WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon source concentration

  1. The Effect of Carbon Source and Fluoride Concentrations in the "Streptococcus Mutans" Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Tony P.; Andrade, Ricardo O.; Bruschi-Thedei, Giuliana C. M.; Thedei, Geraldo, Jr.; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this class experiment is to show the influence of carbon source and of different fluoride concentrations on the biofilm formation by the bacterium "Streptococcus mutans." The observation of different biofilm morphology as a function of carbon source and fluoride concentration allows an interesting discussion regarding the…

  2. Carbon monoxide concentration in donated blood : relation to cigarette smoking and other sources

    OpenAIRE

    Åberg, Anna-Maja; Nilsson Sojka, Birgitta; Winsö, Ola; Abrahamsson, Pernilla; Johansson, Göran; Larsson, Jan Erik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carbon monoxide (CO) is normally present in the human body due to endogenous production of CO. CO can also be inhaled by exposure to external sources such as cigarette smoke, car exhaust, and fire. The purpose of this study was to investigate CO concentrations in blood from 410 blood donors at the blood center in Umea, Sweden. To further evaluate the effects of cigarette smoking on CO concentrations, the elimination time for CO was examined in six volunteer smokers after a smoked ...

  3. Monitoring of black carbon concentration at an inland rural area including fixed sources in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeonghoon; Yun, Jeongseok; Kim, Kyeong Jun

    2016-01-01

    We monitored black carbon (BC) concentration for 6months to understand the characteristics of atmospheric aerosols of an inland rural area in Korea. A multi-angle absorption photometer was used to continuously monitor the BC concentration, which was compared with elemental carbon (EC) concentration measured by an OC/EC Analyzer. For the atmospheric aerosols less than 10μm, size distributions were measured using both an optical particle counter and a scanning mobility particle sizer. The diurnal variations for BC concentration show that the average BC concentration was 1.43μgm(-3) and exhibited peaks in the morning rush hours. However, the BC concentration measured at night from 20:00 to 08:00 was higher than that measured during the day. The reason why the BC concentration at night was higher would be partly due to the regional characteristics influenced by the combination of local fixed sources and traffic condition. It is suggested that the traffic and transporting of pollutants from the west influenced the increase in the BC concentration at inland rural area including fixed sources. PMID:25900115

  4. At neutral pH the chronological lifespan of Hansenula polymorpha increases upon enhancing the carbon source concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Adam Kawałek; van der Klei, Ida J

    2014-01-01

    Dietary restriction is generally assumed to increase the lifespan in most eukaryotes, including the simple model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, recent data questioned whether this phenomenon is indeed true for yeast. We studied the effect of reduction of the carbon source concentration on the chronological lifespan of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha using four different carbon sources. Our data indicate that reduction of the carbon source concentration has a negative (glucose, eth...

  5. Effect of carbon source and nitrate concentration on denitrifying phosphorus removal by DPB sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ya-yi; PENG Yong-zhen; Wang Shu-ying; PAN Mian-li

    2004-01-01

    Effect of added carbon source and nitrate concentration on the denitrifying phosphorus removal by DPB sludge was systematically studied using batch experiments, at the same time the variation of ORP was investigated.Results showed that the denitrifying and phosphorus uptake rate in anoxic phase increased with the high initial anaerobic carbon source addition. However once the initial COD concentration reached a certain level, which was in excess to the PHB saturation of poly-P bacteria, residual COD carried over to anoxic phase inhibited the subsequent denitrifying phosphorus uptake. Simultaneously, phosphate uptake continued until all nitrate was removed, following a slow endogenous release of phosphate. High nitrate concentration in anoxic phase increased the initial denitrifying phosphorus rate. Once the nitrate was exhausted, phosphate uptake changed to release. Moreover, the time of this turning point occurred later with the higher nitrate addition. On the other hand, through on-line monitoring the variation of the ORP with different initial COD concentration , it was found ORP could be used as a control parameter for phosphorus release, but it is impossible to utilize ORP for controlling the denitrificaion and anoxic phosphorus uptake operations.

  6. Hemicellulose concentration and composition in plant cell walls under extreme carbon source-sink imbalances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaedel, C.; Hoch, G. (Univ. of Basel, Institute of Botany, Basel (Switzerland)); Richter, A.; Bloechl, A. (Univ. of Vienna, Dept. of Chemical Ecology and Ecosystem Research, Vienna (Austria))

    2010-01-15

    Hemicelluloses account for one-quarter of the global dry plant biomass and therefore are the second most abundant biomass fraction after cellulose. Despite their quantitative significance, the responsiveness of hemicelluloses to atmospheric carbon oversupply is still largely unknown, although hemicelluloses could serve as carbon sinks with increasing CO{sub 2} concentrations. This study aimed at clarifying the role hemicelluloses play as carbon sinks, analogous to non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), by experimentally manipulating the plants' carbon supply. Sixteen plant species from four different plant functional types (grasses, herbs, seedlings of broad-leaved trees and conifers) were grown for 2 months in greenhouses at either extremely low (140 ppm), medium (280 ppm) or high (560 ppm) atmospheric CO{sub 2}concentrations, thus inducing situations of massive C-limitation or -oversupply. Above and below ground biomass as wellas NSC significantly increased in all species and tissues with increasing CO{sub 2}concentrations. Increasing CO{sub 2}concentrations had no significant effect on total hemicellulose concentrations in leaves and woody tissues in all species, except for two out of four grass species, where hemicellulose concentrations increased with atmospheric CO{sub 2}supply. Despite the overall stable total hemicellulose concentrations, the monosaccharide spectra of hemicelluloses showed a significant increase in glucose monomers in leaves of woody species as C-supply increased. In summary, total hemicellulose concentrations in de novo built biomass seem to be largely unaffected by changed atmospheric CO{sub 2}concentrations, while significant increases of hemicellulose-derived glucose with increasing CO{sub 2}concentrations in leaves of broad-leaved and conifer tree seedlings showed differential responses among the different hemicellulose classes in response to varying CO{sub 2}concentrations. (author)

  7. Hemicellulose concentration and composition in plant cell walls under extreme carbon source-sink imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädel, Christina; Richter, Andreas; Blöchl, Andreas; Hoch, Günter

    2010-07-01

    Hemicelluloses account for one-quarter of the global dry plant biomass and therefore are the second most abundant biomass fraction after cellulose. Despite their quantitative significance, the responsiveness of hemicelluloses to atmospheric carbon oversupply is still largely unknown, although hemicelluloses could serve as carbon sinks with increasing CO(2) concentrations. This study aimed at clarifying the role hemicelluloses play as carbon sinks, analogous to non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), by experimentally manipulating the plants' carbon supply. Sixteen plant species from four different plant functional types (grasses, herbs, seedlings of broad-leaved trees and conifers) were grown for 2 months in greenhouses at either extremely low (140 ppm), medium (280 ppm) or high (560 ppm) atmospheric CO(2) concentrations, thus inducing situations of massive C-limitation or -oversupply. Above and belowground biomass as well as NSC significantly increased in all species and tissues with increasing CO(2) concentrations. Increasing CO(2) concentrations had no significant effect on total hemicellulose concentrations in leaves and woody tissues in all species, except for two out of four grass species, where hemicellulose concentrations increased with atmospheric CO(2) supply. Despite the overall stable total hemicellulose concentrations, the monosaccharide spectra of hemicelluloses showed a significant increase in glucose monomers in leaves of woody species as C-supply increased. In summary, total hemicellulose concentrations in de novo built biomass seem to be largely unaffected by changed atmospheric CO(2) concentrations, while significant increases of hemicellulose-derived glucose with increasing CO(2) concentrations in leaves of broad-leaved and conifer tree seedlings showed differential responses among the different hemicellulose classes in response to varying CO(2) concentrations. PMID:20113432

  8. Contribution of various carbon sources toward isoprene synthesis mediated by altered atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, A. M.; Asensio, D.; Eller, A. S.; Wilkinson, M. J.; Schnitzler, J.; Jackson, R. B.; Monson, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Biogenically released isoprene is abundant in the troposphere, and has an essential function in determining atmospheric chemistry and important implications for plant metabolism. As a result, considerable effort has been made to understand the underlying mechanisms driving isoprene synthesis, particularly in the context of a rapidly changing environment. Recently, a number of studies have focused on the contribution of recently assimilated carbon as opposed to stored/alternative intracellular or extracellular carbon sources in the context of environmental stress. Results from these studies can offer clues about the importance of various carbon pools for isoprene production and elucidate the corresponding physiological changes that are responsible for these dynamic shifts in carbon allocation. We performed a 13CO2-labeling study using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to examine the kinetics of the incorporation of recently assimilated photosynthate into isoprene emitted from poplar (Poplar x canescens) under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated CO2 growth conditions. We also monitored the importance of pyruvate-derived carbon for isoprene biosynthesis and obtained a detailed account of where individual carbons are derived from by analyzing the ratio of the 3C subunit of isoprene (M41+) (a fragment which contains two carbons from pyruvate) to the ratio of the parent isoprene molecule (M69+). Dynamics in the M41+:M69+ ratio indicate that recently assimilated carbon is incorporated into the pyruvate carbon pool slowly across all CO2 treatments and is therefore accessible for isoprene synthesis at a slower rate when compared to substrates derived directly from photosynthesis. Analysis of the rates of change for individual masses indicated that the carbon pools in trees grown in sub-ambient CO2 (200 ppm) are labeled ~2 times faster than those of trees grown in ambient or elevated CO2. Analysis of the total isoprene emission rates between treatments

  9. Source sector and region contributions to concentration and direct radiative forcing of black carbon in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Liao, Hong; Mao, Yuhao; Ridley, David A.

    2016-01-01

    We quantify the contributions from five domestic emission sectors (residential, industry, transportation, energy, and biomass burning) and emissions outside of China (non-China) to concentration and direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) in China for year 2010 using a nested-grid version of the global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) coupled with a radiative transfer model. The Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (HTAP) anthropogenic emissions of BC for year 2010 are used in this study. Simulated surface-layer BC concentrations in China have strong seasonal variations, which exceed 9 μg m-3 in winter and are about 1-5 μg m-3 in summer in the North China Plain and the Sichuan Basin. Residential sector is simulated to have the largest contribution to surface BC concentrations, by 5-7 μg m-3 in winter and by 1-3 μg m-3 in summer, reflecting the large emissions from winter heating and the enhanced wet deposition during summer monsoon. The contribution from industry sector is the second largest and shows relatively small seasonal variations; the emissions from industry sector contribute 1-3 μg m-3 to BC concentrations in the North China Plain and the Sichuan Basin. The contribution from transportation sector is the third largest, followed by that from biomass burning and energy sectors. The non-China emissions mainly influence the surface-layer concentrations of BC in western China; about 70% of surface-layer BC concentration in the Tibet Plateau is attributed to transboundary transport. Averaged over all of China, the all-sky DRF of BC at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is simulated to be 1.22 W m-2. Sensitivity simulations show that the TOA BC direct radiative forcings from the five domestic emission sectors of residential, industry, energy, transportation, biomass burning, and non-China emissions are 0.44, 0.27, 0.01, 0.12, 0.04, and 0.30 W m-2, respectively. The domestic and non-China emissions contribute 75% and 25% to BC DRF in China

  10. Physiology of Aspergillus niger in Oxygen-Limited Continuous Cultures: Influence of Aeration, Carbon Source Concentration and Dilution Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diano, Audrey; Peeters, J.; Dynesen, Jens Østergaard;

    2009-01-01

    of low oxygen availability, at different carbon source concentrations and at different specific growth rates, on the metabolism of A. niger, using continuous cultures. The results show that there is an increase in the production of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates at low oxygen concentrations....... Indeed, at these conditions, a decrease in the mitochondrial respiratory chain activity leads to an accumulation of NADH and to a decreased ATP production which uncouples catabolism and anabolism, influences the intracellular pH and leads to production and excretion of organic acids. Moreover, mannitol...... is being produced in order to ensure reoxidation of NADH, and this is the main cellular response to balance the ratio NADH/NAD at low oxygen availability. Mannitol production is also coupled to low specific growth rate, which suggests a control of carbon catabolite repression on the mannitol pathway...

  11. Comparation of Organic and Elemental carbon concentrations in PM2.5 in five Mexican cities: Potencial Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Murillo, J.; Cardenas, B.; Campos-Ramos, A.; Blanco-Jimenez, S.; Angeles-Garcia, F.

    2011-12-01

    During 2006-2010 the National Center for Environmental Research and Training of the National Institute of Ecology of Mexico, carried out several short field studies in the cities of Salamanca, Gto, Tula, Hgo; Guadalajara, Jal; Toluca, Edo Mex; and Tijuana, BC to determine concentration and chemical compositions of PM2.5. These cities, although different in size population have all important industrial and area sources that contribute to high PM2.5 concentrations and therefore potential health impacts. Chemical analyses included organic and elemental carbon for which DRI Model 2001 Thermal/Optical Carbon Analyzer (Atmoslytic Inc, Calabasas, CA, USA) was used. Highest PM2.5 mass mean concentrations were obtained in Salamanca (46 μg/m3), followed by Toluca (43 μg/m3), Guadalajara (37 μg/m3), Tula (20 μg/m3) and Tijuana (18 μg/m3). For Salamanca and Tula, annual levels exceeded the Mexican PM2.5 annual standard of 15 μg/m3. Total carbonaceous aerosol accounted for 41.4%, 41.1%, 32.3%, 29.5% and 29.1% of PM2.5 mass in Tula, Toluca, Guadalajara, Salamanca and Tijuana, respectively. Higher OC2, OC3 and OC4 carbon fractions were observed in Guadalajara, Tijuana and Toluca, indicating an important contribution of gasoline and diesel vehicles emissions in these cities. As for Tula and Salamanca, cities in which refineries and power plants are present, OC3, OC4, EC1 and EC2 represent the higher fractions which could be attributed to stationary sources that use heavy fuels for their combustion process. UNMIX and PMF analyses were used in order to identify the most important sources that contributes to OC and EC concentrations.

  12. Black carbon (BC) of urban topsoil of steel industrial city (Anshan), Northeastern China: Concentration, source identification and environmental implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yutong; Xiao, Qing; Lu, Shenggao

    2016-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) and total carbon (TC) concentrations in urban topsoils and vertical profiles from steel industrial city, Anshan, Northeastern China, were determined. A total of 115 topsoil samples and 4 soil profiles were collected, in which the BC concentrations were determined using chemical oxidation technique. The BC concentrations in urban topsoils are in the range of 1.86 to 246.46gkg(-1) with an average of 33.86gkg(-1). Both BC and TC concentrations decrease sharply with soil depth, whereas BC/TC ratio shows a little variation with depth. The spatial distribution of BC in urban topsoils reveals that the BC concentration is much higher in the northern part of the city, which is consistent with the steel production. The distribution factors (DF) of BC are the highest in 1000-500 and 500-250μm size fractions, while the lowest in 50-2μm fraction. The mass loading of BC in 250-50 and 50-2μm size fractions accounts for 76.2% of bulk soil, indicating these two size fractions responsible for BC accumulation in soils. Enrichment factor (EF) of BC in urban topsoils ranges from 0.92 to 122.01 with an average of 16.76, indicating that the urban topsoils studied are moderately or severely accumulated by the BC. Strong correlation is found between BC and pollution load index (PLI) of heavy metals, indicating the possibility of similar sources of BC and heavy metals in soils. The BC/TC ratio in soils ranges from 0.45 to 0.97, with an average of 0.75. The BC/TC ratio shows the mixed sources of BC derived from fossil fuel combustion and vehicle emissions. The BC concentration and BC/TC ratio may reflect the degree of industrial activities and pollution sources in urban soils. The study demonstrated that BC is an effective indicator of degree and "hotspots" of heavy metals pollution in urban soils. PMID:27450257

  13. Carbon Concentration of Austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ławrynowicz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out to examine the influence of temperature and times of austempering process on the maximum extend towhich the bainite reaction can proceed and the carbon content in retained austenite. It should be noted that a small percentage change in theaustenite carbon content can have a significant effect on the subsequent austempering reaction changing the volume fraction of the phasespresent and hence, the resulting mechanical properties. Specimens were prepared from an unalloyed ductile cast iron, austenitised at 950oCfor 60 minutes and austempered by the conventional single-step austempering process at four temperatures between BS and MS, eg., 250,300, 350 and 400oC. The samples were austempered at these temperatures for 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes and finally quenched toambient temperature. Volume fractions of retained austenite and carbon concentration in the residual austenite have been observed byusing X-ray diffraction. Additionally, carbon concentration in the residual austenite was calculated using volume fraction data of austeniteand a model developed by Bhadeshia based on the McLellan and Dunn quasi-chemical thermodynamic model. The comparison ofexperimental data with the T0, T0' and Ae3' phase boundaries suggests the likely mechanism of bainite reaction in cast iron is displacive rather than diffusional. The carbon concentration in retained austenite demonstrates that at the end of bainite reaction the microstructure must consist of not only ausferrite but additionally precipitated carbides.

  14. Variovorax sp.-mediated biodegradation of the phenyl urea herbicide linuron at micropollutant concentrations and effects of natural dissolved organic matter as supplementary carbon source

    OpenAIRE

    Horemans, Benjamin; Vandermaesen, Joke; Smolders, Erik; Springael, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    In nature, pesticides are often present as micropollutants with concentrations too low for efficient biodegradation and growth of heterotrophic pollutant degrading bacteria. Instead, organic carbon present in environmental dissolved organic matter (eDOM) constitutes the main carbon source in nature. Information on how natural organic carbon affects degradation of pollutants and micropollutants in particular, is however poor. Linuron degrading Variovorax sp. strains SRS16, WDL1 and PBLH6 and a...

  15. Denitrification of high concentrations of nitrites and nitrates in synthetic medium with different sources of organic carbon. III. Methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyk, M; Gałka, E; Sakowicz, E; Mycielski, R

    1985-01-01

    The denitrification of nitrites and nitrates (1000 mg N/l) in medium containing methanol as a source of organic carbon was studied. Continuous cultures of mixed population of autochtonic microflora from bottom sludge of nitrogenous wastewater reservoir were set up in a chemostat-type column and packed bed reactor. The efficiency of denitrification of nitrates in packed bed reactor was 506.7 mg N/l/h whereas denitrification of nitrites was from 8.7 to 16.0 mg N/l/h depending on the granulation of the filing material. In the latter case 83% nitrogen was removed from the medium. One of the factors causing low efficiency of denitrification of nitrites is excessive alkalization of the medium in the bed. The use of a three-step bed with adjusted pH resulted in complete denitrification of nitrites with efficiency 60 mg N/l/h. The bacteria inside the bed were dominated by Paracoccus denitrificans and by Pseudomonas aeruginosa when nitrates were present. The sensitivity of P. denitrificans to high concentrations of nitrites seems to be the second factor contributing to low efficiency of denitrification with methanol as organic substrate. PMID:2412408

  16. Source Material and Concentration of Wildfire-Produced Pyrogenic Carbon Influence Post-Fire Soil Nutrient Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas A. Michelotti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyrogenic carbon (PyC is produced by the thermal decomposition of organic matter in the absence of oxygen (O. PyC affects nutrient availability, may enhance post-fire nitrogen (N mineralization rates, and can be a significant carbon (C pool in fire-prone ecosystems. Our objectives were to characterize PyC produced by wildfires and examine the influence that contrasting types of PyC have on C and N mineralization rates. We determined C, N, O, and hydrogen (H concentrations and atomic ratios of charred bark (BK, charred pine cones (PC, and charred woody debris (WD using elemental analysis. We also incubated soil amended with BK, PC, and WD at two concentrations for 60 days to measure C and N mineralization rates. PC had greater H/C and O/C ratios than BK and WD, suggesting that PC may have a lesser aromatic component than BK and WD. C and N mineralization rates decreased with increasing PyC concentrations, and control samples produced more CO2 than soils amended with PyC. Soils with PC produced greater CO2 and had lower N mineralization rates than soils with BK or WD. These results demonstrate that PyC type and concentration have potential to impact nutrient dynamics and C flux to the atmosphere in post-fire forest soils.

