for the anchorage of Pt catalyst nanoparticles. Modification of the fibre surface is therefore needed. In this study Pt nanoparticles have been deposited onto as-received and surface-modified G-CNFs. The surface modifications of the fibres comprise acid treatment and nitrogen doping by pyrolysis of a polyaniline...... (PANI) precursor. The modified surfaces were studied by FTIR and XPS and the electrochemical characterization, including long-term Pt stability tests, was performed using a low-temperature PEMFC single cell. The performance and stability of the G-CNF supported catalysts were compared with a CB supported...

  14. Microstructural features and microhardness of Fe-Mo-Nb-V-C low-carbon steel processed by high-pressure torsion: The significance of the initial structural state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Galina; Astafurova, Elena; Melnikov, Eugene; Naydenkin, Eugene; Smirnov, Alexander; Bataev, Vladimir; Dobatkin, Sergey

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the initial heat treatment (quenching or tempering) of low-carbon steel (Fe-Mo-Nb-V-C) on special features of the ultrafine-grained structure and microhardness produced by high-pressure torsion was investigated. High-pressure torsion promotes the more apparent refinement of structural elements of the steel (dpr = 55 nm for the quenched state and 74 nm for the tempered state) and an increase in structural homogeneity of microhardness of quenched specimens in comparison with tempered ones. Experimental results reveal a high significance of the initial structural state for the final deformation-processed microstructure and microhardness (radial distribution) of steel specimens.

  15. Nanostructured polypyrrole/carbon composite as Pt catalyst support for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongbin; Li, Lei; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Yongming

    A novel catalyst support was synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole on Vulcan XC-72 carbon in naphthalene sulfonic acid (NSA) solution containing ammonium persulfate as oxidant at room temperature. Pt nanoparticles with 3-4 nm size were deposited on the prepared polypyrrole-carbon composites by chemical reduction method. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements showed that Pt particles were homogeneously dispersed in polypyrrole-carbon composites. The Pt nanoparticles-dispersed catalyst composites were used as anodes of fuel cells for hydrogen and methanol oxidation. Cyclic voltammetry measurements of hydrogen and methanol oxidation showed that Pt nanoparticles deposited on polypyrrole-carbon with NSA as dopant exhibit better catalytic activity than those on plain carbon. This result might be due to the higher electrochemically available surface areas, electronic conductivity and easier charge-transfer at polymer/carbon particle interfaces allowing a high dispersion and utilization of deposited Pt nanoparticles.

  16. Nanostructured polypyrrole/carbon composite as Pt catalyst support for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hongbin; Li, Lei; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Yongming [School of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2008-10-01

    A novel catalyst support was synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole on Vulcan XC-72 carbon in naphthalene sulfonic acid (NSA) solution containing ammonium persulfate as oxidant at room temperature. Pt nanoparticles with 3-4 nm size were deposited on the prepared polypyrrole-carbon composites by chemical reduction method. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements showed that Pt particles were homogeneously dispersed in polypyrrole-carbon composites. The Pt nanoparticles-dispersed catalyst composites were used as anodes of fuel cells for hydrogen and methanol oxidation. Cyclic voltammetry measurements of hydrogen and methanol oxidation showed that Pt nanoparticles deposited on polypyrrole-carbon with NSA as dopant exhibit better catalytic activity than those on plain carbon. This result might be due to the higher electrochemically available surface areas, electronic conductivity and easier charge-transfer at polymer/carbon particle interfaces allowing a high dispersion and utilization of deposited Pt nanoparticles. (author)

  17. Enhanced Fuel Cell Catalyst Durability with Nitrogen Modified Carbon Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    1000 mg of commercially available carbon powder (Cabot Vulcan XCR72R) was placed into the barrel and the chamber was evacuated to approximately 1 × 10−6...unmodified and N-modified Vulcan were obtained on a Philips CM200 TEM. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the synthesized catalysts was done...durability cycles Pt-Ru/ Vulcan 73 3.3 × 10−5 24 51 10 Pt-Ru/N- Vulcan 55 2.9 × 10−5 17 60 40 Pt-Ru/C JM 5000 69 3.0 × 10−5 20 48 17 tials higher than 0.7 V

  18. Fatigue crack growth behaviors in hot-rolled low carbon steels: A comparison between ferrite-pearlite and ferrite-bainite microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Mingfei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Yu, Hao, E-mail: yhzhmr@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2013-01-01

    The roles of microstructure types in fatigue crack growth behaviors in ferrite-pearlite steel and ferrite-bainite steel were investigated. The ferrite-bainite dual-phase microstructure was obtained by intermediate heat treatment, conducted on ferrite-pearlite hot-rolled low carbon steel. This paper presents the results from investigation using constant stress-controlled fatigue tests with in-situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fatigue crack growth (FCG) rate tests, and fatigue fractography analysis. Microscopy images arrested by in-situ SEM showed that the fatigue crack propagation in F-P steel could become unstable more ealier compared with that in F-B steel. The fatigue cracks in ferrite-pearlite were more tortuous and could propagate more freely than that in ferrite-bainite microstructures. However, frequent crack branching were observed in ferrite-bainite steel and it indicated that the second hard bainite phase effectively retarded the crack propagation. The variation of FCG rate (da/dN) with stress intensity factor range ({Delta}K) for F-P and F-B steels was discussed within the Paris region. It was shown that FCG rate of F-P steel was higher than that of F-B steel. Moreover, the fatigue fracture surface analysis proved that grain boundaries could also play a role in the resistance of crack propagation.

  19. Microstructure and abrasive wear properties of M(Cr,Fe7C3 carbides reinforced high-chromium carbon coating produced by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner BUYTOZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, high-chromium ferrochromium carbon hypereutectic alloy powder was coated on AISI 4340 steel by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. The coating layers were analyzed by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Depending on the gas tungsten arc welding pa-rameters, either hypoeutectic or hypereutectic microstructures were produced. Wear tests of the coatings were carried out on a pin-on-disc apparatus as function of contact load. Wear rates of the all coating layers were decreased as a function of the loading. The improvement of abrasive wear resistance of the coating layer could be attributed to the high hardness of the hypereutectic M7C3 carbides in the microstruc-ture. As a result, the microstructure of surface layers, hardness and abrasive wear behaviours showed different characteristics due to the gas tungsten arc welding parameters.

  20. Carbon-Supported Silver Catalysts for CO Selective Oxidation in Excess Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Limin Chen; Ding Ma; Barbara Pietruszka; Xinhe Bao

    2006-01-01

    Carbon materials were used as supports for Ag catalysts that are prepared using the conventional wet impregnation method, and their catalytic properties for CO selective oxidation in excess hydrogen at temperatures below 483 K were tested. A variety of techniques, e.g. N2 adsorption, XPS, TPD, UV-Vis DRS, TEM and SEM, were used to determine the influence of physical and chemical properties of the carbon on the properties of Ag catalyst. It was found that defects on the carbon surface served as nucleation sites for silver ions, while functional groups on carbon surface induced their reduction to the metallic form. The formation of silver particles on carbon was governed by homogeneous and/or heterogeneous nucleation during the impregnation and subsequent activation processes. The best catalytic performance was obtained with a Ag/carbon black catalyst with a uniform size distribution of silver nanoparticles (about 12 nm), moderate BET surface area (with a mesoporous structure), and a limited amount of carbon-oxygen groups. The research indicates that carbon materials are potentially good supports for silver catalysts for preferential oxidation of CO in excess hydrogen.

  1. Oxygen reduction on carbon supported Pt-W electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meza, D.; Morales, U.; Salgado, L. [Departamento de Quimica, Area de Electroquimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Distrito Federal (Mexico); Roquero, P. [Unidad de Investigacion en Catalisis, Facultad de Quimica, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    The catalytic activity of Pt-W electrocatalysts towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was studied. Pt-W/C materials were prepared by thermolysis of tungsten and platinum carbonyl complexes in 1-2 dichloro-benzene during 48 h. The precursors were mixed to obtain relations of Pt:W: 50:50 and 80:20%w, respectively. The Pt carbonyl complex was previously synthesized by bubbling CO in a chloroplatinic acid solution. The synthesized materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and a rotating disk electrode (RDE). The results show that both materials (Pt{sub 50}W{sub 50}/C and Pt{sub 80}W{sub 20}/C) have a crystalline phase associated with metallic platinum and an amorphous phase related with tungsten and carbon. The particle size of the electrocatalysts depends on the relationship between platinum and tungsten. Finally, both materials exhibit catalytic activity for oxygen reduction. (author)

  2. Polyaniline-functionalized carbon nanotube supported platinum catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Daping; Zeng, Chao; Xu, Cheng; Cheng, Niancai; Li, Huaiguang; Mu, Shichun; Pan, Mu

    2011-05-03

    Electrocatalytically active platinum (Pt) nanoparticles on a carbon nanotube (CNT) with enhanced nucleation and stability have been demonstrated through introduction of electron-conducting polyaniline (PANI) to bridge the Pt nanoparticles and CNT walls with the presence of platinum-nitride (Pt-N) bonding and π-π bonding. The Pt colloids were prepared through ethanol reduction under the protection of aniline, the CNT was dispersed well with the existence of aniline in the solution, and aniline was polymerized in the presence of a protonic acid (HCl) and an oxidant (NH(4)S(2)O(8)). The synthesized PANI is found to wrap around the CNT as a result of π-π bonding, and highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles are loaded onto the CNT with narrowly distributed particle sizes ranging from 2.0 to 4.0 nm due to the polymer stabilization and existence of Pt-N bonding. The Pt-PANI/CNT catalysts are electroactive and exhibit excellent electrochemical stability and therefore promise potential applications in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  3. Carbon dioxide emission prediction using support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Chairul; Rachman Dzakiyullah, Nur; Bayu Nugroho, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the SVM model was proposed for predict expenditure of carbon (CO2) emission. The energy consumption such as electrical energy and burning coal is input variable that affect directly increasing of CO2 emissions were conducted to built the model. Our objective is to monitor the CO2 emission based on the electrical energy and burning coal used from the production process. The data electrical energy and burning coal used were obtained from Alcohol Industry in order to training and testing the models. It divided by cross-validation technique into 90% of training data and 10% of testing data. To find the optimal parameters of SVM model was used the trial and error approach on the experiment by adjusting C parameters and Epsilon. The result shows that the SVM model has an optimal parameter on C parameters 0.1 and 0 Epsilon. To measure the error of the model by using Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) with error value as 0.004. The smallest error of the model represents more accurately prediction. As a practice, this paper was contributing for an executive manager in making the effective decision for the business operation were monitoring expenditure of CO2 emission.

  4. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part I: Micro-structural characterization and geometric modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    A computational strategy to predict the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites is proposed in this two-part paper. In Part I, the micro-structural characteristics of these nano-composites are discerned. These characteristics include networks/agglomerations of carbon nanotubes and thick polymer interphase regions between the nanotubes and the surrounding matrix. An algorithm is presented to construct three-dimensional geometric models with large amounts of randomly dispersed and aggregated nanotubes. The effects of the distribution of the nanotubes and the thickness of the interphase regions on the concentration of the interphase regions are demonstrated with numerical results. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties during Q&P processing of medium-carbon steels with different silicon levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenicek, S.; Vorel, I.; Kana, J.; Opatova, K.; Rubesova, K.; Kotesovec, V.; Masek, B.

    2017-03-01

    Evolution of microstructure during heat treatment plays a fundamental role in the resulting mechanical properties of steel. Today, mechanical properties in conjunction with technological properties, such as weldability, formability, and machinability, and their optimum combinations, are widely discussed in a number of mechanical engineering disciplines. In this manner, requirements arise for developing steels which could offer high strength and good formability, and which could be used for making parts with high resistance to failure and with a long life. One present-day example of such steels involves Q&P-processed martensitic steels. Their properties are dictated by their treatment, as well as their alloying, particularly by the silicon content. Silicon fundamentally affects microstructure evolution during Q&P processing and, as a result, mechanical properties. With this way it is possible to receive microstructures consinsting of martensite and retained austenite with an ultimate tensile stress of more than 1600 MPa and a uniform elongation of more than 12 %.

  6. The preparation of 248CmF 3 deposits on self-supported carbon foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, W. S.; Petek, M.; Zevenbergen, L. A.

    1987-06-01

    Another target preparative technique was recently added to the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory's (IRML) capabilities for custom target fabrication. In support of super-heavy-ion physics experiments, methods and equipment were developed for the preparation of 248CmF 3 deposits on carbon foils. The starting material was obtained as either a chloride or nitrate solution, converted to the flouride, and evaporated on carbon foil substrates. Deposits ranging from 40 to 570 μg/cm 2 were prepared as a 12-mm-diam spot on 45- to 60-μg/cm 2 self-supported carbon foils. The deposits were then overcoated with approximately 10 μg/cm 2 of carbon to minimize contamination problems during target handling. The high cost of 248Cm ($100/μg) and its limited availability were the key constraints in the development of preparative technology beyond the inherent radioactivity of 248Cm.

  7. Hydrogenation of ortho-nitrochlorobenzene on activated carbon supported platinum catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Cheng-jun; YIN Hong; CHEN Zhi-rong

    2005-01-01

    Platinum/carbon catalyst is one of the most important catalysts in hydrogenation of ortho-nitrochlorobenzene to 2,2'-dichlorohydrazobenzene. The preparation process and the supports of catalysts are studied in this paper. Raw materials and preparation procedure of the activated carbon have great influences on the compositions and surface structure of platinum/carbon catalysts. Platinum catalysts supported on activated carbon with high purity, high surface area, large pore volume and appropriate pore structure usually exhibit higher activities for hydrogenation of ortho-nitrochlorobenzene to 2,2'-dichlorohydrazobenzene.The catalyst prepared from H2PtCl6 with pH=3 shows greater catalytic performance than those prepared under other conditions.

  8. Microstructure and mechanical properties of in situ casting TiC/Ti6Al4V composites through adding multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ya, Bin; Zhou, Bingwen; Yang, Hongshuo; Huang, Bingkun; Jia, Fei; Zhang, Xingguo, E-mail: zxgwj@dlut.edu.cn

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Adding MWCNTs in situ casting fabricating TiC/Ti6Al4V composites is first reported. • The solidification process of in situ casting TiC/Ti6Al4V composites is discussed. • Microstructure shows remarkable correlations with adding MWCNTS. • Strength and plasticity show remarkable correlations with adding MWCNTs. - Abstract: In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were added as carbon sources to fabricate in situ casting TiC/Ti6Al4V (TC4) composites. The effects of MWCNTs on the microstructure and mechanical properties are studied. The composites are analyzed by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscope and electron probe microanalysis. The fracture behavior of TiC/TC4 composites are also studied. Smaller size of TiC particles and grain compared with TC4-graphite composites can be observed. The tensile strength of TC4-MWCNTs composites is about 1110.1 MPa, which is higher than that of TC4-graphite composites, about 1003.6 MPa. Fracture behavior also was changed by adding MWCNTs in situ casting TiC/TC4 composites.

  9. The effect of activated carbon support surface modification on characteristics of carbon nanospheres prepared by deposition precipitation of Fe-catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristianto, H.; Arie, A. A.; Susanti, R. F.; Halim, M.; Lee, J. K.

    2016-11-01

    In this study the effect of activated carbon support modification to synthesis of CNSs was observed. Modification of activated carbon was done by using nitric acid. The effect of modification was analyzed from its FTIR spectra. The Fe catalysts were deposited on to the support by using urea deposition precipitation method at various initial catalysts concentration. CNSs was synthesized by utilizing cooking palm oil as renewable carbon source, and pyrolized at 700°C for 1 hour under nitrogen atmosphere. The products obtained then analyzed using SEM-EDS, TEM, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. The modification of activated carbon support had increased the oxygen functional group. This increase resulted on increase of metal catalysts deposited on activated carbon surface. Peak of C (100) was observed, while ID/IG of samples were obtained around 0.9, which is commonly obtained for CNSs. High catalysts loading on modified activated carbon support caused decomposition of CNSs and formation carbon onion.

  10. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Supporting Sustainable Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Zwaan, B. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    This insightful book explores the issue of sustainable development in its more operative and applied sense. Although a great deal of research has addressed potential interpretations and definitions of sustainable development, much of this work is too abstract to offer policy-makers and researchers the feasible and effective guidelines they require. This book redresses the balance. The authors highlight how various indicators and aggregate measures can be included in models that are used for decision-making support and sustainability assessment. They also demonstrate the importance of identifying practical means to assess whether policy proposals, specific decisions or targeted scenarios are sustainable. With discussions of basic concepts relevant to understanding applied sustainability analysis, such as definitions of costs and revenue recycling, this book provides policy-makers, researchers and graduate students with feasible and effective principles for measuring sustainable development.

  11. Assessment of Carbon Tetrachloride Groundwater Transport in Support of the Hanford Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Technology Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Murray, Christopher J.; Cole, Charles R.; Cameron, Richard J.; Johnson, Michael D.; Skeen, Rodney S.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2001-07-13

    Groundwater modeling was performed in support of the Hanford Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration (ITRD) Program. The ITRD program is facilitated by Sandia National Laboratory for the Department of Energy Office of Science and Technology. This report was prepared to document the results of the modeling effort and facilitate discussion of characterization and remediation options for the carbon tetrachloride plume among the ITRD participants. As a first step toward implementation of innovative technologies for remediation of the carbon tetrachloride (CT) plume underlying the 200-West Area, this modeling was performed to provide an indication of the potential impact of the CT source on the compliance boundary approximately 5000 m distant. The primary results of the modeling bracket the amount of CT source that will most likely result in compliance/non-compliance at the boundary and the relative influence of the various modeling parameters.

  12. Carbon sources supporting a diverse fish community in a tropical coastal ecosystem (Gazi Bay, Kenya)

    OpenAIRE

    Nyunja, J; Ntiba, M; Onyari, J.; Mavuti, K.; Soetaert, K.; Bouillon, S.

    2009-01-01

    Interlinked mangrove-seagrass ecosystems are characteristic features of many tropical coastal areas, where they act as feeding and nursery grounds for a variety of fishes and invertebrates. The autotrophic carbon sources supporting fisheries in Gazi bay (Kenya) were studied in three sites, two located in the tidal creeks flowing through extensive mangrove forests, another site located in the subtidal seagrass meadows, approximately 2.5 km away from the forest. Carbon and nitrogen stable isoto...

  13. Preparation of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes-supported High Loading Platinum for Vehicular PEMFC Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing ZHANG; Li Juan CHEN; Kai Yong GE; Yan Chuan GUO; Bi Xian PENG

    2005-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotube-supported Pt (Pt/MWNTs) catalysts with high dispersion and high loading of Pt were prepared by chemical reduction method and the loading of Pt got to 40wt%. The average diameter of Pt nanoparticles on MWNTs was about 3.5 nm. When the hydrogen and air were used as reactant gases for PEMFC, Pt/MWNTs catalysts showed significantly higher performance than the Pt/XC-72 (carbon black) catalysts.

  14. Study on the Reaction Mechanism for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over supported Nickel Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling QIAN; Zi Feng YAN

    2003-01-01

    The adsorption and dissociation of methane and carbon dioxide for reforming on nickelcatalyst were extensively investigated by TPSR and TPD experiments. It showed that thedecomposition of methane results in the formation of at least three kinds of surface carbon specieson supported nickel catalyst, while CO2 adsorbed on the catalyst weakly and only existed in onekind of adsorption state. Then the mechanism of interaction between the species dissociatedfrom CH4 and CO2 during reforming was proposed.

  15. Various conformations of carbon nanocoils prepared by supported Ni-Fe/molecular sieve catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaoming; Chen, Xiuqin; Takeuchi, K; Motojima, Seiji

    2006-01-01

    The carbon nanocoils with various kinds of conformations were prepared by the catalytic pyrolysis of acetylene using the Ni metal catalyst supported on molecular Sieves which was prepared using Fe-containing kaolin as the raw material. There are four kinds of carbon nanocoils conformations produced by this catalyst. The influences of reaction temperature and gas conditions on the conformations of the nanocoils were investigated and the reasons of forming nano-size coils were discussed by comparison with pure Ni metal catalyst.

  16. Effect of Carbon Distribution During the Microstructure Evolution of Dual-Phase Steels Studied Using Cellular Automata, Genetic Algorithms, and Experimental Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Chandan; Karmakar, Anish; Hasan, Sk. Md.; Chakrabarti, Debalay; Pietrzyk, Maciej; Chakraborti, Nirupam

    2016-12-01

    The development of ferrite-martensite dual-phase microstructures by cold-rolling and intercritical annealing of 0.06 wt pct carbon steel was systematically studied using a dilatometer for two different heating rates (1 and 10 K/s). A step quenching treatment has been designed to develop dual-phase structures having a similar martensite fraction for two different heating rates. An increase in heating rate seemed to refine the ferrite grain size, but it increased the size and spacing of the martensitic regions. As a result, the strength of the steel increased with heating rate; however, the formability was affected. It has been concluded that the distribution of C during the annealing treatment of cold-rolled steel determines the size, distribution, and morphology of martensite, which ultimately influences the mechanical properties. Experimental detection of carbon distribution in austenite is difficult during annealing of the cold-rolled steel as the phase transformation occurs at a high temperature and C is an interstitial solute, which diffuses fast at that temperature. Therefore, a cellular automata (CA)-based phase transformation model is proposed in the present study for the prediction of C distribution in austenite during annealing of steel as the function of C content and heating rate. The CA model predicts that the carbon distribution in austenite becomes more inhomogeneous when the heating rate increases. In the CA model, the extent of carbon inhomogeneity is measured using a kernel averaging method for different orders of neighbors, which accounts for the different physical space during calculation. The obtained results reveal that the 10th order (covering 10- µm physical spaces around the cell of interest) is showing the maximum inhomogeneity of carbon and the same effect has been investigated and confirmed using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) for 0.06 wt pct carbon steel. Furthermore, the optimization of carbon homogeneity with respect to heating

  17. Carbon Management and Decision Support Systems for the CASA Ecosystem Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klooster, S.; Potter, C.; Fladeland, M.; Genovese, V.; Kramer, M.

    2003-12-01

    Ecosystem modeling and satellite remote sensing can link human activities such as land use change and forest management to the spatial distribution of carbon pools and fluxes at regional scales. The main objectives of this research and application are to: 1) evaluate major forest and agricultural sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide in the U. S. using NASA EOS satellite data and ecosystem modeling, 2) support the U. S. Government interagency program for registration of voluntary greenhouse gas emissions reductions under section 1605(b) of the 1992 Energy Policy Act, and 3) develop an internet-based decision support system (DSS) of carbon sequestration in U. S. ecosystems for users nationwide. We report on the first results of this DSS to assess the impacts of forest stand age on potential carbon sequestration, as predicted by the CASA (Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach) biosphere model. Estimates of carbon storage in woody plant pools are compared before and after adjustment for management of stand age based on U. S. Forest Service map products. These predictions of historical forest carbon storage are subsequently compared to the potential annual increment of ecosystem carbon gain or loss under conditions of future climate variation.

  18. Potassium hydroxide catalyst supported on palm shell activated carbon for transesterification of palm oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroutian, Saeid; Aroua, Mohamed Kheireddine; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Sulaiman, Nik Meriam Nik [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-11-15

    In this study, potassium hydroxide catalyst supported on palm shell activated carbon was developed for transesterification of palm oil. The Central Composite Design (CCD) of the Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was employed to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, catalyst loading and methanol to oil molar ratio on the production of biodiesel using activated carbon supported catalyst. The highest yield was obtained at 64.1 C reaction temperature, 30.3 wt.% catalyst loading and 24:1 methanol to oil molar ratio. The physical and chemical properties of the produced biodiesel met the standard specifications. This study proves that activated carbon supported potassium hydroxide is an effective catalyst for transesterification of palm oil. (author)

  19. Study on hydrogen evolution performance of the carbon supported PtRu alloy film electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Bin; LI; Yang; ZAN; Lin-han

    2005-01-01

    The carbon supported PtRu alloy film electrodes having Pt about 0.10 mg/cm2 or even less were prepared by ion beam sputtering method (IBSM). It was valued on the hydrogen analyse performance, the temperature influence factor and the stability by electroanalysis hydrogen analyse method. It was found that the carbon supported PtRu alloy film electrodes had higher hydrogen evolution performance and stability, such as the hydrogen evolution exchange current density (j0) was increase as the temperature (T) rised, and it overrun 150 mA/cm2 as the trough voltage in about 0.68V, and it only had about 2.8% decline in 500 h electrolytic process. The results demonstrated that the carbon supported PtRu alloy film electrodes kept highly catalytic activity and stability, and it were successfully used in pilot plant for producing H2 on electrolysis of H2S.

  20. New catalyst supports prepared by surface modification of graphene- and carbon nanotube structures with nitrogen containing carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eun-Jin; Hempelmann, Rolf; Nica, Valentin; Radev, Ivan; Natter, Harald

    2017-02-01

    We present a new and facile method for preparation of nitrogen containing carbon coatings (NCC) on the surface of graphene- and carbon nanotubes (CNT), which has an increased electronic conductivity. The modified carbon system can be used as catalyst support for electrocatalytic applications, especially for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). The surface modification is performed by impregnating carbon structures with a nitrogen containing ionic liquid (IL) with a defined C:N ratio, followed by a thermal treatment under ambient conditions. We investigate the influence of the main experimental parameters (IL amount, temperature, substrate morphology) on the formation of the NCC. Additionally, the structure and the chemical composition of the resulting products are analyzed by electron microscopic techniques (SEM, TEM), energy disperse X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and hot extraction analysis. The modified surface has a nitrogen content of 29 wt% which decreases strongly at temperatures above 600 °C. The new catalyst supports are used for the preparation of PEMFC anodes which are characterized by polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Compared to unmodified graphene and CNT samples the electronic conductivity of the modified systems is increased by a factor of 2 and shows improved mass transport properties.

