WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon stainless steel

  1. Ultrasonic inspection for circumferential butt joint of austenitic stainless steel with carbon steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Shengyun; Xiong Lasen

    2006-01-01

    Tthe practical application of ultrasonic wave inspection in welded joint by austenitic stainless steel with carbon steel is presented. It is shown from the experimental results that the high frequency narrow-pulsed longitudinal ultrasonic wave inspection technique can detect the defects in deferent sound path and location within the tested welded joint clearly and exactly. The study in the paper may provide a new approach for further application of ultrasonic inspection in coarse-grained materials.

  2. Heat exchange performance of stainless steel and carbon foams modified with carbon nano fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuzovskaya, I.; Pacheco Benito, S.; Chinthaginjala, J.K.; Reed, C.P.; Lefferts, L.; Meer, van der T.H.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNF), with fishbone and parallel wall structures, were grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on the surface of carbon foam and stainless steel foam, in order to improve their heat exchange performance. Enhancement in heat transfer efficiency between 30% and 75% was achieved

  3. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    KAUST Repository

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien

    2014-06-01

    In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Optimization of Friction Welding Process Parameters for Joining Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel%Optimization of Friction Welding Process Parameters for Joining Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R Paventhan; P R Lakshminarayanan; V Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    Friction weIding is a solid state joining process used extensively currently owing to its advantages such as low heat input, high production efficiency, ease of manufacture, and environment friendliness. Materials difficult to be welded by fusion welding processes can be successfully welded by friction welding. An attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the tensile strength of friction welded AISI 1040 grade medium carbon steel and AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel, incorporating the process parameters such as friction pressure, forging pressure, friction time and forging time, which have great influence on strength of the joints. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the friction welding process parameters to attain maximum tensile strength of the joint. The maximum tensile strength of 543 MPa could be obtained for the joints fabricated under the welding conditions of friction pressure of 90 MPa, forging pressure of 90 MPa, friction time of 6 s and forging time of 6 s.

  5. Numerical simulation and experimental investigation of laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouie Esfahani, M. R.; Coupland, J.; Marimuthu, S.

    2015-07-01

    This study reports an experimental and numerical investigation on controlling the microstructure and brittle phase formation during laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel to austenitic stainless steel. The significance of alloying composition and cooling rate were experimentally investigated. The investigation revealed that above a certain specific point energy the material within the melt pool is well mixed and the laser beam position can be used to control the mechanical properties of the joint. The heat-affected zone within the high-carbon steel has significantly higher hardness than the weld area, which severely undermines the weld quality. A sequentially coupled thermo-metallurgical model was developed to investigate various heat-treatment methodology and subsequently control the microstructure of the HAZ. Strategies to control the composition leading to dramatic changes in hardness, microstructure and service performance of the dissimilar laser welded fusion zone are discussed.

  6. Effect of carbon dioxide and temperature on passive film parametersof superduplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emandro Vieira da Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Superduplex stainless steel has been frequently employed in new sites of Brazilian Pre-Salt. In these environments, chloride concentration, temperature and carbon dioxide are normally present in higher levels than those at sea water at room temperature. In these conditions, it is expected that the passive films of stainless steel also show modifications. To better understand such modifications, samples of superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750 were submitted to electrochemical impedance measurements in brine media, at two temperatures and under presence/absence of carbon dioxide. The electrochemical impedance results were initially tested using the Kramers-Kronig transform and subsequently fitted by equivalent circuit employing constant phase elements - CPE. Moreover, to quantify the effect of each factor (temperature, chloride, carbon dioxide and microstructure on the equivalent circuit, their parameters were tested applying statistical analysis. Significant effect of carbon dioxide and temperature was found on related parameters of passive film for heat-treated samples.

  7. Stress and Composition of Carbon Stabilized Expanded Austenite on Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Low-temperature gaseous carburizing of stainless steel is associated with a colossal supersaturation of the fcc lattice with carbon, without the development of carbides. This article addresses the simultaneous determination of stress and composition profiles in layers of carbon xpanded austenite...

  8. Corrosion of stainless and carbon steels in molten mixtures of industrial nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Prairie, M.R.; Chavez, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Corrosion behavior of two stainless steels and carbon steel in mixtures of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} was evaluated to determine if impurities found in commodity grades of alkali nitrates aggravate corrosivity as applicable to an advanced solar thermal energy system. Corrosion tests were conducted for 7000 hours with Types 304 and 316 stainless steels at 570C and A36 carbon steel at 316C in seven mixtures of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} containing variations in impurity concentrations. Corrosion tests were also conducted in a ternary mixture of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, and Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Corrosion rates were determined by descaled weight losses while oxidation products were examined by scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The nitrate mixtures were periodically analyzed for changes in impurity concentrations and for soluble corrosion products.

  9. Cavitation erosion resistance of diamond-like carbon coating on stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Feng; Jiang, Shuyun, E-mail: jiangshy@seu.edu.cn

    2014-02-15

    Two diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are prepared on stainless steel 304 by cathodic arc plasma deposition technology at different substrate bias voltages and arc currents (−200 V/80 A, labeled DLC-1, and −100 V/60 A, labeled DLC-2). Cavitation tests are performed by using a rotating-disk test rig to explore the cavitation erosion resistance of the DLC coating. The mass losses, surface morphologies, chemical compositions and the phase constituents of the specimens after cavitation tests are examined by using digital balance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicate that the DLC-2 coatings can elongate the incubation period of stainless steel, leading to an excellent cavitation erosion resistance as compared to the untreated stainless steel specimens. After duration of 100 h cavitation test, serious damaged surfaces and plenty of scratches can be observed on the surfaces of the stainless steel specimens, while only a few grooves and tiny pits are observed on the DLC-2 coatings. It is concluded that, decreasing micro defects and increasing adhesion can reduce the delamination of DLC coating, and the erosion continues in the stainless steel substrate after DLC coating failure, and the eroded surface of the substrate is subjected to the combined action from cavitation erosion and slurry erosion.

  10. Advanced manufacturing technologies of large martensitic stainless steel castings with ultra low carbon and high cleanliness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Yanchun

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The key manufacturing technologies associated with composition, microstructure, mechanical properties, casting quality and key process control for large martensitic stainless steel castings are involved in this paper. The achievements fully satisfied the technical requirements of the large 700 MW stainless steel hydraulic turbine runner for the Three Gorges Hydropower Station, and become the major technical support for the design and manufacture of the largest 700 MW hydraulic turbine generator unit in the world developed through our own efforts. The characteristics of a new high yield to tensile strength (Rp0.2/Rm ratio and high obdurability martensitic stainless steel with ultra low carbon and high cleanliness are also described. Over the next ten years, the large martensitic stainless steel castings and advanced manufacturing technologies will see a huge demand in clean energy industry such as nuclear power, hydraulic power at home and abroad. Therefore, the new high yield o tensile strength (Rp0.2/Rm ratio and high obdurability martensitic stainless steel materials, the fast and flexible manufacturing technologies of large size castings, and new environment friendly sustainable process will face new challenges and opportunities.

  11. Cavitation erosion resistance of diamond-like carbon coating on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Feng; Jiang, Shuyun

    2014-02-01

    Two diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are prepared on stainless steel 304 by cathodic arc plasma deposition technology at different substrate bias voltages and arc currents (-200 V/80 A, labeled DLC-1, and -100 V/60 A, labeled DLC-2). Cavitation tests are performed by using a rotating-disk test rig to explore the cavitation erosion resistance of the DLC coating. The mass losses, surface morphologies, chemical compositions and the phase constituents of the specimens after cavitation tests are examined by using digital balance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicate that the DLC-2 coatings can elongate the incubation period of stainless steel, leading to an excellent cavitation erosion resistance as compared to the untreated stainless steel specimens. After duration of 100 h cavitation test, serious damaged surfaces and plenty of scratches can be observed on the surfaces of the stainless steel specimens, while only a few grooves and tiny pits are observed on the DLC-2 coatings. It is concluded that, decreasing micro defects and increasing adhesion can reduce the delamination of DLC coating, and the erosion continues in the stainless steel substrate after DLC coating failure, and the eroded surface of the substrate is subjected to the combined action from cavitation erosion and slurry erosion.

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Dissimilar Friction Stir Weld between Austenitic Stainless Steel and Low Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Jafarzadegan; A.Abdollah-zadeh; A.H.Feng; T.Saeid; J.Shen; H.Assadi

    2013-01-01

    Dissimilar fusion welding of austenitic stainless steels to carbon steels has some metallurgical and technical problems.It was suggested that the solid-state nature of friction stir welding (FSW) can overcome these problems and produce a sound weld with reliable mechanical properties.In this study,plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by FSW at tool rotational speed of 600 r/min and welding speed of 50 mm/min.In the stir zone (SZ) of 304 stainless steel,the results showed a refined grain structure with some features of metadynamic recrystallization.In the SZ of st37 steel,the hot deformation of material in the austenite region produced small austenite grains.These grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite by cooling the material after FSW.The production of fine grains increased the hardness and tensile strength in the SZ of both sides with respect to their base metals (BMs).

  13. Three Heavy Reflector Experiments in the IPEN/MB-01 Reactor: Stainless Steel, Carbon Steel, and Nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, A.; de Andrade e Silva, G. S.; Mura, L. F.; Fuga, R.; Jerez, R.; Mendonça, A. G.

    2014-04-01

    The heavy reflector experiments performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility comprise a set of critical configurations employing the standard 28×26-fuel-rod configuration. The heavy reflector, either Stainless Steel, Carbon Steel or Nickel plates, was placed at the west face of this reactor. 32 plates around 3.0 mm thick were used in all the experiments. The aim was to provide high quality experimental data for the interpretation and validation of the SS-304 heavy reflector calculation methods. The experiments of Carbon Steel, which is composed mainly of iron, and Nickel were performed to provide a consistent and an interpretative check to the SS-304 reflector measurements. The experimental data comprise a set of critical control bank positions, temperatures and reactivities as a function of the number of the plates. The competition between the effect of thermal neutron capture in the heavy reflector and the effect of fast neutrons back scattering to the core is highlighted by varying the reflector thickness. For the Carbon Steel case the reactivity gain when all the 32 plates are inserted is the smallest one, thus demonstrating that Carbon Steel or essentially iron does not have the same reflector properties as the Stainless Steel or Nickel plates do. Nickel has the highest reactivity gain, thus demonstrating that this material is better reflector than Iron and Stainless Steel. The theoretical analysis was performed by MCNP-5 with the nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0. It was shown that this library has a very good performance up to thirteen plates and overestimates the reactivity for higher number of plates independently of the type of the reflector.

  14. Effect of Stress Relief Annealing on Microstructure & Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints Between Low Alloy Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivas, R.; Das, G.; Das, S. K.; Mahato, B.; Kumar, S.; Sivaprasad, K.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Two types of welded joints were prepared using low alloy carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel as base materials. In one variety, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 82. In another type, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 182. In case of Inconel 82, method of welding was GTAW. For Inconel 182, welding was done by SMAW technique. For one set of each joints after buttering, stress relief annealing was done at 923 K (650 °C) for 90 minutes before further joining with weld metal. Microstructural investigation and sub-size in situ tensile testing in scanning electron microscope were carried out for buttered-welded and buttered-stress relieved-welded specimens. Adjacent to fusion boundary, heat-affected zone of low alloy steel consisted of ferrite-pearlite phase combination. Immediately after fusion boundary in low alloy steel side, there was increase in matrix grain size. Same trend was observed in the region of austenitic stainless steel that was close to fusion boundary between weld metal-stainless steel. Close to interface between low alloy steel-buttering material, the region contained martensite, Type-I boundary and Type-II boundary. Peak hardness was obtained close to fusion boundary between low alloy steel and buttering material. In this respect, a minimum hardness was observed within buttering material. The peak hardness was shifted toward buttering material after stress relief annealing. During tensile testing no deformation occurred within low alloy steel and failure was completely through buttering material. Crack initiated near fusion boundary between low alloy steel-buttering material for welded specimens and the same shifted away from fusion boundary for stress relieved annealed specimens. This observation was at par with the characteristics of microhardness profile. In as welded condition, joints fabricated with Inconel 82 exhibited superior bond strength than the weld produced with Inconel 182. Stress relief annealing

  15. Fatigue life of stainless steel 304 enhancement by addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Rizwanulhaque; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Cunshan [Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China); Sabir, M. Iqbal [Xiao Zhang County, Tianjin (China)

    2015-01-15

    Stainless steel is among the most widely used industrial materials. In particular, stainless steel 304 (304SS) is the most used material grade. To increase the utilization of any industrial material, its fatigue life should be optimized. In this work, the fatigue life of 304SS was enhanced by the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Moreover, the incorporation of a small amount of MWCNTs increased the fatigue life of 304SS. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the suppression of fatigue crack growth rate was caused by CNT deposition at the crack tip. CNTs were entangled with each other, thereby resulting in finer grain size. The XRD diffractograms of the 304SS treated area peak showed that the microstructure consisted of austenite and carbon.

  16. The possibility of tribopair lifetime extending by welding of quenched and tempered stainless steel with quenched and tempered carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marušić

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the conditions of tribocorrosion wear, extending of parts lifetime could be achieved by using stainless steel,which is hardened to sufficiently high hardness. In the tribosystem bolt/ bushing shell/link plate of the bucket elevator transporter conveyor machine, the previously quenched and tempered martensitic stainless steel for bolts is hardened at ≈47 HRC and welded with the quenched and tempered high yield carbon steel for bolts. Additional material, based on Cr-Ni-Mo (18/8/6 is used. The microstructure and hardness of welded samples are tested. On the tensile tester, resistance of the welded joint is tested with a simulated experiment. Dimensional control of worn tribosystem elements was performed after six months of service.

  17. Growth of carbon nanotubes and microfibers over stainless steel mesh by cracking of methane

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The ${La}_{2}{NiO}_{4}$ film was synthesized on the 304 stainless steel (SS) mesh. The hydrogen reduction of La2NiO4 generated homogeneous nanocatalyst particles (probably ${Ni}/{La}_2{O}_{3}$) over which methane was cracked, producing carbon notubes/microfibers and hydrogen. The carbon nanotubes/microfibers were strongly bonded to the SS mesh. It was observed that the methane conversion always reached its maximum at the cracking temperature of 750 °C regardless of its concentration varying f...

  18. Pyrolytic carbon-coated stainless steel felt as a high-performance anode for bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Hidalgo, Diana; Tommasi, Tonia; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-07-01

    Scale up of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) requires highly conductive, biocompatible and stable electrodes. Here we present pyrolytic carbon-coated stainless steel felt (C-SS felt) as a high-performance and scalable anode. The electrode is created by generating a carbon layer on stainless steel felt (SS felt) via a multi-step deposition process involving α-d-glucose impregnation, caramelization, and pyrolysis. Physicochemical characterizations of the surface elucidate that a thin (20±5μm) and homogenous layer of polycrystalline graphitic carbon was obtained on SS felt surface after modification. The carbon coating significantly increases the biocompatibility, enabling robust electroactive biofilm formation. The C-SS felt electrodes reach current densities (jmax) of 3.65±0.14mA/cm(2) within 7days of operation, which is 11 times higher than plain SS felt electrodes (0.30±0.04mA/cm(2)). The excellent biocompatibility, high specific surface area, high conductivity, good mechanical strength, and low cost make C-SS felt a promising electrode for BESs.

  19. Effect of Carbon and Nitrogen Content on Deformation and Fracture of AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Menapace

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of small differences in the content of carbon and nitrogen on the room temperature tensile deformation and fracture behaviour of an AISI 304 stainless steel was studied. In the steel containing the lower amount of carbon and nitrogen, a higher amount of strain induced alfa’ martensite is formed, which increases strain hardening rate and both uniform and total elongation at fracture. The presence of large martensitic areas in the cross section causes strain localization at the austenite/martensite interface, which promotes the nucleation of cracks and their propagation along the interface. This results in a decrease of Ultimate Tensile Strength. Strain induced transformation slightly reduces strain rate sensitivity, as well.

  20. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  1. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Investigation of Carbon Stabilized Expanded Austenite and Carbides in Stainless Steel AISI 316

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny;

    2011-01-01

    Low temperature carburized AISI 316 stainless steel - carbon expanded austenite - was investigated with EXAFS and synchrotron diffraction together with synthesized carbides of the type M3C2, M7C3 and M23C6. It was found that the chemical environment of carbon expanded austenite is not associated ...

  2. Image analysis of corrosion pit initiation on ASTM type A240 stainless steel and ASTM type A 1008 carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nine, H. M. Zulker

    The adversity of metallic corrosion is of growing concern to industrial engineers and scientists. Corrosion attacks metal surface and causes structural as well as direct and indirect economic losses. Multiple corrosion monitoring tools are available although those are time-consuming and costly. Due to the availability of image capturing devices in today's world, image based corrosion control technique is a unique innovation. By setting up stainless steel SS 304 and low carbon steel QD 1008 panels in distilled water, half-saturated sodium chloride and saturated sodium chloride solutions and subsequent RGB image analysis in Matlab, in this research, a simple and cost-effective corrosion measurement tool has identified and investigated. Additionally, the open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results have been compared with RGB analysis to gratify the corrosion. Additionally, to understand the importance of ambiguity in crisis communication, the communication process between Union Carbide and Indian Government regarding the Bhopal incident in 1984 was analyzed.

  3. Pyrolysis-catalysis of waste plastic using a nickel-stainless-steel mesh catalyst for high-value carbon products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yeshui; Nahil, Mohamad A; Wu, Chunfei; Williams, Paul T

    2017-02-03

    A stainless-steel mesh loaded with nickel catalyst was produced and used for the pyrolysis-catalysis of waste high-density polyethylene with the aim of producing high-value carbon products, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The catalysis temperature and plastic-to-catalyst ratio were investigated to determine the influence on the formation of different types of carbon deposited on the nickel-stainless-steel mesh catalyst. Increasing temperature from 700 to 900°C resulted in an increase in the carbon deposited on the nickel-loaded stainless-steel mesh catalyst from 32.5 to 38.0 wt%. The increase in sample-to-catalyst ratio reduced the amount of carbon deposited on the mesh catalyst in terms of g carbon g(-1) plastic. The carbons were found to be largely composed of filamentous carbons, with negligible disordered (amorphous) carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of the filamentous carbons revealed them to be composed of a large proportion (estimated at ∼40%) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The optimum process conditions for CNT production, in terms of yield and graphitic nature, determined by Raman spectroscopy, was catalysis temperature of 800°C and plastic-to-catalyst ratio of 1:2, where a mass of 334 mg of filamentous/MWCNTs g(-1) plastic was produced.

  4. Prevention of burn-on defect on surface of hydroturbine blade casting of ultra-low-carbon refining stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ling

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The burn-on sand is common surface defect encountered in CO2-cured silicate-bonded sand casting of hydroturbine blade of ultra-low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, its feature, causes and prevention measures are presented in this paper. Experiments showed that the burn-on defect is caused by oxidization of chromium in the molten steel at high temperature and can be effectively eliminated by using chromium-corundum coating.

  5. Prevention of burn-on defect on surface of hydroturbine blade casting of ultra-low-carbon refining stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ling; Xie Huasheng; Huang Danzhong; Li Hankun; Tan Rui; Zhou Jingyi

    2008-01-01

    The burn-on sand is common surface defect encountered in CO2-cured silicate-bonded sand casting of hydroturbine blade of ultra-low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, its feature, causes and prevention measures are presented in this paper. Experiments showed that the bum-on defect is caused by oxidization of chromium in the molten steel at high temperature and can be effectively eliminated by using chromium-corundum coating.

  6. Microhardness tests of stainless steel 52100 implanted with nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    Mardanian, M; Taheri, Z

    2003-01-01

    In this research work, samples of stainless steel 52100 disks were implanted with nitrogen and carbon dioxide ions at the energy of 90 keV. Microhardness measurement were performed to determine the hardness of the surface. The N-2 sup + implanted steels at the doses of 1x10 sup 1 8 ions cm sup sub 2 gave the highest hardness of 49.70%, while for the CO sub 2 sup + ions implantation, the hardness of 17% and 5% were obtained at the doses of 3x10 sup 1 8 and 1x10 sup 1 9 ions cm sup - 2, respectively. To support the interpretation of our microhardness results the implanted surface were analyzed by the use of XRD method. Our results indicated that the hardness of the N sub 2 sup + implanted samples are due to formation of beta-Cr N phase in the surface layer, while in the CO sub 2 + implanted samples no observation of carbon as graphite or carbide was made. In addition, the absence of any hump in the XRD spectrum indicating that carbon is not in the amorphous phase either.

  7. Rigidity and retention of carbon fibre versus stainless steel root canal posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purton, D G; Love, R M

    1996-07-01

    Two of the main requirements of a root canal post are that it is rigid so as to resist flexing under functional load, and that it is well retained in the root. This study compared these properties in two different 1-mm diameter root canal posts--smooth carbon fibre posts (Endopost) and serrated stainless steel posts (Parapost). Ten posts of each type were tested for rigidity in a three-point bend test. Ten posts of each type were cemented with resin cement into the roots of endodontically treated, extracted teeth. The tensile force required to remove the posts was recorded. The Paraposts proved to be significantly more rigid under load (P canals.

  8. Estimation on gas generation and corrosion rates of carbon steel, stainless steel and zircaloy in alkaline solutions under low oxygen condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihara, Morihiro; Honda, Akira [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Nishimura, Tsutomu; Wada, Ryutaro [Kobe Steel Ltd., Engineering Company, Energy and Nuclear System Center, Osaka (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Hydrogen gas generated by corrosion of metals in TRU waste repository may degrade the function of the engineered barrier system for nuclide migration. Therefore, estimation of gas generation rates of metals under the repository condition is important. In this study, we obtained gas generation rates of carbon steel, stainless steel and zircaloy in alkaline solutions under low oxygen conditions and evaluated the corrosion rates based on these data in order to compare with the published data. The magnitude of corrosion rates of carbon steel, stainless steel and zircaloy were 10{sup -1} {mu}m/y, 10{sup -2} {mu}m/y and 10{sup -3} {mu}m/y, respectively. These values agreed with the published corrosion rates from gas generation rates by others. (author)

  9. A comparative study of graphene-coated stainless steel fiber felt and carbon cloth as anodes in MFCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Junxian; Liu, Zhongliang; Li, Yanxia; Yang, Siqi; Zhou, Yu

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the stainless steel-based materials and their potential in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) anode application. Herein, AISI 316L stainless steel fiber felts (SSFFs) were used as anodes in MFCs and their performance was compared with the carbon cloth anode MFCs. The experimental results showed that the unmodified carbon cloth (CC) anode had a better performance than the unmodified SSFF anode. However, after coating a thin layer of graphene (GN) on SSFF and CC, the power density of the MFC equipped with the modified SSFF was 2,143 mW m(-2), much higher than that of the graphene-modified CC-MFC which was only 1,018 mW m(-2). The experimental results proved that the use of durable metallic backbones combined with a thin layer of carbon nanoparticles offers exciting opportunities in the advancement of MFC anode design.

  10. Decontamination and decarburization of stainless and carbon steel by melt refining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizia, R.E.; Worcester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Webber, D.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A.

    1996-09-05

    With many nuclear reactors and facilities being decommissioned in the next ten to twenty years the concern for handling and storing Radioactive Scrap Metal (RSM) is growing. Upon direction of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Lockheed Idaho Technology Company (LITCO) is developing technologies for the conditioning of spent fuels and high-level wastes for interim storage and repository acceptance, including the recycling of Radioactive Scrap Metals (RSM) for beneficial reuse with the DOE complex. In February 1993, Montana Tech of the University of Montana was contracted to develop and demonstrate technologies for the decontamination of stainless steel RSM. The general objectives of the Montana Tech research program included conducting a literature survey, performing laboratory scale melt refining experiments to optimize decontaminating slag compositions, performing an analysis of preferred melting techniques, coordinating pilot scale and commercial scale demonstrations, and producing sufficient quantities of surrogate-containing material for all of the laboratory, pilot and commercial scale test programs. Later on, the program was expanded to include decontamination of carbon steel RSM. Each research program has been completed, and results are presented in this report.

  11. Improved field emission properties of carbon nanotubes grown on stainless steel substrate and its application in ionization gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Detian; Cheng, Yongjun; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Huzhong; Dong, Changkun; Li, Da

    2016-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique on different substrates. Microstructures and field emission characteristics of the as-grown CNT arrays were investigated systematically, and its application in ionization gauge was also evaluated preliminarily. The results indicate that the as-grown CNT arrays are vertically well-aligned relating to the substrate surfaces, but the CNTs grown on stainless steel substrate are longer and more crystalline than the ones grown on silicon wafer substrate. The field emission behaviors of the as-grown CNT arrays are strongly dependent upon substrate properties. Namely, the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate has better field emission properties, including lower turn on and threshold fields, better emission stability and repeatability, compared with the one grown on silicon wafer substrate. The superior field emission properties of the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate are mainly attributed to low contact resistance, high thermal conductivity, good adhesion strength, etc. In addition, the metrological behaviors of ionization gauge with the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate as an electron source were investigated, and this novel cathode ionization gauge extends the lower limit of linear pressure measurement to 10-8 Pa, which is one order of magnitude lower than the result reported for the same of gauge with CNT cathode.

  12. Advances in the research of nitrogen containing stainless steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The current status of nitrogen containing stainless steels at home and aboard has been introduced. The function and existing forms of nitrogen in the stainless steels, influence of nitrogen on mechanical properties and anti-corrosion properties as well as the application of nitrogen containing cast stainless steels were discussed in this paper. It is clear that nitrogen will be a potential and important alloying element in stainless steels. And Argon Oxygen Decarbonization (AOD) refining can provide an advanced manufacture process for nitrogen containing stainless steels with ultra-low- carbon and high cleanliness.

  13. Erosion and Corrosion of Mild Steel and Stainless Steel in Sodium Carbonate/Bicarbonate Solution Bearing Alumina Particle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Qing-long; LIANG Hong-da

    2004-01-01

    With a rotating cylinder electrode apparatus, the polarization behaviors of the mild steel and the stainless steel 0Cr18Ni9 in NaHCO3 (0.5 M)+Na2CO3 (0.5 M) solution with and without erodent particles were investigated and compared. The results show that the rotation speed of cylinder hardly affects the polarization behavior of sample in solution without particles but exerts a great influence on that with particles. Increasing rotation speed, the free corrosion potential shifts to positive direction and the oxygen limiting current density increases. Both the mild steel and stainless steel 0Cr18Ni9 experience a significant increase of the mass loss by increasing erosion, and erosive wear was dominated by severe micro-plowing. The insufficient mechanical strength of both materials leads to a low resistance to particle removal. Increasing peripheral velocities of the rotating cylinder enhances the corrosion rate of the mild steel. The stainless steel 0Cr18Ni9, due to a high erosive wear, also suffers from similar erosion-corrosion damage, despite that its corrosion resistance is much higher than that of the mild steel.

  14. Effect of reactor temperature on direct growth of carbon nanomaterials on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edzatty, A. N.; Syazwan, S. M.; Norzilah, A. H.; Jamaludin, S. B.

    2016-07-01

    Currently, carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) are widely used for various applications due to their extraordinary electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. In this work, CNMs were directly grown on the stainless steel (SS316) via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Acetone was used as a carbon source and argon was used as carrier gas, to transport the acetone vapor into the reactor when the reaction occurred. Different reactor temperature such as 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900 °C were used to study their effect on CNMs growth. The growth time and argon flow rate were fixed at 30 minutes and 200 ml/min, respectively. Characterization of the morphology of the SS316 surface after CNMs growth using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) showed that the diameter of grown-CNMs increased with the reactor temperature. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) was used to analyze the chemical composition of the SS316 before and after CNMs growth, where the results showed that reduction of catalyst elements such as iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) at high temperature (700 - 900 °C). Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis showed that the nano-sized hills were in the range from 21 to 80 nm. The best reactor temperature to produce CNMs was at 800 °C.

  15. Structural, electronic and photovoltaic characterization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown directly on stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Camilli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have taken advantage of the native surface roughness and the iron content of AISI-316 stainless steel to grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by chemical vapour deposition without the addition of an external catalyst. The structural and electronic properties of the synthesized carbon nanostructures have been investigated by a range of electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The results show the good quality and the high graphitization degree of the synthesized MWCNTs. Through energy-loss spectroscopy we found that the electronic properties of these nanostructures are markedly different from those of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG. Notably, a broadening of the π-plasmon peak in the case of MWCNTs is evident. In addition, a photocurrent was measured when MWCNTs were airbrushed onto a silicon substrate. External quantum efficiency (EQE and photocurrent values were reported both in planar and in top-down geometry of the device. Marked differences in the line shapes and intensities were found for the two configurations, suggesting that two different mechanisms of photocurrent generation and charge collection are in operation. From this comparison, we are able to conclude that the silicon substrate plays an important role in the production of electron–hole pairs.

  16. Carbon/PEEK composite materials as an alternative for stainless steel/titanium hip prosthesis: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Farshid; Hassani, Kamran; Solhjoei, Nosratollah; Karimi, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) has been ranked within the most typical surgical processes in the world. The durability of the prosthesis and loosening of prosthesis are the main concerns that mostly reported after THR surgeries. In THR, the femoral prosthesis can be fixed by either cement or cementless methods in the patient's bones. In both procedures, the stability of the prosthesis in the hosted bone has a key asset in its long-term durability and performance. This study aimed to execute a comparative finite element simulation to assess the load transfer between the prosthesis, which is made of carbon/PEEK composite and stainless steel/titanium, and the femur bone. The mechanical behavior of the cortical bone was assumed as a linear transverse isotropic while the spongy bone was modeled like a linear isotropic material. The implants were made of stainless steel (316L) and titanium alloy as they are common materials for implants. The results showed that the carbon/PEEK composites provide a flatter load transfer from the upper body to the leg compared to the stainless steel/titanium prosthesis. Furthermore, the results showed that the von Mises stress, principal stress, and the strain in the carbon/PEEK composites prosthesis were significantly lower than that made of the stainless steel/titanium. The results also imply that the carbon/PEEK composites can be applied to introduce a new optimum design for femoral prosthesis with adjustable stiffness, which can decrease the stress shielding and interface stress. These findings will help clinicians and biomedical experts to increase their knowledge about the hip replacement.

  17. Carbon diffusion and phase transformations during gas carburizing of high-alloyed stainless steels: Experimental study and theoretical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, T.; Dulcy, J.; Gantois, M.

    2005-10-01

    Gas carburizing of high-alloyed stainless steels increases surface hardness, as well as the overall mechanical characteristics of the surface. The growth of chromium-rich carbides during carbon transfer into the steel causes precipitation hardening in the surface, but decreases the chromium content in solid solution. In order to maintain a good corrosion resistance in the carburized layer, the stainless steel composition and the carburizing process need to be optimized. To limit the experimental work, a methodology using software for modeling the thermodynamic and kinetic properties in order to simulate carbon diffusion and phase transformations during gas carburizing is presented. Thermodynamic calculations are initially used to find the optimum parameters ( T, carbon wt pct, etc.) in order to maintain the highest Cr and Mo contents in the austenitic solid solution. In a second step, kinetic calculations using the diffusion-controlled transformations (DICTRA) software are used to predict how the amount of the different phases varies and how the carbon profile in the steel changes as a function of time during the process. Experimental carbon profiles were determined using a wavelength-dispersive spectrometer for electron-probe microanalysis (WDS-EPMA), while carbide compositions were measured by energy-dispersive spectroscopy_X (EDS_X) analyses. A good agreement between calculated and experimental values was observed for the Fe-13Cr-5Co-3Ni-2Mo-0.07C and the Fe-12Cr-2Ni-2Mo-0.12C (wt pct) martensitic stainless steels at 955 °C and 980 °C.

  18. CASE-HARDENING OF STAINLESS STEEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    The invention relates to case-hardening of a stainless steel article by means of gas including carbon and/or nitrogen, whereby carbon and/or nitrogen atoms diffuse through the surface into the article. The method includes activating the surface of the article, applying a top layer on the activated...

  19. Investigation on carbon dioxide corrosion behaviour of HP13Cr110 stainless steel in simulated stratum water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, L.J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)], E-mail: mulijunxjtu@126.com; Zhao, W.Z. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2010-01-15

    The carbon dioxide corrosion behaviour of HP13Cr110 stainless steel in simulated stratum water is studied by potentiodynamic curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS); the micro-structure and composition of the corrosion scale formed at high-temperature and high-pressure are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that 13Cr stainless steel is in passive state in the stratum water, the passive current density increases and the passive potential region decreases with increasing temperature. The corrosion scale formed at high-temperature and high-pressure is mainly composed of iron/chromium oxides and a little amount of FeCO{sub 3}.

  20. Conductive and corrosion behaviors of silver-doped carbon-coated stainless steel as PEMFC bipolar plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Liu; Hong-feng Xu; Jie Fu; Ying Tian

    2016-01-01

    Ni–Cr enrichment on stainless steel SS316L resulting from chemical activation enabled the deposition of carbon by spraying a stable suspension of carbon nanoparticles; trace Ag was depositedin situ to prepare a thin continuous Ag-doped carbon film on a porous carbon-coated SS316L substrate. The corrosion resistance of this film in 0.5 mol·L−1 H2SO4 solution containing 5 ppm F− at 80°C was inves-tigated using polarization tests. The results showed that the surface treatment of the SS316L strongly affected the adhesion of the carbon coating to the stainless steel. Compared to the bare SS316L, the Ag-doped carbon-coated SS316L bipolar plate was remarkably more stable in both the anode and cathode environments of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and the interface contact resistance between the specimen and Toray 060 carbon paper was reduced from 333.0 mΩ·cm2 to 21.6 mΩ·cm2 at a compaction pressure of 1.2 MPa.

  1. Measurement of contact angle between stainless steel surface and carbon dioxide by pendant drop method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI NianQiang; GUO KaiHua; LIU Jie; LI TingXun

    2008-01-01

    To measure contact angle between CO2 and solid surface,in this study a visual high-pressure vessel has been developed,with a corresponding well-controlled constant temperature system.Pendant drop method is applied to the investigation of the contact angles of CO2 on a stainless steel surface in its own vapor.The image of the pendant drop is recorded by a camera,and a B-Snake method is used to analyze the contour and the contact angle of the droplet.The experimental results have provided a set of well tested data,which show that CO2 has good infiltration into stainless steel surface and the de-veloped method can be used as a standard testing one for measuring the contact angle between high-pressure liquid and solid surface.

  2. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot...

  3. Inhibition of calcium carbonate deposition on stainless steel using olive leaf extract as a green inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidoud, Roumaissa; Kahoul, Abdelkrim; Naamoune, Farid

    2017-01-01

    The antiscale properties of the aqueous extract of olive (Olea europaea L.) leaves as a natural scale inhibitor for stainless steel surface in Hammam raw water were investigated using chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques in conjunction with a microscopic examination. The X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that the scale deposited over the pipe walls consists of pure CaCO3 calcite. The CA, in accordance with electrochemical impedance spectra and scanning electron microscopy, shows that the inhibition efficiency increases with increasing extract concentration. This efficiency is considerably reduced as the temperature is increased.

  4. Stainless steel mesh supported nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers for binder-free cathode in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuiliang; Chen, Yu; He, Guanghua; He, Shuijian; Schröder, Uwe; Hou, Haoqing

    2012-04-15

    In this communication, we report a binder-free oxygen reduction cathode for microbial fuel cells. The binder-free cathode is prepared by growth of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (NCNFs) on stainless steel mesh (SSM) via simple pyrolysis of pyridine. The interaction force between NCNFs and SSM surface is very strong which is able to tolerate water flush. The NCNFs/SSM cathode shows high and stable electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction, which is comparable to that of Pt/SSM and ferricyanide cathode. This study proposes a promising low-cost binder-free cathode for microbial fuel cells.

  5. High Nitrogen Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    Kiev, 1993. 7. High Nitrogen Steels, edited by M. Kikuchi and Y. Mishima , Vol. 36, No. 7, Iron and Steel Institute of Japan Inernational, Tokyo...the Corrosion of Iron and Steels,” High Nitrogen Steels, edited by M. Kikuchi and Y. Mishima , Vol. 36, No. 7, Iron and Steel Institute of Japan

  6. Development of a radio frequency atmospheric pressure plasma jet for diamond-like carbon coatings on stainless steel substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohbatzadeh, F.; Samadi, O.; Siadati, S. N.; Etaati, G. R.; Asadi, E.; Safari, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet with capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge was developed for diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on stainless steel substrates. The plasma jet was generated by argon-methane mixture and its physical parameters were investigated. Relation between the plasma jet length and width of the powered electrode was discussed. Optical and electrical characteristics were studied by optical emission spectroscopy, voltage and current probes, respectively. The evolutions of various species like ArI, C2 and CH along the jet axis were investigated. Electron temperature and density were estimated by Boltzmann plot method and Saha-Boltzmann equation, respectively. Finally, a diamond-like carbon coating was deposited on stainless steel-304 substrates by the atmospheric pressure radio frequency plasma jet in ambient air. Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy and Vickers hardness test were used to study the deposited films. The length of the jet was increased by increasing the width of the powered electrode. The estimated electron temperature and density were 1.43 eV and 1.39 × 1015 cm-3, respectively. Averaged Vicker's hardness of the coated sample was three times greater than that of the substrate. The SEM images of the deposited thin films revealed a 4.5 μm DLC coated for 20 min.

  7. Precipitation behavior of carbides in high-carbon martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qin-tian; Li, Jing; Shi, Cheng-bin; Yu, Wen-tao; Shi, Chang-min [University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy; Li, Ji-hui [Yang Jiang Shi Ba Zi Group Co., Ltd, Guangdong (China)

    2017-01-15

    A fundamental study on the precipitation behavior of carbides was carried out. Thermo-calc software, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study the precipitation and transformation behaviors of carbides. Carbide precipitation was of a specific order. Primary carbides (M7C3) tended to be generated from liquid steel when the solid fraction reached 84 mol.%. Secondary carbides (M7C3) precipitated from austenite and can hardly transformed into M23C6 carbides with decreasing temperature in air. Primary carbides hardly changed once they were generated, whereas secondary carbides were sensitive to heat treatment and thermal deformation. Carbide precipitation had a certain effect on steel-matrix phase transitions. The segregation ability of carbon in liquid steel was 4.6 times greater that of chromium. A new method for controlling primary carbides is proposed.

  8. Preformed posterior stainless steel crowns: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, T P

    1999-02-01

    For almost 50 years, dentists have used stainless steel crowns for primary and permanent posterior teeth. No other type of restoration offers the convenience, low cost, durability, and reliability of such crowns when interim full-coronal coverage is required. Preformed stainless steel crowns have improved over the years. Better luting cements have been developed and different methods of crown manipulation have evolved. This article reviews stainless steel crown procedures for primary and permanent posterior teeth. Step-by-step placement of a primary molar stainless steel crown is documented and permanent molar stainless steel crown restoration is described. A method for repairing a worn-through crown also is reviewed.

  9. Investigation of the Mechanical Properties of AISI 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel and St 37 Low Carbon Steel Dissimilar Joint by Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Khosrovaninezhad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar joints between AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel and St 37 low carbon steel achieved using friction stir welding technique. The welding was carried out by means of rotational speed of 800 rpm and linear speeds of 50,100,150 mm/min. EDS and XRD techniques were employed in order to determine possible phase transformations. Tensile test, shear punch test and microhardness measurements were conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the joints. The results of phase investigations showed that no carbide and brittle phase were detected at the joint boundary. Also, tensile test results demonstrated that failure occurred in the St 37 base metal. According to the shear punch test, the highest ultimate shear strength and yield shear strength was achieved for the sample welded at rotational speed of 800 rpm and linear speed of 150 mm/min, while this sample showed the least elongation. In addition, the highest microhardness was measured in the stir zone of austenitic stainless steel sample welded in the above mentioned welding condition, which can be attributed to the decrease in grain size caused by recrystallization process.

  10. Characteristics of vacuum sintered stainless steels

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Brytan; L.A. Dobrzański; M. Actis Grande; Rosso, M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study duplex stainless steels were sintered in vacuum. using rapid cooling form the mixture of prealloyed and alloying element powders The purpose of this paper was to describe the obtained microstructures after sintering as well as the main mechanical properties of sintered stainless steels.Design/methodology/approach: In presented work duplex stainless steels were obtained through powder metallurgy starting from austenitic 316L or ferritic 410L prealloyed stainless s...

  11. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  12. Enhanced performance of sulfate reducing bacteria based biocathode using stainless steel mesh on activated carbon fabric electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mohita; Jain, Pratiksha; Varanasi, Jhansi L; Lal, Banwari; Rodríguez, Jorge; Lema, Juan M; Sarma, Priyangshu M

    2013-12-01

    An anoxic biocathode was developed using sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) consortium on activated carbon fabric (ACF) and the effect of stainless steel (SS) mesh as additional current collector was investigated. Improved performance of biocathode was observed with SS mesh leading to nearly five folds increase in power density (from 4.79 to 23.11 mW/m(2)) and threefolds increase in current density (from 75 to 250 mA/m(2)). Enhanced redox currents and lower Tafel slopes observed from cyclic voltammograms of ACF with SS mesh indicated the positive role of uniform electron collecting points. Differential pulse voltammetry technique was employed as an additional tool to assess the redox carriers involved in bioelectrochemical reactions. SRB biocathode was also tested for reduction of volatile fatty acids (VFA) present in the fermentation effluent stream and the results indicated the possibility of integration of this system with anaerobic fermentation for efficient product recovery.

  13. Electrochemical Impedance and Modelling Studies of the Corrosion of Three Commercial Stainless Steels in Molten Carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Ni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion induced by molten carbonates on the metallic structure materials is a problem constraining the life span of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC at elevated temperatures. The reaction between the outgrowing oxide scale and lithium carbonate in the electrolyte is generally a slow process and very important to the passivation behaviour of the underlying steel. The corrosion behaviour of three commercial alloys (P92, SS304, and SS310 with different Cr contents in molten (0.62Li, 0.38K2CO3 at 650°C was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS for 120 hours to investigate the lithiation process. With SEM images and extensive XRD analysis of the oxides, equivalent circuits were proposed to interpret the impedance data and explain the corrosion behaviour of the three alloys at different stage with respect to lithiation process.

  14. Pitting Corrosion Behavior of Stainless Steel 304 in Carbon Dioxide Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guo-min; GUO Xing-peng; ZHENG Jia-shen

    2004-01-01

    The pitting corrosion behavior of stainless steel (SS) 304 in aqueous CO2-H2S-Cl- environment was investigated by potentiodynamic cyclic anodic polarization and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The experimental results show that the pitting corrosion susceptivity of SS 304 increases with the increase of temperature. Chlorine ion is the prerequisite for pitting corrosion of SS 304 in H2S-CO2 environments. There is a linear relationship between the pitting corrosion potential (Eb-100) and chlorine ion concentration, and Eb-100 becomes noble with increasing pH value of the solution with or without H2S. pH value has little effect on the protection potential with the presence of H2S. H2S increases strongly the pitting corrosion susceptivity and deteriorates the pitting corrosion resistance of SS 304 in CO2 environments. The observations by EPMA show that SS 304 in CO2-saturated NaCl solution (3 %) with H2S suffers pitting corrosion accompanied with intergranular corrosion.

  15. New Application of Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jia-long; LI Ying; WANG Fu; ZANG Zheng-gui; LI Si-jun

    2006-01-01

    Several rigid substrates such as stainless steel, titanium alloy, aluminum alloy, nickel foil, silicon, and sodium lime glass have been employed for manufacturing high quality TiO2 films by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The as-deposited TiO2 films have been characterized with SEM/EDX and XRD. The photocatalytic properties were investigated by decomposition of aqueous orangeⅡ. UV-VIS photospectrometer was employed to check the absorption characteristics and photocatalytic degradation activity. The results show that films synthesized on metal substrates display higher photoactivities than that on absolute substrates such as silicon and glass. It is found that solar light is an alternative to UV-light used for illumination during photodegradation of orange Ⅱ. TiO2 film on stainless steel substrate was regarded as the best one for photocatalysis.

  16. Global stainless steel cycle exemplifies China's rise to metal dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Barbara K; Chambon, Marine; Hashimoto, Seiji; Graedel, T E

    2010-05-15

    The use of stainless steel, a metal employed in a wide range of technology applications, has been characterized for 51 countries and the world for the years 2000 and 2005. We find that the global stainless steel flow-into-use increased by more than 30% in that 5 year period, as did additions to in-use stocks. This growth was mainly driven by China, which accounted for almost half of the global growth in stainless steel crude production and which tripled its flow into use between 2000 and 2005. The global stainless steel-specific end-of-life recycling rate increased from 66% (2000) to 70% (2005); the landfilling rate was 22% for both years, and 9% (2000) to 12% (2005) was lost into recycled carbon and alloy steels. Within just 5 years, China passed such traditionally strong stainless steel producers and users as Japan, USA, Germany, and South Korea to become the dominant player of the stainless steel industry. However, China did not produce any significant stainless steel end-of-life flows in 2000 or 2005 because its products-in-use are still too new to require replacements. Major Chinese discard flows are expected to begin between 2015 and 2020.

  17. A comparative study of the mechanical properties and the behavior of carbon and boron in stainless steel cladding tubes fabricated by PM HIP and traditional technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shulga, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    The ring tensile test method was optimized and successfully used to obtain precise data for specimens of the cladding tubes of AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steels and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. The positive modifications in the tensile properties of the stainless steel cladding tube

  18. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  19. Enhancement of Stainless Steel's Mechanical Properties via Carburizing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Alias, S. K.; Abdullah, B.; Hafiz Mohd Bakri, Mohd.; Hafizuddin Jumadin, Muhammad; Mat Shah, Muhammad Amir

    2016-11-01

    Carburizing process is a method to disperse carbon into the steel surface in order to enhance its mechanical properties such as hardness and wear resistance. This paper study investigates the effect of carburizing temperature to the carbon dispersion layer in stainless steel. The standard AISI 304 stainless steel was carburized in two different temperatures which were 900°C and 950°C. The effect of carbon dispersion layers were observed and the results indicated that the increasing value of the average dispersion layer from 1.30 mm to 2.74 mm thickness was found to be related to increment of carburizing holding temperature . The increment of carbon thickness layer also resulted in improvement of hardness and tensile strength of carburized stainless steel.

  20. Evaluation of stainless steels for their resistance to intergranular corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korostelev, A. B.; Abramov, V. Ya.; Belous, V. N.

    1996-10-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are being considered as structural materials for first wall/blanket systems in the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER). The uniform corrosion of stainless steels in water is well known and is not a critical issue limiting its application for the ITER design. The sensitivity of austenitic steels to intergranular corrosion (IGC) can be estimated rather accurately by means of calculation methods, considering structure and chemical composition of steel. There is a maximum permissible carbon content level, at which sensitization of stainless steel is eliminated: K = Cr eff - αC eff, where α-thermodynamic coefficient, Cr eff-effective chromium content (regarding molybdenum influence) and C eff-effective carbon content (taking into account nickel and stabilizing elements). Corrosion tests for 16Cr11Ni3MoTi, 316L and 316LN steel specimens, irradiated up to 2 × 10 22 n/cm 2 fluence have proved the effectiveness of this calculation technique for determination of austenitic steels tendency to IGC. This method is directly applicable in austenitic stainless steel production and enables one to exclude complicated experiments on determination of stainless steel susceptibility to IGC.

  1. Evaluation of stainless steels for their resistance to intergranular corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korostelev, A.B. [Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Abramov, V.Ya. [Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belous, V.N. [Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are being considered as structural materials for first wall/blanket systems in the international thermonuclear reactor (ITER). The uniform corrosion of stainless steels in water is well known and is not a critical issue limiting its application for the ITER design. The sensitivity of austenitic steels to intergranular corrosion (IGC) can be estimated rather accurately by means of calculation methods, considering structure and chemical composition of steel. There is a maximum permissible carbon content level, at which sensitization of stainless steel is eliminated: K=Cr{sub eff}-{alpha}C{sub eff}, where {alpha}-thermodynamic coefficient, Cr{sub eff}-effective chromium content (regarding molybdenum influence) and C{sub eff}-effective carbon content (taking into account nickel and stabilizing elements). Corrosion tests for 16Cr11Ni3MoTi, 316L and 316LN steel specimens, irradiated up to 2 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} fluence have proved the effectiveness of this calculation technique for determination of austenitic steels tendency to IGC. This method is directly applicable in austenitic stainless steel production and enables one to exclude complicated experiments on determination of stainless steel susceptibility to IGC. (orig.).