  17. Effect of carbon source concentration and culture duration on retreivability of bacteria from certain estuarine, coastal and offshore areas around the peninsular India.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goltekar, R.C.; Krishnan, K.P.; DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Paropkari, A.L.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    which could induce nutritional flexibility, it was observed that lower nutrient strengths yielded higher retrievability. There was a difference of two orders between higher and lower n u trient strengths. This may be due to the heavy organic flux... demonstrated that the nutritional flex i bility of bacteria was more enhanced in oligotrophic co n ditions. The retrievability of bacteria from estuarine sources is not uniformly high across a range of carbon concentrations, as might hav e been expected...

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and black carbon in intertidal sediments of China coastal zones: Concentration, ecological risk, source and their relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofei; Hou, Lijun; Li, Ye; Liu, Min; Lin, Xianbiao; Cheng, Lv

    2016-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and black carbon (BC) have attracted many attentions, especially in the coastal environments. In this study, spatiotemporal distributions of PAHs and BC, and the correlations between BC and PAHs were investigated in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. BC in sediments was measured through dichromate oxidation (BCCr) and thermal oxidation (BCCTO). The concentrations of BCCr in the intertidal sediments ranged between 0.61 and 6.32mgg(-1), while BCCTO ranged between 0.57 and 4.76mgg(-1). Spatial variations of δ(13)C signatures in TOC and BC were observed, varying from -21.13‰ to -24.87‰ and from -23.53‰ to -16.78‰, respectively. PAH contents of sediments ranged from 195.9 to 4610.2ngg(-1) in winter and 98.2 to 2796.5ngg(-1) in summer, and significantly seasonal variations were observed at most sampling sites. However, the results of potential toxicity assessment indicated low ecological risk in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. Greater concentrations of PAHs measured in the sediments of estuarine environments indicated that rivers runoff may have been responsible for the higher PAH pollution levels in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. Pearson's correlation analysis suggested that pyrogenic compounds of PAH were significantly related to BC, due to that both BC and these compounds derived mainly from the combustion process of fossil fuels and biomass. Overall, increasing energy consumptions caused by anthropogenic activities can contribute more emissions of BC as well as PAHs and thus improve the importance of BC in indicating pyrogenic compounds of PAHs in the intertidal sediments of China coastal zones. PMID:27266522

  19. KOMBUCHA DENGAN VARIASI KADAR GULA KELAPA SEBAGAI SUMBER KARBON [Kombucha from Different Coconut Sugar Concentration as a Carbon Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merkuria Karyantina

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Kombucha has been known as traditional medicine that can cure various diseases, such as hypercholesterol. Kombucha made of fermented sweetened tea using symbiotic growth of khamir and bacteria. Functional properties of kombucha related to metabolite that has been produced during fermentation process, glucuronic acid. The aim of this research was to get a fit carbon source that can produce kombucha which have highest glucuronic acid. The result showed that microbe that dominated at the beginning through the end of fermentation process was a group of khamir, i.e 1.81x107 ; 1.43x106 ; 2.40x107 ; 7.00x104 CFU/mL for 1, 4, 7, and 10% of additive coconut sugar. Kombucha at 4% of coconut sugar yielded 8.86 ppm of glucuronic acid. Meanwhile, kombucha with 10% of coconut sugar yielded 6.22 ppm of glucuronic acid. Total acid has no corelation with glucuronid acid formation during the fermentation process.

  20. Quantifying sediment source contributions in coastal catchments impacted by the Fukushima nuclear accident with carbon and nitrogen elemental concentrations and stable isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laceby, J. Patrick; Huon Huon, Sylvain; Onda, Yuichi; Evrard, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accidental release of radioactive contaminants resulted in the significant fallout of radiocesium over several coastal catchments in the Fukushima Prefecture. Radiocesium, considered to be the greatest risk to the short and long term health of the local community, is rapidly bound to fine soil particles and thus is mobilized and transported during soil erosion and runoff processes. As there has been a broad-scale decontamination of rice paddy fields and rural residential areas in the contaminated region, one important long term question is whether there is, or may be, a downstream transfer of radiocesium from forests that covered over 65% of the most contaminated region. Accordingly, carbon and nitrogen elemental concentrations and stable isotope ratios are used to determine the relative contributions of forests and rice paddies to transported sediment in three contaminated coastal catchments. Samples were taken from the three main identified sources: cultivated soils (rice paddies and fields, n=30), forest soils (n=45), and subsoils (channel bank and decontaminated soils, n = 25). Lag deposit sediment samples were obtained from five sampling campaigns that targeted the main hydrological events from October 2011 to October 2014. In total, 86 samples of deposited sediment were analyzed for particulate organic matter elemental concentrations and isotope ratios, 24 from the Mano catchment, 44 from the Niida catchment, and 18 from the Ota catchment. Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to examine the source discrimination potential of this tracing suite and select the appropriate tracers for modelling. The discriminant tracers were modelled with a concentration-dependent distribution mixing model. Preliminary results indicate that cultivated sources (predominantly rice paddies) contribute disproportionately more sediment per unit area than forested regions in these contaminated catchments. Future research will examine if there are

  1. Comment on: "Possible source of ancient carbon in phytolith concentrates from harvested grasses" by G. M. Santos et al. (2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Sullivan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Santos et al. (2012 address the important issue that 14C dating of the carbon occluded in silica phytoliths (PhytOC isolated from contemporary plant materials can produce ages that are incompatible, being often several kyr older, with both their known recent origin and the 14C age of the bulk plant material. In their article, Santos et al. (2012 propose that the anomalously old 14C carbon dates of PhytOC from harvested plant materials are based on plants taking up "old" dissolved soil carbon to the plant by roots during nutrient uptake. They then propose that this old soil-derived carbon is subsequently partitioned from the general plant biomass into either the silica phytoliths they produce, or as recalcitrant organic matter elsewhere in the plant. We suggest that the full data available for PhytOC 14C dating does not support this hypothesis. Santos et al. (2012 also address the important issue of contamination of PhytOC by general plant biomass material that can occur with procedures that incompletely extract phytoliths. Whilst we agree that such contamination needs to be avoided when examining the nature of PhytOC, we also point out that the converse problem, i.e. removal of PhytOC by over-vigorous extraction procedures, can also have important adverse consequences.

  2. Comment on "Possible source of ancient carbon in phytolith concentrates from harvested grasses" by G. M. Santos et al. (2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Sullivan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Santos et al. (2012 address the important issue that 14C dating of the carbon occluded in silica phytoliths (PhytOC isolated from contemporary plant materials can produce ages that are incompatible, being often several kyr older, with both their known recent origin and the 14C age of the bulk plant material. In their article, Santos et al. (2012 propose that the anomalously old 14C carbon dates of PhytOC from harvested plant materials are based on plants taking up "old" dissolved soil carbon to the plant by roots during nutrient uptake. They then propose that this old soil-derived carbon is subsequently partitioned from the general plant biomass into either the silica phytoliths they produce or as recalcitrant organic matter elsewhere in the plant. We suggest that the full data available for PhytOC 14C dating do not support this hypothesis. Santos et al. (2012 also address the important issue of contamination of PhytOC by general plant biomass material that can occur with procedures that incompletely extract phytoliths. Whilst we agree that such contamination needs to be avoided when examining the nature of PhytOC, we also point out that the converse problem, i.e. removal of PhytOC by over-vigorous extraction procedures, can also have important adverse consequences.

  3. Effect of various sources of organic carbon and high nitrite and nitrate concentrations on the selection of denitrifying bacteria. II. Continuous cultures in packed bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyk, M

    1983-01-01

    The effect of different organic compounds, nitrites and nitrates at the concentration of 1,000 mg N/l on the quantitative and strain-specific selection of denitrifying bacteria was determined in anaerobic packed bed reactors. Both the source of carbon and nitrogen form influenced strain specificity and the frequency of occurrence of denitrifying bacteria. The frequency of denitrifying bacteria within packed bed reactor ranged in different media from 11% (glucose and nitrates) to 100% (methanol and ethanol with nitrates). A single species selection was observed in the presence of nitrites within packed bed reactor: Pseudomonas aeruginosa in medium with acetate. Pseudomonas stutzeri in medium with ethanol, Pseudomonas mendocina in medium with methanol and Pseudomonas fluorescens in medium with glucose. When nitrates were present in packed bed reactor, the dominating bacteria were: P. stutzeri in medium with acetate, P. fluorescens in medium with ethanol, Paracoccus denitrificans in medium with methanol and Alcaligenes faecalis in medium with glucose. PMID:6194668

  4. Comparison of Spheroidal Carbonaceous Particle Data with Modelled Atmospheric Black Carbon Concentration and Deposition and Air Mass Sources in Northern Europe, 1850–2010

    OpenAIRE

    Meri Ruppel; Lund, Marianne T.; Henrik Grythe; Rose, Neil L.; Jan Weckström; Atte Korhola

    2013-01-01

    Spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCP) are a well-defined fraction of black carbon (BC), produced only by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil. Their past concentrations have been studied using environmental archives, but, additionally, historical trends of BC concentration and deposition can be estimated by modelling. These models are based on BC emission inventories, but actual measurements of BC concentration and deposition play an essential role in their evaluat...

  5. Long-Term Observations on Aerosol Elemental Carbon and Mass Concentrations in Winter-Time in New Delhi: Implications for Local Source Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, S. G.; Singh, K.; Singh, N.; Gupta, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    Fossil-fuel and bio-fuel burning are the two major sources identified for high carbonaceous aerosol loadings in several mega cities in India. In the last decade, according to a report from the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB, 1999), the vehicular emission (mostly diesel-powered engines) was contributed to ~67% of the total air pollution load in New Delhi. Therefore, a policy decision was taken by the government, and most of the diesel-powered engines were converted to compressed natural gas (CNG) -powered engines by 2003. To better understand the effect of these changes on air quality, we collected high volume aerosol samples (total suspended particles, TSP) mostly for a day basis at our institute building in New Delhi almost everyday during winter season (November to January) from 2002 to 2008. We found very high mean aerosol loading, i.e., 488±47 μg m-3 in 2002 winter, which dropped significantly to 280±73 μg m-3 in 2003 winter. Thereafter, a steadily increased trend of aerosol mass loadings was observed, i.e., 339±112, 339±120, 412±107 and 444±55 μg m-3 in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007 winters, respectively. Similar trend was also observed for elemental carbon (EC) concentration in TSP, which was peaked in 2002 (47±11 μg m-3) and minimized in 2003 (32±6 μg m-3), and then gradually increased to 41±8 μg m-3 in 2007 winter. These decline trends of aerosol mass and EC concentrations in 2003 can be explained well, because of the conversion of diesel engine to CNG engines of public transport facilities. However, again increase in aerosol mass and EC concentrations possibly because of a high increase in road traffic in recent years. According to the economic survey of New Delhi 2008-09, the number of vehicles (which includes all types of engines, i.e., petrol, diesel and CNG) has grown from ~3.3 millions in 1997-98 to ~5.6 millions in 2007-08. The influence of engine types and vehicle population on aerosol loading can also be explained well by SO2 and

  6. Achieving low effluent NO3-N and TN concentrations in low influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) to total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) ratio without using external carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiashun; Oleyiblo, Oloche James; Xue, Zhaoxia; Otache, Y. Martins; Feng, Qian

    2015-07-01

    Two mathematical models were used to optimize the performance of a full-scale biological nutrient removal (BNR) activated treatment plant, a plug-flow bioreactors operated in a 3-stage phoredox process configuration, anaerobic anoxic oxic (A2/O). The ASM2d implemented on the platform of WEST2011 software and the BioWin activated sludge/anaerobic digestion (AS/AD) models were used in this study with the aim of consistently achieving the designed effluent criteria at a low operational cost. Four ASM2d parameters (the reduction factor for denitrification , the maximum growth rate of heterotrophs (µH), the rate constant for stored polyphosphates in PAOs ( q pp), and the hydrolysis rate constant ( k h)) were adjusted. Whereas three BioWin parameters (aerobic decay rate ( b H), heterotrophic dissolved oxygen (DO) half saturation ( K OA), and Y P/acetic) were adjusted. Calibration of the two models was successful; both models have average relative deviations (ARD) less than 10% for all the output variables. Low effluent concentrations of nitrate nitrogen (N-NO3), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) were achieved in a full-scale BNR treatment plant having low influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) to total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) ratio (COD/TKN). The effluent total nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen concentrations were improved by 50% and energy consumption was reduced by approximately 25%, which was accomplished by converting the two-pass aerobic compartment of the plug-flow bioreactor to anoxic reactors and being operated in an alternating mode. Findings in this work are helpful in improving the operation of wastewater treatment plant while eliminating the cost of external carbon source and reducing energy consumption.

  7. Revealing source signatures in ambient BTEX concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management of ambient concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) is essential for maintaining low ozone levels in urban areas where its formation is under a VOC-limited regime. The significant decrease in traffic-induced VOC emissions in many developed countries resulted in relatively comparable shares of traffic and non-traffic VOC emissions in urban airsheds. A key step for urban air quality management is allocating ambient VOC concentrations to their pertinent sources. This study presents an approach that can aid in identifying sources that contribute to observed BTEX concentrations in areas characterized by low BTEX concentrations, where traditional source apportionment techniques are not useful. Analysis of seasonal and diurnal variations of ambient BTEX concentrations from two monitoring stations located in distinct areas reveal the possibility to identify source categories. Specifically, the varying oxidation rates of airborne BTEX compounds are used to allocate contributions of traffic emissions and evaporative sources to observed BTEX concentrations. - BTEX sources are identified from temporal variations of ambient concentration

  8. Bioethanol from different Finnish agricultural carbon sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautola, H.; Kymaelaeinen, M.; Tokeensuu, L.; Alatalo, T. (HAMK University of Applied Sciences, Degree Programme in Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Haemeenlinna (Finland)); Caerdenas, R. (Universidad Central del Ecuador, Facultad Ciencias Quimicas, Escuela de Quimica, Av. America. Ciudadela Universitaria, Quito (Ecuador)); Siukola, K.; Naesi, J. (Suomen Biojalostus Oy, Renko (Finland))

    2007-07-01

    Bioethanol in fuel and its domestic production has become a great issue in Finland during the last few years. There has been discussion about what kind of raw materials should be used and are there any local priorities. In the years 2004-2007 local farmers in Haem e , in southern part of Finland, started to find alternative use for sugar beet due to drastic reduction of domestic sugar production in the near future. This was also the start of the experimental studies on bi oethanol production. The aim of the study was to find out how the change of carbon source will effect on bi oethanol yield. The bioethanol production was studied in laboratory scale using carbon sources of saccharose, glucose, sugar beet juice, sugar beet mash and barley hydrolysates pretreated with amylases, (beta-glucanase and xylanase). The yeast used was Saccharomyces sp. The pre experiments were performed in 250 mL flasks to optimize carbon, nitrogen and salts contents in production medium, also comparing different carbon sources and mixtures. The production was then studied in a 30 liter fermenter running for 36 hours. The preliminary studies showed that barley hydrolysate gave the best result 2,4% in bioethanol concentration during the performed fermentations, and saccharose was the best substrate in shake flask fermentations with a 9,6% bioethanol concentration. (orig.)

  9. Source attribution of black carbon in Arctic snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegg, Dean A; Warren, Stephen G; Grenfell, Thomas C; Doherty, Sarah J; Larson, Timothy V; Clarke, Antony D

    2009-06-01

    Snow samples obtained at 36 sites in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Russia, and the Arctic Ocean in early 2007 were analyzed for light-absorbing aerosol concentration together with a suite of associated chemical species. The light absorption data, interpreted as black carbon concentrations, and other chemical data were input into the EPA PMF 1.1 receptor model to explore the sources for black carbon in the snow. The analysis found four factors or sources: two distinct biomass burning sources, a pollution source, and a marine source. The first three of these were responsible for essentially all of the black carbon, with the two biomass sources (encompassing both open and closed combustion) together accounting for >90% of the black carbon. PMID:19569324

  10. Radiation tolerance of Si{sub 1−y}C{sub y} source/drain n-type metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors with different carbon concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Toshiyuki, E-mail: nakashima_t@cdk.co.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Agriculture and Engineering, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen Kibanadai-nishi, Miyazaki (Japan); Chuo Denshi Kogyo Co., Ltd., 3400 Kohoyama, Matsubase, Uki, Kumamoto (Japan); Asai, Yuki; Hori, Masato; Yoneoka, Masashi; Tsunoda, Isao; Takakura, Kenichiro [Kumamoto National College of Technology, 2659-2 Suya, Koshi, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan); Gonzalez, Mireia Bargallo [Institut de Microelectronica de Barcelona (Centre Nacional de Microelectronica — Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas) Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Simoen, Eddy [imec, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Claeys, Cor [imec, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Yoshino, Kenji [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Agriculture and Engineering, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen Kibanadai-nishi, Miyazaki (Japan)

    2014-04-30

    The 2-MeV electron radiation damage of silicon–carbon source/drain (S/D) n-type metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors with different carbon (C) concentrations is studied. Before irradiation, an enhancement of the electron mobility with C concentration of the S/D stressors is clearly observed. On the other hand, after electron irradiation, both the threshold voltage shift and the maximum electron mobility degradation are independent on the C concentration for all electron fluences studied. These results indicate that the strain induced electron mobility enhancement due to the C doping is retained after irradiation in the studied devices. - Highlights: • We have investigated the electron irradiation effect of the Si{sub 1−y}C{sub y} S/D n-MOSFETs. • The threshold voltage variations by irradiation are independent on the C doping. • The electron-mobility decreased for all C concentrations by electron irradiation. • The strain induced mobility enhancement effect is retained after irradiation.

  11. Mesoscale inversion of carbon sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inverse methods at large scales are used to infer the spatial variability of carbon sources and sinks over the continents but their uncertainties remain large. Atmospheric concentrations integrate the surface flux variability but atmospheric transport models at low resolution are not able to simulate properly the local atmospheric dynamics at the measurement sites. However, the inverse estimates are more representative of the large spatial heterogeneity of the ecosystems compared to direct flux measurements. Top-down and bottom-up methods that aim at quantifying the carbon exchanges between the surface and the atmosphere correspond to different scales and are not easily comparable. During this phD, a mesoscale inverse system was developed to correct carbon fluxes at 8 km resolution. The high resolution transport model MesoNH was used to simulate accurately the variability of the atmospheric concentrations, which allowed us to reduce the uncertainty of the retrieved fluxes. All the measurements used here were observed during the intensive regional campaign CERES of May and June 2005, during which several instrumented towers measured CO2 concentrations and fluxes in the South West of France. Airborne measurements allowed us to observe concentrations at high altitude but also CO2 surface fluxes over large parts of the domain. First, the capacity of the inverse system to correct the CO2 fluxes was estimated using pseudo-data experiments. The largest fraction of the concentration variability was attributed to regional surface fluxes over an area of about 300 km around the site locations depending on the meteorological conditions. Second, an ensemble of simulations allowed us to define the spatial and temporal structures of the transport errors. Finally, the inverse fluxes at 8 km resolution were compared to direct flux measurements. The inverse system has been validated in space and time and showed an improvement of the first guess fluxes from a vegetation model

  12. Intracerebral source generators characterizing concentrative meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallee, Christina F; Hunter, Mathew D; Persinger, Michael A

    2011-05-01

    Previous researchers have studied meditation practices as a means to understand consciousness as well as altered states of consciousness. Various meditation techniques, such as Transcendental Meditation (TM) and Qigong, have been explored with source localization tools; however, the concentrative meditation technique has yet to be fully studied in this manner. The current study demonstrates findings, which outline differential activation in a self-referential default network during meditation in participants who espouse themselves as regular concentrative meditation practitioners, as well as comparisons with a control group practicing a modified version of the relaxation response. The results are compared with other putative experimental findings employing other meditation techniques, and the findings outlined in the current study are discussed with respect to changes in perceptual awareness often reported by meditators. PMID:21350845

  13. High Black Carbon (BC) Concentrations along Indian National Highways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract:Black carbon (BC), the optically absorbing component of carbonaceous aerosol, has direct influence on radiation budget and global warming. Vehicular pollution is one of the main sources for poor air quality and also atmospheric pollution. The number of diesel vehicles has increased on the Indian National Highways during day and night; these vehicles are used for the transport of goods from one city to another city and also used for public transport. A smoke plume from the vehicles is a common feature on the highways. We have made measurements of BC mass concentrations along the Indian National Highways using a potable Aethalometer installed in a moving car. We have carried out measurements along Varanasi to Kanpur (NH-2), Varanasi to Durgapur (NH-2), Varanasi to Singrauli (SH-5A) and Varanasi to Ghazipur (NH-29). We have found high concentration of BC along highways, the average BC mass concentrations vary in the range 20 - 40 µg/m3 and found high BC mass concentrations up to 600 μg/m3. Along the highways high BC concentrations were characteristics of the presence of industrial area, power plants, brick kilns and slow or standing vehicles. The effect of increasing BC concentrations along the National Highways and its impact on the vegetation and human health will be presented. Key Words: Black Carbon; Aethalometer; mass concentration; Indian National Highways.

