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Sample records for carbon steel exposed

  1. Corrosion of austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, L.; Anderson, M.; Taylor, D.; Allen, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Oxidation is the primary corrosion phenomenon for the steels exposed to S-CO 2 . → The austenitic steels showed significantly better corrosion resistance than the ferritic-martensitic steels. → Alloying elements (e.g., Mo and Al) showed distinct effects on oxidation behavior. - Abstract: Supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) is a potential coolant for advanced nuclear reactors. The corrosion behavior of austenitic steels (alloys 800H and AL-6XN) and ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels (F91 and HCM12A) exposed to S-CO 2 at 650 deg. C and 20.7 MPa is presented in this work. Oxidation was identified as the primary corrosion phenomenon. Alloy 800H had oxidation resistance superior to AL-6XN. The FM steels were less corrosion resistant than the austenitic steels, which developed thick oxide scales that tended to exfoliate. Detailed microstructure characterization suggests the effect of alloying elements such as Al, Mo, Cr, and Ni on the oxidation of the steels.

  2. Inhibiting pitting corrosion in carbon steel exposed to dilute radioactive waste slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.E.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Dilute caustic high-level radioactive waste slurries can induce pitting corrosion in carbon steel. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests were conducted in simulated and actual waste solutions to determine minimum concentrations of sodium nitrate which inhibit pitting in ASTM A537 class 1 steel exposed to these solutions. Susceptibility to pitting was assessed through microscopic inspection of specimens and inspection of polarization scans. Long-term coupon immersion tests were conducted to verify the nitrite concentrations established by the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests. The minimum effective nitrite concentration is expressed as a function of the waste nitrate concentration and temperature

  3. Electrochemical corrosion of carbon steel exposed to biodiesel/simulated seawater mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Wei [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Department of Civil Engineering, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); Jenkins, Peter E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); Ren Zhiyong, E-mail: zhiyong.ren@ucdenver.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO 80217 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterized the unique corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in the biodiesel/seawater environment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Illustrated the in situ anode and cathode distribution using a wire beam electrode approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elucidated the corrosion mechanisms based on ion transfer and oxygen concentration gradient. - Abstract: The electrochemical corrosion of carbon steel exposed to a mixture of biodiesel and 3.5% NaCl solution simulated seawater was characterized using wire beam electrode (WBE) technique. Both optical images and in situ potential and current measurements showed that all the anodes and most cathodes formed in the water phase, but the cathodes were mainly located along the water/biodiesel interface. Due to oxygen concentration gradient and cross-phase ion transfer, low corrosion currents were also detected in biodiesel phase. Further anode reaction was partially blocked by iron rust, but the alkali residual in biodiesel may interact with corrosion and deteriorate biodiesel quality.

  4. Characterization of Corrosion Products on Carbon Steel Exposed to Natural Weathering and to Accelerated Corrosion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Altobelli Antunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to compare the corrosion products formed on carbon steel plates submitted to atmospheric corrosion in urban and industrial atmospheres with those formed after accelerated corrosion tests. The corrosion products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The specimens were exposed to natural weathering in both atmospheres for nine months. The morphologies of the corrosion products were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The main product found was lepidocrocite. Goethite and magnetite were also found on the corroded specimens but in lower concentrations. The results showed that the accelerated test based on the ASTM B117 procedure presented poor correlation with the atmospheric corrosion tests whereas an alternated fog/dry cycle combined with UV radiation exposure provided better correlation.

  5. Mechanism of pitting corrosion prevention by nitrite in carbon steel exposed to dilute salt solutions. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.E.; Zee, J. van.

    1998-01-01

    'The overall goal of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the role of nitrite in preventing the breakdown of protective oxide(s) on carbon steel and the onset of pitting. Pitting corrosion of carbon steel exposed to dilute alkaline salt solutions can be induced by nitrate, sulfate, and chloride ions and is prevented by sufficient concentration of nitrite. A significant example of this material/electrolyte system is the storage and processing of DOE''s high-level radioactive liquid waste in carbon steel tanks. Added nitrite in the waste has a considerable downstream impact on the immobilization of the waste in a stable glass form. Waste tank integrity and glass production efficiency may benefit from the fundamental understanding of nitrite''s role in preventing pitting. This report summarizes progress after approximately six months of effort in this three-year EMSP project. Initial experimental and theoretical work has focused on the electrochemical behavior of carbon steel in simplified non-radioactive solutions that simulate complex dilute radioactive waste solutions. These solutions contain corrosion-inducing species such as nitrate and chloride and the corrosion-inhibiting nitrite at moderately alkaline pHs. The electrochemical behavior of interest here is that of the open-circuit potential of the steel specimen at equilibrium in the experimental electrolyte and the measures of the steel''s passivity and passivity breakdown.'

  6. Effect of nitrite concentration on pit depth in carbon steel exposed to simulated radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    The growth of pits in carbon steel exposed to dilute (0.055 M nitrate-bearing) alkaline salt solutions that simulate radioactive waste was investigated in coupon immersion tests. Most coupons were tested in the as-received condition, with the remainder having been heat treated to produce an oxide film. Nitrite, which is an established pitting inhibitor in these solutions, was present in concentrations from 0 to 0.031 M to 0.16 M; the last concentration is known to prevent pitting initiation in the test solution at the 50 degrees C test temperature. The depths of the deepest pits on coupons of particular exposure conditions were measure microscopically and were analyzed as simple, type 1 extreme value statistical distributions, to predict the deepest expected pit in a radioactive waste tank subject to the test conditions. While the growth rate of pits could not be established from these tests, the absolute value of the deepest pits predicted is of the order of 100 mils after 448 days of exposure. The data indicate that even nitrite concentrations insufficient to prevent pitting have a beneficial effect on limiting the growth of deepest pits

  7. The effect of β-FeOOH on the corrosion behavior of low carbon steel exposed in tropic marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yuantai; Li Ying; Wang Fuhui

    2008-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion performance of carbon steel exposed in Wanning area, which located in the south part of China with tropic marine environment characters, was studied at different exposure periods (up to 2 years). To investigate the effect of β-FeOOH on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in high chloride ion environment, rust layer was analyzed by using infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and the rusted steel was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method. The weight loss test indicated that the corrosion rate of carbon steel sharply increased during 6 months' exposure and gradually reduced after longer exposure. The results of rust analysis revealed that the underlying corrosion performance of the carbon steel was dependent on the inherent properties of the rust layers formed under different conditions such as composition and structure. Among all the iron oxide, β-FeOOH exerted significant influence. The presence of a monolayer of the rust as well as β-FeOOH accelerated the corrosion process during the initial exposure stage. EIS data implied that β-FeOOH in the inner layer was gradually consumed and transformed to γ-Fe 2 O 3 in the wet-dry cycle, which was beneficial to protect the substrate and reduced the corrosion rate

  8. Mechanism of Pitting Corrosion Prevention by Nitrite in Carbon Steel Exposed to Dilute Salt Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, Philip E.; Zee, John W. van

    2002-01-01

    The research has developed a broad fundamental understanding of the inhibition action of nitrite ions in preventing nitrate pitting corrosion of carbon steel tanks containing high-level radioactive waste. This fundamental understanding can be applied to specific situations during waste removal for permanent disposition and waste tank closure to ensure that the tanks are maintained safely. The results of the research provide the insight necessary to develop solutions that prevent further degradation

  9. Pitting growth rate in carbon steel exposed to simulated radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.E.

    1995-01-01

    Dilute high-level radioactive waste slurries can induce pitting corrosion in carbon steel tanks in which such waste is stored and processed. The waste is normally maintained with closely monitored nitrite and hydroxide concentrations known to prevent the initiation of pitting. Coupon immersion are being conducted in laboratory simulants of waste to determine the probability and growth rate of pitting in steel in the event of below-limits nitrite concentrations. Sets of about 36 carbon steel coupons have been immersed in known corrosive conditions (nitrite < 5% of the established limit) at a temperature of 50 C. Three sets have been removed from testing after 64, 150, and 350 days of immersion. The long immersion times introduced variability in the exposure conditions due to the evaporation and replenishment of solution. The deepest corrosive attack was measured one each coupon by optical microscopy. The deepest pits were ranked and analyzed as a type 1 extreme value distribution to extrapolate from the coupon population to the maximum pit depths in a waste tank structure. The data were compared to a power law for pit growth, although the deepest pits did not increase monotonically with time in the limited data set

  10. Pitting growth rate in carbon steel exposed to simulated radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.E.

    1996-06-01

    Dilute high-level radioactive waste slurries can induce pitting corrosion in carbon steel tanks in which such waste is stored and processed. The waste is normally maintained with closely monitored nitrite and hydroxide concentrations known to prevent the initiation of pitting. Coupon immersion tests are being conducted in laboratory simulants of waste to determine the probability and growth rate of pitting in steel in the event of out-of-limits nitrite concentrations. Sets of about 36 carbon steel coupons have been immersed in known corrosive conditions (nitrite < 5 per cent of the established limit) at a temperature of 50 degrees C. Three sets have been removed from testing after 64, 150, and 350 days of immersion. The long immersion times introduced variability in the exposure conditions due to the evaporation and replenishment of solution. The deepest corrosive attack was measured on each coupon by optical microscopy. The deepest pits were ranked and analyzed as a type 1 extreme value distribution to extrapolate from the coupon population to the maximum expected pit depths in a waste tank structure. The data were compared to a power law for pit growth, although the deepest pits did not increase monotonically with time in the limited data set

  11. Strong tough low-carbon bainite structural steels exposed to heat treatment and mechanical working

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauprecht, W.; Imgrund, H.; Coldren, P.

    1975-01-01

    A review of results of studying the mechanical properties and structure of extremely strong construction low-pearlite and pearlite-free steels subjected to thermomechanical processing (TMP) is presented. The development of TMP of low-pearlite and pearlite-free steels has led to creation of steel of the following composition: 0.06% of C; 1.8% of Mn; 0.3% of Mo; 0.05-0.09% of Nb. Depending on the kind of TMP the most important parameters of which are the temperature of the termination of rolling and the total deformation below 900 deg C, transformation in these steels occurs partially or completely in the intermediate domain. The increased density of dislocations of beinite structure affects substantially the increase in the yield limit. High degrees of squeezing at temperatures below 870 deg C promote formation of ferrite nuclei. The laboratory rolling demonstrates that by selecting the conditions of TMP one can control the mechanical properties of a steel. The sheets of 13 mm thick allow to obtain the guaranteed values of the yield limit of 70 kgf/mm 2 the transition temperature T 50 = -25 deg C, whereas after rolling under different conditions the low-temperature limit of cold shortness is - 125 deg C, and the yield limit - 45 kgf/mm 2 . As followed from the estimate of numerous industrial experiments, with sheets 20 mm thick in hot-rolled state one can obtain the yield limit no less than 50 kgf/mm 2 . On rolling mills that make possible to produce large deformation at low temperature these values can be increased. For instance, with sheets 30 mm thick one can obtain the yield limit of 56 kgf/mm 2 and the transition temperature of - 60 deg C. The dependence of the yield limit on the holding time in steel tempering is given. The steel possesses a considerable reserve of the increase of strength due to dispersion hardening, which after tempering at 600-625 deg C constitutes 8-12 kgf/mm 2 . Because of low carbon content, this steel is characterized by good

  12. On the Rust Products Formed on Weathering and Carbon Steels Exposed to Chloride in Dry-Wet Cyclical Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, K. E.; Morales, A. L.; Barrero, C. A.; Greneche, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    The rust products formed on weathering and carbon steels exposed to dry-wet cyclical processes in different chloride-rich solutions are carefully examined by means of different techniques. Special emphasis is given to the methodology of analysis of the data using 300 K and 77 K Moessbauer spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The rust that is loosely bound to the metal surface and that it is lost during the corrosion process, for both types of steel, was found to be composed of lepidocrocite, superparamagnetic goethite, hematite, and traces of akaganeite. On the other hand, the adherent rust, which is differentiated as scraped and hit according to the way it is obtained, from both steels was found to be composed of akaganeite, spinel phase, goethite exhibiting broad distribution of particle sizes and lepidocrocite. The relative abundances of rust components for both steels were very similar, suggesting similar corrosion processes. Mass loss measurements show that the corrosion rates increases with increasing the chloride concentration. The presence of large quantities of spinel phase and akaganeite are a consequence of a corrosion process under the influence of very high chloride concentrations. Our results are useful for assessing the behavior of weathering steels where the levels of chlorides are high or in contact with sea water.

  13. Evaluation of protective effect of deposits formed by naphthenic corrosion and sulfidation on carbon steel and steel 5Cr-0.5Mo exposed in atmospheric distillation fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Duarte

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Refining of so-called opportunity crude oils with a high level of naphthenic acids and sulfur compounds has been increasing interest due to limited availability of light crude oils, however, considerable corrosive effects in the processing to high temperature on pipes and distillation towers mainly by the attack of naphthenic acids and sulfur compounds; sulfur compounds could be corrosive or can reduce the attack of naphthenic acids due to the formation of sulfides layers on the metal surface. In this work was evaluated the performance of deposits formed on the surface of carbon steel AISI SAE 1020 and 5% Cr-0.5% Mo steel exposed in crude oil fractions obtained from atmospheric distillation tower. For this, gravimetric tests were performed in dynamic autoclave using metal samples pre-treated in a crude oil fraction obtained from the atmospheric distillation tower of the Crude Distillation Unit (CDU # 1 in order to form layers of sulfides on the surface of the two materials and subsequently to expose pre-treated and non-pretreated samples in two different crude oil fractions obtained from atmospheric distillation tower of Crude Distillation Unit (CDU # 2. The evaluation showed that the samples pretreated decreased tendency to corrosion by naphthenic acids and sulfidation compared to untreated samples.

  14. Fundamental Studies on the Electrochemical Behaviour of Carbon Steel Exposed in Sulphide and Sulphate-Reducing Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    The aim of the report is to give a fundamental understanding of the response of different electrochemical techniques on carbon steel in a sulphide environment as well as in a biologically active sulphate-reducing environment (SRB). This will form the basis for further studies and for recommendati......The aim of the report is to give a fundamental understanding of the response of different electrochemical techniques on carbon steel in a sulphide environment as well as in a biologically active sulphate-reducing environment (SRB). This will form the basis for further studies...

  15. Formation of Biofilms and Biocorrosion on AISI-1020 Carbon Steel Exposed to Aqueous Systems Containing Different Concentrations of a Diesel/Biodiesel Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanilda Ramos de Melo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental and economic concerns accelerated biofuels research and industrial production. Many countries have been using diesel and biodiesel blends as fuels justifying research on biofilms formation and metals corrosion. Cylinders made of AISI-1020 carbon steel with an exposed area of 1587 mm2, water, and water associated with B3 fuel (diesel/biodiesel blend at 97 : 3 v/v were used.The formation of biofilms was detected, and biocorrosion was detected on AISI-1020. The results showed a variation in sessile microflora during the experiments. In the biofilms, a significant concentration of aerobic, anaerobic, IOB, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and sulfate-reducing bacteria was observed. The corrosion rates varied between 0.45±0.01 and 0.12±0.01 mm/year, depending on the experimental conditions. The main corrosion products identified were various forms of FeOOH, magnetite, and all forms of FexSy. In systems where there were high levels of sulfate reducing bacteria, corrosion pits were observed. In addition, the aliphatic hydrocarbons present in the fluid containing 10% B3 were totally degraded.

  16. Corrosion behavior of carbon steel exposed for long time to an inoculation medium of sulfate-reducing bacteria; Ryusan`en kangenkin ga seisokusuru baichi ni chokikan shinshinshita tansoko no fushoku kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, F.; Suzuki, T. [Ajinomoto Co. Inc., Kawasaki (Japan). Technology and Engineering Lab.; Seo, M. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering

    1996-10-15

    In this paper, carbon steel was exposed more than six weeks to an inoculation medium of the sulfate-reducing bacteria in which the Fe{sup 2+} concentration was adjusted to a fixed value, the corrosion behavior of carbon steel was investigated by measuring the weight change and surface analysis using EPMA. As a result, the conclusions were obtained as follows: in the case of the medium with high Fe{sup 2+} concentration, the corrosion rate reached a maximum. In this case, the corrosion rate was suppressed to be low during the exposure for up to three weeks, and was increased above four weeks. The corrosion rate became 0.06 mm year{sup -1} by extrapolating the weight loss during the exposure up to six weeks. This value was higher than the average corrosion rate of carbon steel in a neutral solution with deaeration. It was shown from the analysis results using the EPMA that the FeS scale area covered on the surface of carbon steel would act as a cathode, and the other area would act as an anode. The formation of a scale effectively acting as a cathode depended on the exposure time and the formation of FeS in the medium. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep groundwater environment

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    Pauliina eRajala

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The metallic low and intermediate level radioactive waste generally consists of carbon steel and stainless steels. The corrosion rate of carbon steel in deep groundwater is typically low, unless the water is very acidic or microbial activity in the environment is high. Therefore, the assessment of microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep bedrock environment has become important for evaluating the safety of disposal of radioactive waste. Here we studied the corrosion inducing ability of indigenous microbial community from a deep bedrock aquifer. Carbon steel coupons were exposed to anoxic groundwater from repository site 100 m depth (Olkiluoto, Finland for periods of three and eight months. The experiments were conducted at both in situ temperature and room temperature to investigate the response of microbial population to elevated temperature. Our results demonstrate that microorganisms from the deep bedrock aquifer benefit from carbon steel introduced to the nutrient poor anoxic deep groundwater environment. In the groundwater incubated with carbon steel the planktonic microbial community was more diverse and 100-fold more abundant compared to the environment without carbon steel. The betaproteobacteria were the most dominant bacterial class in all samples where carbon steel was present, whereas in groundwater incubated without carbon steel the microbial community had clearly less diversity. Microorganisms induced pitting corrosion and were found to cluster inside the corrosion pits. Temperature had an effect on the species composition of microbial community and also affected the corrosion deposits layer formed on the surface of carbon steel.

  18. A Study on the Corrosion Behavior of Carbon Steel Exposed to a H2S-Containing NH4Cl Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-bo; Li, Yun; Cheng, Guang-xu; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yao-heng

    2018-04-01

    NH4Cl corrosion failure often occurs in the overhead systems of hydrotreaters, and this failure is always accompanied by the appearance of H2S. A combination of electrochemical and surface spectroscopic (SEM/EDS, AFM, XRD) techniques was used to investigate the effect of different factors, including the surface roughness, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and H2S concentration, on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in an NH4Cl environment with the presence of H2S. The effect of H2S concentrations (at the ppm level) on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel was systematically revealed. The experimental results clearly indicated that the corrosion rate reached a minimum value at 10 ppm H2S. The steel surface was covered by a uniform corrosion product film in a 10 ppm H2S environment, and the corrosion product film was tight and protective. The ammonia from NH4Cl helped maintaining the protectiveness of the corrosion films in this environment. Dissolved oxygen mainly accelerated the cathodic reaction. The cathodic limiting current density increased with increasing temperature, and the anodic branch polarization curves were similar at different temperatures. The anodic current density decreased as the pH decreased, and the cathodic current density increased as the pH decreased. The absolute surface roughness (R a) of carbon steel increased from 132.856 nm at 72 h to 153.973 nm at 144 h, and the rougher surface resulted in a higher corrosion rate. The critical innovation in this research was that multiple influential factors were revealed in the NH4Cl environment with the presence of H2S.

  19. A Study on the Corrosion Behavior of Carbon Steel Exposed to a H2S-Containing NH4Cl Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-bo; Li, Yun; Cheng, Guang-xu; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yao-heng

    2018-05-01

    NH4Cl corrosion failure often occurs in the overhead systems of hydrotreaters, and this failure is always accompanied by the appearance of H2S. A combination of electrochemical and surface spectroscopic (SEM/EDS, AFM, XRD) techniques was used to investigate the effect of different factors, including the surface roughness, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and H2S concentration, on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in an NH4Cl environment with the presence of H2S. The effect of H2S concentrations (at the ppm level) on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel was systematically revealed. The experimental results clearly indicated that the corrosion rate reached a minimum value at 10 ppm H2S. The steel surface was covered by a uniform corrosion product film in a 10 ppm H2S environment, and the corrosion product film was tight and protective. The ammonia from NH4Cl helped maintaining the protectiveness of the corrosion films in this environment. Dissolved oxygen mainly accelerated the cathodic reaction. The cathodic limiting current density increased with increasing temperature, and the anodic branch polarization curves were similar at different temperatures. The anodic current density decreased as the pH decreased, and the cathodic current density increased as the pH decreased. The absolute surface roughness ( R a) of carbon steel increased from 132.856 nm at 72 h to 153.973 nm at 144 h, and the rougher surface resulted in a higher corrosion rate. The critical innovation in this research was that multiple influential factors were revealed in the NH4Cl environment with the presence of H2S.

  20. Corrosion of carbon steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, B.

    1988-09-01

    This report assesses the factors which cause preferential attack to occur in carbon steel fusion welds. It was concluded that the main factors were: the inclusion content of the weld metal, the potential of the weld metal being less noble than that of the parent, and the presence of low-temperature transformation products in the heat-affected zone of the weld. These factors should be minimized or eliminated as appropriate so that the corrosion allowances determined for carbon steel waste drums is also adequate for the welds. An experimental/theoretical approach is recommended to evaluate the relative corrosion resistance of welds prepared from BS 4360 grade 43A steel to that of the parent material. (author)

  1. Marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcillo, M.; Alcantara, J.; Diaz, I.; Chico, B.; Simancas, J.; Fuente, D. de la

    2015-07-01

    Basic research on marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels is a relatively young scientific field and there continue to be great gaps in this area of knowledge. The presence of akaganeite in the corrosion products that form on steel when it is exposed to marine atmospheres leads to a notable increase in the corrosion rate. This work addresses the following issues: (a) environmental conditions necessary for akaganeite formation; (b) characterisation of akaganeite in the corrosion products formed; (c) corrosion mechanisms of carbon steel in marine atmospheres; (d) exfoliation of rust layers formed in highly aggressive marine atmospheres; (e) long-term corrosion rate prediction; and (f) behaviour of weathering steels. Field research has been carried out at Cabo Vilano wind farm (Camarinas, Galicia) in a wide range of atmospheric salinities and laboratory work involving the use of conventional atmospheric corrosion techniques and near-surface and bulk sensitive analytical techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mossbauer spectroscopy and SEM/μRaman spectroscopy. (Author)

  2. Monitoreo mediante EIS del acero embebido en un concreto de escoria activada alcalinamente expuesto a carbonatación EIS monitoring of embedded steel in alkali activated concrete exposed to carbonation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian Aperador

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se utilizó la técnica de espectroscopia de impedancia electroquímica (EIS para evaluar la acción del dióxido de carbono sobre la corrosión de un acero estructural ASTM A 706 embebido en un concreto de escoria activado alcalinamente (AAS, el concreto AAS es una mezcla de escoria molida granulada, agregados finos y gruesos y solución alcalina (silicato de sodio en la cantidad requerida para la mezcla de concreto. El estudio se realizó comparativamente con especímenes expuestos a condiciones naturales con una baja concentración de CO2 (0,03% CO2. La carbonatación del concreto se obtuvo de forma acelerada bajo condiciones controladas (3% CO2, 65% de humedad relativa y 20°C de temperatura. Los datos de Impedancia fueron adquiridos en un rango de 1mHz hasta 100kHz. A las frecuencias altas se encontró la respuesta de la interfase medio de exposición-concreto y a frecuencias bajas la respuesta de la interfase correspondiente al concreto - acero. Mediante EIS se estableció la capacidad de lograr la pasivación del acero embebido en concreto AAS, en condiciones ambientales naturales y aceleradas.In this work the technique of impedance spectroscopy electrochemistry (EIS was used to evaluate the effects of carbon dioxide on the corrosion of ASTM A 706 structural steel embedded in concrete with alkali activated slag (AAS, AAS concrete is a mixture of ground granulated slag, fine and coarse aggregates and alkaline solution (sodium silicate in the amount required for the concrete mix. The study was conducted in comparison with specimens exposed to natural conditions with a low concentration of CO2 (0.03% CO2. The carbonation of the concrete was obtained through accelerated carbonation under controlled conditions (3% CO2, 65% of relative humidity and 20°C of temperature. The data of Impedance in the middle frequency region 1mHz - 100KHz. A high frequency response was found using the interface-specific exposure and low frequency

  3. On high temperature strength of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Manabu; Kanero, Takahiro; Ihara, Yoshihito

    1977-01-01

    In the steels for high temperature use, the oxidation resistance is regarded as important, but carbon steels show enough oxidation resistance to be used continuously at the temperature up to 500 deg. C if the strength is left out of consideration, and up to 450 deg. C even when the strength is taken into account. Moreover, the production is easy, the workability and weldability are good, and the price is cheap in carbon steels as compared with alloy steels. In the boilers for large thermal power stations, 0.15-0.30% C steels are used for reheater tubes, main feed water tubes, steam headers, wall water tubes, economizer tubes, bypass pipings and others, and they account for 70% of all steel materials used for the boilers of 350 MW class and 30% in 1000 MW class. The JIS standard for the carbon steels for high temperature use and the related standards in foreign countries are shown. The high temperature strength of carbon steels changes according to the trace elements, melting and heat treatment as well as the main compositions of C, Si and Mn. Al and N affect the high temperature strength largely. The characteristics of carbon steels after the heating for hours, the factors controlling the microstructure and high temperature strength, and the measures to improve the high temperature strength of carbon steels are explained. (Kako, I.)

  4. Microbial corrosion of carbon steel by sulfate-reducing bacteria:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    1997-01-01

    Electrochemical measurements (EIS and DC-polarisation curves) have been conducted on carbon steel coupons exposed in SRB-active environments. Results from EIS measurements show that very large interfacial capacities are found in such systems, and consequently high capacitive currents are to be ex...

  5. Methane formation in tritium gas exposed to stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were performed to determine the effect cleanliness of a surface exposed to tritium gas had on methane formation. These tests performed on 304 stainless steel vessels, cleaned in various ways, showed that the methane formation was reduced by the use of various cleaning procedures

  6. Connections: Superplasticity, Damascus Steels, Laminated Steels, and Carbon Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a description is given of the connections that evolved from the initial development of a family of superplastic plain carbon steels that came to be known as Ultra-High Carbon Steels (UHCS). It was observed that their very high carbon contents were similar, if not identical, to those of Damascus steels. There followed a series of attempts to rediscover how the famous patterns found on Damascus steels blades were formed. At the same time, in order to improve the toughness at room temperature of the newly-developed UHCS, laminated composites were made of alternating layers of UHCS and mild steel (and subsequently other steels and other metals). This led to a study of ancient laminated composites, the motives for their manufacture, and the plausibility of some of the claims relating to the number of layers in the final blades. One apparently ancient laminated composite, recovered in 1837 from the great pyramid of Giza which was constructed in about 2750 B.C., stimulated a carbon dating study of ancient steels. The modern interest in "Bladesmithing" has connections back to many of these ancient weapons.

  7. Iron cycling at corroding carbon steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason S.; McBeth, Joyce M.; Ray, Richard I.; Little, Brenda J.; Emerson, David

    2013-01-01

    Surfaces of carbon steel (CS) exposed to mixed cultures of iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) in seawater media under aerobic conditions were rougher than surfaces of CS exposed to pure cultures of either type of microorganism. The roughened surface, demonstrated by profilometry, is an indication of loss of metal from the surface. In the presence of CS, aerobically grown FeOB produced tight, twisted helical stalks encrusted with iron oxides. When CS was exposed anaerobically in the presence of FeRB, some surface oxides were removed. However, when the same FeOB and FeRB were grown together in an aerobic medium, FeOB stalks were less encrusted with iron oxides and appeared less tightly coiled. These observations suggest that iron oxides on the stalks were reduced and solubilized by the FeRB. Roughened surfaces of CS and denuded stalks were replicated with three culture combinations of different species of FeOB and FeRB under three experimental conditions. Measurements of electrochemical polarization resistance established different rates of corrosion of CS in aerobic and anaerobic media, but could not differentiate rate differences between sterile controls and inoculated exposures for a given bulk concentration of dissolved oxygen. Similarly, total iron in the electrolyte could not be used to differentiate treatments. The experiments demonstrate the potential for iron cycling (oxidation and reduction) on corroding CS in aerobic seawater media. PMID:24093730

  8. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  9. Cubic martensite in high carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Xiao, Wenlong; Jiao, Kun; Ping, Dehai; Xu, Huibin; Zhao, Xinqing; Wang, Yunzhi

    2018-05-01

    A distinguished structural characteristic of martensite in Fe-C steels is its tetragonality originating from carbon atoms occupying only one set of the three available octahedral interstitial sites in the body-centered-cubic (bcc) Fe lattice. Such a body-centered-tetragonal (bct) structure is believed to be thermodynamically stable because of elastic interactions between the interstitial carbon atoms. For such phase stability, however, there has been a lack of direct experimental evidence despite extensive studies of phase transformations in steels over one century. In this Rapid Communication, we report that the martensite formed in a high carbon Fe-8Ni-1.26C (wt%) steel at room temperature induced by applied stress/strain has actually a bcc rather than a bct crystal structure. This finding not only challenges the existing theories on the stability of bcc vs bct martensite in high carbon steels, but also provides insights into the mechanism for martensitic transformation in ferrous alloys.

  10. Microbial-Influenced Corrosion of Corten Steel Compared with Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel in Oily Wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Hamidreza; Alavi, Seyed Abolhasan; Fotovat, Meysam

    2015-07-01

    The microbial corrosion behavior of three important steels (carbon steel, stainless steel, and Corten steel) was investigated in semi petroleum medium. This work was done in modified nutrient broth (2 g nutrient broth in 1 L oily wastewater) in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed culture (as a biotic media) and an abiotic medium for 2 weeks. The behavior of corrosion was analyzed by spectrophotometric and electrochemical methods and at the end was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the degree of corrosion of Corten steel in mixed culture, unlike carbon steel and stainless steel, is less than P. aeruginosa inoculated medium because some bacteria affect Corten steel less than other steels. According to the experiments, carbon steel had less resistance than Corten steel and stainless steel. Furthermore, biofilm inhibits separated particles of those steels to spread to the medium; in other words, particles get trapped between biofilm and steel.

  11. Evaluation of carburization depth in service exposed ferritic steel using magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Moorthy, V.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    The feasibility of using magnetic Barkhausen (MBN) measurement for the evaluation of carburization depth in ferritic steels has been reported in this paper. MBN measurements were carried out on samples from service exposed 0.5Cr-0.5Mo ferritic steel tube at different depths (cross section) from carburised ID surface to simulate the variation in carbon concentration gradient within the skin depth of MBN with increasing time of exposure to carburization. It has been observed that the MBN level increases with increasing depth of measurement. An inverse relation between MBN level and carbon content/hardness value has been observed. This study suggests that, the MBN measurements on the carburised surface can be correlated with the concentration gradient within the skin depth of the MBN which would help in predicting the approximate depth of the carburised layer with proper prior calibration. (author)

  12. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. CITROSOLV process influence. Pt. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lires, O.A.; Burkart, A.L.; Delfino, C.A.; Rojo, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    In order to protect carbon steel towers and piping of Girlder sulfide (G.S.) experimental heavy water plants against corrosion produced by the action of aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfides, a method, previously published, was developed. Carbon steel, exposed to saturated aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, forms iron sulfide scales. In oxygen free solutions evolution of corrosion follows the sequence: mackinawite → cubic ferrous sulfide → troilite → pyrrotite → pyrite. Scales formed by pyrrotite-pyrite or pyrite are the most protective layers (these are obtained at 130 deg C, 2 MPa, for periods of 14 days). CITROSOLV Process (Pfizer) is used to descaling and passivating stainless steel plant's components. This process must be used in mixed (carbon steel - stainless steel) circuits and may cause the formation of magnetite scales over the carbon steel. The influence of magnetite in the pyrrotite-pyrite scales formation is studied in this work. (Author) [es

  13. EIS Response of MIC on Carbon Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Maahn, Ernst

    1998-01-01

    Abstract Microbially influenced corrosion of carbon steel under sulphate reducing (sulphide-producing) bacterial activity (SRB) results in the formation of both ferrous sulphides as well as biofilm on the metal surface. The electrochemical characteristics of the ferrous sulphide/steel interface...... as compared to the biofilm/ferrous sulphide/steel interface has been studied with EIS, DC polarisations (Tafel, LPR) and a potentiostatic step technique. The electrochemical response is related to a threshold sulphide concentration above which very characteristic changes such as indications of finite...

  14. Corrosion of carbon steel in neutral water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Noboru; Iwahori, Toru; Kurosawa, Tatsuo

    1983-01-01

    The initial corrosion behavior of materials used in the construction of heat exchanger and piping system of BWR nuclear power plants and thermal power plants have been examined in neutral water at 30, 50, 100, 160, 200, and 285 deg C with two concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the water. In air-saturated water, the corrosion rate of carbon steel was so higher than those in deaerated conditions and the maximum corrosion rate was observed at 200 deg C. The corrosion rate in deaerated water gradually increased with increasing the water temperature. Low alloy steel (2.25 Cr, 1Mo) exhibited good corrosion resistance compared with the corrosion of carbon steel under similar testing conditions. Oxide films grown on carbon steel in deaerated water at 50, 100, 160, 200, and 285 deg C for 48 and 240 hrs were attacked by dissolved oxygen in room temperature water respectively. However the oxide films formed higher than about 160 deg C showed more protective. The electrochemical behavior of carbon steel with oxide films was also similar to the effect of temperature on the stability of oxide films. (author)

  15. Marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcillo, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Basic research on marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels is a relatively young scientific field and there continue to be great gaps in this area of knowledge. The presence of akaganeite in the corrosion products that form on steel when it is exposed to marine atmospheres leads to a notable increase in the corrosion rate. This work addresses the following issues: (a environmental conditions necessary for akaganeite formation; (b characterisation of akaganeite in the corrosion products formed; (c corrosion mechanisms of carbon steel in marine atmospheres; (d exfoliation of rust layers formed in highly aggressive marine atmospheres; (e long-term corrosion rate prediction; and (f behaviour of weathering steels. Field research has been carried out at Cabo Vilano wind farm (Camariñas, Galicia in a wide range of atmospheric salinities and laboratory work involving the use of conventional atmospheric corrosion techniques and near-surface and bulk sensitive analytical techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM/energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy and SEM/μRaman spectroscopy.La investigación fundamental en corrosión atmosférica marina de aceros al carbono es un campo científico relativamente joven que presenta grandes lagunas de conocimiento. La formación de akaganeíta en los productos de corrosión que se forman sobre el acero cuando se expone a atmósferas marinas conduce a un incremento notable de la velocidad de corrosión. En el trabajo se abordan las siguientes cuestiones: (a condiciones ambientales necesarias para la formación de akaganeíta, (b caracterización de la akaganeíta en los productos de corrosión formados, (c mecanismos de corrosión del acero al carbono en atmósferas marinas, (d exfoliación de las capas de herrumbre formadas en atmósferas marinas muy agresivas, (e predicción de la velocidad de corrosión a largo plazo, y (f comportamiento de aceros patinables. La

  16. Corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in the Tournemire clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foct, F.; Dridi, W.; Cabrera, J.; Savoye, S.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon steels are possible materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste containers for long term geological disposal in argillaceous environments. Experimental studies of the corrosion behaviour of such materials has been conducted in various conditions. Concerning the numerous laboratory experiments, these conditions (water and clay mixture or compacted clay) mainly concern the bentonite clay that would be used for the engineered barrier. On the opposite, only few in-situ experiments has been conducted directly in the local clay of the repository site (such as Boom clay, etc.). In order to better estimate the corrosion behaviour of carbon steels in natural clay site conditions, an experimental study has been conducted jointly by EDF and IRSN in the argillaceous French site of Tournemire. In this study, A42 carbon steel specimens have been exposed in 3 different zones of the Tournemire clay formation. The first type of environmental conditions concerns a zone where the clay has not been affected by the excavation (EDZ) of the main tunnel neither by the main fracture zone of the clay formation. The second and third ones are located in the EDZ of the tunnel. In the second zone, an additional aerated water flows from the tunnel, whereas it does not in the third place. Some carbon steel specimens have been extracted after several years of exposure to these conditions. The average corrosion rate has been measured by the weight loss technique and the pitting corrosion depth has been evaluated under an optical microscope. Corrosion products have also been characterised by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. Results are then discussed regarding the surrounding environmental conditions. Calculations of the oxygen transport from the tunnel through the clay and of the clay re-saturation can explain, in a first approach, the corrosion behaviour of the carbon steel in the different tested zones. (authors)

  17. [Factors influencing electrocardiogram results in workers exposed to noise in steel-making and steel-rolling workshops of an iron and steel plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y H; Yu, S F; Gu, G Z; Chen, G S; Zhou, W H; Wu, H; Jiao, J

    2016-02-20

    To investigate the factors influencing the electrocardiogram results in the workers exposed to noise in steel-making and steel rolling workshops of an iron and steel plant. From September to December, 2013, cluster sampling was used to select 3 150 workers exposed to noise in the steel-making and steel-rolling workshops of an iron and steel plant, and a questionnaire survey and physical examinations were performed. The number of valid workers was 2 915, consisting of 1 606 workers in the steel-rolling workshop and 1 309 in the steel-making workshop. The electrocardiogram results of the workers in steel-making and steel-rolling workshops were analyzed. The overall abnormal rate of electrocardiogram was 26.35%, and the workers in the steel-making workshop had a significantly higher abnormal rate of electrocardiogram than those in the steel-rolling workshop(32.24% vs 21.54%, Pelectrocardiogram than female workers(27.59% vs 18.61%, Pelectrocardiogram than those who did not drink(28.17% vs 23.75%, Pelectrocardiogram than those who were not exposed to high temperature(29.43% vs 20.14%, Pelectrocardiogram in the workers with cumulative noise exposure levels of electrocardiogram results. High cumulative noise exposure, alcohol consumption, and high temperature may affect the abnormal rate of electrocardiogram in the workers exposed to noise in steel-making and steel-rolling workshops.

  18. Ten years of Toarcian argillite - carbon steel in situ interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauzeres, Alexandre [IRSN, PRP-DGE/SRTG/LETIS, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); Maillet, Anais [IRSN, PRP-DGE/SRTG/LETIS, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); UMR CNRS 7285, IC2MP, Batiment B35 - 5, avenue Albert Turpain, 86022 Poitiers cedex (France); Gaudin, Anne [UMR CNRS 6112, LPGN, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); El Albani, Abderrazak; Vieillard, Philippe [UMR CNRS 7285, IC2MP, Batiment B35 - 5, avenue Albert Turpain, 86022 Poitiers cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    In situ interaction experiments over periods of 2, 6, and 10 years between Toarcian argillite and carbon steel discs were carried out in the Tournemire Underground Research Laboratory (URL), yielding a dataset of the materials' geochemical evolution under conditions representative of the future geological disposal of high-level long-lived radioactive wastes. The carbon steel discs were exposed to corrosion due to trapped oxygen. The corrosion rates indicate that the oxidizing transient lasted between 2 and 6 years. A systematic dissolution of calcium phases (Ca-smectite sheets in I/S and calcite) was observed in the iron diffusion halos. The iron release induced mineralogical dissolution and precipitation reactions, which partly clogged the argillite porosity. (authors)

  19. Urine mutagenicity of steel workers exposed to coke oven emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Meo, M.P.; Dumenil, G.; Botta, A.H.; Laget, M.; Zabaloueff, V.; Mathias, A.

    1987-03-01

    Urine mutagenicity of 19 individuals was investigated at a steel mill. All the subjects worked on the coal processing unit. Urine samples were collected at the end of a working day. Urine samples of two exposed workers were collected at the end of two periods of rest and two periods of working. Mutagens were extracted on XAD-2 resin and tested by the Salmonella microsomal assay and the SOS spot test. Mutagenic potencies of exposed smokers and exposed non-smokers were 8.62 +/- 6.56 and 1.1 +/- 0.48 revertants/mg creatinine respectively with Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 + S9. Both values were significantly higher than those of unexposed smokers and non-smokers (5.07 +/- 3.33 and 0.47 +/- 0.72 revertants/mg creatinine respectively). The urinary mutagenic potency of the two exposed individuals increased at the end of periods of working (15.97 +/- 2.57 revertants/mg creatinine) and decreased at the end of periods of rest (12.31 +/- 2.45 revertants/mg creatinine). Urinary mutagens were detected with S. typhimurium strain TA100 + S9 to a lesser extent. No direct-acting mutagens were detected by the SOS spot test. Atmospheric benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) were also measured by h.p.l.c. on the coke battery. BaP concentrations ranged between 0.01 and 0.6 microgram/m3 air at the different working sites. Biological monitoring with short-term tests is discussed.

  20. Interphase and intergranular stress generation in carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, E.C.; Daymond, M.R.; Withers, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron diffraction spectra have been acquired during tensile straining of high and low carbon steels, in order to compare the evolution of internal stress in ferritic steel with and without a reinforcing phase. In low carbon steel, the generation of intergranular stresses predominates, while in high carbon steel similar intergranular stresses among ferrite grain families are superposed upon a large redistribution of stress between phases. Comparison is made to calculations using elastoplastic self-consistent and finite element methods

  1. Integrating Steel Production with Mineral Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaus Lackner; Paul Doby; Tuncel Yegulalp; Samuel Krevor; Christopher Graves

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of the project were (i) to develop a combination iron oxide production and carbon sequestration plant that will use serpentine ores as the source of iron and the extraction tailings as the storage element for CO2 disposal, (ii) the identification of locations within the US where this process may be implemented and (iii) to create a standardized process to characterize the serpentine deposits in terms of carbon disposal capacity and iron and steel production capacity. The first objective was not accomplished. The research failed to identify a technique to accelerate direct aqueous mineral carbonation, the limiting step in the integration of steel production and carbon sequestration. Objective (ii) was accomplished. It was found that the sequestration potential of the ultramafic resource surfaces in the US and Puerto Rico is approximately 4,647 Gt of CO2 or over 500 years of current US production of CO2. Lastly, a computer model was developed to investigate the impact of various system parameters (recoveries and efficiencies and capacities of different system components) and serpentinite quality as well as incorporation of CO2 from sources outside the steel industry.

  2. Carbon steel protection in G.S. [Girldler sulphide] plants: Pt. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lires, Osvaldo; Delfino, Cristina; Rojo, Enrique.

    1989-01-01

    In order to protect carbon steel towers and piping of a GS experimental heavy water plant against corrosion produced by the action of aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulphide, a method, elsewhere published, was developed. Carbon steel exposed to saturated aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulphide forms iron sulphide scales. In oxygen free solutions, evolution of corrosion follows the sequence mackinawite → cubic ferrous sulphide → troilite → pyrrotite → pyrite. Scales formed by pyrrotite and pyrite are the most protective layers (these are obtained at 130 deg C, 2 MPa for a period of 14 days). During a plant shutdown procedures, the carbon steel protected with those scales is exposed to water and highly humid air; under such conditions oxidation is unavoidable. Later, treatment in plant conditions does not regenerate scales because the composition of regenerated scales involves more soluble iron sulphides such as mackinawite and troilite. Therefore, it is not recommendable to expose the protective scales to atmospherical conditions. (Author)

  3. Properties of Reinforced Concrete Steel Rebars Exposed to High Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Topçu, İlker Bekir; Karakurt, Cenk

    2008-01-01

    The deterioration of the mechanical properties of yield strength and modulus of elasticity is considered as the primary element affecting the performance of steel structures under fire. In this study, hot-rolled S220 and S420 reinforcement steel rebars were subjected to high temperatures to investigate the fire performance of these materials. It is aimed to determine the remaining mechanical properties of steel rebars after elevated temperatures. Steels were subjected to 20, 100, 200, 300, 5...

  4. Experimental and numerical simulation of carbon manganese steel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experimental and numerical simulation of carbon manganese steel for cyclic plastic behaviour. J Shit, S Dhar, S Acharyya. Abstract. The paper deals with finite element modeling of saturated low cycle fatigue and the cyclic hardening phenomena of the materials Sa333 grade 6 carbon steel and SS316 stainless steel.

  5. Plasticity of low carbon stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, S.I.; Fel'dgandler, Eh.G.; Kareva, E.N.

    1975-01-01

    In the temperature range 800-1200 0 C and with strain rates of from 10 -3 to 3 s -1 , austenitic (000Kh18N12) and austenitic-ferrite (000Kh26N6) very low carbon stainless steels containing 0.02-0.03% C exhibit no higher resilience than corresponding ordinary steels containing 0.10-0.12% C. However, the plasticity of such steels (particularly two-phase steels) at 900-1100 0 C is appreciably inferior owing to the development of intergranular brittle fracture. Pressure treatment preceded by partial cooling of the surface to 850 0 C yields rolled and forged products with acceptable indices but is inconvenient technically. At the Zlatoustovsk and Ashin metallurgical plants successful tests have been performed involving the forging and rolling of such steels heated to 1280-1300 0 C without partial cooling; it was necessary to improve the killing conditions, correct the chemical composition (increasing the proportion of ferrite) and take measures against heat loss. (author)

  6. Internal friction in martensitic carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, J.J.; Ghilarducci, A.A.; Salva, H.R.; Chaves, C.A.; Velez, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes relationships between the internal friction and the microstructure of two steels containing 0.626 and 0.71 wt.% carbon. The steels were annealed at 1093 K for 5 min, quenched into water and tempered for 10 min at 423, 573 and 723 K. Internal friction was measured by using a forced vibration pendulum, in a temperature range from 100 to 450 K. The internal friction spectrum is decomposed into four peaks: P1 at 215 K, P2 at 235 K, P3 at 260 K and P4 at 380 K for 3 Hz. Peak P1 is attributed to the interactions between dislocations and carbon atoms. Peak P2 is related to the interaction between dislocations and carbide. Peak P3 is related to the generations of kink - pairs along edge dislocations. Peak P4 is attributed to epsilon carbide precipitation.

  7. Properties of Reinforced Concrete Steel Rebars Exposed to High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlker Bekir Topçu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of the mechanical properties of yield strength and modulus of elasticity is considered as the primary element affecting the performance of steel structures under fire. In this study, hot-rolled S220 and S420 reinforcement steel rebars were subjected to high temperatures to investigate the fire performance of these materials. It is aimed to determine the remaining mechanical properties of steel rebars after elevated temperatures. Steels were subjected to 20, 100, 200, 300, 500, 800, and 950∘C temperatures for 3 hours and tensile tests were carried out. Effect of temperature on mechanical behavior of S220 and S420 were determined. All mechanical properties were reduced due to the temperature increase of the steel rebars. It is seen that mechanical properties of S420 steel was influenced more than S220 steel at elevated temperatures.

  8. Effect of steel surface conditions on reinforcing steel corrosion in concrete exposed to marine environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzola, E.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory methods and experimental tests were deployed in the present study to evaluate corrosion in reinforced concrete exposed to marine environments. Reinforcing steel exhibiting two different surface conditions prior to embedment in concrete were studied, one the one hand to assess the electrochemical behaviour of the bars during exposure of the concrete specimens to a simulated marine environment, and on the other to determine the strength of the steel/concrete bond. The reinforced concrete specimens prepared were adapted as required for electrochemical potential and corrosion rate testing. A total of 56 7x15-cm cylindrical specimens containing 3/8" steel rods anchored at a depth of 11.5 cm were made to evaluate the steel / concrete bond and exposed to a natural marine environment for 28 or 190 days prior to testing. All the specimens were made with ready-mixed concrete. It may be concluded from the results of the corrosion tests on reinforcing steel with different surface conditions that the oxide initially covering the bars was dissolved and the steel passivated by the alkalinity in the concrete. The chief finding of the bonding study was that the layer of oxide formed in pre-embedment steel deterioration contributed to establishing a better bond.

    En el contexto de esta investigación, se tomaron en consideración métodos y ensayos experimentales de laboratorio, que permiten hacer una evaluación de la corrosión del hormigón armado expuesto en ambientes marinos. Por una parte se evaluó el comportamiento electroquímico de dos condiciones de estados superficiales del acero embebido en el hormigón, exponiéndolo en un ambiente marino simulado y, por otra parte, se estudió la adherencia entre el acero y el hormigón, con los mismos estados superficiales usados para la evaluación electroquímica. Las probetas se fabricaron de hormigón con acero de refuerzo en su interior, adecuándolas para realizar los ensayos de potenciales

  9. Steel slag carbonation in a flow-through reactor system: the role of fluid-flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Eleanor J; Williams-Jones, Anthony E; Migdisov, Artashes A

    2015-01-01

    Steel production is currently the largest industrial source of atmospheric CO2. As annual steel production continues to grow, the need for effective methods of reducing its carbon footprint increases correspondingly. The carbonation of the calcium-bearing phases in steel slag generated during basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel production, in particular its major constituent, larnite {Ca2SiO4}, which is a structural analogue of olivine {(MgFe)2SiO4}, the main mineral subjected to natural carbonation in peridotites, offers the potential to offset some of these emissions. However, the controls on the nature and efficiency of steel slag carbonation are yet to be completely understood. Experiments were conducted exposing steel slag grains to a CO2-H2O mixture in both batch and flow-through reactors to investigate the impact of temperature, fluid flux, and reaction gradient on the dissolution and carbonation of steel slag. The results of these experiments show that dissolution and carbonation of BOF steel slag are more efficient in a flow-through reactor than in the batch reactors used in most previous studies. Moreover, they show that fluid flux needs to be optimized in addition to grain size, pressure, and temperature, in order to maximize the efficiency of carbonation. Based on these results, a two-stage reactor consisting of a high and a low fluid-flux chamber is proposed for CO2 sequestration by steel slag carbonation, allowing dissolution of the slag and precipitation of calcium carbonate to occur within a single flow-through system. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Study on corrosion of carbon steel in DEA aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun Han; Xie, Jia Lin; Zhang, Li

    2018-02-01

    Corrosion of carbon steel in the CO2 capture process using diethanolamine (DEA) aqueous solutions was investigated. The effects of the mass concentrations of DEA, solution temperature and CO2 loading on the corrosion rate of carbon steel were demonstrated. The experimental results provided comprehensive information on the appropriate concentration range of DEA aqueous solutions under which low corrosion of carbon steel can be achieved.

  11. A computational model for the carbon transfer in stainless steel sodium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casadio, S.; Scibona, G.

    1980-01-01

    A method is proposed of computing the carbon transfer in the type 316, 304 and 321 stainless steels in sodium environment as a function of temperature, exposure time and carbon concentration in the sodium. The method is based on the criteria developed at ANL by introducing some simplifications and takes also into account the correlations obtained at WARD. Calculated carbon profiles are compared both with experimental data and with the results available by the other computer methods. The limits for quantitative predictions of the stainless steel carburization or decarburization exposed in a specific environment are discussed. (author)

  12. Preparation and characterization of 304 stainless steel/Q235 carbon steel composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenning; Feng, Lajun; Feng, Hui; Cao, Ying; Liu, Lei; Cao, Mo; Ge, Yanfeng

    The composite material of 304 stainless steel reinforced Q235 carbon steel has been prepared by modified hot-rolling process. The resulted material was characterized by scanning electron microscope, three-electrode method, fault current impact method, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curve measurement and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that metallurgical bond between the stainless steel layer and carbon steel substrate has been formed. The composite material exhibited good electrical conductivity and thermal stability. The average grounding resistance of the composite material was about 13/20 of dip galvanized steel. There has no surface crack and bubbling formed after fault current impact. The composite material led to a significant decrease in the corrosion current density in soil solution, compared with that of hot dip galvanized steel and bare carbon steel. On the basis polarization curve and EIS analyses, it can be concluded that the composite material showed improved anti-corrosion property than hot-dip galvanized steel.

  13. Passivation condition of carbon steel in bentonite/sand mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Kawakami, Susumu

    2002-03-01

    It is essential to understand the corrosion type of carbon steel under the repository conditions for the lifetime assessment of carbon steel overpack used for geological isolation of high-level radioactive waste. According to the previous study, carbon steel is hard to passivate in buffer material assuming a chemical condition range of groundwater in Japan. However, concrete support will be constructed around the overpack in the case of repository in the soft rock system and groundwater having a higher pH may infiltrate to buffer material. There is a possibility that the corrosion type of carbon steel will be influenced by the rise of the pH in groundwater. In this study, anodic polarization experiments were performed to understand the passivation condition of carbon steel in buffer material saturated with water contacted with concrete. An ordinary concrete an a low-alkalinity concrete were used in the experiment. The results of the experiments showed that the carbon steel can passivate under the condition that water having pH > 13 infiltrate to the buffer material assuming present property of buffer material. If the low-alkalinity concrete is selected as the support material, passivation can not occur on carbon steel overpack. The effect of the factors of buffer material such as dry density and mixing ratio of sand on the passivation of carbon steel was also studied. The results of the study showed that the present property of buffer material is enough to prevent passivation of carbon steel. (author)

  14. Low carbon manganese-nickel-niobium steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisterkamp, F.; Hulka, K.

    1983-11-01

    Experimental heats of a low carbon-manganese-0.5% nickel-0.15% niobium steel have been rolled to plates between 13.5 and 50 mm thickness and to a 16 mm hot strip. Various combinations of soaking temperatures form 1100 0 C to 1300 0 C and of finish rolling temperatures between 710 0 C and 930 0 C have been investigated. From mechanical properties obtained, one can conclude that the investigated steel composition provides very good properties e.g. for pipe steels X65 to X75. In particular, the toughness at low temperature is outstanding despite relaxed rolling conditions. Metalographic and special investigations such as electron microscopy, texture evaluation and chemical extraction, correlated with applied rolling schedules and the mechanical properties obtained resulted in a comprehensive understanding about the benefits of high niobium metallurgy combined with nickel addition. All practically applied welding processes generated mechanical properties, in particular toughness of the weldment, that meet arctic specifications.(Author) [pt

  15. Thermoplastic liners for carbon steel pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdi, Mauyed S.; AlDossary, Abdullah K. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-12-19

    Materials selection for pipe and fittings used to convey corrosive fluids has often been a challenge. Traditionally, exotic Corrosion Resistant Alloys (CRA) have been used in corrosive environments despite their high cost. Plastic lined carbon steel piping offers a cost effective alternative to the use of CRAs by eliminating corrosion, significantly reducing the use of toxic chemicals and the heavy metal usually present in CRAs. Thermoplastic Liners offer the combination of corrosion resistance and mechanical strength, which are unachievable with singular materials. Under pressure conditions, the liner is fully supported by the metalwork, while under vacuum conditions, the liner must be thick enough along with venting system to withstand the collapsing forces created by the negative pressure. Plastic liners have been used successfully to line and protect metallic pipelines for many years and have become an indispensable requirement of the oil and gas industry particularly with water injection and hydrocarbon services. In the case of internally corroded pipes, the use of thermoplastic liners for rehabilitation is an option to extend the lifetime of companies' assets, reduce maintenance cost and increase intervals between T and Is. For new construction, plastic liners in carbon steel pipes can compete technically and economically with pipelines of CRA materials and other corrosion inhibition systems. This paper describes various design features, installations of thermoplastic liners in comparison to other corrosion inhibition methods. (author)

  16. Mechanistic studies of carbon steel corrosion inhibition by cashew ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phenoxide, R-Ar-O- ions from the CNSL inhibitor were found to be responsible for the reduction of the corrosion rate of the carbon steel. Also, it was observed that the surface charge of the carbon steel electrodes was positive with respect to the solutions containing CNSL inhibitor. It is likely that the mechanism of the ...

  17. Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Corrosion-Resistant Rebars in Concrete Structures Under Chloride Ion Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nedal; Boulfiza, Mohamed; Evitts, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete is the most challenging durability problem that threatens reinforced concrete structures, especially structures that are subject to severe environmental conditions (i.e., highway bridges, marine structures, etc.). Corrosion of reinforcing steel leads to cracking and spalling of the concrete cover and billions of dollars are spent every year on repairing such damaged structures. New types of reinforcements have been developed to avoid these high-cost repairs. Thus, it is important to study the corrosion behavior of these new types of reinforcements and compare them to the traditional carbon steel reinforcements. This study aimed at characterizing the corrosion behavior of three competing reinforcing steels; conventional carbon steel, micro-composite steel (MMFX-2) and 316LN stainless steel, through experiments in carbonated and non-carbonated concrete exposed to chloride-laden environments. Synthetic pore water solutions have been used to simulate both cases of sound and carbonated concrete under chloride ions attack. A three-electrode corrosion cell is used for determining the corrosion characteristics and rates. Multiple electrochemical techniques were applied using a Gamry PC4™ potentiostat manufactured by Gamry Instruments (Warminster, PA). DC corrosion measurements were applied on samples subjected to fixed chloride concentration in the solution.