  2. Brazing of stainless steel; Stainless ko no rozuke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsu, T.

    1996-04-01

    This paper explains brazing of stainless steel as to its processing materials, brazing materials, brazing methods, and brazing works. When performing brazing at higher than 800{degree}C on a martensite-based stainless steel represented by the 13Cr steel, attention is required on cracking caused by quenching. When a ferrite-based stainless steel represented by the 18Cr steel is heated above 900{degree}C, crystalline particles grow coarser, causing their tenacity and corrosion resistance to decline. High-temperature long-time heating in brazing in a furnace demands cautions. Austenite-based stainless steel represented by the 18Cr-8Ni steel has the best brazing performance. However, since the steel has large thermal expansion coefficient and low thermal conductivity, attention is required on strain and deformation due to heating, and on localized overheating. Deposition hardened stainless steel made of the Cr-Ni alloy steel added with aluminum and titanium has poor wettability in a brazing work, hence pretreatment is required for the purpose of activation. 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunwoody, John T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mason, Richard E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freibert, Franz J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Willson, Stephen P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veirs, Douglas K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worl, Laura A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Alonso [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conger, Donald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Long-term storage of excess plutonium is of great concern in the U.S. as well as abroad. The current accepted configuration involves intimate contact between the stored material and an iron-bearing container such as stainless steel. While many safety scenario studies have been conducted and used in the acceptance of stainless steel containers, little information is available on the physical interaction at elevated temperatures between certain forms of stored material and the container itself. The bulk of the safety studies has focused on the ability of a package to keep the primary stainless steel containment below the plutonium-iron eutectic temperature of approximately 410 C. However, the interactions of plutonium metal with stainless steel have been of continuing interest. This paper reports on a scoping study investigating the interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal in a pseudo diffusion couple at temperatures above the eutectic melt-point.

  4. Fatigue strain-life behavior of carbon and low-alloy steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 600 in LWR environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keisler, J.; Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The existing fatigue strain vs. life (S-N) data, foreign and domestic, for carbon and low-alloy steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 600 used in the construction of nuclear power plant components have been compiled and categorized according to material, loading, and environmental conditions. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the effects of the various service conditions on the fatigue life of these materials. The results of a rigorous statistical analysis have been used to estimate the probability of initiating a fatigue crack. Data in the literature were reviewed to evaluate the effects of size, geometry, and surface finish of a component on its fatigue life. The fatigue S-N curves for components have been determined by adjusting the probability distribution curves for smooth test specimens for the effect of mean stress and applying design margins to account for the uncertainties due to component size/geometry and surface finish. The significance of the effect of environment on the current Code design curve and on the proposed interim design curves published in NUREG/CR-5999 is discussed. Estimations of the probability of fatigue cracking in sample components from BWRs and PWRs are presented.

  5. Effect of Copper and Bronze Addition on Corrosion Resistance of Alloyed 316L Stainless Steel Cladded on Plain Carbon Steel by Powder Metallurgy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjue CHEN; Yueying WU; Jianian SHEN

    2004-01-01

    A sandwich structure with cladding alloyed 316L stainless steel on plain carbon steel was prepared by means of powder metallurgy (PM) processing. Electrolytic Cu and prealloyed bronze (95Cu wt pct, 5Sn wt pct) were added in different contents up to 15% into the surface cladded 316L layers and the effect of alloying concentrations on the corrosion resistance of the 316L cladding layers was studied. The corrosion performances of the cladding samples were studied by immersion tests and potentio-dynamic anodic polarization tests in H2SO4 and FeCl3 solutions. Both 316L and alloyed 316L surface layers with 1.0 mm depth produced by PM cladding had an effect to improve corrosion resistance in H2SO4 and FeCl3 solutions. Small Cu and bronze addition (4%) had a positive effect in H2SO4 and FeCl3 solutions. 4% Cu alloyed 316L surface layer produced by PM cladding showed similar anodic polarization behaviour to the 316L cladding layer in H2SO4 and FeCl3 solutions.

  6. Preparation Femtosecond Laser Prevention for the Cold-Worked Stress Corrosion Crackings on Reactor Grade Low Carbon Stainless Steel

    CERN Document Server

    John Minehara, Eisuke

    2004-01-01

    We report here that the femtosecond lasers like low average power Ti:Sapphire lasers, the JAERI high average power free-electron laser and others could peel off and remove two stress corrosion cracking (SCC) origins of the cold-worked and the cracking susceptible material, and residual tensile stress in hardened and stretched surface of low-carbon stainless steel cubic samples for nuclear reactor internals as a proof of principle experiment except for the third origin of corrosive environment. Because a 143 °C and 43% MgCl2 hot solution SCC test was performed for the samples to simulate the cold-worked SCC phenomena of the internals to show no crack at the laser-peered off strip on the cold-worked side and ten-thousands of cracks at the non-peeled off on the same side, it has been successfully demonstrated that the femtosecond lasers could clearly remove the two SCC origins and could resultantly prevent the cold-worked SCC.

  7. A Physically Based Dynamic Recrystallization Model Considering Orientation Effects for a Nitrogen Alloyed Ultralow Carbon Stainless Steel during Hot Forging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan-lin XIE; An HE; Hai-long ZHANG; Gen-qi WANG; Xi-tao WANG

    2016-01-01

    The nitrogen alloyed ultralow carbon stainless steel is a good candidate material for primary loop pipes of AP1000 nuclear power plant.These pipes are manufactured by hot forging,during which dynamic recrystallization acts as the most important microstructural evolution mechanism.A physically based model was proposed to describe and predict the microstructural evolution in the hot forging process of those pipes.In this model,the coupled effects of dislocation density change,dynamic recovery,dynamic recrystallization and grain orientation function were con-sidered.Besides,physically based simulation experiments were conducted on a Gleeble-3500 thermo-mechanical sim-ulator,and the specimens after deformation were observed by optical metallography (OM)and electron back-scat-tered diffraction (EBSD)method.The results confirm that dynamic recrystallization is easy to occur with increasing deformation temperature or strain rate.The grains become much finer after full dynamic recrystallization.The model shows a good agreement with experimental results obtained by OM and EBSD in terms of stress-strain curves,grain size,and recrystallization kinetics.Besides,this model obtains an acceptable accuracy and a wide applying scope for engineering calculation.

  8. Studies of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited on stainless steel substrate with Si/SiC intermediate layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Liu Gui-Chang; Wang Li-Da; Deng Xin-Lü; Xu Jun

    2008-01-01

    In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on stainless steel substrates with Si/SiC intermediate layers by combining plasma enhanced sputtering physical vapour deposition (PEUMS-PVD) and microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MW-ECRPECVD) techniques. The influence of substrate negative self-bias voltage and Si target power on the structure and nano-mechanical behaviour of the DLC films were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, nano-indentation, and the film structural morphology by atomic force microscopy (AFM). With the increase of deposition bias voltage, the G band shifted to higher wave-number and the integrated intensity ratio ID/IG increased. We considered these as evidences for the development of graphitization in the films. As the substrate negative self-bias voltage increased, particle bombardment function was enhanced and thesp3-bond carbon density reducing, resulted in the peak values of hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E). Silicon addition promoted the formation of sp3 bonding and reduced the hardness. The incorporated Si atoms substituted sp2- bond carbon atoms in ring structures, which promoted the formation of sp3-bond. The structural transition from C-C to C-Si bonds resulted in relaxation of the residual stress which led to the decrease of internal stress and hardness. The results of AFM indicated that the films was dense and homogeneous, the roughness of the films was decreased due to the increase of substrate negative self-bias voltage and the Si target power.

  9. Paraequilibrium Carburization of Duplex and Ferritic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michal, G. M.; Gu, X.; Jennings, W. D.; Kahn, H.; Ernst, F.; Heuer, A. H.

    2009-08-01

    AISI 301 and E-BRITE stainless steels were subjected to low-temperature (743 K) carburization experiments using a commercial technology developed for carburization of 316 austenitic stainless steels. The AISI 301 steel contained ~40 vol pct ferrite before carburization but had a fully austenitic hardened case, ~20- μm thick, and a surface carbon concentration of ~8 at. pct after treatment; this “colossal” paraequilibrium carbon supersaturation caused an increase in lattice parameter of ~3 pct. The E-BRITE also developed a hardened case, 12- to 18- μm thick, but underwent a more modest (~0.3 pct) increase in lattice parameter; the surface carbon concentration was ~10 at. pct. While the hardened case on the AISI 301 stainless steel appeared to be single-phase austenite, evidence for carbide formation was apparent in X-ray diffractometer (XRD) scans of the E-BRITE. Paraequilibrium phase diagrams were calculated for both AISI 301 and E-BRITE stainless steels using a CALPHAD compound energy-based interstitial solid solution model. In the low-temperature regime of interest, and based upon measured paraequilibrium carbon solubilities, more negative Cr-carbon interaction parameters for austenite than those in the current CALPHAD data base may be appropriate. A sensitivity analysis involving Cr-carbon interaction parameters for ferrite found a strong dependence of carbon solubility on relatively small changes in the magnitude of these parameters.

  10. The effect of cobalt and carbon the microstructure and mechanical properties of martensitic precipitation strengthened stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolwit, Piyamanee

    increasing with increasing cobalt content for the same condition. Limited observation on the effects of carbon additions to a 12Cr/12Co/5Mo/4.5Ni martensitic precipitation strengthening stainless steel has been made for carbon levels of 0.005 wt. %, 0.025 wt. % and 0.05 wt. %. A small addition of chromium, one weight percent, to a 0.005C/12Co/5Mo/5Ni martensitic precipitation strengthening stainless steel was found to increase hardness, strength, Charpy impact energy, and ductility. Results on the effects of cobalt, carbon and chromium additions helped in the selection of modified alloys which were used to investigate the effects of composition and heat treatment on strength and toughness. The first set of modified alloys are referred to as the low carbon modified alloys. These alloys have a better Charpy impact energy than the alloys used to investigate the effect of cobalt on strength and the hardness and strength of these alloys are similar to those of alloys used to investigate the effects of cobalt on strength. Fractographs of these alloys show quasi-cleavage fracture, the presence of ductile fracture increases with increasing cobalt content. The martensite start temperature is lowered by the chromium additions and results in the existence of retained austenite even after refrigeration after austenitizing. Refrigeration prior to tempering is not necessary for these alloys to achieve a high yield strength and good Charpy impact energy. The second set of modified alloys are referred to as the carbon-titanium modified alloys. These alloys differ from the first set of modified alloys in that these alloys contain small additions of carbon and titanium and have lower cobalt levels. Lower cobalt levels were required because carbon lowers the martensite start temperature. These alloys have improved Charpy impact energy and ductility. The carbon addition lowers the martensite start temperature and the martensite start temperature of these alloys is sufficiently low that they

  11. Preparation of precursor for stainless steel foam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiang-yang; LI Shan-ni; LI Jie; LIU Ye-xiang

    2008-01-01

    The effects of polyurethane sponge pretreatment and slurry compositions on the slurry loading in precursor were discussed, and the,performances of stainless steel foams prepared from precursors with different slurry loadings and different particle sizes of the stainless steel powder were also investigated. The experimental results show that the pretreatment of sponge with alkaline solution is effective to reduce the jam of cells in precursor and ensure the slurry to uniformly distribute in sponge, and it is also an effective method for increasing the slurry loading in precursor; the mass fraction of additive A and solid content in slurry greatly affect the slurry loading in precursor, when they are kept in 9%-13% and 52%-75%, respectively, the stainless steel foam may hold excellent 3D open-cell network structure and uniform muscles; the particle size of the stainless steel powder and the slurry loading in precursor have great effects on the bending strength, apparent density and open porosity of stainless steel foam; when the stainless steel powder with particle size of 44 tan and slurry loading of 0.5 g/cm3 in precursor are used, a stainless steel foam can be obtained, which has open porosity of 81.2%, bending strength of about 51.76 MPa and apparent density of about 1.0 g/cm3.

  12. Binder-free carbon black/stainless steel mesh composite electrode for high-performance anode in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Suqi; Yang, Fangfang; Chen, Shuiliang; Liu, Lang; Xiong, Qi; Yu, Ting; Zhao, Feng; Schröder, Uwe; Hou, Haoqing

    2015-06-01

    Carbon black/stainless steel mesh (CB/SSM) composite electrodes were developed as high-performance anodes of microbial fuel cell (MFC) by using a binder-free dipping/drying method. The acid-treatment and thin layer of CB coating greatly improved the microbial adhesion of the electrode surface and facilitated the electron transfer between the bacteria and the electrode surface. As a result, a single-layer CB/SSM anode with thickness of 0.3 mm could generate a projected current density of about 1.53 ± 0.15 mA cm-2 and volumetic current density of 51.0 ± 5.0 mA cm-3, which was much higher than that of the bare SSM anode and conventional carbon felt anode with thickness of 2 mm. Moreover, three-dimensional (3D) CB/SSM electrode could be prepared by simple folding the singe-layer SSM, and produced a projected current density to 10.07 ± 0.88 mA cm-2 and a volumetric current density of 18.66 ± 1.63 mA cm-3. The MFC equipped with the 3D-CB/SSM anode produced a high maximum power density of 3215 ± 80 mW m-2. The CB/SSM electrodes showed good mechanical and electrical properties, excellent microbial adhesion; it represented a high-performance, low-cost electrode material that is easy to fabricate and scale-up.

  13. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...

  14. Biocompatibility of MIM 316L stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shai-hong; WANG Guo-hui; ZHAO Yan-zhong; LI Yi-ming; ZHOU Ke-chao; HUANG Bai-yun

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the bioeompatibility of MIM 316L stainless steel, the percentage of S-period cells were detected by flow cytometry after L929 incubated with extraction of MIM 316L stainless steel, using titanium implant materials of clinical application as the contrast. Both materials were implanted in animal and the histopathological evaluations were carried out. The statistical analyses show that there are no significant differences between two groups (P>0.05), which demonstrates that MIM 316L stainless steel has a good biocompatibility.

  15. Resistance microwelding of 316L stainless steel wire to block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Kasper Storgaard; Khan, M.I.; Bay, Niels

    2011-01-01

    The excellent corrosion resistance of low carbon vacuum melted 316 stainless steel coupled with its non-magnetic properties makes it ideal for biomedical applications. The typical joint geometry for microcomponents, such as medical implants, includes joining of fine wire to a larger block. However......, this type of joint has received little attention in the current literature. The present study was conducted to examine the microstructure and mechanical properties of low carbon vacuum melted 316 stainless steel wire welded to a larger block. Results revealed solid state bonding occurring at low currents...

  16. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaluzny, J. A. [Fermilab; Grimm, C. [Fermilab; Passarelli, D. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  17. Transformation behavior in low carbon 13% chromium-3% copper stainless steel; Tei C-13%Cr-3%Cu ko no hentai kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, T.; Uemori, R.; Miyasaka, A. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    Martensitic transformation and {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation behavior were investigated in low carbon 13% chromium stainless steels containing 2% nickel or 3% copper. The main conclusions are as follows: (1) Hardness of 2% nickel added low carbon 13% chromium steel was independent of cooling rate after hot working at large reduction. Structure of the steel was martensitic even after being subjected to such large reduction of 75%. This result suggests that ferritic transformation was hard to occur under an usual cooling rate because austenite phase was sufficiently stablized by the addition of chromium and nickel. (2) Austenite to ferrite transformation occurred only for the low carbon 13% chromium 3% copper steel without nickel even at the small cooling rate, such as 0.01K/s. This result was mainly attributed to the unstabilization of austenite phase which caused by the precipitation of {epsilon}-Cu. Furthermore, austenite of the steel becomes easy to transform to ferrite due to heavy hot working. This phenomenon was seemed to be caused by the increase in the area of austenite grain boundary owing to recrystallization. Thus, it was considered that the nucleation of {epsilon}-Cu at the grain boundaries promoted ferrite formation. (author)

  18. Characteristics of vacuum sintered stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Brytan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the present study duplex stainless steels were sintered in vacuum. using rapid cooling form the mixture of prealloyed and alloying element powders The purpose of this paper was to describe the obtained microstructures after sintering as well as the main mechanical properties of sintered stainless steels.Design/methodology/approach: In presented work duplex stainless steels were obtained through powder metallurgy starting from austenitic 316L or ferritic 410L prealloyed stainless steels powders by controlled addition of alloying elements powder. Prepared mixes were sintered in a vacuum furnace in 1250°C for 1h. After sintering rapid cooling (6°C/s using nitrogen under pressure was applied. Sintered compositions were subjected to structural examinations by scanning and optical microscopy and EDS analysis as well as X-ray analysis. Mechanical properties were studied through tensile tests and Charpy impact test.Findings: It was demonstrated that austenitic-ferritic microstructures with regular arrangement of both phases and absence of precipitates can be obtained with properly designed powder mix composition as well as sintering cycle with rapid cooling rate. Obtained sintered duplex stainless steels shows good mechanical properties which depends on phases ratio in the microstructure and elements partitioning (Cr/Ni between phases.Research limitations/implications: Basing on alloys characteristics applied cooling rate and powder mix composition seems to be a good compromise to obtain balanced sintered duplex stainless steel microstructures.Practical implications: Mechanical properties of obtained sintered duplex stainless steels structures are rather promising, especially with the aim of extending their field of possible applications.Originality/value: The utilization of vacuum sintering process with rapid cooling after sintering combined with use of elemental powders added to a stainless steel base powder shows its advantages in terms

  19. Carbonation of stainless steel slag in the context of in situ Brownfield remediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capobianco, O.; Costa, G.; Thuy, L.; Magliocco, E.; Hartog, Niels; Baciocchi, R.

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this work was to assess the potential of in situ carbonation as a treatment to modify the properties of alkaline materials such as industrial soil in terms of leaching behaviour and mineralogy and to store the CO2 generated by specific treatments applied in the context of Brownfield

  20. Bacterial Adhesion to Diamond-like Carbon as Compared to Stainless Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soininen, Antti; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Konttinen, Yrjo T.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are suitable candidates for application on biomedical devices and implants, due to their high hardness, low friction, high wear and corrosion resistance, chemical inertness, smoothness, and tissue and blood compatibility. However, most s

  1. Low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The response of various austenitic and duplex stainless steel grades to low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising was investigated. Gaseous nitriding was performed in ammonia/hydrogen mixtures at temperatures ,723 K; gaseous carburising was carried out in carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures...

  2. High Mn austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  3. Forming "dynamic" membranes on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, C. A.; Gaddis, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    "Dynamic" zirconium polyacrylic membrane is formed directly on stainless steel substrate without excessive corrosion of steel. Membrane is potentially useful in removal of contaminated chemicals from solution through reversed osmosis. Application includes use in filtration and desalination equipment, and in textile industry for separation of dyes from aqueous solvents.

  4. Dose perturbations and image artifacts caused by carbon-coated ceramic and stainless steel fiducials used in proton therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Joey; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Lee, Andrew K.; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2010-12-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy using implanted fiducial markers is a common solution for prostate localization to improve targeting accuracy. However, fiducials that are typically used for conventional photon radiotherapy cause large dose perturbations in patients who receive proton radiotherapy. A proposed solution has been to use fiducials of lower atomic number (Z) materials to minimize this effect in tissue, but the effects of these fiducials on dose distributions have not been quantified. The objective of this study was to analyze the magnitude of the dose perturbations caused by select lower-Z fiducials (a carbon-coated zirconium dioxide fiducial and a plastic-coated stainless steel fiducial) and compare them to perturbations caused by conventional gold fiducials. Sets of phantoms were used to assess select components of the effects on dose. First, the fiducials were assessed for radiographic visibility using both conventional computed tomography (CT) and an on-board kilovoltage imaging device at our proton therapy center. CT streak artifacts from the fiducials were also measured in a separate phantom. Second, dose perturbations were measured downstream of the fiducials using radiochromic film. The magnitude of dose perturbation was characterized as a function of marker material, implantation depth and orientation with respect to the beam axis. The radiographic visibility of the markers was deemed to be acceptable for clinical use. The dose measurements showed that the perpendicularly oriented zirconium dioxide and stainless steel fiducials located near the center of modulation of the proton beam perturbed the dose by less than 10%, but that the same fiducials in a parallel orientation near the end of the range of the beam could perturb the dose by as much as 38%. This suggests that carbon-coated and stainless steel fiducials could be used in proton therapy if they are located far from the end of the range of the beam and if they are oriented perpendicular to

  5. HTPro: Low-temperature Surface Hardening of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Low-temperature surface hardening of stainless steel provides the required performance properties without affecting corrosion resistance.......Low-temperature surface hardening of stainless steel provides the required performance properties without affecting corrosion resistance....

  6. Research on Pitting Corrosion-resistant of Stainless Steel/Carbon Steel Welding Jiont%不锈钢/碳钢复合钢板焊接接头耐点蚀性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贡志林

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of bade metal, weld and heat affected zone of stainless steel-carbon steel laminated composite material in 3. 5% NaCl solution, 30% CH3 COOH solution, 60% CH3 COOH solution and 98%CH3 COOH solution was studied respectively through electrochemical test. It was obtained that the corrosion resistance of weld was the better then the base metal, but the corrosion resistance of heat affected zone was the worst. Besides, in the four solution base metal and weld showed poor corrosion resistance in 3. 5%NaCl solution. A theoretical and experimental foundation for stainless steel-carbon steel laminated composite material was supplied.%采用电化学测试方法评价了不锈钢复合板母材、焊缝及热影响区在3.5%NaCl溶液、30%CH3 COOH溶液、60%CH3 COOH溶液、98%CH3 COOH溶液中的耐点蚀性能。结果显示在以上各种溶液中焊缝的抗腐蚀性能最优、母材其次而热影响区抗腐蚀性能最弱。此外在这四种溶液中母材跟焊区在3.5%NaCl溶液溶液中的耐腐蚀性能最弱。

  7. Thermophysical properties of stainless steel foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, K.E.; Strizak, J.P.; Weaver, F.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Besser, J.E.; Smith, D.L. [Aladdin Industries, Inc. (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Evacuated panel superinsulations with very high center-of-panel thermal resistances are being developed for use in refrigerators/freezers. Attainment of high resistances relies upon the maintenance of low vacuum levels by the use of stainless steel vacuum jackets. However, the metal jackets also present a path for heat conduction around the high resistance fillers. This paper presents results of a study of the impact of metal vacuum jackets on the overall thermal performance of vacuum superinsulations when incorporated into the walls and doors of refrigerators/freezers. Results are presented on measurements of the thermophysical properties of several types and thicknesses of stainless steel foils that were being considered for application in superinsulations. A direct electrical heating method was used for simultaneous measurements of the electrical resistivity, total hemispherical emittance, and thermal conductivity of the foils. Results are also presented on simulations of the energy usage of refrigerators/freezers containing stainless-steel-clad vacuum superinsulations.

  8. Ultrasonic Spectroscopy of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Hebsur, Mohan G.; Baaklini, George Y.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    Enhanced, lightweight material systems, such as 17-4PH stainless steel sandwich panels are being developed for use as fan blades and fan containment material systems for next generation engines. In order to improve the production for these systems, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as ultrasonic spectroscopy, are being utilized to evaluate the brazing quality between the 17-4PH stainless steel face plates and the 17-4PH stainless steel foam core. Based on NDE data, shear tests are performed on sections representing various levels of brazing quality from an initial batch of these sandwich structures. Metallographic characterization of brazing is done to corroborate NDE findings and the observed shear failure mechanisms.

  9. Low temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present contribtion gives an overview of some of the technological aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel. Examples of low temperature gaseous nitriding, carburising and nitrocarburising of stainless steel are presented and discussed. In particular......, the morphology, microstructure and characteristics of so-called expanded austenite "layers" on stainless steel are addressed....

  10. Low temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present contribution gives an overview of some of the technological aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel. Examples of low temperature gaseous nitriding, carburising and nitrocarburising of stainless steel are presented and discussed. In particular......, the morphology, microstructure and characteristics of so-called expanite “layers” on stainless steel are addressed....

  11. Activation and Dose Rate Analysis of 316 Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Zhi-long; SUN; Zheng; LIU; Xing-min; WAN; Hai-xia

    2012-01-01

    <正>In order to conduct research on 316 stainless steel to be used in reactors, neutron activation during irradiation and dose rate after irradiation in China Experiment Fast Reactor (CEFR) are calculated and analyzed. Based on 1 g of 316 stainless steel specimen, analysis on the activity of 316 stainless steel irradiated

  12. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  14. 77 FR 1504 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-10

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on stainless steel wire rod From India would be likely to lead to continuation or... contained in USITC Publication 4300 (January 2012), entitled Stainless Steel Wire Rod From...

  15. Stainless Steel Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Switzner, Nathan T

    2010-06-01

    A nitrogen strengthened 21-6-9 stainless steel plate was spinformed into hemispherical test shapes. A battery of laboratory tests was used to characterize the hemispheres. The laboratory tests show that near the pole (axis) of a spinformed hemisphere the yield strength is the lowest because this area endures the least “cold-work” strengthening, i.e., the least deformation. The characterization indicated that stress-relief annealing spinformed stainless steel hemispheres does not degrade mechanical properties. Stress-relief annealing reduces residual stresses while maintaining relatively high mechanical properties. Full annealing completely eliminates residual stresses, but reduces yield strength by about 30%.

  16. 316L 超低碳不锈钢的焊接性分析%Analysis of the Welding Character of Extra Low Carbon Stainless Steel 316L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敏华; 顾天杰

    2015-01-01

    用不同焊接方式和同一焊接方式不同焊口坡度焊接多种316L超低碳不锈钢焊接试板。通过外观观察、 X射线检验、机械性能检验等方法对成品进行分析,掌握了316L材料的焊接性能。结果表明通过采取适当的工艺措施,316L奥氏体不锈钢焊接接头可以避免热裂纹、晶间腐蚀、刀状腐蚀等缺陷。同时验证了316L焊接接头良好的耐蚀性和机械性能。%A variety of extra low carbon stainless steel 316 L welding test plates were made by different welding ways and different weld slope in the same way.Through visual observation, X-ray inspection, mechanical properties test to analyze the products, the welding properties of 316L materials were mastered.The results showed that by adopting the appropriate process measures, welding joint of 316L austenitic stainless steel can prevent hot crack, intergranular corrosion, knife shaped corrosion.At the same time, it was verified that 316L welded joints had good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties.

  17. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Yang and Yibin Ren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have prompted the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel in medical stainless steels, the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steels, and emphatically, the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength and good plasticity, better corrosion and wear resistances, and superior biocompatibility compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel, the newly developed high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventional medical stainless steels.

  18. Laser Rewelding of 304L Stainless Steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maguire, Michael Christopher [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodelas, Jeffrey [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Laser welding of 304L stainless steel during component fabrication has been found to alter the chemical composition of the steel due to material evaporation. During repair or rework, or during potential reuse/ rewelding of certain components, the potential exists to alter the composition to the extent that the material becomes prone to solidification cracking. This work aims to characterize the extent of this susceptibility in order to make informed decisions regarding rewelding practice and base metal chemistry allowances.

  19. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...

  20. Granulate of stainless steel as compensator material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P.C. van Santvoort (J. P C)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractCompensators produced with computer controlled milling devices usually consist of a styrofoam mould, filled with an appropriate material. We investigated granulate of stainless steel as filling material. This cheap, easy to use, clean and re-usable material can be obtained with an averag

  1. Ne Implantation Induced Transformation in Stainless Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordhuis, J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports a microstructural investigation of the changes induced by Ne implantation in stainless steel of the austenitic type. At a critical dose of 2.3 · 10^17/cm^2 a martensitic phase transformation was observed. In particular, attention has been paid to the effect of the stress held of n

  2. Industrial Experience with Case Hardening of Stainless Steels by Solution Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hans Berns; Bernd Edenhofer; Roland Zaugg

    2004-01-01

    SolNit(R) is a novel heat treatment to case harden stainless steels with nitrogen instead of carbon. The calculated equilibrium pressure of N2 corresponds well with the nitrogen content in the steel surface. The process is carried out in vacuum furnaces with pressurized gas quenching. Numerous parts of different stainless steels have been successfully SolNit(R) treated in industry leading to superior properties in respect to hardness/strength and corrosion resistance

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Hot Isostatically Pressed-Produced Stainless Steel/High Alloy Tool Steel Compound Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindwall, Greta; Flyg, Jesper; Frisk, Karin; Sandberg, Odd

    2011-05-01

    Consolidation of tool steel powders and simultaneous joining to a stainless 316L steel are performed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Two tool steel grades are considered: a high vanadium alloyed carbon tool steel, and a high vanadium and chromium alloyed nitrogen tool steel. The boundary layer arising during diffusion bonding is in focus and, in particular, the diffusion of carbon and nitrogen over the joint. Measurements of the elemental concentration profiles and corrosion tests by the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) method are performed. Comparative calculations with the DICTRA software are performed and are found to be in agreement with the experimental results. It is found that the carbon tool steel grade has a more critical influence on the corrosion resistance of the stainless 316L steel in comparison to the nitrogen tool steel grade.

  4. Anticorrosion Coating of Carbon Nanotube/Polytetrafluoroethylene Composite Film on the Stainless Steel Bipolar Plate for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Show

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite film of carbon nanotube (CNT and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE was formed from dispersion fluids of CNT and PTFE. The composite film showed high electrical conductivity in the range of 0.1–13 S/cm and hydrophobic nature. This composite film was applied to stainless steel (SS bipolar plates of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC as anticorrosion film. This coating decreased the contact resistance between the surface of the bipolar plate and the membrane electrode assembly (MEA of the PEMFC. The output power of the fuel cell is increased by 1.6 times because the decrease in the contact resistance decreases the series resistance of the PEMFC. Moreover, the coating of this composite film protects the bipolar plate from the surface corrosion.

  5. Fatigue of stainless steel in hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, G.; Altstetter, C.

    1983-10-01

    The fatigue crack growth rates of two austenitic stainless steel alloys, AISI 301 and 302, were compared in air, argon, and hydrogen environments at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Under the stresses at the crack tip the austenite in type 301 steel transformed martensitically to a’ to a greater extent than in type 302 steel. The steels were also tested in the cold worked condition under hydrogen or argon. Hydrogen was found to have a deleterious effect on both steels, but the effect was stronger in the unstable than in the stable alloy. Cold work decreased fatigue crack growth rates in argon and hydrogen, but the decrease was less marked in hydrogen than in argon. Metallographic, fractographic, and microhardness surveys in the vicinity of the fatigue crack were used to try to understand the reasons for the observed fatigue behavior.

  6. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: • Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels • Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes • Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys

  7. Studies of stainless steel exposed to sandblasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horodek Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of sandblasting on surface and subsurface of stainless steel is investigated using variable energy positron beam (VEP, positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Samples of stainless steel were blasted using 110 μm particles of Al2O3 under different pressure and time duration. In the case of sandblasting for 90 s, the reduction of positron diffusion length depending on the applied pressure was observed. Sandblasting during 30 s leads only to the reduction of positron diffusion length to about 60 nm for all samples. Positron lifetimes close to 170 ps measured using positrons emitted directly from the source point to the presence of vacancies on the dislocation lines. SEM and AFM images show that surface roughness depends rather on pressure of sandblasting than time of exposition.

  8. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Phillips, Nathaniel Steven [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  9. Weldability of Additive Manufactured Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilainen, Ville-Pekka; Pekkarinen, Joonas; Salminen, Antti

    Part size in additive manufacturing is limited by the size of building area of AM equipment. Occasionally, larger constructions that AM machines are able to produce, are needed, and this creates demand for welding AM parts together. However there is very little information on welding of additive manufactured stainless steels. The aim of this study was to investigate the weldability aspects of AM material. In this study, comparison of the bead on plate welds between AM parts and sheet metal parts is done. Used material was 316L stainless steel, AM and sheet metal, and parts were welded with laser welding. Weld quality was evaluated visually from macroscopic images. Results show that there are certain differences in the welds in AM parts compared to the welds in sheet metal parts. Differences were found in penetration depths and in type of welding defects. Nevertheless, this study presents that laser welding is suitable process for welding AM parts.

  10. Warm compacting behavior of stainless steel powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖志瑜; 柯美元; 陈维平; 召明; 李元元

    2004-01-01

    The warm compacting behaviors of four different kinds of stainless steel powders, 304L, 316L, 410L and 430L, were studied. The results show that warm compaction can be applied to stainless steel powders. The green densities and strengths of compacts obtained through warm compaction are generally higher than those obtained through cold compaction. The compacting behaviors in warm compaction and cold compaction are similar.Under the compacting pressure of 700 MPa, the warm compacted densities are 0. 10 - 0.22 g/cm3 higher than the cold compacted ones, and the green strengths are 11.5 %-50 % higher. The optimal warm compacting temperature is 100 - 110 ℃. In the die wall lubricated warm compaction, the optimum internal lubricant content is 0.2%.

  11. State on AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fattah-alhosseini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The passivity and protective nature of the passive films are essentially related to ionic and electronic transport processes, which are controlled by the optical and electronic properties of passive films. In this study, the electrochemical behavior of passive films anodically formed on AISI 304 stainless steel in sulfuric acid solution has been examined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. AISI 304 in sulphuric acid solution is characterized by high interfacial impedance, thereby illustrating its high corrosion resistance. Results showed that the interfacial impedance and the polarization resistance (pol initially increase with applied potential, within the low potential passive. However, at a sufficiently high potential passive (>0.4 V, the interfacial impedance and the polarization resistance decrease with increasing potential. An electrical equivalent circuit based on the impedance analysis, which describes the behavior of the passive film on stainless steel more satisfactorily than the proposed models, is presented.

  12. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  13. SRS stainless steel beneficial reuse program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettinger, W.L.

    1997-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) has thousands of tons of stainless steel radioactive scrap metal (RSNI). Much of the metal is volumetrically contaminated. There is no {open_quotes}de minimis{close_quotes} free release level for volumetric material, and therefore no way to recycle the metal into the normal commercial market. If declared waste, the metal would qualify as low level radioactive waste (LLW) and ultimately be dispositioned through shallow land buried at a cost of millions of dollars. The metal however could be recycled in a {open_quotes}controlled release{close_quote} manner, in the form of containers to hold other types of radioactive waste. This form of recycle is generally referred to as {open_quotes}Beneficial Reuse{close_quotes}. Beneficial reuse reduces the amount of disposal space needed and reduces the need for virgin containers which would themselves become contaminated. Stainless steel is particularly suited for long term storage because of its resistance to corrosion. To assess the practicality of stainless steel RSM recycle the SRS Benficial Reuse Program began a demonstration in 1994, funded by the DOE Office of Science and Technology. This paper discusses the experiences gained in this program.

  14. Antimicrobial Cu-bearing stainless steel scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Ren, Ling; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Shuyuan; Sercombe, Timothy B; Yang, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Copper-bearing stainless steel scaffolds with two different structures (Body Centered Cubic and Gyroid labyrinth) at two solid fractions (25% and 40%) were fabricated from both 316L powder and a mixture of 316L and elemental Cu powder using selective laser melting, and relative 316L scaffolds were served as control group. After processing, the antimicrobial testing demonstrated that the 316L-Cu scaffolds presented excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the cell viability assay indicated that there was no cytotoxic effect of 316L-Cu scaffolds on rat marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As such, these have the potential to reduce implant-associated infections. The Cu was also found to homogeneously distribute within the microstructure by scanning electronic microcopy. The addition of Cu would not significantly affect its strength and stiffness compared to 316L scaffold, and the stiffness of all the scaffolds (3-20GPa) is similar to that of bone and much less than that of bulk stainless steel. Consequently, fabrication of such low stiffness porous structures, especially coupled with the addition of antimicrobial Cu, may provide a new direction for medical stainless steels.

  15. The use of stainless steel crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, N Sue

    2002-01-01

    The stainless steel crown (SSC) is an extremely durable restoration with several clear-cut indications for use in primary teeth including: following a pulpotomy/pulpectomy; for teeth with developmental defects or large carious lesions involving multiple surfaces where an amalgam is likely to fail; and for fractured teeth. In other situations, its use is less clear cut, and caries risk factors, restoration longevity and cost effectiveness are considerations in decisions to use the SSC. The literature on caries risk factors in young children indicates that children at high risk exhibiting anterior tooth decay and/or molar caries may benefit by treatment with stainless steel crowns to protect the remaining at-risk tooth surfaces. Studies evaluating restoration longevity, including the durability and lifespan of SSCs and Class II amalgams demonstrate the superiority of SSCs for both parameters. Children with extensive decay, large lesions or multiple surface lesions in primary molars should be treated with stainless steel crowns. Because of the protection from future decay provided by their feature of full coverage and their increased durability and longevity, strong consideration should be given to the use of SSCs in children who require general anesthesia. Finally, a strong argument for the use of the SSC restoration is its cost effectiveness based on its durability and longevity.

  16. Effects of femoral component material properties on cementless fixation in total hip arthroplasty. A comparison study between carbon composite, titanium alloy, and stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, T; Whiteside, L A; White, S E; McCarthy, D S

    1993-02-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced-carbon composite material is an attractive implant material because its modulus of elasticity can be made similar to that of cortical bone. This study investigated the effect of femoral prosthesis elastic modulus on cementless implant fixation. Distal, as well as proximal, relative micromovements between implant and bone were measured in two testing protocols (axial-load and torsional-load), comparing identically shaped carbon composite (modulus of elasticity = 18.6 GPa), Ti6Al4V (100 GPa), and 630 stainless steel (200 GPa) prostheses. In the axial-load test, proximal mediolateral micromotions were significantly larger in the flexible composite stem than in the two metals. In the torsional-load test, rotational micromotions and "slop" displacements in the flexible stem were significantly larger proximally and significantly smaller distally than in the two metals. While these results suggest that proximal stress transfer may be improved by a flexible stem, they raise the possibility of increased proximal micromotion, and suggest that improved proximal fixation may be necessary to achieve clinical success with flexible composite femoral components.

  17. A Stem Analysis of Two Rapidly Solidified Stainless Steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-25

    slightly faster rate than the 303 stainless steel powder and therefore few usable specimens were obtained by electropolishing . The unsuccessful...CONCLUSIONS Rapid solidification processing of a high- sulphur austenitic type 303 stainless steel produces a significant refinement in the...A STEM ANALYSTS OF TWO RAPIDLY SOLIDIFIED STAINLESS STEELS . (U) UN D MAR 80 T F KELLY, J B VANDER SANDE NOBOI-76-C-0171 UNLSSFE7Minrnc UNCLASSIFIED

  18. On the Plasma (ion) Carburized Layer of High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y. Ueda; N. Kanayama; K. Ichii; T. Oishi; H. Miyake

    2004-01-01

    The manganese concentration of austenitic stainless steel decreases from the inner layer towards the surface of the plasma (ion) carburized layer due to the evaporation of manganese from the specimen surface. The carbon concentration in the carburized layer is influenced by alloyed elements such as Ct, Ni, Si, and Mo, as well as Nitrogen. This study examined the effects of nitrogen on the properties of the carburized layer of high nitrogen stainless steel. Plasma (ion)carburizing was carried out for 14.4 ks at 1303 K in an atmosphere of CH4+H2 gas mixtures under a pressure of 350 Pa. The plasma carburized layer of the high nitrogen stainless steel was thinner than that of an austentric stainless steel containing no nitrogen. This suggested that the nitrogen raised the activity of carbon in the plasma carburized layer, GDOES measurement indicated that the nitrogen level in the layer did not vary after plasma (ion) carburizing.

  19. Tensile and Impact Properties of Shielded Metal Arc Welded AISI 409M Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Shanmugam; A.K.Lakshminarayanan; V.Balasubramanian

    2009-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel and duplex stainless steel on tensile and impact properties of the ferritic stainless steel conforming to AISI 409M grade. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single pass butt welded joints. Tensile and impact properties, microhardness, microstructure and fracture surface morphology of the joints fabricated by austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel and duplex stainless steel filler metals were evaluated and the results were reported. From this investigation, it is found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed higher tensile strength and hardness compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Joints fabricated by austenitic stainless steel filler metal exhibited higher ductility and impact toughness compared with the joints fabricated by ferritic stainless steel and duplex stainless steel filler metals.

  20. Structure change of 430 stainless steel in the heating process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinzhong Liu; Jingtao Han; Wanhua Yu; Shifeng Dai

    2008-01-01

    The microstructure analysis was employed for the ferritic stainless steel (SUS430) with the carbon content from 0.029wt% to 0.100wt% under the simulated heating process condition. The higher carbon sample (430H) contains the duplex phase micro-structure at the temperature of 1150℃; on the other hand, the lower carbon content sample (430L) does not touch two phase area even at the temperature of 1450℃ and has the single phase ferritic microstrucmre. The carbon content need be well controlled for the 430 ferritic stainless steel since it can significandy affect the heating process curve, and the heating process may not be done in the two phase area due to the uncontrolled carbon content. With the low carbon content and the proper soaking time, the grain size is not sensitive to the heating process temperature and the soaking time. In the present heat treatment experiments, the soaking time is about 10 rain, and the processing parameters can be chosen according to the requ'trernent of the gross energy, the efficiency and the continual forming.

  1. Superhard Nanocrystalline Homometallic Stainless Steel on Steel for Seamless Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Eric J.; Hafley, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to deposit nanocrystalline stainless steel onto steel substrates (homometallic) for enhanced wear and corrosion resistance. Homometallic coatings provide superior adhesion, and it has been shown that ultrafine-grained materials exhibit the increased hardness and decreased permeability desired for protective coatings. Nanocrystals will be produced by controlling nucleation and growth and use of an ion beam during deposition by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. Phase I is depositing 31 6L nanocrystalline stainless steel onto 31 6L stainless steel substrates. These coatings exhibit hardnesses comparable to those normally obtained for ceramic coatings such ZrO2, and possess the superior adhesion of seamless, homometallic coatings. Hardening the surface with a similar material also enhances adhesion, by avoiding problems associated with thermal and lattice mismatch. So far we have deposited nanocrystalline homometallic 316L stainless steel coatings by varying the ions and the current density of the ion beams. For all deposition conditions we have produced smooth, uniform, superhard coatings. All coatings exhibit hardness of at least 200% harder than that of bulk materials. Our measurements indicate that there is a direct relationship between nanohardness and the current density of the ion beam. Stress measurements indicate that stress in the films is increasingly proportional to current density of the ion beam. TEM, XPS, and XRD results indicate that the coated layers consist of FCC structure nanocrystallites with a dimension of about 10 to 20 nm. The Ni and Mo concentration of these coating are lower than those of bulk 316L but the concentration of Cr is higher.

  2. Complex Protection of Vertical Stainless Steel Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhrislamov Radik Zakievich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the problem of fail-safe oil and oil products storage in stainless steel tanks and present the patented tank inner side protection technology. The latter provides process, ecological and fire safety and reducing soil evaporation of oil products, which is a specific problem. The above-mentioned technology includes corrosion protection and heat insulation protection providing increase of cover durability and RVS service life in general. The offered technological protection scheme is a collaboration of the author, Steel Paint GmbH firm and JSC “Koksokhimmontazhproyekt”. PU foam unicomponent materials of Steel Paint GmbH firm provide the protection of tank inner side and cover.

  3. Carbon dioxide reduction by mixed and pure cultures in microbial electrosynthesis using an assembly of graphite felt and stainless steel as a cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, Suman; ter Heijne, Annemiek; Dominguez Benetton, Xochitl; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Buisman, Cees J N; Strik, David P B T B; Pant, Deepak

    2015-11-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction to multi-carbon compounds at the cathode using chemolithoautotrophs is an emerging application of microbial electrosynthesis (MES). In this study, CO2 reduction in MES was investigated at hydrogen evolving potentials, separately by a mixed culture and Clostridium ljungdahlii, using a graphite felt and stainless steel assembly as cathode. The mixed culture reactor produced acetate at the maximum rate of 1.3 mM d(-1), along with methane and hydrogen at -1.1 V/Ag/AgCl. Over 160 days of run-time in four fed-batches, 26% of bicarbonate was converted to acetate between day 28 and 41, whereas in the late batches, methane production prevailed. Out of 45 days of run-time in the C. ljungdahlii reactor, 2.4 mM d(-1) acetate production was achieved at -0.9 V/Ag/AgCl in Batch 1. Simultaneous product degradation occurred when the mixed culture was not selectively enriched. Hydrogen evolution is potentially the rapid way of transferring electrons to the biocatalysts for higher bioproduction rates.

  4. Stainless Steel Microstructural Evolution of Hot-Rolled Clad Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Bin LI

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The stainless steel microstructure evolution of carbon–stainless-clad steel plate was investigated during vacuum hot-rolling bonding under different deformation conditions. The results show that carbide M2C precipitates in the interior of stainless steel (SS and carbon content increases with rising reduction ratio (ε. The dislocation density of the SS surface (ρI is lower than that of the midst (ρM, and ρI decreases with the rising ε. However, ρM increases first and then decreases with rising ε. The dislocation density of bonding interface decreases due to the increasing size of austenite grain. Furthermore, the dislocation density of the midst is high where the high energy of carbide M2C is concentrated for single-pass rolling, and the quantity of M2C increases with reduction ratio. Moreover, carbide almost disappeared while being transformed into austenite, and only minimal granular carbides were formed after two-pass rolling. Bonding strength increases evidently with rising ε and is inversely proportional to ρI.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.12828

  5. Hydrogen Sulphide Corrosion of Carbon and Stainless Steel Alloys Immersed in Mixtures of Renewable Fuel Sources and Tested Under Co-processing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely András

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with modern regulations and directives, the use of renewable biomass materials as precursors for the production of fuels for transportation purposes is to be strictly followed. Even though, there are problems related to processing, storage and handling in wide range of subsequent uses, since there must be a limit to the ratio of biofuels mixed with mineral raw materials. As a key factor with regards to these biomass sources pose a great risk of causing multiple forms of corrosion both to metallic and non-metallic structural materials. To assess the degree of corrosion risk to a variety of engineering alloys like low-carbon and stainless steels widely used as structural metals, this work is dedicated to investigating corrosion rates of economically reasonable engineering steel alloys in mixtures of raw gas oil and renewable biomass fuel sources under typical co-processing conditions. To model a desulphurising refining process, corrosion tests were carried out with raw mineral gasoline and its mixture with used cooking oil and animal waste lard in relative quantities of 10% (g/g. Co-processing was simulated by batch-reactor laboratory experiments. Experiments were performed at temperatures between 200 and 300ºC and a pressure in the gas phase of 90 bar containing 2% (m3/m3 hydrogen sulphide. The time span of individual tests were varied between 1 and 21 days so that we can conclude about changes in the reaction rates against time exposure of and extrapolate for longer periods of exposure. Initial and integral corrosion rates were defined by a weight loss method on standard size of coupons of all sorts of steel alloys. Corrosion rates of carbon steels indicated a linear increase with temperature and little variation with composition of the biomass fuel sources. Apparent activation energies over the first 24-hour period remained moderate, varying between 35.5 and 50.3 kJ mol−1. Scales developed on carbon steels at higher

  6. Influence of Trace Alloying Elements on Corrosive Resistance of Cast Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Han-qiao; YAN Xiang; WEI Bo-kang; LIN Han-tong

    2005-01-01

    The influences of trace alloying elements niobium, vanadium and zirconium on the corrosive resistance of 18-8 type cast stainless steel have been studied in deta() orthogonal design experiments. The results show that zirconium is mainly in the form of compound inclusions, which is unfavorable to promote the corrosive resistance of the cast stainless steel. It can alleviate the disadvantageous influence of carbon addition on corrosive resistance when some elements such as vanadium and niobium exist in the steel, and niobium has a remarkable influence on the intergranular corrosive resistance but unobvious on the pitting corrosion, and vanadium has a slightly favorable influence on the corrosive resistance of the steel.

  7. Temperature Dependence of Radiation Damage in Modified Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGYong-nan; PolatAhmat; XUYong-jun; ZHOUDong-mei; DUEn-peng; YUANDa-qing; ZUOYi; WANGZhi-qiang; RUANYu-zhen; ZHUSheng-yun

    2003-01-01

    Stainless steels are often used as target structural materials for spallation neutron sources. The spallation neutron source system is one of the key parts of the ADS system, which provides the source neutrons for driving a sub-critical assembly. Stainless steel (SS) is used for the beam window and target materials of the ADS spallation neutron source system.

  8. Boronization and Carburization of Superplastic Stainless Steel and Titanium-Based Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Matsushita

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Bronization and carburization of fine-grain superplastic stainless steel is reviewed, and new experimental results for fine grain Ti88.5Al4.5V3Fe2Mo2 are reported. In superplastic duplex stainless steel, the diffusion of carbon and boron is faster than in non-superplastic duplex stainless steel. Further, diffusion is activated by uniaxial compressive stress. Moreover, non-superplastic duplex stainless steel shows typical grain boundary diffusion; however, inner grain diffusion is confirmed in superplastic stainless steel. The presence of Fe and Cr carbides or borides is confirmed by X-ray diffraction, which indicates that the diffused carbon and boron react with the Fe and Cr in superplastic stainless steel. The Vickers hardness of the carburized and boronized layers is similar to that achieved with other surface treatments such as electro-deposition. Diffusion of boron into the superplastic Ti88.5Al4.5V3Fe2Mo2 alloy was investigated. The hardness of the surface exposed to boron powder can be increased by annealing above the superplastic temperature. However, the Vickers hardness is lower than that of Ti boride.