  1. Fabrication variables affecting the structure and properties of supported carbon molecular sieve membranes for hydrogen separation

    KAUST Repository

    Briceño, Kelly

    2012-10-01

    A high molecular weight polyimide (Matrimid) was used as a precursor for fabricating supported carbon molecular sieve membranes without crack formation at 550-700°C pyrolysis temperature. A one-step polymer (polyimide) coating method as precursor of carbon layer was used without needing a prior modification of a TiO 2 macroporous support. The following fabrication variables were optimized and studied to determine their effect on the carbon structure: polymeric solution concentration, solvent extraction, heating rate and pyrolysis temperature. Two techniques (Thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy) were used to determine these effects on final carbon structure. Likewise, the effect of the support was also reported as an additional and important variable in the design of supported carbon membranes. Atomic force microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry quantified the degree of influence. Pure gas permeation tests were performed using CH 4, CO, CO 2 and H 2. The presence of a molecular sieving mechanism was confirmed after defects were plugged with PDMS solution at 12wt%. Gas selectivities higher than Knudsen theoretical values were reached with membranes obtained over 650°C, showing as best values 4.46, 4.70 and 10.62 for H 2/N 2, H 2/CO and H 2/CH 4 ratio, respectively. Permeance values were over 9.82×10 -9mol/(m 2Pas)during pure hydrogen permeation tests. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Production of carbon nanofibers in high yields using a sodium chloride support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Junfeng; Kinloch, Ian A; Singh, Charanjeet; Golovko, Vladimir B; Johnson, Brian F G; Shaffer, Milo S P; Li, Yali; Windle, Alan H

    2005-09-08

    A new route for the highly convenient scalable production of carbon nanofibers on a sodium chloride support has been developed. Since the support is nontoxic and soluble in water, it can be easily removed without damage to the nanofibers and the environment. Nanofiber yields of up to 6500 wt % relative to the nickel catalyst have been achieved in a growth time of 15 min. Electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the catalytically grown carbon had relatively little thermal over-growth and possessed either a herringbone or a semi-ordered nanostructure, depending on the growth conditions.

  3. Simple preparation of tungsten supported carbon nanoreactors for specific applications: Adsorption, catalysis and electrochemical activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayani, Vishal J.; Mayani, Suranjana V.; Kim, Sang Wook, E-mail: swkim@dongguk.ac.kr

    2015-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Tungsten carbon composites have shown great recognition in catalysis and electrochemistry. • W-carbon composites are prepared by template replication and W-doping on carbon cage. • Nanocomposites offer enormous assurance as adsorbent, electrode and heterogeneous catalyst. - Abstract: Porous carbon supported tungsten carbide nanoreactors, two sizes (∼25 and 170 nm), were designed using economical petroleum pitch residue followed by tungsten (W) doping. X-ray diffractions showed both carbon tungsten composites (CTC-25 and CTC-170) contained tungsten subcarbide (W{sub 2}C) and monocarbide (WC) as the major and minor crystalline phases, respectively. The present study provides a multiple perspective of carbon tungsten composites (CTCs) for methanol oxidation (as an electrode), adsorption (as an adsorbent) and degradation (as a solid catalyst) of methylene blue (MB). The operational electrodes were designed from both CTCs and used as a catalyst in an electrocatalysis process. The electrocatalysts exhibited high and stable catalytic performance (CTCE-25 > CTCE-170) in methanol electro-oxidation. The newly synthesized W-doped carbon nanoreactors were used successfully as an adsorbent for MB and a heterogeneous catalyst for MB oxidation. Ordered CTC-25 and CTC-170 exhibited dynamic MB adsorption within 15 min and complete oxidation of MB in 25–40 min. A synergetic effect between tungsten carbide and the carbon cage framework was noted.

  4. METHANE DRY REFORMING OVER Ni SUPPORTED ON PINE SAWDUST ACTIVATED CARBON: EFFECTS OF SUPPORT SURFACE PROPERTIES AND METAL LOADING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael García

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of metal loading and support surface functional groups (SFG on methane dry reforming (MDR over Ni catalysts supported on pine-sawdust derived activated carbon were studied. Using pine sawdust as the catalyst support precursor, the smallest variety and lowest concentration of SFG led to best Ni dispersion and highest catalytic activity, which increased with Ni loading up to 3 Ni atoms nm-2. At higher Ni loading, the formation of large metal aggregates was observed, consistent with a lower "apparen" surface area and a decrease in catalytic activity. The H2/CO ratio rose with increasing reaction temperature, indicating that increasingly important side reactions were taking place in addition to MDR.

  5. Preparation of catalyst for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell using a novel spherical carbon support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguchi, Mika; Okubo, Atsuhiko; Kobayashi, Yoshio [Department of Biomolecular Functional Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Yamamoto, Shun [Material and Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Kikuchi, Mayuko; Nishitani-Gamo, Mikka [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Uno, Katsuhiro [Department of Media and Telecommunications Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Ando, Toshihiro [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    In this study, the support Pt catalyst was supported by a novel spherical carbon using a convenient technique. Two different preparation methods utilizing a nanocolloidal solution method without heat treatment were developed (methods 1 and 2). The scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations showed that the Pt nanoparticles (particle size) were supported, with higher dispersion being achieved with method 2 than method 1. The peak of the Pt metal was confirmed from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement. Based on the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements, Pt loading was 19.5 wt.% in method 1 and approximately 50 wt.% in method 2. The Pt specific surface area of the Pt/novel spherical carbon catalyst calculated from the cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurement result was larger than that of the commercially available Pt/Ketjen catalyst. These results indicated that the Pt nanoparticles were supported in high dispersion without heat treatment using novel spherical carbon as a carbon support. (author)

  6. FT-IR Study of Carbon Nanotube Supported Co-Mo Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Shang; Chenguang Liu1; Fei Wei

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, adsorption properties of dibenzothiophene (DBT) on carbon nanotube, carbon nanotube supported oxide state and sulfide state CoMo catalysts are studied by using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) technique and FT-IR spectroscopy. Activated carbon support, γ-Al2O3 support and supported CoMo catalysts are also subjected to studies for comparison. It was found that sulfide state CoMoS/MWCNT, CoMoS/AC and CoMoS/γ-Al2O3 catalysts adsorbed much more DBT molecules than their corresponding oxide state catalysts, as well as their corresponding supports. The chemically adsorbed DBT aromatic molecules did not undergo decomposition on the surface of supports, supported oxide state CoMo catalysts and sulfide state CoMo catalysts when out-gassing at 373 K. FT-IR results indicated that DBT molecules mainly stand upright on the active sites (acid sites and/or transition active phases) of CoMoS/MWCNT catalyst. However, DBT aromatic molecules mainly lie flat on MWCNT and CoMoO/MWCNT.

  7. Microstructural evaluation of a low carbon steel submitted to boriding treatment pre and post GTAW welding; Avaliacao microestrutural de um aco de baixo carbono submetido ao tratamento de boretacao pre e pos-soldagem GTAW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollnow, Edilson Nunes; Osorio, Alice Goncalves, E-mail: edilson.pollnow@hotmail.com, E-mail: osorio.alice@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (CDTec/UFPel), Pelotas, RS (Brazil). Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico; Araujo, Douglas Bezerra de, E-mail: dbaraujo@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (FEMEC/UFU), Uberlandia, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Passos, Thais Andrezza dos; Souza, Daniel, E-mail: thais.andrezza.passos@gmail.com, E-mail: danielsouza@furg.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (EE/FURG), Rio Grande, RS (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2017-04-15

    Studies on surface engineering area are given great importance due to the improvement that surface modifications provide to materials. With a global market that has the need to provide parts and equipment with extended service life and low cost, to support stringent requests and thus maintain its high performance, surface treatments may bring what was impossible into reality. Among the surface treatments that have received attention recently, we have the thermochemical process of boriding. The boriding process consists of saturate the surface of steels and metal alloys with boron. This saturation provides an increase in the surface properties not inherent to the base metal, such as hardness, resistance to abrasion and corrosion. Although the properties of boriding steels have already been studied, the effects that the boriding process perform on the steel during or after the welding processes are not known. Hence, it is the purpose of this study to evaluate the microstructure of a low carbon steel treated with boriding before and after GTAW welding. The results indicated poor metallurgical weldability of low carbon steel with boride layer, with the presence of solidification cracks. Nonetheless, the steel welded previous to boring treatment presented a more ductile nucleus, with harder surface. Although the values of hardness within the nucleus of the steel had dropped drastically at the welded zone after the boring, the surface of this steel showed higher values of hardness due to the boriding layer. This fact should be considered when applications where wear resistance is needed. (author)

  8. Nanostructured Carbon Materials as Supports in the Preparation of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Lázaro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Different advanced nanostructured carbon materials, such as carbon nanocoils, carbon nanofibers, graphitized ordered mesoporous carbons and carbon xerogels, presenting interesting features such as high electrical conductivity and extensively developed porous structure were synthesized and used as supports in the preparation of electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs. The main advantage of these supports is that their physical properties and surface chemistry can be tailored to adapt the carbonaceous material to the catalytic requirements. Moreover, all of them present a highly mesoporous structure, diminishing diffusion problems, and both graphitic character and surface area can be conveniently modified. In the present work, the influence of the particular features of each material on the catalytic activity and stability was analyzed. Results have been compared with those obtained for commercial catalysts supported on Vulcan XC-72R, Pt/C and PtRu/C (ETEK. Both a highly ordered graphitic and mesopore-enriched structure of these advanced nanostructured materials resulted in an improved electrochemical performance in comparison to the commercial catalysts assayed, both towards CO and alcohol oxidation.

  9. Active carbon supported molybdenum carbides for higher alcohols synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Chiarello, Gian Luca; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    This work provides an investigation of the high pressure CO hydrogenation to higher alcohols on K2CO3 promoted active carbon supported molybdenum carbide. Both activity and selectivity to alcohols over supported molybdenum carbides increased significantly compared to bulk carbides in literatures....... spectroscopy were applied for determining the carburization temperature and evaluating the composition of the carbide clusters of different samples through determinations of the Mo-C and Mo-Mo coordination numbers....

  10. Novel catalytic applications of carbon nanofibers on sintered metal fibers filters as structured supports

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Supported metal catalysts are important from both an industrial and a scientific point of view. They are used, amongst others, in large-scale processes such as catalytic reforming, hydrotreating, polymerization reactions and hydrogenations. Often, these catalysts consist of nanosized metal particles deposited on a suitable support, which acts as an anchor for the active phase and, in several cases, contributes to improve the overall catalyst performances. The growth of carbon nanofibers on si...

  11. Novel catalytic applications of carbon nanofibers on sintered metal fibers filters as structured supports

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Supported metal catalysts are important from both an industrial and a scientific point of view. They are used, amongst others, in large-scale processes such as catalytic reforming, hydrotreating, polymerization reactions and hydrogenations. Often, these catalysts consist of nanosized metal particles deposited on a suitable support, which acts as an anchor for the active phase and, in several cases, contributes to improve the overall catalyst performances. The growth of carbon nanofibers on si...

  12. Decision Support and Robust Estimation of Uncertainty in Carbon Stocks and Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, S. C.; Braswell, B. H.; Saatchi, S. S.; Woodall, C. W.; Salas, W.; Ganguly, S.; Harris, N.

    2013-12-01

    The primary goal of our project (NASA Carbon Monitoring System - Saatchi PI) is to create detailed maps of forest carbon stocks and stock changes across the US to assist with national GHG inventories and thereby support decisions associated with land management. A comprehensive and accurate assessment of uncertainty in the forest carbon stock and stock change products is critical for understanding the quantitative limits of the products and for ensuring their usefulness to the broader community. However, a rigorous estimate of uncertainty at the pixel level is challenging to produce for complex products generated from multiple sources of input data and models. Here, we put forth a roadmap for assessing uncertainty associated with the forest carbon products provided as part of this project, which are generated by combining several sources of measurements and models. We also present preliminary results.

  13. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube-Supported Pd Catalyst for Improved Electrocatalytic Performance toward Ethanol Electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ying; Zhang, Xinyuan; Luo, Zhiyong; Tang, Dian; Chen, Changxin; Zhang, Teng; Xie, Zailai

    2017-07-01

    In this study, hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) was applied for surface functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the presence of glucose and urea. The HTC process allowed the deposition of thin nitrogen-doped carbon layers on the surface of the CNTs. By controlling the ratio of glucose to urea, nitrogen contents of up to 1.7 wt% were achieved. The nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube-supported Pd catalysts exhibited superior electrochemical activity for ethanol oxidation relative to the pristine CNTs. Importantly, a 1.5-fold increase in the specific activity was observed for the Pd/HTC-N1.67%CNTs relative to the catalyst without nitrogen doping (Pd/HTC-CNTs). Further experiments indicated that the introduction of nitrogen species on the surface of the CNTs improved the Pd(0) loading and increased the binding energy.

  14. Carbon isotopic record from Upper Devonian carbonates at Dongcun in Guilin, southern China, supporting the world-wide pattern of carbon isotope excursions during Frasnian-Famennian transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Two positive δ13C excursions are presented in records from the Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) marine carbonate sediments in Europe, America, Africa, and Australia, having been considered as a worldwide pattern, and attributed to enhanced organic carbon burial during the F-F biological mass extinction. However, this worldwide pattern has not been revealed from the well-deposited Late Devonian sequences in southern China. In this paper, a detailed investigation has been made on the Late Devonian section at Dongcun, Guilin, southern China to constrain perturbations in δ13C of carbonates in the F-F deposited sequence. The result from this section also indicates two positive δ13C excursions during the F-F transition. The first excursion with an amplitude of 1.5‰ occurred at the bottom of linguiformis Zone, later than the early excursion existing in the Late rhenana Zone of the Late Devonian profiles in other continents, especially, in central Europe. This difference has been expected to be a result as conodont Palmatolepis linguiformis occurred earlier in southern China than other sites. The second excursion with an amplitude of 2.1‰ is located at the F-F boundary, same as the records from other continents. This result strongly supports the view that two carbon isotope positive excursions during the F-F transition are common in carbonate sediments, resulting from worldwide increases of organic carbon burial intensity.

  15. Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts in high temperature polymer electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qingfeng, Li; Bergqvist, R. S.; Hjuler, H. A.

    1999-01-01

    Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts has been investigated in H3PO4, H3PO4-doped Nafion and PBI polymer electrolytes in a temperature range from 80 to 190°C. Compared with pure H3PO4, using the H3PO4 doped Nafion and PBI polymer electrolytes can significantly improve the oxygen...

  16. An infrared spectroscopic study of the adsorption of carbon monoxide on silica-supported copper oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, K.P. de; Geus, John W.; Joziasse, J.

    1980-01-01

    Adsorption of carbon monoxide at room temperature (0.1–50 Torr) on silica-supported copper oxide was studied by infrared spectroscopy. Catalysts were prepared by deposition-precipitation or impregnation. After calcination two types of adsorbed CO were identified showing absorption bands at 2136 ± 3

  17. Sorption properties of perbenzoylated β-cyclodextrin deposited onto a carbon support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytin, K. A.; Kudryashov, S. Yu.; Gerasimova, N. G.; Onuchak, L. A.

    2012-11-01

    Thermodynamic parameters are determined for the adsorption of vapors of hydrocarbons and polar compounds of different structure on carbon adsorbent modified by a monomolecular layer of heptakis(2,3,6-tri- O-benzoyl)-β-cyclodextrin. The effect of the structure and polarity of organic compounds on adsorption onto an adsorbent support with a chiral macrocyclic modifier are considered.

  18. Catalytic decomposition of low level ozone with gold nanoparticles supported on activated carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengyi ZHANG; Bo ZHANG; Rui SHI

    2009-01-01

    Highly dispersed gold nanoparticles were supported on coal-based activated carbon (AC) by a sol immobilization method and were used to investigate their catalytic activity for low-level ozone decomposition at ambient temperature. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption,scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the catalysts before and after ozone decomposition. The results showed that the supported gold nanoparticles prepared with microwave heating were much smaller and more uniformly dispersed on the activated carbon than those prepared with traditional conduction heating, exhibiting higher catalytic activity for ozone decomposition. The pH values of gold precursor solution significantly influenced the catalytic activity of supported gold for ozone decomposition, and the best pH value was 8. In the case of space velocity of 120000 h-1, inlet ozone concentration of 50mg/m3, and relative humidity of 45%, the Au/AC catalyst maintained the ozone removal ratio at 90.7% after 2500 min. After being used for ozone decomposition, the surface carbon of the catalyst was partly oxidized and the oxygen content increased accordingly, while its specific surface area and pore volume only decreased a little.Ozone was mainly catalytically decomposed by the gold nanoparticles supported on the activated carbon.

  19. Carbon Supported Polyaniline as Anode Catalyst: Pathway to Platinum-Free Fuel Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Zabrodskii, A G; Malyshkin, V G; Sapurina, I Y

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of carbon supported polyaniline as anode catalyst in a fuel cell (FC) with direct formic acid electrooxidation is experimentally demonstrated. A prototype FC with such a platinum-free composite anode exhibited a maximum room-temperature specific power of about 5 mW/cm2

  20. Carbon sources supporting a diverse fish community in a tropical coastal ecosystem (Gazi Bay, Kenya)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyunja, J.; Ntiba, M.; Onyari, J.; Mavuti, K.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Bouillon, S.

    2009-01-01

    Interlinked mangrove–seagrass ecosystems are characteristic features of many tropical coastal areas, where they act as feeding and nursery grounds for a variety of fishes and invertebrates. The autotrophic carbon sources supporting fisheries in Gazi bay (Kenya) were studied in three sites, two locat

  1. Forbs enhance productivity of unfertilised grass-clover leys and support low-carbon bioenergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cong, Wen-Feng; Jing, Jingying; Rasmussen, Jim

    2017-01-01

    achieved the 60% reduction in GHG emissions compared to fossil fuel, whereas all fertilised mixtures did not meet the 60% reduction target. These findings suggest that including competitive forbs such as plantain in grass-clover mixtures enhances productivity, supporting low-carbon footprint bioenergy...

  2. Carbon Nanofiber Supported Transition-Metal Carbide Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, A.; Gosselink, R.W.; Dijkstra, J.; Bitter, J.H.; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) studies over carbon nanofiber-supported (CNF) W2C and Mo2C catalysts were performed on guaiacol, a prototypical substrate to evaluate the potential of a catalyst for valorization of depolymerized lignin streams. Typical reactions were executed at 55 bar hydrogen pressure ove

  3. Microstructural study of the ablation behaviors of 3D fine weave pierced Carbon/Carbon composites using plasma torch at ultra-high temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A simple and effective method of testing ablation behaviors of carbon/carbon composites at high temperature was provided, which used plasma torch as the heater. The ablation resistance of 3D fine weave pierced carbon/carbon composites at high temperature was also studied. The results show that temperature of the plasma flame is very high which is much closer to the real work environment of carbon/carbon composites. The factors that affect the ablation characters of carbon/carbon composites depend on both the properties of their components and the environmental conditions in which the material is placed. The ablation behaviors of C/C composites change from the center flame region predominantly influenced by sublimation of graphite to the region close to the outer flame influenced mainly by oxidization of graphite. The sublimation ability of carbon matrix is equal to that of carbon fibers but the oxidization ability of carbon fibers is significantly enhanced compared to that of carbon matrix.

  4. Pd clusters supported on amorphous, low-porosity carbon spheres for hydrogen production from formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulushev, Dmitri A; Bulusheva, Lyubov G; Beloshapkin, Sergey; O'Connor, Thomas; Okotrub, Alexander V; Ryan, Kevin M

    2015-04-29

    Amorphous, low-porosity carbon spheres on the order of a few micrometers in size were prepared by carbonization of squalane (C30H62) in supercritical CO2 at 823 K. The spheres were characterized and used as catalysts' supports for Pd. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure studies of the spheres revealed sp(2) and sp(3) hybridized carbon. To activate carbons for interaction with a metal precursor, often oxidative treatment of a support is needed. We showed that boiling of the obtained spheres in 28 wt % HNO3 did not affect the shape and bulk structure of the spheres, but led to creation of a considerable amount of surface oxygen-containing functional groups and increase of the content of sp(2) hybridized carbon on the surface. This carbon was seen by scanning transmission electron microscopy in the form of waving graphene flakes. The H/C atomic ratio in the spheres was relatively high (0.4) and did not change with the HNO3 treatment. Palladium was deposited by impregnation with Pd acetate followed by reduction in H2. This gave uniform Pd clusters with a size of 2-4 nm. The Pd supported on the original C spheres showed 2-3 times higher catalytic activity in vapor phase formic acid decomposition and higher selectivity for H2 formation (98-99%) than those for the catalyst based on the HNO3 treated spheres. Using of such low-porosity spheres as a catalyst support should prevent mass transfer limitations for fast catalytic reactions.

  5. Influence of various carbon nano-forms as supports for Pt catalyst on proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Abha; Cheruvally, Gouri

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we discuss the influence of various carbon supports for Pt on proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell performance. Here, Pt supported on various carbon nano-forms [Pt/carbon black (Pt/CB), Pt/single-walled carbon nanotubes (Pt/SWCNT), Pt/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Pt/MWCNT) and Pt/graphene (Pt/G)] are synthesized by a facile, single step, microwave-assisted, modified chemical reduction route. Their physical, chemical and electrochemical characteristics pertaining to oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalytic activity and stability in PEM fuel cell are studied in detail by various techniques and compared. The study shows that the different carbon supports does not significantly affect the Pt particle size during synthesis, but leads to different amount of defective sites in the carbon framework which influence both the availability of active metal nano-catalysts and metal-support interaction. In-situ electrochemical investigations reveal that the different carbon supports influence both ORR catalytic activity and stability of the catalyst. This is further corroborated by the demonstration of varying polarization characteristics on PEM fuel cell performance by different carbon supported Pt catalysts. This study reveals MWCNT as the most suitable carbon support for Pt catalyst, exhibiting high activity and stability for ORR in PEM fuel cell.

  6. 两种沥青炭的微观结构研究%Study on the microstructure of two kinds of pitch carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘皓; 李克智

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure of two kinds of pitch carbon was studied by polarized light microscopy ( PLM) , scanning electron microscopy ( SEM) , transmission electron microscopy ( TEM) and XRD techniques respectively. PLM results indicate that the nor⁃mal pitch carbon is mosaics with different size and isotropic, the mesophase pitch carbon is mainly for flow domain. The SEM results show the normal pitch carbon is the grain and lamellar structure, the mesophase pitch carbon is the lamellar banded structure. The HRTEM lattice images of the normal pitch carbon are composed of amorphous and crystallite, the lattice fringes of the mesophase pitch carbon are arranged regularly, and the preferred orientation is high. The degree of the graphite and the interlayer spacing of the mesophase pitch carbon are better than that of the normal pitch carbon.%借助偏光显微镜、扫描电镜、透射电镜和X衍射仪,对两种沥青炭的微观结构进行了研究。结果表明,在偏光显微镜下,普通沥青炭呈现出各种单元尺寸的镶嵌组织和各向同性组织,其内部存在分布较均匀的小孔洞,中间相沥青炭主要为流域组织。在SEM下,普通沥青炭呈现出片层状和粒状结构,中间相沥青炭呈现出片层条带状结构,且片层之间有微裂纹存在。普通沥青炭的高分辨晶格像由非晶态和取向混乱的微晶组成,中间相沥青炭的晶格条纹排列规整,择优取向度高,中间相沥青炭的石墨化度、层间距优于普通沥青炭。

  7. Relationship Between Solidification Microstructure and Hot Cracking Susceptibility for Continuous Casting of Low-Carbon and High-Strength Low-Alloyed Steels: A Phase-Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2013-08-01

    Hot cracking is one of the major defects in continuous casting of steels, frequently limiting the productivity. To understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low-carbon and two high-strength low-alloyed steels. 2D simulation of the initial stage of solidification is performed in a moving slice of the slab using proprietary multiphase-field software and taking into account all elements which are expected to have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during solidification. To account for the correct thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the multicomponent alloy grades, the simulation software is online coupled to commercial thermodynamic and mobility databases. A moving-frame boundary condition allows traveling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. From the simulation results, significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are quantitatively evaluated and correlated with their hot cracking behavior according to the Rappaz-Drezet-Gremaud (RDG) hot cracking criterion. The possible role of the microalloying elements in hot cracking, in particular of traces of Ti, is analyzed. With the assumption that TiN precipitates trigger coalescence of the primary dendrites, quantitative evaluation of the critical strain rates leads to a full agreement with the observed hot cracking behavior.

  8. Investigation of the microstructure, mechanical properties and tribological behaviors of Ti-containing diamond-like carbon films fabricated by a hybrid ion beam method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Wei [Ningbo Key Laboratory of Marine Protection Materials, Division of Surface Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Future Convergence Technology Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Ke, Peiling [Ningbo Key Laboratory of Marine Protection Materials, Division of Surface Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Moon, Myoung-Woon; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol [Future Convergence Technology Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Aiying, E-mail: aywang@nimte.ac.cn [Ningbo Key Laboratory of Marine Protection Materials, Division of Surface Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2012-07-31

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films with various titanium contents were investigated using a hybrid ion beam system comprising an anode-layer linear ion beam source and a DC magnetron sputtering unit. The film composition and microstructure were characterized carefully by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, revealing that the doped Ti atoms had high solubility in the DLC films. The maximum solubility was found to lie between about 7 and 13 at.%. When the Ti content was lower than this solubility, the doped Ti atoms dissolved in the DLC matrix and the films exhibited the typical features of the amorphous DLC structure and displayed low compressive stresses, friction coefficients and wear rates. However, as the doped content exceeded the solubility, Ti atoms bonded with C atoms, resulting in the formation of carbide nano-particles embedded in the DLC matrix. Although the emergence of the carbide nano-particles promoted graphitizing due to a catalysis effect, the film hardness was enhanced to a great extent. On the other hand, the hard carbides particles caused abrasive wear behavior, inducing a high friction coefficient and wear rate. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti doped DLC films (Ti {approx} 24 at.% )were deposited by a hybrid ion beam system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solubility of the Ti atoms in the DLC films was found around 7 {approx} 13 at .%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure evolution from DLC to nanocomposite played key role in film behaviors.

  9. Microstructure characterization of advanced protective Cr/CrN+a-C:H/a-C:H:Cr multilayer coatings on carbon fibre composite (CFC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, L; Janusz, M; Lackner, J M; Kot, M; Major, B

    2016-06-01

    Studies of advanced protective chromium-based coatings on the carbon fibre composite (CFC) were performed. Multidisciplinary examinations were carried out comprising: microstructure transmission electron microscopy (TEM, HREM) studies, micromechanical analysis and wear resistance. Coatings were prepared using a magnetron sputtering technique with application of high-purity chromium and carbon (graphite) targets deposited on the CFC substrate. Selection of the CFC for surface modification in respect to irregularities on the surface making the CFC surface more smooth was performed. Deposited coatings consisted of two parts. The inner part was responsible for the residual stress compensation and cracking initiation as well as resistance at elevated temperatures occurring namely during surgical tools sterilization process. The outer part was responsible for wear resistance properties and biocompatibility. Experimental studies revealed that irregularities on the substrate surface had a negative influence on the crystallites growth direction. Chromium implanted into the a-C:H structure reacted with carbon forming the cubic nanocrystal chromium carbides of the Cr23 C6 type. The cracking was initiated at the coating/substrate interface and the energy of brittle cracking was reduced because of the plastic deformation at each Cr interlayer interface. The wear mechanism and cracking process was described in micro- and nanoscale by means of transmission electron microscope studies. Examined materials of coated CFC type would find applications in advanced surgical tools.