  14. Influence of pH, hardness, dissolved organic carbon concentration, and dissolved organic matter source on the acute toxicity of copper to Daphnia magna in soft waters: implications for the biotic ligand model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Adam C; Tomasso, Joseph R; Klaine, Stephen J

    2009-08-01

    The influence of pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, water hardness, and dissolved organic matter (DOM) source on the acute toxicity of copper were investigated with standardized 48-h Daphnia magna toxicity tests. Toxicity tests were conducted according to a four-factor complete factorial design. Nominal factor levels were as follows: pH 6 and 8; DOC, 2.5 and 10 mg/L; hardness, 10, 20, and 40 mg/L as CaCO3; and two DOM sources (collected from the Black River and Edisto River, SC, USA). The experimental design resulted in 24 different factor level combinations. Results indicated that all factors had significant effects on copper toxicity. Furthermore, a strong interactive effect of DOC concentration and pH was detected. Because the biotic ligand model (BLM) has become a widely used tool for predicting toxicity and interpreting toxicity test results, its performance with these data was evaluated. Seventy percent of BLM predictions were within twofold of the observed median lethal concentrations. However, BLM parameters could be adjusted to improve model performance with this data set. This analysis suggested that in soft waters, the CuOH+ complex binds more strongly with the biotic ligand and that the competitive effect of hardness cations should be increased. The results of the present study may have implications for application of the BLM to some types of surface waters. Furthermore, a comprehensive analysis of BLM performance with all available data should be performed, and necessary updates to model parameters should be made to produce the most robust and widely applicable model. PMID:19265455

  15. Hydrologic significance of carbon monoxide concentrations in ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Dissolved carbon monoxide (CO) is present in ground water produced from a variety of aquifer systems at concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 20 nanomoles per liter (0.0056 to 0.56 ??g/L). In two shallow aquifers, one an unconsolidated coastal plain aquifer in Kings Bay, Georgia, and the other a fractured-bedrock aquifer in West Trenton, New Jersey, long-term monitoring showed that CO concentrations varied over time by as much as a factor of 10. Field and laboratory evidence suggests that the delivery of dissolved oxygen to the soil zone and underlying aquifers by periodic recharge events stimulates oxic metabolism and produces transiently high CO concentrations. In between recharge events, the aquifers become anoxic and more substrate limited, CO is consumed as a carbon source, and CO concentrations decrease. According to this model, CO concentrations provide a transient record of oxic metabolism affecting ground water systems after dissolved oxygen has been fully consumed. Because the delivery of oxygen affects the fate and transport of natural and anthropogenic contaminants in ground water, CO concentration changes may be useful for identifying predominantly anoxic ground water systems subject to periodic oxic or microaerophilic conditions. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  16. Effect of carbon dioxide concentration on the bioleaching of a pyrite-arsenopyrite ore concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal, S.; Dahlstrom, D. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)); Oolman, T. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States))

    1993-02-20

    The effect of carbon dioxide concentration on the bacterial leaching of a pyrite-arsenopyrite ore concentrate was studied in continuous-flow reactors. Steady-state operation with two feed slurry densities, 6 wt% and 16wt% solids, were tested for the effect of carbon dioxide concentration. Bacterial growth rates were estimated via the measurement of carbon dioxide consumption rates. Aqueous-phase carbon dioxide concentrations in excess of 10 mg/L were found to be inhibitory to bacterial growth.

  17. Atmospheric black carbon and sulfate concentrations in Northeast Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Massling

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of Black Carbon (BC in aerosols at the high Arctic field site Villum Research Station (VRS at Station Nord in North Greenland showed a seasonal variation in BC concentrations with a maximum in winter and spring at ground level. The data was obtained using a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP. A similar seasonal pattern was found for sulfate concentrations with a maximum level during winter and spring analyzed by ion chromatography. A correlation between BC and sulfate concentrations was observed over the years 2011 to 2013. This finding gives the hint that most likely transport of primary emitted BC particles to the Arctic was accompanied by aging of the aerosols through condensational processes. This process may have led to the formation of secondary inorganic matter and further transport of BC particles as cloud processing and further washout of particles is less likely based on the typically observed transport patterns of air masses arriving at VRS. Additionally, concentrations of EC (elemental carbon based on a thermo-optical method were determined and compared to BC measurements. Model estimates of the climate forcing due to BC in the Arctic are based on contributions of long-range transported BC during spring and summer. The measured concentrations were here compared with model results obtained by the Danish Hemispheric Model, DEHM. Good agreement between measured and modeled concentrations of both BC and sulfate was observed. The dominant source is found to be combustion of fossil fuel with biomass burning as a minor though significant source. During winter and spring the Arctic atmosphere is known to be impacted by long-range transport of BC and associated with the Arctic haze phenomenon.

  18. Changes in plasma potassium concentration during carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Bugge, K; Lyng, K M;

    1999-01-01

    to either carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum or abdominal wall lifting for laparoscopic colectomy. Despite an increasing metabolic acidosis, prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum resulted in only a slight increase in plasma potassium concentrations, which was both statistically and clinically...

  19. Carbon sources effect on pectinase production from Aspergillus japonicus 586

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira Maria F. S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different carbon sources on the pectinesterases, endo- and exo-polygalacturonase activities from Aspergillus japonicus 586 was evaluated in liquid media (Manachini solutions supplemented with different substrate concentrations. The culture medium was inoculated with 5.10(6 spores/ml and mantained under agitation (140 rpm, at 30°C, during 122 h. The enzyme evaluation was carried out 24 h after filtration. The crude extract from A. japonicus 586 indicated that the best enzymatic activities were afforded in the presence of 0.5% pectin (pectinesterease, 0.2% pectin and 0.2% glycerol (endopolygalacturonase, and 0.5% pectin associated to 0.5% glucose (exopolygalacturonase. Carbon sources concentration, isolated or associated, significantly affects the pectinesterase, and endo- and exopolygalacturonase activities. Pectin, glucose and saccharose, when added to the culture medium in high concentrations, exhibited a repression effect on all the analyzed enzymes.

  20. Origin of black carbon concentration peaks in Cairo (Egypt)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, K.F.; Wahab, M.M.A. [Cairo Univ, Fac Sci, Astron and Meteorol Dept, Giza (Egypt); Alfaro, S.C. [Univ Paris 12, LISA, F-94010 Creteil, (France); Alfaro, S.C. [Univ Paris 07, CNRS, F-94010 Creteil (France); Favez, O.; Sciare, J. [CEA Saclay, DSM, LSCE IPSL, Lab mixte CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    The concentration in black carbon (BC) has been monitored in the mega-city of Cairo (Egypt) during the autumn 2004 and spring 2005 intensive observation periods of the Cairo Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CACHE). As expected for a species released by human activities, hourly mean of this concentration is found to be large at all times. It is also significantly larger in autumn than in spring (9.9 {+-} 6.6 and 6.9 {+-} 4.8 {mu}gC/m{sup 3}, respectively) and quite variable at shorter (diurnal) time scales. Indeed, sharp concentration peaks larger than 25 {mu}gC/m{sup 3} are frequently detected during both observation periods. In order to apportion the roles played by emission intensity and meteorological conditions in the development of these peaks, a simple model is developed that allows derivation of the hourly mean BC emissions by the part of town located upwind of the measurement site. The analysis of the time dependence of these emissions indicates that traffic is by far the major source of BC in Cairo during daytime and this even in autumn when biomass burning takes place in the Nile delta. It is only between 03:00 and 05:00 in the night, at a time when traffic emissions are quite reduced, that the influence of this particular source on BC concentration can become significant. This study also indicates that BC emissions by motorized traffic remain important from the morning rush hour until late in the night. During the day, and particularly in spring, the dilution effect resulting from the development of the planetary boundary layer prevents BC concentrations from becoming very large. This is no longer the case just before sunrise and after sunset, when the combination of dense traffic and low boundary layer is responsible for the observed sharp increase in BC concentration. (authors)

  1. Variability in Carbon Monoxide Concentration in Kaduna Metropolis, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Ariko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study compared Carbon Monoxide concentrations in Urban core and Control station in Kaduna Metropolis, Nigeria. USB-CO data loggers were used for data acquisition for a period of one month. 1hour mean of Carbon Monoxide concentrations for Urban core and Control station were subjected to student “t” test to determine any significant difference in Carbon Monoxide concentration between the two sampled sites. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA test was employed to test the temporal variability in Carbon Monoxide concentrations in the Urban core. The “t” test results showed a significant difference in Carbon Monoxide concentrations, between the Urban core and the Control station. The ANOVA results showed that there is a significant difference in Carbon Monoxide concentrations level between different times of the day. The 1 h mean WHO recommendation for Carbon Monoxide concentration was occasionally exceeded, while the 8 h mean was daily exceeded in the evening periods in Urban core. In the Control station, there was no time both 1 h and 8 h means WHO recommendation were exceeded. These imply that the Rural environment is relatively more livable than the Urban environment in Kaduna metropolis in terms of Carbon Monoxide concentration levels.

  2. 青藏高原冰川区可溶性有机碳含量和来源研究%Concentration and Source of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Snowpits of the Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严芳萍; 康世昌; 陈鹏飞; 柏建坤; 李洋; 胡召富; 李潮流

    2015-01-01

    Snowpit samples of three glaciers ( Laohugou NO. 12 Glacier ( LHG), Small Dongkemadi Glacier on Mount Tanggula (TGL) and East Rongbuk Glacier on Mount Everest (ZF)) in the Tibetan Plateau were collected. Concentrations of DOC and major ions were analyzed. The results showed that average DOC concentrations of the snowpits of LHG, TGL and ZF were (250. 30 ± 157. 10), (216. 92 ± 142. 82) and (152. 50 ± 56. 11) μg·L - 1 , respectively. DOC of TGL and ZF accounted for large parts of total values of DOC and ions. Correspondingly, DOC of LHG accounted for small part (only 5% ), because LHG was located at north China and intensively influenced by natural mineral dust, which caused high concentrations of Ca2 + (the highest value could reach 5 299. 18μg·L - 1 ) and consequently low percentage of DOC of snowpit samples. Correlation and PCA analyses were used to study the sources of DOC. DOC was significantly correlated with Ca2 + , Mg2 + , K + and SO2 -4 . Additionally, PCA further indicated that the main potential source of DOC was the natural source of mineral dust. Meanwhile, anthropogenic pollutants ( e. g. biomass, fossil combustion and agricultural related pollutants) could also not be ignored. Moreover, the carbon depositional fluxes of three snowpits were roughly estimated, and the values of LHG, TGL and ZF snowpits were 189. 23, 132. 76 and 128. 44 mg·(m2·a) - 1 , respectively, which played a significant role in the carbon cycle in this region and was also helpful for the study of glaciers fluctuation.%对青藏高原祁连山老虎沟12号冰川、唐古拉山小冬克玛底冰川及珠穆朗玛峰北坡东绒布冰川雪坑样品中可溶性有机碳(DOC)和主要离子的质量浓度进行了分析.结果表明3个雪坑中 DOC 的平均质量浓度分别为(250.30±157.10)、(216.92±142.82)和(152.50±56.11)μg·L -1,具有从北到南依次减小的空间分布特点.3个雪坑 DOC 和主要离子质量浓度比例分析表明,唐古拉山冰川区和

  3. Concentration of carbon-14 in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon-14 survey program initiated 1960 to gather data on current levels of carbon-14 in environments. Plants essential oil and fermented alcohol were selected as sample materials. The carbon contained in these materials is fixed from atmospheric carbon dioxide by anabolism, so they well reflect the variation of carbon-14 in biosphere. Thymol; Thymol was obtained from the essential oil of Orthodon Japonicium Benth which was cultivated and harvested every year in the experimental field of NIRS and Chiba University. The methylation was carried out to eliminate the strong quenching action of the phenolic group of thymol. Eighteen grams of thymol methyl ether was used as liquid scintillator by adding 0.4% PPO and 0.01% POPOP. Menthol; Menthol was obtained from Mentha arvensis L which was cultivated in the east part of Hokkaido and prepared by Kitami Factory of Federation of Agricultural Cooperative Society of Hokkaido. The chemical conversion of menthol to p-cymene was carried out and used as liquid scintillator as same as above sample. Lemongrass oil; Lemongrass oil was obtained from Cymbopogon citratus Stapf which was cultivated in Izu Experimental Station of Medicinal Plants, National Institute of Hygienic Science located Minami-Izu, Shizuoka Pref. The p-cymene derived from Lemongrass oil was used as liquid scintillator. Alcohol; All sample of fermented alcohol were obtained from the Alcohol Factories of Ministry of Trade and Industry. Raw materials of alcohol were sweet potatos cultivated in several prefectures in Japan ''high test'' molasses and blackstrap molasses imported from several countries of Asia, South America and South Africa, crude alcohol imported from U.S.A., Argentina and Brazil. Mixed solvent of 10 ml sample alcohol and 10 ml toluene or p-xylene containing 0.8% PPO and 0.1% dimethyl POPOP was used as liquid scintillator. (author)

  4. Changes in plasma potassium concentration during carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Bugge, K; Lyng, K M;

    1999-01-01

    Hyperkalaemia with ECG changes had been noted during prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum in pigs. We have compared plasma potassium concentrations during surgery in 11 patients allocated randomly to undergo either laparoscopic or open appendectomy and in another 17 patients allocated randomly...... to either carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum or abdominal wall lifting for laparoscopic colectomy. Despite an increasing metabolic acidosis, prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum resulted in only a slight increase in plasma potassium concentrations, which was both statistically and clinically...... insignificant. Thus hyperkalaemia is unlikely to develop in patients with normal renal function undergoing carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic surgery....

  5. Classroom Carbon Dioxide Concentration, School Attendance, and Educational Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaihre, Santosh; Semple, Sean; Miller, Janice; Fielding, Shona; Turner, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Background: We tested the hypothesis that classroom carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) concentration is inversely related to child school attendance and educational attainment. Methods: Concentrations of CO[subscript 2] were measured over a 3-5?day period in 60 naturally ventilated classrooms of primary school children in Scotland. Concentrations of…

  6. Diagnostics of 222Rn concentrations in dwellings: characterisation of sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon concentrations in the compartments of a dwelling are a result of radon source strengths, which may be pressure driven or diffusive and of air flows transporting radon from one compartment to another. On this basis a diagnostic method was developed for finding the contributions of different air flows and sources to the radon concentration in a dwelling. Source strengths may be computed from observed concentrations and air flows. Diffusive source strengths may be measured using an exhalation meter. Measurements in a test dwelling show that the pressure driven radon source strength in the crawl space is far more important than the diffusive source strength. However, this source strength shows large variations over a period of one month. Implications for the diagnostic method and measuring strategies are discussed. (Author)

  7. [Differences and sources of CO2 concentration, carbon and oxygen stable isotope composition between inside and outside of a green space system and influencing factors in an urban area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shou-jia; Meng, Ping; Zhang, Jin-song; Shu, Jian-hua; Zheng, Ning

    2015-10-01

    The off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy technique was used to measure air CO2 concentration, stable carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18C) isotope ratios on the Fourth Ring Road (FRR) and in the green space system of Beijing Institute of Landscape Architecture (BILA) in summer and winter seasons. The variations of CO2 concentration, δ13C value, δ18C value and the differences of them between the FRR and the BILA, which were correlated with traffic volume and meteorological factors, were analyzed at half-hour timescale. The results showed that traffic volume on the FRR was large both in summer and winter with obvious morning and evening rush hours, and more than 150 thousands vehicles were observed everyday during the observation periods. Diurnal variation of the CO2 concentration showed a two-peak curve both on the FRR and in the green space system of the BILA. In contrast, diurnal variation of δ13C value was a two-trough curve while diurnal variation of δ18O value was a single-trough curve. The differences of CO2 concentration, δ13C value and δ18O value between the FRR and the green space system of BILA in summer were greater than those in winter. The carbon isotope partitioning results showed that in summer vehicle exhaust contributed 64.9% to total atmospheric CO2 of the FRR during measurement time, while heterotrophic respiration contributed 56.3% to total atmospheric CO2 of the green space system in BILA. However, in winter atmospheric CO2 from both the FRR and green space system mostly came from vehicle exhaust. Stepwise regression analysis indicated that differences of CO2 concentration between the FRR and green space system were significantly related to vehicle volume and solar radiation at half-hour timescale, while solar radiation and relative humidity were the main meteorological factors causing δ13 and δ18O differences between the FRR and green space system. Plants in the green space system strongly assimilated CO2 from fossil fuel burning

  8. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact campaign was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in Barrow, Alaska. The carbonaceous component was characterized by measuring the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the PM, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine PM fractions (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) PM fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) study used standard Tisch “hi-vol” motors that have a known lifetime of approximately 1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance, and it is suggested that, for future deployment in the Arctic, the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric PM samples from Barrow, Alaska, from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the OC and BC concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer. However, the annual OC concentrations had a very different seasonal pattern with the highest concentrations during the summer, lowest concentrations during the fall, and increased concentrations during the winter and spring (Figure 1).

  9. Source apportionment of PM10 mass and particulate carbon in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Mann; Park, Jin-Soo; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kim, Hyunjae; Jeon, Haeun; Cho, Chaeyoon; Kim, Ji-Hyoung; Hong, Seungkyu; Rupakheti, Maheswar; Panday, Arnico K.; Park, Rokjin J.; Hong, Jihyung; Yoon, Soon-Chang

    2015-12-01

    The Kathmandu Valley in Nepal is a bowl-shaped urban basin in the Himalayan foothills with a serious problem of fine particulate air pollution that impacts local health and impairs visibility. Particulate carbon concentrations have reached severe levels that threaten the health of 3.5 million local residents. Moreover, snow and ice on the Himalayan mountains are melting as a result of additional warming due to particulate carbon, especially high black carbon concentrations. To date, the sources of the Valley's particulate carbon and the impacts of different sources on particulate carbon concentrations are not well understood. Thus, before an effective control strategy can be developed, these particulate carbon sources must be identified and quantified. Our study has found that the four primary sources of particulate carbon in the Kathmandu Valley during winter are brick kilns, motor vehicles, fugitive soil dust, and biomass/garbage burning. Their source contributions are quantified using a recently developed new multivariate receptor model SMP. In contrast to other highly polluted areas such as China, secondary contribution is almost negligible in Kathmandu Valley. Brick kilns (40%), motor vehicles (37%) and biomass/garbage burning (22%) have been identified as the major sources of elemental carbon (black carbon) in the Kathmandu Valley during winter, while motor vehicles (47%), biomass/garbage burning (32%), and soil dust (13%) have been identified as the most important sources of organic carbon. Our research indicates that controlling emissions from motor vehicles, brick kilns, biomass/garbage burning, and soil dust is essential for the mitigation of the particulate carbon that threatens public health, impairs visibility, and influences climate warming within and downwind from the Kathmandu Valley. In addition, this paper suggests several useful particulate carbon mitigation methods that can be applied to Kathmandu Valley and other areas in South Asia with

  10. Carbon dioxide concentrations are very high in developing oilseeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Fernando D; Ruckle, Mike; Ohlrogge, John; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2004-09-01

    A new method has been developed to rapidly determine the total inorganic carbon concentration (gaseous [CO2] + aqueous [CO(2)] + [HCO3-] + [CO3(2)-]) in developing seeds. Seeds are rapidly dissected and homogenized in 1 N HCl in gas-tight vials. The headspace gas is then analyzed by infrared gas analysis. Developing rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] seeds were analyzed and found to have up to 40 and 12 mM total inorganic carbon, respectively. These concentrations are ca. 600-2000-fold higher than in ambient air or values reported for leaves. Carbon dioxide concentrations in rapeseed peaked during the stage of maximum oil synthesis and declined as seeds matured. The consequences for seed metabolism, physiology and carbon economy are discussed. PMID:15474375

  11. MEDIA OPTIMIZATION FOR BIOPROTEINS PRODUCTION FROM CHEAPER CARBON SOURCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. JAMAL

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available There are high demands for animal and human food supply especially protein, which is an important dietary component. Agricultural wastes, cheap carbon sources- which are rich and have high energy, can be used for producing the value added bioprotein. A lab scale study was carried out to optimize the media composition for bioprotein production from a cheaper carbon source - wheat flour using potential strain, which was selected earlier by screening different microorganisms. The performance of the selected strain was enhanced by media optimization with varied substrate concentration, nitrogen sources and nutrient supplementation according to the central composite design from STATISTICA software. Statistical optimization was carried out to evaluate the polynomial regression model through effect of linear, quadratic and interaction of the factors. The maximum biomass produced was 21.89 g/L with optimum fermentation conditions of wheat flour (4 g/L, nitrogen concentration (0.5 g/L, nutrient concentration (0.1 g/L, and four days of fermentation.