  9. Evaluation of carbon-based nanosorbents synthesised by ethylene decomposition on stainless steel substrates as potential sequestrating materials for nickel ions in aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.J.Lee; L.Y.Lee; L.P.Y.Foo; K.W.Tan; D.G.Hassell

    2012-01-01

    The present work covers the preparation of carbon-based nanosorbents by ethylene decomposition on stainless steel mesh without the use of external catalyst for the treatment of water containing nickel ions (Ni2+).The reaction temperature was varied from 650 to 850℃,while reaction time and ethylene to nitrogen flow ratio were maintained at 30 min and 1:1 cm3/min,respectively.Results show that nanosorbents synthesised at a reaction temperature of 650℃ had the smallest average diameter (75 nm),largest BET surface area (68.95m2/g) and least amount of impurity (0.98 wt.% Fe).A series of batch sorption tests were performed to evaluate the effects of initial pH,initial metal concentration and contact time on Ni2+ removal by the nanosorbents.The equilibrium data fitted well to Freundlich isotherm.The kinetic data were best correlated to a pseudo second-order model indicating that the process was of chemisorption type.Further analysis by the Boyd kinetic model revealed that boundary layer diffusion was the controlling step.This primary study suggests that the prepared material with Freundlich constants compared well with those in the literature,is a promising sorbent for the sequestration of Ni2+ in aqueous solutions.

  10. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: • Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels • Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes • Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys

  11. Deformasi Slot Beberapa Produk Braket Stainless Steel Akibat Gaya Torque Pada Kawat Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atika Zairina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Deformasi slot braket dapat mengurangi besar gaya torque  yang akan dihantarkan ke gigi dan jaringan pendukungnya. Beberapa braket stainless steel yang beredar dipasaran belum pernah diteliti kualitasnya dalam perawatan ortodonsi. Tujuan penelitian adalah untuk membandingkan besar gaya torque akibat sudut puntir 30° 45°  kawat stainless steel dan deformasi slot permanen akibat gaya torque tersebut antara kelompok merk braket (3M, Biom, Versadent, Ormco dan Shinye. Penelitian dilakukan pada lima puluh braket stainless steel edgewise dari lima kelompok merk braket (n=10 di lem ke akrilik. Masing-masing braket dilakukan pengukuran tinggi slot dengan mikroskop stereoskopi lalu dipasang ke alat uji torque yang sudah dibuat untuk penelitian ini. Setelah dilakukan uji torque, braket di ukur kembali tinggi slotnya dan dibandingkan dengan pengukuran sebelumnya untuk mengetahui adanya deformasi slot. Hasil analisis statistik menunjukkan perbedaan bermakna besar gaya torque pada sudut puntir 30° dan 45° antara Biom dan Shinye dengan Omrco. Gaya torque paling besar yaitu pada merk braket 3M (30°= 442,12 gmcm dan 45°= 567,99 gmcm, sedangkan yang terkecil adalah Biom (30°= 285,50 gmcm, 45°=361,38 gmcm. Perbedaan deformasi slot braket terjadi hampir pada semua kelompok merk braket. Deformasi slot braket hanya terjadi pada merk braket Biom (2,82 µm dan Shinye (2,52 µm. Kesimpulan, salah satu faktor yang mempengaruhi besar gaya torque dan terjadinya deformasi slot yaitu komposisi dan proses manufaktur dari braket stainless steel. Proses manufaktur yang tidak sesuai standar dapat menyebabkan kualitas braket yang buruk. Deformasi slot permanen dalam penelitian ini terjadi pada merek braket Biom dan Shinye. Slot Deformation of Various Stainless Steel Bracket Due to Torque Expression On The Wire. Bracket slot deformation can reduce the amount of torque that will be transmitted to teeth and supporting tissues. The quality of some stainless steel

  12. Recycling and valorisation of stainless steel slags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dessel, J. [Belgian Building Research Institute, Brussels (Belgium)

    2001-07-01

    The project described in this paper involves the collaboration of eleven partners. The project aims to create a value-added product by recovering usable non-ferrous metals from the production of stainless steel and use the recycled slag as a secondary material for road construction and concrete applications. The objective of the project is to return the metal contained in the slag to stainless steel production, and to treat the non-metallic slag, perhaps by a metallurgical process based upon direct plasma technology, prior to use in a variety of processes. The project also aims to investigate the environmental characteristics of the slag, which is essential for it to be used as secondary material. The major challenge appears to be the development of an improved process for separating the slag from the metallic particles in order to avoid the frequent breakdowns and significant repairs associated with use of the material. It is expected that using magnetic and density-based separation processes will reduce the cost of maintenance by about 20 per cent. Results achieved to date, and economic factors impacting on feasibility, are also discussed. 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  13. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  14. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-31

    The microstructure of type-308 austenitic stainless steel weld metal containing {gamma} and {delta} and ferrite is shown. Typical composition of the weld metal is Cr-20.2, Ni-9.4, Mn-1.7, Si-0.5, C-0.05, N-0.06 and balance Fe (in wt %). Exposure of austenitic stainless steel welds to elevated temperatures can lead to extensive changes in the microstructural features of the weld metal. On exposure to elevated temperatures over a long period of time, a continuous network of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide forms at the austenite/ferrite interface. Upon aging at temperatures between 550--850 C, ferrite in the weld has been found to be unstable and transforms to sigma phase. These changes have been found to influence mechanical behavior of the weld metal, in particular the creep-rupture properties. For aging temperatures below 550 C the ferrite decomposes spinodally into {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} phases. In addition, precipitation of G-phase occurs within the decomposed ferrite. These transformations at temperatures below 550 C lead to embrittlement of the weld metal as revealed by the Charpy impact properties.

  15. Wetting Properties of Liquid Lithium on Stainless Steel and Enhanced Stainless Steel Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiflis, P.; Xu, W.; Raman, P.; Andruczyk, D.; Ruzic, D. N.; Curreli, D.

    2012-10-01

    Research into lithium as a first wall material has proven its ability to effectively getter impurities and reduce recycling of hydrogen ions at the wall. Current schemes for introducing lithium into a fusion device consist of lithium evaporators, however, as these devices evolve from pulsed to steady state, new methods will need to be employed such as the LIMIT concept of UIUC, or thin flowing film lithium walls. Critical to their implementation is understanding the interactions of liquid lithium with various surfaces. One such interaction is the wetting of materials by lithium, which may be characterized by the contact angle between the lithium and the surface. Experiments have been performed at UIUC into the contact angle of liquid lithium with a given surface, as well as methods to increase it. To reduce the oxidation rate of the droplets, the experiments were performed in vacuum, using a lithium injector to deposit drops on each surface. Among the materials investigated are stainless steel, both untreated and coated with a diamond like carbon (DLC) layer, molybdenum, and boronized molybdenum. The contact angle and its dependence on temperature is measured.

  16. Sigma phase formation kinetics in stainless steel laminate composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenmen, D.W.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Stainless steel laminate composites were made to simulate weld microstructures. The use of laminates with variations in chemical composition allows for one dimensional analysis of phase transformation associated with the more complex three-dimensional solidification experience of weld metal. Alternate layers of austenitic (304L and 316L) and ferritic (Ebrite) stainless steels allowed for the study of sigma phase formation at the austenite-ferrite interface in duplex stainless steel. Two austenitic stainless steels, 304L (18.5Cr-9.2Ni-0.3Mo) and 316L (16.2Cr-10.1Ni-2.6Mo), and one ferritic stainless steel, Ebrite (26.3Cr-0Ni-1.0Mo) were received in the form of sheet which was laboratory cold rolled to a final thickness of 0.25 mm (0.030 in.). Laminate composites were prepared by laboratory hot rolling a vacuum encapsulated compact of alternating layers of the ferrite steel with either 304L or 316L stainless steel sheets. Laminate composite specimens, which simulate duplex austenite-ferrite weld metal structure, were used to establish the kinetics of nucleation and growth of sigma phase. The factors affecting sigma phase formation were identified. The effects of time, temperature, and transport of chromium and nickel were evaluated and used to establish a model for sigma phase formation in the austenite-ferrite interfacial region. Information useful for designing stainless steel welding consumables to be used for high temperature service was determined.

  17. LOCAL LASER ALLOYING OF STAINLESS STEEL 12H18N10T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Vladimir A. Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the research of local laser alloying of stainless steel 12X18H10T. The steel resists quenching, but it is widely used in food, chemical, oil-processing and other industries. The alloying was carried out by graphite that provided carbon increase in steel and improvement of surface capacity. The article shows details of the structural transformations leading to surfaces hardening, and micro hardness spreading inside the modified layer.

  18. Low temperature surface hardening of stainless steel; the role of plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri;

    2016-01-01

    Thermochemical surface engineering by nitriding of austenitic stainless steel transforms the surface zone into expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behavior. As a consequence of the thermochemical surface engineering, huge re...

  19. Nickel-free Stainless Steel for Medical Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yibin REN; Ke YANG; Bingchun ZHANG; Yaqing WANG; Yong LIANG

    2004-01-01

    BIOSS4 steel is essentially a nickel-free austenitic stainless steel developed by the Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, in response to nickel allergy problems associated with nickel-containing stainless steels that are widely used in medical applications. The high nitrogen content of this steel effectively maintains the austenitic stability and also contributes to the high levels of corrosion resistance and strength. BIOSS4 steel possesses a good combination of high strength and toughness, better corrosion resistance, and better blood compatibility, in comparison with the medical 316L stainless steel. Potential applications of BIOSS4 steel can include medical implantation material and orthodontic or orthopedic devices, as well as jewelries and other decorations.

  20. Beneficially reusing LLRW the Savannah River Site Stainless Steel Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettinger, W.L.

    1993-09-09

    With 68 radioactively contaminated excess Process Water Heat Exchangers the Savannah River Site launched its program to turn potential LLRW metal liabilities into assets. Each Heat Exchanger contains approximately 100 tons of 304 Stainless Steel and could be disposed as LLRW by land burial. Instead the 7000 tons of metal will be recycled into LLRW, HLW, and TRU waste containers thereby eliminating the need for near term land disposal and also eliminating the need to add more clean metal to the waste stream. Aspects of the partnership between DOE and Private Industry necessary to accomplish this new mission are described. A life cycle cost analysis associated with past practices of using carbon steel containers to indefinitely store material (contributing to the creation of today`s legacy waste problems) is presented. The avoided cost calculations needed to support the economics of the ``Indifference`` decision process in assessing the Beneficial Reuse option relative to the Burial option are described.

  1. Plain carbon steel bipolar plates for PEMFC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jianli; SUN Juncai; TIAN Rujin; XU Jing

    2006-01-01

    Bipolar plates are a multifunctional component of PEMFC. Comparing with the machined graphite and stainless steels, the plain carbon steel is a very cheap commercial metal material. In this paper, the possibility of applying the plain carbon steels in the bipolar plate for PEMFC was exploited. In order to improve the corrosion resistance of the low carbon steel in the PEMFCs' environments,two surface modification processes was developed and then the electrochemical performances and interfacial contact resistance (ICR) of the surface modified plate of plain carbon steel were investigated. The results show that the surface modified steel plates have good corrosion resistance and relatively low contact resistance, and it may be a candidate material as bipolar plate of PEMFC.

  2. A solid-phase microextraction platinized stainless steel fiber coated with a multiwalled carbon nanotube-polyaniline nanocomposite film for the extraction of thymol and carvacrol in medicinal plants and honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasvand, Alireza; Dowlatshah, Samira; Nouraei, Nadia; Heidari, Nahid; Yazdankhah, Fatemeh

    2015-08-07

    A mechanically hard and cohesive porous fiber, with large surface area, for more strong attachment of the coating was provided by platinizing a stainless steel wire. Then, the platinized stainless steel fiber was coated with a multiwalled carbon nanotube/polyaniline (MWCNT/PANI) nanocomposite using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method and applied for the extraction of thymol and carvacrol with direct-immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME) method followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) quantification. To provide a larger coarse surface for the tightened attachment of coating on the fiber, a stainless steel wire was platinized using a suitable optimized EPD method. Different experimental parameters were studied and the optimal conditions were obtained as: pH of the sample solution: 2; extraction time: 60min; salt content in the sample solution: 1% w/v NaNO3; desorption time: 60min; type and volume of the desorption solvent: acetonitrile, 100μL. Under the optimized conditions, limits of detection (LODs) were 0.6 and 0.8μgmL(-1) for thymol and carvacrol, respectively. Linear dynamic range (LDR) for the calibration curves of both analytes were 1-80μgmL(-1). Relative standard deviation (RSD%, n=6) was 6.8 for thymol and 12.7 for carvacrol. The proposed fiber was successfully applied for the recovery and determination of thymol and carvacrol in thyme, savory, and honey samples.

  3. Nickel release from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haudrechy, P; Foussereau, J; Mantout, B; Baroux, B

    1994-10-01

    Nickel release from nickel-plated metals often induces allergic contact dermatitis, but, for nickel-containing stainless steels, the effect is not well-known. In this paper, AISI 304, 316L, 303 and 430 type stainless steels, nickel and nickel-plated materials were investigated. 4 tests were performed: patch tests, leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime (DMG) spot tests and electrochemical tests. Patch tests showed that 96% of the patients were intolerant to Ni-plated samples, and 14% to a high-sulfur stainless steel (303), while nickel-containing stainless steels with a low sulfur content elicited no reactions. Leaching experiments confirmed the patch tests: in acidic artificial sweat, Ni-plated samples released about 100 micrograms/cm2/week of nickel, while low-sulfur stainless steels released less than 0.03 microgram/cm2/week of nickel, and AISI 303 about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week. Attention is drawn to the irrelevance of the DMG spot test, which reveals Ni present in the metal bulk but not its dissolution rate. Electrochemical experiments showed that 304 and 316 grades remain passive in the environments tested, while Ni-plated steels and AISI 303 can suffer significant cation dissolution. Thus, Ni-containing 304 and 316 steels should not induce contact dermatitis, while 303 should be avoided. A reliable nitric acid spot test is proposed to distinguish this grade from other stainless steels.

  4. New Stainless Steel Alloys for Low Temperature Surface Hardening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present contribution showcases the possibility for developing new surface hardenable stainless steels containing strong nitride/carbide forming elements (SNCFE). Nitriding of the commercial alloys, austenitic A286, and ferritic AISI 409 illustrates the beneficial effect of having SNCFE present...... in the stainless steel alloys. The presented computational approach for alloy design enables “screening” of hundreds of thousands hypothetical alloy systems by use of Thermo-Calc. Promising compositions for new stainless steel alloys can be selected based on imposed criteria, i.e. facilitating easy selection...

  5. Investigation of the Hot Plasticity of Duplex Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Gang; ZHANG Zhi-xia; SONG Hong-wei; TONG Jun; ZHOU Can-dong

    2008-01-01

    Hot plasticity of a nitrogen alloyed 25Cr-7Ni-4 Mo duplex stainless steel was investigated.The results indicate that thc main factors affecting the hot plasticity of duplex stainless steel are listed as follows:coalescent force of phase interface,microstructure,and the phase ratio and difference between the mechanicsl propertms of ferrite and austenite.The heat treatment and sulphur contents have a notable effect on the hot plasticity.The reasonable heat treatrnents and the irlcreased interfacial coalescent force will effectively enhance the hot plasticity of duplex stainless steel.

  6. EXAFS investigation of low temperature nitrided stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2008-01-01

    Low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 flakes were investigated with EXAFS and X-ray diffraction analysis. The stainless steel flakes were transformed into a mixture of nitrogen expanded austenite and nitride phases. Two treatments were carried out yielding different overall nitrogen...... contents: (1) nitriding in pure NH3 and (2)nitriding in pure NH3 followed by reduction in H2. The majority of the Cr atoms in the stainless steel after treatment 1 and 2 was associated with a nitrogen–chromium bond distance comparable to that of the chemical compound CrN. The possibility of the occurrence...

  7. Thermodynamic calculation of phase equilibria in stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klančnik G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper two examples of thermodynamic investigation of stainless steels using both, experimental and modeling approach are described. The ferritic-austenitic duplex stainless steel and austenitic stainless steel were investigated using thermal analysis. The complex melting behavior was evident for both alloy systems. Experimentally obtained data were compared with the results of the thermodynamic calculations using the CALPHAD method. The equilibrium thermal events were also described by the calculated heat capacity. In spite of the complexity of both selected real alloy systems a relative good agreement was obtained between the thermodynamic calculations and experimental results.

  8. [Study on biocompatibility of MIM 316L stainless steel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guohui; Zhu, Shaihong; Li, Yiming; Zhao, Yanzhong; Zhou, Kechao; Huang, Boyun

    2007-04-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the biocompatibility of metal powder injection molding (MIM) 316L stainless steel. The percentage of S-period cells was detected by flow cytometry after L929 cells being incubated with extraction of MIM 316L stainless steel, and titanium implant materials for clinical application were used as control. In addition, both materials were implanted in animals and the histopathological evaluations were carried out. The statistical analyses show that there are no significant differences between the two groups (P > 0.05), which demonstrate that MIM 316L stainless steel has good biocompatibility.

  9. MICROSCOPIC CORROSION STUDIES OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.Leygraf; J.Pan; M.Femenia

    2004-01-01

    Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning electrochemical microscopy have been used for in situ monitoring of localized corrosion processes of different Duplex stainless steels (DSS) in acidic chloride solutions. The techniques allow imaging of local dissolution events with micrometer resolution, as opposed to conventional electrochemical techniques, which only give an overall view of the corrosion behavior. In addition, combined scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy were used for mapping the Volta potential variation over the surface of DSSs. A significant difference in Volta potential between the austenite and ferrite phases suggests galvanic interaction between the phases. A compositional gradient appears within 2 micrometers across the phase boundary, as seen with scanning Auger microscopy (SAM). In all, the studies suggest that higher alloyed DSS exhibit a more homogeneous dissolution behavior than lower alloyed DSS, due to higher and more similar corrosion resistance of the two phases, and enhanced resistance of the ferrite/austenite phase boundary regions.

  10. Plastic deformation effect of the corrosion resistance in case of austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraszti, F.; Kovacs, T.

    2017-02-01

    The corrosion forms are different in case of the austenitic steel than in case of carbon steels. Corrosion is very dangerous process, because that corrosion form is the intergranular corrosion. The austenitic stainless steel shows high corrosion resistance level. It knows that plastic deformation and the heat treating decrease it’s resistance. The corrosion form in case of this steel is very special and the corrosion tests are difficult. We tested the selected steel about its corrosion behaviour after high rate deformation. We wanted to find a relationship between the corrosion resistance decreasing and the rate of the plastic deformation. We wanted to show this behaviour from mechanical and electrical changing.

  11. Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-01-21

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

  12. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Luo; Huaizhi Su; Chaofang Dong; Kui Xiao; Xiaogang Li

    2015-01-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other prop...

  13. On the Carbon Solubility in Expanded Austenite and Formation of Hägg Carbide in AISI 316 Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Ståhl, Kenny; Brink, Bastian;

    2016-01-01

    –420 °C and 465–470 °C, respectively. Hägg carbide (x-M5C2)develops when the carbon content in the expanded austenite exceeds the metastable solubility limit; the transformation of carbon expanded austenite into Hägg carbide occurs irrespective of carburizing temperature in the investigated temperature...

  14. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Q. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: q.zhao@dundee.ac.uk; Liu, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Wang, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Wang, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Peng, N. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Jeynes, C. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-31

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N{sup +}, O{sup +} and SiF{sub 3} {sup +}, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF{sub 3} {sup +}-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N{sup +}-implanted steel, O{sup +}-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  15. Hardness of Carburized Surfaces in 316LN Stainless Steel after Low Temperature Neutron Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, TS

    2005-01-31

    A proprietary surface carburization treatment is being considered to minimize possible cavitation pitting of the inner surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the SNS. The treatment gives a large supersaturation of carbon in the surface layers and causes substantial hardening of the surface. To answer the question of whether such a hardened layer will remain hard and stable during neutron irradiation, specimens of the candidate materials were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to an atomic displacement level of 1 dpa. Considerable radiation hardening occurred in annealed 316LN stainless steel and 20% cold rolled 316LN stainless steel, and lesser radiation hardening in Kolsterised layers on these materials. These observations coupled with optical microscopy examinations indicate that the carbon-supersaturated layers did not suffer radiation-induced decomposition and softening.

  16. Corrosion behaviour of sintered duplex stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utrilla, M. Victoria; Urena, Alejandro; Otero, Enrique; Munez, Claudio Jose [Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Duplex austenite-ferrite stainless steels were prepared by mixing austenitic (316L) and ferritic (434L) atomized powders. Although different 316L/434L ratios were prepared, present work centred its study on 50% ferrite - 50% austenite sintered steel. The powders were mixed and pressed at 700 MPa and sintered at 1250 deg. C for 30 min in vacuum. The cooling rate was 5 deg. C/min. Solution treatment was carried out to homogenize the microstructure at 1100 deg. C during 20 min. A microstructural study of the material in solution was performed, evaluating the microstructure, proportion and shape of porosity, and ferrite percentage. This last was measured by two methods, quantitative metallography and Fischer ferrito-metry. The materials were heat treated in the range of 700 to 1000 deg. C, for 10, 30 and 60 min and water quenched, to study the microstructural changes and the influence on the intergranular corrosion resistance. The method used to evaluate the sensitization to the intergranular corrosion was the electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation procedure (EPR). The test solution was 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0,01 M KSCN at 30 deg. C. The criterion used to evaluate the sensitization was the ratio between the maximum reactivation density (Ir) and the maximum activation density (Ia). The results of the electrochemical tests were discussed in relation with the microstructures observed at the different heat treatments. (authors)

  17. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon-Jun Kim

    2004-12-19

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as {sigma} and {chi} can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ({sigma} + {chi}) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, {sigma} was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and {chi} by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in

  18. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as σ and χ can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (σ + χ) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, σ was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and χ by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by

  19. Controlled dissolution of colossal quantities of nitrogen in stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in austenitic stainless steel was investigated thermogravimetrically by equilibrating thin foils of AISI 304 and AISI 316 in ammonia/hydrogen gas mixtures. Controlled dissolution of colossal amounts of nitrogen under metastable equilibrium conditions was realized...

  20. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

  1. Eddy sensors for small diameter stainless steel tubes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Jack L.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Grant, J. Brian; Korellis, Henry James; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth; Van Blarigan, Benjamin; Andersen, Lisa E.

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop non-destructive, minimally disruptive eddy sensors to inspect small diameter stainless steel metal tubes. Modifications to Sandia's Emphasis/EIGER code allowed for the modeling of eddy current bobbin sensors near or around 1/8-inch outer diameter stainless steel tubing. Modeling results indicated that an eddy sensor based on a single axial coil could effectively detect changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tubing. Based on the modeling results, sensor coils capable of detecting small changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tube were designed, built and tested. The observed sensor response agreed with the results of the modeling and with eddy sensor theory. A separate limited distribution SAND report is being issued demonstrating the application of this sensor.

  2. Class 4 stainless steel box columns in fire

    OpenAIRE

    Uppfeldt, Björn; Veljkovic, Milan, ed. lit.

    2007-01-01

    A study of stainless steel cold-rolled box columns at elevated temperatures is presented, which is a part of an on-going RFCS project "Stainless Steel in Fire". Experimental results of six, class 4, stub columns at elevated temperature, tested by Ala-Outinen (2005), were used to evaluate the FE model. The FE analysis obtained using the commercially available software, ABAQUS, shows that the critical temperature was closely predicted. Further, a parametric study was performed using the same nu...

  3. Decomposition of energetic chemicals contaminated with iron or stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervin, Sima; Bodman, Glenn T; Barnhart, Richard W

    2006-03-17

    Contamination of chemicals or reaction mixtures with iron or stainless steel is likely to take place during chemical processing. If energetic and thermally unstable chemicals are involved in a manufacturing process, contamination with iron or stainless steel can impact the decomposition characteristics of these chemicals and, subsequently, the safety of the processes, and should be investigated. The goal of this project was to undertake a systematic approach to study the impact of iron or stainless steel contamination on the decomposition characteristics of different chemical classes. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the decomposition reaction by testing each chemical pure, and in mixtures with iron and stainless steel. The following classes of energetic chemicals were investigated: nitrobenzenes, tetrazoles, hydrazines, hydroxylamines and oximes, sulfonic acid derivatives and monomers. The following non-energetic groups were investigated for contributing effects: halogens, hydroxyls, amines, amides, nitriles, sulfonic acid esters, carbonyl halides and salts of hydrochloric acid. Based on the results obtained, conclusions were drawn regarding the sensitivity of the decomposition reaction to contamination with iron and stainless steel for the chemical classes listed above. It was demonstrated that the most sensitive classes are hydrazines and hydroxylamines/oximes. Contamination of these chemicals with iron or stainless steel not only destabilizes them, leading to decomposition at significantly lower temperatures, but also sometimes causes increased severity of the decomposition. The sensitivity of nitrobenzenes to contamination with iron or stainless steel depended upon the presence of other contributing groups: the presence of such groups as acid chlorides or chlorine/fluorine significantly increased the effect of contamination on decomposition characteristics of nitrobenzenes. The decomposition of sulfonic acid derivatives and tetrazoles

  4. Properties of duplex stainless steels made by powder metallurgy

    OpenAIRE

    Rosso, M.; M. Actis Grande; Z. Brytan; L.A. Dobrzański

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper was to examine the mechanical properties of duplex stainless steels.Design/methodology/approach: In presented study duplex stainless steels were obtained through powder metallurgy starting from austenitic, martensitic base powders by controlled addition of alloying elements, such as Cr, Ni, Mo and Cu. In the studies behind the preparation of mixes, Schaeffler’s diagram was taken into consideration. Prepared mixes have been sintered in a vacuu...

  5. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lešnjak, A.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels is studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shielding gases and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared. Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas, i.e., a 98 % Ar/2 % H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joints was compared to that of resistance-spot welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a larger weld spot diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same.

    El artículo describe el proceso de soldeo de aceros inoxidables ferríticos por puntos con plasma. La investigación se centró en el establecimiento de los parámetros óptimos de la soldadura, la definición del gas de plasma y de protección más adecuado, así como del equipo óptimo para la realización de la soldadura. Las uniones de láminas de aceros inoxidables ferríticos de 0,8 mm de espesor, soldadas a solape por puntos con plasma, se inspeccionaron visualmente y se ensayaron mecánicamente mediante el ensayo de cizalladura por tracción. Se realizaron macro pulidos. Los resultados de la investigación demostraron que la solución más adecuada para el soldeo por puntos con plasma es elegir el mismo gas de plasma que de protección. Es decir, una mezcla de 98 % de argón y 2 % de hidrógeno. La resistencia a la cizalladura por tracción de las uniones soldadas por puntos con plasma fue comparada con la resistencia de las uniones soldadas por resistencia por puntos. Se llegó a la conclusión de que las uniones soldadas por resistencia soportan una carga algo mayor que la uniones

  6. Surface modifications of stainless steel to minimise contamination in mass spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abda, J.; Douce, D.; Jones, G.; Skeldon, P.; Thompson, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of electrochemically grown and vapour deposited coatings on the build-up of contamination on stainless steel surfaces in the electrospray ionisation source of a mass spectrometer is investigated, together with their influence on the robustness of the instrument response. Quantification of the contamination build-up on flat samples, using white light interferometry, allowed the identification of the most beneficial treatments. Coating with electrochemically-grown anodic oxide and cathodic oxide films and amorphous carbon films doped with silicon or nitrogen resulted in reduced contamination compared with the uncoated stainless steel surface, and provided improved robustness of the instrument response.

  7. Surface stability and conductivity of a high Cr and Ni austenitic stainless steel plates for PEMFC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Rujin; SUN Juncai; WANG Jianli

    2006-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel as bipolar plate for PEMFC, electrochemical behavior of a high Cr and Ni austenitic stainless steel was studied in the solutions containing different concentration of H2SO4 and 2 mg·L-1 F-, and interfacial contact resistance was measured after corrosion tests. The experimental results show that the passive current density lowers with decreasing the concentration of H2SO4. The interfacial contact resistance between carbon paper and passive film formed in the simulated PEMFC environment is higher than the goal of bipolar plate for PEMFC. Surface conductivity should be further reduced by surface modification.

  8. Preparation and Characterization of Stainless Steel/TiC Nanocomposite Particles by Ball-milling Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wenyi; ZHOU Jian

    2009-01-01

    A stainless steel/10wt%TiC nanocomposite particles were prepared by high-energy ball-milling method using stainless steel, carbon and titanium as raw materials. The evolution of phase composition, microstructure and specific surface area of the stainless steel/TiC nanocomposite particles with increasing ball-milling time in the range of 0-100 h were investigated by XRD, SEM, TEM and BET techniques. The results showed that the stainless steel/TiC nano-composite particles were fabricated when the ball-milling time was longer than 20 h. However, the nanocomposite particles were soldered and agglomerated again when the ball-milling time was longer than 60 h. The microstructure of the composite particles transformed from lamellar structure to nanostructure during the repeated process of the cold welding and cracking. TEM image reveals clearly that the in-situ TiC nanoparticles with grain size of 3-8 nm are in the interior of the stainless steel/TiC nanocomposite particles obtained by ball-milling 100 h.

  9. Ferrite Quantification Methodologies for Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo Forgas Júnior

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to quantify ferrite content, three techniques, XRD, ferritoscope and optical metallography, were applied to a duplex stainless steel UNS S31803 solution-treated for 30 min at 1,000, 1,100 and 1,200 °C, and then compared to equilibrium of phases predicted by ThermoCalc® simulation. As expected, the microstructure is composed only by austenite and ferrite phases, and ferrite content increases as the solution treatment temperature increases. The microstructure presents preferred grains orientation along the rolling directions even for a sample solution treated for 30 min at 1,200 °C. For all solution treatment temperatures, the ferrite volume fractions obtained by XRD measurements were higher than those achieved by the other two techniques and ThermoCalc® simulation, probably due to texturing effect of previous rolling process. Values obtained by quantitative metallography look more assertive as it is a direct measurement method but the ferritoscope technique should be considered mainly for in loco measurement.

  10. Evaluation of Cutting Fluids in Multiple Reaming of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belluco, Walter; Zeng, Z.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2001-01-01

    subsequent reaming operations were carried out on austenitic stainless steel using high-speed-steel and solid carbide tools. The tested fluids were all significantly different from the reference fluid in at least some of the tested conditions. Significant differences down to 2 percent in cutting forces and 6...

  11. From flint to stainless steel: observations on surgical instrument composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkup, J.

    1993-01-01

    Man's failure to extract deeply embedded thorns and arrowheads, with bare hands and teeth, stimulated 'instrument substitutes' mimicking these appendages. Evidence from primitive communities suggest animal, plant and mineral items were employed, both before and after metal became the standard material of today's armamentarium. Changing surgical instrument composition has mirrored concurrent technology and manufacturing methods both of which are reviewed. Particular significance is accorded flint, bronze, crucible steel, thermal sterilisation, nickel-plate, stainless steel and disposable plastics. The paper is based on an exhibition From Flint to Stainless Steel on display at the College. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8215156

  12. Activating Flux Design for Laser Welding of Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马立; 胡绳荪; 胡宝; 申俊琦; 王勇慧

    2014-01-01

    The behaviors of YAG laser welding process of ferritic stainless steel with activating fluxes were investi-gated in this study. Some conventional oxides, halides and carbonates were applied in laser welding. The results showed that the effect of oxides on the penetration depth was more remarkable. Most activating fluxes improved the penetration more effectively at low power than that at high power. The uniform design was adopted to arrange the formula of multicomponent activating fluxes, showing that the optimal formula can make the penetration depth up to 2.23 times as large as that without flux, including 50%ZrO2, 12.09%CaCO3, 10.43%CaO and 27.48%MgO. Through the high-speed photographs of welding process, CaF2 can minimize the plasma volume but slightly improve the pene-tration capability.

  13. High surface area stainless steel brushes as cathodes in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Douglas F; Merrill, Matthew D; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-03-15

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are an efficient technology for generating hydrogen gas from organic matter, but alternatives to precious metals are needed for cathode catalysts. We show here that high surface area stainless steel brush cathodes produce hydrogen at rates and efficiencies similar to those achieved with platinum-catalyzed carbon cloth cathodes in single-chamber MECs. Using a stainless steel brush cathode with a specific surface area of 810 m2/m3, hydrogen was produced at a rate of 1.7 +/- 0.1 m3-H2/m3-d (current density of 188 +/- 10 A/m3) at an applied voltage of 0.6 V. The energy efficiency relative to the electrical energy input was 221 +/- 8%, and the overall energy efficiency was 78 +/- 5% based on both electrical energy and substrate utilization. These values compare well to previous results obtained using platinum on flat carbon cathodes in a similar system. Reducing the cathode surface area by 75% decreased performance from 91 +/- 3 A/m3 to 78 +/- 4 A/m3. A brush cathode with graphite instead of stainless steel and a specific surface area of 4600 m2/m3 generated substantially less current (1.7 +/- 0.0 A/m3), and a flat stainless steel cathode (25 m2/m3) produced 64 +/- 1 A/m3, demonstrating that both the stainless steel and the large surface area contributed to high current densities. Linear sweep voltammetry showed that the stainless steel brush cathodes both reduced the overpotential needed for hydrogen evolution and exhibited a decrease in overpotential over time as a result of activation. These results demonstrate for the first time that hydrogen production can be achieved at rates comparable to those with precious metal catalysts in MECs without the need for expensive cathodes.

  14. Liquid Phase Sintering of Highly Alloyed Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Troels

    1996-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering of stainless steel is usually applied to improve corrosion resistance by obtaining a material without an open pore system. The dense structure normally also give a higher strength when compared to conventional sintered steel. Liquid phase sintrering based on addition...... of boride to AISI 316L type steels have previously been studied, but were found to be sensitive to intergranular corrosion due to formation of intermetallic phases rich in chromium and molybdenum. In order to improve this system further, new investigations have focused on the use of higher alloyed stainless...... steel as base material. The stainless base powders were added different amounts and types of boride and sintered in hydrogen at different temperatures and times in a laboratory furnace. During sintering the outlet gas was analyzed and subsequently related to the obtained microstructure. Thermodynamic...

  15. Redemption of asthma pharmaceuticals among stainless steel and mild steel welders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Kristian Tore; Hansen, Johnni

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose was to examine bronchial asthma according to cumulative exposure to fume particulates conferred by stainless steel and mild steel welding through a proxy of redeemed prescribed asthma pharmaceuticals. METHODS: A Danish national company-based historical cohort of 5,303 male ever...... nonsignificant increased rate of redemption of asthma medicine was observed among high-level exposed stainless steel welders in comparison with low-level exposed welders (HR 1.54, 95 % CI 0.76-3.13). This risk increase was driven by an increase risk among non-smoking stainless steel welders (HR 1.46, 95 % CI 1.......06-2.02). Mild steel welding was not associated with increased risk of use asthma pharmaceuticals. CONCLUSION: The present study indicates that long-term exposure to stainless steel welding is related to increased risk of asthma in non-smokers....

  16. Effect of tin addition on the microstructure and properties of ferritic stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Li; Ji-peng Han; Zhou-hua Jiang; Pan He

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the effects of Sn on the inclusions as well as the mechanical properties and hot workability of ferritic stainless steel. Precipitation phases and inclusions in Sn-bearing ferritic stainless steel were observed, and the relationship between the workability and the microstructure of the steel was established. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis of the steel reveals that an almost pure Sn phase forms and MnS–Sn compound inclusions appear in the steel with a higher Sn content. Little Sn segregation was observed in grain boundaries and in the areas around sulfide inclusions;however, the presence of Sn does not adversely affect the workability of the steel con-taining 0.4wt%Sn. When the Sn content is 0.1wt%–0.4wt%, Sn improves the tensile strength and the plastic strain ratio and also improves the plasticity with increasing temperature. A mechanism of improving the workability of ferritic stainless steel induced by Sn addition was discussed:the presence of Sn lowers the defect concentration in the ultra-pure ferritic lattice and the good distribution of tin in the lattice overcomes the problem of hot brittleness that occurs in low-carbon steel as a result of Sn segregation.

  17. [Restoration of composite on etched stainless steel crowns. (1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, G; Zang, Y; Hosoya, Y

    1990-01-01

    Object of investigation The retention of composite resin to etched stainless steel crowns was tested as a possible method for restoring primary anterior teeth. Method employed 1) SEM observation Stainless steel crowns (Sankin Manufacture Co.) were etched with an aqua resia to create surface roughness and undercut to retain the composite resin to the crowns. Etching times were 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 20 minutes, then washed in a 70% alcohol solution using an ultrasonic washer and dried. A total of 96 etched samples and non etched control samples were observed through the scanning electron microscope (Hitachi 520). 2) Shear bond strength test Stainless steel crowns were etched in an aqua resia from 1 to 20 minutes, then washed and dried. Composite resin (Photo Clearfil A, Kuraray Co.) with the bonding agent was placed on the crowns and the shear bond strength was tested in 56 samples using an Autograph (DCS-500, Shimazu). Results 1) SEM observation showed that the etching surface of stainless steel crowns created surface roughness and undercut. The most desirable surface was obtained in the 3 to 5 minute etching time specimens. 2) The highest bond strength was obtained in a 3 minute etching specimen. It was 42.12 MPa, although 29.26 MPa in mean value. Conclusion Etching with an aqua resia increased the adherence of composite resin to the surface of stainless steel crowns.

  18. Antibacterial effect of silver nanofilm modified stainless steel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, F.; Kennedy, J.; Dhillon, M.; Flint, S.

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria can attach to stainless steel surfaces, resulting in the colonization of the surface known as biofilms. The release of bacteria from biofilms can cause contamination of food such as dairy products in manufacturing plants. This study aimed to modify stainless steel surfaces with silver nanofilms and to examine the antibacterial effectiveness of the modified surface. Ion implantation was applied to produce silver nanofilms on stainless steel surfaces. 35 keV Ag ions were implanted with various fluences of 1 × 1015 to 1 × 1017 ions•cm-2 at room temperature. Representative atomic force microscopy characterizations of the modified stainless steel are presented. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry spectra revealed the implanted atoms were located in the near-surface region. Both unmodified and modified stainless steel coupons were then exposed to two types of bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Streptococcus thermophilus, to determine the effect of the surface modification on bacterial attachment and biofilm development. The silver modified coupon surface fluoresced red over most of the surface area implying that most bacteria on coupon surface were dead. This study indicates that the silver nanofilm fabricated by the ion implantation method is a promising way of reducing the attachment of bacteria and delay biofilm formation.

  19. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudaia, F. B.; Khalil, E. O.; Esehiri, A. F.; Daw, K. E.

    2015-03-01

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe2C5. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  20. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abudaia, F. B., E-mail: fabudaia@yahoo.com; Khalil, E. O., E-mail: ekhalil9@yahoo.com; Esehiri, A. F., E-mail: Hope-eseheri@hotmail.co.uk; Daw, K. E., E-mail: Khawladaw@yahoo.com [University of Tripoli Department of Materials and Metallurgical Eng, Tripoli-Libya P.O.Box13589 (Libya)

    2015-03-30

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe{sub 2}C{sub 5}. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  1. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch. Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  2. Evaluation of Direct Diode Laser Deposited Stainless Steel 316L on 4340 Steel Substrate for Aircraft Landing Gear Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2010-4149 EVALUATION OF DIRECT DIODE LASER DEPOSITED STAINLESS STEEL 316L ON 4340 STEEL SUBSTRATE FOR AIRCRAFT LANDING GEAR...March 2010 – 01 March 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EVALUATION OF DIRECT DIODE LASER DEPOSITED STAINLESS STEEL 316L ON 4340 STEEL SUBSTRATE FOR...Code) N/A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 Evaluation of Direct Diode Laser Deposited Stainless Steel 316L on

  3. Ultrahigh Carbon Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherby, O. D.; Oyama, T.; Kum, D. W.; Walser, B.; Wadsworth, J.

    1985-06-01

    Recent studies and results on ultrahigh carbon (UHC) steels suggest that major development efforts on these steels are timely and that programs to evaluate prototype structural components should be initiated. These recent results include: the development of economical processing techniques incorporating a divorced eutectoid transformation, the improvement of room temperature strength and ductility by heat treatment, the enhancement of superplastic properties through dilute alloying with silicon, and the attainment of exceptional notch impact strength in laminated UHC steel composites manufactured through solid state bonding. The unique mechanical properties achieved in UHC steels are due to the presence of micron-size fer-rite grains and ultrafine spheroidized carbides.

  4. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Stainless Steel Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, William H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lou, Xiaoyuan [General Electric (GE), Wilmington, NC (United States); List, III, Frederick Alyious [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Webber, David [General Electric (GE), Wilmington, NC (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and General Electric Company aimed to evaluate the mechanical properties, microstructure, and porosity of the additively manufactured 316L stainless steel by ORNL’s Renishaw AM250 machine for nuclear application. The program also evaluated the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue crack growth rate of the same material in high temperature water environments. Results show the properties of this material to be similar to the properties of 316L stainless steel fabricated additively with equipment from other manufacturers with slightly higher porosity. The stress corrosion crack growth rate is similar to that for wrought 316L stainless steel for an oxygenated high temperature water environment and slightly higher for a hydrogenated high temperature water environment. Optimized heat treatment of this material is expected to improve performance in high temperature water environments.

  5. Biomonitoring of genotoxic exposure among stainless steel welders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Boisen, T; Christensen, J M

    1992-01-01

    A biosurvey in the Danish metal industry measured the genotoxic exposure from stainless steel welding. The study comprised measurements of chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE), unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in peripheral lymphocytes and serum immunoglobulin G....... A higher frequency of chromosomal aberrations, classified as translocations, double minutes, exchanges and rings, was observed in stainless steel welders than in non-welders. SCE was lower in welders working with both MMA and TIG welding than in reference persons. N-Acetoxy-N-acetylaminofluorene (NA...... lymphocytes in exposed persons compared with non-exposed are suggested. MMA welding gave the highest exposure to chromium, an increased number of chromosomal aberrations and a decrease in SCE when compared with TIG welding. Consequently improvements in the occupational practice of stainless steel welding...

  6. Effect of electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An investigation on the influence of low frequency rotary electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting was experimentally conducted and carried out on an industrial trial basis. The results show that application of appropriate electromagnetic stirring parameters can obviously improve the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel, in which both columnar and equiaxed grains can be greatly refined and shrinkage porosity or cavity zone along centerline can be remarkably decreased due to eliminating intracrystalline and enlarging equiaxed grains zone. The industrial trials verify that the electromagnetic stirring intensity of austenitic stainless steel should be higher than that of plain carbon steel. Electromagnetic stirring has somewhat affected the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel even if the magnetic flux density of the electromagnetic stirring reaches 90 mT (amplitude reaches 141 mT ) in average at frequency f=3-4Hz, which provides a reference for the optimization of design and process parameters when applying the rotary electromagnetic stirrer

  7. Effect of electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Shu-cai

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on the influence of low frequency rotary electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting was experimentally conducted and carried out on an industrial trial basis. The results show that application of appropriate electromagnetic stirring parameters can obviously improve the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel, in which both columnar and equiaxed grains can be greatly refined and shrinkage porosity or cavity zone along centerline can be remarkably decreased due to eliminating intracrystalline and enlarging equiaxed grains zone. The industrial trials verify that the electromagnetic stirring intensity of austenitic stainless steel should be higher than that of plain carbon steel. Electromagnetic stirring has somewhat affected the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel even if the magnetic flux density of the electromagnetic stirring reaches 90 mT (amplitude reaches 141 mT in average at frequency f=3-4Hz, which provides a reference for the optimization of design and process parameters when applying the rotary electromagnetic stirrer.

  8. Biomaterial Studies on AISI 316L Stainless Steel after Magnetoelectropolishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Filippi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The polarisation characteristics of the electropolishing process in a magnetic field (MEP – magnetoelectropolishing, in comparison with those obtained under standard/conventional process (EP conditions, have been obtained. The occurrence of an EP plateau has been observed in view of the optimization of MEP process. Up-to-date stainless steel surface studies always indicated some amount of free-metal atoms apart from the detected oxides and hydroxides. Such a morphology of the surface film usually affects the thermodynamic stability and corrosion resistance of surface oxide layer and is one of the most important features of stainless steels. With this new MEP process we can improve metal surface properties by making the stainless steel more resistant to halides encountered in a variety of environments. Furthermore, in this paper the stainless steel surface film study results have been presented. The results of the corrosion research carried out by the authors on the behaviour of the most commonly used material - medical grade AISI 316L stainless steel both in Ringer’s body fluid and in aqueous 3% NaCl solution have been investigated and presented earlier elsewhere, though some of these results, concerning the EIS Nyquist plots and polarization curves are also revealed herein. In this paper an attempt to explain this peculiar performance of 316L stainless steel has been undertaken. The SEM studies, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS were performed on 316L samples after three treatments: MP – abrasive polishing (800 grit size, EP – conventional electrolytic polishing, and MEP – magnetoelectropolishing. It has been found that the proposed magnetoelectropolishing (MEP process considerably modifies the morphology and the composition of the surface film, thus leading to improved corrosion resistance of the studied 316L SS.

  9. 75 FR 67110 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... COMMISSION Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan AGENCY: United States International Trade... stainless steel flanges from India and Taiwan. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it has... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on forged stainless steel flanges from India...

  10. 77 FR 39467 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Final Results of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From India: Final Results of the Antidumping Duty... the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from India. The review..., 2012, the Department published Stainless Steel Bar From India: Preliminary Results and...

  11. 75 FR 59744 - Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan AGENCY... Korea and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel sheet and strip from Germany, Italy, Japan... antidumping duty orders on stainless steel sheet and strip from Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico,...

  12. 76 FR 74831 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... COMMISSION Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water AGENCY...- ISG-2011-01, ``Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water... management of stainless steel structures and components exposed to treated borated water. In response to...

  13. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  14. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This... content in stainless steel weld metal. It updates the guide to remove references to outdated standards...

  15. Studies of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther

    During the present work crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including ·Application of known information to predict solidification phases from the alloy...... investigated and recommendations are given. From studies of literature it is found that the austenitic stainless steels have lowest crack susceptibility by a solidification course leaving approximately 15% rest ferrite in the weld metal. The alloys properties and the solidification rate determines the amount...

  16. Topographical Anisotropy and Wetting of Ground Stainless Steel Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Bellmann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic and physico-chemical methods were used for a comprehensive surface characterization of different mechanically modified stainless steel surfaces. The surfaces were analyzed using high-resolution confocal microscopy, resulting in detailed information about the topographic properties. In addition, static water contact angle measurements were carried out to characterize the surface heterogeneity of the samples. The effect of morphological anisotropy on water contact angle anisotropy was investigated. The correlation between topography and wetting was studied by means of a model of wetting proposed in the present work, that allows quantifying the air volume of the interface water drop-stainless steel surface.

  17. Deformation and rupture of stainless steel under cyclic, torsional creep

    OpenAIRE

    Rees, DWA

    2008-01-01

    Copyright 2008 @ Engineering Integrity Society. Recent results from a long-term, strain-limited, cyclic creep test program upon stainless steel tubes are given. The test conditions employed were: constant temperature 500 °C, shear stress Ƭ = ± 300 MPa and shear strain limits ƴ = ± 4%. It is believed that a cyclic creep behaviour for the material has been revealed that has not been reported before in the literature. That is, the creep curves for stainless steel under repeated, shear stress...

  18. Corrosion behaviour of some conventional stainless steels in electrolyzing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal NASSAR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, attempts were made to increase the amount of hydrogen generated from the water electrolysis process. Some conventional stainless steels (316; 409; 410 and 430 were used as anode and cathode in electrolysis process. Further study was carried out on the corrosion trend in all the investigated metals. It is observed that the electrode material can effect on the amount of hydrogen generate by electrolyzing process and metal composition of the stainless steels effects on the rate of corrosion.

  19. Comparison of antibacterial ability of copper and stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Ping; ZHANG Wen; TANG Hui; ZHANG Xinai; JIN Litong; FENG Zhen; WU Zirong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,the electro-analysis and spectrophotometric analysis methods were used to study the antibacterial ability of copper and stainless steel materials.When Escherichia coli (E.coli) and photo-bacteria were used as samples,the antibacterial effect of stainless steel was very weak,while the percentage of bacteria dying from exposure to metallic copper for 30 min was over 90%.The antibacterial ability of copper has a potential application in the field of disinfection,food packaging and piping of drinking water.

  20. Impact toughness of tungsten films deposited on martensite stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ning-kang; YANG Bin; WANG De-zhi

    2005-01-01

    Tungsten films were deposited on stainless steel Charpy specimens by magnetron sputtering followed by electron beam heat treatment. Charpy impact tests and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate the ductile-brittle transition behavior of the specimens. With decreasing test temperature the fracture mode was transformed from ductile to brittle for both kinds of specimens with and without W films. The data of the crack initiation energy, crack propagation energy, impact absorbing energy, fracture time and deflection as well as the fracture morphologies at test temperature of -70 ℃ show that W films can improve the impact toughness of stainless steel.