  18. Preparation and characterization of 304 stainless steel/Q235 carbon steel composite material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenning Shen

    Full Text Available The composite material of 304 stainless steel reinforced Q235 carbon steel has been prepared by modified hot-rolling process. The resulted material was characterized by scanning electron microscope, three-electrode method, fault current impact method, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curve measurement and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that metallurgical bond between the stainless steel layer and carbon steel substrate has been formed. The composite material exhibited good electrical conductivity and thermal stability. The average grounding resistance of the composite material was about 13/20 of dip galvanized steel. There has no surface crack and bubbling formed after fault current impact. The composite material led to a significant decrease in the corrosion current density in soil solution, compared with that of hot dip galvanized steel and bare carbon steel. On the basis polarization curve and EIS analyses, it can be concluded that the composite material showed improved anti-corrosion property than hot-dip galvanized steel. Keywords: Stainless steel, Carbon steel, Anti-corrosion, Conductivity, Electrochemical, EIS

  19. Microbiologically induced corrosion of carbon steel under continuous flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunaru, Mariana; Dragomir, Maria; Voicu, Anca

    2008-01-01

    Microbiologically induced corrosion is the label generally applied to corrosion involving the action of bacteria on metal surfaces. While different combinations of bacterial species, materials and chemical constituents are interrelated factors, stagnant water is the factor most often mentioned in reported cases. This paper presents the results obtained regarding the testing of microbiologically induced corrosion of carbon steel under continuous flow conditions in the presence of iron-oxidizing bacteria. The tests were performed on coupons of SA106gr.B exposed both in stagnant conditions and in flow conditions. The surfaces of these coupons were studied by metallographic technique, while the developed biofilms were analysed using microbiological technique. The correlation of all the results which were obtained emphasized that the minimizing the occurrence of stagnant or low-flow conditions can prove effective in reducing the risk of microbiologically induced corrosion in plant cooling-water systems. (authors)

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of A515 grade 60 carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.L.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of welding method plate thickness, and subsequent stress relief treatment on the stress corrosion cracking propensity of ASTM A515 Grade 60 carbon steel plate exposed to a 5 M NaNO 3 solution at 190 0 F for eight weeks. It was found that all weld coupons receiving no thermal stress relief treatment cracked within eight weeks; all weld coupons given a vibratory stress relief cracked within eight weeks; two of the eight weld coupons stress relieved at 600 0 F for one hour cracked within eight weeks; none of the weld coupons stress relieved at 1100 0 F for one hour cracked within eight weeks; and that cracking was generally more severe in coupons fabricated from 7/8 inch plate by shielded metal arc welding than it was in coupons fabricated by other welding methods. (U.S.)

  1. Marine Atmospheric Corrosion of Carbon Steel: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Jenifer; Fuente, Daniel de la; Chico, Belén; Simancas, Joaquín; Díaz, Iván; Morcillo, Manuel

    2017-04-13

    The atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel is an extensive topic that has been studied over the years by many researchers. However, until relatively recently, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the action of marine chlorides. Corrosion in coastal regions is a particularly relevant issue due the latter's great importance to human society. About half of the world's population lives in coastal regions and the industrialisation of developing countries tends to concentrate production plants close to the sea. Until the start of the 21st century, research on the basic mechanisms of rust formation in Cl - -rich atmospheres was limited to just a small number of studies. However, in recent years, scientific understanding of marine atmospheric corrosion has advanced greatly, and in the authors' opinion a sufficient body of knowledge has been built up in published scientific papers to warrant an up-to-date review of the current state-of-the-art and to assess what issues still need to be addressed. That is the purpose of the present review. After a preliminary section devoted to basic concepts on atmospheric corrosion, the marine atmosphere, and experimentation on marine atmospheric corrosion, the paper addresses key aspects such as the most significant corrosion products, the characteristics of the rust layers formed, and the mechanisms of steel corrosion in marine atmospheres. Special attention is then paid to important matters such as coastal-industrial atmospheres and long-term behaviour of carbon steel exposed to marine atmospheres. The work ends with a section dedicated to issues pending, noting a series of questions in relation with which greater research efforts would seem to be necessary.

  2. Marine Atmospheric Corrosion of Carbon Steel: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Jenifer; de la Fuente, Daniel; Chico, Belén; Simancas, Joaquín; Díaz, Iván; Morcillo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel is an extensive topic that has been studied over the years by many researchers. However, until relatively recently, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the action of marine chlorides. Corrosion in coastal regions is a particularly relevant issue due the latter’s great importance to human society. About half of the world’s population lives in coastal regions and the industrialisation of developing countries tends to concentrate production plants close to the sea. Until the start of the 21st century, research on the basic mechanisms of rust formation in Cl−-rich atmospheres was limited to just a small number of studies. However, in recent years, scientific understanding of marine atmospheric corrosion has advanced greatly, and in the authors’ opinion a sufficient body of knowledge has been built up in published scientific papers to warrant an up-to-date review of the current state-of-the-art and to assess what issues still need to be addressed. That is the purpose of the present review. After a preliminary section devoted to basic concepts on atmospheric corrosion, the marine atmosphere, and experimentation on marine atmospheric corrosion, the paper addresses key aspects such as the most significant corrosion products, the characteristics of the rust layers formed, and the mechanisms of steel corrosion in marine atmospheres. Special attention is then paid to important matters such as coastal-industrial atmospheres and long-term behaviour of carbon steel exposed to marine atmospheres. The work ends with a section dedicated to issues pending, noting a series of questions in relation with which greater research efforts would seem to be necessary. PMID:28772766

  3. Basic studies on carbon steel decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavarotti, M.; Rizzi, R.; Ronchetti, C.

    1982-01-01

    The dissolution of magnetite films grown in autoclave at high temperature on carbon steel has been performed in a dynamic loop in ammoniated citric and oxalic acid solutions at two different temperatures and constant pH. The dissolution process seems to be affected by the dual-layer oxide morphology depending on the growth conditions in the autoclave. The open-circuit potential of the specimens and the corrosion rate measured by the linear polarization method have been monitored. To this aim a particular corrosion cell and a suitable reference electrode have been set up at CISE. Polarization curves have been performed to check the electrochemical processes involved in the anodic and cathodic area. At last the effect of a corrosion inhibitor, of a complexing and a reducing agent and of temperature has also been studied. The work was carried out in the frame of a CNEN research programme for the development of the CIRENE prototype

  4. Medium carbon vanadium micro alloyed steels for drop forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeszensky, Gabor; Plaut, Ronald Lesley

    1992-01-01

    Growing competitiveness of alternative manufacturing routes requires cost minimization in the production of drop forged components. The authors analyse the potential of medium carbon, vanadium microalloyed steels for drop forging. Laboratory and industrial experiments have been carried out emphasizing deformation and temperature cycles, strain rates and dwell times showing a typical processing path, associated mechanical properties and corresponding microstructures. The steels the required levels of mechanical properties on cooling after forging, eliminating subsequent heat treatment. The machinability of V-microalloyed steels is also improved when compared with plain medium carbon steels. (author)

  5. Effect of Biodiesel Concentration on Corrosion of Carbon Steel by Serratia marcescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pusparizkita Yustina M

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel come into being used as an alternative source of energy as the diminishing of petroleum reserves. This fuel is typically stored in tanks that are commonly made from carbon steel, which is easily corroded by microorganisms. Recent studies have shown that bacteria aside from SRB may also be involved in corrosion. Therefore, this research was aimed to evaluate the effect of biodiesel concentration (15%, 20% and 30% v/v mixed in diesel oil on the corrosion of carbon steel by S. marcescens that dominate biocorrosion on hydrocarbon products. In this study, the corrosion process was investigated by evaluation of biofilm morphology and composition, the rate of corrosion and the corrosion product of carbon steel which was exposed in the mixture of hydrocarbons and the presence of S. marcescens. It can be concluded that higher concentration of biodiesel in diesel oil leads to higher growth of bacteria in the biofilm and higher corrosion rate.

  6. Mixed structures in continuously cooled low-carbon automotive steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, F.A.; Edmonds, D.V.

    1993-01-01

    Mixed microstructures have been studied in low- carbon microalloyed steels suitable for automotive applications, after continuous cooling from the hot-rolled condition. Microstructural features such as polygonal ferrite, bainitic and acicular ferrite and microphase constituent are identified using transmission electron microscopy. The influence of these mixed structures on the tensile strength, impact toughness and fracture behaviour is examined. It is found that improvements in impact toughness as compared with microalloyed medium- carbon ferrite/pearlite steels can be achieved from these predominantly acicular structures developed by controlling alloy composition and continuous cooling of these lower carbon steels. (orig.)

  7. Novel implementation of the use of the EPR-in situ technique (Electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation) to identify intergranular corrosion susceptability of stainless steels exposed to high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, N.; Pineda, Y.; Vera, E.; Sepulveda, H.; Heyn, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (18 % Cr), are often used in pieces that are exposed to temperatures of 450 o C to 900 o C (heat exchangers). At these temperatures sensibilization occurs on the grain boundaries, becoming a key factor in the appearance of intergranular corrosion. In order to prevent this phenomena from occurring 0.3% to 0.8% of niobium is added as an alloying element in the manufacturing process, which prevents the carbon present in the steel combines with the chromium, avoiding the formation of carbides. An electrochemical method for in-situ application was developed to evaluate the corrosive behavior of stainless steel and its susceptibility and degree of sensibilizaton to an intergranular attack. This work shows the effectiveness of this technique in evaluating niobium's inhibitory effect in preventing the formation of chromium carbides on the grain boundaries of 18% chromium steel, and also shows the technique's potentiality in determining how susceptible these steels are to intercrystalline corrosion

  8. Evaluation of carbons exposed to the Three Mile Island accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitz, V.R.; Romans, J.B.; Bellamy, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    One of the lines of defense that served to mitigate the radiological effects of the accident at Three Mile Island was the activated carbon installed in ventilation air flows. Filters in the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Buildings of Unit 2 adsorbed tens to hundreds of curies of iodine-131, preventing the release to the environment. The carbon exposed to the accident has been replaced and the spent carbon has been analyzed in the laboratory. Independent analyses were performed for the two filter trains in both the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Buildings, replaced at various times after the accident. The results of these analyses are compared to new (unexposed) carbons

  9. Investigating early stages of biocorrosion with XPS: AISI 304 stainless steel exposed to Burkholderia species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Saastamoinen, Tuomas

    1999-04-01

    We have investigated the interactions of an exopolymer-producing bacteria, Burkholderia sp. with polished AISI 304 stainless steel substrates using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Steel coupons were exposed to the pure bacteria culture in a specially designed flowcell for 6 h during which the experiment was monitored in situ with an optical microscope. XPS results verified the formation of biofilm containing extracellular polymer on all the samples exposed to bacteria. Sputter results indicated that some ions needed for metabolic processes were trapped within the biofilm. Changes in the relative Fe concentration and Fe 2p peak shape indicated that also iron had accumulated into the biofilm.

  10. Fracture behaviour of the 14Cr ODS steel exposed to helium and liquid lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojna, Anna, E-mail: Anna.Hojna@cvrez.cz [Centrum Vyzkumu Rez s.r.o., UJV Group, Rez 130, 250 68 Husinec (Czech Republic); Di Gabriele, Fosca [Centrum Vyzkumu Rez s.r.o., UJV Group, Rez 130, 250 68 Husinec (Czech Republic); Hadraba, Hynek; Husak, Roman; Kubena, Ivo [CEITEC IPM, Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, 616 62 Brno (Czech Republic); Rozumova, Lucia; Bublikova, Petra; Kalivodova, Jana [Centrum Vyzkumu Rez s.r.o., UJV Group, Rez 130, 250 68 Husinec (Czech Republic); Matejicek, Jiri [Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Za Slovankou 1782/3, 182 00 Praha (Czech Republic)

    2017-07-15

    This work describes the fracture behaviour of the 14Cr ODS steel produced by mechanical alloying process, after high temperature exposures. Small specimens were exposed to helium gas in a furnace at 720 °C for 500 h. Another set of specimens was exposed to flowing liquid lead in the COLONRI II loop at 650 °C for 1000 h. All specimens were tested for the impact and tensile behaviour. The impact test results are compared to other sets of specimens in the as received state and after isothermal annealing at 650 °C for 1000 h. The impact curves of the exposed materials showed positive shifts on the transition temperature. While the upper shelf value did not change in the Pb exposed ODS steel, it significantly increased in the He exposed one. The differences are discussed in terms of surface and subsurface microscopy observation. The embrittlement can be explained as the effect of a slight change in the grain boundary and size distribution combined with the depletion of sub-surface region from alloying elements forming oxide scale on the surface. - Highlights: •We compared the impact energy curves of as received, isothermally aged and He/Pb exposed ODS steel samples. •The highest transition temperature showed the ODS steel exposed to liquid Pb at 650 °C for 1000 h. •We observed the higher tendency of the He exposed samples to crack arrester delamination than the Pb exposed ones. •The crack arrested delamination induced apparent increase of impact energies.

  11. Medium carbon vanadium steels for closed die forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeszensky, Gabor; Plaut, Ronald Lesley

    1993-01-01

    This work analyses the medium carbon micro alloyed vanadium potential for closed die forged production. The steels reach the mechanical resistance requests during cooling after forging, eliminating the subsequent thermal treatment. Those steels also present good fatigue resistance and machinability. The industrial scale experiments are also reported

  12. corrosion response of low carbon steel in tropical road mud

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    Corrosion Mitigation efforts using readily available anti- corrosion coatings to protect low carbon steel test coupons against the ... The following protective coating devices were effective: ..... 2 West, J.M (1986): Basic Corrosion and Oxidation,.

  13. An Evaluation of Carbon Steel Corrosion Under Stagnant Seawater Conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Jason

    2004-01-01

    Corrosion, of 1020 carbon steel coupons in, natural seawater over a six-month period was more aggressive under stagnant anaerobic conditions than stagnant aerobic conditions as measured by weight loss...

  14. Quantification of the degradation of steels exposed to liquid lead-bismuth eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroer, C.; Voss, Z.; Novotny, J.; Konys, J.

    2006-05-01

    Metallographic and gravimetric methods of measuring the degradation of steels are introduced and compared, with emphasis on the quantification of oxidation in molten lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). In future applications of LBE or other molten lead alloys, additions of oxygen should prevent the dissolution of steel constituents in the liquid heavy metal. Therefore, also the amount of steel constituents transferred between the steel (including the oxide scale formed on the surface) and the LBE has to be assessed, in order to evaluate the efficiency of oxygen additions with respect to preventing dissolution of the steel. For testing the methods of quantification, specimens of martensitic steel T91 were exposed for 1500 h to stagnant, oxygen-saturated LBE at 550 C, whereby, applying both metallographic and gravimetric measurements, the recession of the cross-section of sound material deviated by ± 3 μm for a mean value of 11 μm. Although the transfer of steel constituents between the solid phases and the LBE is negligible under the considered exposure conditions, the investigation shows that a gravimetric analysis is most promising for quantifying such a mass transfer. For laboratory experiments on the behaviour of steels in oxygen-containing LBE, it is suggested to make provisions for both metallographic and gravimetric measurements, since both types of methods have specific benefits in the characterisation of the oxidation process. (Orig.)

  15. Electrochemical performances of diamond-like carbon coatings on carbon steel, stainless steel, and brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadinata, Samuel-Sudibyo; Lee, Ming-Tsung; Pan, Szu-Jung; Tsai, Wen-Ta; Tai, Chen-Yi; Shih, Chuan-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings have been deposited onto stainless steel, carbon steel and brass by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, respectively. Atomic arrangement, chemical structure, surface morphology and cross-section microstructure of the DLC coatings were examined by X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical behaviors of the DLC coatings in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution were investigated by performing an open circuit potential (OCP) measurement and a potentiodynamic polarization test. The experimental results showed that properly deposited DLC coatings could cause an increase of OCP by hundreds of millivolts and a reduction of anodic current density by several orders of magnitude as compared to that of the substrate. The results also demonstrated that electrochemical techniques could be used as tools to detect the soundness of the DLC coating by examining OCP and polarization curve, which varied with the form of defect and depended on the type of substrate. - Highlights: ► The substrate could affect the quality of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating. ► Defect-free DLC coating exhibited extremely low anodic current density. ► The quality of DLC coating on metal could be evaluated by electrochemical test

  16. Electrochemical performances of diamond-like carbon coatings on carbon steel, stainless steel, and brass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadinata, Samuel-Sudibyo; Lee, Ming-Tsung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Pan, Szu-Jung [Ocean Energy Research Center, Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Wen-Ta, E-mail: wttsai@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Ocean Energy Research Center, Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tai, Chen-Yi [Ocean Energy Research Center, Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Shih, Chuan-Feng [Ocean Energy Research Center, Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings have been deposited onto stainless steel, carbon steel and brass by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, respectively. Atomic arrangement, chemical structure, surface morphology and cross-section microstructure of the DLC coatings were examined by X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical behaviors of the DLC coatings in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution were investigated by performing an open circuit potential (OCP) measurement and a potentiodynamic polarization test. The experimental results showed that properly deposited DLC coatings could cause an increase of OCP by hundreds of millivolts and a reduction of anodic current density by several orders of magnitude as compared to that of the substrate. The results also demonstrated that electrochemical techniques could be used as tools to detect the soundness of the DLC coating by examining OCP and polarization curve, which varied with the form of defect and depended on the type of substrate. - Highlights: ► The substrate could affect the quality of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating. ► Defect-free DLC coating exhibited extremely low anodic current density. ► The quality of DLC coating on metal could be evaluated by electrochemical test.

  17. Corrosion study of steels exposed over five years to the humid tropical atmosphere of Panama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaén, Juan A., E-mail: juan.jaen@up.ac.pa [Departamento de Química Física, Edificio de Laboratorios Científicos-VIP (Panama); Iglesias, Josefina [Laboratorio de Análisis Industriales y Ciencias Ambientales (Panama)

    2017-11-15

    The results of assessing five-year corrosion of low-carbon and conventional weathering steels exposed to the Panamanian tropical atmosphere is presented. Two different test sites, one in Panama City: 5 km from the shoreline of the Pacific Ocean, and another in the marine environment of Fort Sherman, Caribbean coast of Panama; namely, Fort Sherman Coastal site: 100 m from coastline. The corrosion products, formed in the skyward and earthward faces in the studied tropical environment, were mainly identified using room temperature and low temperature (15 K) Mössbauer spectroscopy, and ATR-FTIR. In all samples, lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and goethite (α-FeOOH) were the main constituents. Some maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), was also identified in Tocumen by Mössbauer spectroscopy and traces of feroxyhyte (δ-FeOOH) using ATR-FTIR. The corrosion rate values obtained are discussed in light of the atmospheric exposure conditions and atmospheric pollutants.

  18. Characterization of D2 tool steel friction surfaced coatings over low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekharbabu, R.; Rafi, H. Khalid; Rao, K. Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Solid state coating by friction surfacing method. • D2 tool steel is coated over relatively softer low carbon steel. • Defect free interface between tool steel coating and low carbon steel substrate. • D2 coatings exhibited higher hardness and good wear resistance. • Highly refined martensitic microstructure in the coating. - Abstract: In this work D2 tool steel coating is produced over a low carbon steel substrate using friction surfacing process. The process parameters are optimized to get a defect free coating. Microstructural characterization is carried out using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Infrared thermography is used to measure the thermal profile during friction surfacing of D2 steel. Wear performance of the coating is studied using Pin-on-Disk wear tests. A lower rotational speed of the consumable rod and higher translational speed of the substrate is found to result in thinner coatings. Friction surfaced D2 steel coating showed fine-grained martensitic microstructure compared to the as-received consumable rod which showed predominantly ferrite microstructure. Refinement of carbides in the coating is observed due to the stirring action of the process. The infrared thermography studies showed the peak temperature attained by the D2 coating to be about 1200 °C. The combined effect of martensitic microstructure and refined carbides resulted in higher hardness and wear resistance of the coating

  19. The corrosion behavior of steel exposed to a DC electric field in the simulated wet-dry cyclic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Nianwei [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Protection and Advanced Materials in Electric Power, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chen, Qimeng [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Protection and Advanced Materials in Electric Power, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Zhang, Junxi, E-mail: zhangjunxi@shiep.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Protection and Advanced Materials in Electric Power, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Zhang, Xin; Ni, Qingzhao [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Protection and Advanced Materials in Electric Power, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Jiang, Yiming; Li, Jin [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2017-05-01

    The corrosion of steel exposed under a direct current (DC) electric field during simulated wet-dry cycles was investigated using weight gain, electrochemical tests, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results show that the steel exposed to a DC electric field exhibits a higher corrosion rate than those exposed under no DC electric field. The higher the DC electric field intensity, the higher the corrosion rate of steel. The XRD and SEM analyses indicate that more γ-FeOOH and cracks appear in the rust formed on steel exposed to the DC electric field. The porous γ-FeOOH, formation and expansion of cracks enhance the transfer of oxygen and corrosion products, thereby accelerating corrosion of steel exposed to DC electric field. - Highlights: • Effect of DC electric field on the corrosion of steel in wet/dry cycles was studied. • DC electric field accelerates the steel corrosion in wet/dry cyclic processes. • More γ-FeOOH is generated on the surface of steel exposed under a DC electric field. • More cracks appear in the rust formed on the steel exposed under a DC electric filed.

  20. The corrosion behavior of steel exposed to a DC electric field in the simulated wet-dry cyclic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Nianwei; Chen, Qimeng; Zhang, Junxi; Zhang, Xin; Ni, Qingzhao; Jiang, Yiming; Li, Jin

    2017-01-01

    The corrosion of steel exposed under a direct current (DC) electric field during simulated wet-dry cycles was investigated using weight gain, electrochemical tests, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results show that the steel exposed to a DC electric field exhibits a higher corrosion rate than those exposed under no DC electric field. The higher the DC electric field intensity, the higher the corrosion rate of steel. The XRD and SEM analyses indicate that more γ-FeOOH and cracks appear in the rust formed on steel exposed to the DC electric field. The porous γ-FeOOH, formation and expansion of cracks enhance the transfer of oxygen and corrosion products, thereby accelerating corrosion of steel exposed to DC electric field. - Highlights: • Effect of DC electric field on the corrosion of steel in wet/dry cycles was studied. • DC electric field accelerates the steel corrosion in wet/dry cyclic processes. • More γ-FeOOH is generated on the surface of steel exposed under a DC electric field. • More cracks appear in the rust formed on the steel exposed under a DC electric filed.

  1. Monitoring Techniques for Microbially Influenced Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2000-01-01

    corrosion rates, when biofilm and corrosion products cover the steel surface. However, EIS might be used for detection of MIC. EN is a suitable technique to characterise the type of corrosion attack, but is unsuitable for corrosion rate estimation. The concentric electrodes galvanic probe arrangement......Abstract Monitoring Techniques for Microbially Influenced Corrosion of Carbon Steel Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria, e.g. on pipelines buried in soil and on marine structures. MIC...... of carbon steel must be monitored on-line in order to provide an efficient protection and control the corrosion. A number of monitoring techniques is industrially used today, and the applicability and reliability of these for monitoring MIC is evaluated. Coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic...

  2. Archaeologic analogues: Microstructural changes by natural ageing in carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, Esther Bravo; Fernandez, Jorge Chamon; Arasanz, Javier Guzman; Peces, Raquel Arevalo; Criado, Antonio Javier; Dietz, Christian; Martinez, Juan Antonio; Criado Portal, Antonio Jose

    2006-01-01

    When discussing the container material for highly active radionuclear waste, carbon steel is one of the materials most frequently proposed by the international scientific community. Evidently, security with respect to the container behaviour into deep geological deposits is fundamental. Among other parameters, knowledge about material mechanical properties is essential when designing the container. Time ageing of carbon steel, apart from possible alterations of the chemical composition (e.g. corrosion) involves important microstructural changes, at the scale of centuries and millenniums. The latter may cause variations of the mechanical properties of carbon steel storage containers, with the corresponding risk of possible leakage. In order to properly estimate such risk and to adjust the corresponding mathematical models to reality, the microstructural changes observed in this study on archaeologic samples are evaluated, comparing ancient and modern steels of similar chemical composition and fabrication processes

  3. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien; Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Parkinson, Dula; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Bjegović, Dubravka; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The morphology of the corrosion of steel in cement paste was studied in situ. • During galvanostatic corrosion, carbon steel reinforcement corroded homogeneously. • On ferritic stainless steel, deep corrosion pits formed and caused wider cracks. • The measured rate of steel loss correlated well with Faraday’s law of electrolysis. - Abstract: In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover

  4. Damascus steels: history, processing, properties and carbon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadsworth, J.

    2007-01-01

    In the mid-1970s, a class of steels containing high levels of carbon (∼ 1-2 wt% C) was developed for superplastic characteristics - that is, the ability to plastically deform to an extraordinary degree in tension at intermediate temperatures. Because these steels also had excellent room temperature properties, they were developed for their commercial potential. In the late 1970s, we became aware of the striking compositional similarities between these modern steels and the ancient steels of Damascus. This observation led us to revisit the history and metallurgy of Damascus steels and related steels. The legends and origins of Damascus steel date back to the time of Alexander the Great (323 BC) and the medieval Crusades (11th and 12th century AD), and this material has also been the subject of scrutiny by famous scientist in Europe, including Michael Faraday. Modern attempts to reproduce the legendary surface patterns which famously characterized Damascus steels are described. The extend to which the characteristics of Damascus steels are unusual is discussed. Finally, a program on radiocarbon dating was initiated to directly determine the age of about 50 ancient steels, including a Damascus knife, and the results are summarized. (author)

  5. ICP-AES determination of trace elements in carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, Arijit; Rajeswari, B.; Kadam, R.M.; Babu, Y.; Godbole, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Carbon steel, a combination of the elements iron and carbon, can be classified into four types as mild, medium, high and very high depending on the carbon content which varies from 0.05% to 2.1%. Carbon steel of different types finds application in medical devices, razor blades, cutlery and spring. In the nuclear industry, it is used in feeder pipes in the reactor. A strict quality control measure is required to monitor the trace elements, which have deleterious effects on the mechanical properties of the carbon steel. Thus, it becomes imperative to check the purity of carbon steel as a quality control measure before it is used in feeder pipes in the reactor. Several methods have been reported in literature for trace elemental determination in high purity iron. Some of these include neutron activation analysis, atomic absorption spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) is widely recognized as a sensitive technique for the determination of trace elements in various matrices, its major advantages being good accuracy and precision, high sensitivity, multi-element capability, large linear dynamic range and relative freedom from matrix effects. The present study mainly deals with the direct determination of trace elements in carbon steel using ICP-AES. An axially viewing ICP spectrometer having a polychromator with 35 fixed analytical channels and limited sequential facility to select any analytical line within 2.2 nm of a polychromator line was used in these studies. Iron, which forms one of the main constituents of carbon steel, has a multi electronic configuration with line rich emission spectrum and, therefore, tends to interfere in the determination of trace impurities in carbon steel matrix. Spectral interference in ICP-AES can be seriously detrimental to the accuracy and reliability of trace element determinations, particularly when they are performed in the presence of high

  6. Corrosion of carbon steel in contact with bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrev, D.; Vokal, A.; Bruha, P.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Carbon steel canisters were chosen in a number of disposal concepts as reference material for disposal canisters. The corrosion rates of carbon steels in water solution both in aerobic and anaerobic conditions are well known, but only scarce data are available for corrosion behaviour of carbon steels in contact with bentonite. A special apparatus, which enables to measure corrosion rate of carbon steels under conditions simulating conditions in a repository, namely in contact with bentonite under high pressure and elevated temperatures was therefore prepared to study: - Corrosion rate of carbon steels in direct contact with bentonite in comparison with corrosion rate of carbon steels in synthetic bentonite pore water. - Influence of corrosion products on bentonite. The apparatus is composed of corrosion chamber containing a carbon steel disc in direct contact with compacted bentonite. Synthetic granitic water is above compacted bentonite under high pressure (50 - 100 bar) to simulate hydrostatic pressure in a repository. The experiments can be carried out under various temperatures. Bentonites used for experiments were Na-type of bentonite Volclay KWK 80 - 20 and Ca-Mg Czech bentonite from deposit Rokle. Before adding water into corrosion system the corrosion chamber was purged by nitrogen gas. The saturation of bentonite and corrosion rate were monitored by measuring consumption of water, pressure increase caused by swelling pressure of bentonite and by generation of hydrogen. Corrosion rate was also determined after corrosion experiments from weight loss of samples. The results of experiments show that the corrosion behaviour of carbon steels in contact with bentonite is very different from corrosion of carbon steels in water simulating bentonite pore water solution. The corrosion rates of carbon steel in contact with bentonite reached after 30 days of corrosion the values approaching 40 mm/yr contrary to values

  7. Super-Hydrophobic Green Corrosion Inhibitor On Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, H.; Ismail, A.; Ahmad, S.; Soon, C. F.

    2017-06-01

    There are many examples of organic coatings used for corrosion protection. In particular, hydrophobic and super-hydrophobic coatings are shown to give good protection because of their enhanced ability to slow down transport of water and ions through the coating. The purpose of this research is to develop water repellent coating to avoid direct contact between metal and environment corrosive and mitigate corrosion attack at pipeline system. This water repellent characteristic on super-hydrophobic coating was coated by electrodeposition method. Wettability of carbon steel with super-hydrophobic coating (cerium chloride and myristic acid) and oxidized surface was investigated through contact angle and inhibitor performance test. The inhibitor performance was studied in 25% tannin acid corrosion test at 30°C and 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl). The water contact angle test was determined by placing a 4-μL water droplet of distilled water. It shows that the wettability of contact angle super-hydrophobic with an angle of 151.60° at zero minute can be classified as super-hydrophobic characteristic. By added tannin acid as inhibitor the corrosion protection on carbon steel becomes more consistent. This reveals that the ability of the coating to withstand with the corrosion attack in the seawater at different period of immersions. The results elucidate that the weight loss increased as the time of exposure increased. However, the corrosion rates for uncoated carbon steel is high compared to coated carbon steel. As a conclusion, from both samples it can be seen that the coated carbon steel has less corrosion rated compared to uncoated carbon steel and addition of inhibitor to the seawater provides more protection to resist corrosion attack on carbon steel.

  8. intercritical heat treatments effects on low carbon steels quenched

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR B. A. EZEKOYE

    Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. 2. E-mail: benjamin.ezekoye@unn.edu.ng; bezekoye@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. Six low carbon steels containing carbon in the range 0.13-0.18wt%C were studied after intercritical quenching, intercritical quenching with low temperature tempering, ...

  9. Ultra low carbon bainitic (ULCB) steels after quenching and tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lis, A.K.; Lis, J.; Kolan, C.; Jeziorski, L.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanical and Charpy V impact strength properties of new advanced ultra low carbon bainitic (ULBC) steels after water quenching and tempering (WQT) have been investigated. Their chemical compositions are given. The nine continuous cooling transformation diagrams (CCT) of the new ULCB steel grades have been established. The CCT diagrams for ULCB N i steels containing 9% Ni - grade 10N9 and 5% Ni - grade HN5MVNb are given. The comparison between CCT diagrams of 3.5%Ni + 1.5%Cu containing steels grade HSLA 100 and HN3MCu is shown. The effect of the increase in carbon and titanium contents in the chemical composition of ULCB M n steels 04G3Ti, 06G3Ti and 09G3Ti on the kinetics of phase transformations during continuous cooling is presented by the shifting CCT diagrams. The Charpy V impact strength and brittle fracture occurence curves are shown. The effect of tempering temperature on tensile properties of WQT HN3MCu steel is shown and Charpy V impact strength curves after different tempering conditions are shown. The optimum tempering temperatures region of HN3MCu steel for high Charpy V impact toughness at law temperatures - 80 o C(193 K) and -120 o C(153 K) is estimated. The effect of tempering temperature on mechanical properties of HN5MVNb steel is given. The low temperature impact Charpy V toughness of HN5MVNb steel is shown. The optimum range of tempering temperature during 1 hour for high toughness of WQT HN5MVNb steel is given. HN3MCu and HN5MVNb steels after WQT have high yield strength YS≥690 MPa and high Charpy V impact toughness KV≥80 J at -100 o C (173K) and KCV≥50 J/cm 2 at - 120 o C (153K) so they may be used for cryogenic applications

  10. Analysis of heat transfer in plain carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Heung Nam; Lee, Kyung Jong

    1999-01-01

    During cooling of steels, the heat transfer was controlled by radiation, convection, conduction and heat evolution from phase transformation. To analyze the heat transfer during cooling precisely, the material constants such as density, heat capacity and the heat evolved during transformation were obtained as functions of temperature and chemical composition for each phase observed in plain carbon steel using a thermodynamic analysis based on the sublattice model of Fe-C-Mn system. The results were applied to 0.049 wt% and 0.155 wt% carbon steels with an austenitic stainless steel as reference by developing a proper heat transfer governing equation. The equation was solved using the lumped system method. In addition, using a transformation dilatometer with adequate experimental conditions to clarify the individual heat transfer effect, the transformation heat evolved during cooling and the transformation behavior as well as the temperature change were observed. The predicted temperature profiles during cooling were well agreed with the measured ones

  11. Corrosion Protection of Carbon Steel Using Poly aniline Composite with Inorganic Pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Dulaimi, A.A.; Shahrir Hashim; Khan, M.I.

    2011-01-01

    Two inorganic pigments (TiO 2 and SiO 2 ) were used to prepare composites with poly aniline (PANI) by situ polymerization method. PANI and PANI composites with SiO 2 and TiO 2 were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The morphology of the synthesized pigments (PANI , PANI-SiO 2 and PANI-TiO 2 ) was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Samples were then used as pigments through blending them with acrylic paint and applied on the surface of carbon steel panels. Corrosion was evaluated for coating of carbon steel panels through full immersion test up to standard ASTMG 31. Mass loss was calculated after they have been exposed in acidic media. A digital camera was also used for monitoring corrosion visually on the surface of carbon steel specimens. The results revealed that acrylic paint pigmented by PANI-SiO 2 composite was more efficient in corrosion protection for carbon steel compared with the other synthesized pigments. (author)

  12. Friction Welding of Titanium and Carbon Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi, HASUI; Yoichi, KIRA; Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University; Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd.

    1985-01-01

    Titanium-steel is a combination of dissimilar materials, which are difficult to weld in general, owing to inevitable formation of brittle intermetallic compounds. A prominent feature of friction welding process is ability to weld dissimilar materials in many kinds of combinations. This report deals with friction weldabilily of pure titanium and S25C steel, which are 12 mm in diameter. Main results are summarized as follows; (1) Suitable welding conditions to obtain a sound weld, which has a j...

  13. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Balkwill, P.H.; O'Brien, T.M.; Taylor, K.J.; Marsh, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    This is the final report of a 2 year programme aimed at (1) determining the rate of anaerobic corrosion of steel in concrete, (2) investigating the nature of the corrosion products formed on carbon steel embedded in cementitious material under anaerobic conditions and (3) evaluating the effect of hydrogen over-pressures on the rate of anaerobic corrosion. All experiments have been carried out at temperatures in the range 20-30 0 C, ie ambient conditions. 4 refs.; 19 figs.; 6 tabs

  14. ESTIMATION OF IRREVERSIBLE DAMAGEABILITY AT FATIGUE OF CARBON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Vakulenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Damageability estimation of carbon steel in the conditions of cyclic loading. Methodology. The steel fragments of railway wheel rim and rail head served as material for research with chemical composition 0.65 % С, 0.67 % Mn, 0.3 % Si, 0.027 % P, 0.028 % S и 0.7 % C, 0.82 % Mn, 0.56 % Si, 0.025 % P, 0.029 % S accordingly. The microstructure of tested steels corresponded to the state of metal after a hot plastic deformation. The fatigue research was conducted in the conditions of symmetric bend using the proof-of-concept machine of type «Saturn-10». Full Wohler diagrams and the lines corresponding to forming of sub-and micro cracks were constructed. The distribution analysis of internal stresses in the metal under cyclic loading was carried out using the microhardness tester of PMT-3 type.Findings. On the basis of fatigue curves for high-carbon steels analysis the positions of borders dividing the areas of convertible and irreversible damages were determined. The article shows that with the growth of carbon concentration in the steel at invariability of the structural state an increase of fatigue limit is observed. At the same time the acceleration of processes, which determine transition terms from the stage of forming of submicrocracks to the microcracks occurs. The research of microhardness distribution in the metal after destruction confirmed the nature of carbon amount influence on the carbon steel characteristics. Originality. Regardless on the stages of breakdown site forming the carbon steels behavior at a fatigue is determined by the ration between the processes of strengthening and softening. At a cyclic loading the heterogeneity of internal stresses distribution decreases with the increase of distance from the destruction surface. Analysis of metal internal restructuring processes at fatigue loading made it possible to determine that at the stages prior to incubation period in the metal microvolumes the cells are already

  15. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    KAUST Repository

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien; Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Parkinson, Dula; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Bjegović, Dubravka; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    KAUST Repository

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien

    2014-06-01

    In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Corrosion behavior of sodium-exposed stainless steels in chloride-containing aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, P.C.S.; Grundy, B.R.; Miller, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of sodium-exposed stainless steels in chloride-containing aqueous solutions was investigated. Results showed that sodium-corroded Type 316 stainless steel (prototypic Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuel cladding) maintains its integrity after five months exposure in these solutions at 82 0 C and with chloride content up to 500 ppM. In contrast, sensitized and sodium mass transfer deposit-containing Type 304 stainless steel failed in the high chloride solution (500 ppM) within ten days at the same temperature. The failure was initiated by pitting and subsequently accelerated by intergranular attack. The results also show that high pH tends to reduce the susceptibility to failure while procedures commonly used for sodium removal have no significant effect on the water corrosion behavior of the test material. Based on the current results, it is concluded that water shortage is feasible for spent fuels in a LMFBR reprocessing plant

  18. Content of nitrogen in waste petroleum carbon for steel industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, R.O; Jimenez, A.F; Szieber, C.W; Banchik, A.D

    2004-01-01

    Steel industries use refined carbon as an alloy for steel production. This alloy is produced from waste carbon from the distillation of the petroleum. The refined carbon, called recarburizer, is obtained by calcination at high temperature. Under these thermal conditions the organic molecules decompose and a fraction of the N 2 , S and H 2 , volatile material and moisture are released; while the carbon tends to develop a crystalline structure similar to graphite's. The right combination of calcinations temperature and time in the furnace can optimize the quality of the resulting product. The content of S and N 2 has to be minimized for the use of calcined carbon in the steel industry. Nitrogen content should be reduced by two orders of magnitude, from 1% - 2% down to hundreds of ppm by weight. This work describes the activities undertaken to obtain calcined coke from petroleum from crude oil carbon that satisfies the requirements of the Mercosur standard 02:00-169 (Pending) for use as a carborizer in steels industries. To satisfy the requirements of the Mercosur standards NM 236:00 IRAM-IAS-NM so that graphite is used as a carburizer a content of 300 ppm maximum weight of nitrogen has to be obtained. So the first stage in this development is to define a production process for supplying calcined coke in the range of nitrogen concentrations required by the Mercosur standards (CW)

  19. Fatigue behaviour of friction welded medium carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel dissimilar joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paventhan, R.; Lakshminarayanan, P.R.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Fusion welding of dissimilar metals is a problem due to difference in properties. → Solid state welding process such as friction welding is a solution for the above problem. → Fatigue life of friction welded carbon steel and stainless steel joints are evaluated. → Effect of notch on the fatigue life of friction welded dissimilar joints is reported. → Formation of intermetallic is responsible for reduction in fatigue life of dissimilar joints. -- Abstract: This paper reports the fatigue behaviour of friction welded medium carbon steel-austenitic stainless steel (MCS-ASS) dissimilar joints. Commercial grade medium carbon steel rods of 12 mm diameter and AISI 304 grade austenitic stainless steel rods of 12 mm diameter were used to fabricate the joints. A constant speed, continuous drive friction welding machine was used to fabricate the joints. Fatigue life of the joints was evaluated conducting the experiments using rotary bending fatigue testing machine (R = -1). Applied stress vs. number of cycles to failure (S-N) curve was plotted for unnotched and notched specimens. Basquin constants, fatigue strength, fatigue notch factor and notch sensitivity factor were evaluated for the dissimilar joints. Fatigue strength of the joints is correlated with microstructure, microhardness and tensile properties of the joints.

  20. Trial manufacturing of titanium-carbon steel composite overpack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, Nobuyuki; Chiba, Takahiko; Tanai, Kenji

    1999-11-01

    This paper reports the results of design analysis and trial manufacturing of full-scale titanium-carbon steel composite overpacks. The overpack is one of the key components of the engineered barrier system, hence, it is necessary to confirm the applicability of current technique in their manufacture. The required thickness was calculated according to mechanical resistance analysis, based on models used in current nuclear facilities. The Adequacy of the calculated dimensions was confirmed by finite-element methods. To investigate the necessity of a radiation shielding function of the overpack, the irradiation from vitrified waste has been calculated. As a result, it was shown that shielding on handling and transport equipment is a more reasonable and practical approach than to increase thickness of overpack to attain a self-shielding capability. After the above investigation, trial manufacturing of full-scale model of titanium-carbon steel composite overpack has been carried out. For corrosion-resistant material, ASTM Grade-2 titanium was selected. The titanium layer was bonded individually to a cylindrical shell and fiat cover plates (top and bottom) made of carbon steel. For the cylindrical shell portion, a cylindrically formed titanium layer was fitted to the inner carbon steel vessel by shrinkage. For the flat cover plates (top and bottom), titanium plate material was coated by explosive bonding. Electron beam welding and gas metal arc welding were combined to weld of the cover plates to the body. No significant failure was evident from inspections of the fabrication process, and the applicability of current technology for manufacturing titanium-carbon steel composite overpack was confirmed. Future research and development items regarding titanium-carbon steel composite overpacks are also discussed. (author)

  1. Fracture behaviour of the 14Cr ODS steel exposed to helium and liquid lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojna, Anna; Di Gabriele, Fosca; Hadraba, Hynek; Husak, Roman; Kubena, Ivo; Rozumova, Lucia; Bublikova, Petra; Kalivodova, Jana; Matejicek, Jiri

    2017-07-01

    This work describes the fracture behaviour of the 14Cr ODS steel produced by mechanical alloying process, after high temperature exposures. Small specimens were exposed to helium gas in a furnace at 720 °C for 500 h. Another set of specimens was exposed to flowing liquid lead in the COLONRI II loop at 650 °C for 1000 h. All specimens were tested for the impact and tensile behaviour. The impact test results are compared to other sets of specimens in the as received state and after isothermal annealing at 650 °C for 1000 h. The impact curves of the exposed materials showed positive shifts on the transition temperature. While the upper shelf value did not change in the Pb exposed ODS steel, it significantly increased in the He exposed one. The differences are discussed in terms of surface and subsurface microscopy observation. The embrittlement can be explained as the effect of a slight change in the grain boundary and size distribution combined with the depletion of sub-surface region from alloying elements forming oxide scale on the surface.

  2. Electrochemical noise from corroding carbon steel and aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, P.R.; Gaonkar, K.B.; De, P.K.; Banerjee, S.

    1997-05-01

    Electrochemical noise measurements were conducted on carbon steel and aluminium in sodium chloride solutions. Noise parameters like standard deviation of potential and current, noise resistance, pitting index, noise power were studied for the purpose of measuring corrosion rate. These parameters compared well with the corrosion rate. Pitting index was not very reliable. Current noise was more close to the corrosion rates. General corrosion gave rise to white noise type of power spectrum while flicker noise type of spectrum was obtained from pitting attack. Sodium nitrite is shown to inhibit the corrosion of carbon steel. Aluminium corrodes in the early period of exposure and passivates during long exposure

  3. Erosion and deuterium retention of CLF-1 steel exposed to deuterium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, L.; Wang, P.; Hu, M.; Gao, L.; Jacob, W.; Fu, E. G.; Luo, G. N.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel has been proposed as the plasma-facing material in remote regions of the first wall. This study reports the erosion and deuterium retention behaviours in CLF-1 steel exposed to deuterium (D) plasma in a linear experimental plasma system as function of incident ion energy and fluence. The incident D ion energy ranges from 30 to 180 eV at a flux of 4 × 1021 D m-2 s-1 up to a fluence of 1025 D m-2. SEM images revealed a clear change of the surface morphology as functions of incident fluence and impinging energy. The mass loss results showed a decrease of the total sputtering yield of CLF-1 steel with increasing incident fluence by up to one order of magnitude. The total sputtering yield of CLF-1 steel after 7.2 × 1024 D m-2 deuterium plasma exposure reduced by a factor of 4 compared with that of pure iron, which can be attributed to the enrichment of W at the surface due to preferential sputtering of iron and chromium. After D plasma exposure, the total deuterium retention in CLF-1 steel samples measured by TDS decreased with increasing incident fluence and energy, and a clear saturation tendency as function of incident fluence or energy was also observed.

  4. Strength of low-carbon rotor steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voropaev, V.I.; Filimonov, O.V.; Borisov, I.A.

    1988-01-01

    The results of studying the effect of chemical composition and thermal treatment regimes on the structural strength of steels of the 25KhN3MFA type are presented. It is shown that alloying with niobium from 0.01 to 0.08% steels with the increased nickel content (4.2-4.5%) contributes to the increase of structural strength and reduction of semibrittleness temperature. To obtain high values of strength and plastic properties cooling with the rate of 10 3 -10 5 K/hr is recommended

  5. Carbon-14 speciation during anoxic corrosion of activated steel in a repository environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, E.; Cvetkovic, B.Z.; Kunz, D. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Waste Management; Salazar, G.; Szidat, S. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

    2018-01-15

    Radioactive waste contains significant amounts of {sup 14}C which has been identified a key radionuclide in safety assessments. In Switzerland, the {sup 14}C inventory of a cement-based repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (L/ILW) is mainly associated with activated steel (∝85 %). {sup 14}C is produced by {sup 14}N activation in steel parts exposed to thermal neutron flux in light water reactors. Release of {sup 14}C occurs in the near field of a deep geological repository due to anoxic corrosion of activated steel. Although the {sup 14}C inventory of the L/ILW repository and the sources of {sup 14}C are well known, the formation of {sup 14}C species during steel corrosion is only poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to identify and quantify the {sup 14}C-bearing carbon species formed during the anoxic corrosion of iron and steel and further to determine the {sup 14}C speciation in a corrosion experiment with activated steel. All experiments were conducted in conditions similar to those anticipated in the near field of a cement-based repository.

  6. OF PLAIN CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two steels En 3 and En 39 were given a TiC-TiN. CVD coating in the carburized and uncarburized conditions. The continuity of the coatings and their adherance to the substrate were examined. The thickness of the deposited coatings were also measured, their adherence to the substrate and their thickness was off ected by ...

  7. Carbon steel protection in G.S. [Girldler sulphide] plants: Pt. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lires, Osvaldo; Delfino, Cristina; Rojo, Enrique.

    1990-01-01

    In order to protect carbon steel of towers and piping of a GS experimental heavy water plant against corrosion produced by the action of aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulphide, a method, elsewhere published, was developed. Carbon steel exposed to saturated aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulphide forms iron sulphide scales. In oxygen free solutions, evolution of corrosion follows the sequence mackinawate → cubic ferrous sulphide → troilite → pyrrotite → pyrite. Scales formed by pyrrotite and pyrite are the most protective layers (these are obtained at 130 deg C, 2 MPa for a period of 14 days). Pyrite formation is favoured by an oxidizing agent presence that allows the oxidation of sulphur ions to disulphur ions. Elemental sulphur or oxygen were used as oxidating agents. Variation and operational parameters such as concentration, temperature, pH, aggregate time, etc. were studied. Though little improvement on protective scales quality was observed, results do not justify operational troubles and the additional costs and effort involved. (Author)

  8. Surface protection of austenitic steels by carbon nanotube coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLucas, T.; Schütz, S.; Suarez, S.; Mücklich, F.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, surface protection properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) deposited on polished austenitic stainless steel are evaluated. Electrophoretic deposition is used as a coating technique. Contact angle measurements reveal hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic wetting characteristics of the carbon nanotube coating depending on the additive used for the deposition. Tribological properties of carbon nanotube coatings on steel substrate are determined with a ball-on-disc tribometer. Effective lubrication can be achieved by adding magnesium nitrate as an additive due to the formation of a holding layer detaining CNTs in the contact area. Furthermore, wear track analysis reveals minimal wear on the coated substrate as well as carbon residues providing lubrication. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy is used to qualitatively analyse the elemental composition of the coating and the underlying substrate. The results explain the observed wetting characteristics of each coating. Finally, merely minimal oxidation is detected on the CNT-coated substrate as opposed to the uncoated sample.

  9. Carbon in condensed hydrocarbon phases, steels and cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAFAROVA Victoria Alexandrovna

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a review of studies carried out mainly by the researchers of the Ufa State Petroleum Technological University, which are aimed at detection of new properties of carbon in such condensed media as petroleum and coal pitches, steels and cast irons. Carbon plays an important role in the industry of construction materials being a component of road and roof bitumen and setting the main mechanical properties of steels. It was determined that crystal-like structures appear in classical glass-like substances – pitches which contain several thousands of individual hydrocarbons of various compositions. That significantly extends the concept of crystallinity. In structures of pitches, the control parameter of the staged structuring process is paramagnetism of condensed aromatic hydrocarbons. Fullerenes were detected in steels and cast irons and identified by various methods of spectrometry and microscopy. Fullerene С60, which contains 60 carbon atoms, has diameter of 0,7 nm and is referred to the nanoscale objects, which have a significant influence on the formation of steel and cast iron properties. It was shown that fullerenes appear at all stages of manufacture of cast irons; they are formed during introduction of carbon from the outside, during crystallization of metal in welded joints. Creation of modified fullerene layers in steels makes it possible to improve anticorrosion and tribological properties of structural materials. At the same time, outside diffusion of carbon from the carbon deposits on the metal surface also leads to formation of additional amount of fullerenes. This creates conditions for occurrence of local microdistortions of the structure, which lead to occurrence of cracks. Distribution of fullerenes in iron matrix is difficult to study as the method is labor-intensive, it requires dissolution of the matrix in the hydrofluoric acid and stage fullerene separation with further identification by spectral methods.

  10. Nonmetallic inclusions in carbon steel smelted in plasma furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shengelaya, I B; Kostyakov, V N; Nodiy, T K; Imerlishvili, V G; Gavisiani, A G [AN Gruzinskoj SSR, Tbilisi. Inst. Metallurgii

    1979-01-01

    A complex investigation on nonmetallic inclusions in carbon cast iron, smelted in plasma furnace in argon atmosphere and cast partly in the air and partly in argon atmosphere, has been carried out. As compared to open-hearth furnace carbon steel, the test metal was found to contain more oxide inclusions and nitrides; besides, in chromium-containing metal, chromium nitrides form the larger part of nitrides.

  11. Oxidation of ultra low carbon and silicon bearing steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, Lucia [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: lucia.suarez@ctm.com.es; Rodriguez-Calvillo, Pablo [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: pablo.rodriguez@ctm.com.es; Houbaert, Yvan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: Yvan.Houbaert@UGent.be; Colas, Rafael [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)], E-mail: rcolas@mail.uanl.mx

    2010-06-15

    Oxidation tests were carried out in samples from an ultra low carbon and two silicon bearing steels to determine the distribution and morphology of the oxide species present. The ultra low carbon steel was oxidized for short periods of time within a chamber designed to obtain thin oxide layers by controlling the atmosphere, and for longer times in an electric furnace; the silicon steels were reheated only in the electric furnace. The chamber was constructed to study the behaviour encountered during the short period of time between descaling and rolling in modern continuous mills. It was found that the oxide layers formed on the samples reheated in the electric furnace were made of different oxide species. The specimens treated in the chamber had layers made almost exclusively of wustite. Selected oxide samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy to obtain electron backscattered diffraction patterns, which were used to identify the oxide species in the layer.

  12. Temperature thresholds for surface blistering of platinum and stainless steel exposed to curium-242 alpha radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonell, W.R.; Dillich, S.

    1981-01-01

    Implantation of helium in materials exposed to alpha-emitting radionuclides such as 242 Cm causes surface blistering at elevated temperatures. The temperature thresholds for such blistering are of practical importance to the selection of suitable container materials for radionuclides, and are of fundamental interest with regard to the mechanisms of helium blistering of materials in radiation environments. The purpose of this investigation was to establish temperature thresholds for surface blistering of platinum and stainless-steel container materials by post-irradiation heating of specimens exposed at room temperature to alpha particles from an external 242 Cm source. These thresholds were compared with (1) the analogous temperature thresholds for surface blistering of materials exposed to external beams of accelerator helium ions, and (2) thresholds for swelling and grain-boundary cracking of materials in which helium is generated internally by (n,α) reactions during reactor exposures

  13. Carbon distribution in bainitic steel subjected to deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Yu. F., E-mail: yufi55@mail.ru [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Nikitina, E. N., E-mail: Nikitina-EN@mail.ru; Gromov, V. E., E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru [Siberian State Industrial University, Novokuznetsk, 654007 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    Analysis of the formation and evolution of carbide phase in medium carbon steel with a bainitic structure during compressive deformation was performed by means of transmission electron diffraction microscopy. Qualitative transformations in carbide phase medium size particles, their density and volume concentration depended on the degree of deformation.

  14. Vanadium Effect on a Medium Carbon Forging Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Garcia-Mateo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the influence of vanadium on the hardenability and the bainitic transformation of a medium carbon steel is analyzed. While V in solid solution enhances the former, it hardly affects bainitic transformation. The results also reveal an unexpected result, an increase of the prior austenite grain size as the V content increases.

  15. Carbon Equivalence and Weldability of Microalloyed Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-25

    being considered for Navy applications. Wilson et al [181 in their review of copper-adde. steels have shown that in the CCT diagram for modified versions...almost linearly with austenite grain size (Fig. 4.2) [211. Therefore, the net effect of the addition of micro-alloying elements is to shift the CCT ... diagram to shorter times and thereby decrease the amount of martensite in the HAZ. Recently, computation of austenite grain growth in the HAZ’s of micro

  16. Fracture Resistance of 14Cr ODS Steel Exposed to a High Temperature Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hojna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the impact fracture behavior of the 14%Cr Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS steel (ODM401 after high temperature exposures in helium and air in comparison to the as-received state. A steel bar was produced by mechanical alloying and hot-extrusion at 1150 °C. Further, it was cut into small specimens, which were consequently exposed to air or 99.9% helium in a furnace at 720 °C for 500 h. Impact energy transition curves are shifted towards higher temperatures after the gas exposures. The transition temperatures of the exposed states significantly increase in comparison to the as-received steel by about 40 °C in He and 60 °C in the air. Differences are discussed in terms of microstructure, surface and subsurface Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM observations. The embrittlement was explained as temperature and environmental effects resulting in a decrease of dislocation level, slight change of the particle composition and interface/grain boundary segregations, which consequently affected the nucleation of voids leading to the ductile fracture.

  17. Effect of carbon activity on the creep behaviour of 21/4Cr, 1Mo steel in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordwell, J.E.; Charnock, W.; Nicholson, R.D.

    1979-02-01

    The creep endurance and creep cracking behaviour of 2 1/4Cr, 1Mo steel in sodium at 475 0 C have been studied at three different sodium carbon activities. Creep endurance was found to increase with increasing carbon activity of the sodium. Tests carried out in high carbon activity sodium were discontinued before fracture. Creep crack initiation displacement at notches decreased with increasing carbon activity, presumably as a result of notch tip carburisation. The plastic zones at the tips of blunt notches in specimens exposed in high carbon activity sodium were preferentially carburised. These observations were similar to those made previously on 9Cr, 1Mo steel. One difference detected metallographically was that in a high carburising environment uniform carburisation was obtained in the 2 1/4Cr, 1Mo steel specimens whereas carburisation gradients were observed in the 9Cr, 1Mo steel. Creep crack propagation rates for given notch opening displacement rates in low and intermediate carbon activity sodium were indistinguishable. However, the strenthening that resulted from the mild carburisation of the specimen in the intermediate carbon activity sodium caused slower notch opening displacement rates and crack propagation rates than in the low carbon activity sodium, when the rates were compared at the same crack length. (author)

  18. Mechanical properties and fatigue strength of high manganese non-magnetic steel/carbon steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaji, Eiji; Ikeda, Soichi; Kim, You-Chul; Nakatsuji, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Kosuke.

    1997-01-01

    The dissimilar materials welded joints of high manganese non-magnetic steel/carbon steel (hereafter referred to as DMW joints), in which weld defects such as hot crack or blowhole are not found, were the good quality. Tensile strength of DMW joints was 10% higher than that of the base metal of carbon steel. In the bend tests, the DMW joints showed the good ductility without crack. Charpy absorbed energy at 0(degC) of the DMW joints was over 120(J) in the bond where it seems to be the lowest. Large hardening or softening was not detected in the heat affected zone. Fatigue strength of the DMW joints is almost the same with that of the welded joints of carbon steel/carbon steel. As the fatigue strength of the DMW joints exceeds the fatigue design standard curve of JSSC for carbon steel welded joints, the DMW joints can be treated the same as the welded joints of carbon steel/carbon steel of which strength is lower than that of high manganese non-magnetic steel, from the viewpoint of the fatigue design. (author)

  19. Characterization of the rust formed on weathering steel exposed to Qinghai salt lake atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Q.X.; Wang, Z.Y.; Han, W.; Han, E.H.

    2008-01-01

    The product formed on weathering steel exposed to salt lake atmosphere for 12 months was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared transmission spectroscopy (IRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) and electrochemical techniques. The rust was mainly composed of β-FeOOH, Fe 8 (O,OH) 16 Cl 1.3 and a little γ-FeOOH. Amorphous δ-FeOOH was only on skyward surface. The rust layer suppressed anodic reaction and facilitated the cathodic reaction. The very small value of rust resistance R r in this work indicated that the rust had poor protective ability. Cl element was rich in the whole rust layer and played an important role in accelerating the corrosion of weathering steel in salt lake atmosphere

  20. Morphological and microstructural studies on aluminizing coating of carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsu, Zaifol; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Daud, Abd Razak; Hussein, Hishammuddin [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Hot dip aluminizing is one of the most effective methods of surface protection for steels and is gradually gaining popularity. The morphology and microstructure of an inter-metallic layer form on the surface of low carbon steel by hot dip aluminization treatment had been studied in detail. This effect has been investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The result shows that the reaction between the steel and the molten aluminium leads to the formation of Fe–Al inter-metallic compounds on the steel surface. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopic studies showed that a two layer coating was formed consisting of an external Al layer and a (Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}) inter metallic on top of the substrate after hot dip aluminizing process. The inter-metallic layer is ‘thick’ and exhibits a finger-like growth into the steel. Microhardness testing shown that the intermetallic layer has high hardness followed by steel substrate and the lowest hardness was Al layer.