  12. Influence of the carbon dioxide concentration on the resistance to carbonation of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonation of concrete at ambient CO2 concentration is a slow process. This makes the testing of the resistance of concrete against carbonation often too slow to be applicable for service life assessments of new structures. Raising the CO2-concentration will accelerate the test but the validity of

  13. Double-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized using carbon black as the dot carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Gang; Li, Feng; Ren, Wen-Cai; Cong, Hongtao; Liu, Chang; Qing Lu, Gao; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2006-07-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) were synthesized used carbon black as the dot carbon source by a semi-continuous hydrogen arc discharge process. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations revealed that most of the tubes were DWNTs with outer and inner diameters in the range of 2.67-4 nm and 1.96-3.21 nm, respectively. Most of the DWNTs were in a bundle form of about 10-30 nm in diameter with high purity (about 70%) from thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), resonant laser Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and TEM characterizations. It was found that carbon black as the dot carbon source could be easy controlled to synthesize one type of nanotube. A simple process combining oxidation and acid treatment to purify the DWNT bundles was used without damaging the bundles. The structure of carbon black, as the key element for influencing purity, bundle formation and purification of DWNTs, is discussed.

  14. Influence of carbon source on alpha-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Morten; Nielsen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The influence of the carbon source on a-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae was quantified in carbon-limited chemostat cultures. The following carbon sources were investigated: maltose, maltodextrin (different chain lengths), glucose, fructose, galactose, sucrose, glycerol, mannitol and...... acetate. A. oryzae did not grow on galactose as the sole carbon source, but galactose was co-metabolized together with glucose. Relative to that on low glucose concentration (below 10 mg/l), productivity was found to be higher during growth on maltose and maltodextrins, whereas it was lower during growth...

  15. Effect of carbon source on the denitrification in constructed wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Songliu; HU Hongying; SUN Yingxue; YANG Jia

    2009-01-01

    The constructed wetlands with different plants in removal of nitrate were investigated.The factors promoting the rates of denitrification including organic carbon, nitrate load, plants in wetlands, pH and water temperature in field were systematically investigated.The results showed that the additional carbon source (glucose) can remarkably improve the nitrate removal ability of the constructed wetland.It demonstrated that the nitrate removal rate can increase from 20% to more than 50% in the summer and from 10% to 30% in the winter, when the nitrate concentration was 30-40 mg/L, the retention time was 24 h and 25 mg/L dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was ploughed into the constructed wetland.However, the nitrite in the constructed wetland accumulated a litter with the supply of the additional carbon source in summer and winter, and it increased from 0.15 to 2 mg/L in the effluent.It was also found that the abilities of plant in adjusting pH and temperature can result in an increase of denitrification in wetlands, and the seasonal change may impact the denitrification.

  16. Improved Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymers at High Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Chao-Xuan Liu; Jin-Woo Choi

    2012-01-01

    The polymer nanocomposite used in this work comprises elastomer poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as a polymer matrix and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a conductive nanofiller. To achieve uniform distribution of carbon nanotubes within the polymer, an optimized dispersion process was developed, featuring a strong organic solvent—chloroform, which dissolved PDMS base polymer easily and allowed high quality dispersion of MWCNTs. At concentrations as high as 9 wt.%, MWCNTs were...

  17. Treatment of hydroponic wastewater by denitrification filters using plant prunings as the organic carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Sukias, J P S

    2008-05-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using pre-treated plant liquors as organic carbon sources for the treatment of hydroponic wastewater containing high nitrate-N (>300 mg N/L). The waste plant material was pre-treated to extract organic carbon-rich liquors. When this plant liquor was used as an organic carbon source in denitrification filters at the organic carbon:nitrogen dose rate of 3C:N, nitrate removal efficiencies were >95% and final effluent nitrate concentrations were consistently 140 mg/L) of organic carbon (fBOD5) remained in the final effluents. Therefore, a 'compromise' organic carbon:nitrogen dose rate (2C:N) was trialled, at which nitrate removal efficiencies were maintained at >85%, final effluent nitrate concentrations were consistently below 45 mg N/L, and effluent fBOD5 concentrations were hydroponic wastewater in a denitrification filter. PMID:17714940

  18. Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamalidis, Athanasios K; Torres, Sharon G; Hakala, J Alexandra; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J; Carroll, Susan

    2012-02-05

    Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising, however, possible CO₂ or CO₂-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define trace metal source terms from the reaction of supercritical CO₂, storage reservoir brines, reservoir and cap rocks. Storage reservoir source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, basalts and cements from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin – Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution is tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g. pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments due to the presence of CO₂. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rock exceed the MCLs by an order of magnitude while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the reservoir and caprock source term to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

  19. Stable carbon isotope analysis of nucleic acids to trace sources of dissolved substrates used by estuarine bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Coffin, R B; Velinsky, D J; R. Devereux; Price, W A; Cifuentes, L A

    1990-01-01

    The natural abundance of stable carbon isotopes measured in bacterial nucleic acids extracted from estuarine bacterial concentrates was used to trace sources of organic matter for bacteria in aquatic environments. The stable carbon isotope ratios of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and nucleic acids extracted from cultures resembled those of the carbon source on which bacteria were grown. The carbon isotope discrimination between the substrate and total cell carbon from bacterial cultures averaged 2.3%...

  20. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) Study was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in Barrow, AK. The carbonaceous component was characterized via measurement of the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the particulate matter, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) particulate matter fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the BBCSI used standard Tisch hi-vol motors which have a known lifetime of ~1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance and it is suggested that the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers for future deployment in the Arctic. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric particulate matter samples from Barrow, AK from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the organic and black carbon concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer.

  1. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal with different carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Nan; Zhou, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is one of the most economical and sustainable methods for phosphorus removal from wastewater. However, the performance of EBPR can be affected by available carbon sources types in the wastewater that may induce different functional microbial communities in the process. Glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) and polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) are commonly found by coexisting in the EBPR process. Predominance of GAO population may lead to EBPR failure due to the competition on carbon source with PAO without contributing phosphorus removal. Carbon sources indeed play an important role in alteration of PAOs and GAOs in EBPR processes. Various types of carbon sources have been investigated for EBPR performance. Certain carbon sources tend to enrich specific groups of GAOs and/or PAOs. This review summarizes the types of carbon sources applied in EBPR systems and highlights the roles of these carbon sources in PAO and GAO competition. Both single (e.g., acetate, propionate, glucose, ethanol, and amino acid) and complex carbon sources (e.g., yeast extract, peptone, and mixed carbon sources) are discussed in this review. Meanwhile, the environmental friendly and economical carbon sources that are derived from waste materials, such as crude glycerol and wasted sludge, are also discussed and compared. PMID:27087523

  2. Study on Behavior of Carbon Reduction of Monazite Concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of monazite concentrate reduced by carbon, especially the decomposed procedure of rare earth phosphates, was investigated by X-ray diffraction , electron probe, TG method and chemical analysis. The results show that rare earth phosphates in monazite concentrate can be reduced to their oxides, among them the decomposition processes of cerium phosphate are not in step with lanthanum phosphate, neodymium phosphate and so on, and the phosphorus was volatilized into air in simple form.

  3. Present possibilities of protein concentrates production from plant sources

    OpenAIRE

    KRISTINOVÁ, Helena

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the bachelor thesis was gather information about present possibilities of proteins concentrates production from plant sources. I focused on dried pea (Pisum sativum L.), soybean (Glycine soja) and potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum L.). The protein concentrates from leguminous plants are produced by three basic processes, i.e. acid leasing (at ~pH 4.5), extracting with aqueous alcohol (60 - 90%), and denaturing the protein with moist heat before extraction with water. Pea protein is p...

  4. From an instantaneous point source to a continuous volume source. Calculation of pollutant concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusion of pollutants in gaseous or liquid media is investigated. At first, the molecular diffusion is studied using the continuous point source model. Pollutant concentration is determined by means of Green's function. Then follows the investigation of turbulent diffusion in a flowing medium. The K-theory is applied in order to calculate the pollutant concentrations for short-time or continuous point source, line source, large-area source, or volume source in a flow field of an anisotropic medium. The extensive differential equations and their analytical solutions are explained in detail. (KW)

  5. Size distributions, sources and source areas of water-soluble organic carbon in urban background air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Timonen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the results of one year long measurement period of the size distributions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC, inorganic ions and gravimetric mass of particulate matter. Measurements were done at an urban background station (SMEAR III by using a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI. The site is located in northern European boreal region in Helsinki, Finland. The WSOC size distribution measurements were completed with the chemical analysis of inorganic ions, organic carbon (OC and monosaccharide anhydrides from the filter samples (particle aerodynamic diameter smaller than 1 μm, PM1. Gravimetric mass concentration varied during the MOUDI samplings between 3.4 and 55.0 μg m−3 and the WSOC concentrations were between 0.3 and 7.4 μg m−3. On average, water-soluble particulate organic matter (WSPOM, WSOC multiplied by 1.6 to convert the analyzed carbon mass to organic matter mass comprised 25±7.7% and 7.5±3.4% of aerosol PM1 mass and the PM1–10 mass, respectively. Inorganic ions contributed 33±12% and 28±19% of the analyzed PM1 and PM1–10 aerosol mass.

    Five different aerosol categories corresponding to different sources or source areas were identified (long-range transport aerosols, biomass burning aerosols from wild land fires and from small-scale wood combustion, aerosols originating from marine areas and from the clean arctic areas. Categories were identified mainly using levoglucosan concentration level for wood combustion and air mass backward trajectories for other groups. Clear differences in WSOC concentrations and size distributions originating from different sources or source areas were observed, although there are also many other factors which might affect the results. E.g. the local conditions and sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs and aerosols as well as various transformation processes are likely

  6. Young organic matter as a source of carbon dioxide outgassing from Amazonian rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayorga, E; Aufdenkampe, A K; Masiello, C A; Krusche, A V; Hedges, J I; Quay, P D; Richey, J E; Brown, T A

    2005-06-23

    Rivers are generally supersaturated with respect to carbon dioxide, resulting in large gas evasion fluxes that can be a significant component of regional net carbon budgets. Amazonian rivers were recently shown to outgas more than ten times the amount of carbon exported to the ocean in the form of total organic carbon or dissolved inorganic carbon. High carbon dioxide concentrations in rivers originate largely from in situ respiration of organic carbon, but little agreement exists about the sources or turnover times of this carbon. Here we present results of an extensive survey of the carbon isotope composition ({sup 13}C and {sup 14}C) of dissolved inorganic carbon and three size-fractions of organic carbon across the Amazonian river system. We find that respiration of contemporary organic matter (less than 5 years old) originating on land and near rivers is the dominant source of excess carbon dioxide that drives outgassing in mid-size to large rivers, although we find that bulk organic carbon fractions transported by these rivers range from tens to thousands of years in age. We therefore suggest that a small, rapidly cycling pool of organic carbon is responsible for the large carbon fluxes from land to water to atmosphere in the humid tropics.

  7. Carbon sources and fates in the Gulf of Papua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goni, M. A.; Monacci, N. M.; Gisewhite, R. A.; Ogston, A.; Crockett, J.; Nittrouer, C.

    2006-12-01

    Seabed sediments were collected along the particle-dispersal system associated with the Fly River-Gulf of Papua continental margin as part of the source to sink program in Papua New Guinea. Box and kasten cores were collected from the subaqueous delta located adjacent to the mouth of the Fly River as well as from the topset, foreset and bottomset regions of the active clinoform in the northern region of the Gulf of Papua. Analyses of elemental (organic carbon, inorganic carbon, nitrogen), stable isotopic (d13C and d15N), radiocarbon (14C), and biomarker (CuO oxidation products) signatures reveal significant differences in the content and composition of sedimentary organic matter (OM) along the dispersal system. The major sources of OM to the system appear to be remains of vascular plants, soil OM from the drainage basin, and materials derived from autochthonous productivity. The geographical contrasts in the concentrations and accumulation fluxes of these distinct types of allochthonous and autochthonous OM are presented in the context of patterns of sediment transport and deposition within the region. An overall OM budget for the whole dispersal system will be presented and its implication for carbon sequestration in fluvial-dominated continental margins discussed.

  8. Concentration of lysozyme/single-walled carbon nanotube dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Daniel W; Davis, Virginia A

    2016-03-01

    The dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) in aqueous solutions of biological materials enables the production of bulk films and fibers that combine natural biological activity with SWNT's intrinsic mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. In this work, we report the rheology and phase behavior of concentrated lysozyme (LSZ)/SWNT dispersions. Even at low concentration, the LSZ's globular structure causes a deviation from the rheological behavior expected of rigid rods such as SWNT. With increasing concentration, stabilized SWNT typically form lyotropic liquid crystalline phases. However, in this case, the LSZ results in depletion attraction and the formation of large dense SWNT aggregates surrounded by a LSZ network. At intermediate concentrations, the microstructure and rheological properties are a complex function of the initial dispersion state, the absolute concentrations, and the LSZ to SWNT ratio. The rheological effects of concentrating mixtures comprised of aggregates, a range of bundle sizes, and individual SWNT were compared to the effects of concentrating supernatants comprised solely of individual SWNT and small bundles. In general, lysozyme concentration has the greatest impact on dispersion viscoelasticity. However, the inherent viscosity was a function of SWNT concentration; data from both initial mixtures and supernatants spanning two orders of magnitude in concentration could be collapsed onto a single master curve. This work provides a foundation for exploring the behavior of other globular protein-SWNT dispersions. PMID:26722820

  9. Improved Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymers at High Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Xuan Liu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymer nanocomposite used in this work comprises elastomer poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS as a polymer matrix and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs as a conductive nanofiller. To achieve uniform distribution of carbon nanotubes within the polymer, an optimized dispersion process was developed, featuring a strong organic solvent—chloroform, which dissolved PDMS base polymer easily and allowed high quality dispersion of MWCNTs. At concentrations as high as 9 wt.%, MWCNTs were dispersed uniformly through the polymer matrix, which presented a major improvement over prior techniques. The dispersion procedure was optimized via extended experimentation, which is discussed in detail.

  10. The anaesthesia of fish by high carbon-dioxide concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1942-01-01

    A practical and economical method for anaesthetizing adult salmon and steelhead trout in the fish trucks used in the Grand Coulee fish salvage program is described. The method consists in generating a predetermined carbon-dioxide concentration in the 1000-gallon tanks of the trucks through the successive addition of predissolved sodium bicarbonate and dilute sulphuric acid in proper quantities. Carbon-dioxide anaesthesia effectively solved the acute problem of species segregation in the fish salvage program and, with minor modifications, could be used with equal success in certain hatchery operations necessitating the handling of large fish.

  11. Influence of oxygen concentration, fuel composition, and strain rate on synthesis of carbon nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the influence of flame parameters including oxygen concentration, fuel composition, and strain rate on the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials in opposed-jet ethylene diffusion flames with or without rigid-body rotation. In the experiments, a mixture of ethylene and nitrogen was introduced from the upper burner; meanwhile, a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen was supplied from the lower burner. A nascent nickel mesh was used as the catalytic metal substrate to collect deposited materials. With non-rotating opposed-jet diffusion flames, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were successfully produced for oxygen concentrations in the range of 21–50 % at a fixed ethylene concentration of 20 %, and for ethylene concentrations ranging from 14 to 24 % at a constant oxygen concentration of 40 %. With rotating opposed-jet diffusion flames, the strain rate was varied by adjusting the angular velocities of the upper and lower burners. The strain rate governed by flow rotation greatly affects the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials [i.e., CNTs and carbon nano-onions (CNOs)] either through the residence time or carbon sources available. An increase in the angular velocity lengthened the residence time of the flow and thus caused the diffusion flame to experience a decreased strain rate, which in turn produced more carbon sources. The growth of multi-walled CNTs was achieved for the stretched flames experiencing a higher strain rate [i.e., angular velocity was equal to 0 or 1 rotations per second (rps)]. CNOs were synthesized at a lower strain rate (i.e., angular velocity was in the range of 2–5 rps). It is noteworthy that the strain rate controlled by flow rotation greatly influences the fabrication of carbon nanostructures owing to the residence time as well as carbon source. Additionally, more carbon sources and higher temperature are required for the synthesis of CNOs compared with those required for CNTs (i.e., about 605–625 °C for CNTs and 700–800 °C for

  12. Source Molecular Effect on Amorphous Carbon Film Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kawazoe, Hiroki; Inayoshi, Takanori; Shinohara, Masanori; Matsuda, Yoshinobu; Fujiyama, Hiroshi; Nitta, Yuki; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki

    2009-01-01

    We investigated deposition process of amorphous carbon films using acetylene and methane as a source molecule, by using infrared spectroscopy in multiple internal reflection geometry (MIR-IRAS). We found that deposited film structures were different due to source molecules.

  13. Effect of Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration on Carbon Assimilation under Fluctuating Light

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holišová, Petra; Zitová, Martina; Klem, Karel; Urban, Otmar

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 6 (2012), s. 1931-1938. ISSN 0047-2425 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/10/0340; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007; GA AV ČR IAA600870701 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : carbon * light * beech * spruce * carbon assimilation * elevate carbon * dioxide concentration * mol * photosynthetic * assimilation * carbon dioxide * dioxide * concentracion * leave * photosynthetic efficiency Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.353, year: 2012

  14. Spatio-temporal variations of black carbon concentrations in the Megacity Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial and temporal distribution and the flux of black carbon (BC) concentration in Beijing were continuously investigated over a two-year period at five sites to highlight the relative influence of contributing sources. The results demonstrate firstly that there is significant spatio-temporal variability of BC in Beijing. Highest concentrations occurred during winter primarily due to stagnant meteorological conditions, and seasonal BC sources, such as coal combustion for heating purposes. Biomass burning was identified as a minor seasonal source during the summer months. BC also varied spatially with higher concentrations in the SE of Beijing and lower concentrations in the NW, due to the differing emission intensity of various local BC sources such as traffic and industry. Frequently, overnight BC concentrations were higher due to specific meteorological conditions, such as the lower urban mixing layer height and various anthropogenic activities, such as exclusive night-time heavy duty vehicle traffic in the inner-city. -- Highlights: •Black carbon (BC) in PM2.5 was investigated in the megacity Beijing for two years. •BC was measured at five sites and day- and night-time samples were distinguished. •BC was highest in winter due to meteorological conditions and heating activities. •BC was higher during night- than day-time due to a lower MLH and heavy-duty traffic. •Spatial variations were also pronounced due to the influence of local sources. -- Black carbon was investigated for a two-year period in the megacity Beijing to gain detailed knowledge about the seasonal, temporal and spatial patterns of BC particles and their sources

  15. Secondary organic carbon quantification and source apportionment of PM10 in Kaifeng, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Lin; FENG Yinchang; WU Jianhui; ZHU Tan; BI Xiaohui; HAN Bo; YANG Weihong; YANG Zhiqiang

    2009-01-01

    During 2005, the filter samples of ambient PM10 from five sites and the source samples of particulate matter were collected in Kaifeng, Henan province of China. Nineteen elements, water-soluble ions, total carbon (TC) and organic carbon (OC) contained in samples were analyzed. Seven contributive source types were identified and their contributions to ambient PM10 were estimated by chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model. Weak associations between the concentrations of organic carbon and element carbon (EC) were observed during the sampling periods, indicating that there was secondary organic aerosol pollution in the urban atmosphere. An indirect method of "OC/EC minimum ratio" was applied to estimate the concentration of secondary organic carbon (SOC). The results showed that SOC contributed 26.2%, 32.4% and 18.0% of TC in spring, summer-fall and winter respectively, and the annual average SOC concentration was 7.07 μg/m3, accounting for 5.73% of the total mass in ambient PM10. The carbon species concentrations in ambient PM10 were recalculated by subtracting the SOC concentrations from measured concentrations of TC and OC to increase the compatibility of source and receptor measurements for CMB model.