  1. Ozone decay on stainless steel and sugarcane bagasse surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Corrêa, Jorge A.; Oliveira, Carlos; Amorim, Jayr

    2013-07-01

    Ozone was generated using dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure to treat sugarcane bagasse for bioethanol production. It was shown that interaction of ozone molecules with the pretreatment reactor wall (stainless steel) needs to be considered during bagasse oxidation in order to evaluate the pretreatment efficiency. The decomposition coefficients for ozone on both materials were determined to be (3.3 ± 0.2) × 10-8 for stainless steel and (2.0 ± 0.3) × 10-7 for bagasse. The results have indicated that ozone decomposition has occurred more efficiently on the biomass material.

  2. The effect of rolling on carbon steel and stainless steel metallurgy composite panels%轧制对碳钢不锈钢冶金结合的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杏玮

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of the global economy and the extensive use of land resource,exploitation of ocean energy has been more and more attention. The harsh environment of the ocean put forward higher requirements to the equipment and materials. Faced with this complex environment,the characteristics of bimetallic composite materials have a huge advantage. The composite-material which consist of carbon steel,brazing layer and stainless steel was investigated in order to reveal the change on the bonding strength of the binding layer after rolling. Then, the change on microstructure which was in the vicinity of the weld was analyzed by metallurgical microscope. The tensile fracture of interface before and after rolling was also characterized by scanning electron microscope to analyze the its bonding strength. Finally,we could come some expectant conclusions.%随着全球经济的飞速发展和对陆地资源的大量使用,更深更远的海洋中的能源开采受到了越来越多的重视,而海洋的苛刻环境就对设备材料提出了更高的要求。面对这种复杂的环境时,双金属复合材料的特性就有了巨大的优势。本文针对在碳钢表面预镀镍钼磷合金钎料制备出的碳钢+中间钎焊层+外层不锈钢的复合材料,研究经过轧制处理后其结合层结合强度的变化,利用金相显微镜分析焊缝附近组织的变化,扫描电子显微镜分析拉伸断口以此来对轧制前后结合强度进行分析。

  3. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

    2012-09-19

    It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, which is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk sulfide

  4. Bactericidal behavior of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Huang, Xiaobo; Ma, Yong; Lin, Naiming; Fan, Ailan; Tang, Bin

    2012-10-01

    Stainless steels are one of the most common materials used in health care environments. However, the lack of antibacterial advantage has limited their use in practical application. In this paper, antibacterial stainless steel surfaces with different Cu contents have been prepared by plasma surface alloying technology (PSAT). The steel surface with Cu content 90 wt.% (Cu-SS) exhibits strong bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) within 3 h. Although the Cu-containing surface with Cu content 2.5 wt.% (CuNi-SS) can also kill all tested bacteria, this process needs 12 h. SEM observation of the bacterial morphology and an agarose gel electrophoresis were performed to study the antibacterial mechanism of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces against E. coli. The results indicated that Cu ions are released when the Cu-containing surfaces are in contact with bacterial and disrupt the cell membranes, killing the bacteria. The toxicity of Cu-alloyed surfaces does not cause damage to the bacterial DNA. These results provide a scientific explanation for the antimicrobial applications of Cu-containing stainless steel. The surfaces with different antibacterial abilities could be used as hygienic surfaces in healthcare-associated settings according to the diverse requirement of bactericidal activities.

  5. Electrochemically induced annealing of stainless-steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, G. T.; Hutchings, I. M.; Sasaki, K.

    2000-10-01

    Modification of the surface properties of metals without affecting their bulk properties is of technological interest in demanding applications where surface stability and hardness are important. When austenitic stainless steel is heavily plastically deformed by grinding or rolling, a martensitic phase transformation occurs that causes significant changes in the bulk and surface mechanical properties of the alloy. This martensitic phase can also be generated in stainless-steel surfaces by cathodic charging, as a consequence of lattice strain generated by absorbed hydrogen. Heat treatment of the steel to temperatures of several hundred degrees can result in loss of the martensitic structure, but this alters the bulk properties of the alloy. Here we show that martensitic structures in stainless steel can be removed by appropriate electrochemical treatment in aqueous solutions at much lower temperature than conventional annealing treatments. This electrochemically induced annealing process allows the hardness of cold-worked stainless steels to be maintained, while eliminating the brittle martensitic phase from the surface. Using this approach, we are able to anneal the surface and near-surface regions of specimens that contain rolling-induced martensite throughout their bulk, as well as those containing surface martensite induced by grinding. Although the origin of the electrochemical annealing process still needs further clarification, we expect that this treatment will lead to further development in enhancing the surface properties of metals.

  6. High temperature carburizing of a stainless steel with uranium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sar Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I kaya, Yueksel, E-mail: sakaya@science.ankara.edu.tr [Ankara University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Tandogan, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Oenal, Mueserref [Ankara University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Tandogan, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-11-25

    Graphical abstract: Temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient for carbon atoms in steel by carburizing with uranium carbide was found as: D = 2.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} exp (-66753/RT) in m{sup 2} s{sup -1} microhardness measurements. Changes in thermodynamic quantities by formation of an activated complex with temperature were obtained as follows: {Delta}H{sup numbersign} = 66741-8.3T J mol{sup -1}, {Delta}C{sub p}{sup numbersign} = 8.3 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1}, ln K{sup numbersign} = -66741/RT = (8.3/R)lnT-48.3, {Delta}G{sup numbersign} = 66741 + 8.3T lnT + 48.3RT J mol{sup -1}, and {Delta}S{sup numbersign} = -409.9-8.3 lnT in J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diffusion and activated complex theories were applied on the carburizing of steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carburizing of steel was investigated by microhardness measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diffusion coefficient of carbon in the steel was determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamic quantities by formation an activated complex were determined. - Abstract: Diffusion theory (DT) and activated complex theory (ACT) were applied to the carburizing process of austenitic stainless steel 1.4988 with uranium carbide by sodium bonding at 773, 873, 973 and 1073 K for 1000 h. Microhardness profiles of the carburized steel specimens were obtained. Diffusion coefficient (D) of carbon atoms into the steel were calculated for each temperature by using the microhardness values instead of the carbon concentrations in the approximate solution of the second Fick's equation. Arrhenius equation for the carburizing process was found as: D = 2.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} exp (-66753/RT) in m{sup 2} s{sup -1}. Equilibrium constant (K{sup numbersign}) and enthalpy of activation ({Delta}H{sup numbersign}) for the formation of an activated complex calculated for each temperature from the Eyring equation using the diffusion coefficient instead of the

  7. Ionic bombardment of stainless steel by nitrogen and nickel ions immersion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Ling; HU Yong-jun; XU jian; MENG Ji-long

    2008-01-01

    A new nitriding process was used to carry out the ionic bombardment, in which nickel ion was introduced. The microstructure, composition and properties of the treated stainless steel were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy(SEM), micro-hardness test and electrochemistry method. The results show that the hardness of the stainless steel is greatly increased after ionic bombardment under nitrogen and nickel ions immersion. Vickers' hardness as high as Hv1268 is obtained. The bombarded stainless steel is of a little reduction in corrosion resistance, as compared with the original stainless steel. However, as compared with the traditional ion-nitriding stainless steel, the corrosion resistance is greatly improved.

  8. Effect of ultrafine grain on tensile behaviour and corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by cold rolling and annealing. The tensile properties were investigated at room temperature. Comparing with coarse grained stainless steel, ultrafine grained sample showed higher strength and plasticity. In addition, grain size changed deformation orientation. The strain induced α'-martensite was observed in coarse grained 2205 duplex stainless steel with large strain. However, the grain refinement inhibited the transformation of α'-martensite;nevertheless, more deformation twins improved the strength and plasticity of ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel. In addition, the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium chloride solution.

  9. Stainless steel 301 and Inconel 718 hydrogen embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgeier, R. K.; Forman, R.

    1970-01-01

    Conditions and results of tensile tests of 26 Inconel 718 and four cryoformed stainless steel specimens are presented. Conclusions determine maximum safe hydrogen operating pressure for cryogenic pressure vessels and provide definitive information concerning flaw growth characteristics under the most severe temperature and pressure conditions

  10. Research of cold-rolling oil for stainless sheet steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The research & application of cold rolling oil for stainless sheet steel are introduced inthis paper. The results indicate that this oil has well properties of anti-wear, oxidation, emulsifyingand fine rust-preventing characteristics, it can meet the employable demands of SENDZIMIR highspeed rolling mill at all.

  11. Towards commercialization of fast gaseous nitrocarburising stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    A novel method for fast and versatile low temperature nitrocarburising of stainless steel has recently been invented by the present authors. Selected results obtained with this new surface hardening process are presented. It is shown that it is possible to obtain a case thickness of 20 μm...

  12. Anomalous kinetics of lath martensite formation in stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Pantleon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of lath martensite formation in Fe-17.3 wt-%Cr-7.1 wt-%Ni-1.1 wt-%Al-0.08 wt-%C stainless steel was investigated with magnetometry and microscopy. Lath martensite forms during cooling, heating and isothermally. For the first time, it is shown by magnetometry during extremely slow...

  13. Assessment of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    Crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including (1) Application of known information to predict solidification phases, (2) Weld metal solidification rate...

  14. Microstructural Characterization of Low Temperature Gas Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work presents microstructural investigations of the surface zone of low temperature gas nitrided precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel AISI 630. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the present phases after successive removal of very thin sections...

  15. Developments of New Lubricants for Cold Forging of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenberg, Thomas; Christensen, Erik; Olesen, P.

    1997-01-01

    Two new lubricant systems for cold forging of stainless steel have been developed. The main component of these systems are FeCl3 and ZnCa2(PO4)2, respectively. Both lubricant systems have been tested using a backward extrusion test. The results show excellent lubricating properties with respect...

  16. Failure Assessment Diagram for Brazed 304 Stainless Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Yory

    2011-01-01

    Interaction equations were proposed earlier to predict failure in Albemet 162 brazed joints. Present study demonstrates that the same interaction equations can be used for lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in 304 stainless steel joints brazed with silver-based filler metals as well as for construction of the Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD).

  17. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  18. Nanoparticle Treated Stainless Steel Filters for Metal Vapor Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murph, Simona E. Hunyadi; Larsen, George K.; Korinko, Paul; Coopersmith, Kaitlin J.; Summer, Ansley J.; Lewis, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    The ability to sequester vapor phase radioactive compounds during industrial processes reduces the exposure of workers and the environment to dangerous radioactive materials. Nanomaterials have a lot of potential in this area because they typically demonstrate size- and shape-dependent properties with higher reactivity than bulk. This is due to the increased surface area-to-volume ratio and quantum size effects. In this report, we developed a gold nanomaterial-treated stainless steel filter, namely wools and coupons, that can be efficiently used for zinc vapor sequestration. Without nanoparticle modification, stainless steel coupons do not react or alloy with Zn. Gold nanomaterials were grown onto various stainless steel filters using solution chemistry that is amenable to scaling up. Materials were characterized by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering before and after exposure to zinc vapors. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy confirm the formation of gold-zinc alloys after Zn vapor exposure. The effect of surface topography on nanoparticle morphology, size and loading density were also investigated, and stainless steel surface defects were found to have an impact on the Au NP growth and subsequently Zn sequestration.

  19. Cobalt chromium stents versus stainless steel stents in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Ahmed Tantawy

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: We concluded that no significant statistical difference was found between the two stents (cobalt-chromium alloy bare metal stent versus conventional bare metal stainless steel stent in diabetic patients regarding (initial procedural success, in-hospital complications, the incidence of ISR at follow up, event-free survival at follow up.

  20. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Shankar; T P S Gill; S L Mannan; S Sundaresan

    2003-06-01

    Solidification cracking is a significant problem during the welding of austenitic stainless steels, particularly in fully austenitic and stabilized compositions. Hot cracking in stainless steel welds is caused by low-melting eutectics containing impurities such as S, P and alloy elements such as Ti, Nb. The WRC-92 diagram can be used as a general guide to maintain a desirable solidification mode during welding. Nitrogen has complex effects on weld-metal microstructure and cracking. In stabilized stainless steels, Ti and Nb react with S, N and C to form low-melting eutectics. Nitrogen picked up during welding significantly enhances cracking, which is reduced by minimizing the ratio of Ti or Nb to that of C and N present. The metallurgical propensity to solidification cracking is determined by elemental segregation, which manifests itself as a brittleness temperature range or BTR, that can be determined using the varestraint test. Total crack length (TCL), used extensively in hot cracking assessment, exhibits greater variability due to extraneous factors as compared to BTR. In austenitic stainless steels, segregation plays an overwhelming role in determining cracking susceptibility.

  1. Nanoparticle Treated Stainless Steel Filters for Metal Vapor Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murph, Simona E. Hunyadi; Larsen, George K.; Korinko, Paul; Coopersmith, Kaitlin J.; Summer, Ansley J.; Lewis, Rebecca

    2016-12-01

    The ability to sequester vapor phase radioactive compounds during industrial processes reduces the exposure of workers and the environment to dangerous radioactive materials. Nanomaterials have a lot of potential in this area because they typically demonstrate size- and shape-dependent properties with higher reactivity than bulk. This is due to the increased surface area-to-volume ratio and quantum size effects. In this report, we developed a gold nanomaterial-treated stainless steel filter, namely wools and coupons, that can be efficiently used for zinc vapor sequestration. Without nanoparticle modification, stainless steel coupons do not react or alloy with Zn. Gold nanomaterials were grown onto various stainless steel filters using solution chemistry that is amenable to scaling up. Materials were characterized by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering before and after exposure to zinc vapors. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy confirm the formation of gold-zinc alloys after Zn vapor exposure. The effect of surface topography on nanoparticle morphology, size and loading density were also investigated, and stainless steel surface defects were found to have an impact on the Au NP growth and subsequently Zn sequestration.

  2. Elaboration of selective solar energy absorbers beginning with stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aries, L.; Bonino, J.P.; Benavente, R.; Laaouini, A.; Traverse, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    An original simple and cheap method of elaboration of selective surfaces is described. The method involves anodic oxydation of stainless steel in acid solution with addition of sulfides; chemical conversion of the metallic surface is achieved. The selective surfaces exhibit an excellent thermal stability.

  3. Transformation in Austenitic Stainless Steel Sheet under Different Loading Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogaard, van den A.H.; Krauer, J.; Hora, P.

    2011-01-01

    The stress-strain relation for austenitic stainless steels is based on 2 main contributions: work hardening and a phase transformation from austenite to martensite. The transformation is highly temperature dependent. In most models for phase transformation from austenite to martensite, the stress tr

  4. Metal release from stainless steel in biological environments: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2015-03-29

    Due to its beneficial corrosion resistance, stainless steel is widely used in, e.g., biomedical applications, as surfaces in food contact, and for products intended to come into skin contact. Low levels of metals can be released from the stainless steel surface into solution, even for these highly corrosion resistant alloys. This needs to be considered in risk assessment and management. This review aims to compile the different metal release mechanisms that are relevant for stainless steel when used in different biological settings. These mechanisms include corrosion-induced metal release, dissolution of the surface oxide, friction-induced metal release, and their combinations. The influence of important physicochemical surface properties, different organic species and proteins in solution, and of biofilm formation on corrosion-induced metal release is discussed. Chemical and electrochemical dissolution mechanisms of the surface oxides of stainless steel are presented with a focus on protonation, complexation/ligand-induced dissolution, and reductive dissolution by applying a perspective on surface adsorption of complexing or reducing ligands and proteins. The influence of alloy composition, microstructure, route of manufacture, and surface finish on the metal release process is furthermore discussed as well as the chemical speciation of released metals. Typical metal release patterns are summarized.

  5. Immobilization of mesoporous silica particles on stainless steel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqua, Luigi; Morra, Marco

    2017-03-01

    A preliminary study aimed to the nano-engineering of stainless steel surface is presented. Aminopropyl-functionalized mesoporous silica is covalently and electrostatically anchored on the surface of stainless steel plates. The anchoring is carried out through the use of a nanometric spacer, and two different spacers are proposed (both below 2 nm in size). The first sample is obtained by anchoring to the stainless steel amino functionalized, a glutaryl dichloride spacer. This specie forms an amide linkage with the amino group while the unreacted acyl groups undergo hydrolysis giving a free carboxylic group. The so-obtained functionalized stainless steel plate is used as substrate for anchoring derivatized mesoporous silica particles. The second sample is prepared using 2-bromo-methyl propionic acid as spacer (BMPA). Successively, the carboxylic group of propionic acid is condensed to the aminopropyl derivatization on the external surface of the mesoporous silica particle through covalent bond. In both cases, a continuous deposition (coating thickness is around 10 μm) is obtained, in fact, XPS data do not reveal the metal elements constituting the plate. The nano-engineering of metal surfaces can represent an intriguing opportunity for producing long-term drug release or biomimetic surface.

  6. Graphene Nanoplatelets Based Protective and Functionalizing Coating for Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Jayanta; Kozlova, Jekaterina; Sammelselg, Väino

    2015-09-01

    Stainless steel is the most widely used alloy for many industrial and everyday applications, and protection of this alloy substrate against corrosion is an important industrial issue. Here we report a promising application of graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets as effective corrosion inhibitors for AISI type 304 stainless steel alloy. The graphene oxide and graphene coatings on the stainless steel substrates were prepared using spin coating techniques. Homogeneous and complete surface coverage by the graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets were observed with a high-resolution scanning electron microscope. The corrosion inhibition ability of these materials was investigated through measurement of open circuit potential and followed by potentiodymamic polarization analysis in aqueous sodium chloride solution before and after a month of immersion. Analyzed result exhibits effective corrosion inhibition for both substrates coated with graphene oxide or graphene nanoplatelets by increasing corrosion potential, pitting potential and decreasing passive current density. The corrosion inhibition ability of the coated substrates has not changed even after the long-term immersion. The result showed both graphene materials can be used as an effective corrosion inhibitor for the stainless steel substrates, which would certainly increase lifetime the substrate. However, long-term protection ability of the graphene coated susbtsrate showed somewhat better inhibition performance than the ones coated with graphene oxide.

  7. Electroless nickel plating on stainless steels and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Procedures for applying an adherent electroless nickel plating on 303 SE, 304, and 17-7 PH stainless steels, and 7075 aluminum alloy was developed. When heat treated, the electroless nickel plating provides a hard surface coating on a high strength, corrosion resistant substrate.

  8. Risk of lung cancer according to mild steel and stainless steel welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anita Rath; Thulstrup, Ane Marie; Hansen, Johnni

    2007-01-01

    to welding fume particulates. METHODS: Male metal workers employed at least 1 year at one or more Danish stainless or mild steel industrial companies from 1964 through 1984 were enrolled in a cohort. Data on occupational and smoking history were obtained by questionnaire in 1986. Welders in the cohort who.......06-1.70)]. Among the stainless steel welders, the risk increased significantly with increasing accumulative welding particulate exposure, while no exposure-response relation was found for mild steel welders, even after adjustment for tobacco smoking and asbestos exposure. CONCLUSIONS: The study corroborates...... earlier findings that welders have an increased risk of lung cancer. While exposure-response relations indicate carcinogenic effects related to stainless steel welding, it is still unresolved whether the mild steel welding process carries a carcinogenic risk....

  9. Facile, soot free approach toward synthesis of carbon nanoropes via chemical vapor deposition of acetylene in the presence of MnFe2O4 coated on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Vivek; Bharadwaj, S.; Amareshwari, K.; Himabindu, V.; Rhee, Kyong Yop; Park, Soo-Jin; Hui, David

    2015-12-01

    High density, soot free, novel and a facile approach toward synthesis of carbon nanoropes (CNRs) were successfully carried out in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) coated on stainless steel foil (SS 316 grade) was used as a catalyst to initiate the growth of CNR. The coated catalyst was introduced into the CVD and the chamber temperature was set at 700 °C later followed with the release of acetylene (50 sccm) and nitrogen (500 sccm) gas, respectively. Total reaction continued until 30 min. No purification or oxidation process of the soot was involved. Analysis reveals the presence of intermingled CNRs with semi crystalline nature of the sample. The elemental analysis confirms the presence of manganese and iron whereas Raman spectrum shows the characteristic narrow G and D bands. The sample displays a super-paramagnetic behavior and is thermally stable up to 500-550 °C presenting a strong exothermic reaction.

  10. Behaviour of cold-formed stainless steel beams at elevated temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju CHEN; Wei-liang JIN

    2008-01-01

    A study of the behaviour of constructional cold-formed stainless steel beams at elevated temperatures was conducted in this paper.An accurate finite element model(FEM)for stainless steel beams was developed using the finite element program ABAQUS.Stainless steel beams having different cross-sections were simulated in this study.The nonlinear FEM was verified against the experimental results.Generally,the developed FEM could accurately simulate the stainless steel beams.Based on the high temperature stainless steel material test results,a parametric study was carried out on stainless steel beams at elevated tem-peratures using the verified FEM.Both high strength stainless steel EN 1.4462 and normal strength stainless steel EN 1.4301 were considered.A total of 42 stainless steel beams were simulated in the parametric study.The effect of temperatures on the behaviour of stainless steel beams was investigated.In addition,a limiting temperature for stainless steel beams was also proposed.

  11. A Feasibility Study on Low Temperature Thermochemical Treatments of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Fluidized Bed Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruman, Esa; Sun, Yong; Triwiyanto, Askar; Manurung, Yupiter H. P.; Adesta, Erry Y.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the feasibility of using an industrial fluidized bed furnace to perform low temperature thermochemical treatments of austenitic stainless steels has been studied, with the aim to produce expanded austenite layers with combined wear and corrosion resistance, similar to those achievable by plasma and gaseous processes. Several low temperature thermochemical treatments were studied, including nitriding, carburizing, combined nitridingcarburizing (hybrid treatment), and sequential carburizing and nitriding. The results demonstrate that it is feasible to produce expanded austenite layers on the investigated austenitic stainless steel by the fluidized bed heat treatment technique, thus widening the application window for the novel low temperature processes. The results also demonstrate that the fluidized bed furnace is the most effective for performing the hybrid treatment, which involves the simultaneous incorporation of nitrogen and carbon together into the surface region of the component in nitrogen and carbon containing atmospheres. Such hybrid treatment produces a thicker and harder layer than the other three processes investigated.

  12. Corrosion properties of S-phase layers formed on medical grade austenitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhagiar, Joseph; Dong, Hanshan

    2012-02-01

    The corrosion properties of S-phase surface layers formed in AISI 316LVM (ASTM F138) and High-N (ASTM F1586) medical grade austenitic stainless steels by plasma surface alloying with nitrogen (at 430°C), carbon (at 500°C) and both carbon and nitrogen (at 430°C) has been investigated. The corrosion behaviour of the S-phase layers in Ringer's solutions was evaluated using potentiodynamic and immersion corrosion tests. The corrosion damage was evaluated using microscopy, hardness testing, inductive coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The experimental results have demonstrated that low-temperature nitriding, carburising and carbonitriding can improve the localised corrosion resistance of both industrial and medical grade austenitic stainless steels as long as the threshold sensitisation temperature is not reached. Carburising at 500°C has proved to be the best hardening treatment with the least effect on the corrosion resistance of the parent alloy.

  13. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitnaker, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  14. Microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep groundwater environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliina eRajala

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The metallic low and intermediate level radioactive waste generally consists of carbon steel and stainless steels. The corrosion rate of carbon steel in deep groundwater is typically low, unless the water is very acidic or microbial activity in the environment is high. Therefore, the assessment of microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep bedrock environment has become important for evaluating the safety of disposal of radioactive waste. Here we studied the corrosion inducing ability of indigenous microbial community from a deep bedrock aquifer. Carbon steel coupons were exposed to anoxic groundwater from repository site 100 m depth (Olkiluoto, Finland for periods of three and eight months. The experiments were conducted at both in situ temperature and room temperature to investigate the response of microbial population to elevated temperature. Our results demonstrate that microorganisms from the deep bedrock aquifer benefit from carbon steel introduced to the nutrient poor anoxic deep groundwater environment. In the groundwater incubated with carbon steel the planktonic microbial community was more diverse and 100-fold more abundant compared to the environment without carbon steel. The betaproteobacteria were the most dominant bacterial class in all samples where carbon steel was present, whereas in groundwater incubated without carbon steel the microbial community had clearly less diversity. Microorganisms induced pitting corrosion and were found to cluster inside the corrosion pits. Temperature had an effect on the species composition of microbial community and also affected the corrosion deposits layer formed on the surface of carbon steel.

  15. Reduction mechanism of stainless steelmaking dust and carbon pellets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Bing; SONG Hai-chen; CHAI Li-yuan; WANG Ja; WANG Yun-yan; MIN Xiao-bo; HE De-wen

    2005-01-01

    The reduction mechanism of stainless steelmaking dust and carbon pellets was investigated. The metal oxides present in the dust were reduced by carbon with a new direct reduction technology. The direct reduction parameters were determined by measuring the rates of dust melting and reduction. The results show that the rate of reduction is faster than that of the melting. Both melting and reduction processes are accelerated by the direct transfer of heat from the smelting slag. The recovery of metals is improved while the pellets were added to argon oxygen decarburization(AOD) or vacuum oxygen decarburization(VOD) vessels in the late period of the first smelting stage. More carbon travels to the slag instead of to the steel because the diffusion coefficient of carbon, impacted by the viscosity of slag and surface tension between slag and melted steel, is larger in the slag than in the steel. The viscosity of slag is about 2.54Pa·s and the surface tension between slag and steel is about 490mN/m.

  16. Modelling of composition and stress profiles in low temperature surface engineered stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Thermochemical surface engineering by nitriding/carburizing of stainless steel causes a surface zone of expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behavior. As a consequence of the thermochemical surface engineering, huge residual...

  17. Deformation behavior of open-cell stainless steel foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, A.C., E-mail: a.kaya@campus.tu-berlin.de; Fleck, C.

    2014-10-06

    This study presents the deformation and cell collapse behavior of open-cell stainless steel foams. 316L stainless-steel open-cell foams with two porosities (30 and 45 pores per inch, ppi) were produced with the pressureless powder metallurgical method, and tested in quasi-static compression. As a result of the manufacturing technique, 316L stainless steel open-cell foams have a high amount of microporosity. The deformation behavior was investigated on a macroscopic scale by digital image correlation (DIC) evaluation of light micrographs and on the microscopic scale by in situ loading of cells in the scanning electron microscope. The deformation behavior of the metal foams was highly affected by microstructural features, such as closed pores and their distribution throughout the foam specimen. Moreover, the closed pores made a contribution to the plateau stress of the foams through cell face stretching. Strut buckling and bending are the dominant mechanisms in cell collapse. Although there are edge defects on the struts, the struts have an enormous plastic deformation capability. The cell size of the steel foams had no significant effect on the mechanical properties. Due to the inhomogeneities in the microstructure, the measured plateau stresses of the foams showed about 20% scatter at the same relative density.

  18. Residual stresses and fatigue in a duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Johan

    1999-05-01

    Duplex stainless steels, consisting of approximately equal amounts of austenite and ferrite, often combine the best features of austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. They generally have good mechanical properties, including high strength and ductility, and the corrosion resistance is often better than conventional austenitic grades. This has lead to a growing use of duplex stainless steels as a material in mechanically loaded constructions. However, detailed knowledge regarding its mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms are still lacking. In this thesis special emphasis has been placed on the residual stresses and their influence on mechanical behaviour of duplex stainless steels. Due to the difference in coefficient of thermal expansion between the two phases, tensile microstresses are found in the austenitic phase and balancing compressive microstresses in the ferritic phase. The first part of this thesis is a literature survey, which will give an introduction to duplex stainless steels and review the fatigue properties of duplex stainless steels and the influence of residual stresses in two-phase material. The second part concerns the evolution of the residual stress state during uniaxial loading. Initial residual stresses were found to be almost two times higher in the transverse direction compared to the rolling direction. During loading the absolute value of the microstresses increased in the macroscopic elastic regime but started to decrease with increasing load in the macroscopic plastic regime. A significant increase of the microstresses was also found to occur during unloading. Finite element simulations also show stress variation within one phase and a strong influence of both the elastic and plastic anisotropy of the individual phases on the simulated stress state. In the third part, the load sharing between the phases during cyclic loading is studied. X-ray diffraction stress analysis and transmission electron microscopy show that even if

  19. Microstructure and antibacterial property of stainless steel implanted by Cu ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bo-fan; NI Hong-wei; XIONG Ping-yuan; XIONG Juan; DAN Zhi-gang

    2004-01-01

    Copper ions were implanted into AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by metal vapor vacuum are (MEVVA) with 60 - 100 keV energy and a dose range (0.2 - 5.0) × 1017 cm-2. Then Cu-implanted stainless steel was treated by a special antibacterial treatment. Antibacterial rates of Cu-implanted stainless steel, Cu-implanted stainless steel with special antibacterial treatment and un-implanted stainless steel were obtained by agar plate method. Phase composition in the implanted layer was analyzed by glancing X-ray diffraction (GXRD). Microstructure of antibacterial stainless steel was observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and changes of the bacterium appearance after 24 h antibacterial action on the surface of un-implanted and Cu-implanted stainless steel with antibacterial treatment were observed with bio-TEM respectively. The results show that stainless steel obtains antibacterial property against E. coli when the Cu ions dose approaches to the saturated one. A suitable amount of Cu-rich phase uniformly disperses on the surface of Cu-implanted stainless steel that is treated by the special antibacterial treatment. The Cu-rich phase naked on the surface has a function of damage to pericellular membrane and cell wall,the pericellular membrane is thickened and the karyon degraded, and finally, bacteria die. Cu-rich phase naked on the surface endows stainless steel with best antibacterial property.

  20. Analysis of the elements sputtered during the lanthanum implantation in stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, F. J.; Respaldiza, M. A.; Paúl, A.; Odriozola, J. A.; Lobato, J. M.; da Silva, M. F.; Redondo, L. M.; Soares, J. C.

    1998-04-01

    The evidence of the modification of the surface structure of the AISI-304 stainless steel during the implantation of lanthanum makes the analysis of the sputtered elements very interesting. Those sputtered elements are deposited on a carbon sheet placed in front of the steel being implanted, and studied by means of RBS and PIXE, together with the implanted specimens. Besides, the protective effect of the implanted ions during the high temperature oxidation is also studied by those techniques together with XRD and thermogravimetric methods.

  1. Analysis of the elements sputtered during the lanthanum implantation in stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ager, F.J.; Respaldiza, M.A. [Sevilla Univ. (Spain). Dept. de FAMN; Paul, A.; Odriozola, J.A.; Lobato, J.M. [ICMSE, Universidad de Sevilla-CSIC, P.O. Pox 874, 41071 Sevilla (Spain); Silva, M.F. da; Redondo, L.M. [ITN, E.N. 10, 2685 Sacavem (Portugal); Soares, J.C. [CFNUL, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1699 Lisboa Codex (Portugal)

    1998-04-01

    The evidence of the modification of the surface structure of the AISI-304 stainless steel during the implantation of lanthanum makes the analysis of the sputtered elements very interesting. Those sputtered elements are deposited on a carbon sheet placed in front of the steel being implanted, and studied by means of RBS and PIXE, together with the implanted specimens. Besides, the protective effect of the implanted ions during the high temperature oxidation is also studied by those techniques together with XRD and thermogravimetric methods. (orig.) 7 refs.

  2. Ultrahigh carbon steels, Damascus steels, and superplasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherby, O.D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Wadsworth, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The processing properties of ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCSs) have been studied at Stanford University over the past twenty years. These studies have shown that such steels (1 to 2.1% C) can be made superplastic at elevated temperature and can have remarkable mechanical properties at room temperature. It was the investigation of these UHCSs that eventually brought us to study the myths, magic, and metallurgy of ancient Damascus steels, which in fact, were also ultrahigh carbon steels. These steels were made in India as castings, known as wootz, possibly as far back as the time of Alexander the Great. The best swords are believed to have been forged in Persia from Indian wootz. This paper centers on recent work on superplastic UHCSs and on their relation to Damascus steels. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Fracture Behavior of Cold Sprayed 304 Stainless Steel Coating During Cold Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xian-ming; ZHANG Jun-bao; HAN Wei; ZHAO Jie

    2012-01-01

    The fracture behavior of cold sprayed 304 stainless steel coating in cold rolling process was studied. The 304 stainless steel coatings were deposited on low carbon steel substrate by cold gas dynamic spray (CGDS) and then cold rolled, respectively. The fracture morphology of the coatings was observed and analyzed, and the crack distri- butions along the longitudinal rolling direction of the coatings were also investigated and discussed. The results showed that the cohesive strength of the cold sprayed 304 stainless steel coating was too low to be cold rolled. Mi crocracks were formed in the as-sprayed coatings and ran perpendicularly to the rolling direction. The spacing dis- tance between these cracks decreased with the increase of the cold rolling reduction. In addition, it was also found that the initial crack generated at the surface of the coating and propagated from the surface to the interface along the weakly bonded particles. A theoretical analysis was developed for the coating fracture. It gave a critical minimum cohesive bonding strength of the coating for non-breaking in cold rolling process. The crack propagation manner of the cold rolled coatings was also discussed.

  4. Nitriding Process Characterization of Cold Worked AISI 304 and 316 Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Alfredo Monteiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nitriding behavior of austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304 and 316 was studied by different cold work degree (0% (after heat treated, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% before nitride processing. The microstructure, layer thickness, hardness, and chemical microcomposition were evaluated employing optical microscopy, Vickers hardness, and scanning electron microscopy techniques (WDS microanalysis. The initial cold work (previous plastic deformations in both AISI 304 and 306 austenitic stainless steels does not show special influence in all applied nitriding kinetics (in layer thicknesses. The nitriding processes have formed two layers, one external layer formed by expanded austenite with high nitrogen content, followed by another thinner layer just below formed by expanded austenite with a high presence of carbon (back diffusion. An enhanced diffusion can be observed on AISI 304 steel comparing with AISI 316 steel (a nitrided layer thicker can be noticed in the AISI 304 steel. The mechanical strength of both steels after nitriding processes reveals significant hardness values, almost 1100 HV, on the nitrided layers.

  5. Multilayer modelling of stainless steel with a nanocrystallised superficial layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, J. [Laboratoire Energetique Mecanique Electromagnetisme (LEME), EA4416, Universite Paris Ouest, 92410 Ville d' Avray (France); Waltz, L., E-mail: laurent.waltz@univ-montp2.fr [Laboratoire de Mecanique et Genie Civil de Montpellier (LMGC), University of Montpellier II, Place Eugene Bataillon, 34000 Montpellier (France); Montay, G.; Retraint, D.; Roos, A.; Francois, M. [Institut Charles Delaunay - LASMIS, UMR CNRS 6279, University of Technology of Troyes, 10010 Troyes (France)

    2012-02-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SMAT has been used for nanocrystallisation of an austenitic stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanical response of the nano-phase has been obtained by an indirect method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Minimisation of a stress formulated objective function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model predicts the strain at which diffuse necking occurs. - Abstract: In order to obtain the macroscopic mechanical response of a 316L stainless steel, nanocrystallised by Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT), a multilayer model is proposed. The constitutive behaviour of each layer is determined from tensile tests or by an inverse method and its thickness is evaluated from Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM and TEM) analyses and local hardness measurements. The consistency of the model is verified by its ability to predict the strain at which diffuse necking occurs.

  6. Surface treatment and corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravcová, M.; Palček, P.; Zatkalíková, V.; Tański, T.; Król, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this article results from corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L after different surface treatments are published. “As received” surface and surface after grinding resulted in lower resistance to pitting corrosion in physiological solution than electrochemically polished in H3PO4+H2SO4+H2O. Electropolishing also improved the surface roughness in comparison with the “as received” surface. Deposition of Al2O3 nanometric ALD coating improves the corrosion resistance of stainless steel in chloride-containing environment by shifting the breakdown potential toward more positive values. This oxide coating not only improves the corrosion resistance but it also affects the wettability of the surface, resulting in hydrophobic surface.

  7. Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaleski, Tania M. [San Jose State Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-10-30

    Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

  8. Failure Assessment of Stainless Steel and Titanium Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Yury A.

    2012-01-01

    Following successful application of Coulomb-Mohr and interaction equations for evaluation of safety margins in Albemet 162 brazed joints, two additional base metal/filler metal systems were investigated. Specimens consisting of stainless steel brazed with silver-base filler metal and titanium brazed with 1100 Al alloy were tested to failure under combined action of tensile, shear, bending and torsion loads. Finite Element Analysis (FEA), hand calculations and digital image comparison (DIC) techniques were used to estimate failure stresses and construct Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD). This study confirms that interaction equation R(sub sigma) + R(sub tau) = 1, where R(sub sigma) and R(sub t u) are normal and shear stress ratios, can be used as conservative lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in stainless steel and titanium brazed joints.

  9. COLD ROLLING ORTHODONTIC WIRES OF AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL AISI 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Santos Messner

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels wires are widely used in the final stages of orthodontic treatment. The objective of this paper is to study the process of conformation of rectangular wires from round wires commercial austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 by the process of cold rolling. The wire quality is evaluated by means of dimensional analysis, microhardness measurements, tensile strength and fractographic analysis of the wires subjected to tensile tests. Also a study on the application of finite element method to simulate the process, comparing the force and rolling stress obtained in the rolling is done. The simulation results are consistent with those obtained in the actual process and the rolled wires show ductile fracture, tensile strength and dimensional variations appropriate to orthodontic standards. The fracture morphology shows the model cup-cone type besides the high deformation and hardness inherent in the cold rolling process.

  10. Laser Welding Of Thin Sheet Of AISI 301 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, R.; Miranda, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    Preliminary results of an investigation on laser welding of AISI 301 stainless steel thin sheet are presented. Welds were made with a CO2 continuous wave laser, varying power density and welding speed. The welds were studied by optical and electron scanning microscopy, X-ray diffraction and hardness tests. Experimental results show that under appropriate conditions, sound welds are obtained, with a negligeable heat affected zoneanda fine microstructure in the fusion zone. The fusion zone shows a cellular - dendritic microstructure, with austenite and ferrite as the major constituents. Ferrite, whose content is 5 to 7%, is predominantly intradendritic with both vermicular and acicular morphologies. However some interdendritic ferrite may also be present. The characteristics of the structure suggest that the solidification mode of AISI 301 stainless steel is essentially ferritic.

  11. Stainless steel porous substrates produced by tape casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadelli, Elisa; Gondolini, Angela; Pinasco, Paola; Sanson, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    In this work the technological issues related to the production of tape cast large-area porous stainless steel supports for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) applications were carefully investigated. The slurry formulation was optimized in terms of amount and nature of the organic components needed: rice starch and polymethyl metacrylate were found to be, respectively, the most suitable pore former and binder because easily eliminated during the thermal treatment in reducing atmosphere. The compatibility of the binder system chosen with the most widely used solvents for screen printing inks was also evaluated. Finally the influence of the sintering temperature and of the refractory supports to be used during the thermal treatments onto the production of porous stainless steel supports was discussed. The whole process optimization allows to produce flat, crack-free metallic substrate 900-1000 μm thick, dimensions up to 5×5 cm and with a tailored porosity of 40% suitable for SOFCs application.

  12. Biomaterials. The Behavior of Stainless Steel as a Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda VISAN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The biomaterials belong to the broad range of biocompatible chemical substances (sometimes even an element, which can be used for a period of time to treat or replace a tissue, organ or function of the human body. These materials bring many advantages in the diagnosis, prevention and medical therapy, reducing downtime for patients, restoring their biological functions, improving hospital management. The market in Romania sells a wide range of biomaterials for dental, cardiovascular medicine, renal, etc. Scientific research contributes to the discovery of new biomaterials or testing known biomaterials, for finding new applications. The paper exemplifies this contribution by presenting the testing of passive stainless steel behaviour in albumin solution using technique of cyclic voltammetry. It was shown that passivation contribute to increased stability of stainless steel implants to corrosive body fluids.

  13. Surface nanocrystallization of stainless steel for reduced biofilm adherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Bin; Li, D Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Davis, Elisabeth M; Irvin, Randall T [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2H7 (Canada); Hodges, Robert S [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center at Fitzsimons, RC1 South Tower, Room 9121, PO Box 6511 MS 8101, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)], E-mail: dongyang@ualberta.ca

    2008-08-20

    Stainless steel is one of the most common metallic biomedical materials. For medical applications, its resistance to the adherence of biofilms is of importance to the elimination or minimization of bacterial infections. In this study, we demonstrate the effectiveness of a process combining surface nanocrystallization and thermal oxidation (or a recovery heat treatment in air) for reducing the biofilm's adherence to stainless steel. During this treatment, a target surface was sandblasted and the resultant dislocation cells in the surface layer were turned into nanosized grains by a subsequent recovery treatment in air. This process generated a more protective oxide film that blocked the electron exchange or reduced the surface activity more effectively. As a result, the biofilm's adherence to the treated surface was markedly minimized. A synthetic peptide was utilized as a substitute of biofilms to evaluate the adhesion between a treated steel surface and biofilms using an atomic force microscope (AFM) through measuring the adhesive force between the target surface and a peptide-coated AFM tip. It was shown that the adhesive force decreased with a decrease in the grain size of the steel. The corresponding surface electron work function (EWF) of the steel was also measured, which showed a trend of variation in EWF with the grain size, consistent with corresponding changes in the adhesive force.

  14. Measurement of local creep properties in stainless steel welds

    OpenAIRE

    Sakanashi, Y.; Gungor, S; Bouchard, J.

    2012-01-01

    A high temperature measurement system for creep deformation based on the digital image correlation (DIC) technique is described. The new system is applied to study the behaviour of a multi-pass welded joint in a high temperature tensile test and a load controlled creep test at 545°C. Spatially resolved tensile properties and time dependent creep deformation properties across a thick section type 316 stainless steel multi-pass welded joint are presented and discussed. Significantly lower creep...

  15. Study of creep cavitation in a stainless steel weldment

    OpenAIRE

    Jazaeri, H.; Bouchard, P. J.; Hutchings, M; Lindner, P.

    2012-01-01

    A study of creep cavities near reheat cracking in AISI Type 316H austenitic stainless steel headers, removed from long-time high temperature operation in nuclear power plants, is reported. It is shown how application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cryogenic fractography and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) can be applied, in a complementary way, to observe and quantify creep cavitation damage. Creep cavities in the vicinity of the crack are found to be mainly surrounding inter-gr...

  16. Laser surface modification of 316L stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Dey, Sangeetha; Muthuchamy, Adiyen A; Janaki Ram, G D; Das, Mitun; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2017-02-28

    Medical grade 316L stainless steel was laser surface melted (LSM) using continuous wave Nd-YAG laser in argon atmosphere at 1 and 5 mm/s. The treated surfaces were characterized using electron backscatter diffraction to study the influence of top surface crystallographic orientation and type of grain boundaries on corrosion resistance, wettability, and biocompatibility. The laser scan velocity was found to have a marginal influence on the surface roughness and the type of grain boundaries. However, the crystal orientation density was found to be relatively high in 1 mm/s samples. The LSM samples showed a higher concentration of {101} and {123} planes parallel to the sample surface as well as a higher fraction of low-angle grain boundaries. The LSM samples were found to exhibit better surface wettability and enhanced the viability and proliferation of human fetal osteoblast cells in vitro when compared to the untreated samples. Further, the corrosion protection efficiency of 316L stainless steel was improved up to 70% by LSM in as-processed condition. The increased concentration of {101} and {123} planes on surfaces of LSM samples increases their surface energy, which is believed to be responsible for the improved in vitro cell proliferation. Further, the increased lattice spacing of these planes and high concentration of low-energy grain boundaries in LSM samples would have contributed to the better in vitro corrosion resistance than untreated 316L stainless steel. Our results indicate that LSM can be a potential treatment option for 316L stainless steel-based biomedical devices to improve biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017.

  17. Are Sulfate Reducing Bacteria Important to the Corrosion of Stainless Steels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    steel specimens. Concentration of sulfide used was 10ŖM for direct comparison to the McNeil/Odom model1 which predicts sulfide mineral formation . Upon...sulfide mineral formation from stainless steels will be slower than for pure iron and that stainless steels with more than 6% molybdenum will be very

  18. Passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the passivation and electrochemical behavior of 316L stainless steel in chlorinated simulated concrete pore solutions at different pH was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The composition of the passive film and surface morphology were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results reveal that metastable pitting susceptibility, stable pitting corrosion, and composition of the passive film are influenced by pH value. After long time immersion, a bilayer structure passive film can be formed in this environment. The appearance of molybdates on the outermost surface layer, further enhancing the stability of the passive film. Moreover, the good pitting corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated concrete pore solution without carbonated is mainly due to the presence of high Cr/Fe ratio and molybdates ions within the passive film.

  19. Study of TiC+TiN Multiple Films On Type of 316L Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Qi; JIN Yong; HU Dong-ping; HUANG Ben-sheng; DENG Bai-quan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the synthesis process of TiC+TiN multiple films on super-low-carbon stainless steels is reported.The TiC layer is coated as the first layer in the multiple film, the change of growth rate of the film on the 316L Stainless steel is not same as the one on carbides substrates, while the mole ratio of CH4 to TiCl4 (mCH4/TiCl4) is changed from 1.2to 2.0. The Ti [C, N], as a kind of inter-layer between TiC and TiN layers, is helpful to improve the adhesion between the TiC and TiN layer. The cooling rate greatly influences the quality of the adhesion between the TiC+TiN film and substrates.

  20. Corrosion resistance properties of sintered duplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper was to examine the corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels using electrochemical methods in 1M NaCl solution. The influence of powder mixes preparation and cooling cycle after sintering on corrosion properties was evaluated.Design/methodology/approach: In presented study duplex stainless steels were obtained through powder metallurgy starting from austenitic, martensitic base powders by controlled addition of alloying elements, such as Cr, Ni, Mo and Cu. In the studies behind the preparation of mixes, Schaeffler’s diagram was taken into consideration. Prepared mixes have been compacted at 800 MPa and sintered in a vacuum furnace with argon backfilling at 1260°C for 1 h. After sintering two different cooling cycles were applied: rapid cooling with an average cooling rate of 245 °C/min and slow cooling of 5 °C/min in argon atmosphere. Produced duplex stainless steels have been studied by scanning and optical microscopy and EDS chemical analysis of microstructure components. Corrosion properties have been studied through electrochemical methods in 1M NaCl water solutionFindings: According to achieved results, it was affirmed that applied sintering method as well as powder mixes preparation allows for manufacturing the sintered duplex steels with good corrosion properties which depends on austenite/ferrite ratio in the microstructure and elements partitioning between phases. Corrosion resistance of sintered stainless steels is strictly connected with the density and the pore morphology present in the microstructure too. The highest resistance to pitting corrosion in 1M NaCl solution was achieved for composition with approximate balance of ferrite and austenite in the microstructure.Research limitations/implications: According to the powders characteristic, the applied fast cooling rate seems to be a good compromise for corrosion properties and microstructures, nevertheless further tests should be carried out in

  1. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands.

  2. Electroless Plated Nanodiamond Coating for Stainless Steel Passivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Korinko, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Spencer, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Stein, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-15

    Tritium gas sample bottles and manifold components require passivation surface treatments to minimize the interaction of the hydrogen isotopes with surface contamination on the stainless steel containment materials. Conventional passivation processes using chemical and electrochemical means are usually insufficient to passivate tritium containment vessels and piping. Previous work demonstrated that both nitric acid and citric acid passivation on stainless steel would not prevent the catalyzed isotope exchange reaction H2 + D2 → 2HD, while electropolishing passivation resulted in surfaces that did not catalyze this hydrogen isotope exchange. The current vendor for surface passivation treatment, Tek-Vac Industries Inc., provided the best passivation technology for the stainless steel components used at SRTE. However, this vendor recently built gas sample bottles that failed to meet site criteria and has since ceased operations. The loss of this vendor created a source gap, as well as a knowledge gap. A practical and reliable robust process to develop tritium passive surfaces is needed.

  3. Investigations on aged Ti-stabilised stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrnsten, U.; Karjalainen-Roikonen, P.; Nenonen, P. [VTT Industrial Systems, Espoo (Finland); Korhonen, R. [Fortum Nuclear Services, Vantaa (Finland); Timofeev, B.T.; Bloomin, A.A. [ZNIIKM, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2003-03-01

    Mechanical and microstructural properties of cast material of type O8X8H10TL and wrought and welded stainless steel pipe material of type O8X8H10T have been determined, aged at NPP operation temperature for about 100 000 h and 200 000 h, respectively. The mechanical properties were determined using tensile testing, impact energy determination and fracture resistance testing. The microstructures were studied using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of the cast Ti-stabilised stainless steel material are evaluated to be only slightly affected by long term ({approx} 100 000 hours) operation at NPP operation temperature. Also the effect of even longer ({approx} 200 000 hours) operation on wrought Ti-stabilised pipe material is very small, as the properties of the aged material are within the normal range of as-manufactured material. The mechanical properties of the Mo-alloyed stainless steel weld metal after {approx} 200 000 hours of operation are still good, although indications of changes due to thermal ageing were observed. (orig.)