  1. Novel sintered ceramic materials incorporated with EAF carbon steel slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V.; Ntampegliotis, K.; Lamprakopoulos, S.; Papapolymerou, G.; Spiliotis, X.

    2017-01-01

    In the present research, novel sintered clay-based ceramic materials containing electric arc furnace carbon steel slag (EAFC) as a useful admixture were developed and characterized. The environmentally safe management of steel industry waste by-products and their valorization as secondary resources into value-added materials towards circular economy have attracted much attention in the last years. EAF Carbon steel slag in particular, is generated during the manufacture of carbon steel. It is a solid residue mainly composed of rich-in- Fe, Ca and Si compounds. The experimental results show that the beneficial incorporation of lower percentages of EAFC up to 6%wt. into ceramics sintered at 950 °C is attained without significant variations in sintering behavior and physico-mechanical properties. Further heating up to 1100 °C strongly enhances the densification of the ceramic microstructures, thus reducing the porosity and strengthening their mechanical performance. On the other side, in terms of thermal insulation behavior as well as energy consumption savings and production cost alleviation, the optimum sintering temperature appears to be 950 °C.

  2. Microstructural investigations of 0.2% carbon content steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollabimazraehno, Sajjad; Hingerl, Kurt

    2011-10-01

    The effect of thermal annealing to get different phases on low carbon steel was investigated. Steel sheets (0.2 wt. % C) of 900 μm thickness were heat treated to produce different structures. All the samples have the same starting point, transformation to coarse austenite at 900 degree Celsius. The nano indentation results revealed that samples have different hadness. By making conventional SEM micrographs, focus ion beam maps, and Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) the microstructural development and grain boundary variation of transformed phases martensite, biainte, tempered martensite and different combination of these phases were studied.

  3. Corrosion of carbon steel under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of carbon steel has been studied in the United Kingdom under granitic groundwater conditions, with pH between 5 and 10 and possibly substantial amounts of Cl - , SO 4 2- and HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- . Corrosion modes considered include uniform corrosion under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions; passive corrosion; localized attack in the form of pitting or crevice corrosion; and environmentally assisted cracking - hydrogen embrittlement or stress corrosion cracking. Studies of these processes are being carried out in order to predict the metal thicknesses required to give container lifetimes of 500 to 1000 years. A simple uniform corrosion model predicts a corrosion rate of around 13.4 μm/a at 20C, rising to 69 μm/a at 50C and 208 μm/a at 90C. A radiation dose of 10 5 rad/h and a G-value of 2.8 for the production of oxidizing species would account for an increase in corrosion rate of 7 μm/a. This model overestimates slightly the results actually achieved for experimental samples exposed for two years, the difference being due to a protective film formed on the samples. These corrosion rates predict that the container must be 227 mm thick to withstand uniform corrosion; however, they predict very high levels of hydrogen production. Conditions will be favourable for localized or pitting corrosion for about 125 years, leading to a maximum penetration of 160 mm. Since the exposure environment cannot be predicted precisely, one cannot state that stress corrosion cracking is impossible. Thus the container must be stress relieved. Other corrosion mechanisms such as microbial corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement are not considered significant

  4. Chemistry conditions in crevices of carbon steel and stainless steel: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushpalata, R.; Veena, S.; Chandran, Sinu; Mohan, T.V.K.; Rangarajan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    2008-01-01

    Occurrence of crevice corrosion in the steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants may lead to transport of radioactivity to the secondary side. It is expected that effect of crevice corrosion will be more pronounced in a passive material like stainless steel (SS) as compared to carbon steel (CS). Theoretical modeling of the dynamics of crevice chemistry calls for experimental data with respect to various water chemistry parameters like pH, conductivity and concentrations of the ionic species in typical crevices of different geometry (aspect ratio of length and width). This paper presents the experimental results obtained with crevices in CS -106 B, SS-304 (nano grain) and SS 316 blocks (varying dimensions) exposed to a medium containing 1 ppm of lithium and chloride ion each for 10 days in static autoclave at 245 deg C. The bulk solution pH showed a reduction in alkalinity and slight increase in conductivity. In case of CS about 58 times increase in Cl - was observed in the smaller crevice of dimension 1 mm (width) x 25 mm (depth) whereas it was only ∼ 12 times in the bigger crevice (2 mm x 39 mm). Other anionic impurities like SO 4 2- and Br - present as impurities in NaCI were also found to be concentrated in the crevices whereas not much increase in cationic impurities was observed. In a similar experiment with SS blocks with crevice dimension comparable to diffusion layer thickness, appreciable increase in chloride concentration was observed. Electrochemical experiments were also carried out in deaerated NaCI (3.5%) solution at 25 deg C with CS, SS-304 (nano grain) and SS-316 (normal-grain) coupons. The OCP was -297 mV for SS-316 whereas for SS-304 coupon the OCP was -339 mV. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization curve showed a passive behavior up to 0.0V and then a sudden increase in anodic current. On nano-grained SS, a yellowish film on the surface was observed with a large number of pits whereas severe general corrosion was observed in the normal

  5. Aerosol measurements from plasma torch cuts on stainless steel, carbon steel, and aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novick, V.J.; Brodrick, C.J.; Crawford, S.; Nasiatka, J.; Pierucci, K.; Reyes, V.; Sambrook, J.; Wrobel, S.; Yeary, J.

    1996-01-01

    The main purpose of this project is to quantify aerosol particle size and generation rates produced by a plasma torch whencutting stainless steel, carbon steel and aluminum. the plasma torch is a common cutting tool used in the dismantling of nuclear facilities. Eventually, other cutting tools will be characterized and the information will be compiled in a user guide to aid in theplanning of both D ampersand D and other cutting operations. The data will be taken from controlled laboratory experiments on uncontaminated metals and field samples taken during D ampersand D operations at ANL nuclear facilities. The plasma torch data was collected from laboratory cutting tests conducted inside of a closed, filtered chamber. The particle size distributions were determined by isokinetically sampling the exhaust duct using a cascade impactor. Cuts on different thicknesses showed there was no observable dependence of the aerosol quantity produced as a function of material thickness for carbon steel. However, data for both stainless steel and aluminum revealed that the aerosol mass produced for these materials appear to have some dependance on thickness, with thinner materials producing tmore aerosols. The results of the laboratory cutting tests show that most measured particle size distributions are bimodal with one mode at about 0.2 μm and the other at about 10 μm. The average Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameters (MMAD's) for these tests are 0.36 ±0.08 μm for stainless steel, 0.48 ±0.17μm for aluminum and 0.52±0.12 μm for carbon steel

  6. Heat exchange performance of stainless steel and carbon foams modified with carbon nano fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuzovskaya, I.; Pacheco Benito, Sergio; Chinthaginjala, J.K.; Reed, C.P.; Lefferts, Leonardus; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNF), with fishbone and parallel wall structures, were grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on the surface of carbon foam and stainless steel foam, in order to improve their heat exchange performance. Enhancement in heat transfer efficiency between 30% and 75% was achieved

  7. Effects of tempering on internal friction of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, J.J.; Ghilarducci, A.A.; Salva, H.R.; Chaves, C.A.; Velez, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Time tempering dependent microstructure of two steels is studied by internal friction. → Internal friction indicates the interactions of dislocations with carbon and carbides. → Internal friction detects the first stage of tempering. → Precipitation hardening is detected by the decrease in the background. - Abstract: Two steels containing 0.626 and 0.71 wt.% carbon have been studied to determine the effects of tempering on the microstructure and the internal friction. The steels were annealed at 1093 K, quenched into water and tempered for 60 min at 423 K, 573 K and 723 K. The increase of the tempering time diminishes the martensite tetragonality due to the redistribution of carbon atoms from octahedrical interstitial sites to dislocations. Internal friction spectrum is decomposed into five peaks and an exponential background, which are attributed to the carbide precipitation and the dislocation relaxation process. Simultaneous presence of peaks P1 and P2 indicates the interaction of dislocations with the segregated carbon and carbide precipitate.

  8. Effects of chloride ions on corrosion of ductile iron and carbon steel in soil environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yarong; Jiang, Guangming; Chen, Ying; Zhao, Peng; Tian, Yimei

    2017-07-31

    Chloride is reported to play a significant role in corrosion reactions, products and kinetics of ferrous metals. To enhance the understanding of the effects of soil environments, especially the saline soils with high levels of chloride, on the corrosion of ductile iron and carbon steel, a 3-month corrosion test was carried out by exposing ferrous metals to soils of six chloride concentrations. The surface morphology, rust compositions and corrosion kinetics were comprehensively studied by visual observation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD), weight loss, pit depth measurement, linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. It showed that chloride ions influenced the characteristics and compositions of rust layers by diverting and participating in corrosion reactions. α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH and iron oxides were major corrosion products, while β-Fe 8 O 8 (OH) 8 Cl 1.35 rather than β-FeOOH was formed when high chloride concentrations were provided. Chloride also suppressed the decreasing of corrosion rates, whereas increased the difficulty in the diffusion process by thickening the rust layers and transforming the rust compositions. Carbon steel is more susceptible to chloride attacks than ductile iron. The corrosion kinetics of ductile iron and carbon steel corresponded with the probabilistic and bilinear model respectively.

  9. The effect of water vapor on the corrosion of carbon steel at 65 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.E.; Estill, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    AISI 1020 carbon steel was exposed to air at various relative humidities at 65 degrees C. A ''critical relative humidity'' (CRH) of 75--85% was determined. The CRH is the transitional relative humidity where oxidation/corrosion changes from dry oxidation to aqueous film electrochemical corrosion. Short term testing suggests that aqueous film electrochemical corrosion results in the formation of an inner oxide of Fe 3 O 4 , and an outer oxide of a powdery Fe 2 O 3 and/or Fe 2 O 3 ·xH 2 O

  10. An experimental study on inelastic behavior for exposed-type steel column bases under three-dimensional loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Hyouk [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yeol [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Considerable damage occurred to steel structures during the Kobe earthquake in Japan. Numerous exposed-type column bases failed in several consistent patterns caused by brittle base plate fracture, excessive anchor bolt elongation, unexpected early anchor bolt failure, and inferior construction work. An exposed-type column base receives axial force and biaxial bending when receiving an arbitrary multidirectional earthquake motion. Up to now, numerous researchers have examined methods to identify their stiffness and strength, but those studies have heretofore been restricted to in-plane behaviors. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the inelastic behavior of exposed type steel column bases under biaxial lateral loading and axially compressive-tensile loading, which is a closer simulation of the real seismic excitation. In this study, exposed type steel column bases with different failure types, anchor bolt yielding and base plate yielding, are tested under different loading programs, then moment resisting mechanisms and failure modes are investigated.

  11. An experimental study on inelastic behavior for exposed-type steel column bases under three-dimensional loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Hyouk; Choi, Yeol

    2013-01-01

    Considerable damage occurred to steel structures during the Kobe earthquake in Japan. Numerous exposed-type column bases failed in several consistent patterns caused by brittle base plate fracture, excessive anchor bolt elongation, unexpected early anchor bolt failure, and inferior construction work. An exposed-type column base receives axial force and biaxial bending when receiving an arbitrary multidirectional earthquake motion. Up to now, numerous researchers have examined methods to identify their stiffness and strength, but those studies have heretofore been restricted to in-plane behaviors. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the inelastic behavior of exposed type steel column bases under biaxial lateral loading and axially compressive-tensile loading, which is a closer simulation of the real seismic excitation. In this study, exposed type steel column bases with different failure types, anchor bolt yielding and base plate yielding, are tested under different loading programs, then moment resisting mechanisms and failure modes are investigated

  12. Measurement of carbon activity in sodium and steel and the behaviour of carbon-bearing species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendran Pillai, S.; Ranganathan, R.; Mathews, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    Carburization or decarburization of structural materials in a sodium system depends on the local differences in carbon activity. The behaviour of carbon-bearing species in sodium influences its carbon activity. In order to understand the behaviour of carbon in these systems, an electrochemical carbon meter was fabricated in our laboratory. The original version of this meter was capable of operating in the temperature range of 850-980 K. Studies are carried out to extend this lower limit of temperature. Employing the carbon meter, experiments were carried out to understand the behaviour of carbon-bearing species. Gas equilibration experiments were also carried out with the same view. A new method for measuring the carbon activity in steels are described which employs the carbon meter. A review on these investigations and the conclusions reached on the behaviour of carbon in fast reactor loops are described

  13. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of carbon steel with bulk coating holidays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    With epoxy coal tar as the coating material, the electrochemical corrosion behavior of Q235 with different kinds of bulk coating holidays has been investigated with EIS (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy) in a 3.5vol% NaCl aqueous solution.The area ratio of bulk coating holiday to total coating area of steel is 4.91%. The experimental results showed that at free corrosionpotential, the corrosion of carbon steel with disbonded coating holiday is heavier than that with broken holiday and disbonded & broken holiday with time; Moreover, the effectiveness of Cathodic Protection (CP) of carbon steel with broken holiday is better than that with disbonded holiday and disbonded & broken holiday on CP potential -850 mV (vs CSE). Further analysis indicated that the two main reasons for corrosion are electrolyte solution slowly penetrating the coating, and crevice corrosion at steel/coating interface near holidays. The ratio of impedance amplitude (Z) of different frequency to minimum frequency is defined as K value. The change rate of K with frequency is related to the type of coating holiday.

  14. Dynamic recrystallization behavior of a medium carbon vanadium microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Hai-lian; Liu, Guo-quan; Xiao, Xiang; Zhang, Ming-he

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic recrystallization behavior of a medium carbon vanadium microalloyed steel was systematically investigated at the temperatures from 900 °C to 1100 °C and strain rates from 0.01 s −1 to 10 s −1 on a Gleeble-1500 thermo-simulation machine. The flow stress constitutive equation of hot deformation for this steel was developed with the activation energy Q being about 273 kJ/mol, which is in reasonable agreement with those reported before. Activation energy analysis showed that vanadium addition in microalloyed steels seemed not to affect the activation energy much. The effect of Zener–Hollomon parameter on the characteristic points of flow curves was studied using the power law relation, and the dependence of critical strain (stress) on peak strain (stress) obeyed a linear equation. Dynamic recrystallization is the most important softening mechanism for the experimental steel during hot compression. The dynamic recrystallization kinetics model of this steel was established based on flow stress and a frequently-used dynamic recrystallization kinetics equation. Dynamic recrystallization microstructure under different deformation conditions was also observed and the dependence of steady-state grain size on the Zener–Hollomon parameter was plotted

  15. [Prevalence and influence factors of hypertension among the workers exposed to noise in steel making and steel rolling workshop of an iron and steel plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Chen, Guoshun; Yu, Shanfa

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence and influence factors of hypertension among the workers exposed to noise in steel making and steel rolling workshop of an iron and steel plant. Using cluster sampling method, 3 150 workers exposed to noise participated in this study. According to do questionnaire survey and blood pressure measurement, 2 924 workers were tested, among which 1 313 workers were from steel making workshop and 1 611 workers were from steel rolling workshop. The relationships between different demographic characteristics, different habits, and different cumulative noise exposures of workers exposed to noise and hypertension were analyzed. For the hypertension prevalence rate, the total prevalence rate was 27.43% (802/2 924), the male was higher than the female (29.88 % (753/2 520) vs 12.13% (49/404), χ² = 55.13, P married ones were higher than the unmarried (29.84% (718/2 406) vs 16.22% (84/518), χ² = 39.76, P vs 24.61% (364/1 479), χ² = 11.93, P = 0.001), drinking ones were higher than the no drinking (31.53% (541/1 716) vs 21.61% (261/1 208), χ² = 35.05, P < 0.001). The hypertension prevalence rates among the subjects with education background in junior high school and below, high school (secondary) and university and above were separately 44.96%(125/278), 29.95%(455/1 519) and 19.70%(222/1 127) (χ² = 81.65, P < 0.001), among cumulative exposure groups 77-89, 90-94, 95-99, 100-104 and 105-113 were separately 8.43% (14/166), 14.48% (53/366), 24.28% (297/1 223), 36.65% (335/914) and 40.39%(103/255) (χ² = 127.58, P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that workers who exposed to cumulative noise in 95-99, 100-104 and 105-113 dB(A) ·year had the higher risk of hypertension, the OR (95%CI) were 1.84 (95% CI: 1.35-2.51), 1.74 (95% CI: 1.24-2.45) and 1.68 (95% CI: 1.09-2.58). Drinking (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.32-1.95) and BMI ≥ 24.0 kg/m² (OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.22-1.30) were the risk factors for hypertension as well. Cumulative

  16. Hardness and adhesion performances of nanocoating on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnidawani, J. N.; Azlina, H. N.; Norita, H.; Bonnia, N. N.

    2018-01-01

    Nanocoatings industry has been aggressive in searching for cost-effective alternatives and environmental friendly approaches to manufacture products. Nanocoatings represent an engineering solution to prevent corrosion of the structural parts of ships, insulation and pipelines industries. The adhesion and hardness properties of coating affect material properties. This paper reviews ZnO-SiO2 as nanopowder in nano coating formulation as the agent for new and improved coating performances. Carbon steel on type S50C used as common substrate in nanocoating industry. 3wt% ZnO and 2wt% SiO2 addition of nanoparticles into nanocoating showed the best formulation since hardness and adhesion of nanocoating was good on carbon steel substrate. Incorporation of nanoparticles into coating increased the performances of coating.

  17. Marine Atmospheric Corrosion of Carbon Steel: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Alc?ntara, Jenifer; de la Fuente, Daniel; Chico, Bel?n; Simancas, Joaqu?n; D?az, Iv?n; Morcillo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel is an extensive topic that has been studied over the years by many researchers. However, until relatively recently, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the action of marine chlorides. Corrosion in coastal regions is a particularly relevant issue due the latter’s great importance to human society. About half of the world’s population lives in coastal regions and the industrialisation of developing countries tends to concentrate production pl...

  18. Analysis of corrosion products of carbon steel in wet bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osada, Kazuo; Nagano, Tetsushi; Nakayama, Shinichi; Muraoka, Susumu

    1992-02-01

    As a part of evaluation of the long-term durability for the overpack containers for high-level radioactive waste, we have conducted corrosion tests for carbon steel in wet bentonite, a candidate buffer material. The corrosion rates were evaluated by weight difference of carbon steel and corrosion products were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and colorimetry. At 40degC, the corrosion rate of carbon steel in wet bentonite was smaller than that in pure water. At 95degC, however, the corrosion rate in wet bentonite was much higher than that in pure water. This high corrosion rate in wet bentonite at 95degC was considered to result from evaporation of moisture in bentonite in contact with the metal. This evaporation led to dryness and then to shrinkage of the bentonite, which generated ununiform contact of the metal with bentonite. Probably, this ununiform contact promoted the local corrosion. The locally corroded parts of specimen in wet bentonite at 95degC were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (micro-FT-IR), and lepidocrocite γ-FeO(OH) was found as well as goethite α-FeO(OH). In wet bentonite at 95degC, hematite α-Fe 2 O 3 was identified by means of colorimetry. (author)

  19. Electrochemical and weight-loss study of carbon steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, V.J.; Olive, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    The Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS) will undergo an 18 month refurbishment project beginning in April, 2008. During this time, most of the carbon steel piping in the primary loop will be drained of water and dried. However, some water will remain during the shutdown due to the lack of drains in some lower points in the piping system. As a result, it is necessary to examine the effect of corrosion during the refurbishment. This study examined the effect of several variables on the corrosion rate of clean carbon steel. Specifically, the effect of oxygen in the system and the presence of chloride ions were evaluated. Corrosion rates were determined using both a weight-loss technique and electrochemical methods. The experiment was conducted at room temperature. The corrosion products from the experiment were analyzed using a Raman microscope. The results of the weight-loss measurements show that the corrosion rate of polished carbon steel is independent of both the presence of oxygen and chloride ions. The electrochemical method failed to yield meaningful results due to the lack of clearly interpretable data and the inherent subjectivity in the analysis. Lepidocricite was found to be the main corrosion product using the Raman microscope. (author)

  20. Grain Refinement of Low Carbon Martensitic Steel by Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kolebina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The low-carbon steels have good corrosion and technological properties. Hot deformation is the main operation in manufacturing the parts from these steels. So one of the important properties of the material is a property of plasticity. The grain size significantly influences on the ductility properties of steel. The grain size of steel depends on the chemical composition of the crystallization process, heat treatment, and steel machining. There are plenty methods to have grain refinement. However, taking into account the large size of the blanks for the hydro turbine parts, the thermal cycling is an advanced method of the grain refinement adaptable to streamlined production. This work experimentally studies the heat treatment influence on the microstructure of the low-carbon 01X13N04 alloy steel and proposes the optimal regime of the heat treatment to provide a significantly reduced grain size. L.M. Kleiner, N.P. Melnikov and I.N. Bogachyova’s works focused both on the microstructure of these steels and on the influence of its parameters on the mechanical properties. The paper focuses mainly on defining an optimal regime of the heat treatment for grain refinement. The phase composition of steel and temperature of phase transformation were defined by the theoretical analysis. The dilatometric experiment was done to determine the precise temperature of the phase transformations. The analysis and comparison of the experimental data with theoretical data and earlier studies have shown that the initial sample has residual stress and chemical heterogeneity. The influence of the heat treatment on the grain size was studied in detail. It is found that at temperatures above 950 ° C there is a high grain growth. It is determined that the optimal number of cycles is two. The postincreasing number of cycles does not cause further reducing grain size because of the accumulative recrystallization process. Based on the results obtained, the thermal cycling

  1. Bainite formation kinetics in high carbon alloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzginova, N.V.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, many investigations have been carried out on the modeling of the bainite formation. In the present work, a physical approach proposed in the literature is implemented to model the formation of lower bainite in high carbon steels (1 wt.% C). In this model, the carbon diffusion is assumed to control the kinetics of the bainite formation. Both the nucleation and the growth rates are considered in an Avrami type analysis. The effect of alloying elements is taken into account considering only the thermodynamics of the system. The results and the physical meaning of the model parameters are discussed. It is shown that the diffusional approach gives a reasonable description of bainite formation kinetics in high carbon steel. Only two fitting parameters are used: the first accounts for carbon grain-boundary diffusion and the second is the initial nucleation-site density. The model satisfactorily accounts for the effect of transformation temperature, but does not take into account the carbide precipitation during bainite formation and the effect of alloying elements on the diffusion coefficient of carbon

  2. Mineral CO2 sequestration by steel slag carbonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.; Comans, R.N.J.; Witkamp, G.J.

    2005-12-01

    Mineral CO2 sequestration, i.e., carbonation of alkaline silicate Ca/Mg minerals, analogous to natural weathering processes, is a possible technology for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. In this paper, alkaline Ca-rich industrial residues are presented as a possible feedstock for mineral CO2 sequestration. These materials are cheap, available near large point sources of CO2, and tend to react relatively rapidly with CO2 due to their chemical instability. Ground steel slag was carbonated in aqueous suspensions to study its reaction mechanisms. Process variables, such as particle size, temperature, carbon dioxide pressure, and reaction time, were systematically varied, and their influence on the carbonation rate was investigated. The maximum carbonation degree reached was 74% of the Ca content in 30 min at 19 bar pressure, 100C, and a particle size of <38 μm. The two must important factors determining the reaction rare are particle size (<2 mm to <38 μm) and reaction temperature (25-225C). The carbonation reaction was found to occur in two steps: (1) leaching of calcium from the steel slag particles into the solution; (2) precipitation of calcite on the surface of these particles. The first step and, more in particular, the diffusion of calcium through the solid matrix toward the surface appeared to be the rate-determining reaction step, The Ca diffusion was found to be hindered by the formation of a CaCO3-coating and a Ca-depleted silicate zona during the carbonation process. Research on further enhancement of the reaction rate, which would contribute to the development of a cost-effective CO2-sequestration process, should focus particularly on this mechanism

  3. Radiofrequency cold plasma nitrided carbon steel: Microstructural and micromechanical characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouanis, F.Z.; Bentiss, F.; Bellayer, S.; Vogt, J.B.; Jama, C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → C38 carbon steel samples were plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge. → RF plasma treatment enables nitriding for non-heated substrates. → The morphological and chemical analyses show the formation of a uniform thickness on the surface of the nitrided C38 steel. → Nitrogen plasma active species diffuse into the samples and lead to the formation of Fe x N. → The increase in microhardness values for nitrided samples with plasma processing time is interpreted by the formation of a thicker nitrided layer on the steel surface. - Abstract: In this work, C38 carbon steel was plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge on non-heated substrates. General characterizations were performed to compare the chemical compositions, the microstructures and hardness of the untreated and plasma treated surfaces. The plasma nitriding was carried out on non-heated substrates at a pressure of 16.8 Pa, using N 2 gas. Surface characterizations before and after N 2 plasma treatment were performed by means of the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Vickers microhardness measurements. The morphological and chemical analysis showed the formation of a uniform structure on the surface of the nitrided sample with enrichment in nitrogen when compared to untreated sample. The thickness of the nitride layer formed depends on the treatment time duration and is approximately 14 μm for 10 h of plasma treatment. XPS was employed to obtain chemical-state information of the plasma nitrided steel surfaces. The micromechanical results show that the surface microhardness increases as the plasma-processing time increases to reach, 1487 HV 0.005 at a plasma processing time of 8 h.

  4. Radiofrequency cold plasma nitrided carbon steel: Microstructural and micromechanical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouanis, F.Z. [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Bentiss, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination et d' Analytique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Chouaib Doukkali, B.P. 20, M-24000 El Jadida (Morocco); Bellayer, S.; Vogt, J.B. [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Jama, C., E-mail: charafeddine.jama@ensc-lille.fr [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2011-05-16

    Highlights: {yields} C38 carbon steel samples were plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge. {yields} RF plasma treatment enables nitriding for non-heated substrates. {yields} The morphological and chemical analyses show the formation of a uniform thickness on the surface of the nitrided C38 steel. {yields} Nitrogen plasma active species diffuse into the samples and lead to the formation of Fe{sub x}N. {yields} The increase in microhardness values for nitrided samples with plasma processing time is interpreted by the formation of a thicker nitrided layer on the steel surface. - Abstract: In this work, C38 carbon steel was plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge on non-heated substrates. General characterizations were performed to compare the chemical compositions, the microstructures and hardness of the untreated and plasma treated surfaces. The plasma nitriding was carried out on non-heated substrates at a pressure of 16.8 Pa, using N{sub 2} gas. Surface characterizations before and after N{sub 2} plasma treatment were performed by means of the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Vickers microhardness measurements. The morphological and chemical analysis showed the formation of a uniform structure on the surface of the nitrided sample with enrichment in nitrogen when compared to untreated sample. The thickness of the nitride layer formed depends on the treatment time duration and is approximately 14 {mu}m for 10 h of plasma treatment. XPS was employed to obtain chemical-state information of the plasma nitrided steel surfaces. The micromechanical results show that the surface microhardness increases as the plasma-processing time increases to reach, 1487 HV{sub 0.005} at a plasma processing time of 8 h.

  5. Corrosion behavior of carbon steel in wet Na-bentonite medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Jae-Won; Ha, Young-Kyoung; Choi, In-Kyu; Chun, Kwan-Sik

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion behaviors of carbon steel in wet Na-bentonite medium were studied. Corrosion rate of carbon steel in wet bentonite was measured to be 20 μm/yr at 25 deg C using the AC impedance technique. This value is agreed with that obtained by weight loss at 40 deg C for 1 year. The effect of bicarbonate ion on the corrosion of carbon steel in wet bentonite was also evaluated. The carbon steels in wet bentonite having 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 M concentration of bicarbonate ion gave corrosion rates of 20, 8, and 0.2 μm/yr, respectively. Corrosion potentials of specimens were also measured and compared with the AC impedance results. Both results indicated that bicarbonate ion could effectively reduce the corrosion rate of carbon steels in bentonite due to the formation of protective layer on the carbon steel. (author)

  6. High carbon microalloyed martensitic steel with ultrahigh strength-ductility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang, Ying [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Dianji University, Shanghai 200245 (China); Chen, Nailu, E-mail: nlchen@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-04-29

    Based on the idea of rising the mechanical stability of retained austenite by the addition of Si in Fe-Mn based steels, an Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb was designed, then its hot rolled plate was successively tread by normalization process as pretreatment of novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) process. Product of tensile and elongation (PSE) of 53.94 GPa% were obtained for this high carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel, and the PSE (40.18 GPa%) obtained by the conversion of tensile sample size using Oliver formula still is more excellent PSE than those of other microalloyed advanced high strength steels reported. The microstructural characterization reveals origin of ultrahigh PSE resulting from both the increase of considerable and dispersed carbon enriched retained austenite with relative high mechanical stability in volume fraction and the decrease of brittle twin-type martensite with the sensitivity of notch.

  7. Processing and refinement of steel microstructure images for assisting in computerized heat treatment of plain carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shubhank; Panda, Aditi; Naskar, Ruchira; Mishra, Dinesh Kumar; Pal, Snehanshu

    2017-11-01

    Steels are alloys of iron and carbon, widely used in construction and other applications. The evolution of steel microstructure through various heat treatment processes is an important factor in controlling properties and performance of steel. Extensive experimentations have been performed to enhance the properties of steel by customizing heat treatment processes. However, experimental analyses are always associated with high resource requirements in terms of cost and time. As an alternative solution, we propose an image processing-based technique for refinement of raw plain carbon steel microstructure images, into a digital form, usable in experiments related to heat treatment processes of steel in diverse applications. The proposed work follows the conventional steps practiced by materials engineers in manual refinement of steel images; and it appropriately utilizes basic image processing techniques (including filtering, segmentation, opening, and clustering) to automate the whole process. The proposed refinement of steel microstructure images is aimed to enable computer-aided simulations of heat treatment of plain carbon steel, in a timely and cost-efficient manner; hence it is beneficial for the materials and metallurgy industry. Our experimental results prove the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  8. A Review of Fatigue Crack Growth for Pipeline Steels Exposed to Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanninga, N; Slifka, A; Levy, Y; White, C

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen pipeline systems offer an economical means of storing and transporting energy in the form of hydrogen gas. Pipelines can be used to transport hydrogen that has been generated at solar and wind farms to and from salt cavern storage locations. In addition, pipeline transportation systems will be essential before widespread hydrogen fuel cell vehicle technology becomes a reality. Since hydrogen pipeline use is expected to grow, the mechanical integrity of these pipelines will need to be validated under the presence of pressurized hydrogen. This paper focuses on a review of the fatigue crack growth response of pipeline steels when exposed to gaseous hydrogen environments. Because of defect-tolerant design principles in pipeline structures, it is essential that designers consider hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth behavior in these applications.

  9. Behavior of portal frames of steel hollow sections exposed to fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahmoud El-Heweity

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical study concerning the behavior of hollow sections steel portal frames exposed to fire. A model is developed to employ both thermal and structural responses incorporating material and geometric non-linearities. To establish the failure mechanism of a frame under fire conditions, a failure criterion is proposed and validated against available experimental data. The failure temperatures predicted through the suggested failure criterion show good agreement compared to the experimental results. A parametric study is then conducted using the calibrated model to focus on failure mechanisms and associated failure temperatures. Variables considered are fire condition and rafter’s inclination angle. The assessment of frame performance is based on the generated failure mechanism and enhancement of failure temperature due to the chosen parameters. Results indicate that the studied variables strongly affect the failure mechanisms of portal frames. Contradictory, their effects on the failure temperature are minimal. Finally, the study presents vital outlines for the designer to find out and hence trace the failure mechanism prior to the completion of the final design stage. Only at this point, the optimum fire protection or adequate section capacity can be accomplished and may seriously be implemented in the field of industrial steel constructions.

  10. Cast Steel Filtration Trials Using Ceramic-Carbon Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipowska B.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Trials of cast steel filtration using two types of newly-developed foam filters in which carbon was the phase binding ceramic particles have been conducted. In one of the filters the source of carbon was flake graphite and coal-tar pitch, while in the other one graphite was replaced by a cheaper carbon precursor. The newly-developed filters are fired at 1000°C, i.e. at a much lower temperature than the currently applied ZrO2-based filters. During filtration trials the filters were subjected to the attack of a flowing metal stream having a temperature of 1650°C for 30 seconds.

  11. Moessbauer spectroscopic study of rust formed on a weathering steel and a mild steel exposed for a long term in an industrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, Takayuki; Nasu, Saburo; Tazaki, Takashi; Kuzushita, Kaori; Morimoto, Shotaro

    2002-01-01

    The rusts formed on mild steel (15-year exposure) and weathering steel (32-year exposure) exposed to an industrial environment have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction technique and 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. By using an X-ray diffraction method, it is suggested that the rusts formed on both steels consist of the crystalline α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH and an X-ray amorphous phase, which gives no peak to X-ray diffraction pattern. The amount of the X-ray amorphous phase exceeds 50% of the total amount of the rust. The 57 Fe Moessbauer spectra observed at 10K indicate that the rust contains only α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH and Fe 3-δ O 4 (γ-Fe 2 O 3 ) for mild steel, and only α-FeOOH and γ-FeOOH for weathering steel. The X-ray amorphous substance in the rust payer formed on mild steel possesses the structures of mainly α-FeOOH showing superparamagnetism owing to its small particle size, and Fe 3-δ O 4 (γ-Fe 2 O 3 ). They are contained both in the inner rust layer and in the outer rust layer. The X-ray amorphous phase in the rust layer formed on weathering steel is mainly α-FeOOH. (author)

  12. Carbon and metal-carbon implantations into tool steels for improved tribological performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, J.-P.; Harskamp, F.; Torri, P.; Willers, H.; Fusari, A.; Gibson, N.; Haupt, J.

    1997-05-01

    The high-fluence implantation of carbon and dual implantations of metal-metalloid pairs into steels with different microstructures are briefly reviewed. A previously unexamined system, the implantation of Si and C into two kinds of tool steels, M3 and D2, have been studied in terms of microstructure and tribological performance. In both cases ion implantation transfers a surface into an amorphous layer. However, the tribological behavior of these two materials differs remarkably: in the case of ion-implanted M3 a reduction of wear in a steel pin is observed even at high pin loads, whereas in the case of ion-implanted D2 the beneficial effects of ion implantation were limited to the lowest pin load. The importance of an initial phase at the onset of sliding is emphasized and a number of peculiarities observed in ion-implanted M3 steel are discussed.

  13. Corrosion of a carbon steel in simulated liquid nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenz Gonzalez, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    This work is part of a collaboration agreement between CNEA (National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina) and USDOE (Department of Energy of the United States of America), entitled 'Tank Corrosion Chemistry Cooperation', to study the corrosion behavior of carbon steel A537 class 1 in different simulated non-radioactive wastes in order to establish the safety concentration limits of the tank waste chemistry at Hanford site (Richland-US). Liquid high level nuclear wastes are stored in tanks made of carbon steel A537 (ASTM nomenclature) that were designed for a service life of 20 to 50 years. A thickness reduction of some tank walls, due to corrosion processes, was detected at Hanford site, beyond the existing predicted values. Two year long-term immersion tests were started using non radioactive simulated liquid nuclear waste solutions at 40 C degrees. This work extends throughout the first year of immersion. The simulated solutions consist basically in combinations of the 10 most corrosion significant chemical components: 5 main components (NaNO 3 , NaCl, NaF, NaNO 2 and NaOH) at three concentration levels and 5 secondary components at two concentration levels. Measurements of the general corrosion rate with time were performed for carbon steel coupons, both immersed in the solutions and in the vapor phases, using weight loss and electrochemistry impedance spectroscopy techniques. Optic and scanning electron microscopy examination, analysis of U-bend samples and corrosion potential measurements, were also done. Localized corrosion susceptibility (pitting and crevice corrosion) was assessed in isolated short-term tests by means of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves. The effect of the simulated waste composition on the corrosion behavior of A537 steel was studied based on statistical analyses. The Surface Response Model could be successfully applied to the statistical analysis of the A537 steel corrosion in the studied solutions. General corrosion was not

  14. INFLUENCE OF ELECTRIC SPARK ON HARDNESS OF CARBON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Vakulenko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of work is an estimation of influence of an electric spark treatment on the state of mouldable superficial coverage of carbon steel. Methodology. The steel of fragment of railway wheel rim served as material for research with chemical composition 0.65% С, 0.67% Mn, 0.3% Si, 0.027% P, 0.028% S. Structural researches were conducted with the use of light microscopy and methods of quantitative metallography. The structural state of the probed steel corresponded to the state after hot plastic deformation. The analysis of hardness distribution in the micro volumes of cathode metal was carried out with the use of microhardness tester of type of PMT-3. An electric spark treatment of carbon steel surface was executed with the use of equipment type of EFI-25M. Findings. After electric spark treatment of specimen surface from carbon steel the forming of multi-layered coverage was observed. The analysis of microstructure found out the existence of high-quality distinctions in the internal structure of coverage metal, depending on the probed area. The results obtained in the process are confirmed by the well-known theses, that forming of superficial coverage according to technology of electric spark is determined by the terms of transfer and crystallization of metal. The gradient of structures on the coverage thickness largely depends on development of structural transformation processes similar to the thermal character influence. Originality. As a result of electric spark treatment on the condition of identical metal of anode and cathode, the first formed layer of coverage corresponds to the monophase state according to external signs. In the volume of coverage metal, the appearance of carbide phase particles is accompanied by the decrease of microhardness values. Practical value. Forming of multi-layered superficial coverage during electric spark treatment is accompanied by the origin of structure gradient on a thickness. The effect

  15. Reproducing ten years of road ageing - Accelerated carbonation and leaching of EAF steel slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suer, Pascal; Lindqvist, Jan-Erik; Arm, Maria; Frogner-Kockum, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Reuse of industrial aggregates is still hindered by concern for their long-term properties. This paper proposes a laboratory method for accelerated ageing of steel slag, to predict environmental and technical properties, starting from fresh slag. Ageing processes in a 10-year old asphalt road with steel slag of electric arc furnace (EAF) type in the subbase were identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and leaching tests. Samples from the road centre and the pavement edge were compared with each other and with samples of fresh slag. It was found that slag from the pavement edge showed traces of carbonation and leaching processes, whereas the road centre material was nearly identical to fresh slag, in spite of an accessible particle structure. Batches of moisturized road centre material exposed to oxygen, nitrogen or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) were used for accelerated ageing. Time (7-14 days), temperature (20-40 o C) and initial slag moisture content (8-20%) were varied to achieve the carbonation (decrease in pH) and leaching that was observed in the pavement edge material. After ageing, water was added to assess leaching of metals and macroelements. 12% moisture, CO 2 and seven days at 40 o C gave the lowest pH value. This also reproduced the observed ageing effect for Ca, Cu, Ba, Fe, Mn, Pb, Ca (decreased leaching) and for V, Si, and Al (increased leaching). However, ageing effects on SO 4 , DOC and Cr were not reproduced.

  16. An assessment of carbon steel overpacks for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.P.; Bland, I.D.; Taylor, K.J.; Sharland, S.; Tasker, P.

    1986-01-01

    The report summarizes the results obtained at Harwell in the second phase of a project evaluating the corrosion behaviour of high-level waste overpacks in geological disposal. It has concentrated on the use of carbon steel in granitic and argillaceous environments, and has aimed at estimating the corrosion allowance required to achieve a 1000-year overpack life. Experimental and mathematical modelling studies have indicated that 200 mm of steel should be more than sufficient to prevent overpack penetration by general or localized corrosion. A theoretical assessment of the possible effects of micro-organisms on overpack corrosion has concluded that such species are likely to be found in repositories, but that only a fraction of their population should be corrosive towards carbon steel. Making the pessimistic assumption that all organic carbon in a 500 mm bentonite backfill is utilized by corrosive sulphate reducing bacteria, it has been estimated that this will result in an additional metal loss of 13 mm. One form of corrosion which cannot be dealt with by the corrosion allowance approach is stress corrosion cracking, since even at the lowest reported propagation rates, a metal thickness exceeding 3 m would be penetrated in 1000 years. It has been concluded that the possibility of stress corrosion cannot be dismissed, but, because the process requires a certain minimum stress level before it can occur, it should be possible to avoid the problem by giving the overpacks a stress relief heat treatment. Tests in a model environment have shown that a heat treatment designed to reduce fabrication stresses to 50% of the yield strengh should be sufficient to prevent cracking. It is recommended that this conclusion be substantiated by scaled-up experiments with model overpacks. The report draws further attention to degradation by hydrogen embrittlement

  17. Friction stir processing on high carbon steel U12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, S. Yu., E-mail: tsy@ispms.ru; Rubtsov, V. E., E-mail: rvy@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Melnikov, A. G., E-mail: melnikov-ag@tpu.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    Friction stir processing (FSP) of high carbon steel (U12) samples has been carried out using a milling machine and tools made of cemented tungsten carbide. The FSP tool has been made in the shape of 5×5×1.5 mm. The microstructural characterization of obtained stir zone and heat affected zone has been carried out. Microhardness at the level of 700 MPa has been obtained in the stir zone with microstructure consisting of large grains and cementitte network. This high-level of microhardness is explained by bainitic reaction developing from decarburization of austenitic grains during cementite network formation.

  18. On the carbide formation in high-carbon stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujahid, M.; Qureshi, M.I.

    1996-01-01

    Stainless steels containing high Cr as well as carbon contents in excess of 1.5 weight percent have been developed for applications which require high resistance erosion and environmental corrosion. Formation of carbides is one of important parameters for controlling properties of these materials especially erosion characteristics. Percent work includes the study of different type of carbides which from during the heat treatment of these materials. It has been found that precipitation of secondary carbides and the nature of matrix transformation plays an important role in determining the hardness characteristics of these materials. (author)

  19. Plasticity of low carbon steel in a hot state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalov, V P; Rizol' , A I; Shram, N N [Ural' skij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Chernykh Metallov, Sverdlovsk (USSR)

    1977-07-01

    The hot ductility (in tapered-specimen piersing test and the in wedge-shaped specimen rolling test) is studied of the Armeo-type low carbon steel produced by vacuum induction and open hearth techniques. The variations of the chemical composition within specified ranges, particularly as regards sulphur, oxygen and the Mn/S ratio, have a marked effect on the processing ductility. The temperature range of brittle fracture and acceptable hot working reductions as functions of the chemical composition have been revealed.

  20. Plasticity of low carbon steel in a hot state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konovalov, V.P.; Rizol', A.I.; Shram, N.N.

    1977-01-01

    The hot ductility (in tapered-specimen piersing test and the in wedge-shaped specimen rolling test) is studied of the Armeo-type low carbon steel produced by vacuum induction and open hearth techniques. The variations of the chemical composition within specified ranges, particularly as regards sulphur, oxygen and the Mn/S ratio, have a marked effect on the processing ductility. The temperature range of brittle fracture and acceptable hot working reductions as functions of the chemical composition have been revealed

  1. Effect of heat treatment on carbon steel pipe welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Harun.

    1987-01-01

    The heat treatment to improve the altered properties of carbon steel pipe welds is described. Pipe critical components in oil, gasification and nuclear reactor plants require adequate room temperature toughness and high strength at both room and moderately elevated temperatures. Microstructure and microhardness across the welds were changed markedly by the welding process and heat treatment. The presentation of hardness fluctuation in the welds can produce premature failure. A number of heat treatments are suggested to improve the properties of the welds. (author) 8 figs., 5 refs

  2. Corrosion Inhibitor of Carbon Steel from Onion Peel Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Samsudin Asep

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon steels composed by two main elements, they are iron (Fe and carbon (C elements which widely used in industrial because of its resistance and more affordable than stainless steel, but their weakness is they have low corrosion resistance. One way to modify carbon steel is by coating them with antioxidant compounds that can delay, slow down, and prevent lipid oxidation process, which obtained from onion peel extract. Several studies on corrosion inhibitors have been performed. However, the efficiency was not reach the optimum. This study aims to examine the effect of onion peel extract concentration on the efficiency of corrosion inhibitor and characterization of the green corrosion inhibitor from onion peel extract. This research method begins by extracting onion peel to 200 ml solvent which we use aquadest and methanol and mixed with 5 grams of crushed onion peel, then let them be extracted for 60 minutes with room temperature. Once it was filtered and the solution obtained, followed by evaporating process with rotary evaporator to decrease the content of solvent. The product is ready to be used as a green corrosion inhibitor of carbon steel in 1 mol/L HCl. While the analysis used is HPLC qualitative analysis, and electroplatting process. The impedance is measured at a frequency of 100 kHz to 4 mHz with an AC current of 10mV. Inhibitor concentrations are vary between 2 ml and 4 ml of onion peel extract. Electroplatting is done within 30 minutes with 10 minutes each checking time. Furthermore, quantitative analysis was done for the analysis of corrosion rate and weight loss. Based on HPLC analysis, it is known that the extract of onion peel contains 1mg/L of quercetin, which is belong to flavonoid group as green inhibitor. While electroplatting process, aquadest solvent having average efficiency of 99,57% for 2 ml of extract, and 99,60% for 4 ml of extract. Methanol solvent having average efficiency of 99,52% for 2 ml of extract and 99

  3. Study on Spheroidization and Related Heat Treatments of Medium Carbon Alloy Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harisha S. R.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of medium carbon steels as engineering materials is reflected by the fact that out of the vast majority of engineering grade ferrous alloys available and used in the market today, a large proportion of them are from the family of medium carbon steels. Typically medium carbon steels have a carbon range of 0.25 to 0.65% by weight, and a manganese content ranging from 0.060 to 1.65% by weight. Medium carbon steels are more resistive to cutting, welding and forming as compared to low carbon steels. From the last two decades a number of research scholars reported the use of verity of heat treatments to tailor the properties of medium carbon steels. Spheroidizing is the novel industrial heat treatment employed to improve formability and machinability of medium/high carbon low alloy steels. This exclusive study covers procedure, the effects and possible outcomes of various heat treatments on medium carbon steels. In the present work, other related heat treatments like annealing and special treatments for property alterations which serve as pretreatments for spheroidizing are also reviewed. Medium carbon steels with property alterations by various heat treatment processes are finding increased responsiveness in transportation, aerospace, space, underwater along with other variegated fields. Improved tribological and mechanical properties consisting of impact resistance, stiffness, abrasion and strength are the main reasons for the increased attention of these steels in various industries. In the present scenario for the consolidation of important aspects of various heat treatments and effects on mechanical properties of medium carbons steel, a review of different research papers has been attempted. This review may be used as a guide to provide practical data for heat treatment industry, especially as a tool to enhance workability and tool life.

  4. Kinetics of electrochemical boriding of low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartal, G.; Eryilmaz, O.L.; Krumdick, G.; Erdemir, A.; Timur, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the growth kinetics of the boride layers forming on low carbon steel substrates was investigated during electrochemical boriding which was performed at a constant current density of 200 mA/cm 2 in a borax based electrolyte at temperatures ranging from 1123 K to 1273 K for periods of 5-120 min. After boriding, the presence of both FeB and Fe 2 B phases were confirmed by the X-ray diffraction method. Cross-sectional microscopy revealed a very dense and thick morphology for both boride phases. Micro hardness testing of the borided steel samples showed a significant increase in the hardness of the borided surfaces (i.e., up to (1700 ± 200) HV), while the hardness of un-borided steel samples was approximately (200 ± 20) HV. Systematic studies over a wide range of boriding time and temperature confirmed that the rate of the boride layer formation is strongly dependent on boriding duration and has a parabolic character. The activation energy of boride layer growth for electrochemical boriding was determined as (172.75 ± 8.6) kJ/mol.

  5. Surface martensitization of Carbon steel using Arc Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyudi, Haris; Dimyati, Arbi; Sebayang, Darwin

    2018-03-01

    In this paper new technology of surface structure modification of steel by short plasma exposure in Arc Plasma Sintering (APS) device is presented. APS is an apparatus working based on plasma generated by DC pulsed current originally used for synthesizing materials via sintering and melting. Plasma exposure in APS was applied into the specimens for 1 and 3 seconds which generate temperature approximately about 1300-1500°C. The SUP9, pearlitic carbon steel samples were used. The hardness, hardening depth and microstructure of the specimens have been investigated by Vickers micro hardness test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) supported by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The results have showed that the mechanical property was significantly improved due to the formation of single martensitic structures as identified by SEM. The hardness of treated surface evaluated by Vickers hardness test showed significant improvement nearly three time from 190 VHN before to 524 VHN after treatment. Furthermore, EDX confirmed that the formation of martensite layer occurred without altering its composition. The APS also produced uniform hardened layer up to 250 μm. The experiment has demonstrated that arc plasma process was successfully improved the mechanical properties of steel in relatively very short time.

  6. Resuspension of carbon dust collected in Tore Supra and exposed to turbulent airflow: Controlled experiments and comparison with model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peillon, S., E-mail: samuel.peillon@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES/SCA/LPMA, Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette 91192 (France); Roynette, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES/SCA/LPMA, Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette 91192 (France); Grisolia, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gensdarmes, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES/SCA/LPMA, Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette 91192 (France)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Mobilization of dust is a key issue for the safety assessment of fusion reactors. • Carbon dust has been collected on the plasma facing components of Tore Supra. • Samples exhibit bimodal particle size distributions. • Samples have been exposed to turbulent airflows for dust resuspension studies. • A comparison with the so-called Rock’n roll resuspension model is proposed. - Abstract: This work presents the results of experiments conducted with carbon microparticles collected in the tokamak Tore Supra in order to characterize their resuspension behaviour from a stainless-steel substrate when exposed to turbulent airflow. Experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel with controlled velocity profiles and monitored environmental conditions. A consequent amount of dust has been collected in the vessel of the tokamak and a bimodal particle size distribution of samples is first demonstrated. Comparison with resuspension of alumina powders with equivalent particle size distributions under turbulent airflow is also discussed. Results for both carbon and alumina microparticles are then compared to a theoretical resuspension model. Data reveal that exposing multilayer deposits with bimodal particle size distributions to low-speed flows (i.e. 3–10 m/s) induces a significant reduction of the mobilized fractions compared to what was predicted by the model. In addition, results helped to highlight some limitations in the model to physically describe changes in the adhesive strength that can occur with a polydisperse deposit.

  7. Comparative Study of API 5L X60 and ASTM 572 Gr50 Steel Exposed to Crude Oil and Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcy Viviana Chiquillo Márquez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the petroleum industry, the biphasic conditions in storage and separation tanks allow that the material to remain exposed to two different environments, causing its deterioration. In this article, an evaluation is made of the corrosive behavior and Vickers microhardness (HV of two high strength low alloy (HSLA steels and how their surfaces are characterized. The ASTM 572 Gr50 steel showed a lower corrosion rate in all systems after being immersed for 720 and 1440 hours. Characterizing the surface by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM showed uniform and localized corrosion for the both steels, and revealed that the ASTM 572 Gr50 steel shows pitting corrosion in crude oil systems. The electrochemical results revealed that the corrosion potential of API X60 steel was more negative; however the ASTM 572 Gr50 steel had a higher current density and a lower polarization resistance when immersed in an oil/seawater mixture. It also observed that, after being immersed in the corrosive fluids, the microstructures of the steels were not modified and variations in their microhardness (HV were minute.

  8. Study on microstructure and mechanical characteristics of low-carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkari Khorrami, Mahmoud; Mostafaei, Mohammad Ali; Pouraliakbar, Hesam, E-mail: hpouraliakbar@alum.sharif.edu; Kokabi, Amir Hossein

    2014-07-01

    In this work, examinations on the microstructure and mechanical properties of plain carbon steel and AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel dissimilar welds are carried out. Welding is conducted in both autogenous and using ER309L austenitic filler rod conditions through gas tungsten arc welding process. The results indicate that fully-ferritic and duplex ferritic–martensitic microstructures are formed for autogenous and filler-added welds, respectively. Carbide precipitation and formation of martensite at ferrite grain boundaries (intergranular martensite) as well as grain growth occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of AISI 430 steel. It is found that weld heat input can strongly affect grain growth phenomenon along with the amount and the composition of carbides and intergranular martensite. Acquired mechanical characteristics of weld in the case of using filler metal are significantly higher than those of autogenous one. Accordingly, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), hardness, and absorbed energy during tensile test of weld metal are increased from 662 MPa to 910 MPa, 140 Hv to 385 Hv, and 53.6 J m{sup −3} to 79 J m{sup −3}, respectively by filler metal addition. From fracture surfaces, predominantly ductile fracture is observed in the specimen welded with filler metal while mainly cleavage fracture occurs in the autogenous weld metal.

  9. General corrosion of carbon steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    This short paper seeks to provide a summary of the main knowledge about the general corrosion of carbon steels in high temperature water. In pure water or slightly alkaline deaerated water, steels develop a protective coating of magnetite in a double layer (Potter and Mann oxide) or a single layer (Bloom oxide). The morphology of the oxide layer and the kinetics of corrosion depend on the test parameters controlling the solubility of iron. The parameters exercising the greatest influence are partial hydrogen pressure and mass transfer: hydrogen favours the solubilization of the magnetite; the entrainment of the dissolved iron prevents a redeposition of magnetite on the surface of the steel. Cubic or parabolic in static conditions, the kinetics of corrosion tends to be linear in dynamic conditions. In dynamic operation, corrosion is at least one order of magnitude lower in water with a pH of 10 than in pure water with a pH of 7. The activation energy of corrosion is 130 kJ/mol (31 kcal/mol). This results in the doubling of corrosion at around 300 deg C for a temperature increase of 15 deg C. Present in small quantities (100-200 ppb), oxygen decreases general corrosion but increases the risk of pitting corrosion - even for a low chloride content - and stress corrosion cracking or corrosion-fatigue. The steel composition has probably an influence on the kinetics of corrosion in dynamic conditions; further work would be required to clarify the effect of some residual elements. (author). 31 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Distribution of radionuclides during melting of carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurber, W.C.; MacKinney, J.

    1997-02-01

    During the melting of steel with radioactive contamination, radionuclides may be distributed among the metal product, the home scrap, the slag, the furnace lining and the off-gas collection system. In addition, some radionuclides will pass through the furnace system and vent to the atmosphere. To estimate radiological impacts of recycling radioactive scrap steel, it is essential to understand how radionuclides are distributed within the furnace system. For example, an isotope of a gaseous element (e.g., radon) will exhaust directly from the furnace system into the atmosphere while a relatively non-volatile element (e.g., manganese) can be distributed among all the other possible media. This distribution of radioactive contaminants is a complex process that can be influenced by numerous chemical and physical factors, including composition of the steel bath, chemistry of the slag, vapor pressure of the particular element of interest, solubility of the element in molten iron, density of the oxide(s), steel melting temperature and melting practice (e.g., furnace type and size, melting time, method of carbon adjustment and method of alloy additions). This paper discusses the distribution of various elements with particular reference to electric arc furnace steelmaking. The first two sections consider the calculation of partition ratios for elements between metal and slag based on thermodynamic considerations. The third section presents laboratory and production measurements of the distribution of various elements among slag, metal, and the off-gas collection system; and the final section provides recommendations for the assumed distribution of each element of interest.

  11. Effect of Cr and Mo on strain ageing behaviour of low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereloma, E.V.; Bata, V.; Scott, R.I.; Smith, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    This work explores the effects of Cr (0.26-0.74 wt%) and Mo (0.09-0.3 wt%) additions on the kinetics of strain ageing process in low carbon steel. The strain ageing behaviour of the steels was investigated by using tensile tests and transmission electron microscopy. The results have shown that Mo-alloyed steels undergo the same four stages of ageing as unalloyed low carbon steel, whereas Cr-alloyed steels exhibit only three stages of ageing. At the same time, the addition of Mo accelerates the ageing response, while alloying with Cr reduces the rate of strain ageing by ∼3 times in comparison with non-alloyed low carbon steel. It especially delays the offset of Stage III. This is explained by the reduction of carbon content in ferrite due to the enrichment of cementite with Cr leading to the reduction of its equilibrium solubility in ferrite.

  12. Effect of Cr and Mo on strain ageing behaviour of low carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereloma, E.V., E-mail: elenap@uow.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Bata, V. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University (Australia); Scott, R.I.; Smith, R.M. [BlueScope Steel Limited, Port Kembla (Australia)

    2010-04-25

    This work explores the effects of Cr (0.26-0.74 wt%) and Mo (0.09-0.3 wt%) additions on the kinetics of strain ageing process in low carbon steel. The strain ageing behaviour of the steels was investigated by using tensile tests and transmission electron microscopy. The results have shown that Mo-alloyed steels undergo the same four stages of ageing as unalloyed low carbon steel, whereas Cr-alloyed steels exhibit only three stages of ageing. At the same time, the addition of Mo accelerates the ageing response, while alloying with Cr reduces the rate of strain ageing by {approx}3 times in comparison with non-alloyed low carbon steel. It especially delays the offset of Stage III. This is explained by the reduction of carbon content in ferrite due to the enrichment of cementite with Cr leading to the reduction of its equilibrium solubility in ferrite.