  16. High-brightness source based on luminescent concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Dick K G; Bruls, Dominique; Jagt, Henri

    2016-07-11

    The concept of a high-luminance light source based on luminescent conversion of LED light and optical concentration in a transparent phosphor is explained. Experiments on a realized light source show that a luminous flux of 8500 lm and a luminance of 500 cd/mm2 can be attained using 56 pump LEDs at 330 W electrical input power. The measurement results are compared to optical simulations, showing that the experimental optical efficiency is slightly lower than expected. The present status enables applications like mid-segment digital projection using LED technology, whereas the concept is scalable to higher fluxes. PMID:27410894

  17. Organic carbon concentrations and stocks in Romanian mineral forest soils

    OpenAIRE

    Lucian C. Dincă; Gheorghe Spârchez; Maria Dincă; Viorel N. B. Blujdea

    2012-01-01

    Estimating soils organic carbon stock and its change in time is an actual concern for scientists and climate change policy makers. The present article firstly focus on determination of C stocks in Romania on forest soil types, as well as development of the spatial distribution mapping using a Geographic Information System (GIS) and also the secondly on the quantification of uncertainty associated with currently available data on C concentration on forest soils geometrical layers. Determinatio...

  18. Source of variation of isoflavone concentrations in perennial clover species

    OpenAIRE

    Bronislava Butkute; Butkute Lemeziene; Giedre Dabkeviciene; Valdas Jakstas; Egidijus Vilcinskas; Valdimaras Janulis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Clover has attracted considerable interest not only as a valuable livestock forage plant, but also as an important source of isoflavones. The current study was aimed to assess the variation of concentration of three isoflavones in clover species grown under a cool temperate climate environment in Lithuania. Materials and Methods: Isoflavone contents were quantified in the plant parts of 21 accessions belonging to five perennial species of genus Trifolium (T. pratense, T. repens,...

  19. The geographic concentration of blue carbon in the continental US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feagin, R. A.; Hinson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Salt water wetlands have the potential to be bought and sold as relatively rich reservoirs of carbon in the context of sequestration projects. However, little is known about the geographic distribution of this potential, and no coarse scale investigation has addressed this ecosystem service at the continental scale. Our objective was to determine blue carbon stocks and flux in coastal wetland soils in the United States and categorize the potential for projects by estuarine basin, state, and wetland type. We linked National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) data with the Soil Survey Geographic Database (SSURGO) through spatial analysis within a Geographic Information System (GIS). We then calculated and mapped soil organic carbon across the continental US. Results were filtered by state, estuarine basin, wetland type, and accumulation rate, and ranking lists for each categorization were produced. The results showed that belowground carbon accumulation is concentrated in specific regions, with the richest and largest reservoirs in the Gulf and Atlantic southeastern estuaries, for example mangrove zones in Florida. Salt marshes on the southern Pacific Coast were relatively low in carbon due to small areas of coverage and the presence of sandy and inorganic soil. The geomorphic position of a wetland within a given estuary, for example on an exposed barrier island versus recessed towards inflowing headwaters, accounted for a greater degree of soil carbon variation than the wetland type, for example woody mangroves versus herbaceous marshes. The potential of a blue carbon sequestration project in relation to its location could be influential in determining wetland policy, conservation, and restoration in the coming decades.

  20. Concentration gradient induced morphology evolution of silica nanostructure growth on photoresist-derived carbon micropatterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Shi, Tielin; Xi, Shuang; Lai, Wuxing; Liu, Shiyuan; Li, Xiaoping; Tang, Zirong

    2012-09-01

    The evolution of silica nanostructure morphology induced by local Si vapor source concentration gradient has been investigated by a smart design of experiments. Silica nanostructure or their assemblies with different morphologies are obtained on photoresist-derived three-dimensional carbon microelectrode array. At a temperature of 1,000°C, rope-, feather-, and octopus-like nanowire assemblies can be obtained along with the Si vapor source concentration gradient flow. While at 950°C, stringlike assemblies, bamboo-like nanostructures with large joints, and hollow structures with smaller sizes can be obtained along with the Si vapor source concentration gradient flow. Both vapor-liquid-solid and vapor-quasiliquid-solid growth mechanisms have been applied to explain the diverse morphologies involving branching, connecting, and batch growth behaviors. The present approach offers a potential method for precise design and controlled synthesis of nanostructures with different features.

  1. Comparison of aerobic denitrifying activity among three cultural species with various carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Y; Hasegawa, K; Hanaki, K

    2004-01-01

    Abilities of three aerobic denitrifiers such as Alcaligenes faecalis, Microvirgula aerodenitrificans and Paracoccus pantotrophus were compared from the viewpoints of nitrate removal efficiency and organic matter utilization. First, the effect of carbon source was investigated. Although nitrate reduction was observed in all strains under aerobic conditions, a change of carbon source considerably affected the denitrification ability. In the case of P. pantotrophus, nitrate and nitrite were completely removed in three days under sodium acetate or leucine as a carbon source. In the case of A. faecalis, sufficient nitrate removal was observed only when sodium acetate or ethanol was added. P. pantotrophus and A. faecalis showed a higher ability of nitrate removal than that of M. aerodenitrificans. Therefore, P. pantotrophus was selected in order to investigate the effects of concentration and repetitive addition of carbon. Sodium acetate was used as a sole carbon source. Nitrate was not reduced when the carbon concentration was below 500 mgC/L. However, when carbon source was added repeatedly, nitrate was reduced under 100 mgC/L after the optical density of the bacterium reached above 1.0. This result indicated that a high enough level of bacterial density was necessary to express aerobic denitrification activity. PMID:15566182

  2. The relationship between black carbon concentration and black smoke: A more general approach

    OpenAIRE

    Heal, Mathew R.; Quincey, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The black carbon (BC) component of ambient particulate matter is an important marker for combustion sources and for its impact on human health and radiative forcing. Extensive data archives exist for the black smoke metric, the historic measure of ambient particle darkness. An expression presented in earlier publications (Quincey, 2007; Quincey et al., 2011) for estimating BC concentrations from traditional black smoke measurements is shown to have limitations that can be addressed by using a...

  3. Contributions of natural sources to ozone and PM concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Azimeh; Christensen, Jesper; Gross, Allan; Irannejad, parviz; Glasius, Marianne; Brandt, Jørgen

    2014-05-01

    Natural emissions play an important role in determining ambient levels of harmful atmospheric pollutants, especially tropospheric ozone and particulate matter (PM). Natural sources have become more important with the ongoing reductions of anthropogenic emissions and are expected to be even more significant in the future in connection with a changing climate. Despite of the efforts made for modelling of natural emissions, the uncertainties and gaps with regard to investigation and quantification of these emissions are still quite large. In this study, the large-scale atmospheric chemistry transport model, DEHM (the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model) is further developed, evaluated and applied to study and quantify the contributions of many compounds from the natural sources to the concentration of ozone and formation of PM. The relative contributions are calculated for the domain covering more than the Northern Hemisphere for a typical year 2006. Natural source categories adopted in the recent model consist of vegetation, lightning, soils, wild animals and oceans. Here, DEHM has been further developed to include more natural emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as well as a scheme for describing secondary organic aerosols. Moreover, the parameterization used for estimating sea-salt generation has been modified to contain additional features. Evaluation of the modeled total fine PM, against observations, is conducted for both the previous and new model versions to assess improvement of the model performance with the updated description of natural emissions. Using the developed DEHM, our simulations indicate that at the Northern Hemisphere the contribution from natural emissions to the average annual ozone concentrations over land is between 4-30 ppbV. Among the natural emissions, biogenic VOCs are found to be the most significant contributors to ozone formation. Our results show that biogenic VOCs enhance the average ozone concentration with around

  4. Review: role of carbon sources for in vitro plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mehwish; Ahmad, Touqeer; Sablok, Gaurav; Standardi, Alvaro; Hafiz, Ishfaq Ahmad

    2013-04-01

    In vitro plant cells, tissues and organ cultures are not fully autotrophic establishing a need for carbohydrates in culture media to maintain the osmotic potential, as well as to serve as energy and carbon sources for developmental processes including shoot proliferation, root induction as well as emission, embryogenesis and organogenesis, which are highly energy demanding developmental processes in plant biology. A variety of carbon sources (both reducing and non-reducing) are used in culture media depending upon genotypes and specific stages of growth. However, sucrose is most widely used as a major transport-sugar in the phloem sap of many plants. In micropropagation systems, morphogenetic potential of plant tissues can greatly be manipulated by varying type and concentration of carbon sources. The present article reviews the past and current findings on carbon sources and their sustainable utilization for in vitro plant tissue culture to achieve better growth rate and development. PMID:23212616

  5. Crop soil air carbon dioxide concentration and sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiresse, M.; Gers, C.; Dourel, L.; Kaemmerer, M.; Revel, J.C. [Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse, Toulouse (France). Ecole Nationale Superieure Agronomique de Toulouse

    1995-12-31

    The introduction of organic compounds into the soil may increase carbon dioxide emission and thus change the composition of the soil air and microfauna. These factors were studied in a field experiment in luvi-redoxisoils in the South West of France. The untreated liquid sludge from the wastewater treatment plant of Toulouse was tested. The first field plot was an unploughed plot, without any fertilizer and any sludge; the second was a control plot sown with Zea mays and a standard mineral fertilizer without any sludge; the third plot was sown with Zea mays and a normal amount of sludge; and the last plot was sown with Zea mays and a large amount of sludge. In these plots soil air dioxide carbon concentration during all the maize cultivation was measured using the Draeger field method twice a week. The results showed that burying degradable organic compounds increases soil air CO{sub 2}. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Effect of increased carbon dioxide concentrations on stratospheric ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past several years, much attention has been focused on the destruction of ozone by anthropogenic pollutants such as the nitrogen oxides and chlorofluoromethane. Little or no attention has been given to the influence on ozone of an increased carbon dioxide concentration for which a measurable growth has been observed. Increased carbon dioxide can directly affect ozone by perturbing atmospheric temperatures, which will alter ozone production, whose rate displays a fairly strong temperature dependence. This paper presents one-dimensional model results for the steady state ozone behavior when the CO2 concentration is twice its ambient level which account for coupling between chemistry and temperature. When the CO2 level doubled, the total ozone burden increased in relation to the ambient burden by 1.2--2.5%, depending on the vertical diffusion coefficient used. Above 30 km. In this region the relation variations were insensitive to the choice of diffusion coefficient. Below 30 km, ozone concentrations were smaller than the unperturbed values and were sensitive to the vertical diffusion profile in this region (10--30 km). Ozone decreases in the lower stratosphere because of a reduction in ozone-producing solar radiation, which results in smaller downward ozone fluxes from the region at 25--30 km relative to the flux values for the ambient atmosphere. These offsetting changes occurring in the upper and lower stratosphere act to minimize the variation in total ozone

  7. Do Vermont's Floodplains Constitute an Important Source of Labile Carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdrial, J. N.; Dolan, A.; Kemsley, M.

    2014-12-01

    Floodplains are extremely heterogeneous landscapes with respect to soil and sediment composition and can present an important source of carbon (C) during floods. For example, stream bank soils and sediments are zones of active erosion and deposition of sediment associated C. Due to the presence of plants, riparian soils contain high amounts of C that is exchanged between stream waters and banks. Abandoned channels and meander wetlands that remain hydrologically connected to the main channel contain high amounts of organic matter that can be flushed into the stream during high discharge. This heterogeneity, result of floodplain geomorphology, land cover and use, can profoundly impact the amount and type of dissolved organic matter (DOM) introduced into streams. In order to assess DOM characteristics leached from heterogeneous floodplain soils, aqueous soil extracts were performed on soil samples representative of different land covers (n=20) at four depths. Extracts were analyzed for dissolved organic C and total dissolved nitrogen with a Shimadzu C analyzer. Colored dissolved organic matter characteristics was measured with the Aqualog Fluorescence Spectrometer and quantified with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Preliminary data from three floodplains in Vermont (Connecticut, Missisquoi and Mad River) show a 3D variability of longitudinal, lateral, and vertical extents on water-extractable, mobile C. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations in meander swamp samples were found up to 9 times higher than in those of soils from agricultural field indicative of an important C source. Although C concentrations in adjacent fields were low, high abundance of labile C (indicated by tryptophan-like fluorescence) in water extracts from fields indicates recent biological production of C. This labile C is easily processed by microbes and transformed to the greenhouse gas CO2. These results provide important information on the contribution and lability of different floodplain

  8. Alteration of Oceanic Nitrification Under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J.; Chow, C. E.; Popp, B. N.; Fuhrman, J. A.; Feng, Y.; Hutchins, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are increasing exponentially and expected to double by the year 2100. Dissolution of excess CO2 in the upper ocean reduces pH, alters carbonate chemistry, and also represents a potential resource for autotrophic organisms that convert inorganic carbon into biomass--including a broad spectrum of marine microbes. These bacteria and archaea drive global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen and constitute the vast majority of biomass in the sea, yet their responses to reduced pH and increased pCO2 remain largely undocumented. Here we show that elevated pCO2 may sharply reduce nitrification rates and populations of nitrifying microorganisms in the ocean. Multiple experiments were performed in the Sargasso Sea and the Southern California Bight under glacial maximum (193 ppm), present day (390 ppm), and projected (750 ppm) pCO2 concentrations, over time scales from hours to multiple days, and at depths of 45 m to 240 m. Measurement of nitrification rates using isotopically-labeled nitrogen showed 2-5 fold reduction under elevated pCO2--as well as an increase under glacial maximum pCO2. Marine Crenarchaeota are likely involved in nitrification as ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and are among the most abundant microbial groups in the ocean, yet this group decreased by 40-80% under increased pCO2, based on quantification of both 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene copies. Crenarchaeota also steadily declined over the course of multiple days under elevated pCO2, whereas ammonia-oxidizing (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were more variable in their responses or were not detected. These findings suggest that projected increases in pCO2 and subsequent decreases in pH may strongly influence marine biogeochemistry and microbial community structure in the sea.

  9. Black carbon concentration trends in Helsinki during 1996–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pakkanen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The black carbon (BC concentration trends were studied during ten years in Helsinki, Finland. Measurements were made in three campaigns between 1996 and 2005 at an urban area locating two kilometres from the centre of Helsinki. The first campaign was from November 1996 to June 1997, the second from September 2000 to May 2001 and the third from March 2004 to October 2005. In this study, only data from winter and spring months was analysed. The effect of traffic and meteorological variables on the measured BC concentrations was studied by means of a multiple regression analysis, where the meteorological data was obtained from a meteorological pre-processing model (MPP-FMI. During the ten years, the campaign median BC concentrations were found to decrease slightly from 1.11 to 1.00 μg m−3. The lowest campaign median concentration (0.93 μg m−3 was measured during the second campaign in 2000–2001, when also the lowest traffic rates were measured. The strongest decrease between campaigns 1 and 3 was observed during weekday daytimes, when the traffic rates are highest. The variables affecting the measured BC concentrations most were traffic, wind speed and mixing height. On weekdays, traffic had clearly the most important influence and on weekends the effect of wind speed diluted the effect of traffic. The affecting variables and their influence on the BC concentration were similar in winter and spring. The separate examination of the three campaigns showed that the effect of traffic on the BC concentrations had decreased during the studied years. This reduction was caused by cleaner emissions from vehicles, since between years 1996 and 2005 the traffic rates had increased. A rough estimate gave that vehicle number-scaled BC mass concentrations have decreased from 0.0028 to 0.0020 μg m−3 between campaigns 1 and 3.

  10. Modulation of Candida albicans Biofilm by Different Carbon Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemmaraju, Suma C; Pruthi, Parul A; Prasad, R; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    In the present investigation, the role of carbon sources (glucose, lactate, sucrose, and arabinose) on Candida albicans biofilm development and virulence factors was studied on polystyrene microtiter plates. Besides this, structural changes in cell wall component β-glucan in presence of different carbon sources have also been highlighted. Biofilm formation was analyzed by XTT (2,3-bis[2-Methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide) reduction assay. Glucose-grown cells exhibited the highest metabolic activity during adhesion among all carbon sources tested (p albicans biofilm development and modulate virulence factors and structural organization of cell wall component β-glucan. PMID:26899861

  11. Growth of graphene films from non-gaseous carbon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James; Sun, Zhengzong; Yan, Zheng; Ruan, Gedeng; Peng, Zhiwei

    2015-08-04

    In various embodiments, the present disclosure provides methods of forming graphene films by: (1) depositing a non-gaseous carbon source onto a catalyst surface; (2) exposing the non-gaseous carbon source to at least one gas with a flow rate; and (3) initiating the conversion of the non-gaseous carbon source to the graphene film, where the thickness of the graphene film is controllable by the gas flow rate. Additional embodiments of the present disclosure pertain to graphene films made in accordance with the methods of the present disclosure.

  12. Size distributions, sources and source areas of water-soluble organic carbon in urban background air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Timonen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the results of one year long measurement period of the size distributions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC, inorganic ions and gravimetric mass of particulate matter. Measurements were done at an urban background station (SMEAR III by using a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI. The site is located in northern European boreal region in Helsinki, Finland. The WSOC size distribution measurements were completed with the chemical analysis of inorganic ions, organic carbon (OC and monosaccharide anhydrides from the filter samples. During the measurements gravimetric mass in the MOUDI collections varied between 3.4 and 55.0 μg m−3 and the WSOC concentration was between 0.3 and 7.4 μg m−3. On average, water-soluble particulate organic matter (WSPOM, WSOC multiplied by 1.6 comprised 25±7.7% and 7.5±3.4% of aerosol PM1 mass and the PM1−10 mass, respectively. Inorganic ions contributed 33±12% and 28±19% of the analyzed PM1 and PM1−10 aerosol mass.

    Five different aerosol categories corresponding to different sources or source areas were identified (long-range transport aerosols, biomass burning aerosols from wild land fires and from small-scale wood combustion, aerosols originating from marine areas and from the clean arctic areas. Clear differences in WSOC concentrations and size distributions originating from different sources or source areas were observed, although there are also many other factors which might affect the results. E.g. the local conditions and sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs and aerosols as well as various transformation processes are likely to have an impact on the measured aerosol composition. Using the source categories, it was identified that especially the oxidation products of biogenic VOCs in summer had a clear effect on WSOC concentrations.