  4. Simulation of Friction Stir Processing in 304L Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A major dilemma facing the nuclear industry is repair or replacement of stainless steel reactor components that have been exposed to neutron irradiation. When conventional fusion welding is used for weld repair, the high temperatures and thermal stresses inherent in the process enhance the growth of helium bubbles, causing intergranular cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ. Friction stir processing (FSP has potential as a weld repair technique for irradiated stainless steel, because it operates at much lower temperatures than fusion welding, and is therefore less likely to cause cracking in the HAZ. Numerical simulation of the FSP process in 304L stainless steel was performed using an Eulerian finite element approach. Model input required flow stresses for the large range of strain rates and temperatures inherent in the FSP process. Temperature predictions in three locations adjacent to the stir zone were accurate to within 4% of experimentally measure values. Prediction of recrystallized grain size at a location about 6mm behind the tool center was less accurate, because the empirical model employed for the prediction did not account for grain growth that occurred after deformation in the experiment was halted.

  5. [Clinical evaluation of gingival tissue restored with stainless steel crown].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, D D; Tsai, T P; Chen, T C

    1992-12-01

    The use of stainless steel crown for the restoration of primary molars is widely accepted in pediatric dentistry. There has been a concern regarding their effect on the health of the gingival tissue. It is a possibility that the preformed crown may be a contributing cause of gingivitis. This study evaluated one hundred and thirty-seven crowns in forty-five patients who had received pedodontic treatment at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. The results indicated that the majority of stainless steel crowns had one or more defects, with crown crimping being the most common error. According to what the paired t-test showed, non-ideal crowns indicated that the gingival index was significantly higher than the entire mouth and control teeth. However the supragingival plaque accumulation of these teeth was significant lower than the entire mouth and control teeth. There was only a moderate positive correlation between supragingival plaque and gingivitis. The operator is necessary to adapt the stainless steel crown margin as closely as possible to the tooth and to avoid the mechanical defect of a crown. It minimizes the irritation of gingival tissue and diminishes the bacterial adherence of subgingival plaque, therefore preserving the health of gingival tissue.

  6. Thermo-mechanical behavior of stainless steel knitted structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdani, Syed Talha Ali; Fernando, Anura; Maqsood, Muhammad

    2016-09-01

    Heating fabric is an advanced textile material that is extensively researched by the industrialists and the scientists alike. Ability to create highly flexible and drapeable heating fabrics has many applications in everyday life. This paper presents a study conducted on the comparison of heatability of knitted fabric made of stainless steel yarn. The purpose of the study is to find a suitable material for protective clothing against cold environments. In the current research the ampacity of stainless steel yarn is observed in order to prevent the overheating of the heating fabrics. The behavior of the knitted structure is studied for different levels of supply voltage. Infrared temperature sensing is used to measure the heat generated from the fabrics in order to measure the temperature of the fabrics without physical contact. It is concluded that interlock structure is one of the most suited structures for knitted heating fabrics. As learnt through this research, fabrics made of stainless steel yarn are capable of producing a higher level of heating compared to that of knitted fabric made using silver coated polymeric yarn at the same supply voltage.

  7. Surface interactions of cesium and boric acid with stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman-Canfield, N.

    1995-08-01

    In this report, the effects of cesium hydroxide and boric acid on oxidized stainless steel surfaces at high temperatures and near one atmosphere of pressure are investigated. This is the first experimental investigation of this chemical system. The experimental investigations were performed using a mass spectrometer and a mass electrobalance. Surfaces from the different experiments were examined using a scanning electron microscope to identify the presence of deposited species, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis to identify the species deposited on the surface. A better understanding of the equilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetics of the steam-accelerated volatilizations, and the release kinetics are gained by these experiments. The release rate is characterized by bulk vaporization/gas-phase mass transfer data. The analysis couples vaporization, deposition, and desorption of the compounds formed by cesium hydroxide and boric acid under conditions similar to what is expected during certain nuclear reactor accidents. This study shows that cesium deposits on an oxidized stainless steel surface at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 Kelvin. Cesium also deposits on stainless steel surfaces coated with boric oxide in the same temperature ranges. The mechanism for cesium deposition onto the oxide layer was found to involve the chemical reaction between cesium and chromate. Some revaporization in the cesium hydroxide-boric acid system was observed. It has been found that under the conditions given, boric acid will react with cesium hydroxide to form cesium metaborate. A model is proposed for this chemical reaction.

  8. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2016-02-28

    Cast stainless steels (CASSs) have been extensively used for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr–rich α'-phase by Spinodal decomposition of δ-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. An approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. These results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  9. Industrial Experience on the Caustic Cracking of Stainless Steels and Nickel Alloys - A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B

    2005-10-09

    Caustic environments are present in several industries, from nuclear power generation to the fabrication of alkalis and alumina. The most common material of construction is carbon steel but its application is limited to a maximum temperature of approximately 80 C. The use of Nickel (Ni) alloys is recommended at higher temperatures. Commercially pure Ni is the most resistant material for caustic applications both from the general corrosion and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) perspectives. Nickel rich alloys also offer a good performance. The most important alloying elements are Ni and chromium (Cr). Molybdenum (Mo) is not a beneficial alloying element and it dissolves preferentially from the alloy in presence of caustic environments. Austenitic stainless steels such as type 304 and 316 seem less resistant to caustic conditions than even plain carbon steel. Experimental evidence shows that the most likely mechanism for SCC is anodic dissolution.

  10. Adhesion of food-borne bacteria to stainless steel is reduced by food conditioning films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yin; Jorgensen, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Preconditioning of stainless steel with aqueous cod muscle extract significantly impedes subsequent bacterial adhesion most likely due to repelling effects of fish tropomyosin. The purpose of this study was to determine if other food conditioning films decrease or enhance bacterial adhesion...... to stainless steel. Attachment of Pseudomonas fluorescens AH2 to stainless steel coated with water-soluble coatings of animal origin was significantly reduced as compared with noncoated stainless steel or stainless steel coated with laboratory substrate or extracts of plant origin. Coating with animal extracts...... also decreases adhesion of other food-relevant bacteria. The manipulation of adhesion was not attributable to growth inhibitory effects. Chemical analysis revealed that the stainless steels were covered by homogenous layers of adsorbed proteins. The presence of tropomyocin was indicated by appearance...

  11. Microstructure and properties of composite of stainless steel and partially stabilized zirconia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文泉; 谢建新; 杨志国; 王从曾

    2003-01-01

    To fabricate the metal-ceramics multi-layer hollow functionally gradient materials(FGMs) that mightmeet the requirement of repeated service and long working time of high temperature burners, such as spacecraft en-gine, the microstructure and properties of composite of stainless steel and partially stabilized zirconia were investiga-ted. Samples of different proportions of stainless steel to partially yttria-stabilized zirconia were fabricated by powderextrusion and sintering method. Shrinkage, relative density, microstructure, micro-Vickers hardness, compressionstrength, bending strength, fractography morphology and electrical resistivity of sintered samples with differentproportions of stainless steel were measured. The results show that threshold of metallic matrix composite(MMC)is approximately equal to 60 % (volume fraction) stainless steel. The samples with 0 to 50% (volume fraction) stain-less steel indicate ceramic brittleness and non cutability, and the samples with 70% to 100% (volume fraction) stain-less steel indicate metallic plasticity and cutability.

  12. EFFECT OF INTERMETALLIC PHASES ON CORROSION BEHAVIOR AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL AND SUPER-DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Paulraj

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS and Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS have excellent integration of mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the formation of intermetallic phases is a major problem in their usage. The mechanical and corrosion properties are deteriorated due to the presence of intermetallic phases. These phases are induced during welding, prolonged exposure to high temperatures, and improper heat treatments. The main emphasis of this review article is on intermetallic phases and their effects on corrosion and mechanical properties. First the effect of various alloying elements on DSS and SDSS has been discussed followed by formation of various intermetallic phases. The intermetallic phases affect impact toughness and corrosion resistance significantly. Their deleterious effect on weldments has also been reviewed.

  13. Application of diffuse discharges of atmospheric pressure formed by runaway electrons for modification of copper and stainless steel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasenko, V. F., E-mail: VFT@loi.hcei.tsc.ru; Shulepov, M. A.; Erofeev, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of studies devoted to the influence of a runaway electron pre-ionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) formed in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure on the surface of copper and stainless steel are presented. Nanosecond high-voltage pulses were used to obtain REP DD in different gases at high pressures in a chamber with a flat anode and a cathode possessing a small radius of curvature. This mode of discharge was implemented owing to the generation of runaway electrons and X-rays. The conditions under which the surface of copper and stainless steel was cleaned from carbon and oxidized are described.

  14. An Investigation of Unipolar Arcing Damage on Stainless Steel and Titanium Carbide Coated Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    STAINLESS STEEL AND TITANIUM CARBIDE COATED SURFACES by Michael Thomas Keville and Robert William Lautrup June 1980 Thesis Advisors: F. Schwirzke K.D...rd"ll SU108016) V " 111. ’Cato .: "? : :V lI . An Investigation of Unipolar Arcing Master’s esis Damage on Stainless Steel and Titanium , Carbide Coated...on Stainless Steel and Titanium Carbide Coated Surfaces by Michael Thomas Keville Lieutenant, United States Navy B.S., United States Naval Academy

  15. The influence of sintering time on the properties of PM duplex stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Brytan; L.A. Dobrzański; M. Actis Grande; Rosso, M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effect of sintering time on the pore morphology, microstructural changes, tensile properties and corrosion resistance of vacuum sintered duplex stainless steel.Design/methodology/approach: In presented study PM duplex stainless steels were obtained through mixing base ferritic stainless steel powder with controlled addition of elemental alloying powders and then sintered in a vacuum furnace with argon backfilling at 1250°C for different tim...

  16. Improved corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel by nanocrystalline and electrochemical nitridation in artificial saliva solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jinlong; Liang, Tongxiang

    2015-12-01

    The fluoride ion in artificial saliva significantly changed semiconductor characteristic of the passive film formed on the surface of 316L stainless steels. The electrochemical results showed that nanocrystalline α‧-martensite improved corrosion resistance of the stainless steel in a typical artificial saliva compared with coarse grained stainless steel. Moreover, comparing with nitrided coarse grained stainless steel, corrosion resistance of the nitrided nanocrystalline stainless steel was also improved significantly, even in artificial saliva solution containing fluoride ion. The present study showed that the cryogenic cold rolling and electrochemical nitridation improved corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel for the dental application.

  17. NDE of explosion welded copper stainless steel first wall mock-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taehtinen, S.; Kauppinen, P.; Jeskanen, H.; Lahdenperae, K.; Ehrnsten, U. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity

    1997-04-01

    The study showed that reflection type C-mode scanning acoustic microscope (C-SAM) and internal ultrasonic inspection (IRIS) equipment can be applied for ultrasonic examination of copper stainless steel compound structures of ITER first wall mock-ups. Explosive welding can be applied to manufacture fully bonded copper stainless steel compound plates. However, explosives can be applied only for mechanical tightening of stainless steel cooling tubes within copper plate. If metallurgical bonding between stainless steel tubes and copper plate is required Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) method can be applied. (orig.)

  18. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Luo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott–Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments.

  19. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-12-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott-Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments.

  20. Tensile behavior of irradiated manganese-stabilized stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on seven experimental, high-manganese austenitic stainless steels after irradiation up to 44 dpa in the FFTF. An Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C base composition was used, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, B, and P were added to improve strength. Nominal amounts added were 0.1% Ti, 1% W, 0.1% V, 0.005% B, and 0.03% P. Irradiation was carried out at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C on the steels in the solution-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Tensile tests were conducted at the irradiation temperature. Results were compared with type 316 SS. Neutron irradiation hardened all of the solution-annealed steels at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C, as measured by the increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. The steel to which all five elements were added to the base composition showed the least amount of hardening. It also showed a smaller loss of ductility (uniform and total elongation) than the other steels. The total and uniform elongations of this steel after irradiation at 420{degrees}C was over four times that of the other manganese-stabilized steels and 316 SS. There was much less difference in strength and ductility at the two higher irradiation temperatures, where there was considerably less hardening, and thus, less loss of ductility. In the cold-worked condition, hardening occured only after irradiation at 420{degrees}C, and there was much less difference in the properties of the steels after irradiation. At the 420{degrees}C irradiation temperature, most of the manganese-stabilized steels maintained more ductility than the 316 SS. After irradiation at 420{degrees}C, the temperature of maximum hardening, the steel to which all five of the elements were added had the best uniform elongation.

  1. Salt spray corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco, F.; Abenojar, J.; Torralba, J.M. [Dept. de Ciencia de Materiales e Ing. Metalurgica, Univ. Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes (Spain); Lima, W.M. [Univ. Estadual de Maringa, Maringa PR (Brazil); Marce, R.; Bas, J.A. [AMES S.A., Sant Vicenc dels Horts Barcelona (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    This work deals with the possibility of using intermetallics as addition to P/M stainless steel in order to try to sinter these steels in nitrogen-base atmospheres. 316L was chosen as stainless steel matrix, and two intermetallics (from Ti-Al and Cr-Al binary systems), with a sieve size of less than 80 {mu}m, were added in the amount of 3% vol. to obtain MMCs. Powders were mixed, compacted at 700 MPa by uniaxial compacting, and then sintered at two temperatures (1120 and 1230 C) in five different atmospheres (95N{sub 2}/5H{sub 2}, 80N{sub 2}/20H{sub 2}, 25N{sub 2}/75H{sub 2}, hydrogen and vacuum). A complete microstructural study was carried out both by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Corrosion tests by salt spray fog were done in order to measure the possible improvements of intermetallic addition on the corrosion behaviour of these steels. SEM studies were also carried out on as corroded samples in order to understand the mechanisms of corrosion. Intermetallics absorb nitrogen from the nitrogen based atmospheres, and they develop a duplex (ferrite / austenite) microstructure when composite materials are sintered in hydrogen and vacuum. These microstructural features explain the results obtained in salt spray fog test. (orig.)

  2. Welding of titanium and stainless steel using the composite insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepanov, A. N.; Mali, V. I.; Orishich, A. M.; Malikov, A. G.; Drozdov, V. O.; Malyutina, Y. N.

    2016-11-01

    The paper concerns the possibility of obtaining a lasting permanent joint of dissimilar metals: technically pure titanium and stainless steel using laser welding and an intermediate composite insert. The insert was a four-layer composition of plates of steel, copper, niobium, and titanium welded by explosion. The material layers used in the insert prevented the molten steel and titanium from mixing, which excluded the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds, such as FeTi and Fe2Ti. The optimization of explosion welding parameters provided a high quality of the four-layer composition and the absence of defects in the area of the joint of insert plates. The results of strength tests showed that values of the ultimate strength and yield of the permanent joint with the composite insert welded by explosion are comparable to the strength characteristics of titanium.

  3. Investigation of Sintering Technology for Composite of Stainless Steel and Partially Stabilized Zirconia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The sintering technology for mixed powdered extrusion rods of different proportions of stainless steel to magnesiapartially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) was investigated. The effects of some sintering parameters including holdingtime, atmosphere and protective gas pressure on shrinkage, relative density, microstructure, micro-Vickers hardnessand compression strength of sintered samples were mainly researched. The experimental results are as follows: (1)The shrinkage and the relative density of the sintered samples decrease as increasing stainless steel content in thecomposite, except for the case containing 90 percent of stainless steel; (2) The porosity in PSZ matrix rises asincreasing the stainless steel content in the composite; (3) Longer sintering holding time, higher sintering vacuumand gas-pressure sintering process not only enhance the relative density, but also improve microstructure of composite;(4) Micro-Vickers hardness of PSZ matrix decreases as increasing stainless steel content, while that of stainless steelparticles in sintered samples varies unnoticeably.

  4. Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Spray-Formed Boron-Modified Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepon, Guilherme; Nogueira, Ricardo P.; Kiminami, Claudio S.; Botta, Walter J.; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2017-04-01

    Spray-formed boron-modified supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) grades are alloys developed to withstand severe wear conditions. The addition of boron to the conventional chemical composition of SMSS, combined with the solidification features promoted by the spray forming process, leads to a microstructure composed of low carbon martensitic matrix reinforced by an eutectic network of M2B-type borides, which considerably increases the wear resistance of the stainless steel. Although the presence of borides in the microstructure has a very beneficial effect on the wear properties of the alloy, their effect on the corrosion resistance of the stainless steel was not comprehensively evaluated. The present work presents a study of the effect of boron addition on the corrosion resistance of the spray-formed boron-modified SMSS grades by means of electrochemical techniques. The borides fraction seems to have some influence on the repassivation kinetics of the spray-formed boron-modified SMSS. It was shown that the Cr content of the martensitic matrix is the microstructural feature deciding the corrosion resistance of this sort of alloys. Therefore, if the Cr content in the alloy is increased to around 14 wt pct to compensate for the boron consumed by the borides formation, the corrosion resistance of the alloy is kept at the same level of the alloy without boron addition.

  5. Study On The Effect Of Corrosion Behaviour Of Stainless Steel Before And After Carburizing Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, S. A.; Alias, S. K.; Ahmad, S.; Fauzi, M. H. Mohd; Ahmad, N. N.

    2016-11-01

    This study investigates the effect of corrosion behaviour of stainless steel before and after carburizing process. All samples were prepared based on the testing specification requirement and the chemical compositions of the stainless steel were obtained using spectrometer tester. Samples were then undergoing pack carburizing process by adding 50g of carbon powder as the carburizing agent. Then the samples were heated at 900 °C and 950 °C for 8 hours. To obtain corrosion rate, weight loss test was conducted and the samples were immersed in three different solutions which were distilled water, hydrochloric acid and sodium chloride. Hardness and density test were employed to measure the physical properties of the ASTM 304 stainless steel. The microstructures of all samples were observed using Olympus BX41M optical microscope. The resulting phases after each heat treatment were tested by x-ray diffraction (XRD) tester. The percentage of corrosion values, determined from this technique, showed fairly good agreement. Carburizing process produced a carburizing layer improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance abilities

  6. Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Spray-Formed Boron-Modified Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepon, Guilherme; Nogueira, Ricardo P.; Kiminami, Claudio S.; Botta, Walter J.; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2017-01-01

    Spray-formed boron-modified supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) grades are alloys developed to withstand severe wear conditions. The addition of boron to the conventional chemical composition of SMSS, combined with the solidification features promoted by the spray forming process, leads to a microstructure composed of low carbon martensitic matrix reinforced by an eutectic network of M2B-type borides, which considerably increases the wear resistance of the stainless steel. Although the presence of borides in the microstructure has a very beneficial effect on the wear properties of the alloy, their effect on the corrosion resistance of the stainless steel was not comprehensively evaluated. The present work presents a study of the effect of boron addition on the corrosion resistance of the spray-formed boron-modified SMSS grades by means of electrochemical techniques. The borides fraction seems to have some influence on the repassivation kinetics of the spray-formed boron-modified SMSS. It was shown that the Cr content of the martensitic matrix is the microstructural feature deciding the corrosion resistance of this sort of alloys. Therefore, if the Cr content in the alloy is increased to around 14 wt pct to compensate for the boron consumed by the borides formation, the corrosion resistance of the alloy is kept at the same level of the alloy without boron addition.

  7. The interaction between nitride uranium and stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shornikov, D. P.; Nikitin, S. N.; Tarasov, B. A.; Baranov, V. G.; Yurlova, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Uranium nitride is most popular nuclear fuel for Fast Breeder Reactor New Generation. In-pile experiments at reactor BOR-60 was shown an interaction between nitride fuel and stainless steel in the range of 8-11% burn up (HA). In order to investigate this interaction has been done diffusion tests of 200 h and has been shown that the reaction occurs in the temperature range 1000-1100 ° C. UN interacted with steel in case of high pollution oxygen (1000-2000 ppm). Also has been shown to increase interaction UN with EP-823 steel in the presence of cesium. In this case the interaction layer had a thickness about 2-3 μm. Has been shown minimal interaction with new ODS steel EP-450. The interaction layer had a thickness less then 2 μm. Did not reveal the influence of tellurium and iodine increased interaction. It was show compatibility at 1000 °C between UN and EP-450 ODS steel, chrome steel, alloying aluminium and silicium.

  8. Analysis of nanometer-scale precipitation in a rapidly solidified stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisutmethangoon, S.; Kelly, T.F.; Camus, P.P.; Flinn, J.E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Larson, D.J.; Miller, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-03-21

    The authors have rapid-solidification-processed many stainless steels by gas atomization and achieved strength improvements of over 50% relative to conventionally-processed stainless steels with concomitant improvement in corrosion and oxidation behavior. These strength improvements are most pronounced after aging treatments when elevated concentrations of oxygen and vanadium are present in the stainless steel. An austenitic (FCC) stainless steel was prepared by gas atomization and consolidated by hot extrusion at 900 C. These specimens were heat treated for 1 hour at 1,000 C and aged at 600 C for 500 hours. The microstructure of each alloy composition was observed in TEM with bright field imaging. After aging, most alloys showed the same precipitate morphology as before aging. An obvious change, however, was found only in the alloy with highest oxygen content. A high number density of 15 to 20 nm diameter precipitates was measured in this alloy. Moreover, with weak-beam dark field imaging, a very high number density of coherent, 6 to 10 nm diameter precipitates is observed throughout the matrix by Moire fringe contrast. An atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) investigation showed that FIM provides high contrast imaging the precipitates. In order to get a more global view of the structure, energy-filtered composition imaging on a LEO EM 912 was used to map the oxygen and nitrogen in carbon extraction replicas of the aged specimens. These images confirm that the 18 nm precipitates are oxides, however, it appears that the 8 nm precipitates are not extracted.

  9. Fabrication of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels with excellent mechanical and pitting corrosion properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-bing Li; Zhou-hua Jiang; Yang Cao; Zu-rui Zhang

    2009-01-01

    18Cr18Mn2Mo0.9N high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel exhibits high strength and good ductility at room temperature. The steel shows typical duc-tile-brittle transition behavior and excellent pitting corrosion resistance properties.

  10. A review on nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2013-10-01

    The field of biomaterials has become a vital area, as these materials can enhance the quality and longevity of human life. Metallic materials are often used as biomaterials to replace structural components of the human body. Stainless steels, cobalt-chromium alloys, commercially pure titanium and its alloys are typical metallic biomaterials that are being used for implant devices. Stainless steels have been widely used as biomaterials because of their very low cost as compared to other metallic materials, good mechanical and corrosion resistant properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, the adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have promoted the development of "nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels" for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel and emphatically the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steel, as well as the development of nickel-free nitrogen containing stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength, better corrosion and wear resistance and superior biocompatibility in comparison to the currently used austenitic stainless steel (e.g. 316L), the newly developed nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventionally used medical stainless steels.

  11. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Martensitic Stainless Steel 6Crl5MoV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steel containing Cr of 12% to 18%(mass percent) are common utilized in quenching and tempering processes for knife and cutlery steel. The properties obtained in these materials are significantly influ- enced by matrix composition after heat treatment, especially as Cr and C content. Comprehensive considered the hardness and corrosion resistance, a new type martensitic stainless steel 6Crl5MoV has been developed. The effect of heat treatment processes on microstructure and mechanical properties of 6Crl5MoV martensitic stainless steel is emphatically researched. Thermo-Calc software has been carried out to thermodynamic calculation; OM, SEM and TEM have been carried out to microstructure observation; hardness and impact toughness test have been carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties. Results show that the equilibrium carbide in 6Cr15MoV steel is M23 C6 car- bide, and the M23 C6 carbides finely distributed in annealed microstructure. 6Crl5MoV martensitic stainless steel has a wider quenching temperature range, the hardness value of steel 6Cr15MoV can reach to HRC 60.8 to HRC 61.6 when quenched at 1 060 to 1 100 ℃. Finely distributed carbides will exist in quenched microstructure, and effectively inhabit the growth of austenite grain. With the increasing of quenching temperature, the volume fraction of undis- solved carbides will decrease. The excellent comprehensive mechanical properties can be obtained by quenched at 1 060 to 1 100℃ with tempered at 100 to 150 ℃, and it is mainly due to the high carbon martensite and fine grain size. At these temperature ranges, the hardness will retain about HRC 59.2 to HRC 61.6 and the Charpy U-notch impact toughness will retain about 17.3 to 20 J. A lot of M23C6 carbides precipitated from martensite matrix, at the same time along the boundaries of martensite lathes which leading to the decrease of impact toughness when tempered at 500 to 540 ℃. The MaC precipitants also existed in the

  12. Stable phases in aged type 321 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentley, J.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    X-ray diffraction and Analytical Electron Microscopy have been used to characterize the precipitate phases present in type 321 stainless steel after 17 years of service at approximately 600/sup 0/C. The morphology, crystallography, and orientation relationships with the matrix of the precipitates have been determined along with the chemical composition of several of the phases. Long-term aging of type 321 stainless steel indicates TiC, not M/sub 23/C/sub 6/, is the stable carbide phase. A theory is developed to explain appearance of M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ at intermediate times. The theory also indicates the means for preventing M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ formation and hence sensitization of the steel to intergranular corrosion. The amount of sigma found correlates well with results from shorter time studies. Ti/sub 4/C/sub 2/S/sub 2/ and a complex phosphide-arsenide were also present.

  13. Malfunction analysis of OPGW of stainless steel-unit structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李星梅; 张素芳; 王旭锋; 乞建勋

    2008-01-01

    Composite fiber optic overhead ground wire (OPGW) is increasingly applied in China’s overhead transmission lines. The stainless steel structure is adopted by most OPGWs as it is very small and easy to match the existing ground wire. The malfunction of OPGW in Beijing-Shanghai Optical Communication Project was analyzed through the chemical composition method and spectrum semi-quantitative method. The analysis indicates that the cable fault was due to the failure of seepage and irregular holes in the steel pipe of the optical unit. The rain water and the watery air entered into the optical units, and the water in turn became ice when temperature dropped. The occurrence of ice led to the acceleration of attenuation of the fiber. The results show that the rupture of stainless steel tube is mainly due to the instability of welding technique. The malfunction of OPGW is due to the local defects of welding seam because of local stress concentration in the manufacturing process.

  14. Barnacle cement: an etchant for stainless steel 316L?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, R; Kumar, R; Doble, M; Venkatesan, R

    2010-09-01

    Localized corrosion of stainless steel beneath the barnacle-base is an unsolved issue for the marine industry. In this work, we clearly bring out for the first time the role of the barnacle cement in acting as an etchant, preferentially etching the grain boundaries, and initiating the corrosion process in stainless steel 316L. The investigations include structural characterization of the cement and corroded region, and also chemical characterization of the corrosion products generated beneath the barnacle-base. Structural characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals the morphological changes in the cement structure across the interface of the base-plate and the substrate, modification of the steel surface by the cement and the corrosion pattern beneath the barnacle-base. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of the corrosion products show that they are composed of mainly oxides of iron thereby implying that the corrosion is aerobic in nature. A model for the etching and corrosion mechanism is proposed based on our observations.

  15. Sensitization of Laser-beam Welded Martensitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Martin; Rajendran, Kousika Dhasanur; Lindner, Stefan

    Ferritic and martensitic stainless steels are an attractive alternative in vehicle production due to their inherent corrosion resistance. By the opportunity of press hardening, their strength can be increased to up to 2000 MPa, making them competitors for unalloyed ultra-high strength steels. Welding, nevertheless, requires special care, especially when it comes to joining of high strength heat treated materials. With an adopted in-line heat treatment of the welds in as-rolled as well as press hardened condition, materials with sufficient fatigue strength and acceptable structural behavior can be produced. Because of microstructural transformations in the base material such as grain coarsening and forced carbide precipitation, the corrosion resistance of the weld zone may be locally impaired. Typically the material in the heat-affected zone becomes sensitive to intergranular cracking in the form of knife-edge corrosion besides the fusion line. The current study comprises of two text scenarios. By an alternating climate test, general response in a corroding environment is screened. In order to understand the corrosion mechanisms and to localize the sensitive zones, sensitisation tests were undertaken. Furthermore, the applicability of a standard test according to ASTM 763-83 was examined. It was found that the alternative climate test does not reveal any corrosion effects. Testing by the oxalic acid test revealed clearly the effect of welding, weld heat treatment and state of thermal processing. Also application of the standard which originally suited for testing ferritic stainless steels could have been justified.

  16. Cold Spray Repair of Martensitic Stainless Steel Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccoli, M.; Cornacchia, G.; Maestrini, D.; Marconi, G. P.; Roberti, R.

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of using cold spray as repair technique of martensitic stainless steel components was evaluated through laboratory investigations. An austenitic stainless steel feedstock powder was chosen, instead of soft metals powders like nickel, copper, or aluminum, used for repairing components made in light alloy or cast iron. The present study directly compares the microstructure, the residual stresses, and the micro-hardness of repairs obtained by cold spray and by TIG welding, that is commonly used as repair technique in large steel components. XRD and optical metallographic analysis of the repairs showed that cold spray offers some advantages, inducing compressive residual stresses in the repair and avoiding alterations of the interface between repair and base material. For these reasons, a heat treatment after the cold spray repair is not required to restore the base material properties, whereas a post-weld heat treatment is needed after the welding repair. Cold spray repair also exhibits a higher micro-hardness than the welding repair. In addition, the cavitation erosion resistance of a cold spray coating was investigated through ultrasonic cavitation tests, and the samples worn surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  17. Self-reduction Mechanism of Coal Composite Stainless Steel Dust Hot Briquette

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sok-chol RI; Man-sheng CHU; Shuang-yin CHEN; Zheng-gen LIU; Hun HONG

    2016-01-01

    To efficiently recycle valuable metals such as chromium and nickel in stainless steel dust,self-reduction ex-periments were carried out to study the reduction mechanism of metal oxides in coal composite stainless steel dust hot briquette,which is defined as a CCSB here.Self-reduction of CCSB is proceeded by volatile matter and fixed car-bon contained within CCSB.Experiments were performed to study the effects of temperature and carbon to oxygen (C/O Coal )ratio on self-reduction of CCSB.At 1 400 and 1 450 ℃,volatile matter in coal used for experiment could take the place of about 40% of fixed carbon in coal.Under the present experimental conditions,reduction product of chromium appears as FeCr2 O 4 ,Cr2 O 3 ,Cr7 C3 ,and [Cr]in turn during reduction.To evaluate the formation of met-al nuggets in self-reduction process of CCSB,metal nuggets containing chromium and nickel were observed in outside of reduction products under various conditions,and thermodynamic equilibrium calculation was carried out for possi-ble products and formation of molten metal by fixed carbon.SEM and EDS analyses were made for metal nugget and slag in reduced product.The results reveal that it is reasonable to achieve the metal nuggets at 1 450 ℃,0.8 of C/O Coal ratio and 20 min of reduction time.The nugget formation can indicate one innovative process for comprehensive utilization of stainless steel dust.

  18. Arc discharge deposition of stainless steel coatings at different nitrogen pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskinen, J. [VTT Manufacturing Technology (Finland); Torri, P. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Hirvonen, J.P. [VTT Manufacturing Technology (Finland); Mahiout, A. [VTT Manufacturing Technology (Finland); Stanishevsky, A. [Plasmoteg Engineering Centre, Minsk (Belarus)

    1996-03-01

    A filtered arc discharge process was employed to deposit stainless steel films using an AISI316 cathode. In this procedure, macroparticles and droplets, which are the most serious drawback of arc deposition processes especially in corrosion applications, are mostly filtered out. Films were deposited in vacuum or in the presence of a nitrogen plasma at different partial pressures. Low carbon steel and silicon single crystals were employed as substrates. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the films. The corrosion properties were examined using electrochemical polarization measurements. The corrosion current density was clearly lower than that of bulk steel, but higher than that of bulk AISI316. Increasing the film thickness and nitrogen content lowered the corrosion current density. (orig.)

  19. Microbial corrosion in weld zone of stainless steel. Stainless ko yosetsubu no biseibutsu fushoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, E. (National Chemical Laboratory for Industry, Tsukuba (Japan)); Nishimura, M. (Mitsubishi Kakoki Kaisha, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-10-15

    Microbial corrosion may happen wherever water is treated in many kinds of practical metal except titan, such as common steel, copper alloy, stainless steel, and high-nickel alloy. Although microbes causing microbial corrosion are not limited to specified microbes, specially affecting microbes are iron bacteria, iron-oxidizing bacteria, and sulfate-reducing bacteria. mechanism in these microbial corrosion, which is fundamentally caused through formation of oxygen concentration cells and production of metabolites, is complex and different by each microbe. In the case of stainless steel, the corrosion is located mainly in weld zones or heat affected zones, the shape of corrosion is like a pot, and the pattern is a type of pitting corrosion. Microbes are apt to adhere to the surface near weld zones, then oxygen becomes consequently insufficient beneath the surface, where the self-mending capacity of passive films is deprived, resulting in occurrence of pitting corrosion. For protection of microbial corrosion, it is essential to control water so that habitation of microbes is not formed. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  20. THE EFFECT OF W ON THE REPASSIVATION BEHAVIOR OF Ni-ADDED STAINLESS STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.X. Pan; K. Y. Kim

    2005-01-01

    The effect of W on the repassivation behavior of Ni-added stainless steels was investigated with respect to the repassivation rate and the SCC susceptibility. It was found that more stable passive film was formed on the W-modified stainless steels than that of steels without W-modification, and the repassivation rate was faster for W-modified stainless steels in acidic chloride solution (0.5M H2SO4+3.5% Cl-). In neutral chloride solution (1M MgCl2), there were no significant differences on both passivation properties and the repassivation rates for duplex stainless steels,while W-modified austenite stainless steel showed faster repassivation rate. The SCC tests verified that W-modified Ni-added stainless steels exhibited better SCC resistance than steels without W in chloride solution. Moreover, W-modification in higher Ni-added stainless steels exhibited more remarkable SCC resistance than steels with lower Ni content in chloride solution.

  1. Cytotoxicity study of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa, C P O; Rogero, S O; Tschiptschin, A P

    2006-11-01

    Stainless steel has been frequently used for temporary implants but its use as permanent implants is restricted due to its low pitting corrosion resistance. Nitrogen additions to these steels improve both mechanical properties and corrosion resistance, particularly the pitting and crevice corrosion resistance. Many reports concerning allergic reactions caused by nickel led to the development of nickel free stainless steel; it has excellent mechanical properties and very high corrosion resistance. On the other hand, stainless steels are biologically tolerated and no chemical bonds are formed between the steel and the bone tissue. Hydroxyapatite coatings deposited on stainless steels improve osseointegration, due their capacity to form chemical bonds (bioactive fixation) with the bone tissue. In this work hydroxyapatite coatings were plasma-sprayed on three austenitic stainless steels: ASTM-F138, ASTM-F1586 and the nickel-free Böhler-P558. The coatings were analyzed by SEM and XDR. The cytotoxicity of the coatings/steels was studied using the neutral red uptake method by quantitative evaluation of cell viability. The three uncoated stainless steels and the hydroxyapatite coated Böhler-P558 did not have any toxic effect on the cell culture. The hydroxyapatite coated ASTM-F138 and ASTM-F1586 stainless steels presented cytotoxicity indexes (IC50%) lower than 50% and high nickel contents in the extracts.

  2. Aging and Embrittlement of High Fluence Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, gary; Jiao, Zhijie; der ven, Anton Van; Bruemmer, Stephen; Edwards, Dan

    2012-12-31

    Irradiation of austenitic stainless steels results in the formation of dislocation loops, stacking fault tetrahedral, Ni-Si clusters and radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Of these features, it is the formation of precipitates which is most likely to impact the mechanical integrity at high dose. Unlike dislocation loops and RIS, precipitates exhibit an incubation period that can extend from 10 to 46 dpa, above which the cluster composition changes and a separate phase, (G-phase) forms. Both neutron and heavy ion irradiation showed that these clusters develop slowly and continue to evolve beyond 100 dpa. Overall, this work shows that the irradiated microstructure features produced by heavy ion irradiation are remarkably comparable in nature to those produced by neutron irradiation at much lower dose rates. The use of a temperature shift to account for the higher damage rate in heavy ion irradiation results in a fairly good match in the dislocation loop microstructure and the precipitate microstructure in austenitic stainless steels. Both irradiations also show segregation of the same elements and in the same directions, but to achieve comparable magnitudes, heavy ion irradiation must be conducted at a much higher temperature than that which produces a match with loops and precipitates. First-principles modeling has confirmed that the formation of Ni-Si precipitates under irradiation is likely caused by supersaturation of solute to defect sinks caused by highly correlated diffusion of Ni and Si. Thus, the formation and evolution of Ni-Si precipitates at high dose in austenitic stainless steels containing Si is inevitable.

  3. Joining dissimilar stainless steels for pressure vessel components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zheng; Han, Huai-Yue

    1994-03-01

    A series of studies was carried out to examine the weldability and properties of dissimilar steel joints between martensitic and austenitic stainless steels - F6NM (OCr13Ni4Mo) and AISI 347, respectively. Such joints are important parts in, e.g. the primary circuit of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). This kind of joint requires both good mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and a stable magnetic permeability besides good weldability. The weldability tests included weld thermal simulation of the martensitic steel for investigating the influence of weld thermal cycles and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the mechanical properties of the heat-affected zone (HAZ); implant testing for examining the tendency for cold cracking of martensitic steel; rigid restraint testing for determining hot crack susceptibility of the multi-pass dissimilar steel joints. The joints were subjected to various mechanical tests including a tensile test, bending test and impact test at various temperatures, as well as slow strain-rate test for examining the stress corrosion cracking tendency in the simulated environment of a primary circuit of a PWR. The results of various tests indicated that the quality of the tube/tube joints is satisfactory for meeting all the design requirements.

  4. Oxidation of molecular tritium in austenitic stainless steel containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blet, V.; Brossard, P.; Falanga, A.; Guidon, H.; Le Sergent, C. (CEA, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (FR)); Clavier, B. (USSI Ingenierie, BP 72, 92223 Bagneux (FR))

    1992-03-01

    This paper discusses the rate of oxidation of molecular tritium. determined at room temperature in closed austenitic stainless steel containments versus the tritium concentration of tritium-oxygen gaseous mixtures. With our experimental conditions, the overall rate of oxidation is found to depend not only on tritium concentration but also on initial oxygen concentration. The tritiated water which is produced, does not remain in the gaseous phase but is partially trapped on the surface oxides. In addition, kinetics of reaction are strongly dependent on the geometry of the cylindrical containments. When the vessel diameter is smaller than 4 mm, tritiated water formation is significantly reduced.

  5. Dependence of Radiation Damage in Stainless Steel on Irradiation Dose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The accelerator driven radioactive clean nuclear power system (ADS) is a novel innovative idea forthe sustainable development of nuclear power system. The spallation neutron source system is one of thethree key parts of ADS, which provides source neutrons of about 1018 s-1 for the burning-up of fuels.Stainless steel (SS) is used for the beam window and target materials of the spallation neutron sourcesystem. It is irradiated by high-energy and intense protons and/or neutrons during operation. Theaccumulated displacement damage dose could reach a couple of hundred dpa (displacement per atom) per

  6. Laser Welding of Large Scale Stainless Steel Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitemeyer, D.; Schultz, V.; Syassen, F.; Seefeld, T.; Vollertsen, F.

    In this paper a welding process for large scale stainless steel structures is presented. The process was developed according to the requirements of an aircraft application. Therefore, stringers are welded on a skin sheet in a t-joint configuration. The 0.6 mm thickness parts are welded with a thin disc laser, seam length up to 1920 mm are demonstrated. The welding process causes angular distortions of the skin sheet which are compensated by a subsequent laser straightening process. Based on a model straightening process parameters matching the induced welding distortion are predicted. The process combination is successfully applied to stringer stiffened specimens.

  7. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  8. Low cycle fatigue behavior of aluminum/stainless steel composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    Composites consisting of an aluminum matrix reinforced with various volume fractions of stainless steel wire were fabricated by hot die pressing under various conditions of temperature, time, and pressure. The composites were tested in plane bending to complete fracture under cycle loading, and the results were analyzed on a computer to obtain a statistically valid mathematical relationship between the low-cycle fatigue life and the fiber volume fraction of the composite. The fractured surfaces of the composites were examined by scanning electron microscopy to identify the characteristic features of fatigue damage. Fatigue damage mechanisms are proposed and discussed.

  9. Glow Discharge Plasma Nitriding of AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.QAYYUM; M.A.NAVEED; S.ZEB; G.MURTAZA; M.ZAKAULLAH

    2007-01-01

    Glow discharge plasma nitriding of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel has been carried out for different processing time under optimum discharge conditions established by spectroscopic analysis.The treated samples were analysed by X-ray diffraction(XRD)to explore the changes induced in the crystallographic structure.The XRD pattern confirmed the formation of an expanded austenite phase(γN)owing to incorporation of nitrogen as an interstitial solid solution in the iron lattice.A Vickers microhardness tester was used to evaluate the surface hardness as a function of indentation depth(μm).The results showed clear evidence of surface changes with substantial increase in surface hardness.

  10. General and Localized Corrosion of Borated Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.E. Lister; Ronald E. Mizia; A.W. Erickson; T.L. Trowbridge; B. S. Matteson

    2008-03-01

    The Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system is being proposed to transport and store spent nuclear fuel at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The preliminary design of this system identifies borated stainless steel as the neutron absorber material that will be used to fabricate fuel basket inserts for nuclear criticality control. This paper discusses corrosion test results for verifying the performance of this material manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A887, Grade A, under the expected repository conditions.

  11. Electropolishing of Stainless Steel Implants for Stable Functional Osteosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omel’chuk, A.О.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the electropolishing stainless steel for stable functional osteosynthesis has been developed. The polishing of implants was carried out in solutions, based on the ternary system H2SO4—H3PO4—H2O with stepwise decreasing the current density and increasing the orthophosphoric acid concentration. The optimal polishing conditions (current density, solution composition, temperature and duration have been determined. The developed method improves the quality and mechanical properties of the surface.

  12. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Domankova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with the corresponding incubation period 2.5 min.

  13. History of ultrahigh carbon steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsworth, J.; Sherby, O.D.

    1997-06-20

    The history and development of ultrahigh carbon steels (i.e., steels containing between 1 and 2.l percent C and now known as UHCS) are described. The early use of steel compositions containing carbon contents above the eutectoid level is found in ancient weapons from around the world. For example, both Damascus and Japanese sword steels are hypereutectoid steels. Their manufacture and processing is of interest in understanding the role of carbon content in the development of modern steels. Although sporadic examples of UHCS compositions are found in steels examined in the early part of this century, it was not until the mid-1970s that the modern study began. This study had its origin in the development of superplastic behavior in steels and the recognition that increasing the carbon content was of importance in developing that property. The compositions that were optimal for superplasticity involved the development of steels that contained higher carbon contents than conventional modern steels. It was discovered, however, that the room temperature properties of these compositions were of interest in their own right. Following this discovery, a period of intense work began on understanding their manufacture, processing, and properties for both superplastic forming and room temperature applications. The development of superplastic cast irons and iron carbides, as well as those of laminated composites containing UHCS, was an important part of this history.

  14. Effect of Austenitizing Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Hardness of Martensitic Stainless Steel AISI 420

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, L. D.; Du Toit, M.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of austenitizing on the microstructure and hardness of two martensitic stainless steels was examined with the aim of supplying heat-treatment guidelines to the user that will ensure a martensitic structure with minimal retained austenite, evenly dispersed carbides and a hardness of between 610 and 740 HV (Vickers hardness) after quenching and tempering. The steels examined during the course of this examination conform in composition to medium-carbon AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, except for the addition of 0.13% vanadium and 0.62% molybdenum to one of the alloys. Steel samples were austenitized at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 °C, followed by oil quenching. The as-quenched microstructures were found to range from almost fully martensitic structures to martensite with up to 35% retained austenite after quenching, with varying amounts of carbides. Optical and scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the microstructures, and X-ray diffraction was employed to identify the carbide present in the as-quenched structures and to quantify the retained austenite contents. Hardness tests were performed to determine the effect of heat treatment on mechanical properties. As-quenched hardness values ranged from 700 to 270 HV, depending on the amount of retained austenite. Thermodynamic predictions (using the CALPHAD™ model) were employed to explain these microstructures based on the solubility of the carbide particles at various austenitizing temperatures.

  15. General and Localized corrosion of Austenitic and Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Fix; J. Estill; L. Wong; R. Rebak

    2004-05-28

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  16. General and Localized Corrosion of Austenitic And Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estill, J C; Rebak, R B; Fix, D V; Wong, L L

    2004-03-11

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  17. Microstructure and wear resistance of spray-formed supermartensitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Zepon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 90's the oil industry has been encouraging the development of corrosion and wear resistant alloys for onshore and offshore pipeline applications. In this context supermartensitic stainless steel was introduced to replace the more expensive duplex stainless steel for tubing applications. Despite the outstanding corrosion resistance of stainless steels, their wear resistance is of concern. Some authors reported obtaining material processed by spray forming, such as ferritic stainless steel, superduplex stainless steel modified with boron, and iron-based amorphous alloys, which presented high wear resistance while maintaining the corrosion performance1,2. The addition of boron to iron-based alloys promotes the formation of hard boride particles (M2B type which improve their wear resistances3-9. This work aimed to study the microstructure and wear resistance of supermartensitic stainless steel modified with 0.3 wt. (% and 0.7 wt. (% processed by spray forming (SF-SMSS 0.3%B and SF-SMSS 0.7%B, respectively. These boron contents were selected in order to improve the wear resistance of supermartensitic stainless steel through the formation of uniformly distributed borides maintaining the characteristics of the corrosion resistant matrix. SF-SMSS 0.7%B presents an abrasive wear resistance considerably higher than spray-formed supermartensitic stainless steel without boron addition (SF-SMSS.

  18. 75 FR 76025 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... party responded to the sunset review notice of initiation by the applicable deadline * * *'' (75 FR... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan AGENCY: United States... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would be likely to lead...

  19. 75 FR 53714 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan (53 FR 9787). On February 23, 1993, Commerce... on imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan (65 FR 11766... Japan, Korea, and Taiwan (70 FR 61119). The Commission is now conducting third reviews to...

  20. 77 FR 41969 - Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-17

    ... Revocation in Part, and Deferral of Administrative Review, 77 FR 19179, 19181 (March 30, 2012). Based on a... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative...) initiated an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from Japan...

  1. 78 FR 45271 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... COMMISSION Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam Determination On the... injured by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel pressure pipe... pipe from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam. Accordingly, effective May 16, 2013, the...

  2. Influence of surface roughness of stainless steel on microbial adhesion and corrosion resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Bagge-Ravn, Dorthe; Kold, John;

    2003-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate if hygienic characteristics of stainless steel used in the food industry could be improved by smoothing surface roughness from an Ra of 0.9 to 0.01 ƒÝm. The adherence of Pseudomonas sp., Listeria monocytogenes and Candida lipolytica to stainless steel...

  3. 78 FR 79667 - Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip in Coils From Japan: Initiation of Expedited Changed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ....30 percent copper and between 0.20 and 0.50 percent cobalt. This steel is sold under proprietary...-cobalt alloy stainless strip is also excluded from the scope of this order. This ductile stainless steel strip contains, by weight, 26 to 30 percent chromium, and 7 to 10 percent cobalt, with the remainder...

  4. Male-mediated spontaneous abortion among spouses of stainless steel welders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjollund, N H; Bonde, Jens Peter; Jensen, Tina Kold

    2000-01-01

    Male-mediated spontaneous abortion has never been documented for humans. The welding of stainless steel is associated with the pulmonary absorption of hexavalent chromium, which has genotoxic effects on germ cells in rodents. Clinical and early subclinical spontaneous abortions were examined among...... spouses of stainless-steel welders....

  5. Low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel; bridging from science to technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present contribution gives an overview of some of the fundamental scientific aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel, in particular the characterisation of socalled expanded austenite is addressed. Selected technological examples of thermochemical treatment...... of stainless steel are presented....

  6. 75 FR 30437 - Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan AGENCY... stainless steel sheet and strip from Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan. SUMMARY: The... strip from Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan would be likely to lead to continuation...

  7. 76 FR 46323 - Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan... from Germany, Italy, and Mexico \\2\\ would not be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of... with respect to stainless steel sheet and strip from Germany, Italy, and Mexico, and Commissioner...

  8. 76 FR 69292 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water AGENCY... Staff Guidance (LR-ISG), LR- ISG-2011-01, ``Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water.'' This LR-ISG revises the guidance in the Standard Review Plan...

  9. 77 FR 27815 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... COMMISSION Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water AGENCY..., ``Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water.'' This LR-ISG... Power Plants (SRP-LR) and Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report for the aging management...