  13. Efficiency of inhibitor for biocorrosion influenced by consortium sulfate reducing bacteria on carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahat, Nur Akma; Othman, Norinsan Kamil [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Sahrani, Fathul Karim [School of Environment and Natural Resources Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    The inhibition efficiency of benzalkonium chloride (BKC) in controlling biocorrosion on the carbon steel surfaces has been investigated. The carbon steel coupons were incubated in the presence of consortium SRB (C-SRB) with and without BKC for the difference medium concentration. The corrosion rate and inhibition efficiency have been evaluated by a weight loss method. The morphology of biofilm C-SRB on the steel surfaces were characterized with variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VPSEM). The results revealed that BKC exhibits a low corrosion rate, minimizing the cell growth and biofilm development on the carbon steel surfaces.

  14. Efficiency of inhibitor for biocorrosion influenced by consortium sulfate reducing bacteria on carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahat, Nur Akma; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Sahrani, Fathul Karim

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition efficiency of benzalkonium chloride (BKC) in controlling biocorrosion on the carbon steel surfaces has been investigated. The carbon steel coupons were incubated in the presence of consortium SRB (C-SRB) with and without BKC for the difference medium concentration. The corrosion rate and inhibition efficiency have been evaluated by a weight loss method. The morphology of biofilm C-SRB on the steel surfaces were characterized with variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VPSEM). The results revealed that BKC exhibits a low corrosion rate, minimizing the cell growth and biofilm development on the carbon steel surfaces

  15. Efficiency of inhibitor for biocorrosion influenced by consortium sulfate reducing bacteria on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, Nur Akma; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Sahrani, Fathul Karim

    2015-09-01

    The inhibition efficiency of benzalkonium chloride (BKC) in controlling biocorrosion on the carbon steel surfaces has been investigated. The carbon steel coupons were incubated in the presence of consortium SRB (C-SRB) with and without BKC for the difference medium concentration. The corrosion rate and inhibition efficiency have been evaluated by a weight loss method. The morphology of biofilm C-SRB on the steel surfaces were characterized with variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VPSEM). The results revealed that BKC exhibits a low corrosion rate, minimizing the cell growth and biofilm development on the carbon steel surfaces.

  16. Adsorption and performance of the 2-mercaptobenzimidazole as a carbon steel corrosion inhibitor in EDTA solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderón, J.A.; Vásquez, F.A.; Carreño, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a thermodynamic analysis of the adsorption and anti-corrosion performance of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2-MBI) on carbon steel in EDTA-Na2 solutions. The adsorption of the inhibitor on the metal surface was studied as a function of the concentration of the inhibiting species and the temperature of the system. The corrosion inhibition efficiency was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and mass loss tests. The results show that the adsorption of the inhibitor onto the metal surface behaves according to the Langmuir model, following an endothermic process. The inhibitor is chemically adsorbed onto the carbon steel surface. The efficiency of corrosion inhibition was above 93%, which was confirmed by both mass loss tests and the electrochemical impedance technique. The good performance of the corrosion inhibitor was maintained up to 24 h after the inhibitor was added to the corrosive EDTA-Na2 solutions. When the ratio of the volume of solution/exposed area was reduced, a decrease in the area covered by the inhibitor was observed. The best cost/benefit ratio for the corrosion protection of carbon steel was obtained when the number of moles of the inhibitor per surface area was maintained at 2.68 mmol cm"−"2. - Highlights: • Adsorption of the inhibitor on the metal surface is confirmed by thermodynamic data. • Adsorption of the inhibitor onto the metal behaves according to the Langmuir model. • Endothermic adsorption process indicates that the inhibitor is chemically adsorbed. • The efficiency of corrosion inhibition was above 93%. • The good performance of the corrosion inhibitor was maintained up to 24 h.

  17. Adsorption and performance of the 2-mercaptobenzimidazole as a carbon steel corrosion inhibitor in EDTA solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderón, J.A., E-mail: andres.calderon@udea.edu.co [Centro de Investigación, Innovación y Desarrollo de Materiales –CIDEMAT, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Vásquez, F.A. [Centro de Investigación, Innovación y Desarrollo de Materiales –CIDEMAT, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Carreño, J.A. [Laboratório de H2S, CO2 e Corrosividade, Instituto Nacional De Tecnologia (INT), Av. Venezuela, 82 – Térreo, Anexo 01, Sala 101A, Saúde, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a thermodynamic analysis of the adsorption and anti-corrosion performance of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2-MBI) on carbon steel in EDTA-Na2 solutions. The adsorption of the inhibitor on the metal surface was studied as a function of the concentration of the inhibiting species and the temperature of the system. The corrosion inhibition efficiency was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and mass loss tests. The results show that the adsorption of the inhibitor onto the metal surface behaves according to the Langmuir model, following an endothermic process. The inhibitor is chemically adsorbed onto the carbon steel surface. The efficiency of corrosion inhibition was above 93%, which was confirmed by both mass loss tests and the electrochemical impedance technique. The good performance of the corrosion inhibitor was maintained up to 24 h after the inhibitor was added to the corrosive EDTA-Na2 solutions. When the ratio of the volume of solution/exposed area was reduced, a decrease in the area covered by the inhibitor was observed. The best cost/benefit ratio for the corrosion protection of carbon steel was obtained when the number of moles of the inhibitor per surface area was maintained at 2.68 mmol cm{sup −2}. - Highlights: • Adsorption of the inhibitor on the metal surface is confirmed by thermodynamic data. • Adsorption of the inhibitor onto the metal behaves according to the Langmuir model. • Endothermic adsorption process indicates that the inhibitor is chemically adsorbed. • The efficiency of corrosion inhibition was above 93%. • The good performance of the corrosion inhibitor was maintained up to 24 h.

  18. Phase analysis of corrosion products of carbon steel in sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia R, J.; Yee M, H.; Maldonado M, H.; Nunez, L.; Reguera, E.

    1998-01-01

    Nowadays carbon steel continues being the most widely used metallic material in marine and coastal buildings. The economic losses, due to corrosion processes, of those countries with important industrial and social activities in coastal regions are highly significant. In this sense the evaluation of the corrosion process of carbon steel and other materials in seawater or in coastal zones is a primary task for protection methods or to predict the hfe of an specific installation. In this communication we present the phases analysis, using XRD and Moessbauer techniques, of corrosion products of a carbon steel (CT3, equivalent to AISI C1020) exposed in two natural corrosion stations in the Caribbean sea (Cuba). The exposition time run from days to 36 months and the evaluated rust are characteristic of samples totally immersed in seawater, from the splash zone and form coastal zones at different distance from the shoreline. Quantitative phase analysis shown presence of magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ), maghemite (y-Fe 2 O 3 ), akaganeite (B-FeOOH), lepidocrocite (y-FeOOH) and goethite (a-FeOOH) as iron bearing phases, and CaCO 3 (Calcite and aragonite), these last ones mainly in the immersed samples. Quantitative phase analysis by XRD was implemented as a linear combination of the patterns characteristic of all the detected phases and an appropriate model for the background. The quantitative results were used in kinetic models to understand the phase transformation between the iron oxides and oxy hydroxides in the studied conditions. The XRD qualitative and quantitative results were corroborated by Moessbauer spectroscopy in the temperature range of 20 to 300 K. (Author)

  19. Analysis of corrosion products of carbon steel in wet bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osada, K.; Nagano, T.; Kozai, N.; Nakashima, S.; Nakayama, S.; Muraoka, S.

    1991-01-01

    The following conclusions were obtained; (1) At 40degC, the average corrosion rate of SS41 carbon steel in wet bentonite was 0.025 mm/y. This is smaller than the value of 0.042 mm/y obtained in pure water at 40degC. However, at 95degC, the corrosion rate of SS41 carbon steel in wet bentonite was 0.27 mm/y, which is much larger than that in pure water at 95degC. (2) At 95degC, γ-FeO(OH) (lepidocrocite) was formed only in wet bentonite, and it was absent in pure water. Evaporation of moisture resulted in the formation of partial covering of bentonite, which promoted local corrosion. Consequently, γ-FeO(OH) was considered to be formed. (3) In wet bentonite at 95degC, α-Fe 2 O 3 (hematite) can be identified by means of colorimetry. The color of corrosion products is orangish, indicating the contribution of α-Fe 2 O 3 in iron hydroxides. (author)

  20. Microstructures and mechanical properties of duplex low carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfirano; Eben, U. S.; Hidayat, M.

    2018-04-01

    The microstructures behavior of duplex cold-rolled low carbon steel for automotive applications has been investigated. Intercritical annealing treatment is commonly used to develop a duplex low carbon steel containing ferrite and martensite. To get a duplex phase ferrite and martensite, the specimens were heated at inter-critical annealing temperature of 775°C - 825°C, for heating time up to 20 minutes, followed by water-quenched. The hardness of specimens was studied. The optical microscopy was used to analyze the microstructures. The optimal annealing conditions (martensite volume fraction approaching 20%) at 775°C with a heating time of 10 minutes was achieved. The highest hardness value was obtained in cold-rolled specimens of 41% in size reduction for intercritical annealing temperature of 825°C. In this condition, the hardness value was 373 HVN. The correlation between intercritical annealing temperature and time can be expressed in the transformation kinetics as fγ/fe = 1-exp(-Ktn) wherein K and n are grain growth rate constant and Avrami’s exponent, respectively. From experiment, the value of K = 0.15 and n = 0.461. Using the relationship between temperatures and heating time, activation energy (Q) can be calculated that is 267 kJ/mol.

  1. 75 FR 69125 - Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... with material injury by reason of imports from China of certain seamless carbon and alloy steel standard, line, and pressure pipe (``seamless SLP pipe''), provided for in subheadings 7304.19.10, 7304.19... Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From China Determination On the basis of...

  2. Long-term progress prediction for the carbon steel corrosion in diluted artificial seawater with and without zinc / sodium carbonate mixed phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Kazumi; Ishioka, Shinichi; Iwanami, Masaru; Kaneko, Tetsuji; Tanaka, Norihiko; Kawaharada, Yoshiyuki; Yokoyama, Yutaka; Umehara, Ryuji; Kato, Chiaki; Ueno, Fumiyoshi; Fukaya, Yuichi; Kumaga, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (1F) were damaged by an unprecedented severe accident in the great east Japan earthquake on 11th, March, 2011, and seawater and fresh water were injected as an emergency countermeasure for the core cooling. The primary containment vessels (PCVs), made of carbon steel, were exposed to seawater and fresh water, and have had the possibility of corrosion. The PCVs of 1F are the most important equipment for the core cooling and removal of the fuel debris, the structural integrity of the PCV must be maintained until decommissioning. Therefore, evaluation of PCV carbon steel corrosion behavior is important, as well as evaluation of corrosion inhibitors as one of the corrosion protection methods. In this study, long-term immersion corrosion tests for up to 10000 hours were performed in diluted artificial seawater simulating 1F with and without zinc / sodium carbonate mixed phosphate. Based on the long-term immersion corrosion test results, diagnosis method of the reduction in plate thickness of the nuclear vessel was examined. The validity of the existing corrosion progress models following parabolic rate law was confirmed. The corrosion progress models were also applicable to the corrosion inhibited condition adding zinc / sodium carbonate mixed phosphate. It was found that the corrosion rate of carbon steel drastically fell down by adding this corrosion inhibitor. (author)

  3. A Study of the Effect of Interrupted Quenches on a Thermomechanically Processed High Carbon Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    steel . Successful martempering requires a cooling rate sufficient to avoid the nose of the C- curve and thus prevent significant bainite formation. When...STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF INTERRUPTED QUENCHES ON A THERMONECHANICALLY PROCESSED HIGH CARBON STEEL by Steven A. Barton October 1982 Thesis Advisor: T.R...unlimited. A Study of the Effect of Interrupted Quenches on a Thermomechanically Processed High Carbon Steel by Steven A. Barton Lieutenant, United

  4. Damage Analysis and Evaluation of Light Steel Structures Exposed to Wind Hazards

    OpenAIRE

    Na Yang; Fan Bai

    2017-01-01

    Compared to hot-rolled steel structures, cold-formed steel structures are susceptible to extreme winds because of the light weight of the building and its components. Many modern cold-formed steel structures have sustained significant structural damage ranging from loss of cladding to complete collapse in recent cyclones. This article first provides some real damage cases for light steel structures induced by the high winds. After that, the paper reviews research on the damage analysis and e...

  5. Raising the Corrosion Resistance of Low-Carbon Steels by Electrolytic-Plasma Saturation with Nitrogen and Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmanov, S. A.; Grishina, E. P.; Belkin, P. N.; Kusmanova, Yu. V.; Kudryakova, N. O.

    2017-05-01

    Structural features of the external oxide layer and internal nitrided, carbonitrided and carburized layers in steels 10, 20 and St3 produced by the method of electrolytic plasma treatment are studied. Specimens of the steels are tested for corrosion in a naturally aerated 1-N solution of sodium chloride. The condition of the metal/sodium chloride solution interface is studied by the method of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is shown that the corrosion resistance of low-carbon steels can be raised by anode electrolytic-plasma saturation with nitrogen and carbon. Recommendations are given on the choice of carbonitriding modes for structural steels.

  6. A study of the condition for the passivation of carbon steel in bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Morimoto, Masataka; Honda, Akira

    1999-01-01

    It is important to study the corrosion behavior of materials to be used for overpack for high-level radioactive waste disposal. Carbon steel is one of the candidate materials. The type of corrosion on carbon steel depends on whether the carbon steel is passivated or not. In this study, the condition for the passivation of carbon steel was studied using bentonite as the buffer material. Anodic polarization in bentonite and the measurements of pH of porewater in bentonite was measured. The results of these experiments showed that the possibility of passivation is small in highly compacted bentonite in groundwater in Japan. Therefore, localized corrosion on carbon steel due to the breakdown of passive film is unlikely in bentonite. In other words, general corrosion seems to be the most probable type of corrosion under repository condition in Japan. (author)

  7. Special Advanced Studies for Pollution Prevention. Delivery Order 0017: Sol-Gel Surface Preparation for Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel Bonding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zheng, Haixing

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this program is to study the feasibility of using sol-gel active alumina coatings for the surface preparation of carbon steel and stainless steel for adhesive bonding, and to optimize...

  8. Corrosion of carbon steel and low-alloy steel in diluted seawater containing hydrazine under gamma-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Junichi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Tsukada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Seawater was injected into reactor cores of Units 1, 2, and 3 in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station as an urgent coolant. It is considered that the injected seawater causes corrosion of steels of the reactor pressure vessel and primary containment vessel. To investigate the effects of gamma-rays irradiation on weight loss in carbon steel and low-alloy steel, corrosion tests were performed in diluted seawater at 50°C under gamma-rays irradiation. Specimens were irradiated with dose rates of 4.4 kGy/h and 0.2 kGy/h. To evaluate the effects of hydrazine (N 2 H 4 ) on the reduction of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, N 2 H 4 was added to the diluted seawater. In the diluted seawater without N 2 H 4 , weight loss in the steels irradiated with 0.2 kGy/h was similar to that in the unirradiated steels, and weight loss in the steels irradiated with 4.4 kGy/h increased to approximate 1.7 times of those in the unirradiated steels. Weight loss in the steels irradiated in the diluted seawater containing N 2 H 4 was similar to that in the diluted seawater without N 2 H 4 . When N 2 was introduced into the gas phase in the flasks during gamma-rays irradiation, weight loss in the steels decreased. (author)

  9. Surface analysis, by SNMS, of 316L steel exposed to simulated BWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, D.; Schenker, E.

    1994-01-01

    Samples of 316L steel have been exposed to Boiling Light Water Reactor chemistry for between forty and seven thousand hours. These samples, with three different surface finishes, 'as-delivered', mechanically polished and electro-polished, have been analysed by Sputtered Neutral Mass Spectrometry and profiles of the constituent alloying elements have been obtained. Differences in the oxide that has built-up are compared and discussed in terms of current ideas of corrosion mechanisms. The structure of the oxide changes with exposure time for the experimental conditions. The effect of surface finish and water velocity have a clear marked effect on the oxide structure and growth rate, respectively: samples in a low water velocity stream form the protective oxide, chromia, and some mixed spinels; electro-polished samples have no chromium layer but show possible secondary passivation through the build-up of nickel; and samples in high velocity water form a simple structured oxide that does not reach a saturation thickness after 291 days but steadily increases. (author) 9 figs., 3 tabs., 7 refs

  10. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Pressure influence on iron sulfide scales formation. Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfino, C.A.; Lires, O.A.; Rojo, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    In order to protect carbon steel towers and piping of Girlder sulfide (G.S.) experimental heavy water plants against corrosion produced by the action of aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, a method, previously published, was developed. Carbon steel, exposed to saturated aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, forms iron sulfide scales. In oxygen free solutions evolution of corrosion follows the sequence: mackinawite → cubic ferrous sulfide → troilite → pyrrotite → pyrite. Scales formed by pyrrotite-pyrite or pyrite are the most protective layers (these are obtained at 130 deg C, 2MPa, for periods of 14 days). Experiments, at 125 deg C and periods of 10-25 days, were performed in two different ways: 1- constant pressure operations at 0.5 and 1.1 MPa. 2- variable pressure operation between 0.3-1 MPa. In all cases pyrrotite-pyrite scales were obtained. (Author) [es

  11. 76 FR 66893 - Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From India, Thailand, and Turkey; Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ...] Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From India, Thailand, and Turkey; Final Results of... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from India, Thailand, and Turkey, pursuant to section 751(c..., Thailand, and Turkey. See Antidumping Duty Order; Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes from...

  12. 78 FR 16832 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and the Republic of Korea: Revocation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ...] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and the Republic of Korea: Revocation of... ``ITC'') that revocation of the antidumping duty (``AD'') orders on corrosion-resistant carbon steel... (``Sunset'') Review, 77 FR 85 (January 3, 2012). \\2\\ See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From...

  13. Improved corrosion resistance of cast carbon steel in sulphur oxides by Alonizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzer, M.; Dzioba, Z.

    1992-01-01

    The results of studies on the Alonizing of cast steel and of testing the corrosion resistance of this cast steel in an atmosphere containing 5 to 6% SO 2 + 50% SO 3 at 853 K are described and compared with the results obtained with unalonized cast carbon steel and high-alloy 23Cr-8Ni-2Mo cast steel. The duration of the corrosion tests was 336 hours. The aluminium diffusion layer on cast carbon steel was obtained by holding the specimens in a mixture containing 99% of powered Fe-Al and 1% of NH 4 Cl at 1323 ± 20 K. The holding time was 10 and 20 hours, respectively. The aluminium layer formed on the cast carbon steel was examined by optical microscopy and an X-ray microanalysis. After Alonizing for 10 h the layer had reached a thickness of 950 μm, and contained up to 35% Al. In a mixture of sulphur oxides corrosion rate of the alonized cast carbon steel was by about 600 times lower than of the unalonized cast carbon steel, and by about 50 times lower than that of the 23Cr-8Ni-2Mo cast steel. (orig.) [de

  14. Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Carbon Steel and Hot Dip Galvanized Steel in Simulated Concrete Solution with Different pH Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanchen XIE

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hot dip galvanizing technology is now widely used as a method of protection for steel rebars. The corrosion behaviors of Q235 carbon steel and hot galvanized steel in a Ca(OH2 solution with a pH from 10 to 13 was investigated by electrode potential and polarization curves testing. The results indicated that carbon steel and hot galvanized steel were all passivated in a strong alkaline solution. The electrode potential of hot dip galvanized steel was lower than that of carbon steel; thus, hot dip galvanized steel can provide very good anodic protection for carbon steel. However, when the pH value reached 12.5, a polarity reversal occurred under the condition of a certain potential. Hot dip galvanized coating became a cathode, and the corrosion of carbon steel accelerated. The electrochemical behaviors and passivation abilities of hot dip galvanized steel and carbon steel were affected by pH. The higher the pH value was, the more easily they were passivated.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.3.16675

  15. Hot ductility of medium carbon steel with vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Park, Jun-Young; Chung, JunHo; Park, Dae-Bum; Jang, Jin-Young; Huh, Sungyul; Ju Kim, Sung; Kang, Jun-Yun; Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Hot ductility of medium carbon steel containing 0.52 wt% of carbon and 0.11 wt% of vanadium was investigated using a hot tensile test performed up to fracture. The hot ductility was evaluated by measuring the reduction of area of the fractured specimens, which were strained at a variety of test temperatures in a range of 600–1100 °C at a strain rate of 2×10"−"3/s. The hot ductility was excellent in a temperature range of 950–1100 °C, followed by a decrease of the hot ductility below 950 °C. The hot ductility continued to drop as the temperature was lowered to 600 °C. The loss of hot ductility in a temperature range of 800–950 °C, which is above the Ae_3 temperature, was due to V(C,N) precipitation at austenite grain boundaries. The further decline of hot ductility between 700 °C and 750 °C resulted from the transformation of ferrite films decorating austenite grain boundaries. The hot ductility continued to decrease at 650 °C or less, owing to ferrite films and the pearlite matrix, which is harder than ferrite. The pearlite was transformed from austenite due to relatively high carbon content.

  16. Corrosion behaviour of dissimilar welds between martensitic stainless steel and carbon steel from secondary circuit of candu npp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, L.; Fulger, M.; Tunaru, M.; Velciu, L.; Lazar, M.

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion damages of welds occur in spite of the fact that the proper base metal and filler metal have been correctly selected, industry codes and standards have been followed and welds have been realized with full weld penetration and have proper shape and contour. It is not unusual to find that, although the base metal or alloy is resistant to corrosion in a particular environment, the welded counterpart is not resistant. In secondary circuit of a Nuclear Power Station there are some components which have dissimilar welds. Our experiments were performed in chloride environmental on two types of samples: non-welded (420 martensitic steel and 52.2k carbon steel) and dissimilar welds (dissimilar metal welds: joints beetween 420 martensitic steel and 52.2k carbon steel). To evaluate corrosion susceptibility of dissimilar welds was used electrochemical method (potentiodynamic method) and metallography microscopy (microstructural analysis). The present paper follows the localized corrosion behaviour of dissimilar welds between austenitic stainless steel and carbon steel in solutions containing chloride ions. We have been evaluated the corrosion rates of samples (welded and non-welded) by electrochemically. (authors)

  17. Corrosion Inhibition of the Galvanic Couple Copper-Carbon Steel in Reverse Osmosis Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Carrillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the electrochemical behaviour of corrosion inhibition of the copper-carbon steel galvanic couple (Cu-CS, exposed to reverse osmosis water (RO used for rinsing of heat exchangers for heavy duty machinery, during manufacture. Molybdate and nitrite salts were utilized to evaluate the inhibition behaviour under galvanic couple conditions. Cu-CS couple was used as working electrodes to measure open circuit potential (OCP, potentiodynamic polarization (PP, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. The surface conditions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The most effective concentration ratio between molybdate and nitrite corrosion inhibitors was determined. The morphological study indicated molybdate deposition on the anodic sites of the galvanic couple. The design of molybdate-based corrosion inhibitor developed in the present work should be applied to control galvanic corrosion of the Cu-CS couple during cleaning in the manufacture of heat exchangers.

  18. Statistical analysis of inhibitor concentrations for radioactive waste in carbon steel tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.E.; Edwards, T.B.

    1993-01-01

    Based on a logistic regression approach, a model was developed using the explanatory variables log([NO 3 - ]), log([NO 2 - ]), and temperature to estimate the probability of pitting in a carbon steel exposed to high-level radioactive waste. Pitting susceptibility data obtained by the two techniques of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and coupon immersion were separately and jointly analyzed with the model. Similar predictive ability is seen for equations based on both electrochemical and coupon immersion data. Using the theory associated with the determination of confidence intervals for the estimated probability, a methodology was developed to provide a lower bound for the nitrite concentration which inhibits pitting, i.e., which holds the estimated probability of pitting to a reasonably low level of 0.05

  19. High-carbon chromium steel resistance to small plastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajduchenya, V.F.; Madyanov, S.A.; Apaev, B.A.; Kirillov, Yu.V.; Sokolov, L.D.

    1978-01-01

    The phase composition of a steel with 1.08% C and 2.1% Cr, and the variation in the level of microstresses in the matrix as related to the annealing temperature in the range of 400-600 deg C and in the applied compression stress were investigated. To study the phase composition, and chromium content in the α-solution and the carbide phases, magnetic, chemical, and X-ray spectrum analyses were carried out. The change in the level of microstresses was determined roentgenographically. During the stress relaxation test at temperatures of 20-180 deg C, the mechanism of plastic deformation near the yield point was investigated. It is shown that three dislocation mechanisms operate in high-carbon chromium steel under the conditions at hand: overcoming the Pierls-Nabarro barriers by the dislocations, overcoming the stress fields of coherent carbide particles by dislocations, and circumvention of second-phase particles by dislocations. The dependence of the realization of the different plastic deformation mechanisms on the number of carbide particles and the chromium concentration in the matrix was established. The thermally activated nature of the motion of the dislocations under conditions of stress relaxation at an elevated temperature is noted

  20. Crystallographic features of lath martensite in low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Hiromoto; Ueji, Rintaro; Tsuji, Nobuhiro; Minamino, Yoritoshi

    2006-01-01

    Electron backscattering diffraction with field-emission scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze crystallographically the lath martensite structure in a 0.20% carbon steel. The crystallographic features of the lath martensite structure, of the order of the prior austenite grain size or larger, were clarified. Although the orientations of the martensite crystals were scattered around the ideal variant orientations, the martensite in this steel maintained the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) orientation relationship. The procedures of the crystallographic analysis of the martensite (ferrite) phase with the K-S orientation relationship were explained in detail. Variant analysis showed that all 24 possible variants did not necessarily appear within a single prior austenite grain and that all six variants did not necessarily appear within each packet. Specific combinations of two variants appeared within local regions (sub-blocks), indicating a strict rule for variant selection. Prior austenite grain boundaries and most of the packet boundaries were clearly recognized. However, it was difficult to determine the block boundaries within the sub-blocks

  1. The kinetics of pitting corrosion of carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.P.; Taylor, K.J.; Sooi, Z.

    1988-02-01

    The development of an improved statistical method for analysing pit growth data to take account of the difference in area of laboratory specimens and full sized high level nuclear waste containers is described. Statistical analysis of data from pit growth experiments with large area (460 cm 2 ) plates of BS 4360 steel have indicated that the depth distributions correlate most closely with a limited distribution function. This correlation implies that previous statistical analyses to estimate the maximum pit depths in full size containers, which were made using unlimited distribution functions, will be pessimistic. An evaluation of the maximum feasible pitting period based on estimating the period during which the oxygen diffusion flux is sufficient to stabilise a passive film on carbon steel containers has indicated that this is of the order of 125 years rather than the full 1000 year container life. The estimate is sensitive to the value of the leakage current assumed to flow through the passive film, and therefore work is planned to measure this accurately in relevant granitic environments. (author)

  2. The corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-01-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low- and intermediate-level waste. Since gas production is mainly due to the corrosion of carbon steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible on the corrosion rate of steel in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities lie in the range 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 .a). Corrosion rates of this order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, with the result that there is very little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. Given the current situation, it would appear somewhat risky to accept the lower value for hydrogen production as proven. Proposals are made for experiments which would reduce this element of uncertainty. (author) 10 figs., 35 refs

  3. Environmental review of options for managing radioactively contaminated carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to develop a strategy for the management of radioactively contaminated carbon steel (RCCS). Currently, most of this material either is placed in special containers and disposed of by shallow land burial in facilities designed for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or is stored indefinitely pending sufficient funding to support alternative disposition. The growing amount of RCCS with which DOE will have to deal in the foreseeable future, coupled with the continued need to protect the human and natural environment, has led the Department to evaluate other approaches for managing this material. This environmental review (ER) describes the options that could be used for RCCS management and examines the potential environmental consequences of implementing each. Because much of the analysis underlying this document is available from previous studies, wherever possible the ER relies on incorporating the conclusions of those studies as summaries or by reference

  4. Hot corrosion of pack cementation aluminized carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, A.F.; Mohamed, K.E.; Abd El-Azim, M.E.; Soliman, H.M.

    1998-01-01

    Low carbon steel was aluminized by the pack cementation technique at various aluminizing temperatures and times in or der to have different aluminide coatings. The aluminized specimens were sprayed at the beginning of the hot corrosion experiments with Na C 1+Na 2 SO 4 solution. The hot corrosion tests were carried out by thermal cycling at 850 degree C in air. The results were evaluated by, corrosion kinetics based on weight change measurements, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. It was found that the maximum corrosion resistance to this corrosive environment is achieved by aluminizing at 900 degree C for 19 h or 950 degree C for >4 h. These aliminizing conditions lead to formation of thick aluminide coatings with sufficient aluminium concentration (>15 wt%) at their outer surface necessary for continuous formation of protective Al 2 O 3 scale. The tested materials are used in protection of some components used in electric power stations (conventional or nuclear)

  5. Effect of Nanoparticles on Wettability of Nanocoating on Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norhasnidawani Johari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanocoatings plays an important role in coating industry. The solution was being prepared through copolymerization of epoxy resin hardener and with the incorporation of metal oxide nanoparticles, Zinc Oxide (ZnO and Silica (SiO2. ZnO and SiO2 were synthesized using sol-gel. Epoxy hardener acted as host while the metal oxide nanoparticles as guest components. The formulation of nanocoatings with excellent adhesion strength and corrosion protection of carbon steel was studied. The performance of wetting ability with different medium was analysed using contact angle. Water medium showed the addition of 3wt% of hybrid between ZnO and SiO2 was the best nanocoating to form hydrophobic surface and was also the best nanocoating surface to form hydrophilic surface with vacuum oil dropping. In oil dropping, the contact angle was smaller than 90° and the water drop tends to spreads on surface.

  6. Polyaspartic acid as a green corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, R. [Department of Chemistry, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050016 (China); Department of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Gu, N.; Li, C. [Department of Chemistry, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050016 (China)

    2011-04-15

    The inhibitor effect of the environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitor polyaspartic acid (PASP) on the corrosion of carbon steel in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was investigated by weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Polarization curve results clearly reveal the fact that PASP is a good anode-type inhibitor. EIS results confirm its corrosion inhibition ability. The inhibition efficiency increases with increasing PASP concentration, and the maximum inhibition efficiency was 80.33% at 10 C. SEM reveals that a protective film forms on the surface of the inhibited sample. The adsorption of this inhibitor is found to follow the Freundlich adsorption isotherm. A mechanism is proposed to explain the inhibitory action of the corrosion inhibitor. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Investigation of the benzotriazole as addictive for carbon steel phosphating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annies, V.; Cunha, M.T.; Rodrigues, P.R.P.; Banczek, E.P.; Terada, M.

    2010-01-01

    This work studied the viability of substitution of sodium nitrite (NaNO 2 ) for benzotriazole (BTAH) in the zinc phosphate bath (PZn+NaNO 2 ) for phosphating of carbon steel (SAE 1010). The characterization of the samples was carried out by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Optical Microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The chemical composition was evaluated by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. The corrosion behavior of the samples was investigated by Open Circuit Potential, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Anodic Potentiodynamic Polarization Curves in a 0.5 mol L -1 NaCl electrolyte. The experimental results showed that the phosphate layer obtained in the solution with benzotriazole (PZn+BTAH) presented better corrosion resistance properties than that obtained in sodium nitrite. The results demonstrated that the sodium nitrite NaNO 2 can be replaced by benzotriazole (BTAH) in zinc phosphate baths. (author)

  8. The role of carbon in the breakaway oxidation of mild steel in high pressure carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surman, P.L.; Brown, A.M.

    1974-01-01

    The rate controlling step in the oxidation of iron and mild steel in CO 2 is the diffusion of iron across the inner of two layers of magnetite scale. Cation diffusion is directed towards available oxidant and hence tends to produce fresh oxide in freely available space. The initial oxidation process is thus protective and stress-free. As oxidation proceeds the gaseous reaction product, carbon monoxide, tends to accumulate at the oxide/metal interface. Eventually this leads to simultaneous carbon deposition and oxide formation. This carbon contamination allows oxidant access to oxide crystallite 'jacking points', and hence volume expansion and stressed breakaway corrosion can occur. Experiments designed to simulate the promotion, propagation and healing of breakaway oxidation and to define the conditions for carbon deposition are reported. (author)

  9. Modelling hydrogen permeation in a hydrogen effusion probe for monitoring corrosion of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiwiparat, P.; Rirksomboon, T.; Steward, F.R.; Lister, D.H.; Cook, W.G.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen accumulation inside carbon steel and stainless steel devices shaped like cylindrical cups attached to a pipe containing hydrogen gas was modelled with MATLAB software. Hydrogen transfer around the bottom of the cups (edge effect) and diffusion through the cup walls (material effect) were accounted for. The variation of hydrogen pressure with time was similar for both materials, but the hydrogen plateau pressures in stainless steel cups were significantly higher than those in carbon steel cups. The geometry of the cup also affected the plateau pressure inside the cup. (author)

  10. Investigating pitting in X65 carbon steel using potentiostatic polarisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Sikiru; Hua, Yong; Barker, R.; Neville, A.

    2017-11-01

    Although pitting corrosion in passive materials is generally well understood, the growth of surface pits in actively-corroding materials has received much less attention to date and remains poorly understood. One of the key challenges which exists is repeatedly and reliably generating surface pits in a practical time-frame in the absence of deformation and/or residual stress so that studies on pit propagation and healing can be performed. Another pertinent issue is how to evaluate pitting while addressing general corrosion in low carbon steel. In this work, potentiostatic polarisation was employed to induce corrosion pits (free from deformation or residual stress) on actively corroding X65 carbon steel. The influence of applied potential (50 mV, 100 mV and 150 mV vs open circuit potential) was investigated over 24 h in a CO2-saturated, 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution at 30 °C and pH 3.8. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilised to examine pits, while surface profilometry was conducted to measure pit depth as a function of applied potential over the range considered. Analyses of light pitting (up to 120 μm) revealed that pit depth increased linearly with increase in applied potential. This paper relates total pit volume (measured using white light interferometry) to dissipated charge or total mass loss (using the current response for potentiostatic polarisation in conjunction with Faraday's law). By controlling the potential of the surface (anodic) the extent of pitting and general corrosion could be controlled. This allowed pits to be evaluated for their ability to continue to propagate after the potentiostatic technique was employed. Linear growth from a depth of 70 μm at pH 3.8, 80 °C was demonstrated. The technique offers promise for the study of inhibition of pitting.

  11. Fireside corrosion and steamside oxidation of 9-12% Cr martensitic steels exposed for long term testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Jensen, S. A.; Rasmussen, F.

    2009-01-01

    MoV121 and HCM12 for the 12% Cr steels. The test tubes were welded in as part of the existing final superheaters in actual plants and exposure has been conducted over a ten year period (1994-2005). Compared to the older steel types, T92 and HCM12 utilise tungsten to improve their creep strength. From......To obtain long term corrosion and steam oxidation data for the 9-12%Cr ferritic steels, test tube sections have been exposed in Amager 3 and Avedore 1 coal fired power plants in Denmark (formerly run by ENERGI E2). Thus direct comparisons can be made for T91 and T92 for the 9% Cr steels and X20Cr...... Avedore I testing, T91 and T92 can be compared for exposure times up to similar to 48 000 h exposure. From Amager 3 testing, X20, HCM12 and T92 were tested; T92 has been exposed for up to 31 000 h and X20 and HCM12 have had 84 500 h exposure. Tube sections were removed for various exposure durations...

  12. Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in the steel sector in key developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, L.K.; Phylipsen, G.J.M.; Worrell, E.

    2001-04-01

    Iron and steel production consumes enormous quantities of energy, especially in developing countries where outdated, inefficient technologies are still used to produce iron and steel. Carbon dioxide emissions from steel production, which range between 5 and 15% of total country emissions in key developing countries (Brazil, China, India, Mexico, and South Africa), will continue to grow as these countries develop and as demand for steel products such as materials, automobiles, and appliances increases. In this report, we describe the key steel processes, discuss typical energy-intensity values for these processes, review historical trends in iron and steel production by process in five key developing countries, describe the steel industry in each of the five key developing countries, present international comparisons of energy use and carbon dioxide emissions among these countries, and provide our assessment of the technical potential to reduce these emissions based on best-practice benchmarking. Using a best practice benchmark, we find that significant savings, in the range of 33% to 49% of total primary energy used to produce steel, are technically possible in these countries. Similarly, we find that the technical potential for reducing intensities of carbon dioxide emissions ranges between 26% and 49% of total carbon dioxide emissions from steel production in these countries.

  13. Influence of Heat Treatments on the Corrosion Resistance of Medium -Carbon Steel using Sulfuric Spring Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhlas Basheer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion is one of the important problems that may be occur to the parts of machinery and equipment after manufactured and when used as a result of exposure to corrosive media. Plain-carbon steel is considered as one of the most common minerals used in industrial applications. Some of heat treatments can have direct effect on the corrosion rate of steel by building up galvanic corrosion cells between its microscopic phases. Therefore, to adopt one of kinds of the plain-carbon steel and the most commonly used in industry to be study subject, that is medium carbon steel and took samples of this steel has been treated thermally in three methods which the normalising, annealing, and hardening .The corrosive media used in the research is Sulfuric Spring, it contains many chemical compounds to show its influence on the corrosion of steel. The weight loss method is used to determine corrosion rate and to compare between the results obtained, show that the greatest corrosion resistance of the annealed steel and the corrosion resistance of the hardened steel is the lowest while the corrosion  resistance of the normalised steel is in-between them.         Calcium carbonate was formed on the metal surface which acts as an isolating layer which decrease corrosion rate with time

  14. The effect of variations in carbon activity on the carburization of austenitic steels in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwyther, J.R.; Hobdell, M.R.; Hooper, A.J.

    1978-07-01

    Experience has shown that the liquid sodium coolant of fast breeder reactors is an effective carbon-transport medium; the resulting carburization of thin austenitic stainless steel components (eg IHX and fuel cladding) could adversely affect their mechanical integrity. The degree and nature of steel carburization depend, inter alia, on the carbon activity of the sodium environment. Exploratory tests are described in which specimens of austenitic stainless steel were carburized in sodium, the carbon activity of which was continuously monitored by a BNL electrochemical carbon meter. The sodium carbon activity was initially high, but decreased with time, simulating conditions equivalent to plant start-up or coolant clean-up following accidental oil ingress. The extent and nature of steel carburization was identified by metallography, electron microscopy, X-ray crystallography and chemical analysis. (author)

  15. Fatigue Life Estimation of Medium-Carbon Steel with Different Surface Roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyou Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Medium-carbon steel is commonly used for the rail, wire ropes, tire cord, cold heading, forging steels, cold finished steel bars, machinable steel and so on. Its fatigue behavior analysis and fatigue life estimation play an important role in the machinery industry. In this paper, the estimation of fatigue life of medium-carbon steel with different surface roughness using established S-N and P-S-N curves is presented. To estimate the fatigue life, the effect of the average surface roughness on the fatigue life of medium-carbon steel has been investigated using 75 fatigue tests in three groups with average surface roughness (Ra: 0.4 μm, 0.8 μm, and 1.6 μm, respectively. S-N curves and P-S-N curves have been established based on the fatigue tests. The fatigue life of medium-carbon steel is then estimated based on Tanaka-Mura crack initiation life model, the crack propagation life model using Paris law, and material constants of the S-N curves. Six more fatigue tests have been conducted to validate the presented fatigue life estimation formulation. The experimental results have shown that the presented model could estimate well the mean fatigue life of medium-carbon steel with different surface roughness.

  16. SURFACE ROUGHNESS AND CUTTING FORCES IN CRYOGENIC TURNING OF CARBON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. YAP

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cryogenic liquid nitrogen on surface roughness, cutting forces, and friction coefficient of the machined surface when machining of carbon steel S45C in wet, dry and cryogenic condition was studied through experiments. The experimental results show that machining with liquid nitrogen increases the cutting forces, reduces the friction coefficient, and improves the chips produced. Beside this, conventional machining with cutting fluid is still the most suitable method to produce good surface in high speed machining of carbon steel S45C whereas dry machining produced best surface roughness in low speed machining. Cryogenic machining is not able to replace conventional cutting fluid in turning carbon steel.

  17. Reproducing ten years of road ageing - Accelerated carbonation and leaching of EAF steel slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suer, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.suer@swedgeo.se [Swedish Geotechnical Institute, Linkoeping (Sweden); Lindqvist, Jan-Erik [Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Institute, Boras (Sweden); Arm, Maria; Frogner-Kockum, Paul [Swedish Geotechnical Institute, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Reuse of industrial aggregates is still hindered by concern for their long-term properties. This paper proposes a laboratory method for accelerated ageing of steel slag, to predict environmental and technical properties, starting from fresh slag. Ageing processes in a 10-year old asphalt road with steel slag of electric arc furnace (EAF) type in the subbase were identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and leaching tests. Samples from the road centre and the pavement edge were compared with each other and with samples of fresh slag. It was found that slag from the pavement edge showed traces of carbonation and leaching processes, whereas the road centre material was nearly identical to fresh slag, in spite of an accessible particle structure. Batches of moisturized road centre material exposed to oxygen, nitrogen or carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) were used for accelerated ageing. Time (7-14 days), temperature (20-40 {sup o}C) and initial slag moisture content (8-20%) were varied to achieve the carbonation (decrease in pH) and leaching that was observed in the pavement edge material. After ageing, water was added to assess leaching of metals and macroelements. 12% moisture, CO{sub 2} and seven days at 40 {sup o}C gave the lowest pH value. This also reproduced the observed ageing effect for Ca, Cu, Ba, Fe, Mn, Pb, Ca (decreased leaching) and for V, Si, and Al (increased leaching). However, ageing effects on SO{sub 4}, DOC and Cr were not reproduced.

  18. The correlation between accelerated and field corrosion tests performed in carbon steel and weathering steel coupons, coated and non-coated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2002-01-01

    The performance of four different organic coating systems applied to carbon and weathering steel coupons has been assessed in this investigation. applied on the surface of carbon steel and weathering steel coupons. The coupons have been evaluated using five different tests, three field tests and two accelerated tests. The field tests were carried out at three atmospheric stations, located at COSIPA in Cubatao-SP, at Alto da Serra in Cubatao-SP and at Paula Souza in Sao Paulo city. The accelerated tests consisted of (a) exposure to alternate cycles of ultraviolet radiation/condensation combined with salt spray cycles (UVCON combined with Salt Spray) and of (b) exposure to alternate cycles of ultraviolet radiation/condensation combined with the Prohesion test. The performance of the coatings was assessed by visual observation and photographs, using a method based on ASTM D-610, ASTM D-714 and ASTM-1654 standards to rank them. The oxide phases formed on the surfaces of the non-coated specimens of carbon and weathering steels, exposed to the same tests performed with the coated specimens, were identified using three different techniques: X-ray diffraction, Raman microscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy. In the field tests, the specimens have been exposed for 1, 2, 3, 6 and 9 months. In the accelerated ones, the results were obtained after 1340 hours (4 cycles) test. The main component identified in all the specimens collected from the field tests and from the UVCON combined with the Prohesion test was lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH). Goethite (α-FeOOH ) and magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) were identified as the other two main phases present in ali the specimens. In the UVCON combined with Salt Spray test, the dominant phase was magnetite, followed by goethite and lepidocrocite. The morphology of the rust formed on the specimens was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Structures corresponding to goethite and lepidocrocited were recognized on ali specimens, except those

  19. Damage Analysis and Evaluation of Light Steel Structures Exposed to Wind Hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Compared to hot-rolled steel structures, cold-formed steel structures are susceptible to extreme winds because of the light weight of the building and its components. Many modern cold-formed steel structures have sustained significant structural damage ranging from loss of cladding to complete collapse in recent cyclones. This article first provides some real damage cases for light steel structures induced by the high winds. After that, the paper reviews research on the damage analysis and evaluation of light steel structures caused by strong winds, which include connection failure, fatigue failure, purlin buckling, and primary frame component instability problems. Moreover, this review will mention some applications of structure damage assessment methods in this area, such as vulnerability analysis and performance-based theory, etc.

  20. Sustainable Steel Carburization by Using Snack Packaging Plastic Waste as Carbon Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyan Yin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the research regarding waste conversion to resources technology has attracted growing attention with the continued increase of waste accumulation issues and rapid depletion of natural resources. However, the study, with respect to utilizing plastics waste as carbon resources in the metals industry, is still limited. In this work, an environmentally friendly approach to utilize snack packaging plastic waste as a valuable carbon resources for steel carburization is investigated. At high temperature, plastic waste could be subject to pyrolytic gasification and decompose into small molecular hydrocarbon gaseous products which have the potential to be used as carburization agents for steel. When heating some snack packaging plastic waste and a steel sample together at the carburization temperature, a considerable amount of carbon-rich reducing gases, like methane, could be liberated from the plastic waste and absorbed by the steel sample as a carbon precursor for carburization. The resulting carburization effect on steel was investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalyzer, and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer techniques. These investigation results all showed that snack packaging plastic waste could work effectively as a valuable carbon resource for steel carburization leading to a significant increase of surface carbon content and the corresponding microstructure evolution in steel.

  1. Modeling of a self-healing process in blast furnace slag cement exposed to accelerated carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zemskov, S.V.; Ahmad, B.; Copuroglu, O.; Vermolen, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    In the current research, a mathematical model for the post-damage improvement of the carbonated blast furnace slag cement (BFSC) exposed to accelerated carbonation is constructed. The study is embedded within the framework of investigating the effect of using lightweight expanded clay aggregate,

  2. Galvanic Interaction between Chalcopyrite and Pyrite with Low Alloy and High Carbon Chromium Steel Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Azizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate the galvanic interaction between pyrite and chalcopyrite with two types of grinding media (low alloy and high carbon chromium steel ball in grinding of a porphyry copper sulphide ore. Results indicated that injection of different gases into mill altered the oxidation-reduction environment during grinding. High carbon chromium steel ball under nitrogen gas has the lowest galvanic current, and low alloy steel ball under oxygen gas had the highest galvanic current. Also, results showed that the media is anodic relative to pyrite and chalcopyrite, and therefore pyrite or chalcopyrite with a higher rest potential acted as the cathode, whilst the grinding media with a lower rest potential acted as the anode, when they are electrochemically contacted. It was also found that low alloy steel under oxygen produced the highest amount of EDTA extractable iron in the slurry, whilst high carbon chromium steel under nitrogen atmosphere led to the lowest amount.

  3. Hydrogen degradation of 21-6-9 and medium carbon steel by disc pressure test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, D.H.; Zhou, W.X.; Xu, Z.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports the method of disc pressure test and the results for 21-6-9 stainless steel and medium carbon steel in hydrogen gas with different pressures and time of storage. The results show the hydrogen induced degradation of these two kinds of steel. An attempt was made to establish an index which uses variation of area of deformed disc to determine the degradation of ductility in a hydrogen environment. (orig.)

  4. Stress state evaluation in low carbon and TRIP steels by magnetic permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouli, M.-E.; Giannakis, M

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic permeability is an indicative factor for the steel health monitoring. The measurements of magnetic permeability lead to the evaluation of the stress state of any ferromagnetic steel. The magnetic permeability measurements were conducted on low carbon and TRIP steel samples, which were subjected to both tensile and compressive stresses. The results indicated a direct correlation of the magnetic permeability with the mechanical properties, the stress state and the microstructural features of the examined samples. (paper)

  5. Carbonation of steel slag for CO2 sequestration: Leaching of products and reaction mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2006-01-01

    Carbonation of industrial alkaline residues can be used as a CO2 sequestration technology to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. In this study, steel slag samples were carbonated to a varying extent. Leaching experiments and geochemical modeling were used to identify solubility-controlling processes of

  6. Reinforcement steel corrosion in passive state and by carbonation: Consideration of galvanic currents and interface steel - concrete defaults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasser, A.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis aims to study the durability of nuclear waste deep storage structures. The work carried out is essentially an experimental study, and focuses on the corrosion of steel in the passive state with aerated or non-aerated conditions on the one hand, and the corrosion of steel in carbonated concrete during the propagation phase on the other hand. Indeed, the pore solution of concrete in contact with the metal is alkaline (pH between 12 and 13). Under these conditions, steel reinforced concrete remains passive by forming a stable and protective oxide layer (corrosion of steel in the passive state). This passive layer limits the steel corrosion rate at very low values (negligible on a short life time) but not null. For the nuclear waste storage structures due to a very long life time (up to several hundred years), this low corrosion rate can become a risk. Therefore, it is necessary to study the evolution of the oxide layer growth over time. The objectives of the thesis are to study the influence of the steel-concrete interface quality on reinforcement corrosion in passive and active state, and the possible occurrence of galvanic corrosion currents between different reinforcement steel areas. (author)

  7. Electrochemical formation of carbonated corrosion products on carbon steel in deaerated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refait, Ph.; Bourdoiseau, J.A.; Jeannin, M.; Nguyen, D.D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Green rust is electro-generated at low NaHCO 3 concentration (0.003 mol dm −3 ). ► Chukanovite and carbonated green rust are obtained in NaHCO 3 + Na 2 SO 4 deaerated electrolytes. ► The mechanisms of formation of carbonated corrosion products of carbon steel are specified. - Abstract: To investigate the nature and properties of carbonated rust layers, carbon steel electrodes were polarised anodically at a potential ∼100–200 mV higher than the open circuit potential in NaHCO 3 solutions (0.003, 0.1 and 1 mol dm −3 ) continuously deaerated by an argon flow. X-ray diffraction and μ-Raman spectroscopy were used to identify the electro-generated compounds. GR(CO 3 2− ) (=Fe II 4 Fe III 2 (OH) 12 CO 3 ·4H 2 O) is observed at 0.003 and 0.1 mol dm −3 NaHCO 3 whereas FeCO 3 is obtained at the largest concentration (1 mol dm −3 ). GR(CO 3 2− ) is accompanied by magnetite Fe 3 O 4 at the lowest NaHCO 3 concentration. The current density decreases to negligible values in each case, indicating that a passive film also forms independently of the nature of the carbonated compound. Experiments were performed similarly in solutions of NaHCO 3 and Na 2 SO 4 . Chukanovite Fe 2 (OH) 2 CO 3 could be obtained in solutions containing 0.03 mol dm −3 of each salt. In contrast with the results obtained in the solutions free of sulphate, the current density remains important during the formation of the rust layer

  8. 78 FR 16252 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India, Indonesia, and Thailand: Final Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... Indonesia P.T. Krakatau Steel 10.21 All Others 10.21 Thailand Sahaviriya Steel Industries Public Company...] Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India, Indonesia, and Thailand: Final Results of... products (``HR steel'') from India, Indonesia, and Thailand pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of...

  9. Mechanical Behavior of Stainless Steel Fiber-Reinforced Composites Exposed to Accelerated Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Caitlin; McBride, Amanda; E. Zaghi, Arash; Burke, Kelly A.; Hill, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Recent advancements in metal fibers have introduced a promising new type of stainless steel fiber with high stiffness, high failure strain, and a thickness corrosion. The main goal of this study is to compare the impact of corrosion on the mechanical properties of steel fiber-reinforced composites with those of conventional types of stainless steel. By providing experimental evidences, this study may promote the application of steel fiber-reinforced composite as a viable alternative to conventional metals. Samples of steel fiber-reinforced polymer and four different types of stainless steel were subjected to 144 and 288 h of corrosion in ferric chloride solution to simulate accelerated corrosion conditions. The weight losses due to corrosion were recorded. The corroded and control samples were tested under monotonic tensile loading to measure the ultimate stresses and strains. The effect of corrosion on the mechanical properties of the different materials was evaluated. The digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to investigate the failure mechanism of the corrosion-damaged specimens. Overall, steel fiber-reinforced composites had the greatest corrosion resistance. PMID:28773132

  10. Fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Michaud, W.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue tests have been conducted on A106-Gr B carbon steel and A533-Gr B low-alloy steel to evaluate the effects of an oxygenated-water environment on the fatigue life of these steels. For both steels, environmental effects are modest in PWR water at all strain rates. Fatigue data in oxygenated water confirm the strong dependence of fatigue life on dissolved oxygen (DO) and strain rate. The effect of strain rate on fatigue life saturates at some low value, e.g., between 0.0004 and 0.001%/s in oxygenated water with ∼0.8 ppm DO. The data suggest that the saturation value of strain rate may vary with DO and sulfur content of the steel. Although the cyclic stress-strain and cyclic-hardening behavior of carbon and low-alloy steels is distinctly different, the degradation of fatigue life of these two steels with comparable sulfur levels is similar. The carbon steel exhibits pronounced dynamic strain aging, whereas strain-aging effects are modest in the low-alloy steel. Environmental effects on nucleation of fatigue crack have also been investigated. The results suggest that the high-temperature oxygenated water has little or not effect on crack nucleation

  11. Corrosion Performance of Carbon Steel in Simulated Pore Solution in the Presence of Micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, J.; Koleva, D.A.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Kolev, H.; Van Breugel, K.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the results on the investigation of the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in model alkaline medium in the presence of very low concentration of polymeric nanoaggregates [0.0024 wt % polyethylene oxide (PEO)113-b-PS70 micelles]. The steel electrodes were investigated in chloride

  12. Deep underground measurements of 60Co in steel exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, Mikael; Gasparro, Joël; Vasselli, Roberto; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Arnold, Dirk; Neumaier, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    When using gamma-ray spectrometry performed deep underground, it is possible to measure 60Co activities down to 0.1 mBq in steel samples of some 100 g without any pre-concentration. It is thus still possible to measure 60Co induced by neutrons from the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima in pieces of steel collected at distances up to about 1200 m slant range. The results of non-destructive measurements of eight steel samples are compared with the 1986 Dose Re-Evaluation (DS86) model calculations.

  13. Deep underground measurements of 60Co in steel exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hult, Mikael; Gasparro, J.Joeel; Vasselli, Roberto; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Arnold, Dirk; Neumaier, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    When using gamma-ray spectrometry performed deep underground, it is possible to measure 60 Co activities down to 0.1 mBq in steel samples of some 100 g without any pre-concentration. It is thus still possible to measure 60 Co induced by neutrons from the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima in pieces of steel collected at distances up to about 1200 m slant range. The results of non-destructive measurements of eight steel samples are compared with the 1986 Dose Re-Evaluation (DS86) model calculations

  14. Deep underground measurements of {sup 60}Co in steel exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hult, Mikael E-mail: mikael.hult@cec.eu.int; Gasparro, J.Joeel; Vasselli, Roberto; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Arnold, Dirk; Neumaier, Stefan

    2004-09-01

    When using gamma-ray spectrometry performed deep underground, it is possible to measure {sup 60}Co activities down to 0.1 mBq in steel samples of some 100 g without any pre-concentration. It is thus still possible to measure {sup 60}Co induced by neutrons from the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima in pieces of steel collected at distances up to about 1200 m slant range. The results of non-destructive measurements of eight steel samples are compared with the 1986 Dose Re-Evaluation (DS86) model calculations.

  15. 76 FR 64312 - Light-Walled Welded Rectangular Carbon Steel Tubing From Taiwan: Final Results of the Expedited...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... Rectangular Carbon Steel Tubing From Taiwan: Final Results of the Expedited Sunset Review of the Antidumping... the antidumping duty order on light-walled welded rectangular carbon steel tubing from Taiwan pursuant... steel tubing from Taiwan pursuant to section 751(c) of the Act. See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset...

  16. 75 FR 29976 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products From Italy: Extension of the Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-475-826] Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products From Italy: Extension of the Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...-quality steel plate products from Italy. See Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products...

  17. 78 FR 29113 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products From the Republic of Korea: Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ...-Quality Steel Plate Products From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain cut-to-length carbon-quality steel plate products... duty order on certain cut-to-length carbon-quality steel plate products from the Republic of Korea...

  18. 78 FR 4385 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ...-Quality Steel Plate Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty... the antidumping duty order on certain cut-to- length carbon-quality steel plate products (CTL plate... Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products from the Republic of Korea'' dated concurrently with this notice...

  19. 75 FR 33578 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes from India: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... Shrimp From Brazil, 69 FR 76910 (December 23, 2004), and accompanying Issues and Decision Memorandum at... Eleventh Administrative Review of the Antidumping Duty Order on Certain Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel...

  20. Laboratory investigations on the corrosion rate of A42 carbon steel in various secondary circuit chemistries representative of hydraulic tests conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brussieux, C.; Clinard, M.H.; Guillodo, M.; Alos-Ramos, O.