  13. Organic carbon concentrations and stocks in Romanian mineral forest soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian C. Dincă

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Estimating soils organic carbon stock and its change in time isan actual concern for scientists and climate change policy makers. Thepresent article firstly focus on determination of C stocks in Romania on forest soil types, as well as development of the spatial distribution mapping using a Geographic Information System (GIS and also the secondly on the quantification of uncertainty associated with currently available data on C concentration on forest soils geometrical layers. Determination of C stock was done based on forest management plans database created over 2000-2006. Unlike original database, the data for this study was harmonized on following depths: 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-40 cm, and > 40 cm. Then, the obtained values were grouped by soil types, resulting average values for the main forest soils from Romania. A soil area weighted average value of 137 t/ha is calculated for Romania, in the range of estimationsfor other European geographic and climatic areas. The soils that have the largest amount of organic carbon are andosols, vertisols, entic and haplic podzols, whereas the ones that have the smallest values of organic carbon are solonetz and solonchaks. Although current assessment relies on very large number of samples from the forest management planning database, the variability of C concentration remains very large, ~40-50% for coefficient the variation and ~100% of the average, when defining the range of 95% of entire soil population, rather showing the variability than uncertainty of the average estimated. Best fit for C concentration on geometric layersin any forest soil is asymmetric, associated with log-normal distributions.

  14. Organic carbon concentrations and stocks in Romanian mineral forest soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian C. Dincă

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Estimating soils organic carbon stock and its change in time is an actual concern for scientists and climate change policy makers. The present article firstly focus on determination of C stocks in Romania on forest soil types, as well as development of the spatial distribution mapping using a Geographic Information System (GIS and also the secondly on the quantification of uncertainty associated with currently available data on C concentration on forest soils geometrical layers. Determination of C stock was done based on forest management plans database created over 2000-2006. Unlike original database, the data for this study was harmonized on following depths: 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-40 cm, and > 40 cm. Then, the obtained values were grouped by soil types, resulting average values for the main forest soils from Romania. A soil area weighted average value of 137 t/ha is calculated for Romania, in the range of estimations for other European geographic and climatic areas. The soils that have the largest amount of organic carbon are andosols, vertisols, entic and haplic podzols, whereas the ones that have the smallest values of organic carbon are solonetz and solonchaks. Although current assessment relies on very large number of samples from the forest management planning database, the variability of C concentration remains very large, ~40-50% for coefficient the variation and ~100% of the average, when defining the range of 95% of entire soil population, rather showing the variability than uncertainty of the average estimated. Best fit for C concentration on geometric layers in any forest soil is asymmetric, associated with log-normal distributions.

  15. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beama)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y.

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm2 at the peak of the pulse.

  16. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y. [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm{sup 2} at the peak of the pulse.

  17. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse. PMID:22380206

  18. Source apportionment of ambient particle number concentrations in central Los Angeles using positive matrix factorization (PMF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowlat, Mohammad Hossein; Hasheminassab, Sina; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor model (version 5.0) was used to identify and quantify major sources contributing to particulate matter (PM) number concentrations, using PM number size distributions in the range of 13 nm to 10 µm combined with several auxiliary variables, including black carbon (BC), elemental and organic carbon (EC/OC), PM mass concentrations, gaseous pollutants, meteorological, and traffic counts data, collected for about 9 months between August 2014 and 2015 in central Los Angeles, CA. Several parameters, including particle number and volume size distribution profiles, profiles of auxiliary variables, contributions of different factors in different seasons to the total number concentrations, diurnal variations of each of the resolved factors in the cold and warm phases, weekday/weekend analysis for each of the resolved factors, and correlation between auxiliary variables and the relative contribution of each of the resolved factors, were used to identify PM sources. A six-factor solution was identified as the optimum for the aforementioned input data. The resolved factors comprised nucleation, traffic 1, traffic 2 (with a larger mode diameter than traffic 1 factor), urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and soil/road dust. Traffic sources (1 and 2) were the major contributor to PM number concentrations, collectively making up to above 60 % (60.8-68.4 %) of the total number concentrations during the study period. Their contribution was also significantly higher in the cold phase compared to the warm phase. Nucleation was another major factor significantly contributing to the total number concentrations (an overall contribution of 17 %, ranging from 11.7 to 24 %), with a larger contribution during the warm phase than in the cold phase. The other identified factors were urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and soil/road dust, with relative contributions of approximately 12 % (7.4-17.1), 2.1 % (1

  19. A Novel Airborne Carbon Isotope Analyzer for Methane and Carbon Dioxide Source Fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, E. S.; Huang, Y. W.; Owano, T. G.; Leifer, I.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field studies on major sources of the important greenhouse gas methane (CH4) indicate significant underestimation of methane release from fossil fuel industrial (FFI) and animal husbandry sources, among others. In addition, uncertainties still exist with respect to carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements, especially source fingerprinting. CO2 isotopic analysis provides a valuable in situ measurement approach to fingerprint CH4 and CO2as associated with combustion sources, leakage from geologic reservoirs, or biogenic sources. As a result, these measurements can characterize strong combustion source plumes, such as power plant emissions, and discriminate these emissions from other sources. As part of the COMEX (CO2 and MEthane eXperiment) campaign, a novel CO2 isotopic analyzer was installed and collected data aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft. Developing methods to derive CH4 and CO2 budgets from remote sensing data is the goal of the summer 2014 COMEX campaign, which combines hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and non-imaging spectroscopy (NIS) with in situ airborne and surface data. COMEX leverages the synergy between high spatial resolution HSI and moderate spatial resolution NIS. The carbon dioxide isotope analyzer developed by Los Gatos Research (LGR) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology and incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for high sensitivity and optimal instrument stability. This analyzer measures CO2 concentration as well as δ13C, δ18O, and δ17O from CO2 at natural abundance (100-3000 ppm). The laboratory accuracy is ±1.2 ppm (1σ) in CO2 from 370-1000 ppm, with a long-term (1000 s) precision of ±0.012 ppm. The long-term precision for both δ13C and δ18O is 0.04 ‰, and for δ17O is 0.06 ‰. The analyzer was field-tested as part of the COWGAS campaign, a pre-cursor campaign to COMEX in March 2014, where it successfully discriminated plumes related to combustion processes associated with

  20. Development and evaluation of a daily temporal interpolation model for fine particulate matter species concentrations and source apportionment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Jeremiah D.; Holmes, Heather A.; Balachandran, Sivaraman; Maier, Marissa L.; Zhai, Xinxin; Ivey, Cesunica; Digby, Kyle; Mulholland, James A.; Russell, Armistead G.

    2016-09-01

    The impacts of emissions sources on air quality in St. Louis, Missouri are assessed for use in acute health effects studies. However, like many locations in the United States, the speciated particulate matter (PM) measurements from regulatory monitoring networks in St. Louis are only available every third day. The power of studies investigating acute health effects of air pollution is reduced when using one-in-three day source impacts compared to daily source impacts. This paper presents a temporal interpolation model to estimate daily speciated PM2.5 mass concentrations and source impact estimates using one-in-three day measurements. The model is used to interpolate 1-in-3 day source impact estimates and to interpolate the 1-in-3 day PM species concentrations prior to source apportionment (SA). Both approaches are compared and evaluated using two years (June 2001-May 2003) of daily data from the St. Louis Midwest Supersite (STL-SS). Data withholding is used to simulate a 1-in-3 day data set from the daily data to evaluate interpolated estimates. After evaluation using the STL-SS data, the model is used to estimate daily source impacts at another site approximately seven kilometers (7 km) northwest of the STL-SS (Blair); results between the sites are compared. For interpolated species concentrations, the model performs better for secondary species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and organic carbon) than for primary species (metals and elemental carbon), likely due to the greater spatial autocorrelation of secondary species. Pearson correlation (R) values for sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, elemental carbon, and organic carbon ranged from 0.61 (elemental carbon, EC2) to 0.97 (sulfate). For trace metals, the R values ranged from 0.31 (Ba) to 0.81 (K). The interpolated source impact estimates also indicated a stronger correlation for secondary sources. Correlations of the secondary source impact estimates based on measurement data and interpolation data ranged from 0.68 to 0

  1. Black carbon and elemental concentration of ambient particulate matter in Makassar Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of less or equal to 10 um or PM10, has been collected on a weekly basis for one year from February 2012 to January 2013 at one site of Makassar, Province of South Sulawesi Indonesia. The samples were collected using a size selective high volume air sampler sited at Daya, a mixed urban, commercial and industrial area in the city of Makassar. The concentration of black carbon (BC) along with a total of 14 elements (i.e Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Fe, K, Mg, Ba, Na, Ni, Pb, Si, Ti and Zn) were determined from the sample. Results showed that the average particulate mass concentration was 32.9 ± 11.6 μg/m3 with BC and elemental concentration constituted 6.1% and 10.6% of the particulate concentration, respectively. Both BC and elemental constituents contributed 16.7% while 83.3% of the particulate matter remained to be counted for. The black carbon concentration was higher during the dry months which may be attributed to rampant biomass burning during hot and dry weather conditions, apart from other possible sources. Most of the elements were enriched relative to soil origin illustrating of their possible associations with other sources such as marine and anthropogenic derived aerosols, particularly Cr, Ni, Pb, and Zn, which are known to originate from man-made activities

  2. Comparative Analysis of Carbon Monoxide Modeling from Vehicular Sources in Puebla City, México

    OpenAIRE

    Sthephany Sedeño-Cisneros; María Auxilio Osorio-Lama; Miguel Ángel Valera-Pérez; René Bernardo Elías Cabrera-Cruz

    2015-01-01

    The results of dispersion modeling of carbon monoxide are reported in this paper. The results of applying the technique of Rapid Assessment of Sources of Environmental Pollution (RASEP) database and the Air Monitoring State System in the City of Puebla, México, were employed. Concentrations of carbon monoxide emitted by cars inferred by RASAP technique with those reported by the environmental monitoring station “Nymphs”, were compared. The date of 21 June 2005-2010 was se...

  3. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Ruslana Vasylkovska; Natalia Petriv; Halyna Semchyshyn

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) meta...

  4. [Effect of PLA/starch slow-release carbon source on biological denitrification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dan-Qi; Wang, Juan; Zheng, Tian-Long; Liu, Jian-Guo; Wang, Qun-Hui

    2014-06-01

    We used polylactic acid (PLA) and starch to develop a slow-release carbon source and biofilm carrier by blending and fusing techniques for removing nitrate contamination from groundwater, investigated the changes of nitrate, nitrite concentrations and COD in denitrification process supplied by the slow-release carbon source in different mass ratios [PLA/starch (P: S) were 8:2, 7:3, 6:4, 5:5, respectively]. The experimental results demonstrated that the best mass ratio of PLA/starch was 5:5, resulting in a nitrate removal rate of more than 99%. A high denitrification performance was achieved in continuous fixed-bed reactor, the effluent nitrate concentration was below 2 mg x L(-1). These experiments provide scientific basis for the development of environmentally-friendly and controllable slow-release carbon source. PMID:25158501

  5. A simple diffusion model for calculating concentrations from line sources in Nairobi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple physically realistic model is used for estimating carbon monoxide(CO) from highway in Nairobi using motor vehicle data for 1989. The year 1989 was chosen because it was the most recent year with motor vehicle count data for majority of the streets. Data for 1988 was also sought for comparison purposes. Average motor vehicles speeds in Nairobi were measured for a period of two months using Range master, which uses the ''Doppler effect'' principle. The speeds were used to determine the sources strength or these streets. A simple diffusion equation was then used to estimate concentration of CO at various distances downwind of the streets. The meteorological data used was from previous studies in Nairobi. Streets on which trafffic was slow constituted strong sources strength for carbon monoxide. Concentration was found to be a strong function of distance from the source and depended on wind speed. The pick traffic hours in Nairobi city were noted to be between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. in the morning and 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the evening on most streets. A smaller traffic volum was also observed during lunch hours. (author)

  6. Yttrium and lanthanum recovery from low cerium carbonate, yttrium carbonate and yttrium concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, separation, enrichment and purification of lanthanum and yttrium were performed using as raw material a commercial low cerium rare earth concentrate named LCC (low cerium carbonate), an yttrium concentrate named 'yttrium carbonate', and a third concentrated known as 'yttrium earths oxide. The first two were industrially produced by the late NUCLEMON - NUCLEBRAS de Monazita e Associados Ltda, using Brazilian monazite. The 'yttrium earths oxide' come from a process for preparation of lanthanum during the course of the experimental work for the present thesis. The following techniques were used: fractional precipitation with urea; fractional leaching of the LCC using ammonium carbonate; precipitation of rare earth peroxycarbonates starting from the rare earth complex carbonates. Once prepared the enriched rare earth fractions the same were refined using the ion exchange chromatography with strong cationic resin without the use of retention ion and elution using the ammonium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. With the association of the above mentioned techniques were obtained pure oxides of yttrium (>97,7%), lanthanum (99,9%), gadolinium (96,6%) and samarium (99,9%). The process here developed has technical and economic viability for the installation of a large scale unity. (author)

  7. Proteomic analysis of carbon concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. for sequestration of carbon dioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randhir K Bharti

    Full Text Available A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO. The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC, however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials.

  8. Effect of boron concentration on physicochemical properties of boron-doped carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron-doped carbon nanotubes (B-CNTs) were synthesized using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) floating catalyst method. Toluene was used as the carbon source, triphenylborane as boron as well as the carbon source while ferrocene was used as the catalyst. The amount of triphenylborane used was varied in a solution of toluene and ferrocene. Ferrocene was kept constant at 2.5 wt.%. while a maximum temperature of 900 °C was used for the synthesis of the shaped carbon nanomaterial (SCNMs). SCNMs obtained were characterized by the use of transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), high resolution-electron microscope, electron dispersive X-ay spectroscopy (EDX), Raman spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, and inverse gas chromatography. TEM and SEM analysis confirmed SCNMs obtained were a mixture of B-CNTs and carbon nanofibres (B-CNF). EDX and ICP-OES results showed that boron was successively incorporated into the carbon hexagonal network of CNTs and its concentration was dependent on the amount of triphenylborane used. From the VSM results, the boron doping within the CNTs introduced ferromagnetic properties, and as the percentage of boron increased the magnetic coactivity and squareness changed. In addition, boron doping changed the conductivity and the surface energy among other physicochemical properties of B-CNTs. - Highlights: • Boron-doping of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) changes their physiochemical properties. • Amount of boron-doping was dependent on the wt.% of boron precursor used. • Boron-doping changed CNTs surfaces and the distribution of dispersive energy sites. • Boron-doping affected the conductivity and ferromagnetic properties. • Increased boron-doping results in a more favourable interaction with polar probes

  9. Enhanced biological nutrient removal in modified carbon source division anaerobic anoxic oxic process with return activated sludge pre-concentration☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Lu; Haiyan Wu; Haoyan Li; Dianhai Yang

    2015-01-01

    A pilot-scale modified carbon source division anaerobic anoxic oxic (AAO) process with pre-concentration of returned activated sludge (RAS) was proposed in this study for the enhanced biological nutrient removal (BNR) of municipal wastewater with limited carbon source. The influent carbon source was fed in step while a novel RAS pre-concentration tank was adopted to improve BNR efficiency, and the effects of an influent carbon source distribution ratio and a RAS pre-concentration ratio were investigated. The results show that the removal efficiency of TN is mainly influenced by the carbon source distribution ratio while the TP removal relies on the RAS pre-concentration ratio. The optimum carbon source distribution ratio and RAS pre-concentration ratio are 60%and 50%, respectively, with an inner recycling ratio of 100%under the optimum steady operation of pilot test, reaching an average effluent TN concentration of 9.8 mg·L−1 with a removal efficiency of 63%and an average TP removal efficiency of 94%. The mechanism of nutrient removal is discussed and the kinetics is analyzed. The results reveal that the optimal carbon source distribution ratio provides sufficient denitrifying carbon source to each anoxic phase, reducing nitrate accumulation while the RAS pre-concentration ratio improves the condition of anaerobic zone to ensure the phosphorus release due to less nitrate in the returned sludge. Therefore, nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria and phosphorus accumulation organisms play an important role under the optimum condition, enhancing the performance of nutrient removal in this test.

  10. Latitudinal distribution of the sources of carbon monoxide in the troposphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have constructed a vertically and zonally averaged model of the troposphere which calculates photochemical interactions and diffusive North-South transport of trace species. The model can be used to calculate the latitudinal distribution of the source function of a species if its concentration distribution is known. We have applied this procedure to carbon monoxide and find large sources outside the industrialized belt in the Northern Hemisphere

  11. Addressing sources of uncertainty in a global terrestrial carbon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exbrayat, J.; Pitman, A. J.; Zhang, Q.; Abramowitz, G.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Several sources of uncertainty exist in the parameterization of the land carbon cycle in current Earth System Models (ESMs). For example, recently implemented interactions between the carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycles lead to diverse changes in land-atmosphere C fluxes simulated by different models. Further, although soil organic matter decomposition is commonly parameterized as a first-order decay process, the formulation of the microbial response to changes in soil moisture and soil temperature varies tremendously between models. Here, we examine the sensitivity of historical land-atmosphere C fluxes simulated by an ESM to these two major sources of uncertainty. We implement three soil moisture (SMRF) and three soil temperature (STRF) respiration functions in the CABLE-CASA-CNP land biogeochemical component of the coarse resolution CSIRO Mk3L climate model. Simulations are undertaken using three degrees of biogeochemical nutrient limitation: C-only, C and N, and C and N and P. We first bring all 27 possible combinations of a SMRF with a STRF and a biogeochemical mode to a steady-state in their biogeochemical pools. Then, transient historical (1850-2005) simulations are driven by prescribed atmospheric CO2 concentrations used in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Similarly to some previously published results, representing N and P limitation on primary production reduces the global land carbon sink while some regions become net C sources over the historical period (1850-2005). However, the uncertainty due to the SMRFs and STRFs does not decrease relative to the inter-annual variability in net uptake when N and P limitations are added. Differences in the SMRFs and STRFs and their effect on the soil C balance can also change the sign of some regional sinks. We show that this response is mostly driven by the pool size achieved at the end of the spin-up procedure. Further, there exists a six-fold range in the level

  12. Energy costs of carbon dioxide concentrating mechanisms in aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A; Beardall, John; Giordano, Mario

    2014-09-01

    Minimum energy (as photon) costs are predicted for core reactions of photosynthesis, for photorespiratory metabolism in algae lacking CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) and for various types of CCMs; in algae, with CCMs; allowance was made for leakage of CO2 from the internal pool. These predicted values are just compatible with the minimum measured photon costs of photosynthesis in microalgae and macroalgae lacking or expressing CCMs. More energy-expensive photorespiration, for example for organisms using Rubiscos with lower CO2-O2 selectivity coefficients, would be less readily accommodated within the lowest measured photon costs of photosynthesis by algae lacking CCMs. The same applies to the cases of CCMs with higher energy costs of active transport of protons or inorganic carbon species, or greater allowance for significant leakage from the accumulated intracellular pool of CO2. High energetic efficiency can involve a higher concentration of catalyst to achieve a given rate of reaction, adding to the resource costs of growth. There are no obvious mechanistic interpretations of the occurrence of CCMs algae adapted to low light and low temperatures using the rationales adopted for the occurrence of C4 photosynthesis in terrestrial flowering plants. There is an exception for cyanobacteria with low-selectivity Form IA or IB Rubiscos, and those dinoflagellates with low-selectivity Form II Rubiscos, for which very few natural environments have high enough CO2:O2 ratios to allow photosynthesis in the absence of CCMs. PMID:24390639

  13. High cadmium concentration in soil in the Three Gorges region: Geogenic source and potential bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • High concentrations of Cd in soils of a rural area in the Three Gorges region, China, are reported. • Lognormal distribution plots and enrichment factors were applied to identify Cd sources. • Sedimentary rocks are main source of Cd in the Cd-enriched soils. • Results of sequential extractions show that a considerable fraction of the Cd in soils is in a labile form. - Abstract: This study investigated the distribution and sources of Cd in soils from a Cd-rich area in the Three Gorges region, China. The results showed that in the study area arable soils contain 0.42–42 mg kg−1 Cd with 0.12–8.5 mg kg−1 in the natural soils, corresponding to high amounts of Cd (0.22–42 mg kg−1) in outcropping sedimentary rocks in the area. Both lognormal distribution and enrichment factor (EF) plots were applied in an attempt to distinguish between geogenic and anthropogenic origins of Cd in the local soils. The lognormal distribution plots illustrated that geogenic sources dominated in soils with low and moderate Cd concentrations (<8.5 mg kg−1), whereas anthropogenic sources (agricultural activities, coal mining) significantly elevated Cd contents in some arable soils (>8.5 mg kg−1). The enrichment factor plots illustrated that the majority of the soil samples had EF values of <5, pointing to a geogenic origin of Cd in the soils, whereas some arable soils had EF values >5, pointing to an additional anthropogenic input of Cd to the soils. Sequential extraction results showed that Cd soluble in water and weak acid (water-soluble, exchangeable and carbonate fraction of the soil) accounts for an average of 31% of the total soil Cd, which indicates high potential for Cd mobility and bioavailability. The findings point to a potential health risk from Cd in areas with high geogenic background concentrations of this metal