  10. Microstructure and critical current density in MgB2 bulk made of 4.5 wt% carbon-coated boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, M.; Muralidhar, M.; Jirsa, M.; Murakami, M.

    2017-07-01

    Superconducting performance and its uniformity was studied in the single-step sintered MgB2 bulk prepared with 4.5 wt% of carbon in the carbon-encapsulated boron. The 20 mm in diameter MgB2 pellet was cut into several pieces from bottom to top and the microstructure, superconducting transition temperature (Tc onset), and critical current density at 20 K were studied. DC magnetization measurements showed a sharp superconducting transition with onset Tc at around 35.5 K in all positions. SEM analysis indicated a dispersion of grains between 200 and 300 nm in size, as the main pinning medium in this MgB2 superconductors. The critical current density at 20 K was quite uniform, around 330 kA/cm2 and 200 kA/cm2 at self-field and 1 T, respectively, for all measured positions. The results indicate that the carbon-encapsulated boron is very promising for production of high quality bulk MgB2 material for various industrial applications.

  11. EFFECT OF FOREIGN CARBON ON ACTIVITY OF METHANE COMBUSTION OVER SUPPORTED PALLADIUM CATALYSTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Caixia; An Lidun; Wang Hongli

    2001-01-01

    EDTA as precursor of carbon was introduced into Pd(NO3)2 catalysts supported on γ-Al2O3 or 5%MgO/γ-Al2O3. Two kinds of samples,denoted as Pd(NO3)2/[support+EDTA] and [Pd(NO3)2/support]+EDTA, were prepared by changing sequence of impregnating EDTA to the supports. After only being dried they were tested for methane combustion. XPS analyses to the samples at different stages of testing reaction were performed. It was found that the Pd(NO3)2 catalysts became more inactive due to the introduction of EDTA. EDTA in the catalysts was naturally in situ oxidized,partially became into CO2 and escaped, partially coked and deposited on palladium and support with temperature increasing in oxygen-rich atmosphere.Formation of Pd-C solid solution was also confirmed during the reaction. It can be suggested that foreign carbon, in spite of its any existing forms and position in catalysts, inhibits methane combustion largely. The role of carbon on morphological change of palladium during methane combustion was also discussed.

  12. Tensile test of a silicon microstructure fully coated with submicrometer-thick diamond like carbon film using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlei; Uesugi, Akio; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports the tensile properties of single-crystal silicon (SCS) microstructures fully coated with sub-micrometer thick diamond like carbon (DLC) film using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). To minimize the deformations or damages caused by non-uniform coating of DLC, which has high compression residual stress, released SCS specimens with the dimensions of 120 µm long, 4 µm wide, and 5 µm thick were coated from the top and bottom side simultaneously. The thickness of DLC coating is around 150 nm and three different bias voltages were used for deposition. The tensile strength improved from 13.4 to 53.5% with the increasing of negative bias voltage. In addition, the deviation in strength also reduced significantly compared to bare SCS sample.

  13. Carbon nanocages: a new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-03-24

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for "real world" application.

  14. On the mobility of carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles towards unveiling cathode degradation in water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciok, Paul; Schalenbach, Maximilian; Carmo, Marcelo; Stolten, Detlef

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates the influence of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) overpotential on the mobility of carbon-supported platinum particles. The migration of the platinum over the carbon support was analyzed by means of identical location transmission electron microscopy (IL-TEM). While at potentials of 0.1 and 0 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), no changes to the Pt/C material were observed. With a decrease of the overpotential to -0.1 V vs. RHE, an increase in the quantity of migrating platinum particles took place. At -0.2 V vs. RHE, a further rise in the particle migration was observed. The effect of the overpotential on the migration was explained by a higher hydrogen generation rate, the formation of a hydrogen monolayer on the platinum and the resulting changes of the platinum support distance. The mechanisms revealed in this study could describe a relevant source of degradation of PEM water electrolyzers.

  15. Fabrication of iridium oxide nanoparticles supported on activated carbon powder by flashlight irradiation for oxygen evolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Park, Sung-Hyeon [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jinseong; Yi, Mi Hye [Eco Technology Center of the Hyundai Motor Company, 17-5 Mabuk-ro, Giheung-gu, Youngin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-716 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak-Sung, E-mail: kima1774@gmail.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Iridium supported on activated carbon was oxidized by flashlight irradiation at room temperature in ambient condition. - Highlights: • Ir was oxidized by flashlight irradiation at room temperature in ambient condition. • The Pt–IrO{sub 2}/C has a higher net current density than those of Pt–Ir/C and Pt/C. • During the flashlight process, an activated carbon was not damaged. • Flashlight irradiation purified an activated carbon by removing contaminants. - Abstract: In this study, iridium oxide (IrO{sub 2}) nanoparticles supported on activated carbon were fabricated for oxygen evolutions using a flashlight irradiation process at room temperature under ambient conditions within a few milliseconds. The fabricated IrO{sub 2} nanoparticles were decorated on the activated carbon surface and enlarged to 3.51 nm as average diameter from an initial value of 1.54 nm. The fabricated IrO{sub 2} nanoparticles were characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) for the oxygen evolution reaction.

  16. Effect of Sn on methane decomposition over Fe supported catalysts to produce carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Patricia F.; Ribeiro, Leandro P.; Rosmaninho, Marcelo G. [ICEx. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Ardisson, Jose D. [Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Laboratorio de Fisica Aplicada (Brazil); Dias, Anderson [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Lago, Rochel M., E-mail: rochel@qui.ufmg.br [ICEx. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Departamento de Quimica (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    In this work, alumina-supported Sn containing Fe catalysts were investigated in CVD reactions (Chemical Vapor Deposition) using methane for carbon production. The catalysts were prepared with 10 wt.% of Fe (as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and 3, 6 and 12 wt.% of Sn (as SnO{sub 2}) supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} named hereon Fe10Sn3A, Fe5Sn6A and Fe10Sn12A, respectively. These catalysts were characterized by SEM, TPCVD, TPR, TG, Raman, XRD and {sup 57}Fe and {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy. Methane reacts with Fe10A catalyst (without Sn) in the temperature range 680-900 Degree-Sign C to produce mainly Fe{sup 0}, Fe{sub 3}C and 20 wt.% of carbon deposition. TPR and TPCVD clearly showed that Sn strongly hinders the CH{sub 4} reaction over Fe catalyst. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer suggested that in the presence of Sn the reduction of Fe{sup + 3} by methane becomes very difficult. {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer showed Sn{sup + 4} species strongly interact with metallic iron after CVD, producing iron-tin phases such as Fe{sub 3}SnC and FeSn{sub 2}. This interaction Sn-Fe increases the CVD temperatures and decreases the carbon yield leading to the production of more organized forms of carbon such as carbon nanotubes, nanofibers and graphite.

  17. Effect of Sn on methane decomposition over Fe supported catalysts to produce carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Patrícia F.; Ribeiro, Leandro P.; Rosmaninho, Marcelo G.; Ardisson, José D.; Dias, Anderson; Lago, Rochel M.

    2011-11-01

    In this work, alumina-supported Sn containing Fe catalysts were investigated in CVD reactions (Chemical Vapor Deposition) using methane for carbon production. The catalysts were prepared with 10 wt.% of Fe (as Fe2O3) and 3, 6 and 12 wt.% of Sn (as SnO2) supported on Al2O3 named hereon Fe10Sn3A, Fe5Sn6A and Fe10Sn12A, respectively. These catalysts were characterized by SEM, TPCVD, TPR, TG, Raman, XRD and 57Fe and 119Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. Methane reacts with Fe10A catalyst (without Sn) in the temperature range 680-900°C to produce mainly Fe0, Fe3C and 20 wt.% of carbon deposition. TPR and TPCVD clearly showed that Sn strongly hinders the CH4 reaction over Fe catalyst. 57Fe Mössbauer suggested that in the presence of Sn the reduction of Fe + 3 by methane becomes very difficult. 119Sn Mössbauer showed Sn + 4 species strongly interact with metallic iron after CVD, producing iron-tin phases such as Fe3SnC and FeSn2. This interaction Sn-Fe increases the CVD temperatures and decreases the carbon yield leading to the production of more organized forms of carbon such as carbon nanotubes, nanofibers and graphite.

  18. Evaluation of porous carbon felt as an aerobic biocathode support in terms of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Edward M.; Scott, Keith; Head, Ian M.; Curtis, Tom; Yu, Eileen Hao

    2017-07-01

    Aerobic biocathodes provide a low-cost and sustainable substitute for expensive precious metal catalysts at the cathode of Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs). However, the abiotic formation of peroxide, which is catalyzed by the porous carbon support at certain cathode potentials, may be detrimental to their activity. Two different carbon felt supports, one treated with nitric acid, the other untreated, were characterized electrochemically through a series of chronoamperometry (CA) experiments using a novel 4-electrode electrochemical setup, in order to determine the potential at which peroxide is initially formed. Peroxide was detected at a potential of -0.2 V (all potentials are against Ag/AgCl) for the untreated carbon felt electrode and at a potential of -0.05 V for the nitric acid treated carbon felt. Given these results, two half-cells poised at -0.2 and -0.1 V were setup in order to study biocathode formation. The half-cell poised at -0.2 V did not develop an aerobic biocathode, whereas the half-cell poised at -0.1 V developed an aerobic biocathode. This study shows that to develop aerobic biocathodes on carbon felt, cathode electrode potentials more positive than -0.2 V must be applied.

  19. Influence of the Synthesis Method for Pt Catalysts Supported on Highly Mesoporous Carbon Xerogel and Vulcan Carbon Black on the Electro-Oxidation of Methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinthia Alegre

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Platinum catalysts supported on carbon xerogel and carbon black (Vulcan were synthesized with the aim of investigating the influence of the characteristics of the support on the electrochemical performance of the catalysts. Three synthesis methods were compared: an impregnation method with two different reducing agents, sodium borohydride and formic acid, and a microemulsion method, in order to study the effect of the synthesis method on the physico-chemical properties of the catalysts. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were applied. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were used for studying carbon monoxide and methanol oxidation. Catalysts supported on carbon xerogel presented higher catalytic activities towards CO and CH3OH oxidation than catalysts supported on Vulcan. The higher mesoporosity of carbon xerogel was responsible for the favored diffusion of reagents towards catalytic centers.

  20. Serine, but Not Glycine, Supports One-Carbon Metabolism and Proliferation of Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan F. Labuschagne

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous work has shown that some cancer cells are highly dependent on serine/glycine uptake for proliferation. Although serine and glycine can be interconverted and either might be used for nucleotide synthesis and one-carbon metabolism, we show that exogenous glycine cannot replace serine to support cancer cell proliferation. Cancer cells selectively consumed exogenous serine, which was converted to intracellular glycine and one-carbon units for building nucleotides. Restriction of exogenous glycine or depletion of the glycine cleavage system did not impede proliferation. In the absence of serine, uptake of exogenous glycine was unable to support nucleotide synthesis. Indeed, higher concentrations of glycine inhibited proliferation. Under these conditions, glycine was converted to serine, a reaction that would deplete the one-carbon pool. Providing one-carbon units by adding formate rescued nucleotide synthesis and growth of glycine-fed cells. We conclude that nucleotide synthesis and cancer cell proliferation are supported by serine—rather than glycine—consumption.

  1. Surface Properties and Catalytic Performance of Activated Carbon Fibers Supported TiO2 Photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huifen; Fu, Pingfeng

    Activated carbon fibers supported TiO2 photocatalyst (TiO2/ACF) in felt-form was successfully prepared with a dip-coating process using organic silicon modified acrylate copolymer as a binder followed by calcination at 500°C in a stream of Ar gas. The photocatalyst was characterized by SEM, XRD, XPS, FTIR, and BET surface area. Most of carbon fibers were coated with uniformly distributed TiO2 clusters of nearly 100 nm. The loaded TiO2 layer was particulate for the organic binder in the compact film was carbonized. According to XPS and FTIR analysis, amorphous silica in carbon grains was synthesized after carbonizing organic silicon groups, and the Ti-O-Si bond was formed between the interface of loaded TiO2 and silica. Additionally, the space between adjacent carbon fibers still remained unfilled after TiO2 coating, into which both UV light and polluted solutions could penetrate to form a three-dimensional environment for photocatalytic reactions. While loaded TiO2 amount increased to 456 mg TiO2/1 g ACF, the TiO2/ACF catalyst showed its highest photocatalytic activity, and this activity only dropped about 10% after 12 successive runs, exhibiting its high fixing stability of coated TiO2.

  2. Preparation of ZIF-8 membranes supported on macroporous carbon tubes via a dipcoating-rubbing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingyin; Zhang, Xiongfu; Liu, Haiou; Wang, Tonghua; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, a new dipcoating-rubbing method (DCRM) was developed to seed the surface of a macroporous carbon tube with a mixture of graphite and ZIF-8 nanoparticles. A continuous and low-defect ZIF-8 membrane was well formed on the seeded carbon tube by solvothermal growth. The DCRM involved a two-step process including first dipcoating a thin layer of the composite of graphite and ZIF-8 nanoparticles on the carbon surface and then rubbing the layer to form a stable seed layer. The graphite in the composite acting as binding agent could have two functions: (1) anchoring the ZIF-8 seeds onto the carbon surface; (2) smoothing the coarse surface of the macroporous carbon tube, thus forming a high quality ZIF-8 membrane. The as-prepared membrane was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and single gas permeation and was proved to be continuous and low-defect. The ideal selectivity of H2/CH4 is 7.9 with a H2 permeance of 7.15×10-8 mol Pa-1 s-1 m-2, which is higher than its corresponding Knudsen diffusion value. We could therefore expect the ZIF-8 membrane supported on macroporous tubular carbon to achieve a high selectivity of H2 over CH4 through a molecular sieving effect.

  3. Effect of Activated Carbon as a Support on Metal Dispersion and Activity of Ruthenium Catalyst for Ammonia Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Ten kinds of activated carbon from different raw materials were used as supports to prepare ruthenium catalysts. N2 physisorption and CO chemisorption were carried out to investigate the pore size distribution and the ruthenium dispersion of the catalysts. It was found that the Ru dispersion of the catalyst was closely related to not only the texture of carbon support but also the purity of activated carbon. The activities of a series of the carbon-supported barium-promoted Ru catalysts for ammonia synthesis were measured at 425 ℃, 10.0 MPa and 10 000 h-1. The result shows that the same raw material activated carbon, with a high purity, high surface area, large pore volume and reasonable pore size distribution might disperse ruthenium and promoter sufficiently, which activated carbon as support, could be used to manufacture ruthenium catalyst with a high activity for ammonia synthesis. The different raw material activated carbon as the support would greatly influence the catalytic properties of the ruthenium catalyst for ammonia synthesis. For example, with coconut shell carbon(AC1) as the support, the ammonia concentration in the effluent was 13.17% over 4%Ru-BaO/AC1 catalyst, while with the desulfurized coal carbon(AC10) as the support, that in the effluent was only 1.37% over 4%Ru-BaO/AC10 catalyst.

  4. Intercalated carbon nanotubes as a template for the preparation of supported heteroatomic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouler, Marie-Claude; Chamssedine, Fadel; Claves, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Chemistry in confined conditions is explored at the level of the interlayer space of multiwall carbon nanotubes. Starting from preliminary intercalated tubes, a ligand exchange reaction has been successfully conducted within the former Van der Waals gap, resulting in a final dispersion of heteroatomic particles, around 2 nm large and nearly homogeneous in size, on the outer surface of the tubes. Intercalated tubular carbon architectures thus prove to be interesting templates for a bottom-up preparation of chemically complex supported nanoparticles, with potential activities for versatile applications.

  5. Novel niobium carbide/carbon porous nanotube electrocatalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabil, Y.; Cavaliere, S.; Harkness, I. A.; Sharman, J. D. B.; Jones, D. J.; Rozière, J.

    2017-09-01

    Niobium carbide/carbon nanotubular porous structures have been prepared using electrospinning and used as electrocatalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. They were functionalised with 3.1 nm Pt particles synthesised by a microwave-assisted polyol method and characterised for their electrochemical properties. The novel NbC-based electrocatalyst demonstrated electroactivity towards the oxygen reduction reaction as well as greater stability over high potential cycling than a commercial carbon-based electrocatalyst. Pt/NbC/C was integrated at the cathode of a membrane electrode assembly and characterised in a single fuel cell showing promising activity and power density.

  6. SURFACE PROPERTIES AND CATALYTIC PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS SUPPORTED TiO2 PHOTOCATALYST

    OpenAIRE

    HUIFEN YANG; PINGFENG FU

    2008-01-01

    Activated carbon fibers supported TiO2 photocatalyst (TiO2/ACF) in felt-form was successfully prepared with a dip-coating process using organic silicon modified acrylate copolymer as a binder followed by calcination at 500°C in a stream of Ar gas. The photocatalyst was characterized by SEM, XRD, XPS, FTIR, and BET surface area. Most of carbon fibers were coated with uniformly distributed TiO2 clusters of nearly 100 nm. The loaded TiO2 layer was particulate for the organic binder in the compac...

  7. An investigation into carbon nanostructured materials as catalyst support in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veltzé, Sune

    black support materials for low platinum containing electrocatalyst. This is partly due to their high electronic conductivity. Partly due to their high surface area needed for the dispersion of nanoparticulate metal-clusters. In addition carbon nano-structures (CNF, SWCNT, MWCNT etc.) are more durable...... dispersion methods as the weak Van der Waals forces prevent the solvatisation and dispersion carbon nano structured materials. As the dispersion of SWCNT, MWCNT and CNF exhibit colloidal dispersion behaviour, the usual methods of consist solvatisation in organic solvents, mixture of water and an organic...

  8. MODIFICATION OF CARBON STEEL BY LASER SURFACE MELTING: PART I: EFFECT OF LASER BEAM TRAVELLING SPEED ON MICROSTRUCTURAL FEATURES AND SURFACE HARDNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem F. El-Labban

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to improve the surface hardness of carbon steel by application of laser surface melting of effective conditions. The travelling speed of laser beam during this treatment is one of the important treatment conditions. This study aims to investigate the effect of laser surface melting with different beam speeds on macro and microstructure as well as the hardness distribution through the thickness of carbon steel. To achieve this target, three different travelling speeds (1500, 1000 and 500 mm min-1 at a constant beam power of 800 W were chosen in this study. The resulted laser treated specimens were investigated in macro and microscopically scale using optical and scanning electron microscope. Hardness measurements were also carried out through the thickness of the laser treated specimens. The laser treated areas with all used travelling speeds results in melted and solidified zone on the surface of the steel. In the same time, Plates of acicular martensite structure were observed within the upper part of the melted and solidified zone in almost all experimental conditions, while some bainite structure in ferrite grains are detected in its lower part. By increasing the travelling speed, the depth of the laser treated zone was decreases, while travelling speed has much less significant effect on the laser treated zone width. The size of the formed martensite plates was increased by decreasing the travelling speed from 1500 to 500 mm min-1. On the other hand, the travelling speed has a straight effect on the length of the acicular martensite; as the travelling speed increases, the acicular martensite became longer, while it shows fine acicular martensite at lower travelling speeds. The depth that full martensite structure can be reached is increased by increasing travelling speed. At lower travelling speed (500 mm min-1, large amount of bainite structure is observed at the center of the treated zone up to its lower end. The

  9. A Novel Carbon Nanotube-Supported NiP Amorphous Alloy Catalyst and Its Hydrogenation Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ju; Fengyi Li

    2006-01-01

    A carbon nanotube-supported NiP amorphous catalyst (NiP/CNT) was prepared by induced reduction. Benzene hydrogenation was used as a probe reaction for the study of catalytic activity. The effects of the support on the activity and thermal stability of the supported catalyst were discussed based on various characterizations, including XRD, TEM, ICP, XPS, H2-TPD, and DTA. In comparison with the NiP amorphous alloy, the benzene conversion on NiP/CNT catalyst was lower, but the specific activity of NiP/CNT was higher, which is attributed to the dispersion produced by the support, an electron-donating effect, and the hydrogen-storage ability of CNT. The NiP/CNT thermal stability was improved because of the dispersion and electronic effects and the good heat-conduction ability of the CNT support.

  10. Carbon-Coated Silicon Nanowires on Carbon Fabric as Self-Supported Electrodes for Flexible Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Li, Ge; Seo, Min Ho; Lui, Gregory; Hassan, Fathy M; Feng, Kun; Xiao, Xingcheng; Chen, Zhongwei

    2017-03-22

    A novel self-supported electrode with long cycling life and high mass loading was developed based on carbon-coated Si nanowires grown in situ on highly conductive and flexible carbon fabric substrates through a nickel-catalyzed one-pot atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition. The high-quality carbon coated Si nanowires resulted in high reversible specific capacity (∼3500 mA h g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1)), while the three-dimensional electrode's unique architecture leads to a significantly improved robustness and a high degree of electrode stability. An exceptionally long cyclability with a capacity retention of ∼66% over 500 cycles at 1.0 A g(-1) was achieved. The controllable high mass loading enables an electrode with extremely high areal capacity of ∼5.0 mA h cm(-2). Such a scalable electrode fabrication technology and the high-performance electrodes hold great promise in future practical applications in high energy density lithium-ion batteries.

  11. thesis of high-purity carbon nanotubes over alumina and silica supported bimetallic catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Ratković

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were synthesized by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition method (CCVD of ethylene over alumina and silica supported bimetallic catalysts based on Fe, Co and Ni. The catalysts were prepared by a precipitation method, calcined at 600 °C and in situ reduced in hydrogen flow at 700 °C. The CNTs growth was carried out by a flow the mixture of C2H4 and nitrogen over the catalyst powder in a horizontal oven. The structure and morphology of as-synthesized CNTs were characterized using SEM. The as-synthesized nanotubes were purified by acid and basic treatments in order to remove impurities such as amorphous carbon, graphite nanoparticles and metal catalysts. XRD and DTA/TG analyses showed that the amounts of by-products in the purified CNTs samples were reduced significantly. According to the observed results, ethylene is an active carbon source for growing high-density CNTs with high yield but more on alumina-supported catalysts than on their silica- supported counterparts. The last might be explained by SMSI formed in the case of alumina-supported catalysts, resulting in higher active phase dispersion.

  12. Microstructure and chemical composition of compressed and carbonized poplar%压缩炭化杨木的微观结构与化学成分

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈琛; 邓玉和; 徐了; 周宇; 陈旻; 吴晶; 王向歌; 杨莹

    2012-01-01

    研究压缩、炭化过程中木材结构与化学成分的变化对压缩炭化木的应用有重要意义.利用扫描电镜、扫描电镜X射线能谱和红外光谱分析研究了杨木经压缩、炭化的微观结构和木材的化学成分变化.研究发现:意杨Populus euramericana经过压缩、炭化后,细胞腔变小,胞壁距离减小,胞壁距离最大分别缩小56.94%和53.34%,但细胞壁本身仍然保持了其完整性;心边材各元素的变化趋势一致,炭元素上升,氧元素下降,以边材为例,素材O/C为1.76,压缩、炭化处理后分别为1.65,1.45;杨木在热压和高温炭化过程中,纤维素的降解,使C—H伸缩振动吸收峰强度下降,并发生了一定的位移,半纤维素降解使C=O伸缩振动吸收峰强度降低,木质素苯环和酚醚键C—O—C的伸缩振动吸收峰的变化说明木质素也发生了化学反应,炭化后的心材在波数2853 cm-1附近出现了明显的振动,说明木材内部复杂的化学反应产生了新的化学基团.%The study of microstructure and chemical composition of carbonized wood has an important meaning for its application. Changes in microstructure and chemical composition of compressed and carbonized poplar (Populus euramevicana) were studied using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDS) Analysis, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy. Results showed that after Poplar was compressed and carbonized, to maintain cell wall integrity the cell cavity and the distance between the cell walls, which reduced 56.94%, 53.34% at maximum, noticeably diminished. Element content in the sapwood and the heartwood varied similarly after hot-pressing and after carbonization with carbon content increasing and oxygen content decreasing. For example, the C-over-0 ration of untreated wood was 1.76, after compressed and carbonized, the ration reduced to 1.65 and 1.45. Cellulose and hemicellulose degradation led to a reduction in

  13. Numerical evaluation of oxide growth in metallic support microstructures of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and its influence on mass transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Georg; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Persson, Åsa Helen

    2015-01-01

    Metal-supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are developed as a durable and cost-effective alternative to the state-of-the-art cermet SOFCs. This novel technology offers new opportunities but also new challenges. One of them is corrosion of the metallic support, which will decrease the long-ter...

  14. 丙酮回收用活性炭微结构的研究%STUDY ON MICROSTRUCTURE OF ACTIVATED CARBON FOR ACETONE RECOVERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军利; 韩学文; 施荫锐

    2003-01-01

    Serial commercial activated carbon for acetone recovery was inspected by surface area and pore distribution analysis instrument(AS-703).It illuminated the main factors influencing acetone recovery from the aspect of microstructure.Domestic sample of activated carbon with similar adsorption capability and lower price comparing with imported commercial activated carbons was provided.The pore suitable for the adsorption of acetone is micropore.The size of micropore volume determines the adsorption capacity of acetone,without relating to total pore volume.Micropore volume of the activated carbon is in the range of 0.40~0.50cm3/g and mean pore radius is 1nm.%利用AS-703比表面积、孔径分布测定仪对几种回收丙酮溶剂的商品活性炭进行了比较深入的剖析,从微观结构上阐明了影响丙酮回收用活性炭的主要因素,并提供了国产化样品,与进口商品活性炭相比较具有价格低吸附性能好等优点.微孔容积的大小决定了丙酮吸附量的多少,而与总孔容积关系不大.丙酮回收用活性炭的孔径主要集中在1nm左右,微孔容积在0.40~0.50cm3/g.

  15. Physicochemical investigations of carbon nanofiber supported Cu/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Din, Israf Ud, E-mail: drisraf@yahoo.com, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Shaharun, Maizatul S., E-mail: drisraf@yahoo.com, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Subbarao, Duvvuri, E-mail: duvvuri-subbarao@petronas.com.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Naeem, A., E-mail: naeeem64@yahoo.com [National Centre of Excellence in Physical Chemistry, University of Peshawar (Pakistan)

    2014-10-24

    Zirconia-promoted copper/carbon nanofiber catalysts (Cu‐ZrO{sub 2}/CNF) were prepared by the sequential deposition precipitation method. The Herringbone type of carbon nanofiber GNF-100 (Graphite nanofiber) was used as a catalyst support. Carbon nanofiber was oxidized to (CNF-O) with 5% and 65 % concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The CNF activated with 5% HNO{sub 3} produced higher surface area which is 155 m{sup 2}/g. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption. The results showed that increase of HNO{sub 3} concentration reduced the surface area and porosity of the catalyst.