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia and hydrazine are currently used in the chemical conditioning of steam generators hydraulic test medium to minimize the corrosion rate of carbon steels. However, hydrazine is classified carcinogenic by the European Commission. Significant effort is therefore ongoing to limit its use or even replace it. The results presented in this paper were obtained in the frame of an EDF and AREVA research program on the subject. The corrosion rate of carbon steel in alkaline media with hydrazine was thoroughly studied. However, most studies concern polished coupons and very few data are available for carbon steel covered with oxides layer(s) representative of the layer(s) which can be found in a SG after operation. In this context, the corrosion rate at 25°C of carbon steel pre-oxidized by an autoclave treatment was studied. The tests coupons were submitted to a secondary circuit chemical conditioning treatment in an autoclave at 280°C during 30 days prior to the corrosion rate measurement. The corrosion rates were measured during two months by an electrochemical method (polarization resistance) in test media composed with deionized water, ammonia and hydrazine under an air blanket at 25°C. Similitudes with steam generators' volume/surface ratios were respected during these tests. The coupons submitted to an autoclave treatment were covered by a duplex magnetite layer. After exposure to hydrazine and ageing, the structure of the magnetite layer contains bigger crystallites than after ageing without exposure to hydrazine. The corrosion rate of passive A42 steel exposed to hydrazine was stable and low even after the complete consumption of hydrazine during at least 50 days. The corrosion rate of passive A42 steel not exposed to hydrazine grew steadily to reach the same corrosion rates as polished carbon steels within 50 days. The hydrazine consumption rate observed in the presence of magnetite covered A42 carbon steel was found higher than 1mg/kg/hour. To explain

  1. Responses of Microbial Community Composition to Temperature Gradient and Carbon Steel Corrosion in Production Water of Petroleum Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xiao Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil reservoir production systems are usually associated with a temperature gradient and oil production facilities frequently suffer from pipeline corrosion failures. Both bacteria and archaea potentially contribute to biocorrosion of the oil production equipment. Here the response of microbial populations from the petroleum reservoir to temperature gradient and corrosion of carbon steel coupons were investigated under laboratory condition. Carbon steel coupons were exposed to production water from a depth of 1809 m of Jiangsu petroleum reservoir (China and incubated for periods of 160 and 300 days. The incubation temperatures were set at 37, 55, and 65°C to monitoring mesophilic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms associated with anaerobic carbon steel corrosion. The results showed that corrosion rate at 55°C (0.162 ± 0.013 mm year-1 and 37°C (0.138 ± 0.008 mm year-1 were higher than that at 65°C (0.105 ± 0.007 mm year-1, and a dense biofilm was observed on the surface of coupons under all biotic incubations. The microbial community analysis suggests a high frequency of bacterial taxa associated with families Porphyromonadaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, and Spirochaetaceae at all three temperatures. While the majority of known sulfate-reducing bacteria, in particular Desulfotignum, Desulfobulbus and Desulfovibrio spp., were predominantly observed at 37°C; Desulfotomaculum spp., Thermotoga spp. and Thermanaeromonas spp. as well as archaeal members closely related to Thermococcus and Archaeoglobus spp. were substantially enriched at 65°C. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens of the family Methanobacteriaceae were dominant at both 37 and 55°C; acetoclastic Methanosaeta spp. and methyltrophic Methanolobus spp. were enriched at 37°C. These observations show that temperature changes significantly alter the microbial community structure in production fluids and also affected the biocorrosion of carbon steel under anaerobic conditions.

  2. Emerging surface characterization techniques for carbon steel corrosion: a critical brief review

    OpenAIRE

    Dwivedi, D.; Lepkova, K.; Becker, T.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon steel is a preferred construction material in many industrial and domestic applications, including oil and gas pipelines, where corrosion mitigation using film-forming corrosion inhibitor formulations is a widely accepted method. This review identifies surface analytical techniques that are considered suitable for analysis of thin films at metallic substrates, but are yet to be applied to analysis of carbon steel surfaces in corrosive media or treated with corrosion inhibitors. The rev...

  3. Effect of small addition of Cr on stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Rumana; Pahlevani, Farshid, E-mail: f.pahlevani@unsw.edu.au; Sahajwalla, Veena

    2017-03-15

    High carbon steels with dual phase structures of martensite and austenite have considerable potential for industrial application in high abrasion environments due to their hardness, strength and relatively low cost. To design cost effective high carbon steels with superior properties, it is crucial to identify the effect of Chromium (Cr) on the stability of retained austenite (RA) and to fully understand its effect on solid-state phase transition. This study addresses this important knowledge gap. Using standard compression tests on bulk material, quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, nano-indentation on individual austenitic grains, transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction–based orientation microscopy techniques, the authors investigated the effect of Cr on the microstructure, transformation behaviour and mechanical stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel, with varying Cr contents. The results revealed that increasing the Cr %, altered the morphology of the RA and increased its stability, consequently, increasing the critical pressure for martensitic transformation. This study has critically addressed the elastoplastic behaviour of retained austenite – and provides a deep understanding of the effect of small additions of Cr on the metastable austenite of high carbon steel from the macro- to nano-level. Consequently, it paves the way for new applications for high carbon low alloy steels. - Highlights: • Effect of small addition of Cr on metastable austenite of high carbon steel from the macro- to nano-level • A multi-scale study of elastoplastic behaviour of retained austenite in high carbon steel • The mechanical stability of retained austenite during plastic deformation increased with increasing Cr content • Effect of grain boundary misorientation angle on hardness of individual retained austenite grains in high carbon steel.

  4. CO2 laser cladding of VERSAlloyTM on carbon steel with powder feeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae-Do; Kweon, Jin-Wook

    2007-01-01

    Laser cladding processing with metal powder feeding has been experimented on carbon steel with VERSAlloy TM . A special device for the metal powder feeding was designed and manufactured. By adopting proper cladding parameters, good clad layers and sound metallurgical bonding with the base metal were obtained. Analysis indicates that the micro hardness of clad layer and the heat-affected zone increased with increasing of cladding speed. The experimental results showed that VERSAlloy TM cladded well with carbon steel

  5. Zn-10.2% Fe coating over carbon steel atmospheric corrosion resistance. Comparison with zinc coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnau, G.; Gimenez, E.; Rubio, M.V.; Saura, J.J.; Suay, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Zn-10.2% Fe galvanized coating versus hot galvanized coating over carbon steel corrosion performance has been studied. Different periods of atmospheric exposures in various Valencia Community sites, and salt spray accelerated test have been done. Carbon steel test samples have been used simultaneously in order to classify exposure atmosphere corrosivity, and environmental exposure atmosphere characteristics have been analyzed. Corrosion Velocity versus environmental parameters has been obtained. (Author) 17 refs

  6. Electroslag welding of rotor steels produced with vacuum-carbon reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshchin, M.B.; Modzhuk, M.D.; Izvekov, B.V.

    1985-01-01

    Metallurgical processes of electroslag welding of rotor steels, melted with vacuum-carbon deoxidation, have been considered. It is established, that during electroslag welding of steels with carbon content 0.20...0.30%, suppression of welding bath boiling and production of dense weld metal with a high impact strength can be ensured at oxygen concentration in soldered on metal not exceeding 0.01% and silicon content 0.06...0.10%

  7. Corrosion by concentrated sulfuric acid in carbon steel pipes and tanks: state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panossian, Zehbour; Almeida, Neusvaldo Lira de; Sousa, Raquel Maria Ferreira de [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pimenta, Gutemberg de Souza [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas e Desenvolvimento (CENPES); Marques, Leandro Bordalo Schmidt [PETROBRAS Engenharia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    PETROBRAS, allied to the policy of reduction of emission of pollutants, has been adjusting the processes of the new refineries to obtain products with lower sulfur content. Thus, the sulfur dioxide, extracted from the process gases of a new refinery to be built in the Northeast, will be used to produce sulfuric acid with concentration between (94-96) %. This acid will be stored in carbon steel tanks and transported through a buried 8-km carbon steel pipe from the refinery to a pier, where it will be loaded onto ships and sent to the consumer markets. Therefore, the corrosion resistance of carbon steel by concentrated acid will become a great concern for the mentioned storage and transportation. When the carbon steel comes into contact with concentrated sulfuric acid, there is an immediate acid attack with the formation of hydrogen gas and ferrous ions which, in turn, forms a protective layer of FeSO{sub 4} on the metallic surface. The durability of the tanks and pipes made of carbon steel will depend on the preservation of this protective layer. This work presents a review of the carbon steel corrosion in concentrated sulfuric acid and discusses the preventive methods against this corrosion, including anodic protection. (author)

  8. Role of cavity formation in SCC of cold worked carbon steel in high-temperature water. Part 2. Study of crack initiation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Aoki, Masanori; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2013-01-01

    To consider the role of cavity formation in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of cold worked (CW) carbon steel in high-temperature water, SCC and creep growth (part 1) and initiation (part 2) tests were performed. The part 2 crack initiation tests used blunt notched compact tension (CT) type specimens of CW carbon steel exposed under the static load condition in hydrogenated pure water and in air in the range of temperatures between 360 and 450°C. Inter-granular (IG) crack initiation was observed both in water and in air even in static load condition when steel specimens had been cold worked. 1/T type temperature dependencies of initiation times were observed for CW carbon steel, and the crack initiation times in an operating pressurized heavy water reactor, PHWR (Pt Lepreau) seemed to lie on the extrapolated line of the experimental results. Cavities were identified at the grain boundaries near the bottom of a notch (highly stressed location) before cracks initiated both in water and air. The cavities were probably formed by the condensation of vacancies and they affected the bond strength of the grain boundaries. To assess the mechanism of IGSCC initiation in high temperature water, the diffusion of vacancies driven by stress gradients was studied using a specially designed CT specimen. As a model for IGSCC in CW carbon steel in high temperature water, it was concluded that the formation of cavities from the collapse of vacancies offers the best interpretation of the present data. (author)

  9. Evaluation of long-term corrosion durability and self-healing ability of scratched coating systems on carbon steel in a marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xia; Chen, Changwei; Xu, Weichen; Zhu, Qingjun; Ge, Chengyue; Hou, Baorong

    2017-09-01

    Defects in protective-coating systems on steel surfaces are inevitable in practical engineering applications. A composite coating system, including a primer, middle coat and topcoat, were used to protect carbon steel from corrosion in a marine environment. Two environmental additives, glass fibers and thiourea, were applied in the middle coat to modify the coating system. The long-term corrosion durability and self-healing ability of the scratched coating system were evaluated by multiple methods. Results of the electrochemical technologies indicated that the coating system that contained 0.5 wt.% fibers and 0.5 wt.% thiourea presented good corrosion protection and self-healing for carbon steel when immersed in 3.5% NaCl for 120 d. Evolution of localized corrosion factors with time, as obtained from the current distribution showed that fibers combined with thiourea could inhibit the occurrence of local corrosion in scratched coating systems and retarded the corrosion development significantly. Surface characterization suggested that adequate thiourea could be absorbed uniformly on fibers for a long time to play an important role in protecting the carbon steel. Finally, schematic models were established to demonstrate the action of fibers and thiourea on the exposed surface of the carbon steel and the scratched coating system in the entire deterioration process.

  10. Influence of the impurities on the depth of penetration with carbon steel weldings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Savytsky

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the results of the research about the influence of the impurities on the depth of penetration with carbon steels weldings of different chemical composition are presented. These data suggest that presence of those impurities, such as sulphure and oxygen, in the steel, increases the depth of penetration to 1,3 - 1,5 times compared to welding refined steels. Applying activating fluxes for welding high tensile steels, provides an increase in the depth of penetration of 2 - 3 times.

  11. Intragranular ferrite morphologies in medium carbon vanadium-microalloyed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadel A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine TTT diagram of medium carbon V-N micro-alloyed steel with emphasis on the development of intragranular ferrite morphologies. The isothermal treatment was carried out at 350, 400, 450, 500, 550 and 600°C. These treatments were interrupted at different times in order to analyze the evolution of the microstructure. Metallographic evaluation was done using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results show that at high temperatures (≥ 500°C polygonal intragranulary nucleated ferrite idiomorphs, combined with grain boundary ferrite and pearlite were produced and followed by an incomplete transformation phenomenon. At intermediate temperatures (450, 500°C an interloced acicular ferrite (AF microstructure is produced, and at low temperatures (400, 350°C the sheave of parallel acicular ferrite plates, similar to bainitic sheaves but intragranularly nucleated were observed. In addition to sheaf type acicular ferrite, the grain boundary nucleated bainitic sheaves are observed. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI174004

  12. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Balkwill, P.H.; O'Brien, T.M.; Taylor, K.J.; Marsh, G.P.

    1990-11-01

    The report describes the work of a two year programme investigating the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel embedded in a range of candidate repository cements and concretes at laboratory ambient temperatures. The factors investigated in the study were the rate of the anaerobic corrosion reaction, the effect of hydrogen overpressure on the reaction rate and the form of the corrosion product. Both electrochemical and sample weight loss corrosion rate measurements were used. The cements and concretes used were prepared both with and without small additions of chloride (2% by weight of mix water). The results indicate that the corrosion rate is low, <1 μm/year, the effect of hydrogen overpressure is not significant over the range of pressures investigated, 1-100 atmospheres, and that the corrosion product is dependent on the cement used to cast the samples. Magnetite was identified in the case of blast furnace slag replacement cements but for pulverised fuel ash and ordinary Portland cements no corrosion product was evident either from X-ray diffraction or laser Raman measurements. (Author)

  13. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Balkwill, P.H.; O'Brien, T.M.; Taylor, K.J.; Marsh, G.P.

    1990-11-01

    The report describes the work of a two year programme investigating the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel embedded in a range of candidate repository cements and concretes at laboratory temperatures. The factors investigated in the study were the rate of the anaerobic corrosion reaction, the effect of hydrogen overpressure on the reaction rate and the form of the corrosion product. Both electrochemical and sample weight loss corrosion rate measurements were used. The cements and concretes used were prepared both with and without small additions of chloride (2% by weight of mix water). The results indicate that the corrosion rate is low, < 1 μm/year, the effect of hydrogen overpressure is not significant over the range of pressures investigated, 1-100 atmospheres, and that the corrosion product is dependent on the cement used to cast the samples. Magnetite was identified in the case of blast furnace slag replacement cements but for pulverised fuel ash and ordinary Portland cements no corrosion product was evident either from X-ray diffraction or laser Raman measurements. Further work is presently underway to investigate the effects of elevated temperatures and chloride levels on the anaerobic corrosion reaction and the rate of hydrogen gas production. (author)

  14. Fracture assessment of Savannah River Reactor carbon steel piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertz, G.E.; Stoner, K.J.; Caskey, G.R.; Begley, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors have been in operation since the mid-1950's. One postulated failure mechanism for the reactor piping is brittle fracture of the original A285 and A53 carbon steel piping. Material testing of archival piping determined (1) the static and dynamic tensile properties; (2) Charpy impact toughness; and (3) the static and dynamic compact tension fracture toughness properties. The nil-ductility transition temperature (NDTT), determined by Charpy impact test, is above the minimum operating temperature for some of the piping materials. A fracture assessment was performed to demonstrate that potential flaws are stable under upset loading conditions and minimum operating temperatures. A review of potential degradation mechanisms and plant operating history identified weld defects as the most likely crack initiation site for brittle fracture. Piping weld defects, as characterized by radiographic and metallographic examination, and low fracture toughness material properties were postulated at high stress locations in the piping. Normal operating loads, upset loads, and residual stresses were assumed to act on the postulated flaws. Calculated allowable flaw lengths exceed the size of observed weld defects, indicating adequate margins of safety against brittle fracture. Thus, a detailed fracture assessment was able to demonstrate that the piping systems will not fail by brittle fracture, even though the NDTT for some of the piping is above the minimum system operating temperature

  15. Investigation of the pitting corrosion of low carbon steel containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    The present study was undertaken because the prediction of the degradation rate of low carbon steel contains over long time frames is one of the crucial elements in the development of a source term model for low-level shallow land burial. The principal data base considered is that of the NBS corrosion measurements of ferrous materials buried in the ground for periods of up to 18 years. In this investigation, the maximum penetration in mils, hm, due to pitting corrosion was found to conform closely to the relation h m = kt n where it is the exposure time of the sample in years, κ is the pitting parameter in mil/(years) n , and n > O is a parameter related to the aeration property of the soil. The central objective of the present investigation is the determination of the dependence of the pitting parameters κ and n on the soil properties. The result of a detailed linear correlation analysis of κ on one hand, the pH value and the resistivity of the soil on the other hand revealed that κ is principally influenced by the pH value of the soil. The resistivity of the soil is found to play a minor role

  16. Decrudding and chemical cleaning of carbon steel components - an evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaonkar, K.B.; Elayathu, N.S.D.; Shibad, P.R.; Gadiyar, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    Corrosion and accumulation of corrosion products on the surfaces of structural components and plant equipments can cause se vereoperational problems during service. An illustration is the heat exchanger systems in nuclear power stations. Development and standardisation of appropriate chemical cleaning and decontamination procedures and their evaluation hence merit serious consideration. A number of chemical cleaning procedures using formulations based on hydrochloric and citric acid solutions have been examined to study their crud dissolving and derusting ability in addition to the attack on base material. The compositions were chosen: (1) along with complexing agents EDTA and ammonium citrate, (2) with pH control, and (3) with the use of inhibitors acridine, rhodine, hexamine and phenyl-thiourea. The evaluations have been made at 28 and 60 deg C. Rusted carbon steel coupons having a rust of 10-12 mg/cm 2 on the surface have been used for the purpose of the above evaluations. Data on corrosion rates of monel and cupronickel (70:30) in the descaling solutions have also been presented. Results on the above evaluation studies have been discussed. (author)

  17. Effects of hydrogen on carbon steels at the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, W.C.

    1995-01-01

    Concern has been expressed that hydrogen produced by corrosion, radiolysis, and decomposition of the waste could cause embrittlement of the carbon steel waste tanks at Hanford. The concern centers on the supposition that the hydrogen evolved in many of the existing tanks might penetrate the steel wall of the tank and cause embrittlement that might lead to catastrophic failure. This document reviews literature on the effects of hydrogen on the carbon steel proposed for use in the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility for the time periods before and during construction as well as for the operational life of the tanks. The document draws several conclusions about these effects. Molecular hydrogen is not a concern because it is not capable of entering the steel tank wall. Nascent hydrogen produced by corrosion reactions will not embrittle the steel because the mild steel used in tank construction is not hard enough to be susceptible to hydrogen stress cracking and the corrosion product hydrogen is not produced at a rate sufficient to cause either loss in tensile ductility or blistering. If the steel intended for use in the tanks is produced to current technology, fabricated in accordance with good construction practice, postweld heat treated, and operated within the operating limits defined, hydrogen will not adversely affect the carbon steel tanks during their 50-year design life. 26 refs

  18. The Effects of Cr and Al Addition on Transformation and Properties in Low‐Carbon Bainitic Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Junyu Tian; Guang Xu; Mingxing Zhou; Haijiang Hu; Xiangliang Wan

    2017-01-01

    Three low‐carbon bainitic steels were designed to investigate the effects of Cr and Al addition on bainitic transformation, microstructures, and properties by metallographic method and dilatometry. The results show that compared with the base steel without Cr and Al addition, only Cr addition is effective for improving the strength of low‐carbon bainitic steel by increasing the amount of bainite. However, compared with the base steel, combined addition of Cr and Al has no significant effect o...

  19. The CCT diagrams of ultra low carbon bainitic steels and their impact toughness properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lis, A.K.; Lis, J.; Jeziorski, L.

    1998-01-01

    The CCT diagrams of ULCB N i steels, HN3MV, HN3MVCu having 5.1% Ni and 3.5% Ni and Cu bearing steels; HN3M1.5Cu, HSLA 100 have been determined. The reduced carbon concentration in steel, in order to prevent the formation of cementite, allowed for using nickel, manganese, chromium and molybdenum to enhance hardenability and refinement of the bainitic microstructures by lowering B S temperature. Copper and microadditions of vanadium and niobium are successfully used for precipitation strengthening of steel both in thermomechanically or heat treated conditions. Very good fracture toughness at low temperatures and high yield strength properties of HN3MVCu and HN3MV steels allowed for fulfillment of the requirements for steel plates for pressure vessels and cryogenic applications. (author)

  20. A quality approach to maintain the properties of S235 JR structural carbon steel in Lebanon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidawi, J.A.; Al Khatib, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text.S235JR carbon steel is one of the most popular steels used in Lebanon. It is imported by steel dealers and is widely used by all fabricators and manufacturers of steels for many structural purposes and applications. This kind of steel has good ductile properties as well as excellent weldability. It is still known by its previous designation St 37-2 or E 24-2. S235JR is produced in many shapes and thicknesses such as steel plates, sheets, angles and different other geometric shapes. Standard chemical and mechanical tests were conducted and reported on S235JR hot-rolled structural low-carbon mild steel specimens collected from Lebanese steel market. The main objective of this work is to assure the compliance of these properties with those set by the steel manufacturer. The above mentioned tests were performed at the laboratories of the Industrial Research Institute (IR) in Lebanon to assure the quality and credibility of the results. related European and American standards were presented as references and compared with the achieved results. Discussion was presented to show the similarities and differences between S235JR steel samples and standard requirements. Some of the reasons for such differences were discussed. Sufficient data was furnished through this work for the public and mainly for the Lebanese Standard Organization LIBNOR to easily adopt and implement the EN 10025:1993 European standard that can be applied in Lebanon concerning the most commonly used hot rolled low carbon structural steel. A follow up concerning adopting and implementing EN 10025:1993 will be briefed

  1. Ultrasonic and metallographic studies on AISI 4140 steel exposed to hydrogen at high pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruganti, Malavika

    This thesis conducts an investigation to study the effects of hydrogen exposure at high temperature and pressure on the behavior of AISI 4140 steel. Piezoelectric ultrasonic technique was primarily used to evaluate surface longitudinal wave velocity and defect geometry variations, as related to time after exposure to hydrogen at high temperature and pressure. Critically refracted longitudinal wave technique was used for the former and pulse-echo technique for the latter. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to correlate the ultrasonic results with the microstructure of the steel and to provide better insight into the steel behavior. The results of the investigation indicate that frequency analysis of the defect echo, determined using the pulse-echo technique at regular intervals of time, appears to be a promising tool for monitoring defect growth induced by a high temperature and high pressure hydrogen-related attack.

  2. Characterisation of Ceramic-Coated 316LN Stainless Steel Exposed to High-Temperature Thermite Melt and Molten Sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Vetrivendan, E.; Shukla, Prabhat Kumar; Das, Sanjay Kumar; Hemanth Rao, E.; Murthy, S. S.; Lydia, G.; Nashine, B. K.; Mallika, C.; Selvaraj, P.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2017-11-01

    Currently, stainless steel grade 316LN is the material of construction widely used for core catcher of sodium-cooled fast reactors. Design philosophy for core catcher demands its capability to withstand corium loading from whole core melt accidents. Towards this, two ceramic coatings were investigated for its application as a layer of sacrificial material on the top of core catcher to enhance its capability. Plasma-sprayed thermal barrier layer of alumina and partially stabilised zirconia (PSZ) with an intermediate bond coat of NiCrAlY are selected as candidate material and deposited over 316LN SS substrates and were tested for their suitability as thermal barrier layer for core catcher. Coated specimens were exposed to high-temperature thermite melt to simulate impingement of molten corium. Sodium compatibility of alumina and PSZ coatings were also investigated by exposing samples to molten sodium at 400 °C for 500 h. The surface morphology of high-temperature thermite melt-exposed samples and sodium-exposed samples was examined using scanning electron microscope. Phase identification of the exposed samples was carried out by x-ray diffraction technique. Observation from sodium exposure tests indicated that alumina coating offers better protection compared to PSZ coating. However, PSZ coating provided better protection against high-temperature melt exposure, as confirmed during thermite melt exposure test.

  3. Ultra-Low Carbon Bainitic Steels for Heavy Plate Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    these steels. The CCT diagrams 7 of steels typical of the HY grades indicate that the nose of the proeutectoid ferrite/pearlite reactions is located...austenite, carbides, and martensite. An example of the type of CCT diagram for one of the steels used in this investigation is presented in Figure 12...introduce a "bay" of unstable austenite which acts to separate the ferrite "nose" from the bainite/martensite regions on TTT or CCT diagrams , see Figure

  4. Properties of welded joints of 2,25Cr-1Mo steel with various carbon content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vornovitskij, I.N.; Brodetskaya, E.Z.; Pozdnyakova, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of welded joints of 2,25 Cr - 1 Mo steel pipelines with different carbon content are considered. It is shown that application of electrodes developed in some countries for welding permits in many cases to exclude heat treatment of welded joints owing to high ductility of weld deposited metal. To improve the ductility, it is necessary to limit both carbon content down to 0,03-0,06% and detrimental elements (sulfur, phosphorus). Heat affected zone hardness may be increased at the expense of carbon. Weld deposited metal possesses the highest long-term strength at the given test temperature; in this case long-term strength of welded joints and base metal is practically the same. The long-term strength of high-carbon steel is higher at the test temperature of 565 deg C as compared to mean-carbon and low-carbon steels, whose long-term strength is practically equal at this temperature. The long-term strength of high-carbon and mean-carbon steels is practically the same and higher as compared with low-carbon one at the test temperature of 510 deg C

  5. Mechanical behavior of precipitation hardenable steels exposed to highly corrosive environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1994-01-01

    Unexpected occurrences of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15 - 5 PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a 3.5 percent NaCl aqueous solution. The material selected for the study was 15 - 5 PH steel in the H 900 condition. The Slow Strain Rate technique was used to test the metallic specimens.

  6. Accelerated Carbonation of Steel Slag Compacts: Development of High-Strength Construction Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaghebeur, Mieke; Nielsen, Peter, E-mail: peter.nielsen@vito.be; Horckmans, Liesbeth [Sustainable Materials Management, VITO, Mol (Belgium); Van Mechelen, Dirk [RECMIX bvba, Genk (Belgium)

    2015-12-17

    Mineral carbonation involves the capture and storage of carbon dioxide in carbonate minerals. Mineral carbonation presents opportunities for the recycling of steel slags and other alkaline residues that are currently landfilled. The Carbstone process was initially developed to transform non-hydraulic steel slags [stainless steel (SS) slag and basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slags] in high-quality construction materials. The process makes use of accelerated mineral carbonation by treating different types of steel slags with CO{sub 2} at elevated pressure (up to 2 MPa) and temperatures (20–140°C). For SS slags, raising the temperature from 20 to 140°C had a positive effect on the CO{sub 2} uptake, strength development, and the environmental properties (i.e., leaching of Cr and Mo) of the carbonated slag compacts. For BOF slags, raising the temperature was not beneficial for the carbonation process. Elevated CO{sub 2} pressure and CO{sub 2} concentration of the feed gas had a positive effect on the CO{sub 2} uptake and strength development for both types of steel slags. In addition, the compaction force had a positive effect on the strength development. The carbonates that are produced in situ during the carbonation reaction act as a binder, cementing the slag particles together. The carbonated compacts (Carbstones) have technical properties that are equivalent to conventional concrete products. An additional advantage is that the carbonated materials sequester 100–150 g CO{sub 2}/kg slag. The technology was developed on lab scale by the optimization of process parameters with regard to compressive strength development, CO{sub 2} uptake, and environmental properties of the carbonated construction materials. The Carbstone technology was validated using (semi-)industrial equipment and process conditions.

  7. 77 FR 37711 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ...)] Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam...-fair-value imports from India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam of circular welded carbon... respect to circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe from Oman and the United Arab Emirates being sold in...

  8. 75 FR 55745 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... Products covered by this order are certain corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from Korea. These... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon... review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE...

  9. 78 FR 19210 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    .... Scope of the Order Products covered by this order are certain corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon... countervailing duty (CVD) order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from the Republic of Korea for...

  10. 78 FR 55241 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... merchandise covered by this Order \\2\\ is certain corrosion- resistant carbon steel flat products from Korea... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon... the countervailing duty (CVD) order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from the...

  11. Evaluation of corrosion of steel embedded in concrete exposed to carbonation AAS using a factorial experiment with repeated measures. Evaluación de la corrosión del acero embebido en concreto AAS, expuesto a carbonatación mediante un experimento factorial con medidas repetidas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Aperador Chaparro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents various techniques for assessing corrosion, the linear polarization resistance and galvanostatic pulse, the analysis was performed using analysis of variance models using a factorial experiment with three factors, one repeated measure, because on the same experimental unit (reinforced concrete, it experienced several samples to be measured in time (0 h=1, 350 h=2, 700 h=3, 1050 h=4, 1700 h=5 y 2600 h=6. This makes the observations are not independent, the other two factors relate to, the binder (ce: 1 = activatedslag [AAS] and 2 = ordinary Portland concrete [OPC] and the exposure condition (ca: 1 = y 2 = environmental exposure accelerated carbonation. These factors were discussed according to the results of the electrochemical properties. Initially performed the statistical processing of each of the variables in relation to the properties and analyzed the interaction between them. Where they established the differences in materials used as coating steel, concrete, OPC and AAS. OPC concrete specimens, exhibited a resting potential, polarization resistance and ohmic (CO2 condition than those obtained for reinforced concrete in AAS.En este artículo se presentan las técnicas de evaluación de la corrosión, tales como potencial de corrosión, resistencia lineal a la polarización y pulso galvanostático a los concretos de activación alcalina (AAS y Portland tipo I (OPC. El estudio se realizó por medio de modelos de análisis de varianza, aplicando un experimento factorial con tres factores, uno de ellos medida repetida, debido a que sobre la misma unidad experimental (concreto armado AAS y OPC se ensayaron varias muestras para medirlas en el tiempo (0 h=1, 350 h=2, 700 h=3, 1050 h=4, 1700 h=5 y 2600 h=6, lo que hace que las observaciones no sean independientes; los otros dos factores corresponden al cementante (ce: 1=escoria activada alcalinamente [AAS] y 2=concreto Portland ordinario [OPC] y la condición de exposici

  12. The possibility of tribopair lifetime extending by welding of quenched and tempered stainless steel with quenched and tempered carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marušić

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the conditions of tribocorrosion wear, extending of parts lifetime could be achieved by using stainless steel,which is hardened to sufficiently high hardness. In the tribosystem bolt/ bushing shell/link plate of the bucket elevator transporter conveyor machine, the previously quenched and tempered martensitic stainless steel for bolts is hardened at ≈47 HRC and welded with the quenched and tempered high yield carbon steel for bolts. Additional material, based on Cr-Ni-Mo (18/8/6 is used. The microstructure and hardness of welded samples are tested. On the tensile tester, resistance of the welded joint is tested with a simulated experiment. Dimensional control of worn tribosystem elements was performed after six months of service.

  13. Mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic and electron numbers of stainless steel and carbon steels with different energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Fakarudin Abdul Rahman; Mohd Iqbal Saripan; Nor Paiza Mohamad Hasan; Ismail Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ ρ) of stainless steel (SS316L) and carbon steel (A516) that are widely used as petrochemical plant components, such as distillation column, heat exchanger, boiler and storage tank were measured at 662, 1073 and 1332 keV of photon energies. Measurements of radiation intensity for various thicknesses of steel were made by using transmission method. The γ-ray intensity were counted by using a Gamma spectrometer that contains a Hyper-pure Germanium (HPGe) detector connected with Multi Channel Analyzer (MCA). The effective numbers of atomic (Z eff ) and electron (N eff ) obtained experimentally were compared by those obtained through theoretical calculation. Both experimental and calculated values of Z eff and N eff were in good agreement. (author)

  14. Microbial activities in hydrocarbon-laden wastewaters: Impact on diesel fuel stability and the biocorrosion of carbon steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Renxing; Duncan, Kathleen E; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Davidova, Irene; Yakimov, Michail M; Suflita, Joseph M

    2017-08-20

    Anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation not only diminishes fuel quality, but also exacerbates the biocorrosion of the metallic infrastructure. While successional events in marine microbial ecosystems impacted by petroleum are well documented, far less is known about the response of communities chronically exposed to hydrocarbons. Shipboard oily wastewater was used to assess the biotransformation of different diesel fuels and their propensity to impact carbon steel corrosion. When amended with sulfate and an F76 military diesel fuel, the sulfate removal rate in the assay mixtures was elevated (26.8μM/d) relative to incubations receiving a hydroprocessed biofuel (16.1μM/d) or a fuel-unamended control (17.8μM/d). Microbial community analysis revealed the predominance of Anaerolineae and Deltaproteobacteria in F76-amended incubations, in contrast to the Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria in the original wastewater. The dominant Smithella-like sequences suggested the potential for syntrophic hydrocarbon metabolism. The general corrosion rate was relatively low (0.83 - 1.29±0.12mpy) and independent of the particular fuel, but pitting corrosion was more pronounced in F76-amended incubations. Desulfovibrionaceae constituted 50-77% of the sessile organisms on carbon steel coupons. Thus, chronically exposed microflora in oily wastewater were differentially acclimated to the syntrophic metabolism of traditional hydrocarbons but tended to resist isoalkane-laden biofuels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Interface Analyses Between a Case-Hardened Ingot Casting Steel and Carbon-Containing and Carbon-Free Refractories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruhstorfer, Jens; Dudczig, Steffen; Rudolph, Martin; Schmidt, Gert; Brachhold, Nora; Schöttler, Leandro; Rafaja, David; Aneziris, Christos G.

    2018-06-01

    Corrosion tests of carbon-free and carbon-containing refractories were performed. The carbon-free crucibles corroded, whereas the carbon-containing crucibles were negligibly attacked. On them, inclusions were attached. This study investigates melt oxygen contents, interface properties, and steel compositions with their non-metallic inclusions in order to explore the inclusion formation and deposition mechanisms. The carbon-free crucibles were based on alumina, mullite, and zirconia- and titania-doped alumina (AZT). The carbon-containing (-C) ones were alumina-C and AZT-C. Furthermore, nanoscaled carbon and alumina additives (-n) were applied in an AZT-C-n material. In the crucibles, the case-hardened steel 17CrNiMo7-6 was remelted at 1580 °C. It was observed that the melt and steel oxygen contents were higher for the tests in the carbon-free crucibles. Into these crucibles, the deoxidizing alloying elements Mn and Si diffused. Reducing contents of deoxidizing elements resulted in higher steel oxygen levels and less inclusions, mainly of the inclusion group SiO2-core-MnS-shell (2.5 to 8 μ m). These developed from smaller SiO2 nuclei. The inclusion amount in the steel was highest after remelting in AZT-C-n for 30 minutes but decreased strongly with increasing remelting time (60 minutes) due to inclusions' deposition on the refractory surface. The Ti from the AZT and the nanoadditives supported inclusion growth and deposition. Other inclusion groups were alumina and calcium aluminate inclusions. Their contents were high after remelting in carbon- or AZT-containing crucibles but generally decreased during remelting. On the AZT-C-n crucible, a dense layer formed from vitreous compositions including Al, Ca, Mg, Si, and Ti. To summarize, for reducing forming inclusion amounts, mullite is recommended as refractory material. For capturing formed inclusions, AZT-C-n showed a high potential.

  16. Paying the full price of steel – Perspectives on the cost of reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rootzén, Johan; Johnsson, Filip

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the impacts felt downstream of carbon pricing and investments made in CO_2 abatement within the steel industry. Using the supply of steel to a passenger car as a case study, the effects of a steel price increase on cost structures and price at each step of the supply chain were assessed. Since the prices of emission allowances under the European Union Emissions Trading System fall well below those required to unlock investments in low-CO_2 production processes in the integrated steelmaking industry this paper seeks to pave the way for a discussion on complementary policy options. The results of the analysis suggest that passing on the compliance costs of the steel industry would have only marginal impacts on costs and prices for the end-use sectors (e.g., on the production cost or selling price of the passenger car). Under the assumptions made herein, at a carbon price of 100 €/tCO_2, the retail price of a mid-sized European passenger car would have to be increased by approximately 100–125 €/car (<0.5%) to cover the projected increases in steel production costs. - Highlights: • Examines impacts downstream of investments in CO_2 abatement in the steel industry. • Show how investing in low-CO_2 processes have marginal impacts in end-user stage. • Increase in the retail price of a mid-sized passenger car would be well below 1%. • Open up for complementary policies, financing mechanisms or new business models.

  17. Modal Analysis of a Steel Radial Gate Exposed to Different Water Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusewicz, Krzysztof; Sterpejkowicz-Wersocki, Witold; Jankowski, Robert

    2017-06-01

    With the increase in water retention needs and planned river regulation, it might be important to investigate the dynamic resistance of vulnerable elements of hydroelectric power plants, including steelwater locks. The most frequent dynamic loads affecting hydroengineering structures in Poland include vibrations caused by heavy road and railway traffic, piling works and mining tremors. More destructive dynamic loads, including earthquakes, may also occur in our country, although their incidence is relatively low. However, given the unpredictable nature of such events, as well as serious consequences they might cause, the study of the seismic resistance of the steel water gate, as one of the most vulnerable elements of a hydroelectric power plant, seems to be important. In this study, a steel radial gate has been analyzed. As far as water gates are concerned, it is among the most popular solutions because of its relatively small weight, compared to plain gates. A modal analysis of the steel radial gate was conducted with the use of the FEM in the ABAQUS software. All structural members were modelled using shell elements with detailed geometry representing a real structure.Water was modelled as an added mass affecting the structure. Different water levels were used to determine the most vulnerable state of the working steel water gate. The results of the modal analysis allowed us to compare the frequencies and their eigenmodes in response to different loads, which is one of the first steps in researching the dynamic properties of steel water gates and their behaviour during extreme dynamic loads, including earthquakes.

  18. Study of occupational health impact of atmospheric pollution on exposed workers at an iron and steel complex by using neutron activation analysis of scalp hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Z.F.; Qian, Q.F.; Feng, X.Q.; Zhang, P.Q.; Liu, N.Q.; Feng, W.Y.

    2004-01-01

    The occupational health impact of atmospheric pollution on exposed workers at one iron and steel complex was studied by instrumental neutron activation analysis of workers' hair samples and medical examination. The experimental results indicate that there is a positive correlation between the high inhalation amounts of iron and other trace elements by the exposed workers and the symptom of their high blood pressure and hypoglycemia, which implies that the atmospheric environment polluted by iron and steel industry has an adverse health impact on the exposed workers. The measures to relieve and abate the occupational diseases caused by air-borne particulate matter should be taken. (author)

  19. Preparation of diamond like carbon thin film on stainless steel and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diamond-like carbon; buffer layer; plasma CVD; surface characterization; biomedical applications. Abstract. We report the formation of a very smooth, continuous and homogeneous diamond-like carbon DLC thin coating over a bare stainless steel surface without the need for a thin Si/Cr/Ni/Mo/W/TiN/TiC interfacial layer.

  20. Effect of Mo Content on Microstructure and Property of Low-Carbon Bainitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijiang Hu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, three low-carbon bainitic steels, with different Mo contents, were designed to investigate the effects of Mo addition on microstructure and mechanical properties. Two-step cooling, i.e., initial accelerated cooling and subsequent slow cooling, was used to obtain the desired bainite microstructure. The results show that the product of strength and elongation first increases and then shows no significant change with increasing Mo. Compared with Mo-free steel, bainite in the Mo-containing steel tends to have a lath-like morphology due to a decrease in the bainitic transformation temperature. More martensite transformation occurs with the increasing Mo, resulting in greater hardness of the steel. Both the strength and elongation of the steel can be enhanced by Mo addition; however, the elongation may decrease with a further increase in Mo. From a practical viewpoint, the content of Mo could be ~0.14 wt. % for the composition design of low-carbon bainitic steels in the present work. To be noted, an optimal scheme may need to consider other situations such as the role of sheet thickness, toughness behavior and so on, which could require changes in the chemistry. Nevertheless, these results provide a reference for the composition design and processing method of low-carbon bainitic steels.

  1. Electrochemical behaviour of stainless steel under radiation and exposed to representative chemistry in pressurised water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Mi

    2013-01-01

    The dissertation focuses on the behaviour of stainless steel under irradiation and exposed to primary PWR conditions. The electrochemical potential of austenitic 316L stainless steel and the environmental parameters (hydrogen pressure, temperature, etc.,) have been measured continuously at high temperature (HT) and high pressure (HP) under irradiation, using a unique experimental HTHP working cell. Two sources of irradiation, proton and electron beams, have been employed in the study. A high similarity of electrochemical behaviour under both types of irradiations has been observed: (i) an oxidative potential response under irradiation (few tens of milli-volts); (ii) an increase in the hydrogen pressure reduces the oxidative potential response; (iii) a synergetic effect of thermal ageing and fluence leading to a decrease of the oxidative response under irradiation. The observations of the oxide film showed that without irradiation, metallic nickel in the inner and outer oxide films has been observed under a high hydrogen pressure. Under irradiation, um scale cavities (pits) have been observed in the strongly electron irradiated oxide film formed on 316L stainless steel. These defects are induced by the effect of irradiation of the passive film and water radiolysis. It is also shown that water radiolysis influences the PWR water chemistry by making it become a stronger oxidant at the oxide/solution interface. As a result, the release of metallic cations is increased and a-Fe 2 O 3 hematite has been observed on the irradiated outer oxide film where cavities were formed. (author) [fr

  2. Can Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Mitigate Corrosion of Carbon Steel in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; Syrek-Gerstenkorn, B.

    2017-01-01

    Transport of CO2 for carbon capture and storage (CCS) uses low-cost carbon steel pipelines owing to their negligible corrosion rates in dry CO2. However, in the presence of liquid water, CO2 forms corrosive carbonic acid. In order to mitigate wet CO2 corrosion, use of expensive corrosion-resistant alloys is recommended; however, the increased cost makes such selection economically unfeasible; hence, new corrosion mitigation methods are sought. One such method is the use of thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA), which has been used to mitigate corrosion of carbon steel in seawater, but there are concerns regarding its suitability in CO2-containing solutions. A 30-day test was carried out during which carbon steel specimens arc-sprayed with aluminum were immersed in deionized water at ambient temperature bubbled with 0.1 MPa CO2. The acidity (pH) and potential were continuously monitored, and the amount of dissolved Al3+ ions was measured after completion of the test. Some dissolution of TSA occurred in the test solution leading to nominal loss in coating thickness. Potential measurements revealed that polarity reversal occurs during the initial stages of exposure which could lead to preferential dissolution of carbon steel in the case of coating damage. Thus, one needs to be careful while using TSA in CCS environments.

  3. The Influence of Calcium Carbonate Composition and Activated Carbon in Pack Carburizing Low Carbon Steel Process in The Review of Hardness and Micro Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafni; Hadi, Syafrul; Edison

    2017-12-01

    Carburizing is a way of hardening the surface by heating the metal (steel) above the critical temperature in an environment containing carbon. Steel at a temperature of the critical temperature of affinity to carbon. Carbon is absorbed into the metal form a solid solution of carbon-iron and the outer layer has high carbon content. When the composition of the activator and the activated charcoal is right, it will perfect the carbon atoms to diffuse into the test material to low carbon steels. Thick layer of carbon Depending on the time and temperature are used. Pack carburizing process in this study, using 1 kg of solid carbon derived from coconut shell charcoal with a variation of 20%, 10% and 5% calcium carbonate activator, burner temperature of 950 0C, holding time 4 hours. The test material is low carbon steel has 9 pieces. Each composition has three specimens. Furnace used in this study is a pack carburizing furnace which has a designed burner box with a volume of 1000 x 600 x 400 (mm3) of coal-fired. Equipped with a circulation of oxygen from the blower 2 inches and has a wall of refractory bricks. From the variation of composition CaCO3, microstructure formed on the specimen with 20% CaCO3, better diffusion of carbon into the carbon steel, it is seen by the form marten site structure after quenching, and this indicates that there has been an increase of or adding carbon to in the specimen. This led to the formation of marten site specimen into hard surfaces, where the average value of hardness at one point side (side edge) 31.7 HRC

  4. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed

  5. 76 FR 31938 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Notice of Preliminary Results of 2009...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... the File from Christopher Hargett, International Trade Compliance Analyst, through Melissa Skinner... Skinner, Office Director, concerning ``Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products from India: Customs...

  6. Nano-scaled iron-carbon precipitates in HSLC and HSLA steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the composition, quantity and particle size distribution of nano-scaled precipitates with size less than 20 nm in high strength low carbon (HSLC) steel and their effects on mechanical properties of HSLC steel by means of mass balance calculation of nano-scaled precipitates measured by chemical phase analysis plus SAXS method, high-resolution TEM analysis and thermodynamics calculation, as well as temper rapid cooling treatment of ZJ330. It is found that there existed a large quantity of nano-scaled iron-carbon precipitates with size less than 18 nm in low carbon steel produced by CSP and they are mainly Fe-O-C and Fe-Ti-O-C precipitates formed below temperature A1. These precipitates have ob- vious precipitation strengthening effect on HSLC steel and this may be regarded as one of the main reasons why HSLC steel has higher strength. There also existed a lot of iron-carbon precipitates with size less than 36 nm in HSLA steels.

  7. Nano-scaled iron-carbon precipitates in HSLC and HSLA steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jie; WU HuaJie; LIU YangChun; KANG YongLin

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the composition, quantity and particle size distribution of nano-scaled precipitates with size less than 20 nm in high strength Iow carbon (HSLC) steel and their effects on mechanical properties of HSLC steel by means of mass balance calculation of nano-scaled precipitates measured by chemical phase analysis plus SAXS method, high-resolution TEM analysis and thermodynamics calculation, as well as temper rapid cooling treatment of ZJ330. It is found that there existed a large quantity of nano-scaled iron-carbon precipitates with size less than 18 nm in Iow carbon steel produced by CSP and they are mainly Fe-O-C and Fe-Ti-O-C precipitates formed below temperature A1. These precipitates have obvious precipitation strengthening effect on HSLC steel and this may be regarded as one of the main reasons why HSLC steel has higher strength. There also existed a lot of iron-carbon precipitates with size less than 36 nm in HSLA steels.

  8. Ferrite morphology and residual phases in continuously cooled low carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    Although much research has been conducted on the isothermal transformation products of medium to high carbon hardenable steels, relatively little has been reported for transformation of low carbon structural steels under continuous cooling conditions. The trend towards reduced carbon levels (less than about 0.1 wt% C) has been driven by demands for formability and weldability, challenging steel designers to maintain strength by microalloying and/or thermomechanical controlled processing. Although control of the ferritic products formed in low carbon steels after hot rolling, normalising and welding is essential in order to ensure adequate strength and toughness, understanding of the microstructures formed on continuous cooling is still limited. In addition, transformation mechanisms remain controversial because of polarisation of researchers into groups championing diffusional and displacive theories for the transformation of austenite over a wide range of cooling rates. The present review compares and draws together the main ferrite classification schemes, and discusses some critical issues on kinetics and mechanisms, in an attempt to rationalise the effects of cooling rate, prior austenite structure and composition on the resulting ferrite structure and its mechanical properties. It is concluded that with increasing cooling rate the ferritic product becomes finer, more plate-like, more dislocated, more carbon supersaturated, more likely to be formed by a displacive mechanism, harder and stronger. Other conclusions are that: (i) 'bainitic ferrite', which is a pervasive form of ferrite in continuously cooled low carbon steels, is different from the conventional upper and lower bainites observed in higher carbon steels, insofar as the co-product 'phase' is typically martensite-austenite islands rather than cementite; and (ii) low carbon bainite rather than martensite is the dominant product at typical fast cooling rates (<500K/s) associated with commercial

  9. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Improved Surface Quality of Exposed Automotive Sheet Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John G. Speer; David K. Matlock; Noel Meyers; Young-Min Choi

    2002-10-10

    Surface quality of sheet steels is an important economic and technical issue for applications such as critical automotive surfaces. This project was therefore initiated to develop a more quantitative methodology for measuring surface imperfections, and to assess their response to forming and painting, particularly with respect to their visibility or invisibility after painting. The objectives were met, and included evaluation of a variety of imperfections present on commercial sheet surfaces or simulated using methods developed in the laboratory. The results are expected to have significant implications with respect to the methodology for assessing surface imperfections, development of quantitative criteria for surface inspection, and understanding and improving key painting process characteristics that influence the perceived quality of sheet steel surfaces.

  10. Variation of transition temperatures from upper to lower bainites in plain carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, M.; Okamoto, H.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results and explanations for the transition temperature from upper to lower bainites in carbon steels containing from 0.20 to 1.80 wt%C were presented metallographically and kinematically. The experimental results are summarized as follows: (1) Lower bainite is not formed in steels with less than 0.35 wt%C and no transition from upper to lower bainite occurs. (2) The transition temperature of steels containing from 0.54 to 1.10 %C indicates a constant temperature of 350 C and does not depend on the carbon content. It is important to note that a transition temperature of 350 C corresponds to the Ms temperature of a 0.55%C steel being the boundary of the martensite morphology between a lath and a plate. (3) Transition temperatures of steels with more than 1.10%C decrease along the a line below about 65 C from T 0 -composition line. The bainitic transformation is essentially a kind of the martensitic one and its nucleation site is considered to be a carbon depleted zone in austenite by the thermal fluctuation of carbon atom at an isothermal holding temperature. The supercooling of about 65 C below the T 0 -composition line at the carbon range more than 1.10 wt%C is attributed to the non-chemical free energy for the displacive growth of lower bainite. (orig.)

  11. The effects of bacteria on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, T.; Wada, R.; Nishimoto, H.; Fujiwara, K.; Taniguchi, N.; Honda, A.

    1999-10-01

    As a part of evaluation of corrosion life of carbon steel overpack, the experimental studies have been performed on the effects of bacteria on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in compacted bentonite using iron bacteria (IB) as a representative oxidizing bacteria and sulphur reducing bacteria (SRB) as a representative reducing bacteria. The results of the experimental studies showed that; The activity of SRB was low in compacted bentonite in spite of applying suitable condition for the action of bacteria such as temperature and nutritious solution. Although the corrosion behavior of carbon steel was affected by the existence of bacteria in simple solution, the corrosion rates of carbon steel in compacted bentonite were several μ m/year -10 μ m/year irrespective of coexistence of bacteria and that the corrosion behavior was not affected by the existence of bacteria. According to these results, it was concluded that the bacteria would not affect the corrosion behavior of carbon steel overpack under repository condition. (author)

  12. Evaluation of carbon diffusion in heat treatment of H13 tool steel under different atmospheric conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Ramezani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although the cost of the heat treatment process is only a minor portion of the total production cost, it is arguably the most important and crucial stage on the determination of material quality. In the study of the carbon diffusion in H13 steel during austenitization, a series of heat treatment experiments had been conducted under different atmospheric conditions and length of treatment. Four austenitization atmospheric conditions were studied, i.e., heat treatment without atmospheric control, heat treatment with stainless steel foil wrapping, pack carburization heat treatment and vacuum heat treatment. The results showed that stainless steel foil wrapping could restrict decarburization process, resulting in a constant hardness profile as vacuum heat treatment does. However, the tempering characteristic between these two heat treatment methods is different. Results from the gas nitrided samples showed that the thickness and the hardness of the nitrided layer is independent of the carbon content in H13 steel.

  13. Corrosion of stainless and carbon steels in molten mixtures of industrial nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Prairie, M.R.; Chavez, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Corrosion behavior of two stainless steels and carbon steel in mixtures of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} was evaluated to determine if impurities found in commodity grades of alkali nitrates aggravate corrosivity as applicable to an advanced solar thermal energy system. Corrosion tests were conducted for 7000 hours with Types 304 and 316 stainless steels at 570C and A36 carbon steel at 316C in seven mixtures of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} containing variations in impurity concentrations. Corrosion tests were also conducted in a ternary mixture of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, and Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Corrosion rates were determined by descaled weight losses while oxidation products were examined by scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The nitrate mixtures were periodically analyzed for changes in impurity concentrations and for soluble corrosion products.

  14. Effect of Ethanol Chemistry on SCC of Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    Pipeline companies have a keen interest in assessing the feasibility of transporting fuel grade ethanol (FGE) and ethanol blends in existing pipelines. Previous field experience and laboratory research, funded by PRCI and API, has shown that steel ca...

  15. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of high dose carbon-implanted steel and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviente, J. L.; García, A.; Alonso, F.; Braceras, I.; Oñate, J. I.

    1999-04-01

    A study has been made of the depth dependence of the atomic fraction and chemical bonding states of AISI 440C martensitic stainless steel and Ti-6Al-4V alloy implanted with 75 keV C + at very high doses (above 10 18 ions cm -2), by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with an Ar + sputtering. A Gaussian-like carbon distribution was observed on both materials at the lowest implanted dose. More trapezoidal carbon depth-profiles were found with increasing implanted doses, and a pure carbon layer was observed only on the titanium alloy implanted at the highest dose. The implanted carbon was combined with both base metal and carbon itself to form metallic carbides and graphitic carbon. Furthermore, carbon-enriched carbides were also found by curve fitting the C 1s spectra. The titanium alloy showed a higher carbidic contribution than the steel implanted at the same C + doses. A critical carbon concentrations of about 33 at.% and 23 at.% were measured for the formation of C-C bonds in Ti-6Al-4V and steel samples, respectively. The carbon atoms were bound with metal to form carbidic compounds until these critical concentrations were reached; when this C concentration was exceeded the proportion of C-C bonds increased and resulted in the growth of carbonaceous layers.

  16. Yttrium implantation effects on extra low carbon steel and pure iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudron, E.; Buscail, H. [Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., Le Puy en Velay (France). Lab. Vellave d`Elaboration; Jacob, Y.P.; Stroosnijder, M.F. [Institute for Advanced Materials, Joint Research Center, The European Commission, 21020, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy); Josse-Courty, C. [Laboratoire de Recherche sur la Reactivite des Solides, UMR 56-13 CNRS, UFR Sciences et Techniques, 9 Avenue A. Savary, B.P. 400, 21011, Dijon Cedex (France)

    1999-05-25

    Extra low carbon steel and pure electrolytic iron samples were yttrium implanted using ion implantation technique. Compositions and structures of pure iron and steel samples were investigated before and after yttrium implantation by several analytical and structural techniques (RBS, SIMS, RHEED and XRD) to observe the yttrium implantation depth profiles in the samples. This paper shows the different effects of yttrium implantations (compositions and structures) according to the implanted sample nature. (orig.) 23 refs.

  17. 75 FR 42782 - Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil, Japan, and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ...)] Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil, Japan, and Russia AGENCY: United... Brazil and Japan, and the suspended investigation on hot-rolled steel from Russia. SUMMARY: The... Japan, and the suspended investigation on hot-rolled steel from Russia would be likely to lead to...

  18. 75 FR 62566 - Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil, Japan, and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ...)] Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil, Japan, and Russia AGENCY: United... antidumping duty investigation on hot-rolled steel from Russia. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice of... suspended investigation on hot-rolled steel from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or...

  19. Effect of High-Temperature Thermomechanical Treatment on the Brittle Fracture of Low-Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, M. A.; Pyshmintsev, I. Yu.; Varnak, O. V.; Mal'tseva, A. N.

    2018-02-01

    The effect of high-temperature thermomechanical treatment (HTMT) on the brittleness connected with deformation-induced aging and on the reversible temper brittleness of a low-carbon tube steel with a ferrite-bainite structure has been studied. When conducting an HTMT of a low-alloy steel, changes should be taken into account in the amount of ferrite in its structure and relationships between the volume fractions of the lath and the acicular bainite. It has been established that steel subjected to HTMT undergoes transcrystalline embrittlement upon deformation aging. At the same time, HTMT, which suppresses intercrystalline fracture, leads to a weakening of the development of reversible temper brittleness.

  20. Effects of LWR environments on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-03-01

    SME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides construction of nuclear power plant components. Figure I-90 Appendix I to Section III of the Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data suggest that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This paper reports the results of recent fatigue tests that examine the effects of steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, loading waveform, and surface morphology on the fatigue life of A 106-Gr B carbon steel and A533-Gr B low-alloy steel in water

  1. Interim fatigue design curves for carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Both temperature and oxygen affect fatigue life; at the very low dissolved-oxygen levels in PWRs and BWRs with hydrogen water chemistry, environmental effects on fatigue life are modest at all temperatures (T) and strain rates. Between 0.1 and 0.2 ppM, the effect of dissolved-oxygen increases rapidly. In oxygenated environments, fatigue life depends strongly on strain rate and T. A fracture mechanics model is developed for predicting fatigue lives, and interim environmentally assisted cracking (EAC)-adjusted fatigue curves are proposed for carbon steels, low-alloy steels, and austenitic stainless steels

  2. The hot working characteristics of a boron bearing and a conventional low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, Waldo; Banks, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Constitutive hot working constants were determined for an 11 ppm boron low carbon strip steel and compared from 875 to 1140 deg. C and strain rates of 0.001-2.5 s -1 to a high nitrogen low carbon strip steel. The boron steel showed a different hot working behaviour than the conventional steel with the steady state flow stress about 50-60% higher, the peak strain more than 50% higher and the eventual ferrite grain size about 40% smaller, if compared at the same temperature compensated strain rates or Z values. This difference persisted where the soaking temperature before compression was varied between 1140 and 1250 deg. C, proving that undissolved AlN in the boron-bearing steel was not responsible. With systematically varied linear cooling rates after hot working, the final ferrite grain size in the boron steel is finer and is independent of the two Z values applied during hot working. Retarded softening by dynamic recrystallisation during hot working in the boron containing steel is probably caused by boron solute drag of moving grain boundaries

  3. Behaviour of carbon steel and chromium steels in CO2 environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, B.; Bounie, P.; Guntz, G.; Prouheze, J.C.; Renault, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The behavior in aqueous CO 2 environments of steel with chromium content between 0 and 22% has been studied by autoclave tests. The influence of chromium and molybdenum contents has been investigated particularly on 13 Cr steel. Conventional electrochemical test results are related to the CO 2 autoclave test results. The influence of the environment: temperature, chloride concentration, partial pressure of CO 2 and some amount of H 2 S on the corrosion resistance are discussed

  4. Influence of boron on strain hardening behaviour and ductility of low carbon hot rolled steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deva, Anjana; Jha, B.K.; Mishra, N.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Unique feature of low strain hardening exponent (n) with high total elongation has been discussed in industrially produced low carbon boron containing steel. → n has been correlated with the micro structural changes occurring during deformation of steel. → This feature of low n and high % elongation has potential for higher cold reducibility. → The work is being reported for the first time on industrially produced low carbon boron containing steel. - Abstract: The beneficial effect of boron on mechanical properties of low carbon Al-killed steel has been reported in recent past. However, the effect of boron on strain hardening exponent (n) and ductility has not been fully understood. This aspect has been discussed in present work. The results of mill trials with reference to n and ductility with boron added steel are compared to those for commercial grade. The lowering of 'n' with increased total elongation in boron bearing steel has been related to the microstructural evolution as a result of boron addition.