  10. A comparison of radiation shielding of stainless steel with different magnetic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calik Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The radiation shielding properties of three different stainless steels have been investigated. For this purpose, linear attenuation coefficients at photon energy levels of 662 keV and 1250 keV have been measured. The obtained results showed that ferritic stainless steel was more capable in stopping the high energy photons than its non-magnetic counterpart.

  11. 46 CFR 148.04-13 - Ferrous metal borings, shavings, turnings, or cuttings (excluding stainless steel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Ferrous metal borings, shavings, turnings, or cuttings (excluding stainless steel) must not be stowed and... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ferrous metal borings, shavings, turnings, or cuttings (excluding stainless steel). 148.04-13 Section 148.04-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF...

  12. Low-temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel: the current status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The present review addresses the state of the art of low-temperature gaseous surface engineering of (austenitic) stainless steel and is largely based on the authors' own work in the last 10 years. The main purpose of low temperature gaseous surface engineering of stainless steel is to develop a h...

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels in NaCl solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speidel, Markus O.

    1981-05-01

    The metallurgical influences on the stress corrosion resistance of many commercial stainless steels have been studied using the fracture mechanics approach. The straight-chromium ferritic stainless steels, two-phase ferritic-austenitic stainless steels and high-nickel solid solutions (like alloys 800 and 600) investigated are all fully resistant to stress corrosion cracking at stress intensity (K1) levels ≤ MN • m-3/2 in 22 pct NaCl solutions at 105 °C. Martensitic stainless steels, austenitic stainless steels and precipitation hardened superalloys, all with about 18 pct chromium, may be highly susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, depending on heat treatment and other alloying elements. Molybdenum additions improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of austenitic stainless steels significantly. The fracture mechanics approach to stress corrosion testing of stainless steels yields results which are consistent with both the service experience and the results from testing with smooth specimens. In particular, the well known “Copson curve” is reproduced by plotting the stress corrosion threshold stress intensity (ATISCC) vs the nickel content of stainless steels with about 18 pct chromium.

  14. Thermal stability study for candidate stainless steels of GEN IV reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeg Veternikova, J., E-mail: jana.veternikova@stuba.sk [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Degmova, J. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Pekarcikova, M. [Institute of Materials Science, Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Paulinska 16, 917 24 Trnava (Slovakia); Simko, F. [Department of Molten Salts, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Petriska, M. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Skarba, M. [Slovak University of Technology, Vazovova 5, 812 43 Bratislava (Slovakia); Mikula, P. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Pupala, M. [Department of Molten Salts, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Thermal resistance of advanced stainless steels were observed at 1000 °C. • GEN IV candidate steels were confronted to classic AISI steels. • ODS AISI 316 has weaker thermal resistance than classic AISI steel. • Ferritic ODS steels and NF 709 has better thermal resistance than AISI steels. - Abstract: Candidate stainless steels for GEN IV reactors were investigated in term of thermal and corrosion stability at high temperatures. New austenitic steel (NF 709), austenitic ODS steel (ODS 316) and two ferritic ODS steels (MA 956 and MA 957) were exposed to around 1000 °C in inert argon atmosphere at pressure of ∼8 MPa. The steels were further studied in a light of vacancy defects presence by positron annihilation spectroscopy and their thermal resistance was confronted to classic AISI steels. The thermal strain supported a creation of oxide layers observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  15. Small punch creep test in a 316 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saucedo-Munoz, M. L.; Komazaki, S. I.; Hashida, T.; Lopez-Hirata, V. M.

    2015-03-30

    The small punch creep test was applied to evaluate the creep behavior of a 316 type austenitic stainless steel at temperatures of 650, 675 and 700 degree centigrade. The small punch test was carried out using a creep tester with a specimen size of 10x10x0.3 mm at 650, 675 and 700 degree centigrade using loads from 199 to 512 N. The small punch creep curves show the three stages found in the creep curves of the conventional uniaxial test. The conventional creep relationships which involve parameters such as creep rate, stress, time to rupture and temperature were followed with the corresponding parameters of small punch creep test and they permitted to explain the creep behavior in this steel. The mechanism and activation energy of the deformation process were the grain boundary sliding and diffusion, respectively, during creep which caused the intergranular fracture in the tested specimens. (Author)

  16. STRUCTURAL STABILITY OF HIGH NITROGEN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Bakajová

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the structural stability of an austenitic stainless steel with high nitrogen content. The investigated steel was heat treated at 800°C using different annealing times. Investigation was carried out using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and thermodynamic calculations. Three phases were identified by electron diffraction: Cr2N, sigma – phase and M23C6. The thermodynamic prediction is in good agreement with the experimental result. The only is the M23C6 carbide phase which is not thermodynamically predicted. Cr2N is the majority secondary phase and occurs in the form of discrete particles or cells (lamellas of Cr2N and austenite.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  18. Phase transformations evaluation on a UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel based on nondestructive testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo Silva, Edgard de, E-mail: edgard@cefetpb.edu.br [Centro federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Paraiba (CEFET PB), Area da Industria, Avenida 1o de Maio, 720 - 58015-430 - Joao Pessoa/PB (Brazil); Costa de Albuquerque, Victor Hugo, E-mail: victor.albuquerque@fe.up.pt [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (DEM), Cidade Universitaria, S/N - 58059-900 - Joao Pessoa/PB (Brazil); Pereira Leite, Josinaldo, E-mail: josinaldo@ct.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (DEM), Cidade Universitaria, S/N - 58059-900 - Joao Pessoa/PB (Brazil); Gomes Varela, Antonio Carlos, E-mail: varela@cefetpb.edu.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (DEM), Cidade Universitaria, S/N - 58059-900 - Joao Pessoa/PB (Brazil); Pinho de Moura, Elineudo, E-mail: elineudo@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais, Campus do Pici, Bloco 715, 60455-760 - Fortaleza/CE (Brazil); Tavares, Joao Manuel R.S., E-mail: tavares@fe.up.pt [Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto (FEUP), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial (DEMEGI)/Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial - INEGI, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-08-15

    Duplex stainless steel presents special mechanical properties such as, for example, mechanical and corrosion strength, becoming competitive in relation to the other types of stainless steel. One of the great problems of duplex stainless steel microstructural changes study is related to embrittlement above 300 deg. C, with the precipitation of the {alpha}' phase occurring over the ferritic microstructure. Aiming to characterise embrittlement of duplex stainless steel, hardening kinetics, from 425 to 475 deg. C, was analysed through the speed of sound, Charpy impact energy, X-ray diffraction, hardness and microscopy parameters. The presence of two hardening stages, detected through the speed of sound, was observed, one being of brittle characteristic and the other ductile. Moreover, the speed of sound showed a direct correlation with the material's hardness. Thus, it is concluded that the speed of sound is a promising nondestructive parameter to follow-up embrittlement in duplex stainless steel.

  19. 76 FR 64105 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India AGENCY: United States International Trade... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel wire rod from India would...

  20. 76 FR 38686 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... the antidumping duty order on stainless steel wire rod from India would be likely to lead...

  1. 75 FR 61699 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea, and Taiwan: Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea... orders on stainless steel plate in coils (SSPC) from Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea, and... from Allegheny Ludlum Corporation, North American Stainless and the United Steel, Paper and...

  2. 76 FR 78614 - Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Continuation of Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... International Trade Administration Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan... welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from South Korea (Korea) and Taiwan would likely lead to... published the antidumping duty orders on welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan.\\1\\...

  3. Evaluation of metal release and local tissue response to indigenous stainless steel miniplates used in facial fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Dugal, Arun; Dadhe, D. P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The issue of metal release from stainless steel bone plates has gained considerable momentum advocating the removal of stainless steel miniplates after healing of fracture. So far no study has been published in the literature regarding metal release with the indigenously manufactured stainless steel miniplates.

  4. The retention of iodine in stainless steel sample lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, G.J.; Deir, C. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada); Ball, J.M. [Whiteshell Laboratories, Pinawa (Canada)

    1995-02-01

    Following an accident in a multi-unit CANDU nuclear generating station, decontamination of air vented from containment would play a critical role in minimizing the release of iodine to the environment. The concentration of gas phase iodine in containment air would be measured using the post accident radiation monitoring system, requiring that air samples be passed through a considerable length of tubing to a remote location where the desired measurements could safely be made. A significant loss of iodine, due to adsorption on the sample line surfaces, could greatly distort the measurement. In this study, the retention of I{sub 2}(g) on stainless steel was evaluated in bench scale experiments in order to evaluate, and if possible minimise, the extent of any such line losses. Experiments at the University of Toronto were performed using 6 inch lengths of 1/4 inch stainless steel tubing. Air, containing I-131 labelled I{sub 2}(g), ranging in concentration from 10{sup {minus}10} to 10{sup {minus}6} mol/dm{sup 3} and relative humidity (:RH) from 20 to 90 %, was passed through tubing samples maintained at temperatures ranging from 25 to 90{degrees}C. Adsorption at low gas phase iodine concentrations differed substantially from that at higher concentrations. The rate of deposition was proportional to the gas phase concentration, giving support to the concept of a first order deposition velocity. The surface loading increased with increasing relative humidity, particularly at low RH values, while the deposition rate decreased with increasing temperature. Surface water on the steel may play an important role in the deposition process. The chemisorbed iodine was located primarily in areas of corrosion. Furthermore, water used to wash the steel contained Fe, Mn and iodine in the form of iodide, suggesting that I{sub 2} reacted to form metal iodides. The deposition of I{sub 2} was also found to depend on the initial surface condition.

  5. Study on tempering behaviour of AISI 410 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Gopa, E-mail: gopa_mjs@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Das, C.R.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Thomas Paul, V. [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Panneerselvam, G. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Dasgupta, Arup [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2015-02-15

    Martensitic stainless steels find extensive applications due to their optimum combination of strength, hardness and wear-resistance in tempered condition. However, this class of steels is susceptible to embrittlement during tempering if it is carried out in a specific temperature range resulting in significant reduction in toughness. Embrittlement of as-normalised AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel, subjected to tempering treatment in the temperature range of 673–923 K was studied using Charpy impact tests followed by metallurgical investigations using field emission scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Carbides precipitated during tempering were extracted by electrochemical dissolution of the matrix and identified by X-ray diffraction. Studies indicated that temper embrittlement is highest when the steel is tempered at 823 K. Mostly iron rich carbides are present in the steel subjected to tempering at low temperatures of around 723 K, whereas chromium rich carbides (M{sub 23}C{sub 6}) dominate precipitation at high temperature tempering. The range 773–823 K is the transition temperature range for the precipitates, with both Fe{sub 2}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} types of carbides coexisting in the material. The nucleation of Fe{sub 2}C within the martensite lath, during low temperature tempering, has a definite role in the embrittlement of this steel. Embrittlement is not observed at high temperature tempering because of precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, instead of Fe{sub 2}C, preferentially along the lath and prior austenite boundaries. Segregation of S and P, which is widely reported as one of the causes for temper embrittlement, could not be detected in the material even through Auger electron spectroscopy studies. - Highlights: • Tempering behaviour of AISI 410 steel is studied within 673–923 K temperature range. • Temperature regime of maximum embrittlement is identified as 773–848 K. • Results show that type of

  6. Improved Accident Tolerance of Austenitic Stainless Steel Cladding through Colossal Supersaturation with Interstitial Solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Frank [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-10-13

    We proposed a program-supporting research project in the area of fuel-cycle R&D, specifically on the topic of advanced fuels. Our goal was to investigate whether SECIS (surface engineering by concentrated interstitial solute – carbon, nitrogen) can improve the properties of austenitic stainless steels and related structural alloys such that they can be used for nuclear fuel cladding in LWRs (light-water reactors) and significantly excel currently used alloys with regard to performance, safety, service life, and accident tolerance.

  7. Investigation on the adsorption of alkoxysilanes on stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Julien; Bistac, Sophie; Brogly, Maurice; Delaite, Christelle; Lasuye, Thierry; Stasik, Bernard

    2013-11-01

    Alkoxysilanes, and mainly trialkoxysilanes, have been widely used as coupling agents on metallic surfaces. They are of interest mainly because they form a water-stable covalent bond with a surface composed of hydroxides. The grafting of these molecules should also give rise to the formation of a siloxane network at the substrate's surface. However, only a few studies examine stainless steel substrate, such as AISI 316L, for which the main difficulty is the low surface reactivity. In order to improve the silane anchoring, a prehydrolysis of the alkoxysilane was performed to transform the methoxy groups into silanol groups. This reaction happened in an aqueous medium and at a controlled pH, which impacted the prehydrolysis efficiency. Curing followed this step, which allows the grafting of the alkoxysilane on stainless steel's surface. Polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) was performed in order to identify the grafting of the silane molecules. Tests were made to compare the grafting of alkoxysilanes as a function of their functional groups and their prehydrolysis conditions. PM-IRRAS coupled with atomic force microscopy allowed the observation of the grafting of the studied alkoxysilanes. The nature of the remaining functional group (its ability to react with polymer, for example) of the alkoxysilane plays a major role in this process, since its chemical nature influences the grafting mechanism.

  8. Water Lubrication of Stainless Steel using Reduced Graphene Oxide Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae-Jin; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2015-11-01

    Lubrication of mechanical systems using water instead of conventional oil lubricants is extremely attractive from the view of resource conservation and environmental protection. However, insufficient film thickness of water due to low viscosity and chemical reaction of water with metallic materials have been a great obstacle in utilization of water as an effective lubricant. Herein, the friction between a 440 C stainless steel (SS) ball and a 440 C stainless steel (SS) plate in water lubrication could be reduced by as much as 6-times by coating the ball with reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The friction coefficient with rGO coated ball in water lubrication was comparable to the value obtained with the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. Moreover, the wear rate of the SS plate slid against the rGO coated ball in water lubrication was 3-times lower than that of the SS plate slid against the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. These results clearly demonstrated that water can be effectively utilized as a lubricant instead of oil to lower the friction and wear of SS components by coating one side with rGO. Implementation of this technology in mechanical systems is expected to aid in significant reduction of environmental pollution caused by the extensive use of oil lubricants.

  9. EBSD study of a hot deformed austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, H., E-mail: h-m@gmx.com [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Cabrera, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. Bases de Manresa 1, 08242 Manresa (Spain); Najafizadeh, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Calvillo, P.R. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. Bases de Manresa 1, 08242 Manresa (Spain)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructural characterization of an austenitic stainless steel by EBSD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The role of twins in the nucleation and growth of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grain refinement through the discontinuous dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of recrystallized fraction using the grain average misorientation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relationship between recrystallization and the frequency of high angle boundaries. - Abstract: The microstructural evolution of a 304 H austenitic stainless steel subjected to hot compression was studied by the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. Detailed data about the boundaries, coincidence site lattice (CSL) relationships and grain size were acquired from the orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) maps. It was found that twins play an important role in the nucleation and growth of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) during hot deformation. Moreover, the conventional discontinuous DRX (DDRX) was found to be in charge of grain refinement reached under the testing conditions studied. Furthermore, the recrystallized fraction (X) was determined from the grain average misorientation (GAM) distribution based on the threshold value of 1.55 Degree-Sign . The frequency of high angle boundaries showed a direct relationship with X. A time exponent of 1.11 was determined from Avrami analysis, which was related to the observed single-peak behavior in the stress-strain flow curves.

  10. Large strain cyclic behavior of metastable austenic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geijselaers, H.J.M., E-mail: h.j.m.geijselaers@utwente.nl; Hilkhuijsen, P.; Bor, T.C.; Boogaard, A.H. van den

    2015-04-17

    Metastable austenitic stainless steel will transform to martensite when subjected to mechanical working. In this research an austenitic stainless steel has been subjected to large amplitude strain paths containing a strain reversal. During the tests, apart from the stress and the strain also magnetic induction was measured. From the in situ magnetic induction measurements an estimate of the stress partitioning among the phases is determined. When the strain path reversal is applied at low strains, a classical Bauschinger effect is observed. When the strain reversal is applied at higher strains, a higher flow stress is measured after the reversal compared to the flow stress before reversal. Also a stagnation of the transformation is observed, meaning that a higher strain as well as a higher stress than before the strain path change is required to restart the transformation after reversal. The observed behavior can be explained by a model in which for the martensitic transformation a stress induced transformation model is used. The constitutive behavior of both the austenite phase and the martensite is described by a Chaboche model to account for the Bauschinger effect. Mean-field homogenization of the material behavior of the individual phases is employed to obtain a constitutive behavior of the two-phase composite. The overall applied stress, the stress in the martensite phase and the observed transformation behavior during cyclic shear are very well reproduced by the model simulations.

  11. Development of Cast Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, G.; Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Walker, L. R.; Meyer, H. M., III; Leonard, D. N.

    2016-09-01

    Cast Fe-Ni-Cr chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels with Ni levels up to 45 wt.% are used at high temperatures in a wide range of industrial applications that demand microstructural stability, corrosion resistance, and creep strength. Although alumina scales offer better corrosion protection at these temperatures, designing cast austenitic alloys that form a stable alumina scale and achieve creep strength comparable to existing cast chromia-forming alloys is challenging. This work outlines the development of cast Fe-Ni-Cr-Al austenitic stainless steels containing about 25 wt.% Ni with good creep strength and the ability to form a protective alumina scale for use at temperatures up to 800-850°C in H2O-, S-, and C-containing environments. Creep properties of the best alloy were comparable to that of HK-type cast chromia-forming alloys along with improved oxidation resistance typical of alumina-forming alloys. Challenges in the design of cast alloys and a potential path to increasing the temperature capability are discussed.

  12. Magnetic anisotropy of ultrafine 316L stainless steel fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyr, Tien-Wei; Huang, Shih-Ju; Wur, Ching-Shuei

    2016-12-01

    An as-received 316L stainless steel fiber with a diameter of 20 μm was drawn using a bundle drawing process at room temperature to form ultrafine stainless steel fibers with diameters of 12, 8, and 6 μm. The crystalline phases of the fibers were analyzed using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile fitting technique. The grain sizes of γ-austenite and α‧-martensite were reduced to nanoscale sizes after the drawing process. XRD analysis and focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope observations showed that the newly formed α‧-martensitic grains were closely arrayed in the drawing direction. The magnetic property was measured using a superconducting quantum interference device vibrating sample magnetometer. The magnetic anisotropy of the fibers was observed by applying a magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to the fiber axis. The results showed that the microstructure anisotropy including the shape anisotropy, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and the orientation of the crystalline phases strongly contributed to the magnetic anisotropy.

  13. Development of Cast Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, G.; Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Walker, L. R.; Meyer, H. M., III; Leonard, D. N.

    2016-11-01

    Cast Fe-Ni-Cr chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels with Ni levels up to 45 wt.% are used at high temperatures in a wide range of industrial applications that demand microstructural stability, corrosion resistance, and creep strength. Although alumina scales offer better corrosion protection at these temperatures, designing cast austenitic alloys that form a stable alumina scale and achieve creep strength comparable to existing cast chromia-forming alloys is challenging. This work outlines the development of cast Fe-Ni-Cr-Al austenitic stainless steels containing about 25 wt.% Ni with good creep strength and the ability to form a protective alumina scale for use at temperatures up to 800-850°C in H2O-, S-, and C-containing environments. Creep properties of the best alloy were comparable to that of HK-type cast chromia-forming alloys along with improved oxidation resistance typical of alumina-forming alloys. Challenges in the design of cast alloys and a potential path to increasing the temperature capability are discussed.

  14. Assessment of nickel release from stainless steel crowns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Ramazani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Adverse effects of dental materials, especially metals, have been an important issue in recent decades.The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of nickel released from stainless steel crowns in artificial saliva.In this in-vitro study, 270 stainless steel crowns were divided into five groups, each with nine subgroups. Each group (I to V was comprised of four, five, six, seven and eight crowns, respectively. Each subgroup was placed in a polyethylene jar containing artificial saliva and held in an incubator at 37°C for four weeks. The amount of released nickel was determined on days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28, using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Wilcoxon Signed-Rank and Kruskal-Wallis with Dunn's post hoc tests (SPSS software, v. 18 were used for statistical analysis at a significance level of 0.05.The mean level of nickel on day 1 was more than that of day 7; this difference was statistically significant for all groups (P < 0.05, except for group II (P = 0.086. Also, the mean difference of released nickel between the groups was significant on day 1 (P = 0.006 and was insignificant on day 7 (P = 0.620. The nickel levels were zero on days 14, 21, and 28.The amount of nickel was below the toxic level and did not exceed the dietary intake.

  15. Dynamic Recrystallization and Hot Workability of 316LN Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoyang Sun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To identify the optimal deformation parameters for 316LN austenitic stainless steel, it is necessary to study the macroscopic deformation and the microstructural evolution behavior simultaneously in order to ascertain the relationship between the two. Isothermal uniaxial compression tests of 316LN were conducted over the temperature range of 950–1150 °C and for the strain rate range of 0.001–10 s−1 using a Gleeble-1500 thermal-mechanical simulator. The microstructural evolution during deformation processes was investigated by studying the constitutive law and dynamic recrystallization behaviors. Dynamic recrystallization volume fraction was introduced to reveal the power dissipation during the microstructural evolution. Processing maps were developed based on the effects of various temperatures, strain rates, and strains, which suggests that power dissipation efficiency increases gradually with increasing temperature and decreasing stain rate. Optimum regimes for the hot deformation of 316LN stainless steel were revealed on conventional hot processing maps and verified effectively through the examination of the microstructure. In addition, the regimes for defects of the product were also interpreted on the conventional hot processing maps. The developed power dissipation efficiency maps allow optimized processing routes to be selected, thus enabling industry producers to effectively control forming variables to enhance practical production process efficiency.

  16. Effect of Harmonic Microstructure on the Corrosion Behavior of SUS304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Prabhat K.; Shekhar, S.; Nakatani, M.; Ota, M.; Vajpai, S. K.; Ameyama, K.; Mondal, K.

    2016-12-01

    Corrosion behavior of a harmonic structured SUS304L austenitic stainless steel was examined and compared with nonharmonic structured SUS304L stainless steel and conventional 304 stainless steel in 3.5 pct NaCl solution. The study was performed using linear polarization, potentiodynamic polarization, cyclic polarization, and a salt fog exposure test for 30 days. Characterization was accomplished using a scanning electron microscope, an electron probe microanalyzer, and Raman spectroscopy. Improved pitting corrosion resistance was found in the case of the harmonic structured steel as compared to that of the nonharmonic and the conventional 304 stainless steel. Harmonically distributed fine-grained structure, less porosity, and higher fraction of passive α-FeOOH are attributed to the improvement in corrosion resistance of the harmonic structured steel.

  17. Comparative study in the induced corrosion by sulfate reducing microorganisms, in a stainless steel 304L sensitized and a carbon steel API X65; Estudio comparativo de la corrosion inducida por microorganismos sulfatorreductores, en un acero inoxidable 304L sensibilizado y un acero al carbono API X65

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz S, A.; Gonzalez F, E.; Arganis J, C.; Luna C, P.; Carapia M, L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: ads@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    In spite of the operational experience related with the presence of the phenomenon of microbiological corrosion (MIC) in industrial components, it was not but until the decade of the 80 s when the nuclear industry recognized its influence in some systems of Nuclear Generating Power plants. At the moment, diverse studies that have tried to explain the generation mechanism of this phenomenon exist; however, they are even important queries that to solve, especially those related with the particularities of the affected metallic substrates. Presently work, the electrochemical behavior of samples of stainless steel AISI 304L sensitized is evaluated and the carbon steel APIX65, before the action of sulfate reducing microorganisms low the same experimental conditions; found that for the APIX65 the presence of this type of bacteria promoted the formation of a stable biofilm that allowed the maintenance of the microorganisms that damaged the material in isolated places where stings were generated; while in the AISI 304L, it was not detected damage associated to the inoculated media. The techniques of Resistance to the Polarization and Tafel Extrapolation, allowed the calculation of the speed of uniform corrosion, parameter that doesn't seem to be influenced by the presence of the microorganisms; while that noise electrochemical it distinguished in real time, the effect of the sulfate reducing in the steel APIX65. (Author)

  18. Characterization of particle exposure in ferrochromium and stainless steel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvelä, Merja; Huvinen, Markku; Viitanen, Anna-Kaisa; Kanerva, Tomi; Vanhala, Esa; Uitti, Jukka; Koivisto, Antti J; Junttila, Sakari; Luukkonen, Ritva; Tuomi, Timo

    2016-07-01

    This study describes workers' exposure to fine and ultrafine particles in the production chain of ferrochromium and stainless steel during sintering, ferrochromium smelting, stainless steel melting, and hot and cold rolling operations. Workers' personal exposure to inhalable dust was assessed using IOM sampler with a cellulose acetate filter (AAWP, diameter 25 mm; Millipore, Bedford, MA). Filter sampling methods were used to measure particle mass concentrations in fixed locations. Particle number concentrations and size distributions were examined using an SMPS+C sequential mobile particle sizer and counter (series 5.400, Grimm Aerosol Technik, Ainring, Germany), and a hand-held condensation particle counter (CPC, model 3007, TSI Incorporated, MN). The structure and elemental composition of particles were analyzed using TEM-EDXA (TEM: JEM-1220, JEOL, Tokyo, Japan; EDXA: Noran System Six, Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., Madison,WI). Workers' personal exposure to inhalable dust averaged 1.87, 1.40, 2.34, 0.30, and 0.17 mg m(-3) in sintering plant, ferrochromium smelter, stainless steel melting shop, hot rolling mill, and the cold rolling mill, respectively. Particle number concentrations measured using SMPS+C varied from 58 × 10(3) to 662 × 10(3) cm(-3) in the production areas, whereas concentrations measured using SMPS+C and CPC3007 in control rooms ranged from 24 × 10(3) to 243 × 10(3) cm(-3) and 5.1 × 10(3) to 97 × 10(3) cm(-3), respectively. The elemental composition and the structure of particles in different production phases varied. In the cold-rolling mill non-process particles were abundant. In other sites, chromium and iron originating from ore and recycled steel scrap were the most common elements in the particles studied. Particle mass concentrations were at the same level as that reported earlier. However, particle number measurements showed a high amount of ultrafine particles, especially in sintering, alloy smelting and melting, and tapping

  19. Ultra-Pure Ferritic Stainless Steels-Grade, Refining Operation, and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Xiang-mi; JIANG Zhou-hua; LI Hua-bing

    2007-01-01

    The grades of ultra-pure ferritic stainless steels, especially the grades used in automobile exhaust system, were reviewed. The dependence of properties on alloying elements, the refining facilities, and the mechanism of the reactions in steel melts were described in detail. Vacuum, strong stirring, and powder injection proved to be effective technologies in the melting of ultra-pure ferritic stainless steels. The application of the ferritic grades was also briefly introduced.

  20. Attenuation of shock waves in copper and stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, W.B.

    1986-06-01

    By using shock pins, data were gathered on the trajectories of shock waves in stainless steel (SS-304L) and oxygen-free-high-conductivity copper (OFHC-Cu). Shock pressures were generated in these materials by impacting the appropriate target with thin (approx.1.5 mm) flying plates. The flying plates in these experiments were accelerated to high velocities (approx.4 km/s) by high explosives. Six experiments were conducted, three using SS-304L as the target material and three experiments using OFHC-Cu as the target material. Peak shock pressures generated in the steel experiments were approximately 109, 130, and 147 GPa and in the copper experiments, the peak shock pressures were approximately 111, 132, and 143 GPa. In each experiment, an attenuation of the shock wave by a following release wave was clearly observed. An extensive effort using two characteristic codes (described in this work) to theoretically calculate the attenuation of the shock waves was made. The efficacy of several different constitutive equations to successfully model the experiments was studied by comparing the calculated shock trajectories to the experimental data. Based on such comparisons, the conclusion can be drawn that OFHC-Cu enters a melt phase at about 130 GPa on the principal Hugoniot. There was no sign of phase changes in the stainless-steel experiments. In order to match the observed attenuation of the shock waves in the SS-304L experiments, it was necessary to include strength effects in the calculations. It was found that the values for the parameters in the strength equations were dependent on the equation of state used in the modeling of the experiments. 66 refs., 194 figs., 77 tabs.

  1. Dissimilar Friction Stir Welding Between UNS S31603 Austenitic Stainless Steel and UNS S32750 Superduplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoro, Maria Claudia; Pereira, Victor Ferrinho; Mei, Paulo Roberto; Ramirez, Antonio Jose

    2015-02-01

    In order to verify the viability of dissimilar UNS S31603 austenitic and UNS S32750 superduplex stainless steels joined by friction stir welding, 6-mm-thick plates were welded using a PCBN-WRe tool. The welded joints were performed in position control mode at rotational speeds of 100 to 300 rpm and a feed rate of 100 mm/min. The joints performed with 150 and 200 rpm showed good appearance and no defects. The metallographic analysis of both joints showed no internal defects and that the material flow pattern is visible only in the stirred zone (SZ) of the superduplex steel. On the SZ top, these patterns are made of regions of different phases (ferrite and austenite), and on the bottom and central part of the SZ, these patterns are formed by alternated regions of different grain sizes. The ferrite grains in the superduplex steel are larger than those in the austenitic ones along the SZ and thermo-mechanically affected zone, explained by the difference between austenite and ferrite recrystallization kinetics. The amount of ferrite islands present on the austenitic steel base metal decreased near the SZ interface, caused by the dissolving of the ferrite in austenitic matrix. No other phases were found in both joints. The best weld parameters were found to be 200 rpm rotation speed, 100 mm/min feed rate, and tool position control.

  2. Persistence of deposited metals in the lungs after stainless steel and mild steel welding fume inhalation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Chapman, Rebecca; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G

    2011-05-01

    Welding generates complex metal fumes that vary in composition. The objectives of this study were to compare the persistence of deposited metals and the inflammatory potential of stainless and mild steel welding fumes, the two most common fumes used in US industry. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 40 mg/m(3) of stainless or mild steel welding fumes for 3 h/day for 3 days. Controls were exposed to filtered air. Generated fume was collected, and particle size and elemental composition were determined. Bronchoalveolar lavage was done on days 0, 8, 21, and 42 after the last exposure to assess lung injury/inflammation and to recover lung phagocytes. Non-lavaged lung samples were analyzed for total and specific metal content as a measure of metal persistence. Both welding fumes were similar in particle morphology and size. Following was the chemical composition of the fumes-stainless steel: 57% Fe, 20% Cr, 14% Mn, and 9% Ni; mild steel: 83% Fe and 15% Mn. There was no effect of the mild steel fume on lung injury/inflammation at any time point compared to air control. Lung injury and inflammation were significantly elevated at 8 and 21 days after exposure to the stainless steel fume compared to control. Stainless steel fume exposure was associated with greater recovery of welding fume-laden macrophages from the lungs at all time points compared with the mild steel fume. A higher concentration of total metal was observed in the lungs of the stainless steel welding fume at all time points compared with the mild steel fume. The specific metals present in the two fumes were cleared from the lungs at different rates. The potentially more toxic metals (e.g., Mn, Cr) present in the stainless steel fume were cleared from the lungs more quickly than Fe, likely increasing their translocation from the respiratory system to other organs.

  3. Influence of silver additions to type 316 stainless steels on bacterial inhibition, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tseng, I-Sheng; Møller, Per;

    2010-01-01

    techniques. The microstructure of these 316 stainless steels was examined, and the influences of silver additions to 316 stainless steels on bacterial inhibition, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance were investigated. This study suggested that silver-bearing 316 stainless steels could be used......Bacterial contamination is a major concern in many areas. In this study, silver was added to type 316 stainless steels in order to obtain an expected bacteria inhibiting property to reduce the occurrence of bacterial contamination. Silver-bearing 316 stainless steels were prepared by vacuum melting...

  4. Cancer incidence among mild steel and stainless steel welders and other metal workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K S; Lauritsen, J M; Skytthe, A

    1996-01-01

    "stainless steel (SS) only welders" (SIR = 2.38, 95% C.I. 0.77-5.55). In spite of signs of inconsistency in the risk estimation by duration and latency, we find the results support the conclusions of other studies: employment as a welder is associated with an increased lung cancer risk....... by a postal questionnaire in living cohort members and interviews by proxy for deceased and emigrated subjects. The incidence of lung cancer was increased among workers ever "employed as welders" (SIR = 1.38, 95% C.I. 1.03-1.81). There was a significant excess risk of lung cancer among "mild steel (MS) only...

  5. A peptide-stainless steel reaction that yields a new bioorganic-metal state of matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elisabeth M; Li, Dong-Yang; Irvin, Randall T

    2011-08-01

    A synthetic peptide derived from the native protein sequence of a metal binding bacterial pilus was observed to spontaneously react with stainless steel via a previously unreported type of chemical interaction to generate an altered form of stainless steel which we term bioorganic stainless steel. Bioorganic stainless steel has a significantly increased electron work function (4.9 ± 0.05 eV compared to 4.79 ± 0.07 eV), decreased material adhesive force (19.4 ± 8.8 nN compared to 56.7 ± 10.5 nN), and is significantly harder than regular 304 stainless steel (~40% harder). A formal or semi-formal organo-metallic covalent bond is generated between a pilin receptor binding domain and stainless steel based on XPS analysis which indicates that the electronic state of the surface is altered. Further, we establish that the peptide-steel reaction demonstrates a degree of stereospecificity as the reaction of native L-peptide, D-peptide and a retro-inverso-D-peptide yields bioorganic steel products that can be differentiated via the resulting EWF (4.867 ± 0.008 eV, 4.651 ± 0.008 eV, and 4.919 ± 0.007 eV, respectively). We conclude that electron sharing between the peptide and steel surface results in the stabilization of surface electrons to generate bioorganic steel that displays altered properties relative to the initial starting material. The bioorganic steel generated from the retro-inverso-D-peptide yields a protease stable product that is harder (41% harder at a 400 μN load), and has a 50% lower corrosion rate compared with regular stainless steel (0.11 ± 0.03 mpy and 0.22 ± 0.04 mpy, respectively). Bioorganic steel is readily fabricated.

  6. Electrical-thermal interaction simulation for resistance spot welding nugget process of mild steel and stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春生; 韩凤武; 陆培德; 赵熹华; 陈勇; 邱冬生

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite difference electrical-thermal model for resistance spot welding nugget process of mild steel and stainless steel is introduced. A simulation method of the interaction of electrical and thermal factors is presented. Meanwhile, calculation method of contact resistance and treatment method of heater structure is provided. The influence of the temperature dependent material properties and various cooling boundary conditions on welding process was also taken into account in the model. A method for improving the mild steel and stainless steel joint was analyzed in numerical simulation process. Experimental verification shows that the model prediction agrees well with the practice. The model provides a useful theoretic tool for the analysis of the process of resistance spot welding of mild steel and stainless steel.

  7. Failure of Stainless Steel Welds Due to Microstructural Damage Prevented by In Situ Metallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Salgado Lopez

    Full Text Available Abstract In stainless steels, microstructural damage is caused by precipitation of chromium carbides or sigma phase. These microconstituents are detrimental in stainless steel welds because they lead to weld decay. Nevertheless, they are prone to appear in the heat affected zone (HAZ microstructure of stainless steel welds. This is particularly important for repairs of industrial components made of austenitic stainless steel. Non-destructive metallography can be applied in welding repairs of AISI 304 stainless steel components where it is difficult to ensure that no detrimental phase is present in the HAZ microstructure. The need of microstructural inspection in repairs of AISI 304 is caused because it is not possible to manufacture coupons for destructive metallography, with which the microstructure can be analyzed. In this work, it is proposed to apply in situ metallography as non-destructive testing in order to identify microstructural damage in the microstructure of AISI 304 stainless steel welds. The results of this study showed that the external surface micrographs of the weldment are representative of HAZ microstructure of the stainless steel component; because they show the presence of precipitated metallic carbides in the grain boundaries or sigma phase in the microstructure of the HAZ.

  8. Evaluation of weld defects in stainless steel 316L pipe using guided wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon Hyun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Kyung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Dongeui University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Stainless steel is a popular structural materials for liquid-hydrogen storage containers and piping components for transporting high-temperature fluids because of its superior material properties such as high strength and high corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures. In general, tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding is used for bonding stainless steel. However, it is often reported that the thermal fatigue cracks or initial defects in stainless steel after welding decreases the reliability of the material. The objective of this paper is to clarify the characteristics of ultrasonic guided wave propagation in relation to a change in the initial crack length in the welding zone of stainless steel. For this purpose, three specimens with different artificial defects of 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm in stainless steel welds were prepared. By considering the thickness of s stainless steel pipe, special attention was given to both the L(0,1) mode and L(0,2) mode in this study. It was clearly found that the L(0,2) mode was more sensitive to defects than the L(0,1) mode. Based on the results of the L(0,1) and L(0,2) mode analyses, the magnitude ratio of the two modes was more effective than studying each mode when evaluating defects near the welded zone of stainless steel because of its linear relationship with the length of the artificial defect.

  9. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a `steering' of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  10. Stainless steel binder for the development of novel TiC-reinforced steel cermets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akhtar Farid; Shiju Guo; Xia Yang; Yudong Lian

    2006-01-01

    Steel reinforced TiC composites are an attractive choice for wear resistance and corrosion resistance applications. TiCreinforced 17-4PH maraging stainless matrix composites were processed by conventional powder metallurgy (P/M). TiC-reinforced maraging stainless steel composites with >97% of theoretical density were fabricated. The microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of the composites were evaluated. The microstructure of these composites consisted of spherical and semi-spherical TiC particles.A few microcracks appeared in the composites, showing the presence of tensile stress in the composites produced during sintering.Typical properties, namely, hardness and bend strength were reported for the sintered composites. After heat treatment and aging, the increase of hardness was observed. The increase of hardness was attributed to the aging reaction in the 17-4PH stainless steel. The precipitates appeared in the microstructure and were responsible for the increase in hardness. The specific wear behavior of the composites was strongly dependent on the content of TiC particles, the interparticle spacing, and the presence of hard precipitates in the binder phase.

  11. Antibacterial silver nanocluster/silica composite coatings on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, M.; Perero, S.; Ferraris, S.; Miola, M.; Vernè, E.; Skoglund, S.; Blomberg, E.; Odnevall Wallinder, I.

    2017-02-01

    A coating made of silver nanocluster/silica composites has been deposited, via a radio frequency (RF) co-sputtering technique, for the first time onto stainless steel (AISI 304L) with the aim to improve its antibacterial properties. Different thermal treatments after coating deposition have been applied in order to optimize the coating adhesion, cohesion and its antibacterial properties. Its applicability has been investigated at realistic conditions in a cheese production plant. The physico-chemical characteristics of the coatings have been analyzed by means of different bulk and surface analytical techniques. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to assess coating morphology, composition, surface roughness, wetting properties, size and local distribution of the nanoparticles within the coating. Tape tests were used to determine the adhesion/cohesion properties of the coating. The amount and time-dependence of released silver in solutions of acetic acid, artificial water, artificial tap water and artificial milk were determined by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The antibacterial effect of the coating was evaluated at different experimental conditions using a standard bacterial strain of Staphylococcus aureus in compliance with National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) and AATCC 147 standards. The Ahearn test was performed to measure the adhesion of bacteria to the coated stainless steel surface compared with a control surface. The antibacterial coating retained its antibacterial activity after thermal treatment up to 450 °C and after soaking in common cleaning products for stainless steel surfaces used for e.g. food applications. The antibacterial capacity of the coating remained at high levels for 1-5 days, and showed a good capacity to reduce the adhesion of bacteria up to 30 days. Only a few

  12. Assessment of hydrophobicity and roughness of stainless steel adhered by an isolate of Bacillus cereus from a dairy plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Campos Bernardes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between the surface of stainless steel and Bacillus cereus was studied in terms of the characteristics of interfacial interaction determined from the measurement of the contact angle of the surface of B. cereus and stainless steel in the presence or absence of B. cereus adherence. The microtopographies and the roughness of the surface of stainless steel and stainless steel adhered by B. cereus were evaluated with the help of atomic force microscopy and perfilometry. The strain of B. cereus studied was considered hydrophilic, whereas the stainless steel was considered hydrophobic. The adhesion was not thermodynamically favorable (ΔGadhesion > 0 between the stainless steel and the strain of B. cereus studied. Thus, the interaction between them was not favored by the thermodynamic aspect of adhesion. There was no difference (p > 0.05 in the roughness of the surfaces of stainless steel adhered by B. cereus when analyzed by atomic force microscope and perfilometry.

  13. Assessment of hydrophobicity and roughness of stainless steel adhered by an isolate of Bacillus cereus from a dairy plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Patrícia Campos; de Andrade, Nélio José; Ferreira, Sukarno Olavo; de Sá, João Paulo Natalino; Araújo, Emiliane Andrade; Delatorre, Deyse Maria Zanom; Luiz, Lívia Maria Pinheiro

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between the surface of stainless steel and Bacillus cereus was studied in terms of the characteristics of interfacial interaction determined from the measurement of the contact angle of the surface of B. cereus and stainless steel in the presence or absence of B. cereus adherence. The microtopographies and the roughness of the surface of stainless steel and stainless steel adhered by B. cereus were evaluated with the help of atomic force microscopy and perfilometry. The strain of B. cereus studied was considered hydrophilic, whereas the stainless steel was considered hydrophobic. The adhesion was not thermodynamically favorable (ΔGadhesion > 0) between the stainless steel and the strain of B. cereus studied. Thus, the interaction between them was not favored by the thermodynamic aspect of adhesion. There was no difference (p > 0.05) in the roughness of the surfaces of stainless steel adhered by B. cereus when analyzed by atomic force microscope and perfilometry. PMID:24031578

  14. High Power Laser Welding. [of stainless steel and titanium alloy structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    A review of recent developments in high power, carbon dixoide laser welding is presented. Deep penetration welding in stainless steel to 0.5-in. thick, high speed welding in thin gage rimmed steel and gas shielded welding in Ti-6Al-4V alloy are described. The effects of laser power, power density, focusing optics, gas-shielding techniques, material properties and weld speed on weld quality and penetration are discussed. It is shown that laser welding performance in thin materials is comparable to that of electron beams. It is further shown that high quality welds, as evidenced by NDT, mechanical and metal-lographic tests, can be achieved. The potential of the laser for industrial welding applications is indicated.

  15. Aluminizing of plain carbon steel: Effect of temperature on coating and alloy phase morphology at constant holding time

    OpenAIRE

    Isiko, Maureen Bangukira

    2012-01-01

    Aluminized steel possesses excellent physical, chemical and mechanical properties as compared to plain carbon steel. This type of steel has found application in high temperature, oxidizing and corrosive environments. In addition, aluminized steel is more cost effective than stainless steels. The objective of the current study is to study effect of temperature on the thicknesses and phase morphology of the coating and intermetallic layer that is formed during hot-dip aluminizing of steel at a ...

  16. Research on High-Speed Drilling Performances of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.W.Zhong; Y.P.Ma; F.H.Sun; M.Chen

    2004-01-01

    Due to specific properties arising from their structure (high ductility, high toughness,strong tenacious and low heat conductivity), the stainless steels have poor machinability. The drilling of the stainless steels becomes the machining difficulty for their serious work-hardening and abrasion of tools. In this paper, the austenitic stainless steel is used as the work-piece to perform the contrastive experiments with the TiN coated and TiAlN-coated high-speed steel drills. The cutting force, torque, cutting temperature, and the abrasion of drills and tool life are tested and analyzed in the process of high-speed drilling. Experiment results show the effect of drilling speed on cutting force, cutting temperature, and drill wear. TiAlN-coated drills demonstrate better performances in high speed drilling. The research results will be of great benefit in the selection of drills and in the control of tool wear in high speed drilling of stainless steels.

  17. Fracture behavior of 304 stainless steel coatings by cold gas dynamic spray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei HAN; Xianming MENG; Jie ZHAO; Junbao ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    304 stainless steel coating was deposited on the Interstitial-Free steel substrate by cold gas dynamic spraying (CGDS). Three-point bending test of the cold sprayed 304 stainless steel coating was tested by SHIMADZU electro-hydraulic servo-controlled fatigue testing machine and the fracture morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the fracture behavior of the cold sprayed 304 stainless steel coating was brittleness fracture. The crack in the coating occurred in the interfaces between particles and the crack extended to the internal of the coating with the increase of the load. When the crack has extended to the combination interface between coating and substrate, the crack extended to the two sides. The microstructure and mechanical property of the cold sprayed 304 stainless steel coating have been optimized after heat treatment.

  18. Martensitic stainless steel seamless linepipe with superior weldability and CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Y.; Kimura, M.; Koseki, T.; Toyooka, T.; Murase, F. [Kawasaki Steel Corp., Handa, Aichi (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    Two types of new martensitic stainless steel with good weldability and superior corrosion resistance have been developed for line pipe application. Both steels are suitable for welding without preheating owing to lowering C and N contents, and they show good low temperature toughness in welds without PWHT. One is applied to sweet environments. It gives better resistance to CO{sub 2} corrosion than the 13Cr martensitic stainless steel for OCTG. Lowering C and addition of Ni contribute to reduction of general corrosion rate in the CO{sub 2} environment. The addition of Cu improves the pitting resistance. The other is applied to light sour environments. It gives good SSC resistance in welds owing to the improvement of the pitting resistance due to Mo addition. The seamless pipes of these martensitic stainless steels are applicable as substitutes for a part of duplex stainless steel flow lines.

  19. Effect of Grain Size on Mechanical Properties of Nickel-Free High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua-bing; JIANG Zhou-hua; ZHANG Zu-rui; YANG Yan

    2009-01-01

    The fine grained structures of nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels had been obtained by means of cold rolling and subsequent annealing.The relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties and gain size of nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels was examined.High strength and good ductility of the steel were found.In the grain size range,the Hall-Petch dependency for yield stress,tensile strength,and hardness was valid for grain size ranges for the nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel.In the present study,the ductility of cold rolled nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel decreased with annealing time when the grain size was refined.The fracture surfaces of the tensile specimens in the grain size range were covered with dimples as usually seen in a ductile fracture mode.

  20. Effect of laser surface melting in tensile properties of type 304L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akgun, O.V.; Inal, O.T. (New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Materials and Metallurgical Engineering Dept., Socorro, NM (US)); Lovato, M.L.; Jervist, T.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (US))

    1992-07-15

    In previous study the authors showed laser surface melting (LSM) to increase yield strength of 304 austenitic stainless steels. A consistent increase approximately 10% was also observed in the hardness of the melted layer compared to that of the substrate. Austentic stainless steels do not transform to martensite during laser processing. The microstructure is observed to contain only austenite and some retained {delta}-ferrite due to rapid cooling. Therefore, the hardness increase observed was interpreted to be due to microstructural modifications, namely in the formation of austenite {delta}-ferrite duplex structure as well as a refinement in the subgrain structure. The alloy used in this study, type 304L, is a lower carbon modification of type 304 for welding applications. Lower carbon content minimizes carbide precipitation in the heat affected zone of welds. In an annealed condition type 304L has lower mechanical properties than type 304. This paper reports on this present study which was undertaken to verify if a material that possesses an initially high yield strength, type 304L, would exhibit a similar increase in its yield strength and the magnitude of this enhancement at different test temperatures (22, 100, 200 and 300{degrees}C).

  1. An Investigation on Low-Temperature Thermochemical Treatments of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Fluidized Bed Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruman, E.; Sun, Y.; Triwiyanto, A.; Manurung, Y. H. P.; Adesta, E. Y.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, the feasibility of using an industrial fluidized bed furnace to perform low-temperature thermochemical treatments of austenitic stainless steels has been studied, with the aim to produce expanded austenite layers with combined wear and corrosion resistance, similar to those achievable by plasma and gaseous processes. Several low-temperature thermochemical treatments were studied, including nitriding, carburizing, combined nitriding-carburizing (hybrid treatment), and sequential carburizing and nitriding. The results demonstrate that it is feasible to produce expanded austenite layers on the investigated austenitic stainless steel by the fluidized bed heat treatment technique, thus widening the application window for the novel low-temperature processes. The results also demonstrate that the fluidized bed furnace is the most effective for performing the hybrid treatment, which involves the simultaneous incorporation of nitrogen and carbon together into the surface region of the component in nitrogen- and carbon-containing atmospheres. Such hybrid treatment produces a thicker and harder layer than the other three processes investigated.

  2. An Evaluation of the Corrosion and Mechanical Performance of Interstitially Surface-Hardened Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer L.; Koul, Michelle G.; Schubbe, Joel J.

    2014-06-01

    A surface hardening technique called "interstitial hardening" is commercially available, whereby interstitial carbon atoms are introduced into stainless steel surfaces without the formation of carbides. Surface hardening of machine elements such as impellors or fasteners would improve performance regarding cavitation and galling resistance, and has intensified interest in this process. However, there remains a need to characterize and validate the specific performance characteristics of the hardened materials. This paper describes experimental testing conducted on 316L stainless steel that has been surface hardened using available commercial techniques, using carbon as the interstitial atom. The corrosion performance of the hardened surface is assessed using electrochemical potentiodynamic testing to determine the breakdown potential in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution to identify the most promising method. The hardness and thickness of the surface-hardened layer is characterized and compared using metallography and microhardness profiling. Corrosion fatigue and slow strain rate testing of untreated, hardened, and damaged, hardened surfaces exposed to ASTM seawater is conducted. Finally, critical galling stresses are determined and compared. Post-test examination of damage attempts to identify mechanisms of material failure and characterize how corrosion-assisted cracks initiate and grow in surface-hardened materials.