  16. Synthesis of mesoporous hollow carbon hemispheres as highly efficient Pd electrocatalyst support for ethanol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zaoxue; Meng, Hui; Li, Zihui; Shen, Pei Kang [The Key Laboratory of Low-carbon Chemistry and Energy Conservation of Guangdong Province, The State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Shi, Lei [Changling Catalyst Division, Sinopec Group, Yueyang 414012 (China)

    2010-05-15

    The synthesis procedure of the highly mesoporous hollow carbon hemispheres (HCHs) using glucose as carbon source and solid core mesoporous shell silica (SCMSS) as template and the formation mechanism of the HCHs have been presented. The HCHs show an ultrahigh surface area of 1095.59 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and an average mesopore size of 9.38 nm. The hemispherical structure with large mesopores also results in the improvement in the mass transfer and therefore more concentrated ethanol solution can be used to increase the energy density. The additional advantage of the HCHs compared to the hollow carbon spheres is that they can provide the similar surface area at reduced volume. The current densities of ethanol oxidation on Pd nanoparticles supported on HCH (Pd/HCH) electrocatalyst are three times as many as on Pd/C at the same Pd loadings. (author)

  17. Synthesis and study of carbon microspheres for use as catalyst support for cobalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.J. Coville

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of pure carbon spheres was achieved in the absence of a catalyst through the direct pyrolysis of two hydrocarbon sources, acetylene and ethylene. Systematic studies using acetylene as the feedstock indicated that the size distribution of the resulting carbon microspheres can be controlled by pyrolysis temperature, time and feedstock flow rate. The resulting spheres were fully characterised by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and thermogravimetric analysis. The TEM examination showed that these spheres have a ball-like and chain-like morphology, and the balls have smooth surfaces with a variation in diameter size and distribution determined by the reaction conditions. Carbon microsphere-supported cobalt catalysts were synthesised and have shown good activity in the ethylene hydrogenation reaction.

  18. Carbon covered alumina prepared by the pyrolysis of sucrose: A promising support material for the supported Pt-Sn-bimetallic dehydrogenation catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, S.; He, S.; Li, X.R.; Seshan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Sucrose was pyrolyzed on gamma alumina surface to prepare carbon covered alumina (CCA) material. Alumina and CCA supported Pt–Sn catalysts were prepared by the complex impregnation method under vacuum. Dehydrogenation of n-octadecane was performed to study the effect of carbon addition, Pt loading a

  19. Carbon covered alumina prepared by the pyrolysis of sucrose: A promising support material for the supported Pt-Sn-bimetallic dehydrogenation catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, S.; He, Songbo; Li, X.R.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2014-01-01

    Sucrose was pyrolyzed on gamma alumina surface to prepare carbon covered alumina (CCA) material. Alumina and CCA supported Pt–Sn catalysts were prepared by the complex impregnation method under vacuum. Dehydrogenation of n-octadecane was performed to study the effect of carbon addition, Pt loading

  20. Carbon covered alumina prepared by the pyrolysis of sucrose: A promising support material for the supported Pt-Sn-bimetallic dehydrogenation catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, S.; He, Songbo; Li, X.R.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2014-01-01

    Sucrose was pyrolyzed on gamma alumina surface to prepare carbon covered alumina (CCA) material. Alumina and CCA supported Pt–Sn catalysts were prepared by the complex impregnation method under vacuum. Dehydrogenation of n-octadecane was performed to study the effect of carbon addition, Pt loading a

  1. Microstructural characterization of low and high carbon CoCrMo alloy nanoparticles produced by mechanical milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, T. A.; Goode, A. E.; Porter, A. E.; Ryan, M. P.; Milne, S. J.; Brown, A. P.; Brydson, R. M. D.

    2014-06-01

    CoCrMo alloys are utilised as the main material in hip prostheses. The link between this type of hip prosthesis and chronic pain remains unclear. Studies suggest that wear debris generated in-vivo may be related to post-operative complications such as inflammation. These alloys can contain different amounts of carbon, which improves the mechanical properties of the alloy. However, the formation of carbides could become sites that initiate corrosion, releasing ions and/or particles into the human body. This study analysed the mechanical milling of alloys containing both high and low carbon levels in relevant biological media, as an alternative route to generate wear debris. The results show that low carbon alloys produce significantly more nanoparticles than high carbon alloys. During the milling process, strain induces an fcc to hcp phase transformation. Evidence for cobalt and molybdenum dissolution in the presence of serum was confirmed by ICP-MS and TEM EDX techniques.

  2. Electrochemical performance of lithium ion battery, nano-silicon-based, disordered carbon composite anodes with different microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang-Wu; Patil, Prashanth K.; Wang, Chunsheng; Appleby, A. John; Little, Frank. E.; Cocke, David L.

    Nano-silicon-based disordered carbon composites prepared by mechanical milling and pyrolysis have been examined as anodes of a lithium ion cell. Electrochemical measurements show that the charge-discharge capacity of disordered carbon composites incorporating both silicon-polyparaphenylene (Si-PPP) and silicon-polyvinyl chloride (Si-PVC) with differing silicon contents, decreases with increasing pyrolysis temperature. Si-PVC-based materials have a better cycle life than those based on Si-PPP at the same silicon content.

  3. Highly active carbon supported Pd cathode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A.; Borodzinski, A.; Kedzierzawski, P.; Mierzwa, B.; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, M.; Stobinski, L.; Ciecierska, E.; Zimoch, A.; Opałło, M.

    2016-12-01

    One of the drawbacks of low-temperature fuel cells is high price of platinum-based catalysts used for the electroreduction of oxygen at the cathode of the fuel cell. The aim of this work is to develop the palladium catalyst that will replace commonly used platinum cathode catalysts. A series of palladium catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared and tested on the cathode of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell (DFAFC). Palladium nanoparticles were deposited on the carbon black (Vulcan) and on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface by reduction of palladium(II) acetate dissolved in ethanol. Hydrazine was used as a reducing agent. The effect of functionalization of the carbon supports on the catalysts physicochemical properties and the ORR catalytic activity on the cathode of DFAFC was studied. The supports were functionalized by treatment in nitric acid for 4 h at 80 °C. The structure of the prepared catalysts has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Hydrophilicity of the catalytic layers was determined by measuring contact angles of water droplets. The performance of the prepared catalysts has been compared with that of the commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C (Premetek) catalyst. The maximum power density obtained for the best palladium catalyst, deposited on the surface of functionalized carbon black, is the same as that for the commercial Pt/C (Premetek). Palladium is cheaper than platinum, therefore the developed cathode catalyst is promising for future applications.

  4. Formic acid electrooxidation on carbon supported platinum catalyst with preferential plane orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstajić Mila N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pt-based nanocatalysts supported on Vulcan XC-72R carbon, were prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion method, with addition of various amounts of HCl in the water phase. Polyethileneglycoldodecylether (BRIJ 30 was used as a surfactant, which influenced the Pt surface structure, along with HCl. Catalysts prepared with addition of 0, 15, 25 and 35 % of HCl during the synthesis, were electrochemically characterised in 0,5 M H2SO4 using cyclic voltammetry and CO oxidation. Formic acid electrooxidation was examined on all investigated catalysts, in terms of their electrocatalytic activity and stability. Platinum loading on carbon support was examined by Thermogravimetric analysis. Catalysts showed different features in hydrogen region, and slight differences in formic acid oxidation mechanisms.

  5. Networks of connected Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes as superior catalysts for methanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meihua; Zhang, Jianshuo; Wu, Chuxin; Guan, Lunhui

    2017-02-01

    The high cost and short lifetime of the Pt-based anode catalyst for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) hamper the widespread commercialization of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Therefore, improving the activity of Pt-based catalysts is necessary for their practical application. For the first time, we prepared networks of connected Pt nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes with loading ratio as high as 91 wt% (Pt/MWCNTs). Thanks for the unique connected structure, the Pt mass activity of Pt/MWCNTs for methanol oxidation reaction is 4.4 times as active as that of the commercial Pt/C (20 wt%). When carbon support is considered, the total mass activity of Pt/MWCNTs is 20 times as active as that of the commercial Pt/C. The durability and anti-poisoning ability are also improved greatly.

  6. Effect of Carbon Supported Pt Catalysts on Selective Hydrogenation of Cinnamaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde (CAL to cinnamyl alcohol (COL is of both fundamental and industrial interest. It is of great significance to evaluate the possible differences between different supports arising from metal dispersion and electronic effects, in terms of activity and selectivity. Herein, Pt catalysts on different carbon supports including carbon nanotubes (CNTs and reduced graphene oxides (RGO were developed by a simple wet impregnation method. The resultant catalysts were well characterized by XRD, Raman, N2 physisorption, TEM, and XPS analysis. Applied in the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde, 3.5 wt% Pt/CNT shows much higher selectivity towards cinnamyl alcohol (62% than 3.5 wt% Pt/RGO@SiO2 (48%. The enhanced activity can be ascribed to the high graphitization degree of CNTs and high density of dispersed Pt electron cloud.

  7. Pre-differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in combination with a microstructured nerve guide supports peripheral nerve regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boecker, Arne Hendrik; van Neerven, Sabien Geraldine Antonia; Scheffel, Juliane; Tank, Julian; Altinova, Haktan; Seidensticker, Katrin; Deumens, Ronald; Tolba, Rene; Weis, Joachim; Brook, Gary Anthony; Pallua, Norbert; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Many bioartificial nerve guides have been investigated pre-clinically for their nerve regeneration-supporting function, often in comparison to autologous nerve transplantation, which is still regarded as the current clinical gold standard. Enrichment of these scaffolds with cells intended to support axonal regeneration has been explored as a strategy to boost axonal regeneration across these nerve guides Ansselin et al. (1998). In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were implanted with a cell-seeded microstructured collagen nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Under the influence of seeded, pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells, axons regenerated well into the Perimaix nerve guide. Myelination-related parameters, like myelin sheath thickness, benefitted from an additional seeding with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. Furthermore, both the number of retrogradely labelled sensory neurons and the axon density within the implant were elevated in the cell-seeded scaffold group with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. However, a pre-differentiation had no influence on functional recovery. An additional cell seeding of the Perimaix nerve guide with mesenchymal stromal cells led to an extent of functional recovery, independent of the differentiation status, similar to autologous nerve transplantation. These findings encourage further investigations on pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells as a cellular support for peripheral nerve regeneration. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Supported PtRu on mesoporous carbons for direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbizzani, Catia; Beninati, Sabina; Soavi, Francesca; Varzi, Alberto; Mastragostino, Marina [University of Bologna, Department of Metal Science, Electrochemistry and Chemical Techniques, via San Donato 15, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2008-12-01

    We prepared and characterized several cryogel mesoporous carbons of different pore size distribution and report the catalytic activity of PtRu supported on mesoporous carbons of pore size >15 nm in passive and in active direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). At room temperature (RT), the specific maximum power of the passive DMFCs with mesoporous carbon/PtRu systems as anode was in the range 3-5 W g{sup -1}. Passive DMFC assembly and RT tests limit the performance of the electrocatalytic systems and the anodes were thus tested in active DMFCs at 30, 60 and 80 C. Their responses were also compared to those of commercial Vulcan carbon/PtRu. At 80 C, the specific maximum power of the active DMFC with C656/PtRu was 37 W g{sup -1} and the required amount of Pt per kW estimated at 0.4 V cell voltage was 31 g kW{sup -1}, a value less than half that of Vulcan carbon/PtRu. (author)

  9. Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Cellulose to Gluconate on Carbon Aerogel Supported Gold Nanoparticles Anode in Alkaline Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Hanshuang Xiao; Meifen Wu; Guohua Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The development of high efficient and low energy consumption approaches for the transformation of cellulose is of high significance for a sustainable production of high value-added feedstocks. Herein, electrocatalytic oxidation technique was employed for the selective conversion of cellulose to gluconate in alkaline medium by using concentrated HNO3 pretreated carbon aerogel (CA) supported Au nanoparticles as anode. Results show that a high gluconate yield of 67.8% and sum salts yield of 88.9...

  10. Large-area thin self-supporting carbon foils with MgO coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarz, Anna; Maier-Komor, Peter

    2002-03-01

    Large area self-supporting carbon foils in the thickness of range of 8-22 μg/cm 2, coated with approximately 4 μg/cm 2 MgO have been prepared by e-gun evaporation. They were mounted on frames with apertures of 130 cm 2. Problems related to the parting agent preparation, floating procedure, and mounting onto frames are discussed. Special precautions necessary to avoid damage during foil drying, storage and transportation are suggested.

  11. Carbon nanofiber supported bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles for formic acid electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuan-Hang; Jiang, Yue; Niu, Dong-Fang; Zhang, Xin-Sheng; Zhou, Xing-Gui; Niu, Li; Yuan, Wei-Kang

    2012-10-01

    Carbon nanofiber (CNF) supported PdAu nanoparticles are synthesized with sodium citrate as the stabilizing agent and sodium borohydride as the reducing agent. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) characterization indicates that the synthesized PdAu particles are well dispersed on the CNF surface and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterization indicates that the alloying degree of the synthesized PdAu nanoparticles can be improved by adding tetrahydrofuran to the synthesis solution. The results of electrochemical characterization indicate that the addition of Au can promote the electrocatalytic activity of Pd/C catalyst for formic acid oxidation and the CNF supported high-alloying PdAu catalyst possesses better electrocatalytic activity and stability for formic acid oxidation than either the CNF supported low-alloying PdAu catalyst or the CNF supported Pd catalyst.

  12. Carbon-Supported PtRuMo Electrocatalysts for Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L.G. Fierro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The review article discusses the current status and recent findings of our investigations on the synthesis and characterization of carbon-supported PtRuMo electrocatalysts for direct alcohol fuel cells. In particular, the effect of the carbon support and the composition on the structure, stability and the activity of the PtRuMo nanoparticles for the electrooxidation of CO, methanol and ethanol have been studied. Different physicochemical techniques have been employed for the analysis of the catalysts structures: X-ray analytical methods (XRD, XPS, TXRF, thermogravimetry (TGA and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, as well as a number of electrochemical techniques like CO adsorption studies, current-time curves and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Furthermore, spectroscopic methods adapted to the electrochemical systems for in situ studies, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS, have been used to evaluate the oxidation process of CO, methanol and ethanol over the carbon-supported PtRuMo electrocatalysts.

  13. Manipulating microstructures and electrical properties of carbon fiber/reduced graphene oxide/nickel composite textiles with electrochemical deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei-Liang; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Shi, Fei

    2017-04-01

    Since graphene and their composites play significant roles in the catalysts, energy storage, electronics and other fields, where electron transport is highly critical, here, we introduce reduced graphene oxide (RGO) interfaces in the carbon fiber (CF) networks for preparing a novel lightweight carbon fiber/reduced graphene oxide/nickel (CF-RGO-Ni) composite textile. Upon the charaterizations on the microscopic morphologies, electrical and magnetic properties, and density, the presence of RGO nanosheets and nickel nanoparticles would substantially influence the related physical properties in the resulting composite textiles. Furthermore, the key parameters, including RGO loading, deposition time, current density and annealing temperature of carbon matrices, have been studied to understand their effects on the electrochemical deposition of nickel nanoparticles. Implication of the results suggests that the RGO interface is a unique medium for essentially promoting the electrochemical deposition kinetics and active sites for growing nickel nanoparticles, which indicates a universal approach for preparing advanced lightweight composites with the presence of graphene naonstructures.

  14. Influence of the Synthesis Method for Pt Catalysts Supported on Highly Mesoporous Carbon Xerogel and Vulcan Carbon Black on the Electro-Oxidation of Methanol

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Platinum catalysts supported on carbon xerogel and carbon black (Vulcan) were synthesized with the aim of investigating the influence of the characteristics of the support on the electrochemical performance of the catalysts. Three synthesis methods were compared: an impregnation method with two different reducing agents, sodium borohydride and formic acid, and a microemulsion method, in order to study the effect of the synthesis method on the physico-chemical properties of the catalysts. X-ra...

  15. Effect of Hot Rolling Process on Microstructure and Properties of Low-Carbon Al-Killed Steels Produced Through TSCR Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S. K.; Ahmed, U.; Megahed, G. M.

    2011-10-01

    Low-carbon Al-killed hot rolled strips for direct forming, cold rolling, and galvanizing applications are produced from the similar chemistry at Ezz Flat Steel (EFS) through thin slab casting and rolling (TSCR) technology. The desired mechanical and microstructural properties in hot bands for different applications are achieved through control of hot rolling parameters, which in turn control the precipitation and growth of AlN. Nitrogen in solid solution strongly influences the yield strength (YS), ductility, strain aging index (SAI), and other formability properties of steel. The equilibrium solubility of AlN in austenite at different temperatures and its isothermal precipitation have been studied. To achieve the formability properties for direct forming, soluble nitrogen is fixed as AlN by coiling the strip at higher temperatures. For stringent cold forming, boron was added below the stoichiometric ratio with nitrogen, which improved the formability properties dramatically. The requirements of hot band for processing into cold rolled and annealed deep drawing sheets are high SAI and fine-grain microstructure. Higher finish rolling and low coiling temperatures are used to achieve these. Fully processed cold rolled sheets from these hot strips at customer's end have shown good formability properties. Coil break marks observed in some coils during uncoiling were found to be associated with yielding phenomenon. The spike height (difference between upper and lower yield stresses) and yield point elongation (YPE) were found to be the key material parameters for the break marks. Factors affecting these parameters have been studied and the coiling temperature optimized to overcome the problem.

  16. Research of special carbon nanobeads supported Pt catalyst for fuel cell through high temperature pyrolysis and deposition from novel phthalocyanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yanchuan; YUE Jun; PAN Zhongxiao; XU Haitao; ZHANG Bing; HAN Fengmei; CHEN Lijuan; PENG Bixian; XIE Wenwei; QIAN Haisheng; YAN Tiantang

    2004-01-01

    The carbon nanobeads were prepared through high temperature pyrolysis and deposition from phthaiocyanine. After surface's functionalization treatment of the carbon beads, the carbon nanobeads supported Pt catalyst was produced. The Pt/C catalyst was characterized by SEM,TEM, Raman spectrum, EDS and XRD methods. Combining the carbonaceous paper spreaded up with the catalyst with Nafion membrane, we made MEA electrode. The discharge curves indicated that this carbon nanobeads supported Pt is a good fuel cell catalyst with excellent performance, high activity and sign of a long-time life.

  17. Electrospun fibrous electrodes with tunable microstructure made of polyaniline/multi-walled carbon nanotube suspension for all-solid-state supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Junsheng; Su, Shijie; Fang, Xu [Key Laboratory for Micro/Nano Technology and System of Liaoning Province, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Wang, Dazhi, E-mail: d.wang@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Micro/Nano Technology and System of Liaoning Province, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Xu, Shuangchao [Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Electrospun PANI/MWCNT fibrous electrodes for supercapacitor were prepared. • Microstructure of electrodes is tunable by changing the electrospin parameters. • Fiber-diameter dependence of the electrode performance was observed. • High performance and good stability of electrospun electrodes were obtained. - Abstract: Electrospinning technique was used to prepare high performance fibrous electrodes with tunable microstructure for all-solid-state electrochemical supercapacitor. Symmetrically sandwiched supercapacitors consisting of flexible electrospun polyaniline (PANI)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) electrodes and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) gel electrolyte were assembled. Tunable microstructure of the fibrous electrode was obtained by changing the electrospinning parameters including the collector–needle distance (CND) and the suspension flow rate (SFR). Results show that, higher CND combining with lower SFR can result in a smaller average diameter of the electrospun fibers and hence improve the electrode performance. When the CND changes from 80 to 140 mm, the average fiber diameter will decrease from 2.89 to 1.21 μm, and the specific surface area of the electrode can increase from 57 to 83 m{sup 2}·g{sup −1}. The corresponding specific capacitance of the electrospun electrode will therefore increase from 129.5 to 180 F·g{sup −1}, leading to a synchronous improvement of the energy density of the supercapacitor from 18 to 25 Wh·kg{sup −1}. On the other hand, the supercapacitors using fibrous electrodes in this work also show good rate capability and cycling stability. Using the electrode with an average fiber diameter of 1.21 μm, the specific capacitances can maintain 131 F·g{sup −1} at a current density of 4 A·g{sup −1}, which is 73% of the specific capacitance of the same sample at a current density of 0.5 A·g{sup −1}. And the specific capacitance of the electrode can retain 89

  18. Controlling the microstructure of binary carbide films with elemental substitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, K.; Haider, M.; Hodges, A.; Spreng, R.; Posbergh, E.; Woodward, H.; Lofland, S. E.; Hettinger, J. D.; Heon, M.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2011-03-01

    We report on experiments to control the microstructure of textured binary carbide thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputter deposition. Controlling the microstructure in these materials is important as the microstructure of these films provides a template for the resulting carbide-derived carbon (CDC) film and impacts their performance. Specifically, a combinatorial approach is used to add chromium to TiC films creating a compositional gradient as a function of position. We present a measurement of surface roughness as a function of material composition. The resulting materials, (Ti 1-x Cr x) C films, are significantly smoother than their pure TiC counterparts and the resulting CDC's have correlated defects which will improve the performance of the CDC in supercapacitor applications. This work was supported by Rowan University and NSF under contract DMR-0503711.

  19. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/carbon fiber paper composite to support Pt nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yi, Xi-bin; Liu, Shuo; Fan, Hui-Li; Ju, Wei; Wang, Qi-Chun; Ma, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) grown on carbon fiber paper (CFP) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is introduced as a catalyst support material for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Well dispersed Pt nanoparticles on VACNTs surface are prepared by impregnation-reduction method. The VACNTs on CFP possess well-maintained alignment, large surface area and good electrical conductivity, which leading to the formation of Pt particles with a smaller size and enhance the Pt utilization rate. The structure and nature of resulting Pt/VACNTs/CFP catalysts for methanol oxidation are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). With the aid of VACNTs, well-dispersed Pt catalysts enable the reversibly rapid redox kinetic since electron transport efficiently passes through a one-dimensional pathway, which leads to enhance the catalytic activity and Pt utilization rate. Compared with the Pt/XC-72/CFP electrode, the electrochemical measurements results display that the Pt/VACNTs/CFP catalyst shows much higher electrocatalytic activity and better stability for methanol oxidation. In addition, the oxidation current from 200 to 1200 s decayed more slowly for the Pt/VACNTs/CFP than that of the Pt/XC-72/CFP catalysts, indicating less accumulation of adsorbed CO species. All those results imply that the Pt/VACNTs/CFP has a great potential for applications in DMFCs.

  20. Methanol Electro-Oxidation on Pt-Ru Alloy Nanoparticles Supported on Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangchuan Xing

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been investigated in recent years as a catalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Improved catalyst activities were observed and attributed to metal-support interactions. We report a study on the kinetics of methanol electro-oxidation on CNT supported Pt-Ru alloy nanoparticles. Alloy catalysts with different compositions, Pt53Ru47/CNT, Pt69Ru31/CNT and Pt77Ru23/CNT, were prepared and investigated in detail. Experiments were conducted at various temperatures, electrode potentials, and methanol concentrations. It was found that the reaction order of methanol electro-oxidation on the PtRu/CNT catalysts was consistent with what has been reported for PtRu alloys with a value of 0.5 in methanol concentrations. However, the electro-oxidation reaction on the PtRu/CNT catalysts displayed much lower activation energies than that on the Pt-Ru alloy catalysts unsupported or supported on carbon black (PtRu/CB. This study provides an overall kinetic evaluation of the PtRu/CNT catalysts and further demonstrates the beneficial role of CNTs.

  1. NiMo-sulfide supported on activated carbon to produce renewable diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Y Acelas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to their weak polarity and large surface area, activated carbon supports have the potential to enhance the dispersion of metal-sulfides. It is expected that the absence of a strong metal-support interaction can result in the formation of a very active and stable Ni-Mo-S phase. In this study, catalysts with different amounts of nickel and molybdenum supported on a commercial activated carbon were prepared by a co-impregnation method and characterized by BET, XRF, and SEM techniques. The catalytic activity for hydroprocessing of Jatropha oil was evaluated in a batch reactor, and the composition of the liquid and gaseous products were determined. Results showed that gaseous products are mainly composed of high amounts of propane and small amounts of other light hydrocarbons (C1 to C5. Liquid hydrocarbon products consisted of a mixture containing mainly n-paraffins of C15-C18 and some oxygenated compounds. The catalysts with a mass fraction of 3 % Ni, 15 % Mo (Ni3Mo15/AC presented the highest selectivity toward C17-C18 hydrocarbons, with a product distribution similar to a commercial alumina-supported Ni-Mo-S catalyst.

  2. Electrochemical properties of boron-doped ordered mesoporous carbon as electrocatalyst and Pt catalyst support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsabimana, Anaclet; Bo, Xiangjie; Zhang, Yufan; Li, Mian; Han, Ce; Guo, Liping

    2014-08-15

    The electrochemical properties of boron-doped ordered mesoporous carbon (BOMC) as an electrode material and Pt catalyst support were investigated. The BOMC was synthesized and its structure was examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). More defective sites were introduced into OMC by the doping of boron. Six electroactive compounds were employed to investigate their electrochemical responses on BOMC and OMC modified glassy carbon electrodes. The BOMC, with more defective sites, exhibited high activity toward the electroactive compounds. The property of BOMC of supporting platinum nanoparticle catalyst was examined. Pt nanoparticles were loaded onto BOMC and OMC, and this was confirmed by TEM, XPS and thermogravimetric analysis. Pt nanoparticles with an average diameter of 2.62 nm were deposited on BOMC. The doping of boron into OMC facilitates the dispersion of Pt nanoparticles. Pt nanoparticles supported on BOMC (Pt-BOMC) and Pt nanoparticles supported on OMC (Pt-OMC) were electrochemically characterized. The electrocatalytic activity of Pt-BOMC toward methanol oxidation reaction was compared with that of Pt-OMC and commercial Pt-C catalyst. The results show that the electrocatalytic activity of BOMC is significantly higher than that of other used catalysts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhanced Performance of Oxidation of Rosalva (9-decen-1-ol to Costenal (9-decenal on Porous Silicon-Supported Silver Catalyst in a Microstructured Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enhong Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of metal-assisted HF chemical etching as a convenient technique to produce a few microns thick porous layer in silicon microchannels was demonstrated. Gas phase selective oxidation of rosalva to its aldehyde (costenal was performed in glass/silicon microstructured reactors at temperatures of 375–475 °C on silver catalyst which was deposited on both porous and flat silicon surface by sputter-coating. The effects of temperature (375–475 °C, rosalva concentration (1.17%–3.43%, O2 to rosalva ratio (0.5–20 and residence time on the reaction were investigated. The reactivity of rosalva on the porous silicon supported silver was 5.7–6.4 times higher than on the thin film silver catalyst at 450 °C. Furthermore, activation energy for the porous silicon supported silver was lower. Isothermal conditions in the microreactors allowed high conversion and selectivity to be achieved in a wide range of temperature and oxygen concentration. At typical reaction conditions (1.75% rosalva, O2/rosalva = 3, residence time 18 ms and 450 °C, conversion of 97% and selectivity of 95% to costenal was achieved, corresponding to a turnover frequency of 268 h−1.