  5. The Mechanism of High Ductility for Novel High-Carbon Quenching-Partitioning-Tempering Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Wang, Ying; Chen, Nailu; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua

    2015-09-01

    In this article, a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) process was applied to treat Fe-0.6C-1.5Mn-1.5Si-0.6Cr-0.05Nb hot-rolled high-carbon steel and the microstructures including retained austenite fraction and the average dislocation densities in both martensite and retained austenite were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The Q-P-T steel exhibits high strength (1950 MPa) and elongation (12.4 pct). Comparing with the steel treated by traditional quenching and tempering (Q&T) process, the mechanism of high ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T steel is revealed as follows. Much more retained austenite existing in Q-P-T steel than in Q&T one remarkably enhances the ductility by the following two effects: the dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect and the transformation-induced plasticity effect. Besides, lower dislocation density in martensite matrix produced by Q-P-T process plays an important role in the improvement of ductility. However, some thin plates of twin-type martensite embedded in dislocation-type martensite matrix in high-carbon Q-P-T steel affect the further improvement of ductility.

  6. Corrosion Behaviour of Nickel Plated Low Carbon Steel in Tomato Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluleke OLUWOLE

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This research work investigated the corrosion resistance of nickel plated low carbon steel in tomato fluid. It simulated the effect of continuous use of the material in a tomato environment where corrosion products are left in place. Low carbon steel samples were nickel electroplated at 4V for 20, 25, 30 and 35 mins using Watts solution.The plated samples were then subjected to tomato fluid environment for for 30 days. The electrode potentials mV (SCE were measured every day. Weight loss was determined at intervals of 5 days for the duration of the exposure period. The result showed corrosion attack on the nickel- plated steel, the severity decreasing with the increasing weight of nickel coating on substrate. The result showed that thinly plated low carbon steel generally did not have any advantage over unplated steel. The pH of the tomato solution which initially was acidic was observed to progress to neutrality after 4 days and then became alkaline at the end of the thirty days test (because of corrosion product contamination of the tomatocontributing to the reduced corrosion rates in the plated samples after 10 days. Un-plated steel was found to be unsuitable for the fabrication of tomato processing machinery without some form of surface treatment - thick nickel plating is suitable as a protective coating in this environment.

  7. Corrosion-resistant Foamed Cements for Carbon Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Gill, S.; Pyatina, T., Muraca, A.; Keese, R.; Khan, A.; Bour, D.

    2012-12-01

    The cementitious material consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate designed as an alternative thermal-shock resistant cement for the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells was treated with cocamidopropyl dimethylamine oxide-based compound as foaming agent (FA) to prepare numerous air bubble-dispersed low density cement slurries of and #61603;1.3 g/cm3. Then, the foamed slurry was modified with acrylic emulsion (AE) as corrosion inhibitor. We detailed the positive effects of the acrylic polymer (AP) in this emulsion on the five different properties of the foamed cement: 1) The hydrothermal stability of the AP in 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cements; 2) the hydrolysis-hydration reactions of the slurry at 85 and #61616;C; 3) the composition of crystalline phases assembled and the microstructure developed in autoclaved cements; 4) the mechanical behaviors of the autoclaved cements; and, 5) the corrosion mitigation of carbon steel (CS) by the polymer. For the first property, the hydrothermal-catalyzed acid-base interactions between the AP and cement resulted in Ca-or Na-complexed carboxylate derivatives, which led to the improvement of thermal stability of the AP. This interaction also stimulated the cement hydration reactions, enhancing the total heat evolved during cement’s curing. Addition of AP did not alter any of the crystalline phase compositions responsible for the strength of the cement. Furthermore, the AP-modified cement developed the porous microstructure with numerous defect-free cavities of disconnected voids. These effects together contributed to the improvement of compressive-strength and –toughness of the cured cement. AP modification of the cement also offered an improved protection of CS against brine-caused corrosion. There were three major factors governing the corrosion protection: 1) Reducing the extents of infiltration and transportation of corrosive electrolytes through the cement layer deposited on the underlying CS

  8. A study on the impediment of thickness diminution of Carbon steel tube by using a applied magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Oh; Kim, Jong Hui; Cho, Wan Sik; Hong, Sung Min; Park, Yun Won

    2001-03-01

    Magnetic properties of the carbon steel tube which is used as the pipe laying of cooling water in nuclear power plant were measured to research the impediment of thickness diminution of carbon steel tube. Magnetic field distribution of carbon steel tube in the applied magnetic field was simulated by computer program. On the basis of the simulation results, Alnico 5DG and Alnico 5 were selected as the permanent magnets applicable to the carbon steel tube. Sm2Co17 magnet was used to compare the performance of permanent magnets. The experimental apparatus similar to the draining environment of cooling water in nuclear power plant was also manufactured in order to research the impediment of thickness diminution of carbon steel carbon tube

  9. Initiation of stress corrosion cracking in pre-stained austenitic stainless steels exposed to primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguenin, P.

    2012-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) plants. However, a limited number of cases of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) has been detected in cold-worked (CW) areas of non-sensitized austenitic stainless steel components in French PWRs. A previous program launched in the early 2000's identified the required conditions for SCC of cold-worked stainless steels. It was found that a high strain hardening coupled with a cyclic loading favoured SCC. The present study aims at better understanding the role of pre-straining on crack initiation and at developing an engineering model for IGSCC initiation of 304L and 316L stainless steels in primary water. Such model will be based on SCC initiation tests on notched (not pre-cracked) specimens under 'trapezoidal' cyclic loading. The effects of pre-straining (tensile versus cold rolling), cold-work level and strain path on the SCC mechanisms are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate the dominating effect of strain path on SCC susceptibility for all pre-straining levels. Initiation can be understood as crack density and crack depth. A global criterion has been proposed to integrate both aspects of initiation. Maps of SCC initiation susceptibility have been proposed. A critical crack depth between 10 and 20 μm has been demonstrated to define transition between slow propagation and fast propagation for rolled materials. For tensile pre-straining, the critical crack depth is in the range 20 - 50 μm. Experimental evidences support the notion of a KISCC threshold, whose value depends on materials, pre-straining ant load applied. The initiation time has been found to depend on the applied loading as a function of (σ max max/YV) 11,5 . The effect of both strain path and surface hardening is indirectly taken into account via the yield stress. In this study, material differences rely on strain path effect on mechanical properties. As a result, a stress

  10. Fracture behaviour of the 14Cr ODS steel exposed to helium and liquid lead

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hojná, A.; Di Gabriele, F.; Hadraba, Hynek; Husák, Roman; Kuběna, Ivo; Rozumová, L.; Bublíková, P.; Kalivodová, J.; Matějíček, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 490, JUL (2017), s. 143-154 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-25246S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12837S; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : Impact fracture * Microanalysis * Nanostructured steel * Oxidation * Thermal ageing Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy; JG - Metallurgy (UFP-V) OBOR OECD: Materials engineering; Materials engineering (UFP-V); Materials engineering (UFM-A) Impact factor: 2.048, year: 2016

  11. Tribological performance of hard carbon coatings on 440C bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustas, F M; Misra, M S; Shepard, D F; Froechtenigt, J F [Martin Marietta Astronautics Group, Denver, CO (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Hard carbon coatings such as amorphous carbon, diamond and diamond-like carbon have received considerable attention for tribological applications owing to their high hardness, high modulus and desirable surface properties. Unfortunately, most of the deposition techniques induce high substrate temperatures that would temper traditional bearing steels and reduce the substrate load-carrying capability. Therefore, to effectively use these desirable coatings, a lower temperature deposition technique is required. Ion beam deposition can provide essentially ambient temperature conditions, accurate control of process parameters and good coating-substrate adhesion. To use these attributes, a test program was initiated to deposit mass-analyzed, high purity C{sup +} and CH{sub 4}{sup +} ions on molybdenum and 440C bearing steel for subsequent characterization by Raman spectroscopy and friction-wear tests. Results for a coating deposited from a carbon monoxide source showed an amorphous carbon-microcrystalline graphtie structure which exhibited very high microhardness and a three fold reduction in coefficient of friction for unlubricated tests compared to untreated 440C steel. In addition, incrementally increasing the applied load (by up to a factor of 5) resulted in progressively lower coefficients of friction, which conforms to solid lubrication theory. End-of-travel wear debris and some limited coating delamination were observed within thinner areas of the coating. Therefore an amorphous carbon-graphite coating applied to 440C steel at ambient temperature exhibits solid lubricating film characteristics with high load-carrying capability. (orig.).

  12. Anodic Oxidation of Carbon Steel at High Current Densities and Investigation of Its Corrosion Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Khan, Hamid Yazdani

    2017-06-01

    This work aims at studying the influence of high current densities on the anodization of carbon steel. Anodic protective coatings were prepared on carbon steel at current densities of 100, 125, and 150 A/dm2 followed by a final heat treatment. Coatings microstructures and morphologies were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The corrosion resistance of the uncoated carbon steel substrate and the anodic coatings were evaluated in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The results showed that the anodic oxide coatings which were prepared at higher current densities had thicker coatings as a result of a higher anodic forming voltage. Therefore, the anodized coatings showed better anti-corrosion properties compared to those obtained at lower current densities and the base metal.

  13. Effect of microstructural variation on the Cu/CK45 carbon steel friction weld joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.B.; Jung, S.B. [Advanced Materials and Process Research Center for IT, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Gyounggi-do (Korea)

    2003-12-01

    The mechanical properties of friction-welded pure Cu/CK45 carbon steel joints have been studied. The joint strength increased with increasing upset pressure till it reached a critical value. However, the joint strength was fixed at a low strength with increasing friction time, compared to that of the Cu base metal. The hardness near the interface at the Cu side was softer than that of the base metal due to the dynamically recrystallized and annealed grain. The width of the softened region became wider with increasing friction time and decreasing upset pressure. But the hardness of the CK45 carbon steel side showed a slightly higher value than that of the base metal. This result was explained by the formation of martensite structure at the CK45 carbon steel side during the welding process. (orig.)

  14. Microbiologically influenced corrosion of carbon steel in the presence of sulphate reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunaru, M.; Velciu, L.; Mihalache, M.; Laurentiu, P.

    2016-01-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are the most important organisms in microbiologically induced corrosion. In this context, the paper presents an assessment (by experimental tests) of the behaviour of carbon steel samples (SA106gr.B) in SRB media. Some of samples were immersed in microbial environment in order microbiological analysis of their surface and another part was used to perform accelerated electrochemical tests to determine electrochemical parameters for the system carbon steel / microbial medium (corrosion rate, the polarization resistance of the surface, susceptibility to pitting corrosion). The surfaces of the tested samples were analyzed using the optical and electronic microscope, and emphasized the role of bacteria in the development of biofilms under which appeared characteristics of corrosion attack. The correlation of all results confirmed that SRB accelerated the localized corrosion of the surfaces of SA 106gr.B carbon steel. (authors)

  15. Influence of ultraviolet light irradiation on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel AISI 1015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazi, H. R.; Danaee, I.; Peykari, M.

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion of carbon steel in sodium chloride solution was studied under ultraviolet illumination using weight loss, polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current transient tests. The polarization test revealed an increase in the corrosion current density observed under UV illumination. The impedance spectroscopy indicated that the charge transfer resistance of the system was decreased by irradiation of UV light on a carbon steel electrode. The weight loss of carbon steel in solution increased under UV light, which confirms the results obtained from electrochemical measurements. We propose that the main effect of UV irradiation is on the oxide film, which forms on the surface. Thus, in presence of UV, the conductivity of oxide film might increase and lead to higher metal dissolution and corrosion rate.

  16. Electro-Chemical Behavior of Low Carbon Steel Under H2S Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharia, M. G.; Stanciu, S.; Cimpoesu, R.; Nejneru, C.; Savin, C.; Manole, V.; Cimpoeșu, N.

    2017-06-01

    Abstract A commercial low carbon steel material (P265GH) with application at industrial scale for natural gas delivery and transportation systems was analyzed in H2S atmosphere. The article proposed a new experimental cell in order to establish the behavior of the material in sulfur contaminated environment. In most of the industrial processes for gas purification the corrosion rate is speed up by the presence of S (sulfur) especially as ions or species like H2S. The H2S (hydrogen sulfide) is, beside a very toxic compound, a very active element in the acceleration of metallic materials deterioration especially in complex solicitations like pressure and temperature in the same time. For experiments we used a three electrodes cell with Na2SO4 + Na2S solution at pH 3 at room temperature (∼ 25 °C) to realize EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) and potentio-dynamic polarization experiments. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray dispersive energy spectroscopy were used to characterize the metallic material surface exposed to experimental environment.

  17. Quenching and partitioning treatment of a low-carbon martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshi@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Tobata, Junya; Tao, Teruyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nakada, Nobuo; Takaki, Setsuo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of retained austenite was increased by Q and P treatment in 12Cr-0.1C steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ideal carbon concentrations in austenite and ferrite were calculated assuming CCE condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimum partitioning treatment condition for 12Cr-0.1C steel was found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strength-ductility balance of 12Cr-0.1C steel was improved by TRIP effect. - Abstract: Quenching and partitioning (Q and P) treatment was applied to a commercial low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, AISI Type 410 (Fe-12Cr-0.1C). The quench interruption temperature was optimized with consideration of the ideal carbon concentration in untransformed austenite after partitioning to lower the Ms temperature to room temperature. After partitioning at an appropriate temperature, a significant fraction of austenite was retained through the enrichment of carbon into the untransformed austenite. It was also suggested that the addition of silicon is not necessarily required for the Q and P treatment of 12Cr steel because of the retardation of carbide precipitation at the partitioning temperature owing to the large amount of chromium. Tensile testing revealed that the Q and P-treated material exhibited a significantly improved strength-ductility balance compared with conventional quench-and-tempered materials due to the transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect by the retained austenite.

  18. Quenching and partitioning treatment of a low-carbon martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Tobata, Junya; Tao, Teruyuki; Nakada, Nobuo; Takaki, Setsuo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The amount of retained austenite was increased by Q and P treatment in 12Cr–0.1C steel. ► Ideal carbon concentrations in austenite and ferrite were calculated assuming CCE condition. ► The optimum partitioning treatment condition for 12Cr–0.1C steel was found. ► The strength–ductility balance of 12Cr–0.1C steel was improved by TRIP effect. - Abstract: Quenching and partitioning (Q and P) treatment was applied to a commercial low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, AISI Type 410 (Fe–12Cr–0.1C). The quench interruption temperature was optimized with consideration of the ideal carbon concentration in untransformed austenite after partitioning to lower the Ms temperature to room temperature. After partitioning at an appropriate temperature, a significant fraction of austenite was retained through the enrichment of carbon into the untransformed austenite. It was also suggested that the addition of silicon is not necessarily required for the Q and P treatment of 12Cr steel because of the retardation of carbide precipitation at the partitioning temperature owing to the large amount of chromium. Tensile testing revealed that the Q and P-treated material exhibited a significantly improved strength–ductility balance compared with conventional quench-and-tempered materials due to the transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect by the retained austenite.

  19. Development of carbon steel with superior resistance to wall thinning and fracture for nuclear piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Chang Kyu; Lee, Min Ku; Park, Jin Ju

    2010-07-01

    Carbon steel is usually used for piping for secondary coolant system in nuclear power plant because of low cost and good machinability. However, it is generally reported that carbon steel was failed catastrophically because of its low resistance to wall thinning and fracture toughness. Especially, flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) is one of main problems of the wall thinning of piping in the nuclear power plant. Therefore, in this project, fabrication technology of new advanced carbon steel materials modified by dispersion of nano-carbide ceramics into the matrix is developed first in order to improve the resistance to wall thinning and fracture toughness drastically compared to the conventional one. In order to get highly wettable fine TiC ceramic particles into molten metal, the micro-sized TiC particles were first mechanically milled by Fe (MMed TiC/Fe) in a high energy ball mill machine in Ar gas atmosphere, and then mixed with surfactant metal elements (Sn, Cr, Ni) to obtain better wettability, as this lowered surface tension of the carbon steel melt. According to microscopic images revealed that an addition of MMed TiC/Fe-surfactant mixed powders favorably disperses the fine TiC particles in the carbon steel matrix. It was also found that the grain size refinement of the cast matrix is achieved remarkably when fine TiC particles were added due to the fact that they act as nucleation sites during the solidification process. As a results, a cast carbon steel dispersed with fine TiC particles shows improved mechanical properties such as hardness, tensile strength and cavitation resistance compared to that of without particles. However, the slight decrease of toughness was found

  20. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Kai; Wang, Yibo [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Zhuguo, E-mail: lizg@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, 2.4 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, and 4.8 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation.

  1. A review of the possible effects of hydrogen on lifetime of carbon steel nuclear waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, A.

    2009-07-01

    In Switzerland, the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra) is responsible for developing an effective method for the safe disposal of vitrified high level waste (HLW) and spent fuel. One of the options for disposal canisters is thick-walled carbon steel. The canisters, which would have a diameter of about 1 m and a length of about 3 m (HLW) or about 5 m (spent fuel), will be embedded in horizontal tunnels and surrounded with bentonite clay. The regulatory requirement for the minimum canister lifetime is 1000 years but demonstration of a minimum lifetime of 10,000 years would be desirable. The pore-water to which the canister will be exposed is of marine origin with about 0.1-0.3 M Cl-. Since hydrogen is generated during the corrosion process, it is necessary to assess the probability of hydrogen assisted cracking modes and to make recommendations to eliminate that probability. To that aim, key reports detailing projections for the local environment and associated corrosion rate of the waste canister have been evaluated with the focus on the implication for the absorbed hydrogen concentration in the steel. Simple calculations of hydrogen diffusion and accumulation in the inner compartment of the sealed canister indicate that a pressure equivalent to that for gas pockets external to the canister (envisaged to be about 10 MPa) may be attained in the proposed exposure time, an important consideration since it is not possible to modify the internal surface of the closure weld. Current ideas on mechanisms of hydrogen assisted cracking are assessed from which it is concluded that the mechanistic understanding and associated models of hydrogen assisted cracking are insufficient to provide a framework for quantitative prediction for this application. The emphasis then was to identify threshold conditions for cracking and to evaluate the likelihood that these may be exceeded over the lifetime of the containment. Based on an analysis of data in the

  2. Evaluation of the potential of additives as corrosion inhibitors of CA-50 carbon steel used as reinforcement in concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennucci, Marina Martins

    2006-01-01

    In this work, various compounds were tested to evaluate their potential capability for their use as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel reinforcement in concretes. The additives tested were sodium benzoate, polyethylene glycol, hexamethylenetetramine, benzotriazole and yttrium carbonate. Initially, exploratory tests were carried out to select the ones to be used as corrosion inhibitors, based on the inhibit ion efficiency determined from electrochemical tests, specifically polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. These tests were carried out in a solution composed of 0.01 N sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and 0.05 N potassium hydroxide (KOH) to simulate the composition of the solution inside the pores in concretes. The additive that presented the most promising potential to be used as corrosion inhibitor was benzotriazole (BTA). After the elimination of some compounds and selection of the additive with higher corrosion inhibit ion efficiency in the test medium, the effect of its concentration on the corrosion inhibition efficiency was evaluated. Sodium nitrite solutions with the same concentrations as those solutions with BTA were tested for comparison reasons. Sodium nitrite is a well established corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel reinforcement in concretes but it has been related to toxic effects. The BTA was associated to higher corrosion inhibition efficiencies than that of sodium nitrite in similar concentrations. A blackish adherent film was formed on the steel surface exposed to BTA solutions during long periods of immersion in the alkaline medium. The results suggest that BTA is a potential candidate for substitution of nitrites as corrosion inhibitor of reinforcements in concrete. (author)

  3. Improvement of deposition efficiency and control of hardness for cold-sprayed coatings using high carbon steel/mild steel mixture powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Amao, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Nobuyuki; Ootaki, Kousuke

    2011-01-01

    In this study, in order to make high carbon steel coating by cold spray technique, spray conditions such as carrier gas temperature and pressure etc. were investigated. And also, in order to improve deposition efficiency and control coating hardness of cold-sprayed high carbon steel, high carbon and mild steel mixed powder and its mechanical milled powder were developed and were optimized. By using the cold-spray technique, particle deposition of a high carbon steel was successful. Moreover, by applying mixed and mechanical milled powders, the porosity ratio was decreased and deposition efficiency was improved. Furthermore, using these powders, it is possible to control the hardness value. Especially, when using mechanical milled powder, it is very difficult to identify the interface between the coating and the substrate. The bonding between the coating and the substrate is thus considered to be excellent. (author)

  4. Study of corrosion behavior of carbon steel under seawater film using the wire beam electrode method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zaijian; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jia; Peng, Xin; Wang, Yanhua; Zhang, Penghui; Wang, Haijie; Gao, Congjie

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of carbon steel under seawater film with various thickness was investigated by the wire beam electrode (WBE) method. It was found that the corrosion rate of carbon steel increased significantly under thin seawater film than it was immersed in seawater. The current variation under seawater film indicated that the thickness of diffusion layer of oxygen was about 500 μm, and the maximal current appeared around 40 μm, at which corrosion rate transited from cathodic control to anodic control. The results suggest that WBE method is helpful to study the corrosion process under thin electrolyte film

  5. Surface modifications induced by yttrium implantation on low manganese-carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudron, E.; Buscail, H. [Univ. Blaise Pascal Clermont-Fd II, Le Puy en Velay (France). Lab. Vellave d' Elaboration et d' Etude des Materiaux; Haanapel, V.A.C.; Jacob, Y.P.; Stroosnijder, M.F. [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Center, The European Commission, 21020, Ispra (Italy)

    1999-12-15

    Low manganese-carbon steel samples were ion implanted with yttrium. Sample compositions and structures were investigated before and after yttrium implantations to determine the yttrium distribution in the sample. Yttrium implantation effects were characterized using several analytical and structural techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, glancing angle X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. In this paper it is shown that correlation between composition and structural analyses provides an understanding of the main compounds induced by yttrium implantation in low manganese-carbon steel. (orig.)

  6. A discussion for stabilization time of carbon steel in atmospheric corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zong-kai; Ma, Xiao-bing; Cai, Yi-kun

    2017-09-01

    Stabilization time is an important parameter in long-term prediction of carbon steel corrosion in atmosphere. The range of the stabilization time of carbon steel in atmospheric corrosion has been published in many scientific literatures. However, the results may not precise because engineering experiences is dominant. This paper deals with the recalculation of stabilization time based on ISO CORRAG program, and analyzes the results and makes a comparison to the data mentioned above. In addition, a new thinking to obtain stabilization time will be proposed.

  7. The development of RFT technique for carbon steel tubes in balance-of-plant heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Han Jong; Moon, Yong Sick; Kim, Jae Dong; Kim, Wang Bae; Nam, Min Woo

    2005-01-01

    The NDT method of carbon steel tubes is applied RFT technique. As other NDT methods, It is surprising that RFT has been rapidly developed over the past decade. These improvements have resulted in multi-frequency system, dual driver probes and development of analysis technique. Also these improvements give some profit to power plants as well as general industry. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to improve the reliability of RFT technique for carbon steel tubes. To uplift RFT technique, probes, calibration standards and specimen was developed.

  8. Hot ductility behavior of a low carbon advanced high strength steel (AHSS) microalloyed with boron

    OpenAIRE

    Mejía, Ignacio; Bedolla Jacuinde, Arnoldo; Maldonado, Cuauhtémoc; Cabrera Marrero, José M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study analyses the influence of boron addition on the hot ductility of a low carbon advanced high strength NiCrVCu steel. For this purpose hot tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (650, 750, 800, 900 and 1000 ◦C) at a constant true strain rate of 0.001 s−1. Experimental results showed a substantial improvement in hot ductility for the low carbon advanced high strength steel when microalloyed with boron compared with that without boron addition. Nevertheless,...

  9. Stress corrosion cracking tests on electron beam welded carbon steel specimens in carbonate-bicarbonate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkins, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking tests have been performed on tapered carbon steel test pieces containing electron beam welds with a view to defining susceptibility to such cracking in a carbonate-bicarbonate solution at 90 C and an appropriate electrode potential. The tests involved applying cyclic loads to the specimens and it is shown that the threshold stress for cracking reduces linearly with increase in the magnitude of the cyclic load component. Extrapolation of these trends to zero fluctuating stress indicates static load threshold stresses in the vicinity of the yield stress (i.e. about 300 N/mm 2 for parent plate without a weld, 400 N/mm 2 for specimens with welds on one side only and 600 N/mm 2 for specimens having welds penetrating through the thickness of the specimen). The averages of the maximum crack velocities observed were least for parent plate material and greatest for weld metal, the former being essentially intergranular in morphology and the latter mostly transgranular, with heat affected zone material being intermediate between these extremes. (author)

  10. 77 FR 31877 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea; Scheduling of Full Five...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701-TA-350 and 731-TA-616 and 618 (Third Review)] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea; Scheduling of Full Five-Year Reviews... corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from Korea and the antidumping duty orders on corrosion...

  11. 75 FR 18153 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of... countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from Korea. See Countervailing...

  12. 77 FR 16810 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of... Register the countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from Korea...

  13. 76 FR 20954 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of... Register the countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from Korea...

  14. Pathways to a low-carbon iron and steel industry in the medium-term : the case of Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, Marlene; Worrell, Ernst; Eichhammer, Wolfgang; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Zhang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    The iron and steel industry is a major industrial emitter of carbon dioxide globally and in Germany. If European and German climate targets were set as equal proportional reduction targets (referred to here as “flat” targets) among sectors, the German steel industry would have to reduce its carbon

  15. 77 FR 73674 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, The United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ...)] Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, The United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam... welded carbon-quality steel pipe from India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam, provided for in... from India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam were subsidized and/or dumped within the...

  16. 76 FR 68208 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... (Preliminary)] Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam... carbon-quality steel pipe from India, Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam, provided for in... Governments of India, Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam. Unless the Department of Commerce extends the...

  17. 76 FR 78313 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... (Preliminary)] Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and... India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam of circular welded carbon- quality steel pipe... the Governments of India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam.\\2\\ \\1\\ The record is defined in...

  18. 77 FR 25405 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... antidumping duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from the Republic of Korea, covering... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-580-816] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for the Preliminary Results of...

  19. 76 FR 21332 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... antidumping duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from the Republic of Korea, covering... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-580-816] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limits for the Preliminary Results of...

  20. 75 FR 25841 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... antidumping duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from the Republic of Korea, covering... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-580-816] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limits for the Preliminary Results of...

  1. 77 FR 27438 - Certain Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Korea: Final Results of Expedited...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Certain Corrosion-Resistant... order on certain corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (``CORE'') from the Republic of Korea.... Scope of the Order The merchandise covered by the order includes flat-rolled carbon steel products, of...

  2. 77 FR 25141 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and South Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ...-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and South Korea: Extension of Time Limits for Preliminary...) orders on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from Germany and South Korea (Korea... from Germany and South Korea: Adequacy Redetermination Memorandum,'' (April 20, 2012). The preliminary...

  3. 77 FR 15718 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, the Sultanate of Oman, the United Arab...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ...-811] Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, the Sultanate of Oman, the United Arab... Oman (Oman), the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (Vietnam). See Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, the Sultanate of Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and...

  4. 77 FR 5240 - Light-Walled Welded Rectangular Carbon Steel Tubing From Taiwan: Continuation of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... Rectangular Carbon Steel Tubing From Taiwan: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order AGENCY: Import... revocation of the antidumping duty order on light-walled welded rectangular carbon steel tubing from Taiwan would likely lead to a continuation or recurrence of dumping and material injury to an industry in the...

  5. 75 FR 1335 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Taiwan; Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-583-008] Circular Welded Carbon Steel... review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan.\\1\\ On... review within the original time frame because we require additional time to obtain information from the...

  6. Direct gas-solid carbonation kinetics of steel slag and the contribution to in situ sequestration of flue gas CO(2) in steel-making plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo; Chen, Xuejing; Yan, Feng; Li, Kaimin

    2013-12-01

    Direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag under various operational conditions was investigated to determine the sequestration of the flue gas CO2 . X-ray diffraction analysis of steel slag revealed the existence of portlandite, which provided a maximum theoretical CO2 sequestration potential of 159.4 kg CO 2 tslag (-1) as calculated by the reference intensity ratio method. The carbonation reaction occurred through a fast kinetically controlled stage with an activation energy of 21.29 kJ mol(-1) , followed by 10(3) orders of magnitude slower diffusion-controlled stage with an activation energy of 49.54 kJ mol(-1) , which could be represented by a first-order reaction kinetic equation and the Ginstling equation, respectively. Temperature, CO2 concentration, and the presence of SO2 impacted on the carbonation conversion of steel slag through their direct and definite influence on the rate constants. Temperature was the most important factor influencing the direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag in terms of both the carbonation conversion and reaction rate. CO2 concentration had a definite influence on the carbonation rate during the kinetically controlled stage, and the presence of SO2 at typical flue gas concentrations enhanced the direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag. Carbonation conversions between 49.5 % and 55.5 % were achieved in a typical flue gas at 600 °C, with the maximum CO2 sequestration amount generating 88.5 kg CO 2 tslag (-1) . Direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag showed a rapid CO2 sequestration rate, high CO2 sequestration amounts, low raw-material costs, and a large potential for waste heat utilization, which is promising for in situ carbon capture and sequestration in the steel industry. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Modelling the relative stability of carbon nanotubes exposed to environmental adsorbates and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, Amanda S

    2009-01-01

    In parallel with the development of technological applications for carbon nanotubes, issues related to toxicology and environmental impact are also under increased scrutiny. It is clear from the available literature that the integrity of future carbon nanotube-based devices, our ability to anticipate failure of these devices, and our ability to manage the toxicological and environmental impacts require a detailed understanding of the stability of pure and functionalized carbon nanotubes under a full range of environmental conditions. Motivated by this endeavour, the present study uses a general thermodynamic model to predict the relative stability of carbon nanotubes exposed to a variety of atmospheric adsorbates, and uses them to examine the stability of nanotubes in air, as a function of the relative humidity. In general the results indicate that the adsorption of a sparse coverage of air is thermodynamically favoured, depending on the humidity, and the stability of small diameter nanotubes may be improved by exposure to humid air.

  8. Effect of thermal treatment on the corrosion resistance of Type 316L stainless steel exposed in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Y. [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Zheng, W. [CanmetMATERIALS, Natural Resources Canada, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Guzonas, D.A. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories Chalk River Laboratories, ON (Canada); Cook, W.G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Kish, J.R., E-mail: kishjr@mcmaster.ca [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    There are still unknown aspects about the growth mechanism of oxide scales formed on candidate stainless steel fuel cladding materials during exposure in supercritical water (SCW) under the conditions relevant to the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). The tendency for intermetallic precipitates to form within the grains and on grain boundaries during prolonged exposure at high temperatures represents an unknown factor to corrosion resistance, since they tend to bind alloyed Cr. The objective of this study was to better understand the extent to which intermetallic precipitates affects the mode and extent of corrosion in SCW. Type 316L stainless steel, used as a model Fe–Cr–Ni–Mo alloy, was exposed to 25 MPa SCW at 550 °C for 500 h in a static autoclave for this purpose. Mechanically-abraded samples were tested in the mill-annealed (MA) and a thermally-treated (TT) condition. The thermal treatment was conducted at 815 °C for 1000 h to precipitate the carbide (M{sub 23}C{sub 6}), chi (χ), laves (η) and sigma (σ) phases. It was found that although relatively large intermetallic precipitates formed at the scale/alloy interface locally affected the oxide scale formation, their discontinuous formation did not affect the short-term overall apparent corrosion resistance.

  9. Effect of thermal treatment on the corrosion resistance of Type 316L stainless steel exposed in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Y.; Zheng, W.; Guzonas, D. A.; Cook, W. G.; Kish, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    There are still unknown aspects about the growth mechanism of oxide scales formed on candidate stainless steel fuel cladding materials during exposure in supercritical water (SCW) under the conditions relevant to the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). The tendency for intermetallic precipitates to form within the grains and on grain boundaries during prolonged exposure at high temperatures represents an unknown factor to corrosion resistance, since they tend to bind alloyed Cr. The objective of this study was to better understand the extent to which intermetallic precipitates affects the mode and extent of corrosion in SCW. Type 316L stainless steel, used as a model Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloy, was exposed to 25 MPa SCW at 550 °C for 500 h in a static autoclave for this purpose. Mechanically-abraded samples were tested in the mill-annealed (MA) and a thermally-treated (TT) condition. The thermal treatment was conducted at 815 °C for 1000 h to precipitate the carbide (M23C6), chi (χ), laves (η) and sigma (σ) phases. It was found that although relatively large intermetallic precipitates formed at the scale/alloy interface locally affected the oxide scale formation, their discontinuous formation did not affect the short-term overall apparent corrosion resistance.

  10. Corrosion behavior of reinforcing steel in concrete for nuclear facilities exposed in high chloride and low pH environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Toshiyasu; Raman, Vedarajan

    2010-01-01

    The Cl ion concentration and pH were monitored by inserting micro-electrodes into artificial pores in the mortar which was exposed in 0.5 mol/l chloride solution (pH 4.0). At the same time, the electrochemical behavior of the reinforcing steel was investigated by EIS. The Cl ion concentration in the mortar was obtained using Ag/AgCl micro-electrodes, showing that this behavior is generally controlled by diffusion. When the diffusion equation was used in this work, the diffusion coefficient (D c ) showed a high value of D c = 9.5 x 10 -5 mm 2 /s. Similarly, the pH in the mortar was obtained using W/WO x micro-electrodes. With a 10 mm cover thickness, pH continued to decrease to pH 8.0, which was considered by penetration of H + ions from the surface. Based on the results of monitoring with the micro-electrodes, solutions simulating those in the pores in mortar were prepared and used in EIS measurements. The charge transfer resistance R ct in the simulated solutions showed good correspondence with the impedance Z (Z 1mHz -Z sol ) in the actual mortar. This is attributed to the fact that the corrosion of reinforcing steel was controlled by the solution conditions (mainly Cl concentration and pH) in the pores in mortar.

  11. Effect of precipitate on yield strength of ferritic/martensitic steel exposed to 650 .deg. C liquid sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Jeonghyeon; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sang Hun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Ferritic/martensitic steels(FMS) which are used as one of cladding and structure materials in UCFR, have high creep strength at 600~650°C, low expansion coefficient, and dimensional stability with irradiation-induced void swelling in circumstance of fast neutrons compared to austenitic stainless steel. However, as exposed to high temperature liquid sodium during the design life time (30 to 60 years), the surface of FMS experienced Cr-depletion and decarburization by dissolution of components into sodium and formed oxidations by reacting with sodium. This changes chemical compositions of inter-surface and effects on behavior of precipitations. This change can cause a degradation of mechanical strength of structure material of UCFR. The research about FMS on effects of long term exposure in liquid sodium at 650 °C involve analysis of yield strength by change of microstructure, solid solution hardening and precipitation hardening. It shows how this three parts occupy total yield strength respectively and change over time. In a specific procedure, the microstructure and the surface phenomenon of FMS (Gr. 92) that are exposed to liquid sodium at 650°C, 20 ppm oxygen and are aged in high pure Argon gas environment to express bulk have been investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). When specimens were exposed to 650 °C liquid sodium for 1583, 3095 hours and Ar-gas 1601, 2973 hours, mechanical properties of materials were analyzed quantitatively. After experiment, NaCrO{sub 2} oxidation was formed on the surface of Gr.92 at sodium environment. Also, change of microstructure, dissolution of elements, and nucleation and growth of precipitation was raised. During exposed to high temperature at sodium or Ar-gas, annealed lath structure as well as coarsening of tempered martensite structure affects reduction of mechanical properties. And dissolution of elements results in reduction of solid solution hardening. This

  12. Oxidation behavior of 304 stainless steel exposed to steam at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, H.; Ryu, J. R.; Park, G. H. [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, T. G. [FNC Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    An experiment was conducted on 304 stainless steel(SUS304L) at the LOCA(Lost of Coolant Accident) requirement temperature, 800 .deg. C to 1100 deg. C. SUS304L was used as clothing material and structural frame of LWR. Oxidation behavior of SUS304L by temperature and time was examined after the mechanical and chemical polishing of SUS304L plate. After oxidation, change in weight showed a linear pattern for the first 20 minutes and a parabolic pattern afterwards. Then, fine structure and oxidation layer of SUS304L plate were observed through OM photographing and oxidation characteristics of SUS304L were found through hardness measurement by depth of each plate and XRD(X-Ray Diffraction) photographing.

  13. Numerical validation of selected computer programs in nonlinear analysis of steel frame exposed to fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślak, Mariusz; Pazdanowski, Michał; Woźniczka, Piotr

    2018-01-01

    Validation of fire resistance for the same steel frame bearing structure is performed here using three different numerical models, i.e. a bar one prepared in the SAFIR environment, and two 3D models developed within the framework of Autodesk Simulation Mechanical (ASM) and an alternative one developed in the environment of the Abaqus code. The results of the computer simulations performed are compared with the experimental results obtained previously, in a laboratory fire test, on a structure having the same characteristics and subjected to the same heating regimen. Comparison of the experimental and numerically determined displacement evolution paths for selected nodes of the considered frame during the simulated fire exposure constitutes the basic criterion applied to evaluate the validity of the numerical results obtained. The experimental and numerically determined estimates of critical temperature specific to the considered frame and related to the limit state of bearing capacity in fire have been verified as well.

  14. Image analysis of corrosion pit initiation on ASTM type A240 stainless steel and ASTM type A 1008 carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nine, H. M. Zulker

    The adversity of metallic corrosion is of growing concern to industrial engineers and scientists. Corrosion attacks metal surface and causes structural as well as direct and indirect economic losses. Multiple corrosion monitoring tools are available although those are time-consuming and costly. Due to the availability of image capturing devices in today's world, image based corrosion control technique is a unique innovation. By setting up stainless steel SS 304 and low carbon steel QD 1008 panels in distilled water, half-saturated sodium chloride and saturated sodium chloride solutions and subsequent RGB image analysis in Matlab, in this research, a simple and cost-effective corrosion measurement tool has identified and investigated. Additionally, the open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results have been compared with RGB analysis to gratify the corrosion. Additionally, to understand the importance of ambiguity in crisis communication, the communication process between Union Carbide and Indian Government regarding the Bhopal incident in 1984 was analyzed.

  15. Practical domain for ultrasonic testing of stainless steel over plain carbon steel layered components using M21 waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grewal, D.S.; Bray, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    The first higher order mode of the Rayleigh wave was discussed by Sezawa in the early part of this century in context of seismological wave studies. These Sezawa, or M 21 , or first higher order mode Rayleigh waves, have subsequently been used in the field of nondestructive testing of layered materials based on the development of the seismological model of the Sezawa waves by others. In this paper the study of the Tiersten formulation in context with slow speed over high speed materials, e.g. stainless steel overlay on plain carbon steel, the limitations and applicability of that formulation is reported. This study illustrates the practical bounds for testing such layered media, using numerical analysis of this formulation for the first higher-order mode to establish theoretical limits, and corroboration of these bounds by experimental results

  16. Does carbonation of steel slag particles reduce their toxicity? An in vitro approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibouraadaten, Saloua; van den Brule, Sybille; Lison, Dominique

    2015-06-01

    Mineral carbonation can stabilize industrial residues and, in the steel industry, may contribute to simultaneously valorize CO2 emissions and slag. We hypothesized that, by restricting the leaching of metals of toxicological concern such as Cr and V, carbonation can suppress the toxicity of these materials. The cytotoxic activity (WST1 assay) of slag dusts collected from a stainless and a Linz-Donawitz (LD) steel plant, before and after carbonation, was examined in J774 macrophages. The release of Cr, V, Fe, Mn and Ni was measured after incubation in artificial lung fluids mimicking the extracellular and phagolysosomal milieu to which particles are confronted after inhalation. LD slag had the higher Fe, Mn and V content, and was more cytotoxic than stainless steel slag. The cytotoxic activity of LD but not of stainless dusts was reduced after carbonation. The cytotoxic activity of the dusts toward J774 macrophages necessitated a direct contact with the cells and was reduced in the presence of inhibitors of phagocytosis (cytochalasin D) or phagolysosome acidification (bafilomycin), pointing to a key role of metallic constituents released in phagolysosomes. This in vitro study supports a limited reduction of the cytotoxic activity of LD, but not of stainless, steel dusts upon carbonation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong

    Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, most waterside tube cracks are found near heavy attachment welds on the outer surface and are typically blunt, with multiple bulbous features indicating a discontinuous growth. These types of tube failures are typically referred to as stress assisted corrosion (SAC). For recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry, these failures are particularly important as any water leak inside the furnace can potentially lead to smelt-water explosion. Metal properties, environmental variables, and stress conditions are the major factors influencing SAC crack initation and propagation in carbon steel boiler tubes. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted under boiler water conditions to study the effect of temperature, oxygen level, and stress conditions on crack initation and propagation on SA-210 carbon steel samples machined out of boiler tubes. Heat treatments were also performed to develop various grain size and carbon content on carbon steel samples, and SSRTs were conducted on these samples to examine the effect of microstructure features on SAC cracking. Mechanisms of SAC crack initation and propagation were proposed and validated based on interrupted slow strain tests (ISSRT). Water chemistry guidelines are provided to prevent SAC and fracture mechanics model is developed to predict SAC failure on industrial boiler tubes.

  18. Effect of Heat Input on Geometry of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Bead on Low Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Manas Kumar; Hazra, Ritesh; Mondal, Ajit; Das, Santanu

    2018-05-01

    Among different weld cladding processes, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) cladding becomes a cost effective, user friendly, versatile method for protecting the surface of relatively lower grade structural steels from corrosion and/or erosion wear by depositing high grade stainless steels onto them. The quality of cladding largely depends upon the bead geometry of the weldment deposited. Weld bead geometry parameters, like bead width, reinforcement height, depth of penetration, and ratios like reinforcement form factor (RFF) and penetration shape factor (PSF) determine the quality of the weld bead geometry. Various process parameters of gas metal arc welding like heat input, current, voltage, arc travel speed, mode of metal transfer, etc. influence formation of bead geometry. In the current experimental investigation, austenite stainless steel (316) weld beads are formed on low alloy structural steel (E350) by GMAW using 100% CO2 as the shielding gas. Different combinations of current, voltage and arc travel speed are chosen so that heat input increases from 0.35 to 0.75 kJ/mm. Nine number of weld beads are deposited and replicated twice. The observations show that weld bead width increases linearly with increase in heat input, whereas reinforcement height and depth of penetration do not increase with increase in heat input. Regression analysis is done to establish the relationship between heat input and different geometrical parameters of weld bead. The regression models developed agrees well with the experimental data. Within the domain of the present experiment, it is observed that at higher heat input, the weld bead gets wider having little change in penetration and reinforcement; therefore, higher heat input may be recommended for austenitic stainless steel cladding on low alloy steel.

  19. The effects of carbon prices and anti-leakage policies on selected industrial sectors in Spain – Cement, steel and oil refining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaría, Alberto; Linares, Pedro; Pintos, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    This paper assesses the impacts on the cement, steel and oil refining sectors in Spain of the carbon prices derived from the European Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS), and the potential effect on these sectors of the European Union anti-leakage policy measures. The assessment is carried out by means of three engineering models developed for this purpose. Our results show a high exposure to leakage of cement in coastal regions; a smaller risk in the steel sector, and non-negligible risk of leakage for the oil refining sector when carbon allowance prices reach high levels. We also find that the risk of leakage could be better handled with other anti-leakage policies than those currently in place in the EU. - Highlights: • We simulate the impact of carbon prices on the risk of leakage in the cement, steel and oil refining sectors. • We also assess the effectiveness of different anti-leakage policies in Europe. • Cement production in coastal areas is highly exposed. • The risk of leakage for steel and oil refining is smaller. • Anti-leakage policies should be modified to be efficient

  20. Modification of steel surface by plasma electrolytic saturation with nitrogen and carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusmanov, S.A., E-mail: sakusmanov@yandex.ru; Kusmanova, Yu.V., E-mail: yulia.kusmanova@yandex.ru; Smirnov, A.A., E-mail: sciencealexsm@gmail.com; Belkin, P.N., E-mail: belkinp@yandex.ru

    2016-06-01

    The effect of the electrolyte composition with ammonia, acetone, and ammonium chloride on the structure and properties of low carbon steel was studied in anode plasma electrolytic nitrocarburising. An X-ray diffractometer, a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an optical microscope were used to characterize the phase composition of the modified layer and its surface morphology. Surface roughness was studied with a profilometer–profilograph. The hardness of the treated and untreated samples was measured using a microhardness tester. The sources of nitrogen and carbon are shown to be the products of evaporation and thermal decomposition of the electrolyte components. It is established that the influence of concentration of ammonia, acetone, and ammonium chloride on the size of the structural components of the hardened layer is explained by the competition of the anode dissolution, high-temperature oxidation and diffusion of the saturating component. The electrolyte composition (10–12.5% ammonium chloride, 5% acetone, 5% ammonia) and processing mode (800 °C, 5–10 min) of low carbon steels allowing to obtain the hardened surface layer up to 0.2 mm with microhardness 930 HV and with decrease in the roughness (R{sub a}) from 1.013 to 0.054 μm are proposed. The anode plasma electrolytic nitricarburising is able to decrease friction coefficient of the treated low carbon steel from 0.191 to 0.169 and wear rate from 13.5 mg to 1.0 mg. - Highlights: • Aqueous solution (12.5% NH{sub 4}Cl, 5% ammonia, 5% acetone) is proposed for PEN/C steels. • Microhardness of steel (0.2% C) is 930 HV due to PEN/C for 5–10 min at 800 °C. • Anode PEN/C of low carbon steel decreases its roughness (R{sub a}) from 1.013 to 0.054 μm. • Anode PEN/C decreases friction coefficient of low carbon steel from 0.191 to 0.169 • Anode PEN/C decreases wear loss of low carbon steel from 13.5 mg to 1.0 mg.

  1. Tensile property improvement of TWIP-cored three-layer steel sheets fabricated by hot-roll-bonding with low-carbon steel or interstitial-free steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeyeong; Kim, Jung-Su; Kang, Minju; Sohn, Seok Su; Cho, Won Tae; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2017-01-01

    TWIP-cored three-layer steel sheets were newly fabricated by hot rolling of TWIP steel sheet surrounded by low-carbon (LC) or interstitial-free (IF) steel sheets. TWIP/LC or TWIP/IF interfaces were well bonded without pores or voids, while a few pearlites were thinly formed along the interfaces. The strengths and elongation of the TWIP-cored sheets increased as the volume fraction of TWIP-cored region increased, and were also well matched with the ones calculated by a rule of mixtures based on volume fraction or force fraction. According to digital image correlation and electron back-scatter diffraction analyses, very high strain hardening effect in the initial deformation stage and active twin formation in the interfacial region beneficially affected the overall homogeneous deformation in the TWIP-cored sheets without any yield point phenomenon occurring in the LC sheet and serrations occurring in the TWIP sheet, respectively. These TWIP-cored sheets can cover a wide range of yield strength, tensile strength, and ductility levels, e.g., 320~498 MPa, 545~878 MPa, and 48~54%, respectively, by controlling the volume fraction of TWIP-cored region, and thus present new applications to multi-functional automotive steel sheets requiring excellent properties.

  2. SCC of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels exposed to PWR primary water conditions: susceptibility to initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herms, E.; Raquet, O.; Sejourne, L.; Vaillant, F.

    2009-01-01

    Heavily cold-worked austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304L and 316L types) could be significantly susceptible to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) when exposed to PWR nominal primary water conditions even in absence of any pollutants. Susceptibility to SCC was shown to be related with some conditions such as initial hardness, procedure of cold-work or dynamic straining. A dedicated program devoted to better understand the initiation stage on CW austenitic stainless steels in PWR water is presented. Initiation is studied thanks to SCC test conditions leading to an intergranular cracking propagation mode on a CW austenitic stainless steel which is the mode generally reported after field experience. SCC tests are carried out in typical primary water conditions (composition 1000 ppm B and 2 ppm Li) and for temperature in the range 290 - 340 C. Material selected is 316L cold-worked essentially by rolling (reduction in thickness of 40%). Initiation tests are carried out under various stress levels with the aim to investigate the evolution of the initiation period versus the value of applied stress. SCC tests are performed on cylindrical notched specimens in order to increase the applied stress and allow accelerated testing without modify the exposure conditions to strictly nominal hydrogenated PWR water. Respective influences of cyclic/dynamic conditions on SCC initiation are presented and discussed. Dedicated interrupted tests help to investigate the behaviour of the crack initiation process. These SCC tests have shown that crack initiation could be obtained after a very short time under dynamic loading conditions on heavily pre-strained austenitic stainless steels. Actual results show that the most limiting stage of the cracking process on CW 316L seems to be the transition from slow transgranular propagation of surface initiated cracks to intergranular fast propagation through the thickness of the sample. The duration of this stage during crack initiation tests is

  3. Adhesion of composite carbon/hydroxyapatite coatings on AISI 316L medical steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gawroński

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are contains the results of studies concerning the problems associated with increased of hydroxyapatite (HAp adhesion, manufactured by using Pulse Laser Deposition (PLD method, to the austenitic steel (AISI 316L through the coating of carbon interlayer on it. Carbon coating was deposited by Radio Frequency Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (RF PACVD method.Test results unequivocally showed that the intermediate carbon layer in a determined manner increase the adhesion of hydroxyapatite to the metallic substrate. Obtained results give rise to deal with issues of manufacturing composite bilayer – carbon film/HAp – on ready implants, casted from austenitic cast steel by lost-wax process method as well as in gypsum forms.

  4. Testing of methods for decontamination of stainless steels and carbon steels conformably to demountable equipment of nuclear power plant with WWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dergunova, G.M.; Nazarov, V.K.; Ozolin, A.B.; Smirnov, L.M.; Stel'mashuk, V.P.; Yulikov, E.I.; Vlasov, I.N.

    1978-01-01

    Results are given of experiments on decontamination of stainless steel by the oxidation-reduction method and also results of decontamination of carbon steel by means of solutions based on oxalic acid, citric acid and phosphoric acid. Investigations of efficiency of oxidation-reduction treatment were done on samples of stainless steel cut from the pipeline of the primary coolant circuit of reactor. Comparison is given of efficiency of oxidation-reduction methods of contamination of stainless steel in the case of application of different compositions of decontaminating solutions. Dependences are given for decontamination completeness on duration of operations, on temperature and on ratio of volume of decontaminating solutions to surface are of the sample. For carbon steels parameters are given for decontamination process by means of oxalic, citric and phosphoric acid solutions. (I.T.) [ru

  5. 75 FR 77828 - Certain Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil: Extension of Time Limit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ...-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil: Extension of Time Limit for Final Results of...-Rolled Carbon Quality Steel Products From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty... administrative review of the countervailing duty order on certain hot-rolled flat-rolled carbon- quality steel...

  6. 75 FR 64246 - Certain Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil: Correction to Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ...-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil: Correction to Notice of Antidumping Duty Order AGENCY... certain hot-rolled flat-rolled carbon-quality steel products from Brazil. See Antidumping Duty Order: Certain Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil, 67 FR 11093 (March 12, 2002...

  7. Influence of shadow effect on the strength of steel beams exposed to fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virdi, Kuldeep; Wickström, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    in or in direct contact with concrete are not considered appropriately - only the reduction of the exposed area is taken into account. In addition, the shadow effect is rarely considered in structures with both concrete and asteel elements such as composite floors. It has been mainly used for stand-alone columns...... COMPSEF for the mechanical response. The differences in failure times reflect the savings that can be made using such ‘advanced calculation models’ permitted in Eurocode 3, when compared with the prescriptive methods included in the code....

  8. Electrochemical and corrosion properties of carbon steel in simulated geological disposal environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Katsuhisa

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews electrochemical and corrosion studies on the application of carbon steel to an overpack container, which is used for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes. Deaerated alkaline Na 2 SO 4 -NaHCO 3 - NaCl solutions and bentonite soaked with the solutions are used as simulated geological disposal environments. Electrochemical studies show the corrosion of the steel in an early stage is the activation control. Corrosion rates are controlled by the composition of the solutions, alloying elements, and the structure of the steel. The rates decrease with time due to the formation of FeCO 3 (siderite) film on the steel. Immersion corrosion tests show general corrosion morphology. Average corrosion rates of long duration have been evaluated. Clear proofs of the initiation of localized corrosion, such as pitting, crevice corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement and stress-corrosion cracking, have not been reported. (author)

  9. Influence Voltage Pulse Electrical Discharge In The Water at the Endurance Fatigue Of Carbon Steel

    OpenAIRE

    I.A. Vakulenko; A.G. Lisnyak

    2016-01-01

    Effect of pulses of electrical discharge in the water at the magnitude of the limited endurance under cyclic loading thermally hardened carbon steel was investigated. Observed increase stamina during cyclic loading a corresponding increase in the number of accumulated dislocations on the fracture surface. Using the equation of Cofino-Manson has revealed a decrease of strain loading cycle after treatment discharges. For field-cycle fatigue as a result of processing the voltage pulses carbon st...

  10. Characterizing the effect of carbon steel exposure in sulfide containing solutions to microbially induced corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherar, B.W.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Power, I.M. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Keech, P.G.; Mitlin, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Southam, G. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Shoesmith, D.W., E-mail: dwshoesm@uwo.c [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: Compares inorganic sulfide and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) on steel corrosion. Mackinawite was the dominant iron sulfide phase. SRBs can form nanowires, presumably grown to acquire energy. - Abstract: This article compares the electrochemical effects induced by inorganic sulfide and sulfate reducing bacteria on the corrosion of carbon steel - a subject of concern for pipelines. Biological microcosms, containing varying concentrations of bioorganic content, were studied to investigate changes to the morphology of biofilms and corrosion product deposits. Raman analysis indicated mackinawite (FeS{sub 1-x}) was the dominant iron sulfide phase grown both abiotically and biotically. A fascinating feature of biological media, void of an organic electron donor, was the formation of putative nanowires that may be grown to acquire energy from carbon steel by promoting the measured cathodic reaction.

  11. A coupled carbonation-rust formation mechanical damage model for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Huyen; Bary, B.; L'Hostis, Valerie; DeLarrard, T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting a strategy to simulate the corrosion of steel reinforcement due to carbonation of concrete in atmospheric environment. We propose a model coupling drying, carbonation, diffusion of oxygen, formation of rust and mechanics to describe these phenomena. The rust layer is assumed to be composed of two sub-layers with different elastic modulus. An unstable layer with a low modulus (from 0.1 to 5 GPa) is located next to the transformed medium, and another more stable one with a higher modulus (from 100 to 150 GPa) at the interface with steel reinforcement. This model is applied to a numerical meso-structure composed of 4 phases: mortar matrix, randomly distributed aggregates, steel rebar and rust layers to underline the effect of aggregates on damage initiation and corresponding crack pattern of concrete cover. (authors)

  12. Bainite Formation in Medium-Carbon Low-Silicon Spring Steels Accounting for Chemical Segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goulas, C.; Mecozzi, M.G.; Sietsma, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of chemical inhomogeneity on the isothermal bainite formation is investigated in medium-carbon low-silicon spring steel by dilatometry and microscopy. The analysis of the microstructure at different times during transformation shows that chemical segregation of

  13. Stochastic approach to pitting-corrosion-extreme modelling in low-carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valor, A. [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de La Habana, San Lazaro y L, Vedado 10400, La Habana (Cuba); Caleyo, F. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico)], E-mail: fcaleyo@gmail.com; Rivas, D.; Hallen, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico)

    2010-03-15

    A stochastic model previously developed by the authors using Markov chains has been improved in the light of new experimental evidence. The new model has been successfully applied to reproduce the time evolution of extreme pitting corrosion depths in low-carbon steel. The model is shown to provide a better physical understanding of the pitting process.

  14. Corrosion inhibition of carbon steel XC70 in H 2 SO 4 solution by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, we studied the efficiency of corrosion inhibition of carbon steel XC70 in H2SO4 0.5 M aqueous solution using ferrocenyl derivatives synthesized in our laboratory, this compound is: 3-(ferrocenylmethylamine)benzonitrile. The inhibitory potential of this compound was determined by electrochemical techniques ...

  15. Assessment of wall-thinning in carbon steel pipe by using laser-generated guided wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Yong; Cho, Youn Ho; Lee, Joon Hyun [Pusan National University, School of Mechanical Engineering, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The objective of this research is to estimate the crack location and size of a carbon steel pipe by using a laser ultrasound guided wave for the wall thinning evaluation of an elbow. The wall thinning of the carbon steel pipe is one of the most serious problems in nuclear power plants, especially the wall thinning of the carbon steel elbow caused by Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC). Therefore, a non-destructive inspection method of elbow is essential for the nuclear power plants to operate safely. The specimens used in this study were carbon steel elbows, which represented the main elements of real nuclear power plants. The shape of the wall thinning was an oval with a width of 120mm, a length of 80mm, and a depth of 5mm. The L(0,1) and L(0,2) modes variation of the ultrasound guided wave signal is obtained from the response of the laser generation/air-coupled detection ultrasonic hybrid system represent the characteristics of the defect. The trends of these characteristics and signal processing were use dto estimate the size and location of wall thinning

  16. Martensitic transformation and stress partitioning in a high-carbon steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg; Pantleon, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Martensitic transformation in a high-carbon steel was investigated with (synchrotron) X-ray diffraction at sub-zero Celsius temperature. In situ angular X-ray diffraction was applied to: (i) quantitatively determine the fractions of retained austenite and martensite; and (ii) measure the evolutio...