  14. Source attribution of air pollutant concentrations and trends in the southeastern aerosol research and characterization (SEARCH) network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Charles L; Tanenbaum, Shelley; Hidy, George M

    2013-01-01

    A new approach for determining the contributions of emission sources to trends in concentrations of particulate matter and gases is developed using the chemical mass balance (CMB) method and the U.S. EPA's National Emission Inventory (NEI). The method extends our earlier analysis by using temporally varying emission profiles and includes accounting of primary and secondary particulate organic carbon with an empirical regression calculation. The model offers a potentially important tool for verifying that annual emission reductions by major source category have yielded changes in ambient pollutant concentrations. Using long-term measurements from well-instrumented monitoring sites, observed trends in ambient pollutant concentrations at urban and rural locations can be attributed to emission changes. Trends apportionment is conducted on 2000-2011 ambient monitoring data from the SEARCH network with NEI emissions data adjusted to improve interinventory consistency. The application accounts for major source category influences in southeastern U.S. regional trends; local anomalies are noted. In the SEARCH region, open burning is important as a source of CO and carbonaceous particles. Improved agreement between predicted and measured particulate carbon is obtained by increasing mobile diesel exhaust and area-source particulate carbon emissions by 1 and 20%, respectively, compared with NEI values. The method is general and is applicable to data from any monitoring site that is instrumented for criteria air pollutants, associated gases, and particle composition. PMID:24180677

  15. Influence of carbon and lipid sources on variation of mercury and other trace elements in polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routti, Heli; Letcher, Robert J; Born, Erik W; Branigan, Marsha; Dietz, Rune; Evans, Thomas J; McKinney, Melissa A; Peacock, Elizabeth; Sonne, Christian

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the influence of carbon and lipid sources on regional differences in liver trace element (As, Cd, Cu, total Hg, Mn, Pb, Rb, Se, and Zn) concentrations measured in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) (n = 121) from 10 Alaskan, Canadian Arctic, and East Greenland subpopulations. Carbon and lipid sources were assessed using δ(13) C in muscle tissue and fatty acid (FA) profiles in subcutaneous adipose tissue as chemical tracers. A negative relationship between total Hg and δ(13) C suggested that polar bears feeding in areas with higher riverine inputs of terrestrial carbon accumulate more Hg than bears feeding in areas with lower freshwater input. Mercury concentrations were also positively related to the FA 20:1n-9, which is biosynthesized in large amounts in Calanus copepods. This result raises the hypothesis that Calanus glacialis are an important link in the uptake of Hg in the marine food web and ultimately in polar bears. Unadjusted total Hg, Se, and As concentrations showed greater geographical variation among polar bear subpopulations compared with concentrations adjusted for carbon and lipid sources. The Hg concentrations adjusted for carbon and lipid sources in Bering-Chukchi Sea polar bear liver tissue remained the lowest among subpopulations. Based on these findings, the authors suggest that carbon and lipid sources for polar bears should be taken into account when one is assessing spatial and temporal trends of long-range transported trace elements. PMID:22987581

  16. Seasonal variations in concentration and composition of dissolved organic carbon in Tokyo Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kubo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of recalcitrant and bioavailable dissolved organic carbon (DOC and their seasonal variations were investigated at three stations in Tokyo Bay, Japan, and in two freshwater sources flowing into the bay to evaluate the significance of DOC degradation for the carbon budget in coastal waters and carbon export to the open ocean. Recalcitrant DOC (RDOC was differentiated from bioavailable DOC (BDOC as a remnant of DOC after 150 days of bottle incubation. On average, RDOC accounted for 78% of the total DOC in Shibaura sewage treatment plant (STP effluent, 67% in the upper Arakawa River water, 66% in the lower Arakawa River water, and 78% in surface bay water. RDOC concentrations were higher than BDOC at all stations. In freshwater environments, RDOC concentrations were almost constant throughout the year. In the bay, RDOC was higher during spring and summer than during autumn and winter. The relative abundance of RDOC in the bay derived from phytoplankton, terrestrial, and open oceanic waters was estimated to be 9%, 33%, and 58%, respectively, by multiple regression analysis of RDOC, salinity, and chl a. In addition, comparison with previous data from 1972 revealed that concentrations of RDOC and BDOC have decreased by 33% and 74% at freshwater sites and 39% and 76% at Tokyo Bay, while the ratio of RDOC to DOC has increased. The change in DOC concentration and composition was probably due to increased amounts of sewage treatment plant effluent entering the system. Tokyo Bay exported DOC, mostly RDOC, to the open ocean because of remineralization of BDOC.

  17. Quantifying global terrestrial carbon influx and storage as stimulated by an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Yiqi

    1997-01-01

    EXTRACT (SEE PDF FOR FULL ABSTRACT): Measurements of spatial and temporal distributions of carbon dioxide concentration and carbon-13/carbon-12 ratio in the atmosphere suggest a strong biospheric carbon sink in terrestrial ecosystems. Quantifying the sink, however, has become an enormous challenge for Earth system scientists because of great uncertainties associated with biological variation and environmental heterogeneity in the ecosystems. This paper presents an approach that uses two d...

  18. Concentrating Carbon Dioxide - What Do We Know from Power Plant Capture Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Geologic materials, basically calcium or magnesium-rich rocks, can provide much of the thermodynamic driving force for distributed carbon capture from air - if we can work out appropriate processes. One apparent challenge is that the rate of reaction is slower than we would like it to be. This rate is a combination of the mineralization rate (forming calcite from solution) and, since the reactions are much faster in water, the rate at which carbon dioxide can be added to solution, providing a more concentrated source of CO2(aq) for reaction. This latter problem of mass transfer across the gas-liquid interface is addressed in power plant capture schemes through increasing the chemical driving force, catalytic formation of dissolved CO2 via carbonic anhydrase and its analogues, and simple increases of surface area. An important learning from that body of research is that surface area is critically important - no amount of catalysis or chemical driving force can make up for simple transfer area. This talk will relate those learnings in power plant capture studies to the issue of accumulating CO2 to react with rocks for permanent sequestration. Not only is it important to create surface area for the reactive rocks, such as by grinding or fracturing, but it is equally valuable to increase the concentration of CO2(aq) by rapid transfer across the gas-water interface. Successful future carbon dioxide management schemes will have to take advantage of every kinetic advantage possible, in order to make good use of the thermodynamic advantage that geologic materials present for controlling atmospheric carbon levels.

  19. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vignati

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in the global Transport-Chemistry model TM5 and those due to the uncertainties in the definition and quantification of the observations, which propagate through to both the emission inventories, and the measurements used for the model evaluation.

    The schemes for the atmospheric processing of black carbon that have been tested with the model are (i a simple approach considering BC as bulk aerosol and a simple treatment of the removal with fixed 70% of in-cloud black carbon concentrations scavenged by clouds and removed when rain is present and (ii a more complete description of microphysical ageing within an aerosol dynamics model, where removal is coupled to the microphysical properties of the aerosol, which results in a global average of 40% in-cloud black carbon that is scavenged in clouds and subsequently removed by rain, thus resulting in a longer atmospheric lifetime. This difference is reflected in comparisons between both sets of modelled results and the measurements. Close to the sources, both anthropogenic and vegetation fire source regions, the model results do not differ significantly, indicating that the emissions are the prevailing mechanism determining the concentrations and the choice of the aerosol scheme does not influence the levels. In more remote areas such as oceanic and polar regions the differences can be orders of magnitude, due to the differences between the two schemes. The more complete description reproduces the seasonal trend of the black carbon observations in those areas, although not always the magnitude of the signal, while the more simplified approach underestimates black carbon concentrations by orders of

  20. Chemoselective Synthesis of Carbamates using CO2 as Carbon Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, Daniel; Hirapara, Pradipbhai; Das, Shoubhik

    2016-08-01

    Synthesis of carbamates directly from amines using CO2 as the carbon source is a straightforward and sustainable approach. Herein, we describe a highly effective and chemoselective methodology for the synthesis of carbamates at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. This methodology can also be applied to protect the amino group in amino acids and peptides, and also to synthesize important pharmaceuticals. PMID:27376902

  1. Growth of carbon nanotube field emitters on single strand carbon fiber: a linear electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multi-stage effect has been revisited through growing carbon nanotube field emitters on single strand carbon fiber with a thickness of 11 μm. A prepared linear electron source exhibits a turn-on field as low as 0.4 V μm-1 and an extremely high field enhancement factor of 19 300, when compared with those results from reference nanotube emitters grown on flat silicone wafer; 3.0 V μm-1 and 2500, respectively. In addition, we introduce a novel method to grow nanotubes uniformly around the circumference of carbon fibers by using direct resistive heating on the continuously feeding carbon threads. These results open up not only a new path for synthesizing nanocomposites, but also offer an excellent linear electron source for special applications such as backlight units for liquid crystal displays and multi-array x-ray sources.

  2. Sources of uncertainties in modelling Black Carbon at the global scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cavalli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the global black carbon cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of the properties of black carbon. This work investigates uncertainties related to modelling black carbon: due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in the global Transport-Chemistry model TM5 and due to the uncertainties in the definition and quantification of observed black carbon, which propagate through to both the emission inventories, and the measurements used for the model evaluation.

    The schemes for the atmospheric processing of black carbon that have been tested with the model are (i a simple approach considering black carbon as bulk aerosol and a simple treatment in the removal and (ii a more complete description of microphysical aging within an aerosol dynamics model, where removal is coupled to the microphysical properties of the aerosol. In the first approach a fixed 70% of black carbon is scavenged in clouds and removed when rain is present. The second leads to a global average of 40% black carbon that is scavenged in clouds and subsequently removed by rain, thus resulting in a longer lifetime. This difference is reflected in comparisons between both sets of modelled results and the measurements. Close to the sources, both anthropogenic and vegetation fire source regions, the model results do not differ significantly, showing that the emissions are the prevailing mechanism determining the concentrations and the choice of the aerosol scheme does not influence the levels. In more remote areas such as oceanic and polar regions the differences can be orders of magnitude, due to the differences between the two schemes. The more complete description reproduces the seasonal trend of the black carbon observations in those areas, although not always the magnitude of the signal, while the more simplified approach underestimates black carbon concentrations by orders of magnitude.

  3. Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in New York City community garden soils: Potential sources and influential factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Bravo, Lydia G; Briggs, Dean; Shayler, Hannah; McBride, Murray; Lopp, Donna; Stone, Edie; Ferenz, Gretchen; Bogdan, Kenneth G; Mitchell, Rebecca G; Spliethoff, Henry M

    2016-02-01

    A total of 69 soil samples from 20 community gardens in New York City (New York, USA) were collected and analyzed for 23 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and black carbon. For each garden, samples were collected from nongrowing areas (non-bed) and from vegetable-growing beds, including beds with and without visible sources of PAHs. The sum of the US Environmental Protection Agency's 16 priority PAHs ranged up to 150 mg/kg, and the median (5.4 mg/kg) and mean (14.2 mg/kg) were similar to those previously reported for urban areas in the northeast United States. Isomer ratios indicated that the main sources of PAHs were petroleum, coal, and wood combustion. The PAH concentrations were significantly and positively associated with black carbon and with modeled air PAH concentrations, suggesting a consistent relationship between historical deposition of atmospheric carbon-adsorbed PAHs and current PAH soil concentrations. Median PAH soil concentration from non-bed areas was higher (7.4 mg/kg) than median concentration from beds in the same garden (4.0 mg/kg), and significantly higher than the median from beds without visible sources of PAHs (3.5 mg/kg). Median PAH concentration in beds from gardens with records of soil amendments was 58% lower compared with beds from gardens without those records. These results suggest that gardening practices in garden beds without visible sources of PAHs contribute to reduce PAH soil concentrations. PMID:26636429

  4. Options for cost-effectively reducing atmospheric methane concentrations from anthropogenic biomass sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane is a major greenhouse gas, second only to carbon dioxide in its contribution to future global warming. Methane concentrations have more than doubled over the last two centuries and continue to rise annually. These increases are largely correlated with increasing human populations. Methane emissions from human related activities currently account for about 70 percent of annual emissions. Of these human related emissions, biomass sources account for about 75 percent and non-biomass sources about 25 percent. Because methane has a shorter lifetime than other major greenhouse gases, efforts to reduce methane emissions may fairly quickly be translated into lower atmospheric concentrations of methane and lower levels of radiative forcing. This fairly quick response would have the benefit of slowing the rate of climate change and hence allow natural ecosystems more time to adapt. Importantly, methane may be cost-effectively reduced from a number of biomass and non-biomass sources in the United States and worldwide. Methane is a valuable fuel, not just a waste by-product, and often systems may be reconfigured to reap the fuel value of the methane and more than justify the necessary expenditures. Such options for reducing methane emission from biomass sources exist for landfills, livestock manures, and ruminant livestock, and have been implemented to varying degrees in countries around the world. However, there are a number of barriers that hinder the more widespread use of technologies, including institutional, financial, regulatory, informational, and other barriers. This paper describes an array of available options that may be cost-effectively implemented to reduce methane emissions from biomass sources. This paper also discusses a number of programs that have been developed in the United States and internationally to promote the implementation of these methane reduction options and overcome existing barriers

  5. Effects of cell density, carbon dioxide and molybdenum concentration on biohydrogen production by Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Low concentration of CO2 in headspace (4–8% vol/vol) enhanced hydrogen productivity. • Glucose addition did not cause a high oxygen build-up in the headspace. • Hydrogen productivity was highly optimized at elevated Mo6+ concentration of 1.6 mM. - Abstract: This paper aims to determine the effects of cell density, carbon dioxide, and molybdenum concentration towards hydrogen production rate. Batch cultures of Anabaenavariabilis sp. were incubated in anaerobic environment under continuous indoor illumination of 70 μE m−2 s−1 at 35 °C. The optimal volumetric hydrogen production rate obtained was 44 μmol H2 mg chl a−1 h−1 occurred at cells density of 110 mg L−1, 5% carbon dioxide headspace concentration, and molybdenum concentration of 1.6 mM. The effect of organic carbon source (glucose) was also evaluated in the present study and it was found that the additional carbon produced the highest hydrogen production rate in all conditions. An increased concentration of molybdenum significantly enhanced the hydrogen productivity rate almost to that of glucose-supplemented culture at 49 μmol H2 mg chl a−1 h−1. However, further increase in molybdenum concentration beyond 1.6 mM showed no further improvement in the amount of hydrogen produced

  6. Assessment of Global Carbon Dioxide Concentration Using MODIS and GOSAT Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 is the most important greenhouse gas (GHG in the atmosphere and is the greatest contributor to global warming. CO2 concentration data are usually obtained from ground observation stations or from a small number of satellites. Because of the limited number of observations and the short time series of satellite data, it is difficult to monitor CO2 concentrations on regional or global scales for a long time. The use of the remote sensing data such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data can overcome these problems, particularly in areas with low densities of CO2 concentration watch stations. A model based on temperature (MOD11C3, vegetation cover (MOD13C2 and MOD15A2 and productivity (MOD17A2 of MODIS (which we have named the TVP model was developed in the current study to assess CO2 concentrations on a global scale. We assumed that CO2 concentration from the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (TANSO aboard the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT are the true values and we used these values to check the TVP model accuracy. The results indicate that the accuracy of the TVP model is different in different continents: the greatest Pearson’s correlation coefficient (R2 was 0.75 in Eurasia (RMSE = 1.16 and South America (RMSE = 1.17; the lowest R2 was 0.57 in Australia (RMSE = 0.73. Compared with the TANSO-observed CO2 concentration (XCO2, we found that the accuracy throughout the World is between −2.56~3.14 ppm. Potential sources of TVP model uncertainties were also analyzed and identified.

  7. Effect of Sulfur Concentration on the Morphology of Carbon Nanofibers Produced from a Botanical Hydrocarbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Kaushik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCarbon nanofibers (CNF with diameters of 20–130 nm with different morphologies were obtained from a botanical hydrocarbon: Turpentine oil, using ferrocene as catalyst source and sulfur as a promoter by simple spray pyrolysis method at 1,000 °C. The influence of sulfur concentration on the morphology of the carbon nanofibers was investigated. SEM, TEM, Raman, TGA/DTA, and BET surface area were employed to characterize the as-prepared samples. TEM analysis confirms that as-prepared CNFs have a very sharp tip, bamboo shape, open end, hemispherical cap, pipe like morphology, and metal particle trapped inside the wide hollow core. It is observed that sulfur plays an important role to promote or inhibit the CNF growth. Addition of sulfur to the solution of ferrocene and turpentine oil mixture was found to be very effective in promoting the growth of CNF. Without addition of sulfur, carbonaceous product was very less and mainly soot was formed. At high concentration of sulfur inhibit the growth of CNFs. Hence the yield of CNFs was optimized for a given sulfur concentration.

  8. Photoautotrophic microorganisms as a carbon source for temperate soil invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Olaf; Dyckmans, Jens; Schrader, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We tested experimentally if photoautotrophic microorganisms are a carbon source for invertebrates in temperate soils. We exposed forest or arable soils to a (13)CO2-enriched atmosphere and quantified (13)C assimilation by three common animal groups: earthworms (Oligochaeta), springtails (Hexapoda) and slugs (Gastropoda). Endogeic earthworms (Allolobophora chlorotica) and hemiedaphic springtails (Ceratophysella denticulata) were highly (13)C enriched when incubated under light, deriving up to 3.0 and 17.0%, respectively, of their body carbon from the microbial source in 7 days. Earthworms assimilated more (13)C in undisturbed soil than when the microbial material was mixed into the soil, presumably reflecting selective surface grazing. By contrast, neither adult nor newly hatched terrestrial slugs (Deroceras reticulatum) grazed on algal mats. Non-photosynthetic (13)CO2 fixation in the dark was negligible. We conclude from these preliminary laboratory experiments that, in addition to litter and root-derived carbon from vascular plants, photoautotrophic soil surface microorganisms (cyanobacteria, algae) may be an ecologically important carbon input route for temperate soil animals that are traditionally assigned to the decomposer channel in soil food web models and carbon cycling studies. PMID:26740559

  9. Concentrations, sources and spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils from Beijing, Tianjin and surrounding areas, North China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations, profiles, sources and spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in 40 surface soil samples collected from Beijing, Tianjin and surrounding areas, North China in 2007, and all sampling sites were far from industrial areas, roadsides and other pollution sources, and across a range of soil types in remote, rural villages and urban areas. The total concentrations of 16 PAHs ranged from 31.6 to 1475.0 ng/g, with an arithmetic average of 336.4 ng/g. The highest PAH concentrations were measured in urban soils, followed by rural village soils and soils from remote locations. The remote-rural village-urban PAH concentration gradient was related to population density, gross domestic product (GDP), long-range atmospheric transport and different types of land use. In addition, the PAH concentration was well correlated with the total organic carbon (TOC) concentration of the soil. The PAH profile suggested that coal combustion and biomass burning were primary PAH sources. - The concentration, profiles and possible sources of PAHs in Beijing, Tianjin and surrounding area soils were studied and related to population density and gross domestic product (GDP).