  4. Microstructural Evolution of a Low-Carbon Steel during Application of Quenching and Partitioning Heat Treatments after Partial Austenitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santofimia, M.J.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2008-01-01

    The “quenching and partitioning” (Q&P) process has been studied in a low-carbon steel containing 1.1 wt pct aluminum by heat treatments consisting of partial austenitization at 900 °C and subsequent rapid cooling to a quenching temperature in the range between 125 °C and 175 °C, followed by an isoth

  5. Microstructural Evolution of a Low-Carbon Steel during Application of Quenching and Partitioning Heat Treatments after Partial Austenitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santofimia, M.J.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2008-01-01

    The “quenching and partitioning” (Q&P) process has been studied in a low-carbon steel containing 1.1 wt pct aluminum by heat treatments consisting of partial austenitization at 900 °C and subsequent rapid cooling to a quenching temperature in the range between 125 °C and 175 °C, followed by an

  6. Enhanced methanol electro-oxidation activity of PtRu catalysts supported on heteroatom-doped carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Gang [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)], E-mail: wugang@lanl.gov; Swaidan, Raja [Department of Chemical Engineering, Cooper Union, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Li Deyu; Li Ning [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2008-11-01

    A typical heteroatom (nitrogen)-doped carbon materials were successfully synthesized through the carbonization of a hybrid containing traditional carbon black covered by in situ polymerized polyaniline. The nitrogen content onto carbon can be adjusted up to 5.1 at.% by changing the coverage of polyaniline. The effects of nitrogen doping on the surface physical and electrochemical properties of carbon were studied using XPS, XRD and HRTEM, as well as CV and EIS techniques. With increasing nitrogen doping, the carbon structure became more compact, showing curvatures and dislocations in the graphene stacking. The nitrogen-doped carbon also exhibited a higher accessible surface area in electrochemical reactions, and a lower charge transfer resistance at the carbon/electrolyte interface. Moreover, to investigate the influence of nitrogen doping on the electrocatalytic activity of the PtRu/C catalyst, comparisons in CO stripping and methanol oxidation were carried out on PtRu catalysts supported by non-doped and nitrogen-doped carbon. Since the promotional roles of nitrogen doping, including the high electrochemically accessible surface area, the richness of the disordered nanostructures and defects, and the high electron density on N-doped carbon supports, contribute to the synthesis of well-dispersed PtRu particles with high Pt utilization and stronger metal-support interactions, an enhanced catalytic activity for methanol oxidation was obtained in the case of the PtRu/N-C catalyst in comparison with the traditional PtRu/C catalyst.

  7. Enhanced methanol electro-oxidation activity of PtRu catalysts supported on heteroatom-doped carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Gang; Li, Deyu; Li, Ning [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Swaidan, Raja [Department of Chemical Engineering, Cooper Union, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2008-11-01

    A typical heteroatom (nitrogen)-doped carbon materials were successfully synthesized through the carbonization of a hybrid containing traditional carbon black covered by in situ polymerized polyaniline. The nitrogen content onto carbon can be adjusted up to 5.1 at.% by changing the coverage of polyaniline. The effects of nitrogen doping on the surface physical and electrochemical properties of carbon were studied using XPS, XRD and HRTEM, as well as CV and EIS techniques. With increasing nitrogen doping, the carbon structure became more compact, showing curvatures and dislocations in the graphene stacking. The nitrogen-doped carbon also exhibited a higher accessible surface area in electrochemical reactions, and a lower charge transfer resistance at the carbon/electrolyte interface. Moreover, to investigate the influence of nitrogen doping on the electrocatalytic activity of the PtRu/C catalyst, comparisons in CO stripping and methanol oxidation were carried out on PtRu catalysts supported by non-doped and nitrogen-doped carbon. Since the promotional roles of nitrogen doping, including the high electrochemically accessible surface area, the richness of the disordered nanostructures and defects, and the high electron density on N-doped carbon supports, contribute to the synthesis of well-dispersed PtRu particles with high Pt utilization and stronger metal-support interactions, an enhanced catalytic activity for methanol oxidation was obtained in the case of the PtRu/N-C catalyst in comparison with the traditional PtRu/C catalyst. (author)

  8. Ruthenium oxide/carbon composites with microporous or mesoporous carbon as support and prepared by two procedures. A comparative study as supercapacitor electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pico, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049-Madrid (Spain); Morales, E. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Polimeros (ICTP), CSIC, Juan de la Cierva 3, E-28006-Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, J.A.; Centeno, T.A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR), CSIC, Francisco Pintado Fe 26, E-33011-Oviedo (Spain); Ibanez, J. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM), CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, E-28040-Madrid (Spain); Rojas, R.M.; Amarilla, J.M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049-Madrid (Spain); Rojo, J.M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049-Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jmrojo@icmm.csic.es

    2009-03-01

    Composites are prepared by deposition of nanoparticles of RuO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O (1-4 nm) on two carbons: microporous carbon (1.3 nm of average micropore size) and mesoporous carbon (11 nm of average mesopore size). Two-preparation procedures are used: (i) procedure A consisting of repetitive impregnations of the carbons with RuCl{sub 3}.0.5H{sub 2}O solutions, and (ii) procedure B based on impregnation of the carbons with Ru(acac){sub 3} vapour. The procedure B leads to supported RuO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O particles that appear more crystalline than those obtained by the procedure A. Specific capacitance and specific surface area of the composites are discussed as functions of the RuO{sub 2} content, and different dependences for the composites derived from the two carbons are found. Mesoporous carbon is better support than microporous carbon. Procedure A leads to supported RuO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O particles with higher specific capacitance than the particles deposited by procedure B.

  9. Cycloaddition Reaction of Carbon Dioxide to Epoxides Catalyzed by Polymer-Supported Quaternary Phosphonium Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubing Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer-supported quaternary phosphonium salt (PS-QPS was explored as effective catalyst for the coupling reaction of carbon dioxide with epoxides. The results indicated that cyclic carbonates with high yields (98.6% and excellent selectivity (100% could be prepared at the conditions of 5 MPa CO2, 150°C, and 6 h without the addition of organic solvents or cocatalysts. The effects of various reaction conditions on the catalytic performance were investigated in detail. The catalyst is applicable to a variety of epoxides, producing the corresponding cyclic carbonates in good yields. Furthermore, the catalyst could be recovered easily and reused for five times without loss of catalytic activity obviously. A proposed mechanism for synthesis of cyclic carbonate in the presence of PS-QPS was discussed. The catalyst was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectrum. It is believed that PS-QPS is of great potential for CO2 fixation applications due to its unusual advantages, such as easy preparation, high activity and selectivity, stability, low cost, and reusability.

  10. Nanocrystalline MgO supported nickel-based bimetallic catalysts for carbon dioxide reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkani, Fereshteh [Catalyst and Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran); Rezaei, Mehran [Catalyst and Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran); Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran)

    2010-10-15

    Nanocrystalline magnesium oxide with high surface area and plate-like shape was employed as catalyst support for preparation of nickel-based bimetallic catalysts in methane reforming with carbon dioxide. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption (BET), Temperature programmed oxidation and desorption (TPO-TPD), Thermal gravimetric and differential thermal gravimetric (TGA-DTG), H{sub 2} chemisorption and Transmission and electron microscopies (TEM and SEM) analyses. CO{sub 2}-TPD data showed the high CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of catalysts which improves the resistance of catalysts against the carbon formation. The H{sub 2} chemisorption results also indicated that the addition of Pt to nickel catalyst improved the nickel dispersion. The obtained results revealed that the prepared catalysts showed a high activity and stability during the reaction with a low amount of deposited carbon. Addition of Pt to nickel catalyst improved both the activity and resistivity against carbon formation. (author)

  11. A simple, mass balance model of carbon flow in a controlled ecological life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Jay L.

    1989-01-01

    Internal cycling of chemical elements is a fundamental aspect of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). Mathematical models are useful tools for evaluating fluxes and reservoirs of elements associated with potential CELSS configurations. A simple mass balance model of carbon flow in CELSS was developed based on data from the CELSS Breadboard project at Kennedy Space Center. All carbon reservoirs and fluxes were calculated based on steady state conditions and modelled using linear, donor-controlled transfer coefficients. The linear expression of photosynthetic flux was replaced with Michaelis-Menten kinetics based on dynamical analysis of the model which found that the latter produced more adequate model output. Sensitivity analysis of the model indicated that accurate determination of the maximum rate of gross primary production is critical to the development of an accurate model of carbon flow. Atmospheric carbon dioxide was particularly sensitive to changes in photosynthetic rate. The small reservoir of CO2 relative to large CO2 fluxes increases the potential for volatility in CO2 concentration. Feedback control mechanisms regulating CO2 concentration will probably be necessary in a CELSS to reduce this system instability.

  12. Catalytic oxidation of pulping effluent by activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Bholu Ram; Garg, Anurag

    2016-01-01

    The present study deals with the non-catalytic and catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) for the removal of persistent organic compounds from the pulping effluent. Two activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts (Cu/Ce/AC and Cu/Mn/AC) were used for CWO after characterization by the following techniques: temperature-programmed reduction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. The oxidation reaction was performed in a batch high-pressure reactor (capacity = 0.7  L) at moderate oxidation conditions (temperature = 190°C and oxygen pressure = 0.9 MPa). With Cu/Ce/AC catalyst, the maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and lignin removals of 79%, 77% and 88% were achieved compared to only 50% removal during the non-catalytic process. The 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) to COD ratio (a measure for biodegradability) of the pulping effluent was improved to 0.52 from an initial value of 0.16. The mass balance calculations for solid recovered after CWO reaction showed 8% and 10% deduction in catalyst mass primarily attributed to the loss of carbon and metal leaching. After the CWO process, carbon deposition was also observed on the recovered catalyst which was responsible for around 3-4% TOC reduction.

  13. Efficient optical resolution of amino acid by alanine racemaze chiral analogue supported on mesoporous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, D.; Kim, K.; Park, D.; Kim, G.

    2012-09-01

    Optically pure D-amino acids are industrially important chiral building blocks for the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, food ingredients, and drug intermediates. Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic-resolution processes have recently been developed for deracemization of amino acids. S-ARCA would be a good candidate for the selective adsorption of D amino acid through the imine formation reaction. The organic phase containing S-ARCA adsorbent, TPPC or Ionic Liquid (as a phase transfer catalyst) in MC were coated on the surfaces of mesoporous carbon C-SBA-15(CMK). The aqueous solution of racemic D/L-amino acid and NaOH were added to the carbon support coated with ARCA. The D/L ratios on ARCA and in solution were determined with increasing reaction time. S-ARCA has a unique property for the selective adsorption of D- amino acid (up to 90% selcetivity) in the racemic mixture. The fixed bed reactor containing ARCA/carbon support was also adopted successfully for the selective separation of amino acid.

  14. CO(2) adsorption on supported molecular amidine systems on activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alesi, W Richard; Gray, McMahan; Kitchin, John R

    2010-08-23

    The CO(2) capture capacities for typical flue gas capture and regeneration conditions of two tertiary amidine N-methyltetrahydropyrimidine (MTHP) derivatives supported on activated carbon were determined through temperature-controlled packed-bed reactor experiments. Adsorption-desorption experiments were conducted at initial adsorption temperatures ranging from 29 degrees C to 50 degrees C with temperature-programmed regeneration under an inert purge stream. In addition to the capture capacity of each amine, the efficiencies at which the amidines interact with CO(2) were determined. Capture capacities were obtained for 1,5-diazo-bicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-ene (DBN) and 1,8-diazobicyclo[5.4.0]-undec-7-ene (DBU) supported on activated carbon at a loading of approximately 2.7 mol amidine per kg of sorbent. Moisture was found to be essential for CO(2) capture on the amidines, but parasitic moisture sorption on the activated carbon ultimately limited the capture capacities. DBN was shown to have a higher capture capacity of 0.8 mol CO(2) per kg of sorbent and an efficiency of 0.30 mol CO(2) per mol of amidine at an adsorption temperature of 29 degrees C compared to DBU. The results of these experiments were then used in conjunction with a single-site adsorption model to derive the Gibbs free energy for the capture reaction, which can provide information about the suitability of the sorbent under different operating conditions.

  15. Synthesis of carbon-supported copper catalyst and its catalytic performance in methanol dehydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelepova, Ekaterina V.; Vedyagin, Aleksey A.; Ilina, Ludmila Yu.; Nizovskii, Alexander I.; Tsyrulnikov, Pavel G.

    2017-07-01

    Carbon-supported copper catalyst was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of Sibunit with an aqueous solution of copper nitrate. Copper loading was 5 wt.%. Temperature of reductive pretreatment was varied within a range of 200-400 °C. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. Catalytic activity of the samples was studied in a reaction of methanol dehydrogenation. Silica-based catalyst with similar copper loading was used as a reference. It was found that copper is distributed over the surface of support in the form of metallic and partially oxidized particles of about 12-17 nm in size. Diminished interaction of copper with support was supposed to be responsible for high catalytic activity.

  16. Superior performance of highly flexible solid-state supercapacitor based on the ternary composites of graphene oxide supported poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haihan; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Han, Gaoyi

    2016-08-01

    Ternary composite electrodes based on carbon nanotubes thin films (CNFs)-loaded graphene oxide (GO) supported poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)- carbon nanotubes (GO/PEDOT-CNTs) have been prepared via a facile one-step electrochemical codeposition method. The effect of long and short CNTs-incorporated composites (GO/PEDOT-lCNTs and GO/PEDOT-sCNTs) on the electrochemical behaviors of the electrodes is investigated and compared. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the incorporation of CNTs effectively improves the electrochemical performances of the GO/PEDOT electrodes. Long CNTs-incorporated GO/PEDOT-lCNTs electrodes have more superior electrochemical behaviors with respect to the short CNTs-incorporated GO/PEDOT-lCNTs electrodes, which can be attributed to the optimized composition and specific microstructures of the former. To verify the feasibility of the prepared composite electrodes for utilization as flexible supercapacitor, a solid-state supercapacitor using the CNFs-loaded GO/PEDOT-lCNTs electrodes is fabricated and tested. The device shows lightweight, ultrathin, and highly flexible features, which also has a high areal and volumetric specific capacitance (33.4 m F cm-2 at 10 mV s-1 and 2.7 F cm-3 at 0.042 A cm-3), superior rate capability, and excellent cycle stability (maintaining 97.5% for 5000 cycles). This highly flexible solid-state supercapacitor has great potential for applications in flexible electronics, roll-up display, and wearable devices.

  17. Baseline map of organic carbon in Australian soil to support national carbon accounting and monitoring under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscarra Rossel, Raphael A; Webster, Richard; Bui, Elisabeth N; Baldock, Jeff A

    2014-09-01

    We can effectively monitor soil condition-and develop sound policies to offset the emissions of greenhouse gases-only with accurate data from which to define baselines. Currently, estimates of soil organic C for countries or continents are either unavailable or largely uncertain because they are derived from sparse data, with large gaps over many areas of the Earth. Here, we derive spatially explicit estimates, and their uncertainty, of the distribution and stock of organic C in the soil of Australia. We assembled and harmonized data from several sources to produce the most comprehensive set of data on the current stock of organic C in soil of the continent. Using them, we have produced a fine spatial resolution baseline map of organic C at the continental scale. We describe how we made it by combining the bootstrap, a decision tree with piecewise regression on environmental variables and geostatistical modelling of residuals. Values of stock were predicted at the nodes of a 3-arc-sec (approximately 90 m) grid and mapped together with their uncertainties. We then calculated baselines of soil organic C storage over the whole of Australia, its states and territories, and regions that define bioclimatic zones, vegetation classes and land use. The average amount of organic C in Australian topsoil is estimated to be 29.7 t ha(-1) with 95% confidence limits of 22.6 and 37.9 t ha(-1) . The total stock of organic C in the 0-30 cm layer of soil for the continent is 24.97 Gt with 95% confidence limits of 19.04 and 31.83 Gt. This represents approximately 3.5% of the total stock in the upper 30 cm of soil worldwide. Australia occupies 5.2% of the global land area, so the total organic C stock of Australian soil makes an important contribution to the global carbon cycle, and it provides a significant potential for sequestration. As the most reliable approximation of the stock of organic C in Australian soil in 2010, our estimates have important applications. They could support

  18. 碳纳米管-碳纤维/水泥基材料微观结构和热电性能%Microstructure and thermoelectric properties of carbon nanotube-carbon fiber/cement composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚武; 左俊卿; 吴科如

    2013-01-01

    The microstructure of the cement pastes was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.Thermoelectric properties of carbon nanotube-carbon fiber/cement composites were also measured during the heating and cooling process.Results show that carbon nanotubes act as fillers,which results in a dense microstructure of cement paste,when carbon nanotube is at a low content (less than 0.5 % by mass of cement).The doping of CNTs leads to a highest increase (up to 260%) reaching 22.6μV/℃ in the positive thermoelectric power of the cabon fiber/cement composites,when CNTs addition reaches 0.5 % by weight of cement.Besides,the linearity and reversibility of the Seebeck effect was improved.%研究了碳纳米管-碳纤维/水泥基材料的微观结构以及碳纳米管-碳纤维/水泥基材料升温与降温过程中的热电性能.实验结果表明,当水泥基材料中碳纳米管掺量较低时(碳纳米管掺量占水泥质量百分比不高于0.5%),碳纳米管能有效改善水泥基体性能,密实基体结构.在碳纤维水泥基材料中掺入碳纳米管能有效提高和改善复合材料热电性能;当碳纳米管掺量为水泥质量0.5%,水泥基材料热电势率最多能提高260%,达到22.6μV/℃.与此同时,碳纳米管掺入能增强热电效应中温差电动势与温差关系的线性规律和可逆性规律.

  19. Effects of thermal activation conditions on the microstructure regulation of corncob-derived activated carbon for hydrogen storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dabin Wang; Zhen Geng; Cunman Zhang; Xiangyang Zhou; Xupeng Liu

    2014-01-01

    Activated carbons derived from corncob (CACs) were prepared by pyrolysis carbonization and KOH activation. Through modifying activation conditions, samples with large pore volume and ultrahigh BET specific surface area could be obtained. The sample achieved the highest hydrogen uptake capacity of 5.80 wt%at 40 bar and -196◦C. The as-obtained samples were characterized by N2-sorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Besides, thermogravimetric analysis was also employed to investigate the activation behavior of CACs. Detailed investigation on the activation parameters reveals that moderate activation temperature and heating rate are favorable for preparing CACs with high surface area, large pore volume and optimal pore size distribution. Meanwhile, the micropore volume between 0.65 nm and 0.85 nm along with BET surface area and total pore volume has great effects on hydrogen uptake capacities. The present results indicate that CACs are the most promising materials for hydrogen storage application.

  20. CARBON NANOTUBES VIA METHANE DECOMPOSITION ON AN ALUMINA SUPPORTED COBALT AEROGEL CATALYST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingyu Piao; Jiuling Chen; Yongdan Li

    2003-01-01

    An alumina-supported cobalt aerogel catalyst prepared from a sol-gel and a supercritical drying method was used in the catalytic decomposition of methane. The physical-chemical properties of the catalyst were characterized and its activity for methane decomposition was investigated. The effects of calcination and reaction temperatures on the activity of the catalyst and the morphology of the carbon nanotubes produced were discussed. A CoAl2O4 spinel structure formed in the calcined catalyst. The quantity of the nanotubes produced in the reaction increases with the amount of cobalt in the reduced catalyst. A higher reaction temperature leads to a higher reaction rate, though faster deactivation of the catalyst occurs with the change. The carbon nanotubes grown on the catalyst have smooth walls and uniform diameter distribution.

  1. Catalytic NiO Filter Supported on Carbon Fiber for Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Jong Ki; Seo, Hyun Ook; Jeong, Myunggeun; Kim, Kwangdae; Kim, Young Dok [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Dong Chan [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    Carbon-fiber-supported NiO catalytic filters for oxidation of volatile organic compounds were prepared by electroless Ni-P plating and subsequent annealing processes. Surface structure and crystallinity of NiO film on carbon fiber could be modified by post-annealing at different temperatures (500 and 650 .deg. C). Catalytic thermal decompositions of toluene over these catalytic filters were investigated. 500 .deg. C-annealed sample showed a higher catalytic reactivity toward toluene decomposition than 650 .deg. C-annealed one under same conditions, despite of its lower surface area and toluene adsorption capacity. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies suggest that amorphous structures of NiO on 500 .deg. C-annealed catalyst caused the higher reactivity for oxidation of toluene than that of 650 .deg. C-annealed sample with a higher crystallinity.

  2. Highly Porous Carbon Derived from MOF-5 as a Support of ORR Electrocatalysts for Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Inayat Ali; Qian, Yuhong; Badshah, Amin; Nadeem, Muhammad Arif; Zhao, Dan

    2016-07-13

    The development of highly competent electrocatalysts for the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at cathodes of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is extremely important for their long-term operation and wide applications. Herein, we present highly efficient ORR electrocatalysts based on Pt/Ni bimetallic nanoparticles dispersed on highly porous carbon obtained via pyrolysis of a metal-organic framework MOF-5. In comparison to the commercial Pt/C (20%), the electrocatalyst Pt-Ni/PC 950 (15:15%) in this study exhibits a pronounced positive shift of 90 mV in Eonset. In addition, it also demonstrates excellent long-term stability and durability during the 500-cycle continue-oxygen-supply (COS) accelerating durability tests (ADTs). The significantly improved activity and stability of Pt-Ni/PC 950 (15:15%) can be attributed to the Pt electron interaction with Ni and carbon support as has been proved in X-ray and microscopic analysis.

  3. Microwave-assisted synthesis of carbon-supported carbides catalysts for hydrous hydrazine decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnatsakanyan, Raman; Zhurnachyan, Alina R.; Matyshak, Valery A.; Manukyan, Khachatur V.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.

    2016-09-01

    Microwave-assisted synthesis of carbon-supported Mo2C and WC nanomaterials was studied. Two different routes were utilized to prepare MoO3 (WO3) - C precursors that were then subjected to microwave irradiation in an inert atmosphere. The effect of synthesis conditions, such as irradiation time and gas environment, was investigated. The structure and formation mechanism of the carbide phases were explored. As-synthesized nanomaterials exhibited catalytic activity for hydrous hydrazine (N2H4·H2O) decomposition at 30-70 °C. It was shown that the catalyst activity significantly increases if microwave irradiation is applied during the decomposition process. Such conditions permit complete conversion of hydrazine to ammonia and nitrogen within minutes. This effect can be attributed to the unique nanostructure of the catalysts that includes microwave absorbing carbon and active carbide constituents.

  4. Thermally Activated Palm Kernel Based Carbon as a Support for Edible Oil Hydrogenation Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmajid Alshaibani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon has distinctive properties as a support for hydrogenation catalysts. Thermally activated carbon has been prepared from palm kernel shell at 1073 K and placed under nitrogen flow for 2 h. It was impregnated by palladium using toluene solution of Pd (acac2. The Pd/C was reduced using a water solution of potassium borohydride (KBH4. The Pd-B/C was characterized by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis (BET, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. Pd-B/C was applied for sunflower oil hydrogenation at a temperature of 373 K, hydrogen pressure of 413.5 kPa and agitation of 1400 rpm for 1 h. Pd-B/C noticeably exhibited a higher overall catalyst activity in comparison to some recently published palladium catalysts.

  5. Tailoring the microstructure of porous MgO supports for asymmetric oxygen separation membranes: Optimization of thermoplastic feedstock systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothanda Ramachandran, Dhavanesan; Clemens, F.; Glasscock, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Porous magnesium oxide (MgO) structures were prepared by thermoplastic processing for use as supports in asymmetric thin film oxygen transport membranes (OTMs). The open porosity, pore size distribution, and resulting gas permeability of the MgO structures were measured for different feedstock...... that the unexpected increase in gas permeability at temperatures above 1300 °C was a result of the growth of macro‐pores and the opening of bottle‐neck pores which resulted in improved pore connectivity. Mercury intrusion porosimetry experiments confirmed an increase in average pore size for samples sintered above...

  6. Role of Integrin Subunits in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Osteoblast Maturation on Graphitic Carbon-coated Microstructured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Rodil, Sandra E.; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Dunn, Ginger R.; Almaguer-Flores, Argelia; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2015-01-01

    Surface roughness, topography, chemistry, and energy promote osteoblast differentiation and increase osteogenic local factor production in vitro and bone-to-implant contact in vivo, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. Knockdown of integrin heterodimer alpha2beta1 (α2β1) blocks the osteogenic effects of the surface, suggesting signaling by this integrin homodimer is required. The purpose of the present study was to separate effects of surface chemistry and surface structure on integrin expression by coating smooth or rough titanium (Ti) substrates with graphitic carbon, retaining surface morphology but altering surface chemistry. Ti surfaces (smooth [Ra<0.4μm], rough [Ra≥3.4μm]) were sputter-coated using a magnetron sputtering system with an ultrapure graphite target, producing a graphitic carbon thin film. Human mesenchymal stem cells and MG63 osteoblast-like cells had higher mRNA for integrin subunits α1, α2, αv, and β1 on rough surfaces in comparison to smooth, and integrin αv on graphitic-carbon-coated rough surfaces in comparison to Ti. Osteogenic differentiation was greater on rough surfaces in comparison to smooth, regardless of chemistry. Silencing integrins β1, α1, or α2 decreased osteoblast maturation on rough surfaces independent of surface chemistry. Silencing integrin αv decreased maturation only on graphitic carbon-coated surfaces, not on Ti. These results suggest a major role of the integrin β1 subunit in roughness recognition, and that integrin alpha subunits play a major role in surface chemistry recognition. PMID:25770999

  7. Preparation, microstructure and oxidation resistance of SiCN ceramic matrix composites with glass-like carbon interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xia

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Glass-like carbon (GC interface was successfully introduced into carbon fiber-reinforced SiCN ceramic matrix composite (C/GC/SiCN by polymer infiltration and pyrolysis using phenolic resin as precursor. In order to highlight the Oxidation resistance of GC interface, the Oxidation behavior of GC, carbon fiber (Cf containing approximately 0.3 μm GC coating and C/GC/SiCN was investigated by means of weight changes and residual strength ratio before and after oxidizing, and the results were also compared with that of Cf containing Pyrocarbon (PyC coating and C/PyC/SiCN composite. Scanning electron microscopy displays homogeneous, adherent GC coating on Cf. Weight loss rate of Cf containing GC coating is lower than that of Cf containing PyC coating. The residual stress ratio of C/GC/SiCN was higher than that of C/PyC/SiCN. The results indicate that GC interface can improve anti-oxidation of Cf-reinforced composite than PyC interface.