  3. Micro/nano engineering on stainless steel substrates to produce superhydrophobic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckford, Samuel; Zou Min, E-mail: mzou@uark.edu

    2011-12-30

    Creating micro-/nano-scale topography on material surfaces to change their wetting properties has been a subject of much interest in recent years. Wenzel in 1936 and Cassie and Baxter in 1944 proposed that by microscopically increasing the surface roughness of a substrate, it is possible to increase its hydrophobicity. This paper reports the fabrication of micro-textured surfaces and nano-textured surfaces, and the combination of both on stainless steel substrates by sandblasting, thermal evaporation of aluminum, and aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) of amorphous silicon (a-Si). Meanwhile, fluorinated carbon films were used to change the chemical composition of the surfaces to render the surfaces more hydrophobic. These surface modifications were investigated to create superhydrophobic surfaces on stainless steel substrates. The topography resulting from these surface modifications was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and surface profilometry. The wetting properties of these surfaces were characterized by water contact angle measurement. The results of this study show that superhydrophobic surfaces can be produced by either micro-scale surface texturing or nano-scale surface texturing, or the combination of both, after fluorinated carbon film deposition.

  4. Study of biocompatibility of medical grade high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Menghua; Yin, Tieying; Wang, Yazhou; Du, Feifei; Zou, Xingzheng; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2014-10-01

    Adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the living organism have resulted in development of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also improves steel properties. The cell cytocompatibility, blood compatibility and cell response of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel were studied in vitro. The mechanical properties and microstructure of this stainless steel were compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel. It was shown that the new steel material had comparable basic mechanical properties to 316L stainless steel and preserved the single austenite organization. The cell toxicity test showed no significant toxic side effects for MC3T3-E1 cells compared to nitinol alloy. Cell adhesion testing showed that the number of MC3T3-E1 cells was more than that on nitinol alloy and the cells grew in good condition. The hemolysis rate was lower than the national standard of 5% without influence on platelets. The total intracellular protein content and ALP activity and quantification of mineralization showed good cell response. We conclude that the high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel is a promising new biomedical material for coronary stent development.

  5. 76 FR 34964 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From India: Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty... India for the period of review February 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. See Antidumping or.... (``Grand Foundry''), India Steel Works Ltd. (``India Steel''), Meltroll Engineering Pvt. Ltd....

  6. The adhesion of hot-filament CVD diamond films on AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijnsters, J.G.; Shankar, P.; Enckevort, W.J.P. van; Schermer, J.J.; Meulen, J.J. ter

    2004-01-01

    Steel ball indentation and scratch adhesion testing of hot filament chemical vapour deposited diamond films onto AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steel substrates using two different interlayer systems, namely chromium nitride and borided steel, have been investigated. In order to compare the adhe

  7. The influence of texture on phase transformation in metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilkhuijsen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels are used in many applications, from shavers and kitchen sinks to various applications in the food industry. The diversity in applications of this type of steels is possible due to the many positive properties of the steel. It is not only esthetically pleasing,

  8. Analysis of cracking phenomena in continuous casting of 1Cr13 stainless steel billets with final electromagnetic stirring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Xu; Rong-jun Xu; Zheng-jie Fan; Cheng-bin Li; An-yuan Deng; En-gang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Solidification cracking that occurs during continuous casting of 1Cr13 stainless steel was investigated with and without final elec-tromagnetic stirring (F-EMS). The results show that cracks initiates and propagates along the grain boundaries where the elements of carbon and sulfur are enriched. The final stirrer should be appropriately placed at a location that is 7.5 m away from the meniscus, and the appropri-ate thickness of the liquid core in the stirring zone is 50 mm. As a stirring current of 250 A is imposed, it can promote columnar-equiaxed transition, decrease the secondary dendrite arm spacing, and reduce the segregation of both carbon and sulfur. F-EMS can effectively de-crease the amount of cracks in 1Cr13 stainless steel.

  9. Intergranular Corrosion of 316L Stainless Steel by Aging and UNSM (Ultrasonic Nano-crystal Surface Modification) treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, Y. S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Austenitic stainless steels have been widely used in many engineering fields because of their high corrosion resistance and good mechanical properties. However, welding or aging treatment may induce intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, pitting, etc. Since these types of corrosion are closely related to the formation of chromium carbide in grain boundaries, the alloys are controlled using methods such as lowering the carbon content, solution heat treatment, alloying of stabilization elements, and grain boundary engineering. This work focused on the effects of aging and UNSM (Ultrasonic Nano-crystal Surface Modification) on the intergranular corrosion of commercial 316L stainless steel and the results are discussed on the basis of the sensitization by chromium carbide formation and carbon segregation, residual stress, grain refinement, and grain boundary engineering.

  10. Strategic surface topographies for enhanced lubrication in sheet forming of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Morten Sixten; Olsson, David Dam; Petrushina, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Strategic stainless steel surfaces have been developed for which the tribological properties are significantly improved for sheet-metal forming compared with the as-received surfaces. The improvements have been achieved by modification of the surface to promote Micro-Plasto Hydrodynamic Lubrication....... The technique, which has been developed, is based on an electrochemical treatment changing the topography of the stainless steel surface. Comparative testing of the new surface topographies in ironing and deep drawing of stainless steel sheet shows significant improvements and possibilities of replacing...

  11. An Electrochemical Study on the Corrosion Inhibition of Stainless Steel by Polyaniline Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao WANG; Lin NIU; Qiu Hong LI; Su Xiang WU; Feng Hua WEI

    2004-01-01

    Polyaniline(PANI) film was electrosynthesized on 304 stainless steel by cyclic voltammetry using aqueous oxalic acid as supporting electrolyte. The potential sweep rates were changed to achieve the PANI film with different thickness and structures. Protective properties of the PANI film for corrosion of stainless steel in 3% NaCl aqueous solution were investigated by monitoring potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).The results showed that the PANI film which was formed with lower sweep rate led to more positive shift of corrosion potential and greater charge transfer resistance, reflecting higher inhibition for corrosion of the stainless steel.

  12. Measurement of the magnetic moment in a cold worked 304 stainless steel using HTS SQUID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, D.G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yusung P.O. Box 105, Taejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: dwkim1@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, D.W.; Angani, C.S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yusung P.O. Box 105, Taejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Timofeev, V.P. [B. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 47 Lenin Ave, Kharkov 61103 (Ukraine); Cheong, Y.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yusung P.O. Box 105, Taejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    The magnetic properties of stainless steel have been investigated using a radio frequency (RF) high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device)-based susceptometer. The nuclear grade 304 stainless steel is nonmagnetic at a normal condition but it changes to a partially ferromagnetic state associated with martensitic transformation under a plastic deformation. The magnetic moment of the 304 stainless steels was increased with an increasing cold work rate, and decreased with an increasing annealing temperature. The change of mechanical properties such as yield strength and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) are also analyzed in terms of deformation-induced martensitic transformation.

  13. Regular subwavelength surface structures induced by femtosecond laser pulses on stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Litao; Nishii, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu

    2009-06-15

    In this research, we studied the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on the stainless steel surface using femtosecond laser pulses. A 780 nm wavelength femtosecond laser, through a 0.2 mm pinhole aperture for truncating fluence distribution, was focused onto the stainless steel surface. Under different experimental condition, low-spatial-frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures with a period of 526 nm and high-spatial-frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures with a period of 310 nm were obtained. The mechanism of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on the stainless steel surface is discussed.

  14. Influence of Simulated Outside-Reactor Irradiation on Anticorrosion Property of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The influence of γ-ray irradiation on the properties of inside-reactor stainless steel structures was studied by simulating the working condition of pressurized water reactor (PWR) first circuit and the outside-reactor γ-ray irradiation. The result shows that the simulated outside-reactor irradiation (irradiation dose 4.4 × 104 Gy) has no influence on anticorrosion properties of solutionized SUS304 austenitic stainless steel, including intergranular corrosion (IC) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Anticorrosion properties (IC, SCC) of sensitized SUS304 austenitic stainless steel are reduced by simulated outside-reactor irradiation. The longer the sensitizedtime is, the more obvious the influence is.

  15. Tool degradation during sheet metal forming of three stainless steel alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadman, Boel; Nielsen, Peter Søe; Wiklund, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate if changes in tool design and tool surface preparation are needed when low-Ni stainless steels are used instead of austenitic stainless steels, the effect on tool degradation in the form of galling was investigated with three different types of stainless steel. The resistance to tool...... degradation was analysed by the strip reduction test, simulating resistance to galling during ironing. It was shown that the surface condition of both the tools and the sheet metal was of importance to the galling resistance. Numerical simulations of the experimental tests were compared with the experimental...

  16. Comparison of the thermoelastic phenomenon expressions in stainless steels during cyclic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sapieta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to compare the thermoelastic stress in specimens of stainless steel. As material specimens we chose stainless steel of AISI 304, AISI 316Ti and AISI 316L types. The specimens were cyclically loaded with three-point bending. The whole process was recorded using an infrared camera. The thermal differences that occurred during the test were evaluated based on the thermoelastic stress equations. Subsequently, stress distributions in the specimens were compared for different types of stainless steel.

  17. Low pressure powder injection moulding of stainless steel powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zampieron, J.V.; Soares, J.P.; Mathias, F.; Rossi, J.L. [Powder Processing Center CCP, Inst. de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Filho, F.A. [IPEN, Inst. de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Cidade Univ., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2001-07-01

    Low-pressure powder injection moulding was used to obtain AISI 316L stainless steel parts. A rheological study was undertaken using gas-atomised powders and binders. The binders used were based on carnauba wax, paraffin, low density polyethylene and microcrystalline wax. The metal powders were characterised in terms of morphology, particle size distribution and specific surface area. These results were correlated to the rheological behaviour. The mixture was injected in the shape of square bar specimens to evaluate the performance of the injection process in the green state, and after sintering. The parameters such as injection pressure, viscosity and temperature were analysed for process optimisation. The binders were thermally removed in low vacuum with the assistance of alumina powders. Debinding and sintering were performed in a single step. This procedure shortened considerably the debinding and sintering time. (orig.)

  18. Interface nanochemistry effects on stainless steel diffusion bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, M. J.; Carpenter, R. W.; Kim, M. J.

    2002-02-01

    The diffusion-bonding behavior of single-phase austenitic stainless steel depends strongly on the chemistry of the surfaces to be bounded. We found that very smooth (0.5 nm root-mean-square (RMS) roughness), mechanically polished and lapped substrates would bond completely in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) in 1 hour at 1000 °C under 3.5 MPa uniaxial pressure, if the native oxide on the substrates was removed by ion-beam cleaning, as shown by in-situ Auger analysis. No voids were observed in these bonded interfaces by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the strength was equal to that of the unbounded bare material. No bond formed between the substrates if in-situ ion cleaning was not used. The rougher cleaned substrates partially bonded, indicating that roughness, as well as native oxides, reduced the bonding kinetics.

  19. Electromagnetic non-destructive technique for duplex stainless steel characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, João Vicente; Camerini, Cesar; Pereira, Gabriela

    2016-02-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a two-phase (ferrite and austenite) material, which exhibits an attractive combination of mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance, being commonly employed for equipment of petrochemical plants, refining units and oil & gas platforms. The best properties of DSS are achieved when the phases are in equal proportions. However, exposition to high temperatures (e.g. welding process) may entail undesired consequences, such as deleterious phases precipitation (e.g. sigma, chi) and different proportion of the original phases, impairing dramatically the mechanical and corrosion properties of the material. A detailed study of the magnetic behavior of DSS microstructure with different ferrite austenite ratios and deleterious phases content was accomplished. The non destructive method evaluates the electromagnetic properties changes in the material and is capable to identify the presence of deleterious phases into DSS microstructure.

  20. Crevice and pitting corrosion behavior of stainless steels in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaragoza-Ayala, A.E.; Orozco-Cruz, R. [Univ. Autonoma de Campeche (Mexico). Programa de Corrosion del Golfo de Mexico

    1999-11-01

    Pitting and crevice corrosion tests in natural seawater were performed on a series of stainless steels (i.e., S31603, N08904, S32304, S31803, S32520, N08925 and S31266) in order to determine their resistance to these types of localized corrosion. Open circuit potential (OCP) measurements for these alloys show for short exposure times an ennoblement in the OCP. After a certain time, occasional fall and rise in the OCP values was observed, which can be related to nucleation and repassivation of pits and/or crevices on the metal surface. Analysis of the electrochemical behavior and microscopic observations shows that only S31603 and S32304 alloys were susceptible to crevice and pitting corrosion, whereas the remaining alloys exhibited good resistance. Pitting potentials determined by the potentiodynamic technique also show S3 1603 and S32304 are susceptible to pitting corrosion under the experimental conditions used in this work.

  1. Thermal deformation behavior and microstructure of nuclear austenitic stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Gleeble-1500D thermal simulation tester was employed in the hot-compression investigation of as-cast nuclear 304 austenitic stainless steel under conditions: deformation temperature 950―1200℃; deformations 30% and 50%; deformation rates 0.01 and 0.1 s?1. The results show that the flow stress decreases with temperature rise under the same strain rate and deformation, that the flow stress increases with deformation under the same temperature and strain rate, and that the flow stress increases with strain rate under the same temperature condition, i.e., work hardening becomes distinct. Materials exhibit better strength-toughness when the strain rate is 0.01 s-1, the deformation is 50%, and the temperature is 1050℃.

  2. Laser milling of martensitic stainless steels using spiral trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romoli, L.; Tantussi, F.; Fuso, F.

    2017-04-01

    A laser beam with sub-picosecond pulse duration was driven in spiral trajectories to perform micro-milling of martensitic stainless steel. The geometry of the machined micro-grooves channels was investigated by a specifically conceived Scanning Probe Microscopy instrument and linked to laser parameters by using an experimental approach combining the beam energy distribution profile and the absorption phenomena in the material. Preliminary analysis shows that, despite the numerous parameters involved in the process, layer removal obtained by spiral trajectories, varying the radial overlap, allows for a controllable depth of cut combined to a flattening effect of surface roughness. Combining the developed machining strategy to a feed motion of the work stage, could represent a method to obtain three-dimensional structures with a resolution of few microns, with an areal roughness Sa below 100 nm.

  3. Investigation of Machinability Characteristics of AISI 316Ti Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Kayır

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, many experiments of machinability were carried out on universal turning lathe. The cutting forces that occur during machining of workpieces were measured. A standard dynamometer was used to measure cutting forces. The Dynamometer were assembled on the lathe efficiently. An apart were designed and machined to assembly the dynamometer. Moreover, AISI 316Ti stainless steel parts were turned by carbide cutting tools coated with TiAlN components. Effects of cutting tools with different radius on cutting forces and surface roughness were investigated by using different cutting parameters. Moreover, machined parts' surface roughness was controlled. The experimental results showed that cutting forces increased with the increasing federate, but the surface roughness decreased with increasing the radius of cutting edge.

  4. Multilayer Clad Plate of Stainless Steel/Aluminum/Aluminum Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Jiawei; PANG Yuhua; LI Ting

    2011-01-01

    The 3, 5, 20 layer clad plate from austenitic stainless steel, pure aluminum and aluminum alloy sheets were fabricated in different ways. The stretch and interface properties were measured. The result shows that 20 layer clad plate is better than the others. Well-bonded clad plate was successfully obtained in the following procedure: Basic clad sheet from 18 layer A11060/A13003sheets was firstly obtained with an initial rolling reduction of 44% at 450 ℃, followed by annealing at 300 ℃, and then with reduction of 50% at 550 ℃ from STS304 on each side. The best 20 layer clad plate was of 129 MPa bonding strength and 225 MPa stretch strength.

  5. Cutting of Stainless Steel With Fiber and Disk Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandera, Catherine; Salminen, Antti; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2006-01-01

    Laser cutting is a major application of laser materials processing. The cutting is usually performed with CO2-laser due to its good beam quality and its relatively low costs of ownership. Ever since entering the market the high power solid state lasers have been expected to achieve a dominating......, the new laser types with a high beam quality, in cutting of austenitic stainless steel. The performance of these new lasers at power level of 4 kW was compared with CO2-laser in respect of cutting speed, kerf width, kerf edge roughness and perpendicularity (squarness) in order to validate the potential...... of both of the new lasers against traditional CO2-laser. The results showed that the new lasers offer a great potential in improving the productivity of cutting phase with an acceptable edge quality. This is emphasized in thin sheets of 1.3 and 2.3 mm thickness. In that case the width of the cut kerf...

  6. Electrochemical Evaluation of Corrosion Inhibitors to Austenistic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosmari Adames Montero

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of corrosion inhibitors is one of the most universal methods, and diffused for the protection ofmetals, because they reduce substantially the corrosion losses when they are added in smallconcentrations. At the present work it was carried out the electrochemical tests evaluation of twoinhibitors, A and B, to be used in the chemical cleanings for trays of heat interchanger, which aresuffering thickness losses until its perforation. By the chemical composition analysis, it wasdemonstrated that the metal is an austenistic stainless steel and by electrochemical tests of linearpolarization resistance, electrochemical noise and cyclic sweep, were demonstrated the localizedcorrosion. The best efficiency of the inhibitor A was obtained with one and two percent concentration,while the inhibitor B shows values efficiency near 95% with two percent concentration.

  7. The stainless steel crown debate: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uston, Karen A; Estrella, Maria Regina P

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we will explore the use of the stainless steel crown (SSC) in dentistry today. For the pediatric population, many factors can affect the choice of restoration, such as the variations between primary and permanent tooth morphology, oral environment, and patient selection. The current literature and dentistry guidelines encourage dentists to make an informed decision when determining the restoration recommended for a carious primary molar. To further help educate dental providers on the topic of SSCs the following items will be reviewed: the indications; techniques for placement; advantages; and drawbacks when compared to alternative restorative materials. Regardless of personal opinion, the SSC should continue to be recognized for its efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and successful treatment modality.

  8. The Study of Plasma Nitriding of AISI304 Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; JI Shi-jun; GAO Yu-zhou; SUN Jun-cai

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents results on the plasma nitriding of AISI 304 stainless steel at different temperatures in NH 3 gas. The working pressure was 100~200 Pa and the discharge voltage was 700~800V. The phase of nitrided layer formed on the surface was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The hardness of the samples was measured by using a Vickers microhardness tester with the load of 50g. After nitriding at about 400 ℃ for two hours a nitrided layer consisting of single γN phase with thickness of 5μm was obtained. Microhardness measurements showed significant increase in the hardness from 240 HV (for untreated samples) up to 950 HV (for nitrided samples at temperature of 420℃). The phase composition, the thickness, the microstructure and the surface topography of the nitrided layer as well as its properties depend essentially on the process parameters.

  9. Electrodeposition of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate coatings on stainless steel substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Belavalli E Prasad; P Vishnu Kamath

    2013-06-01

    Cathodic reduction of an aqueous solution containing dissolved calcium and phosphate ions results in the deposition of micrometer thick CaHPO4.2H2O (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate) coatings on stainless steel substrates. The coating obtained at a low deposition current (8 mA cm-2) comprises lath-like crystallites oriented along 020. The 020 crystal planes are non-polar and have a low surface energy. At a high deposition current (12 mA cm-2), platelets oriented along 12$\\bar{1}$ are deposited. CaHPO4.2H2O is an important precursor to the nucleation of hydroxyapatite, the inorganic component of bones. Differently oriented CaHPO4.2H2Ocoatings transform to hydroxyapatite with different kinetics, the transformation being more facile when the coating is oriented along 12$\\bar{1}$. These observations have implications for the development of electrodeposited biocompatible coatings for metal endoprostheses for medical applications.

  10. Laser cladding of Ni-based alloy on stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Chun-fang; TIAN Xin-li; TAN Yong-sheng; WU Zhi-yuan

    2004-01-01

    The coatings on a stainless steel substrate were conducted by laser cladding of Ni-based alloy, using a 5 kW continuous wave CO2 flow transverse laser. SEM, EDX and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the microstructure and constituent phases of the obtained coatings by laser cladding with direct injection of the powder into the melt pool. Solidification planar, cellular and dendrite structures were observed in Ni-based alloy coating. There exists an optimum metallurgical bond between Ni-based laser cladding layer and the base material. The high hardness of the Ni-based alloy coating is attributed to the presence of M7C3-type carbides (essentially chromium-riched carbide) dispersed in the γ(Ni,Fe) phase matrix.

  11. Ultrasound treatment of centrifugally atomized 316 stainless steel powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawers, James C.; McCune, Robert A.; Dunning, John S.

    1991-12-01

    The Bureau of Mines is studying the surface characteristics of rapidly solidified powders and the potential for surface modification of fine powders prior to consolidation. The surface modification and work hardening of fine powders were accomplished by applying high-energy ultrasound to centrifugally atomized austenitic 316 stainless steel powders suspended in liquid media. Cavitation implosion changed the surface morphology, hammering the surface and occasionally fretting off microchips of work-hardened metal. Ultrasound-cavitation work-hardened metal powder surfaces producing a strained, duplex austenite face-centered cubic (fcc)-martensite body-centered tetragonal (bct) phase structure. The amount of work hardening depended upon the quantity of ultrasound energy used, considering both power level and experimental time. Work hardening was relatively independent of the liquid media used.

  12. Fracture properties evaluation of stainless steel piping for LBB applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.J.; Seok, C.S.; Chang, Y.S. [Sung Kyun Kwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the material properties of SA312 TP316 and SA312 TP304 stainless steels and their associated welds manufactured for shutdown cooling line and safety injection line of nuclear generating stations. A total of 82 tensile tests and 58 fracture toughness tests on specimens taken from actual pipes were performed and the effect of various parameters such as the pipe size, the specimen orientation, the test temperature and the welding procedure on the material properties are discussed. Test results show that the effect of the test temperature on the fracture toughness was significant while the effects of the pipe size and the specimen orientation on the fracture toughness were negligible. The material properties of the GTAW weld metal was in general higher than those of the base metal.

  13. Handbook for tensile properties of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Ryu, W. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, W. G.; Chung, M. K.; Han, C. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    Database system of nuclear materials has not been developed and the physical and mechanical properties of materials used in nuclear power plant are not summarized systematically in Korea. Although Korea designs nuclear power plant, many materials used in nuclear power plant are imported because we do not have database system of nuclear material yet and it was hard to select a proper material for the structural materials of nuclear power plant. To develop database system of nuclear materials, data of mechanical, corrosion, irradiation properties are needed. Of theses properties, tensile properties are tested and summarized in this report. Tensile properties of stainless steel used in nuclear reactor internal were investigated. Data between Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute and foreign laboratory were compared to determine the precision of the result. To develope database system, materials, chemical composition, heat treatment, manufacturing process, and grain size were classified. Tensile properties were tested and summarized to use input data of database system. 9 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  14. Creep-fatigue interactions in an austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, S; Maiya, P S

    1978-01-01

    A phenomenological model of the interaction between creep and fatigue in Type 304 stainless steel at elevated temperatures is presented. The model is based on a crack-growth equation and an equation governing cavity growth, expressed in terms of current plastic strain and plastic strain rate. Failure is assumed to occur when a proposed interaction equation is satisfied. Various parameters of the equations can be obtained by correlation with continuously cycling fatigue and monotonic creep-rupture test data, without the use of any hold-time fatigue tests. Effects of various wave shapes such as tensile, compressive, and symmetrical hold on the low-cycle fatigue life can be computed by integrating the damage-rate equations along the appropriate loading path. Microstructural evidence in support of the proposed model is also discussed.

  15. Anomalous kinetics of lath martensite formation in stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Pantleon, Karen;

    2015-01-01

    isochronal cooling that transformation rate maxima occur, which are interrupted by virtually transformation free temperature regions. Microscopy confirms martensite formation after athermal nucleation of clusters followed by their time dependent growth. The observations are interpreted in terms of time...... dependent autocatalytic lath martensite formation followed by mechanical stabilisation of austenite during the transformation process.......The kinetics of lath martensite formation in Fe-17.3 wt-%Cr-7.1 wt-%Ni-1.1 wt-%Al-0.08 wt-%C stainless steel was investigated with magnetometry and microscopy. Lath martensite forms during cooling, heating and isothermally. For the first time, it is shown by magnetometry during extremely slow...

  16. Shape retention of injection molded stainless steel compacts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yi-min; K.A.Khalil; HUANG Bai-yun

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the binder composition, the powder loading, the thermal properties of feedstocks, and the injection molding parameters on the compact shape retention for metal injection molding 17-4PH stainless steel were investigated. The high-density polyethylene is more effective than ethylene vinyl acetate as a second component of the wax-based binder to retain compact shape due to its higher pyrolytic temperature and less heat of fusion. The compact distortion decreases with increasing the powder loading, molding pressure and molding temperature. There exists an optimal process combination including the powder loading of 68%, molding pressure of 120 MPa and molding temperature of 150 ℃. Under this process condition, the percentage of distorted compacts is the lowest.

  17. Stainless steel crown aspiration during sedation in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewumi, A; Kays, David W

    2008-01-01

    Foreign body aspiration (FBA) causes death in more than 300 children every year in the United States. Morbidity and mortality are increased in children due to narrow airways and immature protective mechanisms. Factors to consider in pediatric dentistry are: (1) the patient's age and behavior; (2) presence and extent of disability; (3) local anesthesia; (4) body positioning; and (5) loose teeth. FBA requires prompt recognition and early treatment to minimize potentially serious and sometimes fatal consequences. The purpose of this case report was to describe the aspiration of a stainless steel crown in a 5-year-old boy during conscious sedation. It also discusses how a prompt and accurate diagnosis, early referral, and immediate treatment helped prevent serious complications.

  18. Tooling solutions for sheet metal forming and punching of lean duplex stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadman, Boel; Madsen, Erik; Bay, Niels

    2012-01-01

    .4509 and lean duplex EN1.4162 in a production designed for austenitic stainless steels, such as EN1.4301 and 1.4401. The result is a guideline that summarizes how stainless material properties may affect tool degradation, and suggests tool solutions for reduced production disturbances and tool maintenance cost.......For producers of advanced stainless components the choice of stainless material influences not only the product properties, but also the tooling solution for sheet metal stamping. This work describes how forming and punching tools will be affected when introducing the stainless alloys ferritic EN1...

  19. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  20. Numerical modeling and optimization of machining duplex stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastee D. Koyee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The shortcomings of the machining analytical and empirical models in combination with the industry demands have to be fulfilled. A three-dimensional finite element modeling (FEM introduces an attractive alternative to bridge the gap between pure empirical and fundamental scientific quantities, and fulfill the industry needs. However, the challenging aspects which hinder the successful adoption of FEM in the machining sector of manufacturing industry have to be solved first. One of the greatest challenges is the identification of the correct set of machining simulation input parameters. This study presents a new methodology to inversely calculate the input parameters when simulating the machining of standard duplex EN 1.4462 and super duplex EN 1.4410 stainless steels. JMatPro software is first used to model elastic–viscoplastic and physical work material behavior. In order to effectively obtain an optimum set of inversely identified friction coefficients, thermal contact conductance, Cockcroft–Latham critical damage value, percentage reduction in flow stress, and Taylor–Quinney coefficient, Taguchi-VIKOR coupled with Firefly Algorithm Neural Network System is applied. The optimization procedure effectively minimizes the overall differences between the experimentally measured performances such as cutting forces, tool nose temperature and chip thickness, and the numerically obtained ones at any specified cutting condition. The optimum set of input parameter is verified and used for the next step of 3D-FEM application. In the next stage of the study, design of experiments, numerical simulations, and fuzzy rule modeling approaches are employed to optimize types of chip breaker, insert shapes, process conditions, cutting parameters, and tool orientation angles based on many important performances. Through this study, not only a new methodology in defining the optimal set of controllable parameters for turning simulations is introduced, but also

  1. Documentation of Stainless Steel Lithium Circuit Test Section Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfroy, T. J.; Martin, J. J.; Stewart, E. T.; Rhys, N. O.

    2010-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission-Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team was tasked by Naval Reactors Prime Contract Team (NRPCT) to design, fabricate, and test an actively pumped lithium (Li) flow circuit. This Li circuit takes advantage of work in progress at the EFF TF on a stainless steel sodium/potassium (NaK) circuit. The effort involved modifying the original stainless steel NaK circuit such that it could be operated with Li in place of NaK. This new design considered freeze/thaw issues and required the addition of an expansion tank and expansion/extrusion volumes in the circuit plumbing. Instrumentation has been specified for Li and circuit heaters have been placed throughout the design to ensure adequate operational temperatures and no uncontrolled freezing of the Li. All major components have been designed and fabricated prior to circuit redesign for Li and were not modified. Basic circuit components include: reactor segment, Li to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. The reactor segment, based on a Los Alamos National Laboratory 100-kW design study with 120 fuel pins, is the only prototypic component in the circuit. However, due to earlier funding constraints, a 37-pin partial-array of the core, including the central three rings of fuel pins (pin and flow path dimensions are the same as those in the full design), was selected for fabrication and test. This Technical Publication summarizes the design and integration of the pumped liquid metal Li flow circuit as of May 1, 2005.

  2. Documentation of Stainless Steel Lithium Circuit Test Section Design. Suppl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfroy, Thomas J. (Compiler); Martin, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission-Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team was tasked by Naval Reactors Prime Contract Team (NRPCT) to design, fabricate, and test an actively pumped lithium (Li) flow circuit. This Li circuit takes advantage of work in progress at the EFF TF on a stainless steel sodium/potassium (NaK) circuit. The effort involved modifying the original stainless steel NaK circuit such that it could be operated with Li in place of NaK. This new design considered freeze/thaw issues and required the addition of an expansion tank and expansion/extrusion volumes in the circuit plumbing. Instrumentation has been specified for Li and circuit heaters have been placed throughout the design to ensure adequate operational temperatures and no uncontrolled freezing of the Li. All major components have been designed and fabricated prior to circuit redesign for Li and were not modified. Basic circuit components include: reactor segment, Li to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. The reactor segment, based on a Los Alamos National Laboratory 100-kW design study with 120 fuel pins, is the only prototypic component in the circuit. However, due to earlier funding constraints, a 37-pin partial-array of the core, including the central three rings of fuel pins (pin and flow path dimensions are the same as those in the full design), was selected for fabrication and test. This Technical Publication summarizes the design and integration of the pumped liquid metal Li flow circuit as of May 1, 2005. This supplement contains drawings, analysis, and calculations

  3. Hot Corrosion Behavior of Stainless Steel with Al-Si/Al-Si-Cr Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangyan; Wu, Yongzhao; Liu, Qun; Li, Rongguang; Su, Yong

    2017-03-01

    The 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel with Al-Si/Al-Si-Cr coatings is prepared by slurry process and vacuum diffusion, and the hot corrosion behavior of the stainless steel with/without the coatings is studied under the condition of Na2SO4 film at 950 °C in air. Results show that the corrosion kinetics of stainless steel, the stainless steel with Al-Si coating and the stainless steel with Al-Si-Cr coating follow parabolic laws in several segments. After 24 h corrosion, the sequence of the mass gain for the three alloys is the stainless steel with Al-Si-Cr coating steel with Al-Si coating steel without any coating. The corrosion products of the three alloys are layered. Thereinto, the corrosion products of stainless steel without coating are divided into two layers, where the outside layer contains a composite of Fe2O3 and FeO, and the inner layer is Cr2O3. The corrosion products of the stainless steel with Al-Si coating are also divided into two layers, of which the outside layer mainly consists of Cr2O3, and the inner layer is mainly SiO2. The corrosion film of the stainless steel with Al-Si-Cr coating is thin and dense, which combines well with substrate. Thereinto, the outside layer is mainly Cr2O3, and the inside layer is Al2O3. In the matrix of all of the three alloys, there exist small amount of sulfides. Continuous and protective films of Cr2O3, SiO2 and Al2O3 form on the surface of the stainless steel with Al-Si and Al-Si-Cr coatings, which prevent further oxidation or sulfide corrosion of matrix metals, and this is the main reason for the much smaller mass gain of the two alloys than that of the stainless steel without any coatings in the 24 h hot corrosion process.

  4. RESULTS OF CHARACTERIZATION TESTS OF THE SURFACES OF A COMMERCIALLY CARBURIZED AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, K

    2004-01-07

    A commercial surface carburization treatment that shows promise for hardening the surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the Spallation Neutron Source against cavitation erosion and pitting caused by the action of pulsed pressure waves in the liquid mercury target has been investigated. To verify promotional claims for the treatment and to uncover any factors that might be of concern for the integrity of a carburized target vessel, some characterization tests of the nature of the surface layers of carburized austenitic 316LN stainless steel were conducted. The findings support most of the claims. The carburized layer is about 35 {micro}m thick. Its indentation hardness is about five times larger than that of the substrate steel and declines rapidly with depth into the layer. The surface is distorted by the treatment, and the austenite lattice is enlarged. The corrosion resistance of the carburized layer in an acid medium is greater than that for untreated austenite. The layer is not brittle; it is plastically deformable and is quite resistant to cracking during straining. Contrary to the provider's assertations, the maximum carbon content of the layer is much less than 6-7 wt% carbon, and the carbon is not simply contained in supersaturated solid solution; some of it is present in a previously unreported iron carbide phase located at the very surface. Large variations were found in the thickness of the layer, and they signify that controls may be needed to ensure a uniform thickness for treatment of the SNS target vessel. Inclusion stringers and {delta}-ferrite phase embraced in the treated layer are less resistant to chemical attack than the treated austenite. From a cavitation pitting perspective under SNS bombardment, such non-austenitic phases may provide preferential sites for pitting. The shallow depth of the hardened layer will require use of protection measures to avoid mishandling damage to the layer during assembly and installation of a

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of transient liquid phase diffusion bonding region of low carbon steel-brass-stainless steel composite tube%碳钢-黄铜-不锈钢瞬间液相扩散结合区组织与性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锋刚; 景然; 王永善; 宋佩维

    2016-01-01

    采用OM、SEM、EDS、EPMA、显微硬度和剪切试验等方法,研究了H62黄铜中间层20钢/304不锈钢瞬间液相扩散结合区组织与性能.结果表明,结合区发生Fe、Cr、Ni、Cu、Zn原子互扩散,异种金属界面获得良好的冶金结合,抗剪强度可达到270 MPa以上;碳钢/黄铜界面有含Cr、Cu、Ni、Zn的“岛状”富铁相形成,扩散温度由950℃增加至1100℃,岛状组织形态由不连续状转变为连续状,并向黄铜中间层中生长,随着扩散时间的延长,贯穿于中间层,使结合区硬度增加,抗剪强度提高;950℃扩散复合,碳钢/黄铜界面有铬碳化物形成,剪切断裂发生该处,断口呈脆性穿晶断裂;1100℃扩散复合,碳钢/黄铜界面无铬碳化物形成,剪切断裂发生在黄铜/不锈钢界面,断口呈韧性断裂.%Microstructure and mechanical properties of the transient liquid phase diffusion bonding region of low carbon steel/stainless steel composites with H62 brass interlayer were examined by means of OM,SEM,EDS,EPMA,microhardness and shear tests.The results show that the metallurgical bond of the different metal interface is achieved by the inter-diffusion of Fe,Cr,Ni,Cu and Zn in the diffusion bonding zone,and the compression shearing strength above 270 MPa is obtained.The island iron-rich phase,which contains Fe,Cr,Ni,Cu and Zn,forms at the copper/stainless steel interface.With increasing diffusion temperature from 950 ℃ to 1100 ℃,the island ironrich phase changes from discontinuous to continuous and grows into the brass inter layer,and the micorhardness and shearing strength of the bonding zone increases.Shear failure occurs at the carbon steel/brass interface and fracture surface shows brittle transgranular fracture for the diffusion bonding at 950 ℃,which is attributed to the formation of chromium carbide while shear failure occurs at the brass/stainless steel interface and fracture surface shows ductile fracture for the diffusion bonding at 1100

  6. Ultrahigh Carbon Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    Steels have been utilized to prepare compacted powders of white cast iron (2 to 3%C) which exhibit superplastic be- havior at 650 0C and which are ductile ...strength and ductility than many of these commercially-avail- able steels. In particular, austempered fine-grained UHC steels exhibit good co7,binations of... Ductility of Rapidly Solidified White Cast Irons ", Powd. Metall., 26 (1983), pp. 155-160. (29) L. E. Eiselstein, 0. A. Ruano, J. Wadsworth, and 0. D

  7. Lung cancer mortality in stainless steel and mild steel welders: a nested case-referent study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jens; Hansen, K S

    1996-01-01

    an increasing tendency up to 15 years of exposure. The pattern of stainless steel (SS) welding resembles that of mild steel with an estimated OR of 1.65, 0.88-3.0. The general conclusion is that MS welding as well as SS welding seems to be associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Further followup....... Analysis was based on 439 deceased referents and 94 deceased cases. There was a 70% excess of lung cancer associated with "welding exposure ever" (OR +/- 95% C.I.: 1.68, 1.02-2.78). Overall OR for "mild steel (MS) welding ever" was 1.64, 0.99-2.72. The risk estimates for welding exposures showed...

  8. 76 FR 67673 - Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Final Results of Expedited...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... International Trade Administration Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Final... (the Department) initiated sunset reviews of the antidumping duty orders on welded ASTM A-312 stainless... the antidumping duty orders on welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from South Korea and...

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel core internal welds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Ruther, W. E.; Sanecki, J. E.; Strain, R. V.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-04-14

    Microstructural analyses by several advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on austenitic stainless steel mockup and core shroud welds that had cracked in boiling water reactors. Contrary to previous beliefs, heat-affected zones of the cracked Type 304L, as well as 304 SS core shroud welds and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds, were free of grain-boundary carbides, which shows that core shroud failure cannot be explained by classical intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Neither martensite nor delta-ferrite films were present on the grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the core shroud welds were significantly contaminated by oxygen and fluorine, which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination seems to promote fluorine contamination and suppress thermal sensitization. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests also indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of core shroud welds.

  10. Corrosion of an austenite and ferrite stainless steel weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANIMIR N. GRGUR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal connections are prone to frequent failures. These failures are attributed to the difference in the mechanical properties across the weld, the coefficients of thermal expansion of the two types of steels and the resulting creep at the interface. For the weld analyzed in this research, it was shown that corrosion measurements can be used for a proper evaluation of the quality of weld material and for the prediction of whether or not the material, after the applied welding process, can be in service without failures. It was found that the corrosion of the weld analyzed in this research resulted from the simultaneous activity of different types of corrosion. In this study, electrochemical techniques including polarization and metallographic analysis were used to analyze the corrosion of a weld material of ferrite and austenitic stainless steels. Based on surface, chemical and electrochemical analyses, it was concluded that corrosion occurrence was the result of the simultaneous activity of contact corrosion (ferrite and austenitic material conjuction, stress corrosion (originating from deformed ferrite structure and inter-granular corrosion (due to chromium carbide precipitation. The value of corrosion potential of –0.53 V shows that this weld, after the thermal treatment, is not able to repassivate a protective oxide film.

  11. Hot Forging of Nitrogen Alloyed Duplex Stainless Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.Chandramohan; S.S. Mohamed Nazirudeen; S.S. Ramakrishnan

    2007-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels are gaining global importance because of the need for a high strength corrosion resistant material. Three compositions of this group were selected with three different nitrogen contents viz, 0.15 wt pct (alloy 1), 0.23 wt pct (alloy 2) and 0.32 wt pct (alloy 3). The steels were melted in a high frequency induction furnace and hot forged to various reductions from 16% to 62%. In this work, the effect of hot forging on the ferrite content, hardness, yield strength, impact strength and grain orientation (texture) were studied. Fracture analysis on all the forged specimens using SEM reveals that a size reduction of 48% results in maximum ductility and impact strength as well as minimal ferrite content and grain size. Thus the mechanical properties are found to have a direct correlation to ferrite content and grain size. The highest impact strength was observed in specimens with the smallest grain size, which was observed in specimens forged to 48% reduction in size.

  12. Effect of shot peening on metastable austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fargas, G., E-mail: gemma.fargas@upc.edu [CIEFMA - Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Centre de Recerca en Nanoenginyeria, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Roa, J.J.; Mateo, A. [CIEFMA - Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Centre de Recerca en Nanoenginyeria, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-08-12

    In this work, shot peening was performed in a metastable austenitic stainless steel EN 1.4318 (AISI 301LN) in order to evaluate its effect on austenite to martensite phase transformation and also the influence on the fatigue limit. Two different steel conditions were considered: annealed, i.e., with a fully austenitic microstructure, and cold rolled, consisting of a mixture of austenite and martensite. X-ray diffraction, electron back-scattered diffraction and focus ion beam, as well as nanoindentation techniques, were used to elucidate deformation mechanisms activated during shot peening and correlate with fatigue response. Results pointed out that extensive plastic deformation and phase transformation developed in annealed specimens as a consequence of shot peening. However, the increase of roughness and the generation of microcracks led to a limited fatigue limit improvement. In contrast, shot peened cold rolled specimens exhibited enhanced fatigue limit. In the latter case, the main factor that determined the influence on the fatigue response was the distance from the injector, followed successively by the exit speed of the shots and the coverage factor.

  13. Study of Ce-modified antibacterial 316L stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Junping

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available 316L stainless steel is widely used for fashion jewelry, but it can carry a large number of bacteria and bring the risk of infection since the steel has no antimicrobial performance. In this paper, the effects of Ce on the antibacterial property, corrosion resistance and processability of 316L were studied by microscopic observation, thin-film adhering quantitative bacteriostasis, and electrochemical and mechanical tests. The results show that a trace of Ce can distribute uniformly in the matrix of 316L and slightly improve its corrosion resistance in artificial sweat. With an increase in Ce content, the Ce is prone to form clustering, which degrades the corrosion resistance and the processability. The Ce-containing 316L exhibits Hormesis effect against S. aureus. A small Ce addition stimulates the growth of S. aureus. As the Ce content increases, the modified 316L exhibits an improved antibacterial efficacy. The more Ce is added, the better antibacterial capability is achieved. Overall, if the 316L is modified with Ce alone, it is difficult to obtain the optimal combination of corrosion resistance, antibacterial performance and processability. In spite of that, 0.15 wt.%-0.20 wt.% Ce around is inferred to be the best trade-off.

  14. Improved surface bioactivity of stainless steel substrates using osteocalcin mimetic peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, Samaneh [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials Division, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran 14965/161 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi-Manesh, Hossein, E-mail: naderman@modares.ac.ir [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vali, Hojatollah [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, McGill University, 3640 University Street, Montréal, QC H3A 0C7 (Canada); Faghihi, Shahab, E-mail: sfaghihi@nigeb.ac.ir [Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials Division, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran 14965/161 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-14

    Although stainless steel has a good biocompatibility for most clinical cases, the higher tissue response (bone bonding property) is required in orthopedic field. In this study, to improve bone-bonding ability of stainless steel substrates, a specific sequence of osteocalcin mimetic peptide is used as bioactive coating material to biochemically modify the surface of metallic samples. This sequence consists of thirteen amino acids present in the first helix of osteocalcin is synthesized in amidic form and physically adsorbed on the surface of 316LS (316 low carbon surgical grade) stainless steel substrates. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to characterize the surface of peptide coated and uncoated substrates. The bioactivity and bone bonding ability of coated and uncoated substrates are assessed by level of hydroxyapatite formation, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive x-ray (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The pre-osteoblast cell attachment and proliferation are also evaluated by MTT assay. The results show that the surface of coated sample is homogenously covered by the peptide and display a rougher surface relative to uncoated sample. TEM images reveal the formation of plate-like hydroxyapatite crystals in the presence of the peptide and an amorphous calcium phosphate phase without the peptide. Pre-osteoblast cells proliferation is significantly higher on the surface of peptide coated substrate, while cell attachment remains unaffected by the peptide coatings. Pre-osteoblast cells also demonstrate a higher degree of spreading on the surface of coated sample. It is believed that osteocalcin mimetic peptide improve surface bioactivity and promote hydroxyapatite crystal formation may lead to increased mineralization and bone formation on the surface of metallic biomedical devices. - Graphical abstract: A peptide sequence located in the first helix of OC is selected based on its

  15. Development of Pack Cementation Aluminizing Process on Inner Surface of 316L Stainless Steel Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>In order to form the FeAl coatings on the inner surface of the 316L stainless steel tube,the pack cementation aluminizing process is introduced in this paper. The outside diameter,wall thickness and

  16. Studies of lubricants and punch design in punching of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam; Bay, Niels; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2004-01-01

    Environmentally hazardous lubricants such as chlorinated paraffin oils are often applied in punching and blanking operations especially involving stainless steel workpiece materials. This is due to the fact that punching and blanking are among the tribologically most difficult forming operations...

  17. The sub-zero Celsius treatment of precipitation hardenable semi-austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    A precipitation hardenable semi-austenitic stainless steel AISI 632 grade was austenitized according to industrial specifications and thereafter subjected to isothermal treatment at sub-zero Celsius temperatures. During treatment, austenite transformed to martensite. The isothermal austenite...

  18. Unexpected corrosion of stainless steel in low chloride waters – microbial aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Carpén, Leena; Møller, Per

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Stainless steels EN 1.4301 and 1.4401/1.4404 are normally considered corrosion resistant in low chloride natural waters like drinking water. However, a number of corrosion failures have been observed in e.g. fire extinguisher systems and drinking water installations, where stagnant...... stains on the outside of the installation. Corrosion may occur in water qualities with rather low chloride contents and fairly low conductivity, which would usually not be considered especially corrosive towards stainless steel. One key parameter is the ennoblement documented on stainless steel...... of iron facilitates the growth of iron oxidising bacteria. A number of failure cases from Danish and Finnish stainless steel installations are discussed with the objective to identify key parameters, suggest possible mechanisms and discuss whether prediction is possible. The paper includes a short...

  19. Friction behavior of 304 stainless steel of varying hardness lubricated with benzene and some benzyl structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    The lubricating properties of some benzyl and benzene structures were determined by using 304 stainless steel surfaces strained to various hardness. Friction coefficients and wear track widths were measured with a Bowden-Leben type friction apparatus by using a pin-on-disk specimen configuration. Results obtained indicate that benzyl monosulfide, dibenzyl disulfide, and benzyl alcohol resulted in the lowest friction coefficients for 304 stainless steel, while benzyl ether provided the least surface protection and gave the highest friction. Strainhardening of the 304 stainless steel prior to sliding resulted in reduced friction in dry sliding. With benzyl monosulfide, dibenzyl disulfide, and benzyl alcohol changes in 304 stainless steel hardness had no effect upon friction behavior.

  20. 78 FR 21596 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... welding operation to form one unit are covered by the scope of the order. Drawn stainless steel sinks are... may sometimes be referred to as ``zero radius'' or ``near zero radius'' sinks. The products covered...

  1. The precision cutting control research of automotive stainless steel thin wall pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Lihong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stainless steel thin-walled tube are widely used in automobile industry at present, but as a result of thin wall pipe is poor strength and poor rigidity,which lead to deformation, shaped differencer and other problems in the process, it is hard to ensure the processing quality of parts. This paper proposes a method of thin stainless steel thin wall pipe cutting process in vehicle, greatly improved the problems and technical difficulties in the traditional process, the main research is about the cutting system and the hydraulic fixture design, obtained under low cost circumstances, it can realize high precision stainless steel pipes, high degree of automation to automatic cutting,simplified operation steps at the same time, increased the applicability of the system, provided a kind of advanced stainless steel thin wall pipe cutting device for the small and medium-sized enterprises.

  2. Galvanic corrosion between dental precious alloys and magnetic stainless steels used for dental magnetic attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noriko; Takada, Yukyo; Okuno, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    In this study, we examined the corrosion behavior of dental precious alloys and magnetic stainless steels, namely SUS 444, SUS XM27, and SUS 447J1, used for dental magnetic attachments. Their galvanic corrosion behavior was evaluated from the viewpoint of corrosion potentials when they were in contact with each other. Rest potentials of the precious alloys were constantly higher than those of magnetic stainless steels. Since most gold alloys raised the corrosion potential more significantly than silver alloys did, silver alloys seemed to be better suited than gold alloys for combination with magnetic stainless steels. However, all corrosion potential values were sufficiently lower than the breakdown potentials of the stainless steels and existed within their passive regions. Based on the findings of this study, SUS XM27 and SUS 447J1--which exhibited higher breakdown potentials than SUS 444--emerged as the preferred choices for combination with gold alloys.