  17. Stochastic approach to pitting-corrosion-extreme modelling in low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valor, A.; Caleyo, F.; Rivas, D.; Hallen, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A stochastic model previously developed by the authors using Markov chains has been improved in the light of new experimental evidence. The new model has been successfully applied to reproduce the time evolution of extreme pitting corrosion depths in low-carbon steel. The model is shown to provide a better physical understanding of the pitting process.

  18. Electrochemical Performance of Low-Carbon Steel in Alkaline Model Solutions Containing Hybrid Aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Hu, J.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Boshkov, N.; Radeva, T.; Milkova, V.; Van Breugel, K.

    2010-01-01

    This work reports on the electrochemical performance of low-carbon steel electrodes in model alkaline solutions in the presence of 4.9.10-4 g/l hybrid aggregates i.e. cement extract, containing PDADMAC (poly (diallyl, dimethyl ammonium chloride) / PAA (Poly (acrylic acid)/ PDADMAC over a CaO core.

  19. Assessment of wall-thinning in carbon steel pipe by using laser-generated guided wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Yong; Cho, Youn Ho; Lee, Joon Hyun

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research is to estimate the crack location and size of a carbon steel pipe by using a laser ultrasound guided wave for the wall thinning evaluation of an elbow. The wall thinning of the carbon steel pipe is one of the most serious problems in nuclear power plants, especially the wall thinning of the carbon steel elbow caused by Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC). Therefore, a non-destructive inspection method of elbow is essential for the nuclear power plants to operate safely. The specimens used in this study were carbon steel elbows, which represented the main elements of real nuclear power plants. The shape of the wall thinning was an oval with a width of 120mm, a length of 80mm, and a depth of 5mm. The L(0,1) and L(0,2) modes variation of the ultrasound guided wave signal is obtained from the response of the laser generation/air-coupled detection ultrasonic hybrid system represent the characteristics of the defect. The trends of these characteristics and signal processing were use dto estimate the size and location of wall thinning

  20. Anticorrosion protection of carbon steel by electrodeposition of niobium in melted fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, M.E. de; Robin, A.

    1990-01-01

    The results about niobium electrodeposition over carbon steel from K sub(2) Nb F sub(7) solutions, on LiF-Na F-KF eutetic at 750 sup(0)C and over the corrosion resistance of obtainment deposit from acid media are presented. (author)

  1. On the formation of protective sulphide coatings on carbon steel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, C.; Venkateswaran, G.

    1987-01-01

    A chemical method for protecting carbon steel surfaces by forming pyrrhotite/pyrite coatings has been developed. The protective nature of the coatings has been studied by weight loss kinetics, scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements. A comparison is drawn between the protective nature of pyrite coating with that of magnetite coating. (author)

  2. Numerical predictions of dry oxidation of iron and low-carbon steel at moderately elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshall, G.A.

    1996-11-01

    Wrought and cast low-carbon steel are candidate materials for the thick (e.g. 10 cm) outer barrier of nuclear waste packages being considered for use in the potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain. Dry oxidation is possible at the moderately elevated temperatures expected at the container surface (323-533 K or 50-260 C). Numerical predictions of dry oxidation damage were made based on experimental data for iron and low-carbon steel and parabolic oxidation theory. The Forward Euler method was implemented to integrate the parabolic rate law for arbitrary, complex temperature histories. Assuming growth of a defect-free, adherent oxide, the surface penetration of a low-carbon steel barrier following 5000 years of exposure to a severe, but repository-relevant, temperature history is predicted to be only about 0.127 mm, less than 0.13% of the expected container thickness of 10 cm. Allowing the oxide to spall upon reaching a critical thickness increases the predicted metal penetration values, but degradation is still computed to be negligible. Thus, dry oxidation is not expected to significantly degrade the performance of thick, corrosion allowance barriers constructed of low-carbon steel

  3. 75 FR 26273 - Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ...)] Certain Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From China AGENCY: United States... materially injured or threatened with material injury, or the establishment of an industry in the United States is materially retarded, by reason of subsidized and less-than-fair-value imports from China of...

  4. MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION OF ARGON MIXING PROCESSES AND STEEL SATURATION WITH CARBON IN LADLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Chichko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model for dissolution process of a powder material in steel melt is proposed in the paper. The model permits to take into account mixing hydrodynamics on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations. One of the industrial out-of-furnace treatment schemes taken as an example demonstrates the opportunities to model a carbon dissolution in a ladle.

  5. Effect of Additional Sulfide and Thiosulfate on Corrosion of Q235 Carbon Steel in Alkaline Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bian Li Quan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effect of additional sulfide and thiosulfate on Q235 carbon steel corrosion in alkaline solutions. Weight loss method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and electrochemical measurements were used in this study to show the corrosion behavior and electrochemistry of Q235 carbon steel. Results indicate that the synergistic corrosion rate of Q235 carbon steel in alkaline solution containing sulfide and thiosulfate is larger than that of sulfide and thiosulfate alone, which could be due to redox reaction of sulfide and thiosulfate. The surface cracks and pitting characteristics of the specimens after corrosion were carefully examined and the corrosion products film is flake grains and defective. The main corrosion products of specimen induced by S2− and S2O32- are FeS, FeS2, Fe3O4, and FeOOH. The present study shows that the corrosion mechanism of S2− and S2O32- is different for the corrosion of Q235 carbon steel.

  6. Modeling the wire-EDM process parameters for EN-8 carbon steel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modeling the wire-EDM process parameters for EN-8 carbon steel using .... The neural networks has been developed with the help of MATLAB 8.1 (R13) package .... Now, Simulation and Prediction will be performed using the trained network.

  7. Application of phosphating techniques to aluminium and carbon steel surfaces using nitro guanidine as oxidizing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briseno M, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Phosphate coatings are inorganic crystalline deposits laid down uniformly on properly prepared surfaces by a chemical reaction with the treated base metal. The reaction consists in dissolving some surface metal by acid attack and then causing surface neutralization of the phosphate solution with consequent precipitation of the phosphate coating. Phosphate coatings do not provide appreciable corrosion protection in themselves. They are useful mainly as a base for paints, ensuring good adherence of paint to steel and decreasing the tendency for corrosion to under cut the paint film at scratches or other defects. In this work firstly were realized phosphate on standard carbon steel, employing technical of cold phosphate (at 40 Centigrade degrees and with a treatment time of 30 minutes) and hot phosphate (at 88 Centigrade degrees and with a treatment time of 15 minutes), where with this last were obtained the best results. Both methods used phosphate solutions of Zn/Mn and using as catalyst Nitro guanidine. Aluminium surfaces were phosphate used solutions of Cr and as catalyst Sodium bi fluoride. The phosphating on this surface were realized at temperature of 50 Centigrade degrees and with a treatment time of 10 minutes. In this work were obtained a new phosphate coatings on steel surfaces, these coatings were realized with a phosphate solution manufactured with the precipitates gathered during the hot phosphating on carbon steel. These coatings show excellent physical characteristics and of corrosion resistance. Were determined the physical testings of the coatings phosphate obtained on carbon steel and aluminium surfaces. These testing were: roughness, thickness, microhardness and adhesion. The best results were showed in carbon steel phosphate with precipitated solutions. The technical of analysis for activation with thermic neutrons was used to determine the phosphate coatings composition. Finally, corrosion testings were realized by means of two methods

  8. The effect of various deformation processes on the corrosion behavior of casing and tubing carbon steels in sweet environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elramady, Alyaa Gamal

    The aim of this research project is to correlate the plastic deformation and mechanical instability of casing steel materials with corrosion behavior and surface change, in order to identify a tolerable degree of deformation for casing steel materials. While the corrosion of pipeline and casing steels has been investigated extensively, corrosion of these steels in sweet environments with respect to plastic deformation due to bending, rolling, autofrettage, or handling needs more investigation. Downhole tubular expansion of pipes (casings) is becoming standard practice in the petroleum industry to repair damaged casings, shutdown perforations, and ultimately achieve mono-diameter wells. Tubular expansion is a cold-drawing metal forming process, which consists of running conical mandrels through casings either mechanically using a piston or hydraulically by applying a back pressure. This mechanism subjects the pipes to large radial plastic deformations of up to 30 pct. of the inner diameter. It is known that cold-working is a way of strengthening materials such as low carbon steel, but given that this material will be subjected to corrosive environments, susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) should be investigated. This research studies the effect of cold-work, in the form of cold-rolling and cold-expansion, on the surface behavior of API 5CT steels when it is exposed to a CO2-containing environment. Cold-work has a pronounced influence on the corrosion behavior of both API 5CT K55 and P110 grade steels. The lowest strength grade steel, API 5CT K55, performed poorly in a corrosive environment in the slow strain rate test. The ductile material exhibited the highest loss in strength and highest susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking in a CO 2-containing environment. The loss in strength declined with cold-rolling, which can be ascribed to the surface compressive stresses induced by cold-work. On the other hand, API 5CT P110 grade steels showed higher

  9. Determination of selected metals in the body tissues of occupationally exposed stainless steel workers by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, J.; Soukal, L.; Randa, Z.; Borska, L.; Bencko, V.; Tejral, J.

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure was examined in a group of 20 workers dealing mainly with welding, polishing, and assembling of stainless steel constructions. Biological monitoring of exposure involved the determination of Cr, Mn, Mo, Ni and V in hair and nails by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), urinary Cr and Mn, serum Cr and blood Mn by neutron activation analysis with radiochemical separation (RNAA). The RNAA procedures employed are briefly described. Significantly elevated levels were found for Cr in hair, nails, serum and urine, Mo in hair, and Mn in blood in the exposed subjects compared to controls. The ratios of the mean elemental concentrations for the exposed/control subjects were as follows: 12.5 for hair Cr, 4.4 for nail Cr, 9.6 for serum Cr, 9.0 for urinary Cr, 1.4 for hair Mo and 1.3 for blood Mn. For quality control purposes a number of biological intercomparison and reference materials were analysed. A good agreement obtained with consensus and/or certified values proved the accuracy of our results. The results for the control group compared also well with reference values, thus indicating that no contamination occurred on sampling and sample treatment prior to irradiation. To be able to evaluate the health effects of exposure, haematological, genotoxicity and immunological parameters were also assayed. A number of immunological parameters were altered in the exposed group compared to controls. However, no significant correlations were found between exposure of the individual workers measured with the aid of personal air particulate samplers and the biological indicators of exposure. A comparison of direct and biological monitoring indicates the complexity of the assessment of health effects of occupational exposure. (author)

  10. Effect of commercial metals (Al, Cu, carbon steel, and Zn) on the oxidation of soy-biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz-Ballote, L; Castillo-Atoche, A; Maldonado, L; Ruiz-Gómez, M A; Hernández, E

    2016-01-01

    The effect of aluminum, copper, low carbon steel and zinc on the oxidation of biodiesel derived from soybean oil is studied using residual mass curves from thermogravimetry. Biodiesel is oxidized in the presence and absence of each metal in static conditions and exposed to ambient air. Oxidized biodiesel parameters are confirmed by viscosity measurements, nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that the metals do not negatively influence the oxidative stability of biodiesel and it can even be considered that they slightly inhibit the oxidation process. This behavior was ascribed to a depletion of dissolved oxygen in biodiesel due to oxidation of the metal and the low solubility of oxygen at high temperature. (paper)

  11. Nondestructive evaluation of low carbon steel by magnetic adaptive testing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vértesy, G.; Tomáš, Ivan; Kobayashi, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 2 (2010), s. 125-132 ISSN 1058-9759 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/06/0866; GA AV ČR 1QS100100508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic NDE * magnetic adaptive testing * steel * magnetic hysteresis Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.771, year: 2010

  12. Analysis of low-carbon industrial symbiosis technology for carbon mitigation in a Chinese iron/steel industrial park: A case study with carbon flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hui; Dong, Liang; Li, Huiquan; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Ohnishi, Satoshi; Tang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    CO 2 mitigation strategies in industrial parks are a significant component of the Chinese climate change mitigation policy, and industrial symbiosis can provide specific CO 2 mitigation opportunity. Technology is important to support symbiosis, but few studies in China have focused on this topic at the industrial park level. This research presented a case study in a national iron and steel industrial park in China. Focus was given onto carbon mitigation through industrial symbiosis technology using substance flow analysis (SFA). Three typical iron and steel industry technologies, including coke dry quenching (CDQ), combined cycle power plant (CCPP), and CO 2 capture by slag carbonization (CCSC) were evaluated with SFA. Technology assessment was further conducted in terms of carbon mitigation potential and unit reduction cost. Compared with the Business as usual (BAU) scenario, application with CDQ, CCPP, and CCSC reduced the net carbon emissions by 56.18, 134.43, and 222.89 kg CO 2 per ton crude steel inside the industrial parks, respectively, including both direct and indirect emissions. Economic assessment revealed that the unit costs for the three technologies were also high, thereby necessitating national financial support. Finally, relevant policy suggestions and future concerns were proposed and discussed. - Highlights: • A typical carbon mitigation case study on China iron/steel industrial park. • Using carbon SFA to investigate mitigation effects of industrial symbiosis technology. • CCPP greatly reduced the indirect carbon emission embodied in power purchase. • CCSC reduced the carbon emission by distributing fixed carbon into by-product. • Specific low carbon-tech promotion policies fit to China was discussed and proposed

  13. Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorev, N.N.; Astafiev, A.A.; Loboda, A.S.; Savukov, V.P.; Runov, A.E.; Belov, V.A.; Sobolev, J.V.; Sobolev, V.V.; Pavlov, N.M.; Paton, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    Steels also containing Al, N and arsenic, are suitable for the construction of large components for high-power nuclear reactors due to their good mechanical properties such as good through-hardening, sufficiently low brittleness conversion temperature and slight displacement of the latter with neutron irradiation. Defined steels and their properties are described. (IHOE) [de

  14. Coupled gamma/alpha phase transformations in low-carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Yasushi

    Since steels have been the most prevalently utilized materials for many years, the desire for steels with low alloying components with a well-balanced combination of high strength and toughness is increasing. Low carbon steels consisting of bainitic microstructures are ideally suited to meeting such technological and economic requirements. Thus it is extremely important to fully clarify the mechanism of bainite formation in order to produce this type of engineering steel by optimized alloy and process design. This research focuses on understanding the mechanism of coupled displacive/diffusional gamma/alpha transformation in low-carbon steels including bainitic and martensitic transformation, and establishing a more comprehensive and physically rational computational model for predictive control of coupled gamma/alpha transformation phenomena. Models for coupled gamma/alpha phase transformation proposed in this study are based on a mechanistic and unified theory and the following assumptions: (1) The energy dissipation due to interface motion can be linearly combined with the energy dissipation due to carbon diffusion. (2) The carbon concentrations at the interface in both gamma and alpha phases are constrained by an interface solute trapping law. (3) Interface motion during nucleation is also governed by the carbon diffusion field velocity. (4) The response function of glissile interface motion can be expressed in the form of thermally activated dislocation glide. In contrast to the conventional semi-empirical models of the previous literature, the computational model proposed in this study is demonstrated to successfully provide a comprehensive and quantitative prediction of the effects of temperature, composition, microstructure, and the interactions among them. This includes the effects of substitutional solutes, morphology of the parent gamma phase, density of nucleation sites, temperature dependent variation of flow stress of matrix, and dynamic recovery of

  15. Designing of CK45 carbon steel and AISI 304 stainless steel dissimilar welds

    OpenAIRE

    Pouraliakbar,Hesam; Hamedi,Mohsen; Kokabi,Amir Hossein; Nazari,Ali

    2014-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding of CK45 and AISI304 stainless steel was performed through preparation of different types of samples using ER308L and ERNi-1 wires. Welded samples were studied by different techniques including optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction, hardness measurements and impact test. It was observed that in the buttered specimen, the structure of the weld metal was completely austenitic wh...

  16. Microstructure and failure behavior of dissimilar resistance spot welds between low carbon galvanized and austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marashi, P.; Pouranvari, M.; Amirabdollahian, S.; Abedi, A.; Goodarzi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Resistance spot welding was used to join austenitic stainless steel and galvanized low carbon steel. The relationship between failure mode and weld fusion zone characteristics (size and microstructure) was studied. It was found that spot weld strength in the pullout failure mode is controlled by the strength and fusion zone size of the galvanized steel side. The hardness of the fusion zone which is governed by the dilution between two base metals, and fusion zone size of galvanized carbon steel side are dominant factors in determining the failure mode

  17. Production of metal fullerene surface layer from various media in the process of steel carbonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUZEEV Iskander Rustemovich

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies devoted to production of metal fullerene layer in steels when introducing carbon from organic and inorganic media were performed. Barium carbonate was used as an inorganic medium and petroleum pitch was used as an organic medium. In order to generate the required amount of fullerenes in the process of steel samples carbonization, optimal temperature mode was found. The higher temperature, absorption and cohesive effects become less important and polymeric carbon structures destruction processes become more important. On the bottom the temperature is limited by petroleum pitch softening temperature and its transition to low-viscous state in order to enhance molecular mobility and improve the possibility of their diffusion to metal surface. Identification of fullerenes in the surface modified layer was carried out following the methods of IR-Fourier spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography. It was found out that nanocarbon structures, formed during carbonization in barium carbonate and petroleum pitch mediums, possess different morphology. In the process of metal carbonization from carbonates medium, the main role in fullerenes synthesis is belonged to catalytic effect of surface with generation of endohedral derivatives in the surface layer; but in the process of carbonization from pitch medium fullerenes are formed during crystallization of the latter and crystallization centers are of fullerene type. Based on theoretical data and dataof spectral and chromatographic analysis, optimal conditions of metal fullerene layer formation in barium carbonate and petroleum pitch mediums were determined. Low cohesion of layer, modified in barium carbonate medium, with metal basis was discovered. That was caused by limited carbon diffusion in the volume of α-Fe. According to the detected mechanism of fullerenes formation on steel surface in gaseous medium, fullerenes are formed on catalytic centers – ferrum atoms, forming thin metal

  18. Assembling of carbon nanotubes film responding to significant reduction wear and friction on steel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Xue, Yong; Qiang, Li; Gao, Kaixong; Liu, Qiao; Yang, Baoping; Liang, Aiming; Zhang, Junyan

    2017-11-01

    Friction properties of carbon nanotubes have been widely studied and reported, however, the friction properties of carbon nanotubes related on state of itself. It is showing superlubricity under nanoscale, but indicates high shear adhesion as aligned carbon nanotube film. However, friction properties under high load (which is commonly in industry) of carbon nanotube films are seldom reported. In this paper, carbon nanotube films, via mechanical rubbing method, were obtained and its tribology properties were investigated at high load of 5 to 15 N. Though different couple pairs were employed, the friction coefficients of carbon nanotube films are nearly the same. Compared with bare stainless steel, friction coefficients and wear rates under carbon nanotube films lubrication reduced to, at least, 1/5 and 1/(4.3-14.5), respectively. Friction test as well as structure study were carried out to reveal the mechanism of the significant reduction wear and friction on steel surface. One can conclude that sliding and densifying of carbon nanotubes at sliding interface contribute to the sufficient decrease of friction coefficients and wear rates.

  19. Bainitic Transformation and Properties of Low Carbon Carbide-Free Bainitic Steels with Cr Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxing Zhou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Two low carbon carbide-free bainitic steels (with and without Cr addition were designed, and each steel was treated by two kinds of heat treatment procedure (austempering and continuous cooling. The effects of Cr addition on bainitic transformation, microstructure, and properties of low carbon bainitic steels were investigated by dilatometry, metallography, X-ray diffraction, and a tensile test. The results show that Cr addition hinders the isothermal bainitic transformation, and this effect is more significant at higher transformation temperatures. In addition, Cr addition increases the tensile strength and elongation simultaneously for austempering treatment at a lower temperature. However, when the austempering temperature is higher, the strength increases and the elongation obviously decreases by Cr addition, resulting in the decrease in the product of tensile strength and elongation. Meanwhile, the austempering temperature should be lower in Cr-added steel than that in Cr-free steel in order to obtain better comprehensive properties. Moreover, for the continuous cooling treatment in the present study, the product of tensile strength and elongation significantly decreases with Cr addition due to more amounts of martensite.

  20. Development of high strength hot rolled low carbon copper-bearing steel containing nanometer sized carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaniraj, M.P. [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Young-Min [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joonho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Nam Hoon [Sheet Product Design Group, Hyundai Steel Co., North Industrial Street 1400, 343-823, DangJin 343-823 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Ik; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Jung, Woo-Sang [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jae-Hyeok, E-mail: jhshim@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, In-Suk, E-mail: insukchoi@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    A low carbon ferritic steel was alloyed with Ti, Mo and Cu with the intention of achieving greater increment in strength by multiple precipitate strengthening. The steel is hot rolled and subjected to interrupted cooling to enable precipitation of Ti–Mo carbides and copper. Thermodynamic calculations were carried out to determine equilibrium phase fractions at different temperatures. Microstructure characterization using transmission electron microscopy and composition analysis revealed that the steel contains ~5 nm size precipitates of (Ti,Mo)C. Precipitation kinetics calculations using MatCalc software showed that mainly body centered cubic copper precipitates of size < 5nm form under the cooling conditions in the present study. The steel has the high tensile strength of 853 MPa and good ductility. The yield strength increases by 420 MPa, which is more than that achieved in hot rolled low carbon ferritic steels with only copper precipitates or only carbide precipitates. The precipitation and strengthening contribution of copper and (Ti,Mo)C precipitates and their effect on the work hardening behavior is discussed.

  1. Mechanical Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Beams Bonded with External Carbon Fiber Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribniak, Viktor; Tamulenas, Vytautas; Ng, Pui-Lam; Arnautov, Aleksandr K; Gudonis, Eugenijus; Misiunaite, Ieva

    2017-06-17

    This study investigates the mechanical behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams internally reinforced with steel bars and externally bonded with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets fixed by adhesive and hybrid jointing techniques. In particular, attention is paid to the load resistance and failure modes of composite beams. The steel fibers were used to avoiding the rip-off failure of the concrete cover. The CFRP sheets were fixed to the concrete surface by epoxy adhesive as well as combined with various configurations of small-diameter steel pins for mechanical fastening to form a hybrid connection. Such hybrid jointing techniques were found to be particularly advantageous in avoiding brittle debonding failure, by promoting progressive failure within the hybrid joints. The use of CFRP sheets was also effective in suppressing the localization of the discrete cracks. The development of the crack pattern was monitored using the digital image correlation method. As revealed from the image analyses, with an appropriate layout of the steel pins, brittle failure of the concrete-carbon fiber interface could be effectively prevented. Inverse analysis of the moment-curvature diagrams was conducted, and it was found that a simplified tension-stiffening model with a constant residual stress level at 90% of the strength of the SFRC is adequate for numerically simulating the deformation behavior of beams up to the debonding of the CFRP sheets.

  2. FP corrosion dependence on carbon and chromium content in Fe-Cr steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Koei; Tanigaki, Takanori; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Uno, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to investigate Cs or Cs-Te corrosion dependence on chromium or carbon content in Fe-Cr steel, cesium and Cs-Te corrosion test were performed to three specimens, Fe-9Cr-0C, Fe-9Cr-0.14C and Fe-13Cr-0.14C, for 100 hours at 973K in simulated high burn-up fuel pin environment. Cesium corrosion depth has no dependence on chromium or carbon content in Fe-Cr steel. Cs-Te corrosion was appeared in only Fe-13Cr-0.14C which has chromium carbides ranged along grain boundary. Appearance of the Cs-Te corrosion was determined by distribution or arrangement of chromium carbides which depends on chromium and carbon content. (author)

  3. Hot corrosion behaviour of austenitic steel-303 in molten chloride and carbonate salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Misbahul Amin; Shamsul Baharin Jamaludin; Che Mohd Ruzaidi Ghazali; Khairel Rafezi Ahmad

    2007-01-01

    The investigations are presented for the hot corrosion behaviors of Austenitic Steel-303, under influence of the molten chloride and carbonate salts viz KCl and K 2 CO 3 , oxidised at 1123 K for the period of 60 hour at atmospheric condition. The oxidation kinetic are effect of molten chloride and carbonate salts deposition on the oxidation rate were determined. The susceptibility to suffer a deleterious attack on the alloy by internal corrosion increases with increasing the time. In general, the corrosion resistance austenitic steel-303 in molten carbonate salts is much higher than chloride melt, being an active oxidizing agent providing oxygen during fluxing reaction. However, due to profuse evolution of CO/ CO 2 heavy mass losses are observed during corrosion and scales are porous. The test included mass change monitoring and surface layers were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies. (author)

  4. Carbon transfer between 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo alloy and austenitic steels (experiments in anisothermal loops)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baque, P.; Besson, M.; Champeix, L.; Donati, J.R.; Oberlin, C.; Saint-Paul, P.

    1976-01-01

    Studies on carbon transfer between the ferritic steel 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo and the austenitic steels 316L and 321H have shown that there is not any measurable carbon transfer in the operating conditions of the secondary circuit of PHENIX (475 deg C was the maximal temperature of the 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo steel). A significant carbon transfer has been observed between the ferritic steel and the 316L steel when the 321H was replaced by the 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo steel in the same thermohydraulic conditions (the ferritic steel was then used up to 545 deg C). This experiment has demonstrated the importance of the temperature and the initial carbon content of the ferritic steel as parameters in the decarburization process. It appears that decarburization may not be sensitive to the thermohydraulic conditions at least in the range investigated in those experiments. In the other hand the 316L steel is observed to have been carburized, the degree of carburization remaining appreciably constant and independent on the temperature between 400 deg C and 550 deg C [fr

  5. Influence of refining time on nonmetallic inclusions in a low-carbon, silicon-killed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Marcolino; Pires, Jose Carlos; Cheung, Noe; Garcia, Amauri

    2003-01-01

    Nonmetallic inclusions are harmful to the mechanical properties of every kind of steel produced worldwide. The greater the size of the inclusion present in the structure of a determined kind of steel, the greater its negative effect on the quality of the steel. Therefore, the objective of this work was to investigate the size, the quantity, the shape and the chemical composition of nonmetallic inclusions formed throughout the refining process of silicon-killed, low-carbon steel, as a function of the treatment time in a ladle furnace, trying to ensure the flotation of inclusions bigger than 25 μm. This investigation was carried out using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), with an analysis system using energy dispersive spectometry (EDS). Based on this work, it was possible to know more precisely the nature of the inclusions, the necessary time to ensure flotation of large inclusions, the efficiency of the slag to capture the inclusions, and the inclusion level of the steel throughout its refining process to try to obtain a higher quality steel product

  6. Radiation-use of a forest exposed to elevated concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLucia, E. H.; George, K.; Hamilton, J. G.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation-use efficiency of growth (defined as biomass accumulation per unit of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation) of loblobby pine forest plots exposed to ambient or elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration was compared. Biomass accumulation of the dominant loblobby pines was calculated from monthly measurements of tree growth and site-specific allometric measurements. Leaf area index was estimated by optical, allometric and interfall methods, depending on species. Results showed that depending on tree height, elevated carbon dioxide did not alter the above-ground biomass allocation in loblobby pine. Leaf area index estimates by the different methods were found to vary significantly, but elevated carbon dioxide had only a slight effect on leaf area index in the first three years of this study. The 27 per cent increase in radiation-use efficiency of growth in response to carbon dioxide enrichment is believed to have been caused primarily by the stimulation of biomass increment. It was concluded that long-term increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration can increase the radiation-use efficiency of growth in closed canopy forests, but the magnitude and duration of this increase in uncertain. 57 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  7. Low-carbon transition of iron and steel industry in China: carbon intensity, economic growth and policy intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing; Li, Xiao; Qiao, Yuanbo; Shi, Lei

    2015-02-01

    As the biggest iron and steel producer in the world and one of the highest CO2 emission sectors, China's iron and steel industry is undergoing a low-carbon transition accompanied by remarkable technological progress and investment adjustment, in response to the macroeconomic climate and policy intervention. Many drivers of the CO2 emissions of the iron and steel industry have been explored, but the relationships between CO2 abatement, investment and technological expenditure, and their connections with the economic growth and governmental policies in China, have not been conjointly and empirically examined. We proposed a concise conceptual model and an econometric model to investigate this crucial question. The results of regression, Granger causality test and impulse response analysis indicated that technological expenditure can significantly reduce CO2 emissions, and that investment expansion showed a negative impact on CO2 emission reduction. It was also argued with empirical evidence that a good economic situation favored CO2 abatement in China's iron and steel industry, while achieving CO2 emission reduction in this industrial sector did not necessarily threaten economic growth. This shed light on the dispute over balancing emission cutting and economic growth. Regarding the policy aspects, the year 2000 was found to be an important turning point for policy evolution and the development of the iron and steel industry in China. The subsequent command and control policies had a significant, positive effect on CO2 abatement. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. The effect of cyclic and dynamic loads on carbon steel pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudland, D.L.; Scott, P.M.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the results of four 152-mm (6-inch) diameter, unpressurized, circumferential through-wall-cracked, dynamic pipe experiments fabricated from STS410 carbon steel pipe manufactured in Japan. For three of these experiments, the through-wall crack was in the base metal. The displacement histories applied to these experiments were a quasi-static monotonic, dynamic monotonic, and dynamic, cyclic (R = -1) history. The through-wall crack for the third experiment was in a tungsten-inert-gas weld, fabricated in Japan, joining two lengths of STS410 pipe. The displacement history for this experiment was the same history applied to the dynamic, cyclic base metal experiment. The test temperature for each experiment was 300 C (572 F). The objective of these experiments was to compare a Japanese carbon steel pipe material with US pipe material, to ascertain whether this Japanese steel was as sensitive to dynamic and cyclic effects as US carbon steel pipe. In support of these pipe experiments, quasi-static and dynamic, tensile and fracture toughness tests were conducted. An analysis effort was performed that involved comparing experimental crack initiation and maximum moments with predictions based on available fracture prediction models, and calculating J-R curves for the pipe experiments using the η-factor method

  9. Molecular carbon nitride ion beams for enhanced corrosion resistance of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwitz, A.; Kennedy, J.

    2017-10-01

    A novel approach is presented for molecular carbon nitride beams to coat stainless surfaces steel using conventional safe feeder gases and electrically conductive sputter targets for surface engineering with ion implantation technology. GNS Science's Penning type ion sources take advantage of the breaking up of ion species in the plasma to assemble novel combinations of ion species. To test this phenomenon for carbon nitride, mixtures of gases and sputter targets were used to probe for CN+ ions for simultaneous implantation into stainless steel. Results from mass analysed ion beams show that CN+ and a variety of other ion species such as CNH+ can be produced successfully. Preliminary measurements show that the corrosion resistance of stainless steel surfaces increased sharply when implanting CN+ at 30 keV compared to reference samples, which is interesting from an application point of view in which improved corrosion resistance, surface engineering and short processing time of stainless steel is required. The results are also interesting for novel research in carbon-based mesoporous materials for energy storage applications and as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors, because of their high surface area, electrical conductivity, chemical stability and low cost.

  10. Corrosion control of carbon steel using inhibitor of banana peel extract in acid diluted solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komalasari; Utami, S. P.; Fermi, M. I.; Aziz, Y.; Irianti, R. S.

    2018-04-01

    Issues of corrosion happened in pipes, it was used as fluid transportation in the chemical industry. Corrosion cannot be preventing, however it could be controlled or blocked. Inhibitor addition is one of the method to control the corrosion inside the pipe. Corrosion inhibitors consisted of inorganic and organic compound inhibitors. Organic inhibitor is composed from synthetic and natural material. This study focused to evaluate the inhibition’s efficiency from banana peel to carbon steel in different concentration of inhibitor and immersing time in acid solution variation. The research employed inhibitor concentration of 0 gram/liter, 2 gram/liter, 4 gram/liter and 6 gram/liter, immersed time of carbon steel for 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 hours. It was immersed in chloride acid solution of 0.5 M and 1.5 M. Carbon Steel AISI 4041 was used as specimen steel. Results were analyzed using corrosion rate evaluation for each specimens and inhibitor efficiencies determination. It was found that the specimen without inhibitor yielded fast corrosion rate in long immersing time and high concentration of HCl. However, the specimens with inhibitor gave lowest corrosion rate which was 78.59% for 6 gram/litre and 10 hours in 0.5 M HCl.

  11. Successive carbon- and boron saturation of KhVG steel in powder mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimov, Yu A; Gordienko, S I

    1975-01-01

    Method of successive saturation of KhVG steel with carbon and boron in powder mixtures is described. After carbonization of steel in a charcoal carburator at 930 deg C during 3 hrs a domain of equiaxial large grains is formed there the latter representing carbides of Fe/sub 3/C and (Fe, M)/sub 3/C. The increase of duration of carbonization up to 5 hrs and above results in formation of a cement grid greatly impairing the mechanical properties of the metal. Carbonization is followed by borating in powdered technical boron carbide at 900 deg C for 4 hrs which ensures formation on the sample surface of a borated layer with depth up to 65 mkm covering the carbonized zone. As followed from metallographic and x-ray structural analysis, the borated layer consists of boride needles with complex composition (Fe, Cr, Mn)B. Oil hardening of carbonized KhVG steel from 850 deg C and low-temperature tempering at 180 deg C for 1 hr results in formation in the main metal of martensite-carbide structure and, respectively, in the decrease of the microhardness gradient between the diffusion layers, as compared with borated KhVG steel. Operation tests of strengthened matrices of preforming machines under the conditions of application of dynamic pressing forces up to 1500 kg Fce/cm/sup 2/ demonstrated that the cyclical strength of carboborated coverings is 2.0-3.0 times higher than that of borated ones. The method of carboborating is recommended for strengthening the details of stamp and press tools.

  12. Substitution effects of a carbonated hydroxyapatite biomaterial against intoxication chloride nickel-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulila, Salha; Elfeki, Abdelfattah; Oudadesse, Hassane; Elfeki, Hafed

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential effects of a synthetic apatite (carbonated hydroxyapatite) on the detoxification of a group of male "Wistar" rats exposed to nickel chloride. Toxicity was evaluated by rats' bioassay of nickel chloride. Wistar rats received this metal daily by gavage for seven days (4 mg/ml nickel chloride/200 g body weight, BW). To detoxify this organism, a subcutaneous implantation of the apatite is made. The results revealed that exposure to nickel induced oxidative stress, disorders in the balances of ferric phosphocalcic, renal failures, liver toxicity and significant increase in nickel rates in the bones of intoxicated rats. The application of the carbonated hydroxyapatite presented in this study restored those disorders back to normal. The synthetic apatite protected the rats against the toxic effects of nickel by lowering the levels of lipid peroxidation markers and improving the activities of defense enzymes. It also amended ferric and phosphocalcic equilibriums, protected liver and kidney functions and reduced the nickel rate in the bones of the rats. Overall, the results provided strong support for the protective role of carbonated hydroxyapatite in the detoxification of rats exposed to nickel. Those beneficial effects were further confirmed by physico-chemical characterization (X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy), which revealed its property of anionic and cationic substitution, thus supporting its promising candidacy for future biomedical application. The hydroxyapatite is an effective biomaterial to solve health problems, particularly detoxification against metals (nickel).

  13. Chest pain in rubber chemical workers exposed to carbon disulphide and methaemoglobin formers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, L.C.; Weber, R.P.

    1984-08-01

    A cross sectional prevalence study of chest pain in 94 rubber chemical workers exposed to carbon disulfide (CS2) and methemoglobin forming aromatic amines was carried out. The purpose of the study was to determine whether the prevalence of chest pain or coronary heart disease (CHD), or both, in exposed individuals exceeded that of a group of non-exposed individuals from the same plant. Cardiovascular, smoking, and occupational histories were obtained. Blood pressure, height, weight, serum cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose were measured. Resting electrocardiograms (ECGs) were obtained on all study participants, as were exercise stress tests on selected exposed individuals. Matching eliminated important known risk factors for coronary artery disease. Both chest pain and angina were significantly related to exposure, controlling for age and cigarette smoking. This association was not dependent on duration of exposure as defined by 10 or more years of employment in the department of interest. CHD as defined by angina, a history of myocardial infarction, or a coronary ECG or a combination of these occurred more frequently among exposed workers. The number of abnormal ECGs in the exposed group was twice that in the control group, but the difference was not statistically significant. Age rather than exposure appeared to be the important variable associated with raised blood pressure. Neither biological measures of exposure nor ECGs showed an acute effect of workplace exposures on the myocardium. Possible additive or multiplicative effects of individual chemical agents could not be evaluated. Appropriate modification of medical surveillance of rubber chemical workers with exposure to CS2 and aromatic amines is warranted.

  14. The Effects of Cr and Al Addition on Transformation and Properties in Low‐Carbon Bainitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Three low‐carbon bainitic steels were designed to investigate the effects of Cr and Al addition on bainitic transformation, microstructures, and properties by metallographic method and dilatometry. The results show that compared with the base steel without Cr and Al addition, only Cr addition is effective for improving the strength of low‐carbon bainitic steel by increasing the amount of bainite. However, compared with the base steel, combined addition of Cr and Al has no significant effect on bainitic transformation and properties. In Cr‐bearing steel, Al addition accelerates initial bainitic transformation, but meanwhile reduces the final amount of bainitic transformation due to the formation of a high‐temperature transformation product such as ferrite. Consequently, the composite strengthening effect of Cr and Al addition is not effective compared with individual addition of Cr in low‐carbon bainitic steels. Therefore, in contrast to high‐carbon steels, bainitic transformation in Cr‐bearing low‐carbon bainitic steels can be finished in a short time, and Al should not be added because Al addition would result in lower mechanical properties.

  15. Holographic interferometry as electrochemical emission spectroscopy of carbon steel in seawater with low concentration of RA-41 corrosion inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, K.; Al-Muhana, K.; Habib, A.

    2009-01-01

    In the present investigation, holographic interferometry was utilized for the first time to determine the rate change of the number of the fringe evolutions during the corrosion test of carbon steel in blank seawater and with seawater with different concentrations of a corrosion inhibitor. In other words, the anodic dissolution behaviors (corrosion) of the carbon steel were determined simultaneously by holographic interferometry, an electromagnetic method, and by the electrochemical impedance (EI) spectroscopy, an electronic method. So, the abrupt rate change of the number of the fringe evolutions during corrosion test (EI) spectroscopy, of the carbon steel is called electrochemical emission spectroscopy. The corrosion process of the steel samples was carried out in blank seawater and seawater with different concentrations, 5-20 ppm, of RA-41 corrosion inhibitor using the EI spectroscopy method, at room temperature. The electrochemical emission spectra of the carbon steel in different solutions represent a detailed picture of the rate change of the anodic dissolution of the steel throughout the corrosion processes. Furthermore, the optical interferometry data of the carbon steel were compared to the data, which were obtained from the EI spectroscopy. Consequently, holographic interferometric is found very useful for monitoring the anodic dissolution behaviors of metals, in which the number of the fringe evolutions of the steel samples can be determined in situ. (Author)

  16. Causes of the fissure formation with shrinkage of metal on low carbon steel slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksenzuk, F.A.; Khudas, A.L.; Zelenskaya, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    The causes have been investigated underlying the formation of fissures with spread of metal on low-carbon steel slabs during hot rolling. Metallographic investigations of templates from various sections of work pieces from 15-ton ingots of 08 ps (kp) steels have indicated that the fissures on the slabs are formed after the metal spreads along the small plane and the work piece thins out in the course of rolling because of the opening of large thin-walled honeycomb bubbles. The phenomenon was confirmed schematically on a model in the form of a slab-shaped lead specimen with longitudinal hole of a variable diameter close to one of the edges

  17. The effect of hydrogen on the parameters of plastic deformation localization in low carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunev, Aleksey G., E-mail: agl@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: nadjozhkin@ispms.tsc.ru; Nadezhkin, Mikhail V., E-mail: agl@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: nadjozhkin@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Shlyakhova, Galina V., E-mail: shgv@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and Seversk State Technological Institute (National Research Nuclear University MEPhI), Seversk, 636036 (Russian Federation); Barannikova, Svetlana A., E-mail: bsa@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Zuev, Lev B., E-mail: lbz@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    In the present study, the effect of interstitial hydrogen atoms on the mechanical properties and plastic strain localization patterns in tensile tested polycrystals of low-carbon steel Fe-0.07%C has been studied using double exposure speckle photography technique. The main parameters of plastic flow localization at various stages of deformation hardening have been determined in polycrystals of steel electrolytically saturated with hydrogen in a three-electrode electrochemical cell at a controlled constant cathode potential. Also, the effect of hydrogen on changing of microstructure by using optical microscopy has been demonstrated.

  18. Modeling of roughness effect on hydrogen permeation in a low carbon steel

    OpenAIRE

    Carreño, J. A.; Uribe, I.; Carrillo, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    A model is presented to evaluate the effect of the roughness and the profile of concentration of hydrogen in a low carbon steel. The model takes advantage of the Fick's Second Law, to predict the transport of hydrogen in the steel. The problem is treated as a variational one and its space solution is made numerically by means of the Finite Elements Method, while the temporal equation is solved via the Finite Differences Method, in order to determine the concentration profiles of Hydrogen in t...

  19. Cathodic protection of carbon steel in natural seawater: Effect of sunlight radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, Alessandro [Istituto per l' Energetica e le Interfasi, IENI - CNR, Milano, via Roberto Cozzi 53 20125 Milano (Italy)], E-mail: alessandro.benedetti@cnr.it; Magagnin, Luca [Dip. Chimica, Materiali e Ing. Chimica G. Natta, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, 20131 Milano (Italy); Passaretti, Francesca [Istituto per l' Energetica e le Interfasi IENI - CNR, Lecco, c.so Promessi Sposi 29, 23900 Lecco (Italy); Chelossi, Elisabetta; Faimali, Marco [Istituto di Scienze Marine, ISMAR- CNR - Via De Marini 6, 16149, Genova (Italy); Montesperelli, Giampiero [Universita di Roma - Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 00133, Roma (Italy)

    2009-11-01

    Cathodic protection of metals in seawater is known to be influenced by chemical-physical parameters affecting cathodic processes (oxygen discharge, hydrogen evolution and calcareous deposit precipitation). In shallow seawater, these parameters are influenced by sunlight photoperiod and photosynthetic activity. The results presented here represent the first step in studies dedicated to cathodic protection in shallow photic seawater. This paper reports on carbon steel protected at -850 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (oxygen limiting current regime) in the presence of sunlight radiation but in the absence of biological and photosynthetic activity, the role of which deserves future research. Comparison of results obtained by exposing electrochemical cells to daylight cycles in both biologically inactivated natural seawater and in NaCl 3.5 wt.% solutions showed that sunlight affects current densities and that calcareous deposit interfere with light-currents effects. Sunlight radiation and induced heating of the solution have been separated, highlighting results not otherwise obvious: (1) observed current waves concomitant with sunlight radiation depend fundamentally on solar radiation, (2) solar radiation can determine current enhancements from early to late phases of aragonite crystal growth, (3) a three-day-old CaCO{sub 3} layer reduces but does not eliminate the amplitude of the current waves. Theoretical calculations for oxygen limiting currents and additional field tests showed that sunlight, rather than bulk solution heating, is the main cause of daily current enhancements. This was confirmed by polarizations performed at -850 and -1000 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (constant bulk temperature), during which the electrode was irradiated with artificial lighting. This test also confirmed O{sub 2} discharge to be the cathodic process involved. A mechanism of radiation conversion to heat in the oxygen diffusion layer region is proposed.

  20. The performance of a surface-applied corrosion inhibitor for the carbon steel in saturated Ca(OH)2 solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Haibing; Li, Weihua; Ma, Fubin; Kong, Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, the performance of an amino alcohol based surface applied inhibitor was studied by the electrochemical techniques in saturated Ca(OH) 2 solutions. The surface morphology of the carbon steel was observed by scanning electron microscope, and the energy diffraction spectrum was also tested. Results showed that the inhibitor used in this work demonstrated obvious inhibition efficiency on the carbon steel in saturated Ca(OH) 2 solutions. The inhibition mechanism of the inhibitor lies in the quick adsorption of the active component on carbon steel surface

  1. Monitoring of stainless-steel slag carbonation using X-ray computed microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Marijn A; Nielsen, Peter; De Kock, Tim; Boone, Matthieu N; Quaghebeur, Mieke; Cnudde, Veerle

    2014-01-01

    Steel production is one of the largest contributors to industrial CO2 emissions. This industry also generates large amounts of solid byproducts, such as slag and sludge. In this study, fine grained stainless-steel slag (SSS) is valorized to produce compacts with high compressive strength without the use of a hydraulic binder. This carbonation process is investigated on a pore-scale level to identify how the mineral phases in the SSS react with CO2, where carbonates are formed, and what the impact of these changes is on the pore network of the carbonated SSS compact. In addition to conventional research techniques, high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) is applied to visualize and quantify the changes in situ during the carbonation process. The results show that carbonates mainly precipitate at grain contacts and in capillary pores and this precipitation has little effect on the connectivity of the pore space. This paper also demonstrates the use of a custom-designed polymer reaction cell that allows in situ HRXCT analysis of the carbonation process. This shows the distribution and influence of water and CO2 in the pore network on the carbonate precipitation and, thus, the influence on the compressive strength development of the waste material.

  2. Cold-workability limits for carbon and alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Domiaty, A.

    1999-04-01

    In metalforming, the success in accomplishing the required deformation without failure of the forming tools or cracking of the work material represents the major concern for manufacture and design engineers. The degree of deformation that can be achieved in a particular metalworking process without creating an undesirable condition is defined as workability. In the present work, an experimental investigation was carried out to determine the cold-workability limits for five different types of steel: AISI 1018, 1045, 1078, 4140, and 4340. The upset (compression) test was used to determine the workability limit for each type. The upset dies and specimen geometries were designed to give different strain paths covering the range from homogeneous deformation (ɛz/ɛθ=-2.0) to close to plane-strain condition (ɛz/ɛθ=0.0). Grid pattern was printed on the specimen surface in order to measure the axial and hoop strain components during deformation. Specific elements were selected on the specimen surface, and their strain paths were determined. Each strain path was terminated once surface cracking had been observed. The ends of the strain paths, at which macrocracks were observed, were connected to obtain the workability limit on the forming-limit diagram. The workability limit of AISI 1018 is the highest among the other types of steel.

  3. Characterization of corrosion products formed on steels in the first months of atmospheric exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes Renato Altobelli; Costa Isolda; Faria Dalva Lúcia Araújo de

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion products of carbon steel and weathering steel exposed to three different types of atmospheres, at times ranging from one to three months, have been identified. The steels were exposed in an industrial site, an urban site (São Paulo City, Brazil), and a humid site. The effect of the steel type on the corrosion products formed in the early stages of atmospheric corrosion has been evaluated. The corrosion products formed at the various exposure locations were characterized by Raman...

  4. The difference in thermal and mechanical stabilities of austenite between carbon- and nitrogen-added metastable austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumura, Takuro; Nakada, Nobuo; Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Takaki, Setsuo; Koyano, Tamotsu; Adachi, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of carbon and nitrogen addition on the stability of austenite, athermal and deformation-induced α′-martensitic transformation behaviors were investigated using type 304-metastable austenitic stainless steels containing 0.1 mass% carbon or nitrogen. The difference in the development of the deformation microstructure in particular is discussed in terms of the stacking-fault energy (SFE). Since carbon-added steel has a lower SFE than that of nitrogen-added steel, deformation twins and ε-martensite were preferentially formed in the carbon-added steel, whereas a dislocation cell structure developed in the nitrogen-added steel. Crystallographic analysis using the electron backscatter diffraction method revealed that the difference in the deformation microstructure has a significant influence on the growth behavior of deformation-induced α′-martensite, that is, the interface of the deformation twins and ε-martensite suppresses the growth of α′-martensite, whereas dislocation cell boundaries are not effective. As a result, the mechanical stability of carbon-added steel is slightly higher than that of nitrogen-added steel, although the thermal stabilization effect of carbon is much lower than that of nitrogen

  5. Prediction of hearing loss among the noise-exposed workers in a steel factory using artificial intelligence approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliabadi, Mohsen; Farhadian, Maryam; Darvishi, Ebrahim

    2015-08-01

    Prediction of hearing loss in noisy workplaces is considered to be an important aspect of hearing conservation program. Artificial intelligence, as a new approach, can be used to predict the complex phenomenon such as hearing loss. Using artificial neural networks, this study aims to present an empirical model for the prediction of the hearing loss threshold among noise-exposed workers. Two hundred and ten workers employed in a steel factory were chosen, and their occupational exposure histories were collected. To determine the hearing loss threshold, the audiometric test was carried out using a calibrated audiometer. The personal noise exposure was also measured using a noise dosimeter in the workstations of workers. Finally, data obtained five variables, which can influence the hearing loss, were used for the development of the prediction model. Multilayer feed-forward neural networks with different structures were developed using MATLAB software. Neural network structures had one hidden layer with the number of neurons being approximately between 5 and 15 neurons. The best developed neural networks with one hidden layer and ten neurons could accurately predict the hearing loss threshold with RMSE = 2.6 dB and R(2) = 0.89. The results also confirmed that neural networks could provide more accurate predictions than multiple regressions. Since occupational hearing loss is frequently non-curable, results of accurate prediction can be used by occupational health experts to modify and improve noise exposure conditions.

  6. Examining the temperature behavior of stainless steel surfaces exposed to hydrogen plasmas in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Felipe; Allain, Jean Paul; Kaita, Robert; Lucia, Matthew; St-Onge, Denis; Ellis, Robert; Majeski, Richard

    2014-10-01

    The Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP) is an in-situ diagnostic designed to characterize plasma-facing components (PFCs) in tokamak devices. MAPP is installed in LTX at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. MAPP's capabilities include remotely operated XPS acquisition and temperature control of four samples. The recent addition of a focused ion beam allows XPS depth profiling analysis. Recent published results show an apparent correlation between hydrogen retention and temperature of Li coated stainless steel (SS) PFCs exposed to plasmas like those of LTX. According to XPS data, the retention of hydrogen by the coated surfaces decreases at above 180 °C. In the present study MAPP will be used to study the oxidation of Li coatings as a function of time and temperature of the walls when Li coatings are applied. Experiments in the ion-surface interaction experiment (IIAX) varying the hydrogen fluence on the SS samples will be also performed. Conclusions resulting from this study will be key to explain the PFC temperature-dependent variation of plasma performance observed in LTX. This work was supported by U.S. DOE Contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-AC52-07NA27344 and DE-SC0010717.

  7. On cobalt effect on structural and phase transformations during tempering carbon-containing steels of Fe-Ni-Mo system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhshtadt, A.G.; Khovova, O.M.; Kan, A.V.; Perkas, M.D.; Kudryavtsev, A.N.; Rodionov, Yu.L.

    1990-01-01

    Methods of resistometry, colorimetry, X-ray diffraction chemical and electrochemical phase analyses, Moessbauer spectroscopy and field-ion mass spectrometry are used to study the nature of precipitation hardening of carbon containing Fe-Ni-Mo martensitic steels. Cobalt contribution to formation of phase composition and structural state of steels during tempering is analyzed. Realization conditions of effective combined (carbide-intermetallide) hardening of the investigated system steels are determined

  8. A Study of Submicron Grain Boundary Precipitates in Ultralow Carbon 316LN Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, S.; Han, K.; Kalu, P. N.; Yang, K.; Du, Z. M.

    2010-04-01

    This article reports our efforts in characterization of an ultralow carbon 316LN-type stainless steel. The carbon content in the material is one-third that in a conventional 316LN, which further inhibits the formation of grain boundary carbides and therefore sensitizations. Our primary effort is focused on characterization of submicron size precipitates in the materials with the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique complemented by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Thermodynamic calculations suggested that several precipitates, such as M23C6, Chi, Sigma, and Cr2N, can form in a low carbon 316LN. In the steels heat treated at 973 K (700 °C) for 100 hours, a combination of EBSD and AES conclusively identified the grain boundary precipitates (≥100 nm) as Cr2N, which has a hexagonal closed-packed crystallographic structure. Increases of the nitrogen content promote formation of large size Cr2N precipitates. Therefore, prolonged heat treatment at relatively high temperatures of ultralow carbon 316LN steels may result in a sensitization.

  9. Effect of the dendritic morphology on hot tearing of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridolfi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Hot tears form during solidification in the brittle region of the dendritic front. Most hot tearing criteria are based on solid and fluid mechanics, being the phenomenon strictly depending on the solid resistance to applied strains and on the liquid capability of filling the void spaces. Modelling both mechanisms implies the precise description of the dendritic morphology. To this scope, the theory of coalescence of the dendritic arms at grain boundaries of Rappaz et al. has been applied, in this work, to the columnar growth of carbon steels by means of a simple mathematical model. Depending on the alloy composition, solid bridging starts at solid fractions down to about 0.8 and up to above 0.995 (very low carbon). The morphology of the brittle region changes drastically with increasing carbon and adding other solutes. In particular, ferritic dendrites, typical of low carbon steels, tend to offer short and wide interdendritic spaces to the surrounding liquid making possible their complete filling, and few solid bridges; peritectic steels show the rise of austenite growing and bridging rapidly in the interdendritic spaces, preventing void formation; austenitic dendrites form long and narrow interdendritic spaces difficult to reach for the liquid and with a lot of solid bridges. Sulphur addition mainly acts in delaying the coalescence end, more markedly in ferritic dendrites. (paper)

  10. Enhanced wear resistance of production tools and steel samples by implantation of nitrogen and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, N.J.; Straede, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years ion implantation has become a feasible technique for obtaining improved wear resistance of production tools. However, basic knowledge of how and in which cases ion implantation is working at its best is still needed. The present paper discusses structural and tribological investigations of carbon and nitrogen implanted steels. The nitrogen data were obtained mainly from field tests and the investigation of carbon implantations took place mainly in the laboratory. A study was made of how the tribological behaviour of implanted steels changes with different implantation parameters. The tribological laboratory investigations were carried out using pin-on-disc equipment under controlled test conditions, and deal with high dose carbon implantation (approximately (1-2)x10 18 ions cm -2 ). The wear resistance of steels was enhanced dramatically, by up to several orders of magnitude. The field test results cover a broad range of ion implanted production tools, which showed a marked improvement in wear resistance. Nitrogen implanted tools are also compared with carbon and titanium implanted tools. (orig.)

  11. Formation of fouling deposits on a carbon steel surface from Colombian heavy crude oil under preheating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Pinto, D. A.; Cuervo Camargo, S. M.; Orozco Parra, M.; Laverde, D.; García Vergara, S.; Blanco Pinzon, C.

    2016-02-01

    Fouling in heat exchangers is produced by the deposition of undesired materials on metal surfaces. As fouling progresses, pressure drop and heat transfer resistance is observed and therefore the overall thermal efficiency of the equipment diminishes. Fouling is mainly caused by the deposition of suspended particles, such as those from chemical reactions, crystallization of certain salts, and some corrosion processes. In order to understand the formation of fouling deposits from Colombian heavy oil (API≈12.3) on carbon steel SA 516 Gr 70, a batch stirred tank reactor was used. The reactor was operated at a constant pressure of 340psi while varying the temperature and reaction times. To evaluate the formation of deposits on the metal surfaces, the steel samples were characterized by gravimetric analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). On the exposed surfaces, the results revealed an increase in the total mass derived from the deposition of salt compounds, iron oxides and alkaline metals. In general, fouling was modulated by both the temperature and the reaction time, but under the experimental conditions, the temperature seems to be the predominant variable that controls and accelerates fouling.

  12. Precipitation behavior of carbides in high-carbon martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qin-tian; Li, Jing; Shi, Cheng-bin; Yu, Wen-tao; Shi, Chang-min [University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy; Li, Ji-hui [Yang Jiang Shi Ba Zi Group Co., Ltd, Guangdong (China)

    2017-01-15

    A fundamental study on the precipitation behavior of carbides was carried out. Thermo-calc software, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study the precipitation and transformation behaviors of carbides. Carbide precipitation was of a specific order. Primary carbides (M7C3) tended to be generated from liquid steel when the solid fraction reached 84 mol.%. Secondary carbides (M7C3) precipitated from austenite and can hardly transformed into M23C6 carbides with decreasing temperature in air. Primary carbides hardly changed once they were generated, whereas secondary carbides were sensitive to heat treatment and thermal deformation. Carbide precipitation had a certain effect on steel-matrix phase transitions. The segregation ability of carbon in liquid steel was 4.6 times greater that of chromium. A new method for controlling primary carbides is proposed.

  13. Manganese partitioning in low carbon manganese steel during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lis, J.; Lis, A.; Kolan, C.

    2008-01-01

    For 6Mn16 steel experimental soft annealing at 625 deg. C for periods from 1 h to 60 h and modeling with Thermo-Calc were performed to estimate the partitioning of alloying elements, in particular Mn, between ferrite, cementite and austenite. Using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray analysis it was established that the increase of Mn concentration in carbides to a level 7%-11.2% caused a local decrease of the Ac 1 temperature and led to the presence of austenite around the carbides. Thus, after cooling, small bainite-martensite or bainite-martensite-retained austenite (BM-A) islands were observed. A dispersion of carbides and a coarsening process were observed. The measured amount of Mn in the carbides was in good agreement with theoretical predictions

  14. Alternatives to reduce corrosion of carbon steel storage drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirker, L.R.; Beitel, G.A.