  8. Effects of Carbon Allotropic Forms on Microstructure and Thermal Properties of Cu-C Composites Produced by SPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, K.; Sobczak, N.; Chmielewski, M.; Homa, M.; Gazda, A.; Zybała, R.; Strojny-Nędza, A.

    2016-08-01

    Combination of extreme service conditions and complex thermomechanical loadings, e.g., in electronics or power industry, requires using advanced materials with unique properties. Dissipation of heat generated during the operation of high-power electronic elements is crucial from the point of view of their efficiency. Good cooling conditions can be guaranteed, for instance, with materials of very high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient, and by designing the heat dissipation system in an accurate manner. Conventional materials such as silver, copper, or their alloys, often fail to meet such severe requirements. This paper discusses the results of investigations connected with Cu-C (multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), graphene nanopowder (GNP), or thermally reduced graphene oxide (RGO)) composites, produced using the spark plasma sintering technique. The obtained composites are characterized by uniform distribution of a carbon phase and high relative density. Compared with pure copper, developed materials are characterized by similar thermal conductivity and much lower values of thermal expansion coefficient. The most promising materials to use as heat dissipation elements seems to be copper-based composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and GNP.

  9. Carbon sources supporting a diverse fish community in a tropical coastal ecosystem (Gazi Bay, Kenya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyunja, J.; Ntiba, M.; Onyari, J.; Mavuti, K.; Soetaert, K.; Bouillon, S.

    2009-07-01

    Interlinked mangrove-seagrass ecosystems are characteristic features of many tropical coastal areas, where they act as feeding and nursery grounds for a variety of fishes and invertebrates. The autotrophic carbon sources supporting fisheries in Gazi bay (Kenya) were studied in three sites, two located in the tidal creeks flowing through extensive mangrove forests, another site located in the subtidal seagrass meadows, approximately 2.5 km away from the forest. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope composition of 42 fish species, 2 crustacean species and a range of potential primary food sources (e.g., mangroves, seagrasses and epiphytes, macroalgae) were analysed. There was considerable overlap in the δ 13C signatures between fish (-16.1 ± 2.1‰), seagrasses (-15.1 ± 3.0‰), seagrass epiphytes (-13.6 ± 3.3‰), and macroalgae (-20.4 ± 3.1‰). Nevertheless, the signatures for most primary producers were sufficiently distinct to indicate that the dominant carbon sources for fish were mainly derived from the seagrass and their associated epiphytic community, and possibly macroalgae. Mangrove-derived organic matter contributes only marginally to the overall fish food web. Carbon supporting these fish communities was derived directly through grazing by herbivorous and some omnivorous fishes, or indirectly through the benthic food web. Fishes from the mangrove creeks had distinctly lower δ 13C signatures (-16.8 ± 2.0‰) compared to those collected in the adjacent seagrass beds (-14.7 ± 1.7‰). This indicated that these habitats were used as distinct sheltering and feeding zones for the fishes collected, with minimal degree of exchange within the fish communities despite their regular movement pattern.

  10. SO{sub 2} retention on CaO/activated carbon sorbents. Part II: Effect of the activated carbon support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.C. Macias-Perez; M.A. Lillo-Rodenas; A. Bueno-Lopez; C. Salinas-Martinez de Lecea; A. Linares-Solano [University of Alicante, Alicante (Spain). Department of Inorganic Chemistry

    2008-09-15

    The present paper analyses the role of the activated carbon (AC) properties on the SO{sub 2} uptake capacity of CaO/AC sorbents prepared by AC impregnation or ionic exchange with calcium acetate water solutions. Gas adsorption and mercury porosimetry have been used for textural characterization of the AC and surface oxygen groups have been characterized by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Thermogravimetry has been used for SO{sub 2} retention tests and CO{sub 2} chemisorption at 300{sup o}C for CaO dispersion (d) determinations. The results show that the surface calcium on CaO/AC samples governs the SO{sub 2} uptake. The surface oxygen content is the AC property that mainly controls both the calcium loading and surface calcium on CaO/AC samples, which could be explained by the fact that the surface oxygen lowers the hydrophobic character of the AC supports therefore favouring the interaction with the calcium acetate water solutions. The combination of high calcium loading and dispersion leads to SO{sub 2} uptakes up to 123 mg SO{sub 2}/g. The textural properties of the supports have some influence in the calcium loading. However, the effect is masked by the blockage of AC porosity by the calcium loaded. 25 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. A combined in situ XAS-XRPD-Raman study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over a carbon supported Co catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakoumis, Nikolaos E.; Dehghan, Roya; Johnsen, Rune

    2013-01-01

    A cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalyst, supported on a carbon nanofibers/carbon felt composite (Co/CNF/CF) was studied in situ at realistic conditions. The catalyst was monitored by Xray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction (HR-XRPD) and Raman s...

  12. Synthesis of porous carbon supported palladium nanoparticle catalysts by atomic layer deposition: application for rechargeable lithium-O2 battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yu; Lu, Jun; Luo, Xiangyi; Wu, Tianpin; Du, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Ren, Yang; Wen, Jianguo; Miller, Dean J; Miller, Jeffrey T; Sun, Yang-Kook; Elam, Jeffrey W; Amine, Khalil

    2013-09-11

    In this study, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit nanostructured palladium on porous carbon as the cathode material for Li-O2 cells. Scanning transmission electron microscopy showed discrete crystalline nanoparticles decorating the surface of the porous carbon support, where the size could be controlled in the range of 2-8 nm and depended on the number of Pd ALD cycles performed. X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Pd K-edge revealed that the carbon supported Pd existed in a mixed phase of metallic palladium and palladium oxide. The conformality of ALD allowed us to uniformly disperse the Pd catalyst onto the carbon support while preserving the initial porous structure. As a result, the charging and discharging performance of the oxygen cathode in a Li-O2 cell was improved. Our results suggest that ALD is a promising technique for tailoring the surface composition and structure of nanoporous supports in energy storage devices.

  13. Electrochemical Investigation of the Corrosion of Different Microstructural Phases of X65 Pipeline Steel under Saturated Carbon Dioxide Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng Yang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of metallurgy on the corrosion behaviour of separate weld zone (WZ and parent plate (PP regions of X65 pipeline steel in a solution of deionised water saturated with CO2, at two different temperatures (55 °C and 80 °C and at initial pH~4.0. In addition, a non-electrochemical immersion experiment was also performed at 80 °C in CO2, on a sample portion of X65 pipeline containing part of a weld section, together with adjacent heat affected zones (HAZ and parent material. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS was used to evaluate the corrosion behaviour of the separate weld and parent plate samples. This study seeks to understand the significance of the different microstructures within the different zones of the welded X65 pipe in CO2 environments on corrosion performance; with particular attention given to the formation of surface scales; and their composition/significance. The results obtained from grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD measurements suggest that, post immersion, the parent plate substrate is scale free, with only features arising from ferrite (α-Fe and cementite (Fe3C apparent. In contrast, at 80 °C, GIXRD from the weld zone substrate, and weld zone/heat affected zone of the non-electrochemical sample indicates the presence of siderite (FeCO3 and chukanovite (Fe2CO3(OH2 phases. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM on this surface confirmed the presence of characteristic discrete cube-shaped crystallites of siderite together with plate-like clusters of chukanovite.

  14. Ni/Carbon Hybrid Prepared by Hydrothermal Carbonization and Thermal Treatment as Support for PtRu Nanoparticles for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcelo Marques Tusi; Michele Brandalise; Nataly Soares de Oliveira Polanco; Olandir Vercino Correa; Antonio Carlos da Silva; Juan Carlo Villalba; Fauze Jaco Anaissi

    2013-01-01

    Ni/Carbon was prepared in two steps:initially cellulose as carbon source and NiCl2.6H20 as catalyst of the carbonization process were submitted to hydrothermal treatment at 200 ℃ and further to thermal treatment at 900 ℃ under argon atmosphere.The obtained material contains Ni nanoparticles with face-centered cubic (fcc) structure dispersed on amorphous carbon with graphitic domains.PtRu/C electrocatalysts (carbonsupported PtRu nanoparticles) were prepared by an alcohol-reduction process using Ni/Carbon as support.The materials were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis,energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy,X-ray diffraction,transmission electron microscopy and tested as anodes in single direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC).The performances of PtRu/C electrocatalysts using Ni/Carbon as support were superior to those obtained for PtRu/C using commercial carbon black Vulcan XC72 as support.

  15. Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts in high temperature polymer electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qingfeng, Li; Hjuler, Hans Aage; Bjerrum, Niels

    2000-01-01

    improve the oxygen reduction kinetics due to increased oxygen solubility and suppressed adsorption of phosphoric acid anions. Further enhancement of the catalytic activity can be obtained by operating the polymer electrolytes at higher temperatures. Efforts have been made to develop a polymer electrolyte......Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts has been investigated in H3PO4, H3PO4-doped Nafion and polybenzimidazole (PBI) polymer electrolytes in a temperature range up to 190 degrees C. Compared with pure H3PO4, the combination of H3PO4 and polymer electrolytes can significantly...

  16. Synthesis and characterization of iron-cobalt (FeCo) alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutsopoulos, Sotiris; Barfod, Rasmus; Eriksen, Kim Michael

    2017-01-01

    of the alloy nanoparticles differed depending on the preparation method. When the wet impregnation technique of acetate precursor salts of Fe and Co were used for the synthesis, the size of FeCo alloy nanoparticles was approximately 13 nm. FeCo alloy nanoparticles were characterized by crystallography (XRD...... and mechanically stable for prolonged periods of time. AFM analysis showed that the FeCo nanoparticles were formed on the surface of the carrier. The results of this study suggest that using these easy and inexpensive synthetic methods iron-cobalt nanoparticles can be formed on carbon microparticles support...

  17. Large-area thin self-supporting carbon foils with MgO coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Stolarz, A

    2002-01-01

    Large area self-supporting carbon foils in the thickness of range of 8-22 mu g/cm sup 2 , coated with approximately 4 mu g/cm sup 2 MgO have been prepared by e-gun evaporation. They were mounted on frames with apertures of 130 cm sup 2. Problems related to the parting agent preparation, floating procedure, and mounting onto frames are discussed. Special precautions necessary to avoid damage during foil drying, storage and transportation are suggested.

  18. Synthesis of Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O with Flower-like Microstructure and Its Catalytic Activity for Transesterification of Dimethyl Carbonate with Phenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiang; WANG Ke-li; WU Xing-long; LUO Sheng-jun; HU Chang-wen

    2007-01-01

    A novel flower-like hydrated magnesium carbonate hydroxide, Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2 · 4H2O, with micro-structure composed of individual thin nano-sheets was synthesized using a facile solution route without the use of template or organic surfactant. Reaction time has an important effect on the final morphology of the product. The micro-structure and morphology of Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O were characterized by means of X-ray diffractometry ( XRD), fieldemission scanning electron microscopy(FE-SEM). Brunauer-Emmett-Teller(BET) surface areas of the samples were also measured. The probable formation mechanism of flower-like micro-structure was discussed. It was found that Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O with flower-like micro-strucure was a novel and efficient catalyst for the synthesis of diphenyl carbonate (DPC) by transesterification of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) with phenol.

  19. A nano-microstructured artificial-hair-cell-type sensor based on topologically graded 3D carbon nanotube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmazoglu, O.; Yadav, S.; Cicek, D.; Schneider, J. J.

    2016-09-01

    A design for a unique artificial-hair-cell-type sensor (AHCTS) based entirely on 3D-structured, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is introduced. Standard microfabrication techniques were used for the straightforward micro-nano integration of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays composed of low-layer multi-walled CNTs (two to six layers). The mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube bundles were intensively characterized with regard to various substrates and CNT morphology, e.g. bundle height. The CNT bundles display excellent flexibility and mechanical stability for lateral bending, showing high tear resistance. The integrated 3D CNT sensor can detect three-dimensional forces using the deflection or compression of a central CNT bundle which changes the contact resistance to the shorter neighboring bundles. The complete sensor system can be fabricated using a single chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process step. Moreover, sophisticated external contacts to the surroundings are not necessary for signal detection. No additional sensors or external bias for signal detection are required. This simplifies the miniaturization and the integration of these nanostructures for future microsystem set-ups. The new nanostructured sensor system exhibits an average sensitivity of 2100 ppm in the linear regime with the relative resistance change per micron (ppm μm-1) of the individual CNT bundle tip deflection. Furthermore, experiments have shown highly sensitive piezoresistive behavior with an electrical resistance decrease of up to ˜11% at 50 μm mechanical deflection. The detection sensitivity is as low as 1 μm of deflection, and thus highly comparable with the tactile hair sensors of insects, having typical thresholds on the order of 30-50 μm. The AHCTS can easily be adapted and applied as a flow, tactile or acceleration sensor as well as a vibration sensor. Potential applications of the latter might come up in artificial cochlear systems. In

  20. A nano-microstructured artificial-hair-cell-type sensor based on topologically graded 3D carbon nanotube bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmazoglu, O; Yadav, S; Cicek, D; Schneider, J J

    2016-09-09

    A design for a unique artificial-hair-cell-type sensor (AHCTS) based entirely on 3D-structured, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is introduced. Standard microfabrication techniques were used for the straightforward micro-nano integration of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays composed of low-layer multi-walled CNTs (two to six layers). The mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube bundles were intensively characterized with regard to various substrates and CNT morphology, e.g. bundle height. The CNT bundles display excellent flexibility and mechanical stability for lateral bending, showing high tear resistance. The integrated 3D CNT sensor can detect three-dimensional forces using the deflection or compression of a central CNT bundle which changes the contact resistance to the shorter neighboring bundles. The complete sensor system can be fabricated using a single chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process step. Moreover, sophisticated external contacts to the surroundings are not necessary for signal detection. No additional sensors or external bias for signal detection are required. This simplifies the miniaturization and the integration of these nanostructures for future microsystem set-ups. The new nanostructured sensor system exhibits an average sensitivity of 2100 ppm in the linear regime with the relative resistance change per micron (ppm μm(-1)) of the individual CNT bundle tip deflection. Furthermore, experiments have shown highly sensitive piezoresistive behavior with an electrical resistance decrease of up to ∼11% at 50 μm mechanical deflection. The detection sensitivity is as low as 1 μm of deflection, and thus highly comparable with the tactile hair sensors of insects, having typical thresholds on the order of 30-50 μm. The AHCTS can easily be adapted and applied as a flow, tactile or acceleration sensor as well as a vibration sensor. Potential applications of the latter might come up in artificial cochlear systems. In

  1. Light-Driven Preparation, Microstructure, and Visible-Light Photocatalytic Property of Porous Carbon-Doped TiO2

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Xin Zou; Guo-Dong Li; Jun Zhao; Juan Su; Xiao Wei; Kai-Xue Wang; Yu-Ning Wang; Jie-Sheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Highly porous carbon-doped TiO2 (C-TiO2) has been prepared, for the first time, through a light-driven approach using crystalline titanium glycolate (TG) as the single-source precursor. Although the nonthermally prepared porous C-TiO2 is amorphous, it shows a remarkable visible-light photocatalytic activity higher than that of nitrogen-doped TiO2 (N-TiO2) due to its significant surface area (530 m2/g) and pore-rich structure. X-ray photoelectron, electron paramagnetic resonance, and UV-Vis di...

  2. Characterization by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of magnetite nanoparticles supported on carbon paste electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Lopez, A.; Torres-Torres, D.; Mojica-Gomez, J.; Estrada-Arteaga, C. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, S. C., Parque Tecnologico Queretaro - Sanfandila, C.P. 76703, Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico); Antano-Lopez, R., E-mail: rantano@cideteq.mx [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, S. C., Parque Tecnologico Queretaro - Sanfandila, C.P. 76703, Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2011-09-30

    Magnetite nanoparticles were supported on carbon paste electrode and characterized by low scan rate voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to obtain mechanistic information related to its oxidation and reduction in acid media. The voltammograms showed only one reduction and one oxidation peak for the supported magnetite, which were attributed to formation of ferrous ion and ferric oxide, respectively. Both peaks are fairly wide, indicating complex mechanisms. Using EIS, a mechanism showing up to three time constants, capacitive all of them, was evidenced, both in anodic and cathodic domain. These were attributed to charge transfer at the highest frequencies, adsorption of generated species at intermediate frequencies, and proton adsorption at low frequencies. Discussion about the nature of the adsorbed species and the concerned mechanism for each domain is developed.

  3. Particle size effects in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis by Co catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Nakhaei Pour; Elham Hosaini; Mohammad Izadyar; Mohammad Reza Housaindokht

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Co particle size on the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) activity of carbon nanotube (CNT)-supported Co catalysts was investigated. Microemulsion (using water-to-surfactant molar ratios of 2 to12) and impregnation techniques were used to prepare catalysts with different Co particle sizes. Kinetic studies were performed to understand the effect of Co particle size on catalytic activity. Size-dependent kinetic parameters were developed using a thermodynamic method, to evaluate the structural sensitivity of the CNT-supported Co catalysts. The size-independent FTS reaction rate constant and size-independent adsorption parameter increased with increasing reac-tion temperature. The Polani parameter also depended on catalyst particle size, because of changes in the catalyst surface coverage.

  4. Wet catalyst-support films for production of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Noe T; Hamilton, Christopher E; Pint, Cary L; Orbaek, Alvin; Yao, Jun; Frosinini, Aldo L; Barron, Andrew R; Tour, James M; Hauge, Robert H

    2010-07-01

    A procedure for vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) production has been developed through liquid-phase deposition of alumoxanes (aluminum oxide hydroxides, boehmite) as a catalyst support. Through a simple spin-coating of alumoxane nanoparticles, uniform centimer-square thin film surfaces were coated and used as supports for subsequent deposition of metal catalyst. Uniform VA-CNTs are observed to grow from this film following deposition of both conventional evaporated Fe catalyst, as well as premade Fe nanoparticles drop-dried from the liquid phase. The quality and uniformity of the VA-CNTs are comparable to growth from conventional evaporated layers of Al(2)O(3). The combined use of alumoxane and Fe nanoparticles to coat surfaces represents an inexpensive and scalable approach to large-scale VA-CNT production that makes chemical vapor deposition significantly more competitive when compared to other CNT production techniques.

  5. Potential of Ni supported on clinoptilolite catalysts for carbon dioxide reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimwattanakul, Weetima; Luengnaruemitchai, Apanee; Jitkarnka, Sirirat [The Petroleum and Petrochemical College, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2006-01-15

    Carbon dioxide reforming of methane to synthesis gas has been investigated with Ni-supported clinoptilolite catalysts. The catalysts were prepared by using the incipient wetness impregnation method. The catalytic activity of Ni supported on clinoptilolite with varying Ni loadings was determined and the results showed that at 700{sup o}C, 8wt% Ni/clinoptilolite gave the highest activity. It exhibited not only the highest activity and selectivity but also remarkable stability. Moreover, both the activity and stability of this catalyst were observed to vary with the Zr content, exhibiting a maximum at a composition of 2% Zr. The amount of carbonaceous deposits on the spent catalysts was further investigated by temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) studies. (author)

  6. Enzyme-Mediated Hydrolysis of Poly(ethylene glycol)-Supported Carbonates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Matsumoto; M. Shimojo; M. Nogawa; M. Okudomi

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Enzymatic kinetic resolution of racemic alcohols or esters is known as a useful method for the preparation of optically active secondary alcohols. However, the work-up including the separation of the mixture of the remaining substrate and the resulting compound spend a lot of time and waste much amount of solvents. On the other hand, organic synthesis based on polymer supports has made rapid progress. Although the methodology is potentially useful for the easy separation of compounds obtained by the enzymatic reaction, there have been relatively few reports on enzymatic resolutions of using a polymer so far. We have noticed that using a watersoluble polymer could be suitable for enzymatic transformation. Here, we report the first example of an enzyme-mediated enantioselective hydrolysis of poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG)-supported substrates with a carbonate moiety to afford optically active compounds, and the method enables us to achieve the easy separation of the products[1]. See Scheme 1.

  7. Tungsten carbide modified high surface area carbon as fuel cell catalyst support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Minhua; Merzougui, Belabbes; Shoemaker, Krista; Stolar, Laura; Protsailo, Lesia; Mellinger, Zachary J.; Hsu, Irene J.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    Phase pure WC nanoparticles were synthesized on high surface area carbon black (800 m 2 g -1) by a temperature programmed reaction (TPR) method. The particle size of WC can be controlled under 30 nm with a relatively high coverage on the carbon surface. The electrochemical testing results demonstrated that the corrosion resistance of carbon black was improved by 2-fold with a surface modification by phase pure WC particles. However, the WC itself showed some dissolution under potential cycling. Based on the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, most of the WC on the surface was lost or transformed to oxides after 5000 potential cycles in the potential range of 0.65-1.2 V. The Pt catalyst supported on WC/C showed a slightly better ORR activity than that of Pt/C, with the Pt activity loss rate for Pt/WC/C being slightly slower compared to that of Pt/C. The performance and decay rate of Pt/WC/C were also evaluated in a fuel cell.

  8. Supporting Urban Planning of Low-Carbon Precincts: Integrated Demand Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Lehmann

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Waste is a symbol of inefficiency in modern society and represents misallocated resources. This paper outlines an on-going interdisciplinary research project entitled “Integrated ETWW demand forecasting and scenario planning for low-carbon precincts” and reports on first findings and a literature review. This large multi-stakeholder research project develops a shared platform for integrated ETWW (energy, transport, waste and water planning in a low-carbon urban future, focusing on synergies and alternative approaches to urban planning. The aim of the project is to develop a holistic integrated software tool for demand forecasting and scenario evaluation for residential precincts, covering the four domains, ETWW, using identified commonalities in data requirements and model formulation. The authors of this paper are overseeing the waste domain. A major component of the project will be developing a method for including the impacts of household behavior change in demand forecasting, as well as assessing the overall carbon impacts of urban developments or redevelopments of existing precincts. The resulting tool will allow urban planners, municipalities and developers to assess the future total demands for energy, transport, waste and water whilst in the planning phase. The tool will also help to assess waste management performance and materials flow in relation to energy and water consumption and travel behavior, supporting the design and management of urban systems in different city contexts.

  9. Sorption of cadmium in columns of sand-supported hydrothermally carbonized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minani, J M V; Foppen, J W; Lens, P N L

    2014-01-01

    Sanitation in urban slums, especially in countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, is a challenge. One of the solutions to sanitation is to valorize waste, and to convert bio-waste present in the slum in a cheap and affordable way into lignite via hydrothermal carbonization (HTC). HTC is simple, cheap, converts all carbon (100%), eliminates pathogens completely, and requires wet starting products/biomass, thereby avoiding complicated drying schemes. In this research, we investigated the effectiveness of removing a divalent metal-ion, cadmium, using equilibrium batch experiments and columns of sand-supported hydrothermally carbonized colloidal lignite (HTCCL) derived from sugar, maize, and grass. Our results indicated that equilibrium sorption could be best described by a Langmuir isotherm. The uptake capacity varied from 0.11 to 0.21 mg Cd/g HTC, dependent on the type of HTC used. These values were relatively low compared to other carbonaceous sorbents. However, removal efficiencies in column experiments were remarkably high: 70-100% during 20-24 pore volumes or bed volumes of flushing. We concluded that HTCCL is a promising sorbent that can be used to treat heavily polluted water and/or wastewater.

  10. Carbon-supported ionic liquids as innovative adsorbents for CO₂ separation from synthetic flue-gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erto, Alessandro; Silvestre-Albero, Ana; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Balsamo, Marco; Lancia, Amedeo; Montagnaro, Fabio

    2015-06-15

    Fixed-bed thermodynamic CO2 adsorption tests were performed in model flue-gas onto Filtrasorb 400 and Nuchar RGC30 activated carbons (AC) functionalized with [Hmim][BF4] and [Emim][Gly] ionic liquids (IL). A comparative analysis of the CO2 capture results and N2 porosity characterization data evidenced that the use of [Hmim][BF4], a physical solvent for carbon dioxide, ended up into a worsening of the parent AC capture performance, due to a dominating pore blocking effect at all the operating temperatures. Conversely, the less sterically-hindered and amino acid-based [Emim][Gly] IL was effective in increasing the AC capture capacity at 353 K under milder impregnation conditions, the beneficial effect being attributed to both its chemical affinity towards CO2 and low pore volume reduction. The findings derived in this work outline interesting perspectives for the application of amino acid-based IL supported onto activated carbons for CO2 separation under post-combustion conditions, and future research efforts should be focused on the search for AC characterized by optimal pore size distribution and surface properties for IL functionalization.

  11. Electrochemical durability of heat-treated carbon nanospheres as catalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Haifeng; Wu, Peng; Wan, Wei; Mu, Shichun

    2014-09-01

    Carbon nanospheres is wildly used to support noble metal nanocatalysts in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, however they show a low resistance to electrochemical corrosion. In this study, the N-doped treatment of carbon nanospheres (Vulcan XC-72) is carried out in ammonia gas. The effect of heating treatment (up to 1000 degrees C) on resistances to electrochemical oxidation of the N-doped carbon nanospheres (HNC) is investigated. The resistance to electrochemical oxidation of carbon supports and stability of the catalysts are investigated with potentiostatic oxidation and accelerated durability test by simulating PEM fuel cell environment. The HNC exhibit a higher resistance to electrochemical oxidation than traditional Vulcan XC-72. The results show that the N-doped carbon nanospheres have a great potential application in PEM fuel cells.