  3. Nanosized controlled surface pretreatment of biometallic alloy 316L stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M; Loftis, Derek; Mahapatro, Anil

    2011-12-01

    Stainless steel (AISI 316L) is a medical grade stainless steel alloy used extensively in medical devices and in the biomedical field. 316L stainless steel was successfully electropolished via an ecologically friendly and biocompatible ionic liquid (IL) medium based on Vitamin B4 (NB4) and resulting in nanosized surface roughness and topography. Voltammetry and chronoamperometry tests determined optimum polishing conditions for the stainless steel alloy while atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provided surface morphology comparisons to benchmark success of each electropolishing condition. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) combined with SEM revealed significantly smoother surfaces for each alloy surface while indicating that the constituent metals comprising each alloy effectively electropolished at uniform rates.

  4. A delayed hypersensitivity reaction to a stainless steel crown: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, A; Ozdemir, C E; Yilmaz, Y

    2012-01-01

    Stainless steel crowns are commonly used to restore primary or permanent teeth in pediatric restorative dentistry. Here, we describe a case of a delayed hypersensitivity reaction, which manifested itself as perioral skin eruptions, after restoring the decayed first permanent molar tooth of a 13-year-old Caucasian girl with a preformed stainless steel crown. The eruptions completely healed within one week after removal of the stainless steel crown. The decayed tooth was then restored with a bis-acryl crown and bridge. Since no perioral skin eruptions occurred during the six-month follow-up, we presume that the cause of the perioral skin eruptions was a delayed hypersensitivity reaction, which was triggered by the nickel in the stainless steel crown.

  5. Wear resistance and corrosion resistance of VCp particle reinforced stainless steel composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Xiu-rong; HAN Jie-cai; ZUO Hong-bo; LIU Zhao-jing; LI Feng-zhen; REN Shan-zhi

    2005-01-01

    The VCp reinforced stainless steel composite was produced by in-situ reaction casting. The composite was tested for its wear resistance under the wet abrasive condition and corrosion resistance, compared with the wear-resistant white iron and stainless steel. The results show that the wear resistance of the composite is slightly inferior to that of the white iron, but much better than that of the stainless steel under the wet grinding abrasive condition. The corrosion resistance of the composite is much better than that of the white iron in the acid medium,and a little worse than that of the stainless steel. Thus the composite exhibits superior properties of wear resistance and corrosion resistance.

  6. HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FRACTURE IN FORGED TYPE 304L AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Switzner, Nathan; Neidt, Ted; Hollenbeck, John; Knutson, J.; Everhart, Wes; Hanlin, R. [University of Missouri-Kansas City; Bergen, R. [Precision Metal Products; Balch, D. K. [Sandia Natl Laboratory

    2012-09-06

    Austenitic stainless steels generally have good resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture; however, structural designs for high-pressure gaseous hydrogen are constrained by the low strength of this class of material. Forging is used to increase the low strength of austenitic stainless steels, thus improving the efficiency of structural designs. Hydrogen-assisted racture, however, depends on microstructural details associated with manufacturing. In this study, hydrogen-assisted fracture of forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is investigated. Microstructural variation in multi-step forged 304L was achieved by forging at different rates and temperatures, and by process annealing. High internal hydrogen content in forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is achieved by thermal precharging in gaseous hydrogen and results in as much as 50% reduction of tensile ductility.

  7. Volatilization of zinc and lead in direct recycling of stainless steel making dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Ji(彭及); PENG Bing(彭兵); YU Di(余笛); TANG Mo-tang(唐谟堂); J.Lobel; J.A.Kozinski

    2004-01-01

    The volatilization of zinc and lead from the stainless steel making dust pellets in the direct recycling procedure was conducted by using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer and a Tamman furnace in the nitrogen atmosphere respectively. The results show that the temperature has a significant effect on the volatilization rates of zinc and lead,and the carbon content in the pellets has no effect on the volatilization process. The volatilization of zinc is controlled by the chemical reaction between zinc oxide and carbon monoxide, while the volatilization of lead is controlled by the evaporation front liquid phase to the atmosphere. The volatilization of zinc and lead mainly happen at about 1 000 ℃according to non-isothermal experiment.

  8. 78 FR 31574 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam; Institution of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... the Commission's Handbook on Filing Procedures, 76 FR 62092 (Oct. 6, 2011), available on the... COMMISSION Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam; Institution of... materially retarded, by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless...

  9. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs.

  10. Ductility in a new low nickel stainless steel for reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobo, A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the stress-strain curves for a new low nickel stainless steel, a conventional AISI 304 stainless steel and a carbon steel commonly used in reinforced concrete structures. Ductility was studied in terms of ultimate tensile strength (fmax, elastic limit (fy and total elongation at maximum force [ultimate strain; uniform elongation] (εmax. The three materials were assessed with internationally accepted criteria, such as plastic rotational capacity, necking region and the toughness index (total energy absorbed at uniform elongation. The findings were compared to the properties of three types of conventional reinforcing steel: 500SD, 500N and 500H (EC-2.

    En este trabajo se presentan los diagramas tensióndeformación de un nuevo acero inoxidable con bajo contenido en níquel, un inoxidable convencional AISI 304 y un acero al carbono de uso común en estructuras de hormigón armado. Dicha ductilidad se ha estudiado determinando la tensión máxima (fmax, la tensión en el límite elástico (fy y la deformación bajo carga máxima (εmax. Los tres materiales se han evaluado utilizando criterios aceptados internacionalmente, como son el índice p (capacidad de rotación plástica, el índice A* (área plástica de endurecimiento y el índice de tenacidad Id (energía total absorbida en el punto de alargamiento bajo carga máxima, los resultados obtenidos se han comparado con los aceros convencionales de armaduras 500SD, 500N y 500H (EC-2.

  11. Studies on Nb Microalloying of 13Cr Super Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoping; Wang, Lijun; Subramanian, Sundaresa V.; Liu, Chunming

    2012-12-01

    The effect of Nb microalloying on microstructure, mechanical properties, and pitting corrosion properties of quenched and tempered 13 pct Cr-5 pct Ni-0.02 pct C martensitic stainless steels with different Mo and N contents was investigated. The microstructure, density, and dispersion of high-angle boundaries, nanoscale precipitates, and amount of retained austenite were characterized by using electron backscattered diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction to correlate with properties. The results show that the combined effects of lowering nitrogen content in 13 pct Cr-5 pct Ni-1~2 pct Mo-0.02 pct C steels to 0.01 wt pct, and adding 0.1 pct Nb are to decrease the amount of Cr-rich precipitates, as Nb preferentially combines with residual carbon and nitrogen to form carbonitrides, suppressing the formation of Cr2N and Cr23C6. Austenite grain refinement can be achieved by Nb microalloying through proper heat treatment. If the nitrogen content is kept high, then Cr-rich precipitates would occur irrespective of microalloying addition. The NbN would also occur at high temperature, which will act as substrate for nucleation of coarse precipitates during subsequent tempering, impairing the toughness of the steel. It was shown that the addition of Nb to low interstitial super martensitic stainless steel retards the formation of reversed austenite and results in the formation of nanoscale precipitates (5 to 15 nm), which contribute to a significant increase in strength. More importantly, the pitting corrosion resistance was found to increase with Nb addition. This is attributed to suppression of Cr-rich precipitates, which can cause local depletion of Cr in the matrix and the initiation of pitting corrosion.

  12. Plasma Nitriding of Austenitic Stainless Steel with Severe Surface Deformation Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Shi-jun; GAO Yu-zhou; WANG Liang; SUN Jun-cai; HEI Zu-kun

    2004-01-01

    The dc glow discharge plasma nitriding of austenite stainless steel with severe surface deformation layer is used to produce much thicker surface modified layer. This kind of layers has useful properties such as a high surface hardness of about 1500 Hv 0.1 and high resistance to frictional wear. This paper presents the structures and properties of low temperature plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel with severe surface deformation layer.

  13. Simultaneous surface engineering and bulk hardening of precipitation hardening stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus Berg; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses simultaneous bulk precipitation hardening and low temperature surface engineering of two commercial precipitation hardening stainless steels: Sandvik Nanoflex® and Uddeholm Corrax®. Surface engineering comprised gaseous nitriding or gaseous carburising. Microstructural....... The duration and temperature of the nitriding/carburising surface hardening treatment can be chosen in agreement with the thermal treatment for obtaining optimal bulk hardness in the precipitation hardening stainless steel....

  14. Improving Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steel by Yttrium Addition: An AES Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The influence of Y addition on the distribution of element concentrations in the passive film of high silicon stainless steel formed in 93% H2SO4 was comparatively studied by using auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results show that 0.2%Y addition increases the SiO2 proportion in the passive film of stainless steel so that the formation of SiO2 enriched passive film from silicon in the alloy is brought into full play.

  15. Aging research of the LAB-based liquid scintillator in stainless steel container

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hai-tao; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Shan, Qing; Ding, Ya-yun; Du, Bing; Liu, Shu-tong; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Li; Jia, Wen-bao; Fang, Jian; Ye, Xing-Chen; HU, Wei; Niu, Shun-Li; Yan, Jia-qing; Zhao, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steel is the material used for the storage vessels and piping systems of LAB-based liquid scintillator in JUNO experiment. Aging is recognized as one of the main degradation mechanisms affecting the properties of liquid scintillator. LAB-based liquid scintillator aging experiments were carried out in different material of containers (type 316 and 304 stainless steel and glass) at two different temperature (40 and 25 degrees Celsius). For the continuous liquid scintillator properties...

  16. Graphene Growth via Carburization of Stainless Steel and Application in Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    1697© 2011 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim wileyonlinelibrary.comsmall 2011, 7, No. 12, 1697–1700 1. Introduction Carburization is a...in order to achieve few-layers-thick graphene on stainless steel (SS) substrates. Though the carburization process is similar to the chemi cal...vapor deposition (CVD) tech- nique, which is generally used for growth of graphene on Graphene Growth via Carburization of Stainless Steel and

  17. Improvement of mechanical properties on metastable stainless steels by reversion heat treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Mateo García, Antonio Manuel; Zapata, A.; Fargas Ribas, Gemma

    2013-01-01

    AISI 301LN is a metastable austenitic stainless steel that offers an excellent combination of high strength and ductility. This stainless grade is currently used in applications where severe forming operations are required, such as automotive bodies. When these metastable steels are plastically deformed at room temperature, for example by cold rolling, austenite transforms to martensite and, as a result, yield strength increases but ductility is reduced. Grain refinement is ...

  18. Electrochemical characterisation of a martensitic stainless steel in a neutral chloride solution

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelin, Sabrina; Pébère, Nadine; Régnier, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    International audience; This paper focuses on the characterisation of the electrochemical behaviour of a martensitic stainless steel in 0.1 M NaCl + 0.04 M Na2SO4 solution and is a part of a study devoted to crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels. Polarisation curves and electrochemical impedance measurements were obtained for different experimental conditions in bulk electrolyte. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyse the passive films. At the corrosion potentia...

  19. Electrochemical investigations on crevice corrosion of a martensitic stainless steel in a thin-layer cell

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelin, Sabrina; Pébère, Nadine; Régnier, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This paper focuses on crevice corrosion resistance of a martensitic stainless steel. First, electrochemical measurements were performed in deaerated bulk electrolytes for different chloride concentrations and different values of the pH to determine the critical parameters leading to dissolution or breakdown of the passive film. Then, a thin-layer cell was designed to confine the electrolyte between two parallel stainless steel planes. Impedance measurements obtained fo...

  20. Experimental Test of Stainless Steel Wire Mesh and Aluminium Alloy With Glass Fiber Reinforcement Hybrid Composite

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    At present, composite materials are mostly used in aircraft structural components, because of their excellent properties like lightweight, high strength to weight ratio, high stiffness, and corrosion resistance and less expensive. In this experimental work, the mechanical properties of laminate, this is reinforced with stainless steel wire mesh, aluminum sheet metal, perforated aluminum sheet metal and glass fibers to be laminate and investigated. The stainless steel wire mesh and...

  1. Improvement of Microhardness and Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steel by Nanocomposite Coating

    OpenAIRE

    Hiba Husam Ismail; Kareem Neamah Sallomi; Hamid S. Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steel (AISI 304) has good electrical and thermal conductivities, good corrosion resistance at ambient temperature, apart from these it is cheap and abundantly available; but has good mechanical properties such as hardness. To improve the hardness and corrosion resistance of stainless steel its surface can be modified by developing nanocomposite coatings applied on its surface. The main objective of this paper is to study effect of electroco-deposition method on microhardness and cor...

  2. Improved impact toughness of 13Cr martensitic stainless steel hardened by laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, L. W.; Chang, Y. M.; Torng, S.; Wu, H. C.

    2002-08-01

    The impact toughness of AISI 403 martensitic stainless steel plate and laser-hardened specimens tempered at various temperatures were examined. Phosphorus was the primary residual impurity responsible for tempered embrittlement of this alloy. The experimental result also indicated that AISI 403 stainless steel was very sensitive to reverse-temper embrittlement. The improved impact toughness of the laser-hardened specimen was attributed to the refined microstructure in the laser-hardened zone.

  3. Antibacterial Properties of an Austenitic Antibacterial Stainless Steel and Its Security for Human Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke YANG; Manqi L(U)

    2007-01-01

    An austenitic antibacterial stainless steel is reported in this paper. The very fine and dispersive ε-Cu precipitations in the matrix of the antibacterial steel after the antibacterial treatment endow the steel with antibacterial function. The antibacterial function is strong, long-term and broad-spectrum, and can be maintained even after repeated wear and long time dipping in water. The steel is safe for human body and could be used widely in daily application.

  4. Hydrogen production in single chamber microbial electrolysis cells with stainless steel fiber felt cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Min; Wei, Liling; Qiu, Zhaozheng; Wang, Gang; Shen, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is a promising technology for sustainable production of hydrogen from biodegradable carbon sources. Employing a low-cost and high efficient cathode to replace platinum catalyzed cathode (Pt/C) for hydrogen generation is a challenge for commercialization of MEC. Here we show that a 3D macroporous stainless steel fiber felt (SSFF) with high electrochemical active surface area has an excellent catalytic activity for hydrogen generation, which is comparable to Pt/C cathode and superior to stainless steel mesh (SSM) cathode in the single-chamber MEC. The SSFF cathode (mean filter rating 100 μm) produces hydrogen at a rate of 3.66 ± 0.43 m3 H2 m-3d-1 (current density of 17.29 ± 1.68 A m-2), with a hydrogen recovery of 76.37 ± 15.04% and overall energy efficiency of 79.61 ± 13.07% at an applied voltage of 0.9 V. The performance of SSFF cathode improves over time due to a decrease in overpotential which caused by corrosion. These results demonstrate that SSFF can be a promising alternative for Pt catalytic cathode in MEC for hydrogen production.

  5. Experimental Test of Stainless Steel Wire Mesh and Aluminium Alloy With Glass Fiber Reinforcement Hybrid Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranga Raj R.,

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available At present, composite materials are mostly used in aircraft structural components, because of their excellent properties like lightweight, high strength to weight ratio, high stiffness, and corrosion resistance and less expensive. In this experimental work, the mechanical properties of laminate, this is reinforced with stainless steel wire mesh, aluminum sheet metal, perforated aluminum sheet metal and glass fibers to be laminate and investigated. The stainless steel wire mesh and perforated aluminum metal were sequentially stacked to fabricate, hybrid composites. The aluminum metal sheet is also employed with that sequence to get maximum strength and less weight. The tensile, compressive and flexure tests carried out on the hybrid composite. To investigate the mechanical properties and elastic properties of the metal matrix composite laminate of a material we are using experimental test and theoretical calculation. The experimental work consists of Tensile, compressive and flexural test. The expectation of this project results in the tensile and compressive properties of this hybrid composite it is slightly lesser than carbon fibers but it could facilitate a weight reduction compared with CFRP panels. So this hybrid laminates composite material offering significant weight savings and maximum strength over some other GFRP conventional panels.

  6. TiC-Maraging stainless steel composite: microstructure, mechanical and wear properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akhtar Farid; GUO Shiju; FENG Peizhong; Khadijah Ali Shah; Syed Javid Askari

    2006-01-01

    Particulate TiC reinforced 17-4PH and 465 maraging stainless steel matrix composites were processed by conventional powder metallurgy (P/M). TiC-maraging stainless steel composites with theoretical density >97% were produced using conventional P/M. The microstructure, and mechanical and wear properties of the composites were evaluated. The microstructure of the composites consisted of (core-rim structure) spherical and semi-spherical TiC particles depending on the wettability of the matrix with TiC particles. In TiC-maraging stainless steel composites, 465 stainless steel binder phase showed good wettability with TiC particles. Some microcracks appeared in the composites, indicating the presence of tensile stresses in the composites produced during sintering. The typical properties, hardness, and bend strength were reported for the composites. After heat treatment and aging, an increase in hardness was observed. The increase in hardness was attributed to the aging reaction in maraging stainless steel. The specific wear behavior of the composites strongly depends on the content of TiC particles and their interparticle spacing, and on the heat treatment of the maraging stainless steel.

  7. Utilization of stainless steel crowns by general dentists and pediatric dental specialists in Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowolik, Joan; Kozlowski, Diana; Jones, James E

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate utilization of the stainless steel crown by both the general and pediatric dentists in Indiana. Although reports indicate that there has been a dramatic reduction in dental caries in the US, almost 20 percent of children have dental decay by age four, with almost 80 percent having a cavity by 17 years of age. After reviewing the literature, Seale has recommended that the stainless steel crown is the most successful restoration for children with a rate of high caries. All dental schools in North America teach the value of using stainless steel crowns and the method of tooth preparation. We hypothesized that greater use of the stainless steel crowns would be made by specialists than by general dentists. In this study, of the 200 questionnaires distributed, 62.5 percent were returned and analyzed. The results imply that stainless steel crowns are being significantly underutilized in general dental practice. It is interesting, and perhaps of concern, that the general dentists are not interested in continuing education courses about this subject. Over the next few years, with the aging of the pediatric dental community in Indiana, general (not specialty) dentists will treat most of the children. Because of this, pre-doctoral education needs to place more emphasis on preparation and utilization of the stainless steel crown.

  8. Characterization of corrosion scale formed on stainless steel delivery pipe for reclaimed water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Liu, Shuming; Smith, Kate; Yu, Kanghua; Hu, Hongying; Jiang, Wei; Li, Yuhong

    2016-01-01

    To reveal corrosion behavior of stainless steel delivery pipe used in reclaimed water treatment, this research focused on the morphological, mineralogical and chemical characteristics of stainless steel corrosion scale and corroded passive film. Corrosion scale and coupon samples were taken from a type 304 pipe delivering reclaimed water to a clear well in service for more than 12 years. Stainless steel corrosion scales and four representative pipe coupons were investigated using mineralogy and material science research methods. The results showed corrosion scale was predominantly composed of goethite, lepidocrocite, hematite, magnetite, ferrous oxide, siderite, chrome green and chromite, the same as that of corroded pipe coupons. Hence, corrosion scale can be identified as podiform chromite deposit. The loss of chromium in passive film is a critical phenomenon when stainless steel passive film is damaged by localized corrosion. This may provide key insights toward improving a better comprehension of the formation of stainless steel corrosion scale and the process of localized corrosion. The localized corrosion behavior of stainless steel is directly connected with reclaimed water quality parameters such as residual chlorine, DO, Cl(-) and SO4(2-). In particular, when a certain amount of residual chlorine in reclaimed water is present as an oxidant, ferric iron is the main chemical state of iron minerals.

  9. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Maciel Mattos de Oliveira

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4 stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 ºC and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was determined after 3, 48, 96, 144, 192 and 240 hours of biofilm formation and biotransfer potential from 96 hours. Stainless steel coupons were submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM after 3, 144 and 240 hours. Based on the number of adhered cells and SEM, it was observed that L. monocytogenes adhered rapidly to the stainless steel surface, with mature biofilm being formed after 240 hours. The biotransfer potential of bacterium to substrate occurred at all the stages analyzed. The rapid capacity of adhesion to surface, combined with biotransfer potential throughout the biofilm formation stages, make L. monocytogenes a potential risk to the food industry. Both the experimental model developed and the methodology used were efficient in the study of biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential.

  10. Marine microbial fuel cell: Use of stainless steel electrodes as anode and cathode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, C.; Basseguy, R.; Etcheverry, L.; Bergel, A. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, CNRS-INPT, Toulouse Cedex (France); Mollica, A. [CNR-ISMAR, Genoa (Italy); Feron, D. [SCCME, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2007-12-01

    Numerous biocorrosion studies have stated that biofilms formed in aerobic seawater induce an efficient catalysis of the oxygen reduction on stainless steels. This property was implemented here for the first time in a marine microbial fuel cell (MFC). A prototype was designed with a stainless steel anode embedded in marine sediments coupled to a stainless steel cathode in the overlying seawater. Recording current/potential curves during the progress of the experiment confirmed that the cathode progressively acquired effective catalytic properties. The maximal power density produced of 4 mW m{sup -2} was lower than those reported previously with marine MFC using graphite electrodes. Decoupling anode and cathode showed that the cathode suffered practical problems related to implementation in the sea, which may found easy technical solutions. A laboratory fuel cell based on the same principle demonstrated that the biofilm-covered stainless steel cathode was able to supply current density up to 140 mA m{sup -2} at +0.05 V versus Ag/AgCl. The power density of 23 mW m{sup -2} was in this case limited by the anode. These first tests presented the biofilm-covered stainless steel cathodes as very promising candidates to be implemented in marine MFC. The suitability of stainless steel as anode has to be further investigated. (author)

  11. The study of high speed fine turning of austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.S. Lin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this research paper is focused on the surface roughness variation in high speed fine turning of the austenitic stainless steel.Design/methodology/approach: A series of experimental tests have been done to evaluate the possibility of high speed fine turning of the austenitic stainless steel from the surface roughness variation and machining stability.Findings: It was found that, the smaller the feed rate, the smaller the surface roughness value. But when the feed rate smaller than the critical feed rate, the chatter will occurs and the surface roughness of the work piece would be deteriorated.The higher the cutting speed is, the higher the cutting temperature of cutting tool is. The cutting tool will be soften and the surface roughness of the workpiece will be deteriorated.Research limitations/implications: The tool chattering would caused poor surface roughness in high speed fine turning for feed rate smaller than 0.02 mm/rev. The chatter suppression method must be considered when high speed fine turning of austenitic stainless steel.Originality/value: Most of the stainless steel machining proceeds at low cutting speed because the austenitic stainless steel is a hard machining material. The research result of this paper indicated that high speed fine turning of austenitic stainless steel is possible.

  12. Deformation induced martensite in AISI 316 stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon, N.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The forming process leads to a considerable differentiation of the strain field within the billet, and finally causes the non-uniform distribution of the total strain, microstrusture and properties of the material over the product cross-section. This paper focus on the influence of stress states on the deformation-induced a’ martensitic transformation in AISI Type 316 austenitic stainless steel. The formation of deformation-induced martensite is related to the austenite (g instability at temperatures close or below room temperature. The structural transformation susceptibility is correlated to the stacking fault energy (SFE, which is a function not only of the chemical composition, but also of the testing temperature. Austenitic stainless steels possess high plasticity and can be easily cold formed. However, during cold processing the hardening phenomena always occurs. Nevertheless, the deformation-induced martensite transformation may enhance the rate of work-hardening and it may or may not be in favour of further material processing. Due to their high corrosion resistance and versatile mechanical properties the austenitic stainless steels are used in pressing of heat exchanger plates. However, this corrosion resistance is influenced by the amount of martensite formed during processing. In order to establish the links between total plastic strain, and martensitic transformation, the experimental tests were followed by numerical simulation.

    El proceso de conformación da a lugar a una considerable diferenciación del campo de tensiones dentro de una barra de extrusión y, finalmente, causa una distribución no uniforme de la tensión total, la microestructura y propiedades del material sobre el corte transversal. En este trabajo se estudia la influencia de los estados de tensión sobre la transformación martensítica inducida por deformación en un acero inoxidable austenítico tipo AISI 316. La formación de martensita inducida por

  13. 75 FR 58351 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils from Belgium: Extension of Time Limits for Preliminary and Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils from Belgium: Extension of Time Limits for... countervailing duty order on stainless steel plate in coils from Belgium in accordance with section 751(c) of the... notices of intent to participate on behalf of Allegheny Ludlum Corporation and the United Steel, Paper...

  14. Evaluation of selected martensitic stainless steels for use in downhole tubular expansion - Results of a laboratory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, Robert [Shell International E and P, b.v. Kessler Park 1, Postbus 60, 2280 AB Rijswijk (Netherlands)

    2004-07-01

    A laboratory program was performed to evaluate the potential of selected martensitic stainless steels for downhole cladding applications. The evaluation of the effects of tubular expansion on mechanical properties, defects, and resistance to environmentally assisted cracking demonstrated that some steels were acceptable for the intended application. The results were used to qualify and select the stainless steel for the intended sweet cladding applications. (authors)

  15. Single- and few-layer graphene growth on stainless steel substrates by direct thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Robin; Ashokreddy, A.; Vijayan, C.; Pradeep, T.

    2011-04-01

    Increasing interest in graphene research in basic sciences and applications emphasizes the need for an economical means of synthesizing it. We report a method for the synthesis of graphene on commercially available stainless steel foils using direct thermal chemical vapor deposition. Our method of synthesis and the use of relatively cheap precursors such as ethanol (CH3CH2OH) as a source of carbon and SS 304 as the substrate proved to be economically viable. The presence of single- and few-layer graphene was confirmed using confocal Raman microscopy/spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements were further used to establish the influence of various elemental species present in stainless steel on graphene growth. The role of cooling rate on surface migration of certain chemical species (oxides of Fe, Cr and Mn) that promote or hinder the growth of graphene is probed. Such analysis of the chemical species present on the surface can be promising for graphene based catalytic research.

  16. Hydrogen solubility and diffusion in austenitic stainless steels studied with thermal desorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagodzinskyy, Y.; Todoshchenko, O.; Papula, S.; Haenninen, H. [Laboratory of Engineering Materials, School of Science and Technology, Aalto University, Espoo (Finland)

    2011-01-15

    Hydrogen solubility and diffusion in austenitic stainless steels, namely AISI 310, AISI 301LN and AISI 201, are studied with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) after electrochemical potentiostatic hydrogen pre-charging. Temperature dependencies of hydrogen desorption for all studied steels manifest a complex main peak caused by hydrogen releasing from the steel lattice by diffusion. Depending on the steel and heating rate the peak is situated from 350 to 500 K and its shape reflects a specific of hydrogen diffusion in stainless steels, which are multicomponent alloys. Analysis of the TDS curves is based on the hydrogen diffusion model taking into account trapping of hydrogen atoms in the energetically deep interstitial positions in the steel crystal lattice. Diffusion coefficient of hydrogen and its total content after the same charging procedure are obtained from the TDS curves and compared for the studied steels. (Copyright copyright 2011 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Corrosion performance of martensitic stainless steel seamless pipe for linepipe application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Mitsuo; Miyata, Yukio; Toyooka, Takaaki; Murase, Fumio [Kawasaki Steel Corp., Handa, Aichi (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    The corrosion performance of two types of weldable martensitic stainless steel seamless pipe for pipeline application is investigated. 11Cr steel pipe developed for sweet environment gives better resistance to CO{sub 2} corrosion than the 13Cr martensitic stainless steel for OCTG. 12Cr steel pipe developed for light sour environment shows good SSC resistance in a mild sour environment and superior CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance at high temperature and high CO{sub 2} partial pressure condition. The suitable condition for the 11Cr steel pipe and the 12Cr steel pipe in sweet environment, and the critical pH and H{sub 2}S partial pressure for the 12Cr steel pipe welded joint in sour environment are clarified. Both welded joints have superior resistance to hydrogen embrittlement under the cathodic protection condition in sea water.

  18. Thermal stability study for candidate stainless steels of GEN IV reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeg Veternikova, J.; Degmova, J.; Pekarcikova, M.; Simko, F.; Petriska, M.; Skarba, M.; Mikula, P.; Pupala, M.

    2016-11-01

    Candidate stainless steels for GEN IV reactors were investigated in term of thermal and corrosion stability at high temperatures. New austenitic steel (NF 709), austenitic ODS steel (ODS 316) and two ferritic ODS steels (MA 956 and MA 957) were exposed to around 1000 °C in inert argon atmosphere at pressure of ∼8 MPa. The steels were further studied in a light of vacancy defects presence by positron annihilation spectroscopy and their thermal resistance was confronted to classic AISI steels. The thermal strain supported a creation of oxide layers observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  19. New tribo-systems for sheet metal forming of advanced high strength steels and stainless steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, Ermanno

    the reluctance of industry in the application of new solutions, due to the high trial costs. This project presents a new methodology for testing new environmentally friendly tribo-systems for sheet metal forming of advanced high strength steels and stainless steels. For the purpose, a new Universal Sheet......The environmental issue, concerning the lubrication in sheet metal forming, has become considerably important in the past 10 years. Besides the fact that legislation is becoming more restrictive on the type of lubricant industry is allowed to use, many companies are embracing the path of social...... responsibility and sustainability, which implies a careful application of environmentally friendly technology. On the other hand the global market requires more and more complex products, which ignites a chain reaction that affects the whole life cycle of the product. Regarding sheet metal forming, this means...

  20. Corrosion of aluminium, stainless steels and AISI 680 nickel alloy in nitrogen-based fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kap, I.; Starostin, M.; Shter, G.E.; Grader, G.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    2012-07-15

    Nitrogen-based compounds can potentially be used as alternative non-carbon or low-carbon fuels. Nevertheless, the corrosion of construction materials at high temperatures and pressures in the presence of such fuel has not been reported yet. This work is focused on the corrosion of AISI Al 6061, 1005 carbon steel (CS), 304, 316L, 310 austenitic stainless steels (SS) and 680 nickel alloy in highly concentrated water solution of ammonium nitrate and urea (ANU). The corrosion at 50 C and ambient pressure and at 350 C and 20 bar was investigated to simulate storage and working conditions. Sodium chloride was added to the fuel (0-5 wt%) to simulate industrial fertilizers and accelerated corrosion environment. Heavy corrosion of CS was observed in ANU solution at 50 C, while Al 6061, 304 and 316L SS showed high resistance both to uniform and pitting corrosion in ANU containing 1% of sodium chloride. Addition of 5% sodium chloride caused pitting of Al 6061 but had no influence on the corrosion of SS. Tests in ANU at 350 C and 20 bar showed pitting on SS 304 and 316L and 680 nickel alloy. The highest corrosion resistance was found for SS 310 due to formation of stable oxide film on its surface. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. 2014 Accomplishments-Tritium aging studies on stainless steel: Fracture toughness properties of forged stainless steels-Effect of hydrogen, forging strain rate, and forging temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Michael J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-02-01

    Forged stainless steels are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. During service, tritium diffuses into the reservoir walls and radioactively decays to helium-3. Tritium and decay helium cause a higher propensity for cracking which could lead to a tritium leak or delayed failure of a tritium reservoir. The factors that affect the tendency for crack formation and propagation include: Environment; steel type and microstructure; and, vessel configuration (geometry, pressure, residual stress). Fracture toughness properties are needed for evaluating the long-term effects of tritium on their structural properties. Until now, these effects have been characterized by measuring the effects of tritium on the tensile and fracture toughness properties of specimens fabricated from experimental forgings in the form of forward-extruded cylinders. A key result of those studies is that the long-term cracking resistance of stainless steels in tritium service depends greatly on the interaction between decay helium and the steels’ forged microstructure. New experimental research programs are underway and are designed to measure tritium and decay helium effects on the cracking properties of stainless steels using actual tritium reservoir forgings instead of the experimental forgings of past programs. The properties measured should be more representative of actual reservoir properties because the microstructure of the specimens tested will be more like that of the tritium reservoirs. The programs are designed to measure the effects of key forging variables on tritium compatibility and include three stainless steels, multiple yield strengths, and four different forging processes. The effects on fracture toughness of hydrogen and crack orientation were measured for type 316L forgings. In addition, hydrogen effects on toughness were measured for Type 304L block forgings having two different yield strengths. Finally, fracture toughness properties of type 304L

  2. Laser Boronizing of Stainless Steel with Direct Diode Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuhara, Takayoshi; Morimoto, Junji; Abe, Nobuyuki; Tsukamoto, Masahiro

    Boronizing is a thermo-chemical surface treatment in which boron atoms are diffused into the surface of a work piece to form borides with the base material. When applied to the metallic materials, boronizing provides wear and abrasion resistance comparable to sintered carbides. However conventional boronizing is carried out at temperatures ranging from 800°C to 1050°C and takes from one to several hours. The structure and properties of the base material is influenced considerably by the high temperature and long treatment time. In order to avoid these drawbacks of conventional boronizing, laser-assisted boronizing is investigated which activates the conventional boronizing material and the work piece with a high density laser power. In this study, effect of laser characteristics was examined on the laser boronizing of stainless steel. After laser boronizing, the microstructure of the boride layer was analyzed with an optical microscope, electron probe micro analyser(EPMA) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The mechanical properties of borided layer were evaluated using Vickers hardness tester and sand erosion tester. Results showed that the boride layer was composed of NiB, CrB, FeB and Fe2B, and get wear resistance.

  3. Composite rebonding to stainless steel metal using different bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Shalan, T A; Till, M J; Feigal, R J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the in vitro bond strengths of composite rebonded to stainless steel crown metal (SS) using five different bonding agents after composite to SS bond failure had been produced. The adhesive systems were applied to the failed bonds following the manufacturers' instructions and, as a control, composite was bonded to SS without using a bonding agent. Each group was then divided into two subgroups: mechanically prepared (MP), in which the SS was roughened by a diamond bur, and unprepared (NMP), in which no modification of the SS was done. ESPE VISIO-GEM composite was placed in a plastic mold and light cured to the treated SS. Samples were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 72 hr, thermocycled for 500 cycles between 5 and 55 degrees C, and mounted in an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Caulk's Adhesive System provided significantly higher rebond strength (228.97 +/- 106.9 kg/cm2) than the other materials, and mechanical surface preparation offered no significant advantages.

  4. Carburizing of Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) Under Compression Superplastic Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamad, Nor Wahida; Jauhari, Iswadi

    2012-12-01

    A new surface carburizing technique which combines superplastic deformation with superplastic carburizing (SPC) is introduced. SPC was conducted on duplex stainless steel under compression mode at a fixed 0.5 height reduction strain rates ranging from 6.25 × 10-5 to 1 × 10-3 s-1 and temperature ranging from 1173 K to 1248 K (900 °C to 975 °C). The results are compared with those from conventional and non-superplastic carburizing. The results show that thick hard carburized layers are formed at a much faster rate compared with the other two processes. A more gradual hardness transition from the surface to the substrate is also obtained. The highest carburized layer thickness and surface hardness are attained under SPC process at 1248 K (975 °C) and 6.25 × 10-5 s-1 with a value of (218.3 ± 0.5) μm and (1581.0 ± 5.0) HV respectively. Other than that, SPC also has the highest scratch resistance.

  5. Effect of heat treatment on stainless steel orthodontic wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmar Aparecido Cuoghi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of heat treatment on CrNi stainless steel orthodontic archwires. Half of forty archwires of each thickness - 0.014" (0.35 mm, 0.016" (0.40 mm, 0.018" (0.45 mm and 0.020" (0.50 mm (totalling 160 archwires - were subjected to heat treatment while the remainder were not. All of the archwires had their individual thickness measured in the anterior and posterior regions using AutoCad 2000 software before and after compressive and tensile strength testing. The data was statistically analysed utilising multivariance ANOVA at a 5% significance level. All archwires without heat treatment that were subjected to tensile strength testing presented with anterior opening, which was more accentuated in the 0.020" archwires. In the posterior region, the opening produced by the tensile force was more accentuated in the archwires without heat treatment. There was greater stability in the thermally treated archwires, especially those subjected to tensile strength testing, which indicates that the heat treatment of orthodontic archwires establishes a favourable and indispensable condition to preserve the intercanine width.

  6. Cumulative creep fatigue damage in 316 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    The cumulative creep-fatigue damage behavior of 316 stainless steel at 1500 F was experimentally established for the two-level loading cases of fatigue followed by fatigue, creep fatigue followed by fatigue, and fatigue followed by creep fatigue. The two-level loadings were conducted such that the lower life (high strain) cycling was applied first for a controlled number of cycles and the higher life (low strain) cycling was conducted as the second level to failure. The target life levels in this study were 100 cycles to failure for both the fatigue and creep-fatigue lowlife loading, 5000 cycles to failure for the higher life fatigue loading and 10,000 cycles to failure for the higher life creep-fatigue loading. The failed specimens are being examined both fractographically and metallographically to ascertain the nature of the damaging mechanisms that produced failure. Models of creep-fatigue damage accumulation are being evaluated and knowledge of the various damaging mechanisms is necessary to ensure that predictive capability is instilled in the final failure model.

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Plasma Cu Surface Modified Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiangyu; TANG Bin; FAN Ailan; MA Yong; TIAN Linhai

    2012-01-01

    Cu modified layer was prepared on the surface of AISI304 stainless steel by plasma surface alloying technique.The effects of processing parameters on the thickness,surface topography,microstructure and chemical composition of Cu modified layer were characterized using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES),scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).The experimental results show that the surface modified layer is a duplex layer (deposited + diffused layer) with thickness of about 26 μm under the optimum process parameters.The modified layer is mainly composed of a mixture of Cu and expanded austenite phase.The ball-on-disk results show that the modified layer possesses low friction coefficients (0.25) and excellent wear resistance (wear volume 0.005× 109 μm3).The Cu modified layer is very effective in killing the bacteria S.aureus.Meanwhile,no viable S.aureus is found after 3 h (100% killed) by contact with the Cu alloyed surface.

  8. Quantification of fibrinogen adsorption onto 316L stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettens, Robert T T; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2007-05-01

    Adsorption of the plasma protein fibrinogen (Fb) onto 316L stainless steel (316L SS) was observed and quantified using both in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy techniques. Industry standard mechanical and electrochemical polishing techniques were used to prepare bulk alloy 316L SS samples, rendering the surfaces flat enough to directly observe and measure Fb adsorption. The data were analyzed kinetically using a Langmuir model. Largely irreversible adsorption was found on the 316L SS surface with an adsorption rate constant (k(o)) of 1.9 x 10(-4) mL microg(-1) s(-1) using the ex situ method and 1.7 x 10(-4) mL microg(-1) s(-1) using the in situ method. Additionally, protein conformation and assembly orientation on these surfaces were documented, where the adsorption pattern appeared random. Complete area coverage was never obtained. That is, after adsorption for over 5 time constants (5tau), voids in the structure were always observed.

  9. Fibrinogen adsorption onto 316L stainless steel under polarized conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettens, Robert T T; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2008-04-01

    Adsorption of the plasma protein fibrinogen onto electrically polarized 316L stainless steel was observed and quantified using both in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Significant differences in fibrinogen adsorption were observed across voltages. Ex situ studies showed significantly lower area coverage (theta) and height of adsorbed Fb on cathodically polarized surfaces when compared to anodically polarized surfaces. Conformational differences in the protein may explain the distinctions in Fb surface area coverage (theta) and height between the anodic and cathodic cases. In situ studies showed significantly slower kinetics of Fb adsorption onto surfaces below -100 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) compared to surfaces polarized above -100 mV. Electrochemical current density data showed large charge transfer processes (approximately 1 x 10(-5) to 1 x 10(-4) A/cm(2)) taking place on the 316L SS surfaces at voltages below -100 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl). These relatively large current densities point to flux of ionic species away from the surface as a major source of the reduction in adsorption kinetics rather than just hydrophilic or electrostatic effects.

  10. Proton implantation effect on (SUS-316) stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, A.K., E-mail: anandakdas@yahoo.com [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Savar, Dhaka 1349 (Bangladesh); Ishigami, R. [The Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center, 64-52-1 Nagatani, Tsuruga, Fukui 914-0192 (Japan); Kamal, I. [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Savar, Dhaka 1349 (Bangladesh)

    2015-04-25

    Microstructural damage and nano hardness of the industrial grade stainless steel (SUS-316) have been studied under proton (H{sup +}) implanted condition applying different doses at room temperature. The implantation scheme such as proton energy, fluence, irradiation time, and penetration depth in the target materials were estimated by Monte Carlo Simulation Code SRIM-2008. In the simulation, the parameters were chosen in such a way that the damage density (displacement per atom or dpa) would be uniform up to certain depth from the surface. X-ray diffraction study of the annealed samples prior to the proton implantation showed the austenitic fcc structure and no significant change was observed after proton implantation in it. Microstructural observation made by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) revealed that 1 dpa of proton-irradiation induced the structural damage extended up to 1 μm depth from the surface. The nano hardness study showed that the hardness level of the irradiated samples increased monotonically with the irradiation doses. Proton dose of 1 dpa caused 65% increment of hardness level on average in case of uniformly irradiated samples. It was realized that the increment of hardness was a consequence of microstructural damages caused by the formation of interstitial dislocation loops in the sample matrix keeping the lattice structure unaffected.

  11. Electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide on stainless steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Patra; N Munichandraiah

    2009-09-01

    Electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide is studied on a sand-blasted stainless steel (SSS) electrode in an aqueous solution of NaClO4. The cyclic voltammetric reduction of H2O2 at low concentrations is characterized by a cathodic peak at -0.40 V versus standard calomel electrode (SCE). Cyclic voltammetry is studied by varying the concentration of H2O2 in the range from 0.2 mM to 20 mM and the sweep rate in the range from 2 to 100 mV s-1. Voltammograms at concentrations of H2O2 higher than 2 mM or at high sweep rates consist of an additional current peak, which may be due to the reduction of adsorbed species formed during the reduction of H2O2. Amperometric determination of H2O2 at -0.50 V vs SCE provides the detection limit of 5 M H2O2. A plot of current density versus concentration has two segments suggesting a change in the mechanism of H2O2 reduction at concentrations of H2O2 ≥ 2 mM. From the rotating disc electrode study, diffusion co-efficient of H2O2 and rate constant for reduction of H2O2 are evaluated.

  12. The Unified Creep-Fatigue Equation for Stainless Steel 316

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background—The creep-fatigue properties of stainless steel 316 are of interest because of the wide use of this material in demanding service environments, such as the nuclear industry. Need—A number of models exist to describe creep-fatigue behaviours, but they are limited by the need to obtain specialized coefficients from a large number of experiments, which are time-consuming and expensive. Also, they do not generalise to other situations of temperature and frequency. There is a need for improved formulations for creep-fatigue, with coefficients that determinable directly from the existing and simple creep-fatigue tests and creep rupture tests. Outcomes—A unified creep-fatigue equation is proposed, based on an extension of the Coffin-Manson equation, to introduce dependencies on temperature and frequency. The equation may be formulated for strain as ε p = C 0 c ( T , t , ε p N − β 0 , or as a power-law ε p = C 0 c ( T , t N − β 0 b ( T , t . These were then validated against existing experimental data. The equations provide an excellent fit to data (r2 = 0.97 or better. Originality—This work develops a novel formulation for creep-fatigue that accommodates temperature and frequency. The coefficients can be obtained with minimum experimental effort, being based on standard rather than specialized tests.

  13. Grain Boundary Assemblies in Dynamically-Recrystallized Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Tikhonova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The grain boundary misorientation distributions associated with the development of dynamic recrystallization were studied in a high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel subjected to hot working. Under conditions of discontinuous dynamic recrystallization, the relationships between the grain or subgrain sizes and flow stresses can be expressed by power law functions with different grain/subgrain size exponents of about −0.76 (for grain size or −1.0 (for subgrain size. Therefore, the mean grain size being much larger than the subgrain size under conditions of low flow stress gradually approaches the size of the subgrains with an increase in the flow stress. These dependencies lead to the fraction of high-angle boundaries being a function of the flow stress. Namely, the fraction of ordinary high-angle boundaries in dynamically-recrystallized structures decreases with a decrease in the flow stress. On the other hand, the fraction of special boundaries, which are associated with annealing twins, progressively increases with a decrease of the flow stress.

  14. Antibacterial and corrosive properties of copper implanted austenitic stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Xiong; Bo-fan Xu; Hong-wei Ni

    2009-01-01

    Copper ions were implanted into austenitic stainless steel (SS) by metal vapor vacuum arc with a energy of 100 keV and an ions dose range of (0.5-8.0)x 1017 cm-2. The Cu-implanted SS was annealed in an Ar atmosphere furnace. Glancing X-ray diffraction (GXRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were used to reveal the phase com-positions, microstructures, and concentration profiles of copper ions in the implanted layer. The results show that the antibacterialproperty of Cu-implanted SS is attributed to Cu9.9Fe0.1 which precipitated as needles. The depth of copper in Cu-implanted SS with annealing treatment is greater than that in Cu-implanted SS without annealing treatment, which improves the antibacterial property against S. Aureus. The salt wetting-drying combined cyclic test was used to evaluate the corrosion-resistance of antibacterial SS, and the results reveal that the antibacterial SS has a level of corrosion-resistance equivalent to that of un-implanted SS.

  15. TEM studies of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stróz, D; Psoda, M

    2010-03-01

    Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and X-ray phase analysis were used to study the structure of a layer formed during nitriding the AISI 316L stainless steel at temperature 440 degrees C. It was found that the applied treatment led to the formation of 6-microm-thick layer of the S-phase. There is no evidence of CrN precipitation. The X-ray diffraction experiments proved that the occurred austenite lattice expansion - due to nitrogen atoms - depended on the crystallographic direction. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy studies showed that the layer consisted of a single cubic phase that contained a lot of defects such as dislocations, stacking faults, slip bands and twins. The high-resolution electron microscopy observations were applied to study the defect formation due to the nitriding process. It was shown that the presence of great number of stacking faults leads to formation of nanotwins. Weak, forbidden {100} reflections were still another characteristic feature of the S-phase. These were not detected in the X-ray spectra of the phase. Basing on the high-resolution electron microscopy studies it can be suggested that the short-range ordering of the nitrogen atoms in the octahedral sites inside the f.c.c. matrix lattice takes place and gives rise to appearance of these spots. It is suggested that the cubic lattice undergoes not only expansion but also slight rombohedral distortion that explains differences in the lattice expansion for different crystallographic directions.

  16. Impact analysis of stainless steel spent fuel canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramayo, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Turner, D.W. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Waste Management Organization

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents the results of the numerical analysis performed to asses the structural integrity of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stainless steel canisters when subjected to impact loads associated with free gravity drops from heights not exceeding 20 ft. The SNF canisters are to be used for the Shipment of radioactive material from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Site to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for storage. The Idaho chemical Processing Plant Fuel Receipt Criteria Questionnaire requires that the vertical drop accidents from two heights be analyze. These heights are those that are considered to be critical at the time of unloading the canisters from the shipping cask. The configurations analyzed include a maximum payload of 90 lbs dropping from heights of 20 and 3 ft. The nominal weight of the canister is 23.3 lbs. The analysis has been performed using finite element methods. Innovative analysis techniques are used to capture the effects of failure and separation of canister components. The structural integrity is evaluated in terms of physical deformation and separation of the canister components that may result from failure of components at selected interfaces.

  17. Precipitation of Epsilon Copper in Ferrite Antibacterial Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhixia ZHANG; Gang LIN; Zhou XU

    2008-01-01

    The precipitation of epsilon copper at 1023 K ageing in ferrite antibacterial stainless steel was investigated by a combination of electron microscopy and micro-Vickers hardness measurement. The results show that epsilon copper precipitation occurs within 90 s. Complex rnultilayer structure confirmed as twins and stacking faults on {111}ε-Cu planes was observed in the precipitates. The precipitates grow by the lengthwise enlargement of a set of parallel layers, having [111]ε-Cu and [112]ε-Cu preferred growth orientations. The volume fraction of precipitates f formed within 120 min can be predicted by a modified Avrami equation (In 1/1-f= kt+b).Simultaneously, substituent atom clusters with a size of 5-10 nm was found to occur in the solution and cause matrix strain. The precipitate morphology and distribution on the surface of ferrite antibacterial stainlesss teel are associated with surface crystallographic orientation of the matrix. The precipitates are predominantly located within the ferrite grains of orientation. The precipitates located on {111}α-Fe surface planes have sphere or ellipse shape.

  18. 76 FR 8773 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan AGENCY: United States International Trade... steel flanges from India and Taiwan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  19. Electrochemical methods for characterisation of thermal spray corrosion resistant stainless steel coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, R.; Vreijling, M.P.W.; Ferrari, G.M.; Wit, J.H.W. de

    1998-01-01

    The use of thermal spray stainless steel coatings for protection of low alloyed steels against different types of corrosion is limited due to high porosity levels and oxide inclusions. In this paper electrochemical methods like corrosion potential monitoring and cyclic voltammetry are reported to mo

  20. 75 FR 81308 - Stainless Steel Sheet And Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, And Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Sheet And Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, And Taiwan AGENCY... steel sheet and strip from Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan. SUMMARY: The Commission... sheet and strip from Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan would be likely to lead...