    1995-11-01

    The major tasks of this research were (a) pollution prevention opportunity assessments on the overpacking operations for failed or corroded drums, (b) research on existing container corrosion data, (c) investigation of the storage environment of the new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Type II storage modules, (d) identification of waste streams that demonstrate deleterious corrosion affects on drum storage life, and (e) corrosion test cell program development. Twenty-one waste streams from five US Department of Energy (DOE) sites within the DOE Complex were identified to demonstrate a deleterious effect to steel storage drums. The major components of these waste streams include acids, salts, and solvent liquids, sludges, and still bottoms. The solvent-based waste streams typically had the shortest time to failure: 0.5 to 2 years. The results of this research support the position that pollution prevention evaluations at the front end of a project or process will reduce pollution on the back end

  15. Laser surface modification of boronickelized medium carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkowska, Aneta; Pertek, Aleksandra; Kulka, Michał; Klimek, Leszek

    2015-11-01

    A two-step process was applied to produce the multicomponent boride layers. Boronickelizing consisted of nickel plating and diffusion boriding. Two different methods of heat treatment of boronickelized C45 steel were used: a typical through-hardening, and a laser surface modification with remelting. Microstructure and some mechanical properties of these layers were examined. Microstructural characterization was studied using optical microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis, Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction and X-ray diffraction. The laser modification improved wear resistance, cohesion as well as low-cycle fatigue of the boronickelized layer. Compressive stresses, occurring after laser remelting, could be the reason for the advantageous mechanical behavior of the layer.

  16. Effect of carbon content on microstructure and mechanical properties of hot-rolled low carbon 12Cr-Ni stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, H.; Ye, X.N.; Li, J.D.; Jiang, L.Z.; Liu, Z.Y.; Wang, G.D.; Wang, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Hot-rolled ultra low carbon martensite is characterized by dislocation cells substructure. → The formation of dislocation cells is attributed to high Ms and low interstitial atoms content. → Hot-rolled ultra low carbon 12Cr-Ni stainless steel has excellent impact toughness. → Delta ferrite deteriorates the impact toughness of hot-rolled 12Cr-Ni stainless steel. - Abstract: 12Cr-Ni stainless steels containing different carbon contents from 0.004 wt.% to 0.034 wt.% were hot-rolled and air-cooled. Their corresponding microstructures were observed with optical microscope and transmission electron microscope, and the Vickers hardness, tensile and impact tests were also carried out. It was found that the martensitic morphology was significantly influenced by carbon content. The as-received ultra low carbon martensite in the steel containing 0.004 wt.% C is characterized by dislocation cells substructure. The formation of dislocation cells is attributed to high martensite finishing point (above 400 deg. C) and low interstitial atoms content. On the other hand, the martensite in the steel containing 0.034 wt.% C consists mainly of typical martensite laths because of low martensite finishing point and high interstitial atoms content which hinder dislocation motion. Furthermore, carbon content has an evident effect on the mechanical properties of 12Cr-Ni steels. The hardness and strength of the as-received steels increase with an increase in carbon content, but their elongation and impact toughness decrease with the carbon content. The steel containing 0.004 wt.% C has excellent impact toughness due to the ultra low carbon content in the martensite composed of dislocation cells.

  17. Electrochemical impedance spectrometry using 316L steel, hastelloy, maraging, Inconel 600, Elgiloy, carbon steel, TiN and NiCr. Simulation in tritiated water. 2 volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellanger, G.

    1994-03-01

    Polarization and electrochemical impedance spectrometry curves are presented and discussed. These curves make it possible to ascertain the corrosion domains and to compare the slow and fast kinetics (voltammetry) of different stainless steel alloys. These corrosion kinetics, the actual or simulated tritiated water redox potentials, and the corrosion potentials provide a classification of the steels studied here: 316L, Hastelloy, Maraging, Inconel 600, Elgiloy, carbon steel and TiN and NiCr deposits. From the results it can be concluded that Hastelloy and Elgiloy have the best corrosion resistance. (author). 49 refs., 695 figs., tabs

  18. Influences of spray parameters on the structure and corrosion resistance of stainless steel layers coated on carbon steel by plasma spray treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Kyong An; Lee, Sang Dong; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Shur, Dong Soo; Kim, Joung Soo

    1996-01-01

    Stainless steel powders were sprayed on the grit-blasted SM45C carbon steel substrates using a plasma spray method. The influences of the spray parameters on the structure and corrosion resistance of the layers coated on the carbon steel were investigated. Corrosion behavior of the layers were analyzed by the anodic polarization tests in deaerated 0.1 M NaCl + 0.01 M NaOH solution at 80 deg C. The surface roughness and porosity were observed to decrease with decreasing the particle size. The surface hardness of the coating was always higher than that of the matrix, SM45C, implying that the higher resistance of the coating to erosion-corrosion than that of matrix, and increased as the spray power and the spray distance increase. Stainless steel coats showed more corrosion resistance than the carbon steel did, due to their passivity. The corrosion resistance of the coats, however, were inferior to that of the bulk stainless steels due to the inherent defects formed in the coats. The defects such as rough surface and pores provided the occluded sites favorable for the initiation of localized corrosion, resulting in the conclusion that finer the powder is, higher the corrosion resistance is. And the Cr oxides formation resulting in Cr depletion around the oxides reduced the corrosion resistance of the coats. (author)

  19. 78 FR 72863 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    ...-Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order AGENCY... circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe (``circular welded pipe'') from the People's Republic of China...\\ See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 78 FR 33063 (June 3, 2013). \\2\\ See Circular Welded...

  20. Effects of niobium addition on the structure and properties of medium and high carbon steels. v. 1,2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation about the use of niobium in medium and high carbon steels, with ferritic-pearlitic structure, through the understanding of niobium actuaction mechanism in the structure, and consequently in the mechanical properties of those steels is done. (E.G.) [pt

  1. 76 FR 34101 - Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil, Japan, and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ...] Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil, Japan, and Russia Determinations On...-quality steel products from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to an industry in the United States within a reasonably foreseeable time. The Commission further...

  2. 76 FR 42679 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    .... Steel''), Nucor Corporation (``Nucor''), and ArcelorMittal USA Inc. DATES: Effective Date: July 19, 2011..., 2011. We received briefs from U.S. Steel and Nucor and a rebuttal brief from Tata.\\5\\ On May 17, the... India, dated April 14, 2011; Letter from Nucor to the Department, regarding Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon...

  3. 75 FR 4779 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products From Italy: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ...-Quality Steel Plate Products From Italy: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain cut-to-length carbon- quality steel plate products... that the Department conduct an administrative review of its sales and entries of subject merchandise...

  4. 76 FR 72173 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, the Sultanate of Oman, the United Arab...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    ...-552-810] Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, the Sultanate of Oman, the United Arab... Steel Pipe from India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam, dated October 26, 2011 (hereinafter... pipe from India, the Sultanate of Oman (``Oman''), the United Arab Emirates (``the UAE''), and the...

  5. Medium carbon vanadium steels for closed die forging; Acos de medio carbono microligados ao vanadio para forjaria em matriz fechada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeszensky, Gabor; Plaut, Ronald Lesley

    1994-12-31

    This work analyses the medium carbon micro alloyed vanadium potential for closed die forged production. The steels reach the mechanical resistance requests during cooling after forging, eliminating the subsequent thermal treatment. Those steels also present good fatigue resistance and machinability. The industrial scale experiments are also reported 16 refs., 21 figs.

  6. Determination of Cr, Mn, Si, and Ni in carbon steels by optical emission spectrometry with spark source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Gonzalez, M.A.; Pomares Alfonso, M.; Mora Lopez, L.

    1995-01-01

    Elemental composition of steels determines some important of his characteristic moreover it is necessary to obtain their quality certification. Analytical procedure has performed for determination of Cr, Mn, Si and Ni in carbon steels by optical emission spectrometry with spark source. reproducibility of results is 5-11 %. Exactitude has tested with results that have obtained by internationally recognised methods-

  7. 77 FR 21527 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products From the Republic of Korea: Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... from the Republic of Korea. The review covers one manufacturer/ exporter. The period of review is...-Quality Steel Plate Products From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative... duty order on certain cut-to-length carbon-quality steel plate products (CTL plate) from the Republic...

  8. 76 FR 3612 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan; Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-583-008] Circular Welded Carbon Steel... Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Notice of Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative... complete the preliminary results of this review within the original time frame because we require...

  9. Effects of ion beam bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto tungsten carbide and tool steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awazu, Kaoru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki [Industrial Research Inst. of Ishikawa (Japan); Watanabe, Hiroshi [Gakushuin Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Iwaki, Masaya; Guzman, L [RIKEN, Saitama (Japan)

    1992-04-15

    A study was made of the effects of argon ion bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto WC and tool steels. Carbon thin film deposition was performed at various temperatures ranging from 200degC to 350degC, using C{sub 6}H{sub 6} gas. Argon ion beam bombardment of the films was carried out at an energy of 150 keV with a dose of 1x10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2}. The hardness and adhesion of the films were measured by means of Knoop hardness and scratch tests respectively. The structure of the carbon films was estimated by laser Raman spectroscopy, and the relations were investigated between the mechanical properties and the structure of the films. The hardness of carbon thin films increases as their deposition temperature decreases; this tendency corresponds to the increase in amorphous structure estimated by Raman spectra. Argon ion bombardment results in constant hardness and fraction of amorphous structure. Argon ion beam bombardment of films prior to additional carbon deposition may cause the adhesion of the subsequently deposited films to improve. It is concluded that argon ion beam bombardment is useful for improving the properties of carbon films deposited onto WC and tool steels. (orig.).

  10. Effects of ion beam bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto tungsten carbide and tool steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awazu, Kaoru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Iwaki, Masaya; Guzman, L.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made of the effects of argon ion bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto WC and tool steels. Carbon thin film deposition was performed at various temperatures ranging from 200degC to 350degC, using C 6 H 6 gas. Argon ion beam bombardment of the films was carried out at an energy of 150 keV with a dose of 1x10 16 ions cm -2 . The hardness and adhesion of the films were measured by means of Knoop hardness and scratch tests respectively. The structure of the carbon films was estimated by laser Raman spectroscopy, and the relations were investigated between the mechanical properties and the structure of the films. The hardness of carbon thin films increases as their deposition temperature decreases; this tendency corresponds to the increase in amorphous structure estimated by Raman spectra. Argon ion bombardment results in constant hardness and fraction of amorphous structure. Argon ion beam bombardment of films prior to additional carbon deposition may cause the adhesion of the subsequently deposited films to improve. It is concluded that argon ion beam bombardment is useful for improving the properties of carbon films deposited onto WC and tool steels. (orig.)

  11. 75 FR 32160 - Certain Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products from Brazil: Extension of Time Limit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ...-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products from Brazil: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of...-quality steel products from Brazil. See Agreement Suspending the Countervailing Duty Investigation on Hot... duty order on certain hot-rolled flat-rolled carbon-quality steel products from Brazil. See Initiation...

  12. Anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel under unsaturated conditions in a nuclear waste deep geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwong, G.; Wang, St.; Newman, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Anaerobic corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in humid conditions, but not submerged in aqueous solution, was studied based on hydrogen generation. Initial tests monitored the hydrogen evolution from carbon steel in a high humidity environment (≥ 75% RH) at near-ambient temperature (30 C) using a high sensitivity pressure gauge system (sensitivity of 0.01 μm.a -1 ). The presence of hydrogen in test runs that showed no, or minimal, pressure increase was confirmed by a solid-state potentiometric hydrogen sensor which has the capability of detecting hydrogen partial pressure as low as 10 -6 bar or a corrosion rate of 1.5 * 10 -4 μm.a -1 . Preliminary results indicate that a corrosion rate as high as 0.2 μm.a -1 can be sustained for steel coated with salt at 100% RH. Higher corrosion rates (as high as 0.8 μm.a -1 ) were obtained in less humid environment (71% RH). Without a salt deposit, pickled steel in humid environment (as high as 100% RH) also showed detectable corrosion for a period up to 800 hours, during which 0.8 kPa of hydrogen was accumulated prior to the apparent arrest of corrosion, representing a metal loss of 3 nm. Corrosion scales are also identified with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as by mass change monitoring using a quartz crystal microbalance. Corrosion mechanisms and prediction for longer-term exposure will be discussed. Results will be useful in predicting long-term carbon steel corrosion behaviour and improving the current knowledge of hydrogen gas evolution in a deep geological repository for nuclear waste. (authors)

  13. Metallurgical study of low-temperature plasma carbon diffusion treatments for stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.B.; Leyland, A.; Stevenson, P.R.; Cawley, J.; Matthews, A.

    1993-01-01

    We recently reported a novel low-temperature carbon diffusion technique for surface hardening of stainless steels. The treatment was shown to provide benefits in terms of abrasive wear resistance. There is also evidence to suggest that by performing diffusion treatments at low temperatures (i.e. below 400 C), these benefits can be achieved without compromising corrosion resistance. Here a variety of surface analysis and depth profiling techniques have been used to determine the physical and mechanical properties of carbon-rich layers produced on a range of stainless steel substrate materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was employed to determine the crystallographic structure, whilst wavelength dispersive X-ray analysis (WDX) and glow discharge optical spectroscopy (GDOS) gave information on the concentration and distribution of the diffused species within the treated layers. A variety of carbide-based structures was detected, including the expected M 23 C 6 and, more surprisingly, M 3 C. Optical and electron microscopy techniques were used to provide information on layer morphology. The surfaces produced by the low-temperature carbon-diffusion process generally exhibit a distinct diffusion layer of between 1 and 20 μm, depending on the material and the treatment conditions. Austenitic stainless steels appear to give the best response to treatment, however other types of stainless steel can be treated, particularly if the microstructure contains above 5% retained austenite. Here we discuss the changes in mechanical and metallurgical properties provided by this technique and its potential value for treatment of both austenitic and other stainless steel substrate materials. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of carbon footprints of steel versus concrete pipelines for water transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilana, Lalit; Bhatt, Arpita H; Najafi, Mohammad; Sattler, Melanie

    2016-05-01

    The global demand for water transmission and service pipelines is expected to more than double between 2012 and 2022. This study compared the carbon footprint of the two most common materials used for large-diameter water transmission pipelines, steel pipe (SP) and prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP). A planned water transmission pipeline in Texas was used as a case study. Four life-cycle phases for each material were considered: material production and pipeline fabrication, pipe transportation to the job site, pipe installation in the trench, and operation of the pipeline. In each phase, the energy consumed and the CO2-equivalent emissions were quantified. It was found that pipe manufacturing consumed a large amount of energy, and thus contributed more than 90% of life cycle carbon emissions for both kinds of pipe. Steel pipe had 64% larger CO2-eq emissions from manufacturing compared to PCCP. For the transportation phase, PCCP consumed more fuel due to its heavy weight, and therefore had larger CO2-eq emissions. Fuel consumption by construction equipment for installation of pipe was found to be similar for steel pipe and PCCP. Overall, steel had a 32% larger footprint due to greater energy used during manufacturing. This study compared the carbon footprint of two large-diameter water transmission pipeline materials, steel and prestressed concrete cylinder, considering four life-cycle phases for each. The study provides information that project managers can incorporate into their decision-making process concerning pipeline materials. It also provides information concerning the most important phases of the pipeline life cycle to target for emission reductions.

  15. Corrosion resistance of steel fibre reinforced concrete - A literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos Meson, Victor; Michel, Alexander; Solgaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) is increasingly being used in the construction of civil infrastructure. However, there are inconsistencies among international standards and guidelines regarding the consideration of carbon-steel fibres for the structural verification of SFRC exposed...... of the mechanisms governing the corrosion of carbon-steel fibres in cracks and its effects on the fracture behaviour of SFRC are not fully understood....

  16. 76 FR 48143 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ..., 75 FR 81565 (December 28, 2010). \\3\\ Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods from the People's Republic of..., from Steven Hampton, International Trade Analyst, ``Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products from...

  17. Inhibition effect of phosphorus-based chemicals on corrosion of carbon steel in secondary-treated municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhanhui; Ren, Hongqiang; Xu, Ke; Geng, Jinju; Ding, Lili

    2013-01-01

    Secondary-treated municipal wastewater (MWW) could supply a viable alternative water resource for cooling water systems. Inorganic salts in the concentrated cooling water pose a great challenge to corrosion control chemicals. In this study, the inhibition effect of 1-hydroxy ethylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDP), trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP) and 2-phosphonobutane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid (PBTCA) on corrosion of carbon steel in secondary-treated MWW was investigated by the means of potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The inhibition effect increased with increasing concentration of inhibitors. The corrosion rates of carbon steel were 1.5, 0.8, 0.2 and 0.5 mm a(-1) for blank, HEDP, ATMP and PBTCA samples at 50 mg L(-1), respectively. The phosphorus-based chemicals could adsorb onto the surface of the carbon steel electrode, form a coat of protective film and then protect the carbon steel from corrosion in the test solution.

  18. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of low alloy and carbon steels in high temperature pure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Tsuzuki, R.

    1993-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of low alloy steels (A508 and SNCM630) and a carbon steel (SGV480) in high temperature water has been examined with relation to the heat treatment condition, including a long time aging, and the mechanical properties. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as observed in the highly hardened specimens, and there was observed in the highly hardened specimens, and there was observed in the highly hardened specimens, and there was observed a close relationship between hardness and SCC susceptibility. From the engineering point of view, it was concluded that adequate SR (stress relief) or tempering heat treatment is necessary to avoid the IGSCC of the welded structures made of low alloy and carbon steels. A508 heat treated with specified quench and temper did not show the SCC susceptibility, even after aging 10000 hours at 350, 400 and 450 degrees C. Tensile properties corresponding to the critical hardness for SSC susceptibility coincided with the values at the 'necking point' in the true stress-strain curve. Ductile-brittle transition observed in the fracture toughness test also occurred at around the critical hardness for SCC susceptibility. Therefore, it was conjectured that the limitation of plasticity was an absolute cause for the SCC susceptibility of the steels

  19. Comparison between instrumented precracked Charpy and compact specimen tests of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    The General Atomic Company High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is housed within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Various carbon steel structural members serve as closures at penetrations in the vessel. A program of testing and evaluation is underway to determine the need for reference fracture toughness (K/sub IR/) and indexing procedures for these materials as described in Appendix G to Section III, ASME Code for light water reactor steels. The materials of interest are carbon steel forgings (SA508, Class 1) and plates (SA537, Classes 1 and 2) as well as weldments of these steels. The fracture toughness behavior is characterized with instrumented precracked Charpy V-votch specimens (PCVN) - slow-bend and dynamic - and compact specimens (10-mm and 25-mm thicknesses) using both linear elastic (ASTM E399) and elastic-plastic (equivalent Energy and J-Integral) analytical procedures. For the dynamic PCVN tests, force-time traces are analyzed according to the procedures of the Pressure Vessel Research Council (PVRC)/Metal Properties Council (MPC). Testing and analytical procedures are discussed and PCVN results are compared to those obtained with compact specimens

  20. Sodium phthalamates as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel in aqueous hydrochloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, Eugenio A.; Olivares, Octavio; Likhanova, Natalya V.; Dominguez-Aguilar, Marco A.; Nava, Noel; Guzman-Lucero, Diego; Corrales, Monica

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → N-Alkyl-sodium phthalamates as corrosion inhibitors for industry in acidic medium. → Compounds behaved as mixed type inhibitors and followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm. → Efficiencies were proportional to aliphatic chain length and inhibitor concentration. → Iron complexes and chelates with phthalamates contributed to carbon steel protection. - Abstract: Three compounds of N-alkyl-sodium phthalamates were synthesized and tested as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel in 0.5 M aqueous hydrochloric acid. Tests showed that inhibitor efficiencies were related to aliphatic chain length and dependent on concentration. N-1-n-tetradecyl-sodium phthalamate displayed moderate efficiency against uniform corrosion, 42-86% at 25 deg. C and 25-60% at 40 o C. Tests indicated that compounds behave as mixed type inhibitors where molecular adsorption on steel followed Langmuir isotherm, whereas thermodynamic suggested that a physisorption process occurred. XPS analysis confirmed film formation on surface, where Fe +2 complexes and Fe +2 chelates with phthalamates prevented steel from further corrosion.

  1. Strain-tempering of low carbon martensite steel wire by rapid heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torisaka, Yasunori; Kihara, Junji

    1978-01-01

    In the production of prestressed concrete steel wires, a series of the cold drawing-patenting process are performed to improve the strength. In order to reduce cyclic process, the low carbon martensite steel wire which can be produced only by the process of hot rolling and direct quench has been investigated as strain-tempering material. When strain-tempering is performed on the low carbon martensite steel wire, stress relaxation (Re%) increases and mechanical properties such as total elongation, reduction of area, ultimate tensile strength and proof stress decrease remarkably by annealing. In order to shorten the heating time, the authors performed on the steel wire the strain-tempering with a heating time of 1.0 s using direct electrical resistance heating and examined the effects of rapid heating on the stress relaxation and the mechanical properties. Stress relaxation decreases without impairment of the mechanical properties up to a strain-tempering temperature of 573 K. Re(%) after 10.8 ks is 0% at the testing temperature 301 K, 0.49% at 363 K and 1.39% at 433 K. (auth.)

  2. Fatigue crack growth rate studies on pipes and pipe welds made of austenitic stainless steel and carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Punit; Singh, P.K.; Bhasin, Vivek; Vaze, K.K.; Pukazhendhi, D.M.; Gandhi, P.; Raghava, G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to understand the fatigue crack growth behavior in austenitic stainless steel and carbon steel pipes and pipe welds by carrying out analysis/predictions and experiments. The Paris law has been used for the prediction of fatigue crack growth life. To carry out the analysis, Paris constants have been determined for pipe (base) and pipe weld materials by using Compact Tension (CT)/Three Point Bend (TPB) specimens machined from the actual pipe/pipe weld. Analyses have been carried out to predict the fatigue crack growth life of pipes/pipe welds having part through cracks on the outer surface. In the analyses, Stress Intensity Factors (K) have been evaluated through two different schemes. The first scheme considers the 'K' evaluations at two points of the crack front i.e. maximum crack depth and crack tip at the outer surface. The second scheme accounts for the area averaged root mean square stress intensity factor (K RMS ) at deepest and surface points. In order to validate the analytical procedure/results, experiments have been carried out on full scale pipe and pipe welds with part through circumferential crack. Fatigue crack growth life evaluated using both schemes have been compared with experimental results. Use of stress intensity factor (K RMS ) evaluated using second scheme gives better fatigue crack growth life prediction compared to that of first scheme. (author)

  3. Effect of Quenching Media on Mechanical Properties of Medium Carbon Steel 1030

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khansaa Dawood Salman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation aims to study the effect of quenching media (water, oil, Poly Vinyl Chloride PVC on mechanical properties of 1030 steel. The applications of this steel include machinery parts where strength and hardness are requisites. The steel is heated to about 950  and soaked for 1hr in electrical furnace and then quenched in different quenching medium such as water, oil and poly vinyl chloride. After heat treatment by quenching, the specimens are tempered at 250  for 1hr and then cooling in air. The mechanical properties of the specimens are determined by using universal tensile testing machine for tensile test, Vickers hardness apparatus for hardness testing, measuring the grain size of the phases and examine the microstructure of the specimens before and after heat-treatment. The results of this work showed that improving the mechanical properties of medium carbon 1030 steel, which is quenching by water gives the preferred results as the following: Quenching by water leads to increase σy, σu.t.s, K and hardness, but at the same time quenching by water leads to decrease E and n. Also the quenching by water and followed by tempering leads to improve the microstructure and decreasing (refining of the grain size of ferrite and pearlite phases of the steel used in this work.

  4. Electrochemical corrosion response of a low carbon heat treated steel in a NaCl solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, W.R.; Peixoto, L.C.; Garcia, L.R.; Garcia, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    Dual-phase (DP) steels are produced from a specific heat treatment procedure and have recently emerged as a potential class of engineering materials for a number of structural and automobile applications. Such steels have high strength-to-weight ratio and reasonable formability. The present study aims to investigate the effects of four different and conventional heat treatments (i.e., hot rolling, normalizing, annealing, and intercritical annealing) on the resulting microstructural patterns and on the electrochemical corrosion behavior. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel plots were carried out on heat treated steel samples in a 0.5 M NaCl solution at 25 C with neutral pH. An equivalent circuit analysis was also used to provide quantitative support for the discussions. The normalizing and the annealing heat treatments have provided the highest and the lowest corrosion resistances, respectively. The intercritical annealing and as-received (hot rolled) low carbon steel samples have shown similar corrosion behavior. Although a deleterious effect on the corrosion resistance has been verified for DP steel due to the residual stress from the martensite formation, it combines good mechanical properties with intermediate electrochemical corrosion resistance. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Analyses of quenching process during turn-off of plasma electrolytic carburizing on carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jie; Liu, Run; Xue, Wenbin; Wang, Bin; Jin, Xiaoyue; Du, Jiancheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Cooling rate of carburized steel at the end of PEC treatment is measured. • The quench hardening in the fast or slow turn-off mode hardly takes place. • Decrease of the surface roughness during slow turn-off process is found. • A slow turn-off mode is recommended to replace the conventional turn-off mode. - Abstract: Plasma electrolytic carburizing (PEC) under different turn-off modes was employed to fabricate a hardening layer on carbon steel in glycerol solution without stirring at 380 V for 3 min. The quenching process in fast turn-off mode or slow turn-off mode of power supply was discussed. The temperature in the interior of steel and electron temperature in plasma discharge envelope during the quenching process were evaluated. It was found that the cooling rates of PEC samples in both turn-off modes were below 20 °C/s, because the vapor film boiling around the steel sample reduced the cooling rate greatly in terms of Leidenfrost effect. Thus the quench hardening hardly took place, though the slow turn-off mode slightly decreased the surface roughness of PEC steel. At the end of PEC treatment, the fast turn-off mode used widely at present cannot enhance the surface hardness by quench hardening, and the slow turn-off mode was recommended in order to protect the electronic devices against a large current surge

  6. Cavitation erosion resistance of diamond-like carbon coating on stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Feng; Jiang, Shuyun, E-mail: jiangshy@seu.edu.cn

    2014-02-15

    Two diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are prepared on stainless steel 304 by cathodic arc plasma deposition technology at different substrate bias voltages and arc currents (−200 V/80 A, labeled DLC-1, and −100 V/60 A, labeled DLC-2). Cavitation tests are performed by using a rotating-disk test rig to explore the cavitation erosion resistance of the DLC coating. The mass losses, surface morphologies, chemical compositions and the phase constituents of the specimens after cavitation tests are examined by using digital balance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicate that the DLC-2 coatings can elongate the incubation period of stainless steel, leading to an excellent cavitation erosion resistance as compared to the untreated stainless steel specimens. After duration of 100 h cavitation test, serious damaged surfaces and plenty of scratches can be observed on the surfaces of the stainless steel specimens, while only a few grooves and tiny pits are observed on the DLC-2 coatings. It is concluded that, decreasing micro defects and increasing adhesion can reduce the delamination of DLC coating, and the erosion continues in the stainless steel substrate after DLC coating failure, and the eroded surface of the substrate is subjected to the combined action from cavitation erosion and slurry erosion.

  7. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Austempered Medium-Carbon Spring Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Hoon; Kim, Kwan-Ho; Bae, Chul-Min; Lee, Jae Sang; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2018-03-01

    Changes in microstructure and mechanical properties of medium-carbon spring steel during austempering were investigated. After austempering for 1 h at 290 °C or 330 °C, the bainite transformation stabilized austenite, and microstructure consisting of bainitic ferrite and austenite could be obtained after final cooling; the retained austenite fraction was smaller in the alloy austempered at 290 °C because carbon redistribution between bainitic ferrite and austenite slowed as the temperature decreased, and thereby gave persistent driving force for the bainite transformation. The products of tensile strength and reduction of area in the austempered alloy were much larger in the austempered steel than in quenched and tempered alloy, mainly because of significant increase in reduction of area in austempered alloy.

  8. Application of laser-produced-plasmas to determination of carbon content in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, M.; Aragon, C.; Aguilera, J.A.; Campos, J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an analytical method to determine carbon content in solid and molten steel. It is based on the study of the emission spectrum from a Nd-YAG laser produced plasma. The light emitted from the plasma is focused to the entrance slit of a spectrometer and detected by an OMA III system. For every laser pulse an spectral range of 100 A are recorded. With the use of time-resolved spectroscopy a precision of 1.6% and a detection limit of 65 ppm of carbon content in steel have been obtained. These values are similar to those of other accurate conventional techniques but using optics fiber and laser excitation it is possible to made sample calibrations in hostile environments. Also, as the analysis are made in real time changes in sample composition can be measured without stopping production processes. (Author) 26 refs

  9. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, N.R.; Blackwood, D.J.; Werme, L.

    2001-07-01

    In Sweden, high level radioactive waste will be disposed of in a canister with a copper outer and a cast iron or carbon steel inner. If the iron insert comes into contact with anoxic geological water, anaerobic corrosion leading to the generation of hydrogen will occur. This paper presents a study of the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial Swedish granitic groundwaters. Electrochemical methods and gas collection techniques were used to assess the mechanisms and rates of corrosion and the associated hydrogen gas production over a range of conditions. The corrosion rate is high initially but is anodically limited by the slow formation of a duplex magnetite film. The effects of key environmental parameters such as temperature and ionic strength on the anaerobic corrosion rate are discussed

  10. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Steel: Effect of Formation Temperature and pH of the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Vivekanand; Kain, Vivekanand

    2017-11-01

    The nature of surface oxide formed on carbon steel piping used in nuclear power plants affects flow-accelerated corrosion. In this investigation, carbon steel specimens were oxidized in an autoclave using demineralized water at various temperatures (150-300 °C) and at pH levels (neutral, 9.5). At low temperatures ( 240 °C) as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical impedance measurement followed by Mott-Schottky analysis indicated an increase in defect density with exposure duration at 150 °C at neutral pH but a low and stable defect density in alkaline environment. The defect density of the oxide formed at neutral pH at 150-300 °C was always higher than that formed in alkaline environment as reported in the literature.

  11. Influence Voltage Pulse Electrical Discharge In The Water at the Endurance Fatigue Of Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Vakulenko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Effect of pulses of electrical discharge in the water at the magnitude of the limited endurance under cyclic loading thermally hardened carbon steel was investigated. Observed increase stamina during cyclic loading a corresponding increase in the number of accumulated dislocations on the fracture surface. Using the equation of Cofino-Manson has revealed a decrease of strain loading cycle after treatment discharges. For field-cycle fatigue as a result of processing the voltage pulses carbon steel structure improvement, followed by growth of limited endurance decrease per cycle of deformation. With increasing amplitude of the voltage loop gain stamina effect on metal processing voltage pulses is reduced. The results can be used to extend the life of parts that are subject to cyclic loading.

  12. The study of the corrosion protection of the low-carbon steel using film-products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiancului, L.; Millet, Jean-Pierre

    2001-01-01

    The paper reports studies on the efficiency of the film-inhibitors that covered low-carbon steel placed in a humid medium, and also, the optimization of the working conditions to improve the resistance to corrosion. The analyzes were done in the Industrial Physical - Chemical Laboratories of INSA - Lyon by electrochemical stationary techniques. The experimental device was a potentiometer of type EGG PAR (Princeton Applied Research). It was connected with a computer and three potential electrodes introduced in a cell with NaCl 30 g/l solution to acquire the data and to process the information. The film-products used were organic hydrosoluble polymers with diphosphonic 'heads' that permit a very good absorption at the metallic surface. This research is used to protect the installations of low-carbon steel against the atmospheric and high temperature corrosion. (authors)

  13. Depositing Nickel-based Hardfacing to Join Carbon Steel and Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Fernández-Columbié

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation is to determine the micro-structural behavior of a joint between cast iron and carbon steel by depositing a nickel-based substrate in the carbon steel. The filler was added through Shielded Metal Arc Welding using Castec 3099 (UTP 8 electrodes while the base materials were joined through Gas Tungsten Arc Welding with ER 70S – A1 bare electrodes. The Schaeffler diagram was used to analyze the chemical composition of the resulting weld beads. The results of the analysis performed on the welded area and the heat influence zone indicated the formation of acicular structures near the welded line when Castec 3099 electrodes are used and the formation of skeletal ferrite on the heat influence zone during the application of this welding process. An austenitic mixture is formed when ER 70S – A1 electrodes are used.

  14. A novel imidazoline derivative as corrosion inhibitor for P110 carbon steel in hydrochloric acid environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel imidazoline derivative, 2-methyl-4-phenyl-1-tosyl-4, 5-dihydro-1H-imidazole (IMI, was prepared and investigated as corrosion inhibitor for P110 carbon steel in 1.0 M HCl solution by weight loss measurements, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS tests. The inhibition efficiency increased with the rising concentration of IMI inhibitor. The test results and fitting data indicated that the IMI behaved as a mixed-type inhibitor and obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was carried out to investigate the surface of carbon steel specimens, showing great protection from aggressive solution. Finally, inhibition mechanism of IMI on metal surface was further discussed.

  15. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial groundwaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, N.R. [AEA Technology plc, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom); Blackwood, D.J. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Werme, L. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    In Sweden, high level radioactive waste will be disposed of in a canister with a copper outer and a cast iron or carbon steel inner. If the iron insert comes into contact with anoxic geological water, anaerobic corrosion leading to the generation of hydrogen will occur. This paper presents a study of the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial Swedish granitic groundwaters. Electrochemical methods and gas collection techniques were used to assess the mechanisms and rates of corrosion and the associated hydrogen gas production over a range of conditions. The corrosion rate is high initially but is anodically limited by the slow formation of a duplex magnetite film. The effects of key environmental parameters such as temperature and ionic strength on the anaerobic corrosion rate are discussed.

  16. Effect of soil compositions on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated soil solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T.M. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University (China); Luo, S.X. [Department of Chemistry, Zunyi Normal College, Zunyi (China); Sun, C. [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Wu, Y.H.

    2010-04-15

    In this study, effect of cations, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and anions, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -} on electrochemical corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated soil solution was investigated through potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results indicate that the Ca{sup 2+}and Mg{sup 2+} can decrease the corrosion current density of carbon steel in simulated soil solution, and K{sup +}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, and NO{sub 3}{sup -} can increase the corrosion density. All the above ions in the simulated soil solution can decrease its resistivity, but they have different effect on the charge transfer resistivity. This finding can be useful in evaluating the corrosivity of certain soil through chemical analysis, and provide data for construction engineers. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Detection of wall thinning of carbon steel pipe covered with insulation using Pulsed Eddy Current technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Duckgun; Kishore, M. B.; Lee, D. H.

    2013-01-01

    The test sample is a ferromagnetic carbon steel pipe having different thickness, covered with a 10 cm plastic insulation laminated by 0.4 mm Al plate to simulate the pipelines in NPPs. The PEC Probe used for the wall thinning detection consists of an excitation coil and a Hall sensor. The excitation coils in the probe is driven by a rectangular bipolar current pulse and the Hall-sensor will detects the resultant field. The Hall sensor output is considered as PEC signal. Results shows that the PEC system can detect wall thinning in an insulated pipeline of the NPPs. Local wall thinning in pipelines affects the structural integrity of industries like nuclear power plants (NPPs). In the present study a pulsed eddy current (PEC) technology to detect the wall thing of carbon steel pipe covered with insulation is developed

  18. Passive film growth on carbon steel and its nanoscale features at various passivating potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuan; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Imaged the topography of passivated steel at various film-forming potentials. • Characterized the nanoscale features of passive films. • Determined the composition of passive films formed at various potentials. - Abstract: In this work, the passivation and topographic sub-structure of passive films on a carbon steel in a carbonate/bicarbonate solution was characterized by electrochemical measurements, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. When passivating at a potential near the active-passive transition, the film contains the mixture of Fe_3O_4, Fe_2O_3 and FeOOH, with numerous nanoscale features. As the film-forming potential shifts positively, the passive film becomes more compact and the nanoscale features disappear. When the film is formed at a passive potential where the oxygen evolution is enabled, the content of FeOOH in the film increases, resulting in an amorphous topography and reduced corrosion resistance.

  19. Application of laser-produced-plasmas to determination of carbon content in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, M.; Aragon, C.; Aguilera, J. A.; Campos, J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an analytical method to determine carbon content in solid and molten steel. It is based on the study of the emission spectrum from a Nd-YAG laser produced plasma. The light emitted from the plasma is focused to the entrance slit of a spectrometer and detected by an OMA III system. For every laser pulse an spectral range of 100 A are recorded. With the use of time-resolved spectroscopy a precision of 1.6 % and a detection limit of 65 ppm of carbon content in steel have been obtained. These values are similar to those of other accurate conventional techniques but using optics fiber and laser excitation it is possible to made sample calibrations in hostile environments. Also, as the analysis are made in real time changes in sample composition can be measured without stopping production processes. (Author) 26 refs

  20. Corrosion inhibition efficiency of linear alkyl benzene derivatives for carbon steel pipelines in 1M HCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Al-Sabagh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Linear alkyl benzene sulfonic acid (L and three of its ester derivatives (L1, L2, L3 were prepared, followed by quaternization of these esters (L1Q, L2Q, L3Q. The corrosion inhibition effect on carbon steel in 1 M HCl was studied using weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The adsorption of the inhibitors on carbon steel surface obeyed the Langmuir’s adsorption isotherm. The associated activation energy of corrosion and other thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy (ΔH∗, entropy (ΔS∗ of activation, adsorption–desorption equilibrium constant (Kads, standard free energy of adsorption (ΔGoads, heat (ΔHoads, and entropy of adsorption (ΔSoads were calculated to elaborate the corrosion inhibition mechanism.

  1. Pitting corrosion of 304 stainless steel in an activated carbon filter

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, J.I.; Martins, C.M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Water leakages of an orange color were found in the cross welding zone and barrel of an activated carbon filter used in a wastewater treatment plant. The analysis of the chloride content in the plant flowsheet showed that the equipment was subjected to unsuited chloride concentration for 304 stainless steel resistance to pitting corrosion. The inside shows holes distributed randomly from about 20 cm above the welding zone to the lower outlet port of the equipment. The rehabilitation of the eq...

  2. Corrosion resistance and characterization of metallic coatings deposited by thermal spray on carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sá Brito, V.R.S.; Bastos, I.N.; Costa, H.R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Five combinations of metallic coatings and intermediate bonds were deposited on carbon steels. ► High strength was reached in adhesion tests. ► Epoxy sealing of coatings improves corrosion resistance. -- Abstract: Carbon steels are not resistant to corrosion and several methods are used in surface engineering to protect them from aggressive environments such as marine. The main objective of this work is the evaluation of mechanical and metallurgical properties of five metallic coatings produced by thermal spray on carbon steel. Five chemical compositions were tested in order to give a large panel of possibility. Coatings were characterized by several methods to result in a screening of their performance. At first, the assessment of microstructural morphology by optical microscopy (OM) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was made. OM and SEM results showed uniformity of deposited layer, low amount of oxides and porosity. The physical properties of coatings were also evaluated by microhardness measurement, adhesion and porosity quantification. The corrosion resistance was analyzed in salt spray and electrochemical polarization tests. In the polarization test, as well as in the salt spray, all sealed conditions presented low corrosion. A new intermediate 78.3Ni20Cr1.4Si0.3Fe alloy was studied in order to reduce pores and microcracks that are frequently found in ordinary 95Ni5Al alloy. Based on the performed characterizations, the findings suggested that the FeCrCo deposition, with an epoxy sealing, is suitable to be used as an efficient coating of carbon steel in aggressive marine environments.

  3. Elastic-plastic fracture analysis of carbon steel piping using the latest CEGB R6 approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, S.; Hasegawa, K.; Shimizu, T.; Kobayashi, H.

    1991-01-01

    The elastic-plastic fracture of carbon steel piping having various pipe diameters and circumferential crack angles and subjected to a bending moment is analyzed using the latest United Kingdom Central Electricity Generating Board R6 approach. The elastic-plastic fracture criterion must be applied instead of the plastic collapse criterion with increase of the pipe diameter and the crack angle. A simplified elastic-plastic fracture analysis procedure based on the R6 approach is proposed. (author)

  4. CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance of carbon steel in relation with microstructure changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa, Nathalie, E-mail: nochoa@usb.ve [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad Simón Bolívar, Aptdo., 89000, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Vega, Carlos [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad Simón Bolívar, Aptdo., 89000, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Pébère, Nadine; Lacaze, Jacques [Université de Toulouse, CIRIMAT, UPS/INPT/CNRS, ENSIACET, 4 Allée Emile Monso, CS 44362, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Brito, Joaquín L. [Laboratorio de Físico-química de Superficies, Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas (IVIC), Carretera Panamericana, Km 11, Altos de Pipe, Estado Miranda (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The microstructural effects on the corrosion resistance of an API 5L X42 carbon steel in 0.5 M NaCl solution saturated with CO{sub 2} was investigated. Four microstructures were considered: banded (B), normalized (N), quenched and tempered (Q&T), and annealed (A). Electrochemical measurements (polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) were coupled with surface analyses (scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) to characterize the formation of the corrosion product layers. Electrochemical results revealed that corrosion resistance increased in the following order: B < N < Q&T < A. From the polarization curves it was shown that specifically, cathodic current densities were affected by microstructural changes. SEM images indicated that ferrite dissolved earlier than cementite and a thin layer of corrosion products was deposited on the steel surface. XPS analyses revealed that this layer was composed of a mixture of iron carbonate and non-dissolved cementite. It was also found that the quantity of FeCO{sub 3} content on the steel surface was greater for Q&T and A microstructures. These results, in agreement with the electrochemical data, indicate that the deposition mechanism of iron carbonate is closely related to the morphology of the non-dissolved cementite, determining the protective properties of the corrosion product layers. - Highlights: • The effect of change in microstructure on CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance was evaluated. • An API 5LX 42 carbon steel was immersed in a 0.5 M NaCl solution saturated with CO{sub 2}. • Banded, normalized, quenched-tempered and annealed microstructures were considered. • Electrochemical measurements were coupled with surface analysis. • Morphology and distribution of undissolved Fe{sub 3}C control corrosion kinetics.

  5. Effect of Boron on the Hot Ductility of Resulfurized Low-Carbon Free-Cutting Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-tao; Chen, Wei-qing

    2015-09-01

    The hot ductility of resulfurized low-carbon free-cutting steel with boron additives is studied in the temperature range 850 - 1200°C with the help of a Gleeble-1500 thermomechanical simulator. The introduction of boron increases hot ductility, especially at 900 - 1050°C. In the single-phase austenitic region, this effect is caused by segregation of boron over grain boundaries, acceleration of dynamic recrystallization, and solid-solution softening of deformed austenite.

  6. Evaluation of carbon diffusion in heat treatment of H13 tool steel under different atmospheric conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezani, Maziar; Pasang, Timotius; Chen, Zhan; Neitzert, Thomas; Au, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Although the cost of the heat treatment process is only a minor portion of the total production cost, it is arguably the most important and crucial stage on the determination of material quality. In the study of the carbon diffusion in H13 steel during austenitization, a series of heat treatment experiments had been conducted under different atmospheric conditions and length of treatment. Four austenitization atmospheric conditions were studied, i.e., heat treatment without atmospheric contro...

  7. Effects of various treatments on the serviceability of water-immersed carbon-steel ball bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wensel, R.G.

    1977-06-01

    Carbon-steel ball bearings employing various coatings, surface treatments, lubricants and ball and separator materials were tested under conditions simulating those in the NPD/Bruce type fuelling machine heads. The effects of the treatments on operating torques and wear and corrosion rates were studied. Sealed bearings lubricated with Dow FS 3451 (a fluorosilicone grease) gave the best performance in terms of these parameters. (author)

  8. Validating predictions of evolving porosity and permeability in carbonate reservoir rocks exposed to CO2-brine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. M.; Hao, Y.; Carroll, S.

    2017-12-01

    Improving our ability to better forecast the extent and impact of changes in porosity and permeability due to CO2-brine-carbonate reservoir interactions should lower uncertainty in long-term geologic CO2 storage capacity estimates. We have developed a continuum-scale reactive transport model that simulates spatial and temporal changes to porosity, permeability, mineralogy, and fluid composition within carbonate rocks exposed to CO2 and brine at storage reservoir conditions. The model relies on two primary parameters to simulate brine-CO2-carbonate mineral reaction: kinetic rate constant(s), kmineral, for carbonate dissolution; and an exponential parameter, n, relating porosity change to resulting permeability. Experimental data collected from fifteen core-flooding experiments conducted on samples from the Weyburn (Saskatchewan, Canada) and Arbuckle (Kansas, USA) carbonate reservoirs were used to calibrate the reactive-transport model and constrain the useful range of k and n values. Here we present the results of our current efforts to validate this model and the use of these parameter values, by comparing predictions of extent and location of dissolution and the evolution of fluid permeability against our results from new core-flood experiments conducted on samples from the Duperow Formation (Montana, USA). Agreement between model predictions and experimental data increase our confidence that these parameter ranges need not be considered site-specific but may be applied (within reason) at various locations and reservoirs. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Study of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solehudin, Agus, E-mail: asolehudin@upi.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering Education, Indonesia University of Education (UPI), Bandung, West Java (Indonesia); Nurdin, Isdiriayani [Department of Chemical Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, West Java (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Corrosion and inhibition studies on API 5LX65 carbon steel in chloride solution containing various concentrations of benzotriazole has been conducted at temperature of 70°C using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Corroded carbon steel surface with and without inhibitor have been observed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The objectives of this research are to study the performance of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors. The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H{sub 2}S at different BTAH concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of BTAH concentrations from 0 to 10 mmol/l. The inhibition efficiency of BTAH was found to be affected by its concentration. The optimum efficiency obtained of BTAH is 93% at concentration of 5 mmol/l. The result of XRD and EDS analysis reveal the iron sulfide (FeS) formation on corroded carbon steel surface without inhibitor. The EDS spectrum show the Nitrogen (N) bond on carbon steel surface inhibited by BTAH.

  10. Study of the influence of surface carbon on the tribological properties of ion-treated steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyagoub, Abdenacer; Faussemagne, Arielle

    1999-01-01

    Samples of 100Cr6 steel were treated by different ion beams in order to study the evolution of their tribological properties. A strong correlation was found between the amount of surface carbon, whatever its origin (contamination, direct C implantation or ion-beam mixing of a deposited carbon layer), and the reduction of the friction coefficient as well as the improvement of the wear resistance. These results are discussed in the framework of a recent statistical model founded on the asperity concept and describing the tribological behaviour of bilayer systems

  11. Structural and tribological properties of carbon steels modified by plasma pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartowska, B.; Walis, L.; Piekoszewski, J.; Senatorski, J.; Stanislawski, J.; Nowicki, L.; Ratajczak, R.; Barlak, M.; Kopcewicz, M.; Kalinowska, J.; Prokert, F.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon steels with different concentration of carbon and heat (Armco-iron, steels 20, 45, 65 and N9) were treated according to the standard procedures: they were irradiated with five intense (about 5 J/cm 2 ), short (μs range) argon or nitrogen plasma pulses generated in a rod plasma injector (RPI) type of plasma generator. Samples were characterized by the following methods: nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) 14 N(d,α) 12 C , scanning electron microscopy (SEM), conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS), X-ray diffraction analysis (GXRD), and Amsler wear tests. SEM observations shown that the morphology of the pulse treated samples, both argon and nitrogen plasma are identical. It has been found, that nitrogen is much more efficient than argon in ausenitization of carbon steel. The craters and droplets are uniformly distributed over the surface, which is typical of melted and rapidly recrystallized top layers. The thickness of the modified layers is in the range of 1.2-1.6 μm

  12. Preliminary study on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in Horonobe groundwater environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Kogawa, Noritaka; Maeda, Kazuto

    2006-08-01

    It is necessary to understand the corrosion behavior of candidate overpack materials to plan the in-situ engineered barrier test at underground laboratory constructing at Horonobe and to design the overpacks suitable to Horonobe environment. The preliminary corrosion tests of carbon steel which is a candidate material for overpacks were carried out using artificial groundwater and actual groundwater sampled at Horonobe. As the results of anodic polarization experiments, the anodic polarization curves of carbon steel in buffer material were active dissolution type, and the corrosion type of carbon steel in Horonobe groundwater environment was expected to be general corrosion. The results of immersion test under air equilibrium condition showed that the degrees of corrosion localization were not exceeded the data obtained in previous studies. The trend of corrosion rates in buffer material under anaerobic condition were similar to the data obtained in previous studies. Based on the experimental results, it was confirmed that the corrosion assessment model and assumed corrosion rate in second progress report (H12 report) can be applied to the assessment for Horonobe groundwater condition. (author)

  13. Effect of carbonate in slightly alkaline medium on the corrosion of maraging steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellanger, G.

    1994-01-01

    This study was carried out to ascertain the behavior of maraging steel identified as AMS. 65-12 and used in the tanks of the French plant for the reprocessing of radioactive water. This water has a pH of 9 and contains carbonate ions. The rest or corrosion potentials can be in the transpassive or active region due to radiolytic species. Therefore, the behavior of maraging steel was studied in these two regions. In the neighborhood of the active-passive transition potentials, maraging steel is corroded by means of intermediates. The corrosion potential does not change with carbonate at a constant pH. With carbonate and a low scan rate, the breakdown transpassive potentials are displaced towards more positive potentials and the passive potential region is broader, while at a high scan rate these potentials are displaced towards more negative values. After the beginning of the reverse scan, the current is again positive. These suggest that the corrosion kinetics are not the same. The diffusion coefficient of species inside the oxide layer was determined. ((orig.))

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of internal crack healing in a low carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Ruishan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ma, Qingxian, E-mail: maqxdme@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Weiqi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-04-26

    The behavior of internal crack healing in a low carbon steel at elevated temperatures was investigated. The internal cracks were introduced into low carbon steel samples via the drilling and compression method. The microstructure of crack healing zone was observed using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of crack healing zone at room temperature were tested. The results show that there are two mechanisms of crack healing in the low carbon steel. Crack healing is caused by atomic diffusion at lower temperatures, and mainly depends on recrystallization and grain growth at higher temperatures. The microstructural evolution of crack healing zone can be divided into four stages, and the fracture morphology of crack healing zone can be classified into five stages. At the initial healing stage, the fracture exhibits brittle or low ductile dimple fracture. The ultimate fracture mode is dimple and quasi-cleavage mixed fracture. Fine grain microstructures improve the ultimate tensile strength of crack healing zone, which is even higher than that of the matrix. The strength recovery rate is higher than that of the plasticity.

  15. Effect of cloric acid concentration on corrosion behavior of Ni/Cr coated on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desiati, Resetiana Dwi; Sugiarti, Eni; Thosin, K. A. Zaini

    2018-05-01

    Corrosion is one of the causes of metal degradation. Carbon steel (Fe) is easy to corrode in the extreme environment. Coating on carbon steel is required to improve corrosion resistance owing to protection or hindrance to extreme environmental conditions. In this present work, carbon steel was coated by electroplating techniques for nickel and pack cementation for chrome. The corrosion rate test was performed by Weight Loss method on FeNiCr, FeNi, FeCr and uncoated Fe as comparator which was dyed in 37% HCl and 25% HCl which had previously been measured dimension and mass. The immersion test result of FeNiCr and FeNi specimen were better than FeCr and uncoated Fe in terms of increasing corrosion resistance. The corrosion rate for 56 hours in 37% HCl for FeNiCr was 1.592 mm/y and FeNi was 3.208 mm/y, FeCr only lasted within 32 hours with corrosion rate was 6.494 mm/y. Surface of the sample after the corrosion test there was pitting, crevice corrosion and alloy cracking caused by chloride. The higher the concentration of HCl the faster the corrosion rate.

  16. Corrosion behavior of carbon steel for overpack in groundwater containing bicarbonate ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Toshiyasu; Dong, Junpha

    2009-01-01

    Carbon steel is considered in Japan the candidate material for overpacks in high-level radioactive waste disposal. Effects of bicarbonate solutions on the corrosion behavior and corrosion products of carbon steel were investigated by electrochemical measurements, FT-IR and XRD analyses. The anodic polarization measurements showed that bicarbonate ions (HCO 3 - ) accelerated the anodic dissolution and the outer layer film formation of carbon steel in the case of high concentrations, on the other hand, it inhibited these processes in the case of low concentrations. The FT-IR and XRD analyses of the anodized film showed that siderite (FeCO 3 ) was formed in 0.5 to 1.0 mol/L bicarbonate solution, and Fe 2 (OH) 2 CO 3 in 0.1 to 0.2 mol/L bicarbonate solution, while Fe 6 (OH) 12 CO 3 was formed in 0.02 to 0.05 mol/L bicarbonate solutions. The stability of these corrosion products was able to be explained by using the actual potential-pH diagrams for the Fe-H 2 O-CO 2 system. (author)

  17. Adsorption study of CO and H2O on carbon materials, Ni and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, S.

    1991-01-01

    Adsorption of CO and water vapor on single crystalline graphite, diamond and an amorphous carbon film at room temperature was investigated by low energy ion scattering (ISS) and compared with stainless steel and nickel surfaces. Even for a CO exposure up to 10 4 L, the C intensity stayed constant and no O peak appeared in the ISS spectra from graphite while Ni and O intensities from Ni surface changed strikingly. Intensities of FE and O signals from stainless steel seriously decrease and increase with increasing exposure of H 2 O, respectively, but did not reach saturation even at an exposure of 10 3 L. On the other hand, C and O intensities from carbon surfaces changed moderately to reach saturation at an exposure of some 100 L. These results indicate that CO and H 2 O do not adsorb significantly on carbon surfaces in contrast to nickel and stainless steel surfaces. As a by-product survival probabilities of scattered He + ions from graphite for the primary energy of 0.6-2 keV were measured to be in a range of 10 -4 to 10 -2 and the survival parameter was deduced to be 5.0 x 10 7 cm s -1 . (author)

  18. Study of the pyritized surfaces of the carbon steel components in heavy water production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radulescu, Maria; Parvan, Ioana; Lucan, Dumitra; Fulger, Manuela; Dinu, Alice; Blanatui, A.

    1998-01-01

    The components used in the Girldler Sulfide (GS) process of heavy water production are made of carbon steel covered by iron sulfide layers of different compositions (mackinawite, troilite, pyrrhotite or pyrite) of variable thicknesses. The most protective layers which provide an acceptable corrosion resistance of the subjacent metal are the mixtures of pyrrhotite and pyrite. In the present work, the corrosion resistance of carbon steel samples covered by different types of sulfides was investigated by the following methods: X ray diffraction, metallography and electrochemical methods (potential-dynamical and electrochemical impedance). In order to carry out the electrochemical measurements in the same conditions as those of the operation of carbon steel components in D 2 O production facilities, the experiments were performed with Na 2 S solutions, at pH=4 - 13 and S 2- concentration value between 1 and 1000 mg/l. The dependence of corrosion rate kinetics on pH and S 2- concentration of the testing solution was investigated for sulfide covered samples comparatively with the uncovered ones. Corrosion rates determined gravimetrically were compared with those determined by electrochemical measurements. The uniformity and thickness of the sulfide layers were checked by metallographic methods. The composition of the sulfides formed in various environment conditions was established by X-ray diffraction. Reaction mechanisms specific for sulfide formation environments have been proposed. (authors)

  19. Effect of Rice Straw Extract and Alkali Lignin on the Corrosion Inhibition of Carbon Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabiahtul Zulkafli; Norinsan Kamil Othman; Irman Abdul Rahman; Azman Jalar

    2014-01-01

    A paddy residue based corrosion inhibitor was prepared by treating finely powdered rice straw with aqueous ethanol under acid catalyst (0.01 M H 2 SO 4 ). Commercial alkali lignin was obtained from Sigma-Aldrich. Prior to the corrosion test, the extraction yield and alkali lignin was characterized via FTIR to determine the functional group. The effect of paddy residue extract and commercial alkali lignin on the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 1 M HCl was investigated through the weight loss method, potentiodynamic polarization technique and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The corrosion inhibition efficiency of the extract and alkali lignin at different immersion times (3 h, 24 h and 42 h) was evaluated. The results show that the paddy waste extract exhibited lesser weight loss of carbon steel in the acidic medium in comparison to the commercial alkali lignin, suggesting that the paddy residue extract is more effective than the commercial alkali lignin in terms of its corrosion inhibition properties. The results obtained proves that the extract from paddy residue could serve as an effective inhibitor for carbon steel in acidic mediums. (author)

  20. The effect of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. as manganese oxidizing bacterium on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Moradi-Haghighi, M.; Zarrini, G.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of manganese oxidizing bacterium (MOB), namely Pseudoxanthomonas sp. on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. This bacterium was isolated from sewage treatment plants and identified by biochemical and molecular methods. The electrochemical techniques such as open circuit potentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic and cyclic polarization were used to measure the corrosion rate and observe the corrosion mechanism. Also, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies were applied to surface analysis. This study revealed the strong adhesion of the biofilm on the metal surface in the presence of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. that enhanced the corrosion of carbon steel. X-ray diffraction patterns identified a high content of MnO 2 deposition within these biofilms. This is the first report that discloses the involvement of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. as manganese oxidizing bacteria on the corrosion of carbon steel. - Highlights: ► A new type of manganese oxidizing bacteria, namely Pseudoxanthomonas sp. was indicated. ► This bacterium can create a biofilm on the part of metal surface and affect localized corrosion. ► In the presence of biofilm, the diffusion of oxygen vacancies and manganese ions has occurred.