  12. Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Min; Hu, Yi-Qiang; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2010-07-15

    Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts were evaluated through the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent in a packed-bed reactor. Active carbon-ceramic sphere and ruthenium catalysts were characterized by N(2) adsorption and chemisorption measurements. BET surface area and total pore volume of active carbon (AC) in the active carbon-ceramic sphere increase with increasing KOH-to-carbon ratio, and AC in the sample KC-120 possesses values as high as 1100 m(2) g(-1) and 0.69 cm(3) g(-1) (carbon percentage: 4.73 wt.%), especially. Active carbon-ceramic sphere supported ruthenium catalysts were prepared using the RuCl(3) solution impregnation onto these supports, the ruthenium loading was fixed at 1-5 wt.% of AC in the support. The catalytic activity varies according to the following order: Ru/KC-120>Ru/KC-80>Ru/KC-60>KC-120>without catalysts. It is found that the 3 wt.% Ru/KC-120 catalyst displays highest stability in the CWAO of resin effluent during 30 days. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol removal were about 92% and 96%, respectively at the reaction temperature of 200 degrees C, oxygen pressure of 1.5 MPa, the water flow rate of 0.75 L h(-1) and the oxygen flow rate of 13.5 L h(-1).

  13. Effect of Co in the efficiency of the methanol electrooxidation reaction on carbon supported Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Fernandez, P.; Montiel, M.; Ocon, P. [Dpto. Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM), C/Francisco Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fierro, J.L.G.; Rojas, S. [Grupo de Energia y Quimica Sostenibles, Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/ Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Wang, H.; Abruna, H.D. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University. Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The effect of Co addition to carbon nanotubes supported Pt in the methanol oxidation reaction has been investigated by means of differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS). It has been observed that the CO{sub 2} efficiency increases in carbon nanotubes supported PtCo compared to its homologous Pt catalysts, especially at potentials lower than 0.55 V. Despite of this, the Faradaic current reached by the bimetallic catalysts in the methanol electrooxidation was lower than those recorded on the monometallic samples. This is because Co addition difficult finding enough Pt vicinal sites for methanol dehydrogenation. On the other hand, it has been found that alloying Pt with Co, shifts down the d-band center of the larger element, so the strength of the interaction with adsorbates decreases. Consequently, it will be easier to oxidize CO{sub ad} on the bimetallic surface. Furthermore, the necessary -OH{sub ad} species for the CO{sub ad} oxidation to CO{sub 2} will be provided by the CNTs themselves. (author)

  14. Carbon Supported Ag Nanoparticles as High Performance Cathode Catalyst for Anion Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le eXin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A solution phase-based nanocapsule method was successfully developed to synthesize non-precious metal catalyst - carbon supported Ag nanoparticles (Ag/C. XRD patterns and TEM image show Ag nanoparticles with a small average size (5.4 nm and narrow size distribution (2-9 nm are uniformly dispersed on the carbon black Vulcan XC-72 support. The intrinsic activity and pathway of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR on the Ag/C and commercial Pt/C were investigated using rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE tests at room temperature. The results confirmed that the 4-electron pathway of ORR proceeds on small Ag nanoparticles, and showed comparable ORR activities on the self-prepared Ag/C and a commercial Pt/C. A single H2-O2 anion exchange membrane fuel cell with the Ag/C cathode catalyst exhibited an open circuit potential of 0.98 V and a peak power density of 190 mW/cm2 at 80 oC.

  15. Enhanced activity and selectivity of carbon nanofiber supported Pd catalysts for nitrite reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Danmeng; Choe, Jong Kwon; Shapley, John R; Werth, Charles J

    2012-03-06

    Pd-based catalyst treatment represents an emerging technology that shows promise to remove nitrate and nitrite from drinking water. In this work we use vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports in order to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). Results show that nitrite reduction activity increases by 3.1-fold and selectivity decreases by 8.0-fold, with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size from 1.4 to 9.6 nm. Both activity and selectivity are not significantly influenced by Pd interior versus exterior CNF loading. Consequently, turnover frequencies (TOFs) among all CNF catalysts are similar, suggesting nitrite reduction is not sensitive to Pd location on CNFs nor Pd structure. CNF-based catalysts compare favorably to conventional Pd catalysts (i.e., Pd on activated carbon or alumina) with respect to nitrite reduction activity and selectivity, and they maintain activity over multiple reduction cycles. Hence, our results suggest new insights that an optimum Pd nanoparticle size on CNFs balances faster kinetics with lower ammonia production, that catalysts can be tailored at the nanoscale to improve catalytic performance for nitrite, and that CNFs hold promise as highly effective catalyst supports in drinking water treatment.

  16. Carbon-supported Pd-Pt cathode electrocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yongfu; Zhang, Huamin; Zhong, Hexiang; Xu, Ting; Jin, Hong

    A series of carbon-supported Pd-Pt alloy (Pd-Pt/C) catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with low-platinum content are synthesized via a modified sodium borohydride reduction method. The structure of as-prepared catalysts is characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements. The prepared Pd-Pt/C catalysts with alloy form show face-centered-cubic (FCC) structure. The metal particles of Pd-Pt/C catalysts with mean size of around 4-5 nm are uniformly dispersed on the carbon support. The electrocatalytic activities for ORR of these catalysts are investigated by rotating disk electrode (RDE), cyclic voltammetry (CV), single cell measurements and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) measurements. The results suggest that the electrocatalytic activities of Pd-Pt/C catalysts with low platinum are comparable to that of the commercial Pt/C with the same metal loading. The maximum power density of MEA with a Pd-Pt/C catalyst, the Pd/Pt mass ratio of which is 7:3, is about 1040 mW cm -2.

  17. Carbon-supported Pd-Ir catalyst as anodic catalyst in direct formic acid fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Tang, Yawen; Gao, Ying; Lu, Tianhong

    It was reported for the first time that the electrocatalytic activity of the Carbon-supported Pd-Ir (Pd-Ir/C) catalyst with the suitable atomic ratio of Pd and Ir for the oxidation of formic acid in the direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) is better than that of the Carbon-supported Pd (Pd/C) catalyst, although Ir has no electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of formic acid. The potential of the anodic peak of formic acid at the Pd-Ir/C catalyst electrode with the atomic ratio of Pd and Ir = 5:1 is 50 mV more negative than that and the peak current density is 13% higher than that at the Pd/C catalyst electrode. This is attributed to that Ir can promote the oxidation of formic acid at Pd through the direct pathway because Ir can decrease the adsorption strength of CO on Pd. However, when the content of Ir in the Pd-Ir/C catalyst is too high the electrocatalytic activity of the Pd-Ir/C catalyst would be decreased because Ir has no electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of formic acid.

  18. Synthesis of acetals and ketals catalyzed by tungstosilicic acid supported on active carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shui-jin; DU Xin-xian; HE Lan; SUN Ju-tang

    2005-01-01

    Catalytic activity of activated carbon supported tungstosilicic acidin synthesizing 2-methyl-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl1,3-dioxolane, 2,4-dimethyl-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-l,3-dioxolane, cyclohexanone ethylene ketal, cyclohexanone 1,2-propanediol ketal, butanone ethylene ketal, butanone 1,2-propanediol ketal, 2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolane, 4-methyl-2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolane,2-propyl-1,3-dioxolane, 4-methyl-2-propyl-1,3-dioxolane was reported. It has been demonstrated that activated carbon supported tungstosilicic acid is an excellent catalyst. Various factors involved in these reactions were investigated. The optimum conditions found were: molar ratio of aldehyde/ketone to glycol is 1/1.5, mass ratio of the catalyst used to the reactants is 1.0%, and reaction time is 1.0 h. Under these conditions, the yield of 2-methyl-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-l,3-dioxolane is 61.5%, of 2,4-dimethyl2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-1,3-dioxolane is 69.1%, of cyclohexanone ethylene ketal is 74.6%, of cyclohexanone 1,2-propanediol ketal is 80.1%, of butanone ethylene ketal is 69.5%, of butanone 1,2-propanediol ketal is 78.5%, of 2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolane is 56.7%, of 4-methyl-2-phenyl- 1,3-dioxolane is 86.2%, of 2-propyl-1,3-dioxolane is 87.5%, of 4-methyl-2-propyl-1,3-dioxolane is 87.9%.

  19. Photocatalytic degradation of L-acid by TiO2 supported on the activated carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-ping; WANG Lian-jun; PENG Pan-ying

    2006-01-01

    TiO2 sol was prepared by sol-gel technique with tetrabutyl titanate as precursor. Supported TiO2 catalysts on activated carbon were prepared by soak and sintering method. The aggregation of nano-TiO2 particles can be effectively suppressed by added polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a surface modifier. The average particle diameter of TiO2, specific surface area and absorbability of catalyst can be modified. Based on characteristics of the TiO2 photocatalyst with XRD, specific surface area, adsorption valves of methylene blue and the amount of TiO2 supported on the activated carbon, the photocatalytic degradation of L-acid was studied. The effect of the factors, such as pH of the solution, the initial concentration of L-acid on the photocatalytic degradation of L-acid, were studied also. It was found that when the pH of the solution is 1.95, the amount ofphotocatalyst is 0.5 g, the concentration of the L-acid solution is 1.34 × 10-3 mol/L and the illumination time is 7 h, the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of L-acid can reach 89.88%.The catalyst was reused 6 times and its degradation efficiency hardly changed.

  20. Enhanced Activity and Selectivity of Carbon Nanofiber Supported Pd Catalysts for Nitrite Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng

    2012-03-06

    Pd-based catalyst treatment represents an emerging technology that shows promise to remove nitrate and nitrite from drinking water. In this work we use vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports in order to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). Results show that nitrite reduction activity increases by 3.1-fold and selectivity decreases by 8.0-fold, with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size from 1.4 to 9.6 nm. Both activity and selectivity are not significantly influenced by Pd interior versus exterior CNF loading. Consequently, turnover frequencies (TOFs) among all CNF catalysts are similar, suggesting nitrite reduction is not sensitive to Pd location on CNFs nor Pd structure. CNF-based catalysts compare favorably to conventional Pd catalysts (i.e., Pd on activated carbon or alumina) with respect to nitrite reduction activity and selectivity, and they maintain activity over multiple reduction cycles. Hence, our results suggest new insights that an optimum Pd nanoparticle size on CNFs balances faster kinetics with lower ammonia production, that catalysts can be tailored at the nanoscale to improve catalytic performance for nitrite, and that CNFs hold promise as highly effective catalyst supports in drinking water treatment. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  1. Microstructure, Wear, and Corrosion Characteristics of TiC-Laser Surface Cladding on Low-Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Labban, Hashem F.; Mahmoud, Essam Rabea Ibrahim; Algahtani, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Laser cladding was used to produce surface composite layer reinforced with TiC particles on low-carbon steel alloy for improving the wear and corrosion resistances. The cladding process was carried out at powers of 2800, 2000, 1500, and 1000 W, and a fixed traveling speed of 4 mm/s. The produced layers are free from any cracks. Some of the TiC particles were melted and then re-solidified in the form of fine acicular dendrites. The amount of the melted TiC was increased by increasing the laser power. The hardness of the produced layers was improved by about 19 times of the base metal. Decreasing laser power led to hardness increment at the free surface. The improvement in wear resistance was reached to about 25 times (in case of 1500 W) of the base metal. Moreover, the corrosion resistance shows remarkable improvement after the laser treatment.

  2. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of ciprofloxacin in water with carbon nanotube supported manganese oxides as catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Minghao, E-mail: suiminghao.sui@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Xing, Sichu; Sheng, Li; Huang, Shuhang; Guo, Hongguang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ciprofloxacin in water was degraded by heterogeneous catalytic ozonation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx were supported on MWCNTs to serve as catalyst for ozonation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx/MWCNT exhibited highly catalytic activity on ozonation of ciprofloxacin in water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx/MWCNT resulted in effective antibacterial activity inhibition on ciprofloxacin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx/MWCNT promoted the generation of hydroxyl radicals. - Abstract: Carbon nanotube-supported manganese oxides (MnOx/MWCNT) were used as catalysts to assist ozone in degrading ciprofloxacin in water. Manganese oxides were successfully loaded on multi-walled carbon nanotube surfaces by simply impregnating the carbon nanotube with permanganate solution. The catalytic activities of MnOx/MWCNT in ciprofloxacin ozonation, including degradation, mineralization effectiveness, and antibacterial activity change, were investigated. The presence of MnOx/MWCNT significantly elevated the degradation and mineralization efficiency of ozone on ciprofloxacin. The microbiological assay with a reference Escherichia coli strain indicated that ozonation with MnOx/MWCNT results in more effective antibacterial activity inhibition of ciprofloxacin than that in ozonation alone. The effects of catalyst dose, initial ciprofloxacin concentration, and initial pH conditions on ciprofloxacin ozonation with MnOx/MWCNT were surveyed. Electron spin resonance trapping was applied to assess the role of MnOx/MWCNT in generating hydroxyl radicals (HO{center_dot}) during ozonation. Stronger 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide-OH signals were observed in the ozonation with MnOx/MWCNT compared with those in ozonation alone, indicating that MnOx/MWCNT promoted the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The degradation of ciprofloxacin was studied in drinking water and wastewater process samples to gauge the potential effects of water background matrix on

  3. Effect of the reaction time on the microstructure and porous texture of carbon materials obtained by chlorination of Ti(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})Cl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo-Pérez, D.J. [Centro de Investigación en Micro y Nanotecnología, Universidad Veracruzana, 94294, Boca del Río, Veracruz (Mexico); González-García, P., E-mail: pedro.gonzalez@cidesi.edu.mx [CONACYT Research Fellow – Centro de Ingeniería y Desarrollo Industrial, 76130, Querétaro, Querétaro (Mexico); Poisot, M. [Instituto de Química Aplicada, Universidad del Papaloapan, 68301, San Juan Bautista Tuxtepec, Oaxaca (Mexico); García-González, L. [Centro de Investigación en Micro y Nanotecnología, Universidad Veracruzana, 94294, Boca del Río, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Carbon materials have been obtained by the chlorination reaction of Ti(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})Cl{sub 2} at 900 °C, varying the reaction time at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min. The average microstructure, studied by X ray powder diffraction, suggest that these materials consist mainly of disordered carbon with low graphitization degree (from 13.5 to 16.5%). These results are in agreement with the Raman data since the D band (at ≈ 1350 cm{sup −1}) indicates that disordered carbon networks have appeared. The calculated in-plane correlation length increases from 4.04 to 4.70 nm as the chlorination time increases from 30 to 120 min. The textural analyses reveal adsorption isotherms type 1 with hysteresis H4, microporous areas as high as 855 m{sup 2}/g and pore volume of 0.55 cm{sup 3}/g. Additionally, an important contribution of mesoporosity, around 3.6 nm, was also detected. - Highlights: • Micro-mesoporous carbon materials were obtained by chlorination of Ti(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2} at 900 °C. • The effect of chlorination exposure time on the microstructure and textural properties was studied. • Microstructural analysis by XRD and Raman showed that carbon samples are mainly disordered. • N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms showed isotherms type 1 with hysteresis H4. • Micropore size increases at longer chlorination time; in contrast, pore volume decreases.

  4. Alcohol Synthesis over Pre-Reduced Activated Carbon-Supported Molybdenum-Based Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin L. Kugler

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon (AC-supported molybdenum catalysts, either with or without a potassium promoter, were prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method. The materials were characterized using differential thermal analysis (DTA and temperature programmed reduction (TPR, and were used for mixed alcohol synthesis from syngas (CO+H2. DTA results showed that a new phase, related to the interaction between Mo species and the AC support, is formed during the calcination of the Mo/AC catalyst, and the introduction of a K promoter has noticeable effect on the interaction. TPR results indicated that the Mo is more difficult to reduce after being placed onto the AC support, and the addition of a K promoter greatly promotes the formation of Mo species reducible at relatively low temperatures, while it retards the generation of Mo species that are reducible only at higher temperatures. These differences in the reduction behavior of the catalysts are atributed to the interaction between the active components (Mo and K and the support. Potassium-doping significantly promotes the formation of alcohols at the expense of CO conversion, especially to hydrocarbons. It is postulated that Mo species with intermediate valence values (averaged around +3.5 are more likely to be the active phase(s for alcohol synthesis from CO hydrogenation, while those with lower Mo valences are probably responsible for the production of hydrocarbons.

  5. Carbon-Supported Fe Catalysts for CO2 Electroreduction to High-Added Value Products: A DEMS Study: Effect of the Functionalization of the Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pérez-Rodríguez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vulcan XC-72R-supported Fe catalysts have been synthesised for the electroreduction of CO2 to high-added value products. Catalysts were obtained by the polyol method, using ethylene glycol as solvent and reducing agent. Prior to the metal deposition, Vulcan was subjected to different oxidation treatments in order to modify its surface chemistry and study its influence on the physicochemical and electrochemical properties of the catalysts, as well as on the product distribution. The oxidation treatments of the supports modify their textural properties, but do not affect significantly the physicochemical properties of catalysts. However, DEMS studies showed that the carbon support degradation, the distribution of products, and the catalytic activity toward the CO2 electroreduction reaction depend significantly on the surface chemistry of the carbon support.

  6. Selective Oxidation of Glycerol over Carbon-Supported AuPd Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchie,W.; Murayama, M.; Davis, R.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon-supported AuPd bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated as catalysts in the aqueous-phase selective oxidation of glycerol. The bimetallic catalysts were synthesized by two different methods. The first method involved the deposition of Au onto the surface of 3-nm supported Pd particles by catalytic reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} in aqueous solution by H{sub 2}. The second method used the formation of a AuPd sol that was subsequently deposited onto a carbon support. Characterization of the catalysts using analytical transmission electron microscopy, H{sub 2} titration, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Au L{sub III} and Pd K-edges confirmed that the first synthesis method successfully deposited Au onto the Pd particles. Results from the AuPd sol catalyst also revealed that Au was preferentially located on the surface. Measurement of glycerol oxidation rates (0.3 M glycerol, 0.6 M NaOH, 10 atm O{sub 2}, 333 K) in a semibatch reactor gave a turnover frequency (TOF) of 17 s{sup -1} for monometallic Au and 1 s{sup -1} for monometallic Pd, with Pd exhibiting a higher selectivity to glyceric acid. Although the activity of the bimetallic AuPd catalysts depended on the amount of Au present, none of them had a TOF greater than that of the monometallic Au catalyst. However, the AuPd catalysts had higher selectivity to glyceric acid compared with the monometallic Au. Because a physical mixture of monometallic Au and Pd catalysts also gave higher selectivity to glyceric acid, the Pd is proposed to catalyze the decomposition of the side product H{sub 2}O{sub 2} that is also formed over the Au but is detrimental to the selectivity toward glyceric acid.

  7. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media.

  8. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-19

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF MICROSTRUCTURE AND CONDUCTIVE MECHANISM OF HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE/CARBON BLACK PARTICLE COMPOSITE BY POSITRON ANNIHILATION LIFETIME SPECTROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang-mei Fan; Xian-fenga Zhang; Bang-jiao Ye; Xian-yi Zhou; Hui-min Weng; Jiang-feng Du; Rong-dian Han; Shao-jin Jia; Zhi-cheng Zhang

    2002-01-01

    The microstmcture and conductive mechanism of high density polyethylene/carbon black (HDPE/CB) composite were investigated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The PALS were measured in two series of samples,one with various CB contents in the composites and the other with various γ-irradiation doses in HDPE/CB composite containing 20 wt% CB. It was found that CB particles distribute in the amorphous regions, the CB critical content value in HDPE/CB composite is about 16.7 wt% and the suitable γ-irradiation dose for improving the conductive behavior of HDPE/CB composite is about 20 Mrad. The result observed for the second set of samples suggests that γ-irradiation causes not only cross-linking in amorphous regions but also destruction of the partial crystalline structure. Therefore, a suitable irradiation dose, about 20 Mrad, can induce sufficient cross-linking in the amorphous regions without enhancing the decomposition of crystalline structure, so that the positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect remains while the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) effect is suppressed. A new interpretation of the conductive mechanism, which might provide a more detailed explanation of the PTC effect and the NTC effect has been proposed.

  10. Light-Driven Preparation, Microstructure, and Visible-Light Photocatalytic Property of Porous Carbon-Doped TiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xin Zou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly porous carbon-doped TiO2 (C-TiO2 has been prepared, for the first time, through a light-driven approach using crystalline titanium glycolate (TG as the single-source precursor. Although the nonthermally prepared porous C-TiO2 is amorphous, it shows a remarkable visible-light photocatalytic activity higher than that of nitrogen-doped TiO2 (N-TiO2 due to its significant surface area (530 m2/g and pore-rich structure. X-ray photoelectron, electron paramagnetic resonance, and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy reveal that the as-prepared porous C-TiO2 photocatalyst contains Ti–O–C bonds which result in visible-light absorption of the material at wavelengths less than 550 nm. Furthermore, it is discovered that the Ti–O–C bonds in the as-prepared C-TiO2 is easily transformed to coke-type species under mild thermal treatment (200°C. The resulting coke-containing porous TiO2 is an even better visible-light photocatalyst, almost twice as effective as N-TiO2, because of its stronger visible-light absorption. The Ti–O–C and the coke-containing porous TiO2 materials follow two different mechanisms in the visible-light photocatalysis process for degradation of methylene blue.

  11. The Microstructure of Ni Layer on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by an Electroless Coating Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixue Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs, diameter: 2~3 nm, which were obtained in the suspension of purification solution, with Ni-P coating layers were obtained by an electroless deposition process. The SWNTs before and after coating were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS. An Ni-P layer on individual nanotube with thickness of 20 nm can be obtained after the deposition process. The X-ray diffraction (XRD and selected area electron diffraction (SAED analysis of Ni-P SWNTs before and after heat treatment show that the heat treatment caused the transformation of the amorphous Ni-P layer to the nanocrystalline Ni-P (crystalline Ni and Ni3P intermetallic compound layer. The XRD pattern of SWNTs with Ni-P layers after heat treatment revealed that the crystal structures of Ni in plating layer contained: hexagonal close-packed (hcp structure and face-centered cubic (fcc structure. The lattice parameters of Ni (fcc and Ni3P are larger than the bulk's, indicting that the lattice expansion has taken place. However, the lattice parameter of Ni (hcp has no difference from the bulk's.

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Dissimilar Friction Stir Weld between Austenitic Stainless Steel and Low Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Jafarzadegan; A.Abdollah-zadeh; A.H.Feng; T.Saeid; J.Shen; H.Assadi

    2013-01-01

    Dissimilar fusion welding of austenitic stainless steels to carbon steels has some metallurgical and technical problems.It was suggested that the solid-state nature of friction stir welding (FSW) can overcome these problems and produce a sound weld with reliable mechanical properties.In this study,plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by FSW at tool rotational speed of 600 r/min and welding speed of 50 mm/min.In the stir zone (SZ) of 304 stainless steel,the results showed a refined grain structure with some features of metadynamic recrystallization.In the SZ of st37 steel,the hot deformation of material in the austenite region produced small austenite grains.These grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite by cooling the material after FSW.The production of fine grains increased the hardness and tensile strength in the SZ of both sides with respect to their base metals (BMs).

  13. Fermentation as a first step in carbon and nutrient recovery in regenerative life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Amanda; Lasseur, Christophe; Rebeyre, Pierre; Clauwaert, Peter; Rabaey, Korneel; Ronsse, Frederik; Zhang, Dong Dong; López Barreiro, Diego; Prins, Wolter

    2016-07-01

    Long term manned space missions, such as the establishment of a base on Mars, will require a regenerative means of supplying the basic resources (i.e., food, water, oxygen) necessary to support human life. The MELiSSA-loop is a closed loop compartmentalized artificial aquatic ecosystem designed to recover water, carbon, and nutrients from solid organic wastes (e.g., inedible food waste and feces) for the regeneration of food and oxygen for humans. The first step in this loop is a strictly anaerobic fermentation unit operated as a membrane bioreactor. In this step the aim is to maximize the hydrolysis of complex organic compounds into simple molecules (CO2, ammonia, volatile fatty acids, …) which can be consumed by plants and bacteria downstream to produce food again. Optimal steady state fermentation of a standardized homogeneous mixture of beets, lettuce, wheat straw, toilet paper, feces, and water was demonstrated to recover approximately 50% of the influent carbon as soluble organics in the effluent through anaerobic fermentation. Approximately 10% of the influent COD was converted to CO2, with the remaining ~40% retained as a mixture of undigested solids and biomass. Approximately 50% of the influent nitrogen was recovered in the effluent, 97% of which was in the form of ammonia. Similar results have been obtained at both lab and pilot scale. With only 10% of the carbon driven to CO2 through this fermentation, a major challenge at this moment for the MELiSSA-loop is closing the carbon cycle, by completely oxidizing the carbon in the organic waste and non-edible parts of the plant into CO2 for higher plants and algae to fix again for food production. To further improve the overall degradation we are investigating the integration of a high temperature and pressure, sub- or near critical water conditions to improve the degradation of fibrous material with the addition of an oxidant (hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) under sub- or near critical conditions to further

  14. Strong Metal-Support Interaction: Growth of Individual Carbon Nanofibers from Amorphous Carbon Interacting with an Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei; Kuhn, Luise Theil

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the growth behavior of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). It mentions that CNFs can be synthesized using methods such as arc-discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition. It further states that CNFs can be grown from a physical mixing of amorphous carbon and CGO/Ni nanopar....../Ni nanoparticles, devoid of any gaseous carbon source and external heating and stimulated by an electron beam in a 300 kilo volt transmission electron microscope....

  15. Comparison on the micro-structure of three high-strength and middle-modilus pan-based carbon fiber%3种高强中模型PAN基碳纤维的微观结构比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    井敏; 谭婷婷; 王成国; 冯志海; 杨云华; 潘月秀

    2014-01-01

    The micro-structure of three kinds of high-strength and middle-modulus carbon fiber including two homemade carbon fibers and Toray carbon fibers T800 H were characterized by using scanning electron microscope,X-ray diffrac-tometer,transmission electron microscope and small angle X-ray scattering system.Their surface structure,fracture morphology,graphic micro-crystal structure and micro-pore size were compared.The results indicated that the surface structure of two homemade carbon fibers was better than T800 H.But other micro-structure of the homemade high-strength and middle-modulus carbon fibers had some differences with the Toray carbon fiber.The preparation technolo-gy of the homemade carbon fiber need further improvement.%采用扫描电子显微镜、X 射线衍射仪、透射电子显微镜、小角X射线散射仪对国产的两种高强中模型碳纤维与日本东丽 T800 H 碳纤维的结构进行表征,比较了它们的表面形貌、断面形貌、石墨微晶结构和微孔结构。结果表明,国产的高强中模型碳纤维的表面形貌优于日本 T800H,但在断面形貌、石墨微晶结构和微孔结构等微观结构上仍有一定差距,需从工艺上进行改进。

  16. Nanostructured carbon electrocatalyst supports for intermediate-temperature fuel cells: Single-walled versus multi-walled structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papandrew, Alexander B.; Elgammal, Ramez A.; Tian, Mengkun; Tennyson, Wesley D.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Geohegan, David B.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    It is unknown if nanostructured carbons possess the requisite electrochemical stability to be used as catalyst supports in the cathode of intermediate-temperature solid acid fuel cells (SAFCs) based on the CsH2PO4 electrolyte. To investigate this application, single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were used as supports for Pt catalysts in SAFCs operating at 250 °C. SWNH-based cathodes display greater maximum activity than their MWNT-based counterparts at a cell voltage of 0.8 V, but are unstable in the SAFC cathode as a consequence of electrochemical carbon corrosion. MWNT-based cells are resistant to this effect and capable of operation for at least 160 h at 0.6 V and 250 °C. Cells fabricated with nanostructured carbon supports are more active (52 mA cm-1vs. 28 mA cm-1 at 0.8 V) than state-of-the-art carbon-free formulations while simultaneously displaying enhanced Pt utilization (40 mA mgPt-1vs. 16 mA mgPt-1 at 0.8 V). These results suggest that MWNTs are a viable support material for developing stable, high-performance, low-cost air electrodes for solid-state electrochemical devices operating above 230 °C.

  17. Deformation microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Hughes, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Microstructural characterization and modeling has shown that a variety of metals deformed by different thermomechanical processes follows a general path of grain subdivision, by dislocation boundaries and high angle boundaries. This subdivision has been observed to very small structural scales...... of the order of 10 nm, produced by deformation under large sliding loads. Limits to the evolution of microstructural parameters during monotonic loading have been investigated based on a characterization by transmission electron microscopy. Such limits have been observed at an equivalent strain of about 10...

  18. Sapropel-based supports as novel macroporous carbon-mineral adsorbents for enzymatic active substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Kovalenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The novel macroporous carbon-mineral Sapropel supports were obtained from lacustrine sapropel silts of freshwater lakes by annealing of semi-coke in the inert atmosphere. The specific surface area of these supports varied from 10 to 100 m2/g, the total pore volume from 0.3 cm3/g till 1.6 cm3/g; macropores of diameters more than 2 µm were predominating. The Sapropel supports were studied for the adsorption/adhesion of enzymatic active substances, such as whole bacterial cells, and invertase-active fully destroyed baker's yeast cells (autolysates, and purified enzyme nitrilase. The heterogeneous biocatalysts with required enzymatic activity were prepared and their properties were studied in the corresponding bioconversion processes. The invertase-active biocatalysts exhibited high activity, 120–135 U/g, and stability; the half-times of their inactivation (t½ were more than 1000 h in the continuous process of sucrose hydrolysis at 50 °C. The nitrilase-active biocatalysts for “green” chemistry of nitriles possessed high activity, 350–500 U/g, and the t½ were estimated to be more than 100 h in the periodic process of hydration of acrylonitrile to acrylic acid at 22 °C.

  19. Economic Stability to Papua New Guinea by Contribution in Reducing Carbon Emissions through Support of DC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshan Ahuja,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Papua New Guinea is said to be PNG which is one of the most adversely affected small country by the impacts of climate change. Climate Change is one of the biggest challenges facing by them today, its devastation is widespread and intense. This issue has been discussed to evolve a method to support the nation in achieving the goal of emission reduction. The affects include those on Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry and Tourism which have major contribution towards GDP of the PNG. PNG has a very low economic growth rate according to several economic and social indicators, the performance of the PNG economy since independence has been disappointing. Thus, there is need of taking special attention & responsibilities by giving cooperation by the nations. This is to be done by especially developed ones so as to support the small island nations in adaptation to the impacts of climate change through financial support. Through this act, the Least Developed Countries will achieve economic stability as well as imparting in reduction of carbon emissions. This paper discusses to find a path and sort out the issue. The paper also discusses various negotiating points so as to achieve the said goal mutually and amicably.

  20. Sustainable Hypersaline Microbial Fuel Cells: Inexpensive Recyclable Polymer Supports for Carbon Nanotube Conductive Paint Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattieri, Matteo; Shivel, Nelson D; Sifat, Iram; Bestetti, Massimiliano; Minteer, Shelley D

    2017-02-28

    Microbial fuel cells are an emerging technology for wastewater treatment, but to be commercially viable and sustainable, the electrode materials must be inexpensive, recyclable, and reliable. In this study, recyclable polymeric supports were explored for the development of anode electrodes to be applied in single-chamber microbial fuel cells operated in field under hypersaline conditions. The support was covered with a carbon nanotube (CNT) based conductive paint, and biofilms were able to colonize the electrodes. The single-chamber microbial fuel cells with Pt-free cathodes delivered a reproducible power output after 15 days of operation to achieve 12±1 mW m(-2) at a current density of 69±7 mA m(-2) . The decrease of the performance in long-term experiments was mostly related to inorganic precipitates on the cathode electrode and did not affect the performance of the anode, as shown by experiments in which the cathode was replaced and the fuel cell performance was regenerated. The results of these studies show the feasibility of polymeric supports coated with CNT-based paint for microbial fuel cell applications.

  1. Comparison study of catalyst nanoparticle formation and carbon nanotube growth: Support effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunyu; Luo, Zhiquan; Li, Bin; Ho, Paul S.; Yao, Zhen; Shi, Li; Bryan, Eugene N.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2007-06-01

    A comparison study has been conducted on the formation of catalyst nanoparticles on a high surface tension metal and low surface tension oxide for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth via catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). Silicon dioxide (SiO2) and tantalum have been deposited as supporting layers before deposition of a thin layer of iron catalyst. Iron nanoparticles were formed after thermal annealing. It was found that densities, size distributions, and morphologies of iron nanoparticles were distinctly different on the two supporting layers. In particular, iron nanoparticles revealed a Volmer-Weber growth mode on SiO2 and a Stranski-Krastanov mode on tantalum. CCVD growth of CNTs was conducted on iron/tantalum and iron/SiO2. CNT growth on SiO2 exhibited a tip growth mode with a slow growth rate of less than 100nm /min. In contrast, the growth on tantalum followed a base growth mode with a fast growth rate exceeding 1μm/min. For comparison, plasma enhanced CVD was also employed for CNT growth on SiO2 and showed a base growth mode with a growth rate greater than 2μm /min. The enhanced CNT growth rate on tantalum was attributed to the morphologies of iron nanoparticles in combination with the presence of an iron wetting layer. The CNT growth mode was affected by the adhesion between the catalyst and support as well as CVD process.

  2. The effect of microstructure and texture evolution on mechanical properties of low-carbon steel processed by the continuous hybrid process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sun Kwang; Baek, Hyun Moo [National Research Laboratory for Computer Aided Materials Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Il-Heon [Wire Rod Research Group, Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, 1 Goedong-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-785 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Yong-Taek, E-mail: ytim@kaist.ac.kr [National Research Laboratory for Computer Aided Materials Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Chul Min [Wire Rod Research Group, Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, 1 Goedong-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-785 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the continuous hybrid process is newly designed and applied for producing grain-refined long and large cross-section wires of low-carbon steel at high speed at room temperature. The initial specimen, with a diameter of 13 mm, continuously passes through the rolls, equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) dies, and wire-drawing dies in sequence during the process. The specimens deformed by the continuous hybrid process without and with the wire-drawing dies were obtained to investigate the role in the deformation separately. Their microstructures, textures, and mechanical properties were investigated by optical microscopy (OM), electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD), tension, and Vickers micro-hardness tests and were compared with those for the case processed by the conventional wire-drawing process. According to the present investigation, the continuous hybrid process can more efficiently manufacture fine-grained wires with a strong shear texture in a continuous way than the conventional wire-drawing process can. In addition, the ultimate tensile strength value of the specimen processed by the continuous hybrid process was 23.9% higher, although the elongation was slightly lower than the one produced by the conventional wire-drawing process. The plastic deformation was mainly imposed by the ECAP dies, and the wire-drawing dies improve the dimensional accuracy and increase the local strain homogeneity in the continuous hybrid process. It is demonstrated that the continuous hybrid process might be beneficial in commercializing a continuous application of the severe plastic deformation process for producing grain-refined wires for industrial applications.

  3. Microstructure and property of diamond-like carbon films with Al and Cr co-doping deposited using a hybrid beams system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wei; Liu, Jingmao; Geng, Dongsen; Guo, Peng; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Qimin

    2016-12-01

    DLC films with weak carbide former Al and carbide former Cr co-doping (Al:Cr-DLC) were deposited by a hybrid beams system comprising an anode-layer linear ion beam source (LIS) and high power impulse magnetron sputtering using a gas mixture of C2H2 and Ar as the precursor. The doped Al and Cr contents were controlled via adjusting the C2H2 fraction in the gas mixture. The composition, microstructure, compressive stress, mechanical properties and tribological behaviors of the Al:Cr-DLC films were researched carefully using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, stress-tester, nanoindentation and ball-on-plate tribometer as function of the C2H2 fraction. The results show that the Al and Cr contents in the films increased continuously as the C2H2 fraction decreased. The doped Cr atoms preferred to bond with the carbon while the Al atoms mainly existed in metallic state. Structure modulation with alternate multilayer consisted of Al-poor DLC layer and Al-rich DLC layer was found in the films. Those periodic Al-rich DLC layers can effectively release the residual stress of the films. On the other hand, the formation of the carbide component due to Cr incorporation can help to increase the film hardness. Accordingly, the residual stress of the DLC films can be reduced without sacrificing the film hardness though co-doping Al and Cr atoms. Furthermore, it was found that the periodic Al-rich layer can greatly improve the elastic resilience of the DLC films and thus decreases the film friction coefficient and wear rate significantly. However, the existence of the carbide component would cause abrasive wear and thus deteriorate the wear performance of the films.

  4. A Data-Centered Collaboration Portal to Support Global Carbon-Flux Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Humphrey, Marty [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Beekwilder, Norm [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jackson, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Goode, Monte [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); van Ingen, Catharine [Microsoft. San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2009-04-07

    Carbon-climate, like other environmental sciences, has been changing. Large-scalesynthesis studies are becoming more common. These synthesis studies are often conducted by science teams that are geographically distributed and on datasets that are global in scale. A broad array of collaboration and data analytics tools are now available that could support these science teams. However, building tools that scientists actually use is hard. Also, moving scientists from an informal collaboration structure to one mediated by technology often exposes inconsistencies in the understanding of the rules of engagement between collaborators. We have developed a scientific collaboration portal, called fluxdata.org, which serves the community of scientists providing and analyzing the global FLUXNET carbon-flux synthesis dataset. Key things we learned or re-learned during our portal development include: minimize the barrier to entry, provide features on a just-in-time basis, development of requirements is an on-going process, provide incentives to change leaders and leverage the opportunity they represent, automate as much as possible, and you can only learn how to make it better if people depend on it enough to give you feedback. In addition, we also learned that splitting the portal roles between scientists and computer scientists improved user adoption and trust. The fluxdata.org portal has now been in operation for ~;;1.5 years and has become central to the FLUXNET synthesis efforts.

  5. A Data-Centered Collaboration Portal to Support Global Carbon-Flux Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Humphrey, Marty [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Beekwilder, Norm [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jackson, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Goode, Monte [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); van Ingen, Catharine [Microsoft. San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2009-04-07

    Carbon-climate, like other environmental sciences, has been changing. Large-scalesynthesis studies are becoming more common. These synthesis studies are often conducted by science teams that are geographically distributed and on datasets that are global in scale. A broad array of collaboration and data analytics tools are now available that could support these science teams. However, building tools that scientists actually use is hard. Also, moving scientists from an informal collaboration structure to one mediated by technology often exposes inconsistencies in the understanding of the rules of engagement between collaborators. We have developed a scientific collaboration portal, called fluxdata.org, which serves the community of scientists providing and analyzing the global FLUXNET carbon-flux synthesis dataset. Key things we learned or re-learned during our portal development include: minimize the barrier to entry, provide features on a just-in-time basis, development of requirements is an on-going process, provide incentives to change leaders and leverage the opportunity they represent, automate as much as possible, and you can only learn how to make it better if people depend on it enough to give you feedback. In addition, we also learned that splitting the portal roles between scientists and computer scientists improved user adoption and trust. The fluxdata.org portal has now been in operation for ~;;1.5 years and has become central to the FLUXNET synthesis efforts.

  6. Carbon fiber cloth supported interwoven WS2 nanosplates with highly enhanced performances for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xiao; Chi, Jing-Qi; Lu, Shan-Shan; Gou, Jian-Xia; Dong, Bin; Li, Xiao; Liu, Yan-Ru; Yan, Kai-Li; Chai, Yong-Ming; Liu, Chen-Guang

    2017-01-01

    The interwoven WS2 nanoplates supported on carbon fiber cloth (WS2/CFC) have been successfully synthesized by a facile solvothermal process. XRD and XPS confirm the formation of WS2/CFC. SEM images show the good dispersion of WS2 nanoplates with interwoven structures on the surface of CFC. Thanks to the 3D framework of CFC, WS2 nanoplates realize overall excellent-dispersion interwoven on the surface of CFC compared with pristine bulk WS2 with severe aggregation. Moreover, CFC not only serves as excellent conductive substrate to accelerate electron transport rate, but also contributes to the close combination between WS2 and CFC for long-term stability. The electrochemical measurements show that WS2/CFC exhibit a high specific capacitance of 399 F g-1 at 1.0 A g-1, demonstrating the obviously enhanced capability compared with pristine bulk WS2. Furthermore, WS2/CFC realizes ultra-stable cycling stability with 99% of retention of capacitance after 500 charge-discharge cycles. It may provide novel access of designing carbon-based transition metal disulfides composites for excellent super capacitive properties.

  7. Gas Phase Conversion of Carbon Tetrachloride to Alkyl Chlorides Catalyzed by Supported Ionic Liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Aijun; ZHANG Jinlong; LI Chunxi; MENG Hong

    2009-01-01

    An efficient way of converting carbon tetrachloride(CTC)to alkyl chlorides is reported,which uses the catalysts of ionic liquids supported on granular active carbon.The catalytic performance was evaluated in a temperature range of 120-200℃ and atmospheric pressure for different ionic liquids,namely 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride,1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride,hydrochloric salts of N-methylimidazole(MIm),pyridine and triethylamine,as well as bisulfate and dihydric phosphate of N-methylimidazole.On this basis,the reaction mechanism was proposed,and the influences of the reaction temperature and the attributes of ionic liquids were discussed.The overall reaction was assumed to be comprised of two steps,the hydrolysis of CTC and reaction of HCI with alcohols under acidic catalyst.The results indicate that the conversion of CTC increased monotonically with temperature and even approached 100% at 200 ℃,while the maximum selectivity to alkyl chlorides was obtained around 160 ℃.This reaction might be potentially applicable to the resource utilization of superfluous byproduct of CTC in the chloromethane industry.

  8. CO2 hydrogenation to hydrocarbons over iron nanoparticles supported on oxygen-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ly May Chew; Holger Ruland; Hendrik J Schulte; Wei Xia; Martin Muhler

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogenation of CO2 to hydrocarbons over iron nanoparticles supported on oxygenfunctionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes was studied in a fixed-bed U-tube reactor at 25 bar with a H2:CO2 ratio of 3. Conversion of CO2 was approximately 35% yielding C1-C5 products at 360°C with methane and CO as major products. The CO2 equilibrium conversion for temperatures in the range of 320° to 420°C was analysed by using CHEMCAD simulation software. Comparison between experimental and simulated degrees of CO2 conversion shows that reverse water gas shift equilibrium had been achieved in the investigated temperature range and that less than 47% of CO2 can be converted to CO at 420°C.

  9. Preparation of carbon supported Pt-P catalysts and its electrocatalytic performance for oxygen reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Juan [Institute of Chemical Power Sources, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Tang Yawen; Yang Gaixiu; Chen Yu [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Zhou Qun [Institute of Chemical Power Sources, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Lu Tianhong [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Zheng Junwei, E-mail: jwzheng@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Chemical Power Sources, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2011-05-15

    The carbon supported PtP (PtP/C) catalysts were synthesized from Pt(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and phosphorus yellow at the room temperature. The content of P in the PtP/C catalysts prepared with this method is high and the average size of the PtP particles is decreased with increasing the content of P. The electrocatalytic performances of the PtP/C catalysts prepared with this method for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are better than that of the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The promotion action of P for enhancing the electrocatalytic performance of the PtP/C catalyst for ORR is mainly due to that Pt and P form the alloy and then the electron density of Pt is decreased.

  10. Sulfonation of ordered mesoporous carbon supported Pd catalysts for formic acid electrooxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Gang; Tong, Hao; Liang, Yan-Yu; Li, Hu-Lin

    2009-09-15

    A novel supporting material containing benzenesulfonic acid (BSA) groups and ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) was first prepared by in situ radical polymerization of 4-styrenesulfonate and isoamyl nitrite under ambient conditions. Then, Pd nanoparticles were deposited on as-produced OMCs (f-OMCs) by the NaBH(4) reduction method. The structure and nature of the resulting composites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nitrogen adsorption-desorption. The results show that BSA groups are created and the texture and surface chemistry are altered, whereas the ordered porous structure is maintained. The electrocatalytic properties of the Pd/f-OMCs catalysts for formic acid oxidation (HCOOH) have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry methods, and excellent electrocatalytic activity can be observed.

  11. Alumina supported carbon composite material with exceptionally high defluoridation property from eggshell waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunge, Sneha; Thakre, Dilip; Kamble, Sanjay; Labhsetwar, Nitin; Rayalu, Sadhana

    2012-10-30

    A new alumina supported carbon composite material called "Eggshell Composite" (EC) was synthesized from eggshell waste as calcium source for selective fluoride adsorption from water. The effect of various synthesis parameters like eggshell (ES): Eggshell membrane (ESM) ratio, aluminium loading, mixing time and calcinations temperature to optimize the synthesis conditions for selective fluoride removal has been studied. It was observed that the synthesis parameters have significant influence on development of EC and in turn on fluoride removal capacity. EC synthesized was characterized for elemental composition, morphology, functionality and textural properties. Results showed that EC obtained from eggshell modified with alumina precursor is more selective and efficient for fluoride removal. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm were used to obtain ultimate fluoride removal capacity. The calcium and alumina species in EC shows synergistic effect in fluoride adsorption process. Fluoride sorption studies were carried out in synthetic, groundwater and wastewater. EC proved to be a potential, indigenous and economic adsorbent for fluoride removal.

  12. Study of carbon-supported bimetallic PtCu nanoparticles by ASAXS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, N. V.; Avakyan, L. A.; Pryadchenko, V. V.; Srabionyan, V. V.; Belenov, S. V.; Bugaev, L. A.

    2017-05-01

    Bimetallic platinum-copper nanoparticles on carbon support are studied as a perspective electrochemical catalyst by anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering near the Pt absorption L3-edge. The simultaneous fitting of several diffraction patterns measured at different photon energies lead to a satisfactory agreement between experimental and model curves in the assumption of core-shell structure of the particles with Pt-rich shell and Cu-rich core. It is shown that the average size of as prepared nanoparticles is about 6 nm with distribution spread of about ±2 nm and with thickness of Pt-rich shell approximately 1.6 nm. After annealing at 350o C the average size of the particles increased by two times with additional enlargement of the Pt-rich shell thickness.

  13. Kinetics of carbon monoxide oxidation over modified supported CuO catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loc, Luu Cam; Tri, Nguyen; Cuong, Hoang Tien; Thoang, Ho Si [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam). Inst. of Chemical Technology; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Gaidai, N.A.; Lapidus, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry

    2013-11-01

    The following supported on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts: 10(wt.)%CuO (CuAl), 10%CuO+10%Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} (CuCrAl) and 10%CuO+20%CeO{sub 2} (CuCeAl) were under the investigation. Physico-chemical characteristics of the catalysts were determined by the methods of BET, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and Temperature-Programmed Reduction (TPR). A strong interaction of copper with support in CuAl resulted in the formation of low active copper aluminates. The bi-oxide CuCrAl was more active than CuAl owing to the formation of high catalytically active spinel CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The fact of very high activity of the sample CuCeAl can be explained by the presence of the catalytically active form of CuO-CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The kinetics of CO total oxidation was studied in a gradientless flow-circulating system at the temperature range between 200 C and 270 C. The values of initial partial pressures of carbon monoxide (P{sup o}{sub CO}), oxygen (P{sup o}{sub O2}), and specially added carbon dioxide (P{sup o}{sub CO{sub 2}}) were varied in ranges (hPa): 10 / 45; 33 / 100, and 0 / 30, respectively. (orig.)

  14. Influence of different carbon nanostructures on the electrocatalytic activity and stability of Pt supported electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamatin, Serban Nicolae; Borghei, Maryam; Andersen, Shuang Ma;

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available graphitized carbon nanofibers and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, two carbon materials with very different structure, have been functionalized in a nitric–sulfuric acid mixture. Further on, the materials have been platinized by a microwave assisted polyol method. The relative...... that the functionalization improves the stability for multi-walled carbon nanotubes, at the cost of decreased activity....

  15. Nitrogen: Unraveling the Secret to Stable Carbon-Supported Pt-Alloy Electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    electrolyte fuel cells, state-of-the-art elec- trocatalysts made from high surface area carbon materials decorated with a precious-metal nanoparticle phase o...carbon-matrix materials utilized in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), including Pt-based cath- odes...the doping of various forms of carbon including but not limited to graphene sheets, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, carbon nanotubes, carbon

  16. Graphene supported Sn-Sb rate at carbon core-shell particles as a superior anode for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shuangqiang; Chen, Peng; Wang, Yong [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University (China); Wu, Minghong; Pan, Dengyu [Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, Shanghai Univ. (China)

    2010-10-15

    This paper reports the preparation and Li-storage properties of graphene nanosheets(GNS), GNS supported Sn-Sb rate at carbon (50-150 nm) and Sn-Sb nanoparticles (5-10 nm). The best cycling performance and excellent high rate capabilities were observed for GNS-supported Sn-Sb rate at carbon core-shell particles, which exhibited initial capacities of 978, 850 and 668 mAh/g respectively at 0.1C, 2C and 5C (1C = 800 mA/g) with good cyclability. Besides the GNS support, the carbon skin around Sn-Sb particles is believed to be a key factor to improve electrochemical properties of Sn-Sb. (author)

  17. IMBER (Integrated Marine Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Research: Support of Ocean Carbon Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimetz-Planchon, J.; Gattuso, J.; Maddison, L.; Bakker, D. C.; Gruber, N.

    2011-12-01

    IMBER (Integrated Marine Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Research), co-sponsored by SCOR (Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research) and IGBP (International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme), coordinates research that focuses on understanding and predicting changes in oceanic food webs and biogeochemical cycles that arise from global change. An integral part of this overall goal is to understand the marine carbon cycle, with emphasis on changes that may occur as a result of a changing climate, increased atmospheric CO2 levels and/or reduced oceanic pH. To address these key ocean carbon issues, IMBER and SOLAS (Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Study), formed the joint SOLAS-IMBER Carbon, or SIC Working Group. The SIC Working Group activities are organised into three sub-groups. Sub-group 1 (Surface Ocean Systems) focuses on synthesis, instrumentation and technology development, VOS (Voluntary Observing Ships) and mixed layer sampling strategies. The group contributed to the development of SOCAT (Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas, www.socat.info), a global compilation of underway surface water fCO2 (fugacity of CO2) data in common format. It includes 6.3 million measurements from 1767 cruises from 1968 and 2008 by more than 10 countries. SOCAT will be publically available and will serve a wide range of user communities. Its public release is planned for September 2011. SOCAT is strongly supported by IOCCP and CARBOOCEAN. Sub-group 2 (Interior Ocean Carbon Storage) covers inventory and observations, natural variability, transformation and interaction with modelling. It coordinated a review of vulnerabilities of the decadal variations of the interior ocean carbon and oxygen cycle. It has also developed a plan to add dissolved oxygen sensors to the ARGO float program in order to address the expected loss of oxygen as a result of ocean warming. The group also focuses on the global synthesis of ocean interior carbon observations to determine the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 since

  18. Oxidation of CO and Methanol on Pd-Ni Catalysts Supported on Different Chemically-Treated Carbon Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Calderón

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, palladium-nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers were synthesized, with metal contents close to 25 wt % and Pd:Ni atomic ratios near to 1:2. These catalysts were previously studied in order to determine their activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction. Before the deposition of metals, the carbon nanofibers were chemically treated in order to generate oxygen and nitrogen groups on their surface. Transmission electron microscopy analysis (TEM images revealed particle diameters between 3 and 4 nm, overcoming the sizes observed for the nanoparticles supported on carbon black (catalyst Pd-Ni CB 1:2. From the CO oxidation at different temperatures, the activation energy Eact for this reaction was determined. These values indicated a high tolerance of the catalysts toward the CO poisoning, especially in the case of the catalysts supported on the non-chemically treated carbon nanofibers. On the other hand, apparent activation energy Eap for the methanol oxidation was also determined finding—as a rate determining step—the COads diffusion to the OHads for the catalysts supported on carbon nanofibers. The results here presented showed that the surface functional groups only play a role in the obtaining of lower particle sizes, which is an important factor in the obtaining of low CO oxidation activation energies.

  19. Transition metal-modified polyoxometalates supported on carbon as catalyst in 2-(methylthio)-benzothiazole sulfoxidation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Romina A Frenzel; Gustavo P Romanelli; Mirta N Blanco; Luis R Piz

    2015-01-01

    Polyoxometalates with lacunary Keggin structure modified with transition metal ions [PW11O39M(H2O)]5−, where M = Ni2+, Co2+, Cu2+ or Zn2+, were synthesized and supported on activated carbon to obtain the PW11MC catalysts. Using FT-IR and DTA-TGA it was concluded that the [PW11O39M(H2O)]5− species are interacting with the functional groups of the support, and that thermal treatment leads to the loss of the coordinatively bonded water molecules without any noticeable anion degradation. The activity and selectivity of the catalysts in the sulfoxidation reaction of 2-(methylthio)-benzothiazole, an emerging environmental pollutant, were evaluated. The reaction was carried out in acetonitrile as solvent using H2O2 35% p/v as a clean oxidant. The conversion values decreased in the following order: PW11NiC > PW11CuC > PW11CoC > PW11ZnC, with selectivity to sulfoxide higher than 69%. The catalyst could be reused without appreciable loss of the catalytic activity at least three times. The materials were found to be efficient and recyclable catalysts for 2-(methylthio)-benzothiazole sulfoxidation in order to obtain a more biodegradable product than the corresponding substrate.

  20. Graphene oxide vs. reduced graphene oxide as carbon support in porphyrin peroxidase biomimetic nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United St