  10. Methane and carbon at equilibrium in source rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Mango, Frank D

    2013-01-01

    Methane in source rocks may not exist exclusively as free gas. It could exist in equilibrium with carbon and higher hydrocarbons: CH4 + C  Hydrocarbon. Three lines of evidence support this possibility. 1) Shales ingest gas in amounts and selectivities consistent with gas-carbon equilibrium. There is a 50% increase in solid hydrocarbon mass when Fayetteville Shale is exposed to methane (450 psi) under moderate conditions (100°C): Rock-Eval S2 (mg g-1) 8.5 = > 12.5. All light hydrocarbons are i...

  11. Carbon isotope (14C, 12C) measurements to quantify sources of atmospheric carbon monoxide in urban air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric air samples were collected during the Winter of 1989-90 in Albuquerque, NM USA, for carbon isotope (14C, 12C) analysis of carbon monoxide (CO). An experimental sample design was prepared to target periods when the concentration of CO exceeds the 9 μL/L (volume fraction), 8 hour National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) and during periods of attainment. Sampling sites, time of day, sampling duration, and meteorology were carefully considered so that source impacts be optimal. A balanced sampling factorial design was used to yield maximum information from the constraints imposed; the number of samples was limited by the number of sample canisters available, time, and resources. Carbon isotope measurements of urban air, ''clean-air'' background from Niwot Ridge, Colorado, average (wood) logs and oxygenated-gasolines were used in a 3-source model to calculate the contribution of woodburning to the total atmospheric CO burden in Albuquerque. Results show that the estimated fractional contribution of residential wood combustion (Θ' RWC) ranged from 0 to 0.30 of CO concentrations corrected for ''clean-air'' background. For these same samples, the respective CO concentrations attributed to woodburning range from 0 to 0.90 μmol/mol (mole fraction), well below the NAAQS. In all cases, fossil CO is the predominant source of ambient CO concentrations ranging from 0.96 to 6.34 μmol/mol. A final comment is made on the potential of fossil CO measurements as an indirect tracer of atmospheric benzene, relevant to exposure risk estimates of motor vehicle emissions and occupational health and safety standards. (author). 26 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  12. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslana Vasylkovska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast.

  13. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasylkovska, Ruslana; Petriv, Natalia; Semchyshyn, Halyna

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast. PMID:26843865

  14. Carbon Sources for Polyhydroxyalkanoates and an Integrated Biorefinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guozhan; Hill, David J.; Kowalczuk, Marek; Johnston, Brian; Adamus, Grazyna; Irorere, Victor; Radecka, Iza

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a group of bioplastics that have a wide range of applications. Extensive progress has been made in our understanding of PHAs’ biosynthesis, and currently, it is possible to engineer bacterial strains to produce PHAs with desired properties. The substrates for the fermentative production of PHAs are primarily derived from food-based carbon sources, raising concerns over the sustainability of their production in terms of their impact on food prices. This paper gives an overview of the current carbon sources used for PHA production and the methods used to transform these sources into fermentable forms. This allows us to identify the opportunities and restraints linked to future sustainable PHA production. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol are identified as two promising carbon sources for a sustainable production of PHAs. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol can be produced on a large scale during various second generation biofuels’ production. An integration of PHA production within a modern biorefinery is therefore proposed to produce biofuels and bioplastics simultaneously. This will create the potential to offset the production cost of biofuels and reduce the overall production cost of PHAs. PMID:27447619

  15. Carbon Sources for Polyhydroxyalkanoates and an Integrated Biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guozhan; Hill, David J; Kowalczuk, Marek; Johnston, Brian; Adamus, Grazyna; Irorere, Victor; Radecka, Iza

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a group of bioplastics that have a wide range of applications. Extensive progress has been made in our understanding of PHAs' biosynthesis, and currently, it is possible to engineer bacterial strains to produce PHAs with desired properties. The substrates for the fermentative production of PHAs are primarily derived from food-based carbon sources, raising concerns over the sustainability of their production in terms of their impact on food prices. This paper gives an overview of the current carbon sources used for PHA production and the methods used to transform these sources into fermentable forms. This allows us to identify the opportunities and restraints linked to future sustainable PHA production. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol are identified as two promising carbon sources for a sustainable production of PHAs. Hemicellulose hydrolysates and crude glycerol can be produced on a large scale during various second generation biofuels' production. An integration of PHA production within a modern biorefinery is therefore proposed to produce biofuels and bioplastics simultaneously. This will create the potential to offset the production cost of biofuels and reduce the overall production cost of PHAs. PMID:27447619

  16. Estimating Terrestrial Wood Biomass from Observed Concentrations of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, K. M.; Peters, W.; Carvalhais, N.; van der Werf, G.; Miller, J.

    2008-01-01

    We estimate terrestrial disequilibrium state and wood biomass from observed concentrations of atmospheric CO2 using the CarbonTracker system coupled to the SiBCASA biophysical model. Starting with a priori estimates of carbon flux from the land, ocean, and fossil fuels, CarbonTracker estimates net c

  17. Optimization of low sulfur carob pulp liquor as carbon source for fossil fuels biodesulfurization

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Tiago P.; Paixão, Susana M.; Teixeira, A. V.; Roseiro, J. Carlos; Alves, Luís Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background:Biodesulfurization (BDS) is a complementary technology to hydrodesulfurization since it allows the removal of recalcitrant sulfur compounds present in fossil fuels. The cost of culture medium to produce the biocatalysts is still one limitation for BDS application. Carob pulp, as an alternative carbon source, can reduce this cost. However, the presence of sulfates is critical, since BDS is inhibited at very low concentrations. Thus, the goal of this work was to optimize the process ...

  18. Production of siderophore type chelates in Atlantic Ocean waters enriched with different carbon and nitrogen sources

    OpenAIRE

    Mawji, Edward; Gledhill, M.; Milton, J.A.; M. V. Zubkov; Thompson, Anu; Wolff, George A.; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2011-01-01

    Siderophore type chelates were detected in nutrient enriched, incubated seawater collected from different biogeographical regions of the Atlantic Ocean. Seawater was enriched with glucose and ammonium, glycine (as a source of carbon and nitrogen) or chitin and ammonium at different concentrations and incubated for up to 3 – 4 days in the dark. Siderophore type chelates were detected using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-...

  19. Energy costs of carbon dioxide concentrating mechanisms in aquatic organisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raven, John A.; Beardall, J.; Giordano, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 121, 2-3 (2014), s. 111-124. ISSN 0166-8595 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : carbon dioxide * environmental change * radiation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.502, year: 2014

  20. Intraoperative End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide Concentrations: What Is the Target?

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Gary E.; Megan Way

    2011-01-01

    Recent publications suggest that target end-tidal carbon dioxide concentrations should be higher than values currently considered as acceptable. This paper presents evidence that end-tidal carbon dioxide values higher than concentrations that are currently targeted result in improved patient outcomes and are associated with a reduced incidence of postoperative complications.

  1. Carbon Monoxide Concentration in Different Districts of Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    K A'azam; Mojgan Baniardalani; F. Changani

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution is a major problem in Tehran. Most important agents responsible for the high pollution include carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, hydrocarbons and suspended particles. Determination of quality and quantity of polluting agents is of great importance for sustaining the inhabitants health level. We studied carbon monoxide, one of the most hazardous air-polluting agents, in 22 urban districts of Tehran. The results showed that in average 4.39% of the air in Tehran ha...

  2. Carbon dioxide concentration dictates alternative methanogenic pathways in oil reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Mayumi, Daisuke; Dolfing, Jan; Sakata, Susumu; Maeda, Haruo; Miyagawa, Yoshihiro; Ikarashi, Masayuki; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Takeuchi, Mio; Nakatsu, Cindy H.; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Deep subsurface formations (for example, high-temperature oil reservoirs) are candidate sites for carbon capture and storage technology. However, very little is known about how the subsurface microbial community would respond to an increase in CO2 pressure resulting from carbon capture and storage. Here we construct microcosms mimicking reservoir conditions (55 °C, 5 MPa) using high-temperature oil reservoir samples. Methanogenesis occurs under both high and low CO2 conditions in the microcos...

  3. Theoretical constraints on oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations in the Precambrian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1987-01-01

    Simple (one-dimensional) climate models suggest that carbon dioxide concentrations during the Archean must have been at least 100-1000 times the present level to keep the Earth's surface temperature above freezing in the face of decreased solar luminosity. Such models provide only lower bounds on CO2, so it is possible that CO2 levels were substantially higher than this and that the Archean climate was much warmer than today. Periods of extensive glaciation during the early and late Proterozoic, on the other hand, indicate that the climate at these times was relatively cool. To be consistent with climate models CO2 partial pressures must have declined from approximately 0.03 to 0.3 bar around 2.5 Ga ago to between 10(-3) and 10(-2) bar at 0.8 Ga ago. This steep decrease in carbon dioxide concentrations may be inconsistent with paleosol data, which implies that pCO2 did not change appreciably during that time. Oxygen was essentially absent from the Earth's atmosphere and oceans prior to the emergence of a photosynthetic source, probably during the late Archean. During the early Proterozoic the atmosphere and surface ocean were apparently oxidizing, while the deep ocean remained reducing. An upper limit of 6 x 10(-3) bar for pO2 at this time can be derived by balancing the burial rate of organic carbon with the rate of oxidation of ferrous iron in the deep ocean. The establishment of oxidizing conditions in the deep ocean, marked by the disappearance of banded iron formations approximately 1.7 Ga ago, permitted atmospheric oxygen to climb to its present level. O2 concentrations may have remained substantially lower than today, however, until well into the Phanerozoic.

  4. Spatial distribution of carbon sources and sinks in Canada's forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annual spatial distributions of carbon sources and sinks in Canada's forests at 1 km resolution are computed for the period from 1901 to 1998 using ecosystem models that integrate remote sensing images, gridded climate, soils and forest inventory data. GIS-based fire scar maps for most regions of Canada are used to develop a remote sensing algorithm for mapping and dating forest burned areas in the 25 yr prior to 1998. These mapped and dated burned areas are used in combination with inventory data to produce a complete image of forest stand age in 1998. Empirical NPP age relationships were used to simulate the annual variations of forest growth and carbon balance in 1 km pixels, each treated as a homogeneous forest stand. Annual CO2 flux data from four sites were used for model validation. Averaged over the period 1990-1998, the carbon source and sink map for Canada's forests show the following features: (i) large spatial variations corresponding to the patchiness of recent fire scars and productive forests and (ii) a general south-to-north gradient of decreasing carbon sink strength and increasing source strength. This gradient results mostly from differential effects of temperature increase on growing season length, nutrient mineralization and heterotrophic respiration at different latitudes as well as from uneven nitrogen deposition. The results from the present study are compared with those of two previous studies. The comparison suggests that the overall positive effects of non-disturbance factors (climate, CO2 and nitrogen) outweighed the effects of increased disturbances in the last two decades, making Canada's forests a carbon sink in the 1980s and 1990s. Comparisons of the modeled results with tower-based eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem exchange at four forest stands indicate that the sink values from the present study may be underestimated

  5. Evaluation of Natural Materials as Exogenous Carbon Sources for Biological Treatment of Low Carbon-to-Nitrogen Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Godínez, Juan; Beltrán-Hernández, Icela; Álvarez-Hernández, Alejandro; Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Contreras-López, Elizabeth; Quezada-Cruz, Maribel; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    In the bacterial processes involved in the mitigation of nitrogen pollution, an adequately high carbon-to-nitrogen (C : N) ratio is key to sustain denitrification. We evaluated three natural materials (woodchips, barley grains, and peanut shells) as carbon sources for low C : N wastewater. The amount of organic matter released from these materials to aqueous media was evaluated, as well as their pollution swapping potential by measuring the release of total Kjeldahl nitrogen, N-NH4+, NO2−, and NO3−, and total phosphorous. Barley grains yielded the highest amount of organic matter, which also showed to be the most easily biodegradable. Woodchips and peanut shells released carbon rather steadily and so they would not require frequent replenishment from biological reactors. These materials produced eluates with lower concentrations of nutrients than the leachates from barley grains. However, as woodchips yielded lower amounts of suspended solids, they constitute an adequate exogenous source for the biological treatment of carbon-deficient effluents. PMID:26495313

  6. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Guo, Jun [Testing and Analysis Center, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  7. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility

  8. Comparative study on CO2 sources in soil developed on carbonate rock and non-carbonate rock in Central Guizhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎廷宇; 王世杰; 郑乐平

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, by using concentration and carbon stable isotope the.CO2 sources of soil profiles developed on limestone, dolostone and claystone basements in Central Guizhou, China are comparatively studied. The results show that CO2 concentration of soil profiles developed on different basements is different, having the following sequence: limestone>dolostone>claystone. Below the soil depth of 20 cm from the surface the δ13C value of CO2 in soil profile developed on limestone ranges from -12.811‰ - -13.492‰(PDB), that in soil profile developed on dolostone varys from -13.212‰--14.271‰(PDB) and that in soil profile developed on claystone is about -20.234‰- -21.485‰(PDB). Taking the carbon isotope of soil organic matter and carbonate rock as two isotopic endmembers, the proportion of soil C02 generated by dissolution of carbonate rock is calculated, about 21%-25% for soil profile developed on limestone basement, 19%-21% for soil profile developed on dolostone basement. There is almost no influx of

  9. Molasses as an efficient low-cost carbon source for biological Cr(VI) removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michailides, Michail K. [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Tekerlekopoulou, Athanasia G., E-mail: atekerle@upatras.gr [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Akratos, Christos S.; Coles, Sandra [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Pavlou, Stavros [Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), Stadiou Str., Platani, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Vayenas, Dimitrios V. [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), Stadiou Str., Platani, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece)

    2015-01-08

    Highlights: • Suspended and attached growth reactors were examined for Cr(VI) bio-reduction. • Molasses was proved an efficient and very low cost carbon source. • Molasses was more efficient than sugar in enhancing Cr(VI) reduction. • SBR with recirculation was the most proper operating mode. - Abstract: In the present study, indigenous microorganisms from industrial sludge were used to reduce the activity of Cr(VI). Molasses, a by-product of sugar processing, was selected as the carbon source (instead of sugar used in a previous work) as it is a low-cost energy source for bioprocesses. Initially, experiments were carried out in suspended growth batch reactors for Cr(VI) concentrations of 1.5–110 mg/L. The time required for complete Cr(VI) reduction increased with initial Cr(VI) concentration. Initial molasses concentration was also found to influence the Cr(VI) reduction rate. The optimal concentration for all initial Cr(VI) concentrations tested was 0.8 gC/L. Experiments were also carried out in packed-bed reactors. Three different operating modes were used to investigate the optimal performance and efficiency of the filter, i.e. batch, continuous and SBR with recirculation. The latter mode with a recirculation rate of 0.5 L/min lead to significantly high Cr(VI) reduction rates (up to 135 g/m{sup 2} d). The results of this work were compared with those of a similar work using sugar as the carbon source and indicate that molasses could prove a feasible technological solution to a serious environmental problem.

  10. Molasses as an efficient low-cost carbon source for biological Cr(VI) removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Suspended and attached growth reactors were examined for Cr(VI) bio-reduction. • Molasses was proved an efficient and very low cost carbon source. • Molasses was more efficient than sugar in enhancing Cr(VI) reduction. • SBR with recirculation was the most proper operating mode. - Abstract: In the present study, indigenous microorganisms from industrial sludge were used to reduce the activity of Cr(VI). Molasses, a by-product of sugar processing, was selected as the carbon source (instead of sugar used in a previous work) as it is a low-cost energy source for bioprocesses. Initially, experiments were carried out in suspended growth batch reactors for Cr(VI) concentrations of 1.5–110 mg/L. The time required for complete Cr(VI) reduction increased with initial Cr(VI) concentration. Initial molasses concentration was also found to influence the Cr(VI) reduction rate. The optimal concentration for all initial Cr(VI) concentrations tested was 0.8 gC/L. Experiments were also carried out in packed-bed reactors. Three different operating modes were used to investigate the optimal performance and efficiency of the filter, i.e. batch, continuous and SBR with recirculation. The latter mode with a recirculation rate of 0.5 L/min lead to significantly high Cr(VI) reduction rates (up to 135 g/m2 d). The results of this work were compared with those of a similar work using sugar as the carbon source and indicate that molasses could prove a feasible technological solution to a serious environmental problem

  11. Effect of carbon source on growth and lipid accumulation in Chlorella sorokiniana GXNN01

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Hongjin; WANG Guangce

    2009-01-01

    Heterotrophic culture of microalgae to develop methods of increasing biomass productivity and storage lipids has brought new insight to commercial biodiesel production. To understand the relationship between heterotrophy and lipid production, the effects of carbon sources on the growth and lipid accumulation of Chlorella sorokiniana GXNN01 was studied. The alga exhibited an increased growth rate in response to the addition of carbon sources, which reached the stationary phase after 48 h at 30°C. In addition, glucose and NaAc had a significant effect on the lipid accumulation during the early-stationary phase. Specifically, the lipid content was 0.237±0.026 g g~(-1) cell dry weight and 0.272±0.041 g L~(-1) when glucose was used as the carbon source, whereas the lipid content reached 0.287±0.018 g g~(-1) cell dry weight and 0.288±0.008 g L~(-1) when NaAc was used as the carbon source. The neutral lipid content was found to first decrease and then increase over time during the growth phase. A glucose concentration of 20 mmol L~(-1) gave the maximal lipid yield and the optimum harvest time was the early-stationary phase.

  12. Concentrations of total organic carbon and trihalomethanes in feedwater of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A UK Magnox coastal power station was found to experience organic fouling of the condensate polishing plant resins, leading to impaired anion resin kinetics. After 25 years of operation it also began to experience some on-load corrosion boiler tube leaks from a source of halide. Dry primary coolant of carbon dioxide has to be maintained, and each boiler tube leak requires that power must be reduced to plug the leaking tube. Sources of the organic materials were investigated and trihalomethanes (THMs) were identified in the station 'Town's Main' water supply. Seasonal variations and the change in concentration through the make-up water treatment plant and in the steam/water circuit were investigated. Approximately 4% of the total organic carbon (TOC) and 80% of the THMs passed through the water treatment plant (WTP) with some of the remaining THMs breaking down in the once-through boiler, in this case releasing halide into the boiler. This required palliative measures for boiler alkalisation and an upgrade to the WTP. (orig.)

  13. Air Pollution in China: Mapping of Concentrations and Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Rohde, Robert A.; Muller, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    China has recently made available hourly air pollution data from over 1500 sites, including airborne particulate matter (PM), SO2, NO2, and O3. We apply Kriging interpolation to four months of data to derive pollution maps for eastern China. Consistent with prior findings, the greatest pollution occurs in the east, but significant levels are widespread across northern and central China and are not limited to major cities or geologic basins. Sources of pollution are widespread, but are particu...

  14. Carbon (EC/OC) concentrations as derived from routine PM measurements in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ten Brink, H.M.; Weijers, E.P. [ECN Biomass, Coal and Environmental Research, Petten (Netherlands); Van Arkel, F.T. [Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency PBK, Den Haag (Netherlands); De Jonge, D. [GGD Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-12-15

    Filter samples, collected in the national BOP programme (Netherlands Research Program on Particulate Matter), were analysed for their carbon content. The average amount of carbon at the six measuring sites corresponded with a mass concentration of 5 {mu}g.m{sup -3} in PM10 and 4 {mu}g.m{sup -3} in PM2.5, showing that carbon is a major component of particulate matter (PM). An important problem was that a substantial part of the carbon was derived from volatile carbon that was adsorbed on the filters. The amount of adsorbed volatile carbon was estimated from the carbon found in unloaded filters. This report first describes the adsorption problem itself, because it is the main reason why a standard method for measuring carbon in PM is lacking. Subsequently is described how the actual amount of carbon in PM was estimated.

  15. Carbon trading and carbon taxation: how to consider biotic sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoto Protocol (KP) to the UNFCCC includes land-use change and forestry in the carbon accounting process, limited to afforestation, reforestation and deforestation since 1990, and explicitly provides for the option of using a variety of flexibility mechanisms to meet the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets stipulated in a more cost-efficient manner. Domestically, different countries might adopt different approaches to achieve their emission reduction objectives, such as carbon trading or carbon taxation, and it is not clear to date what the implications for bioenergy use, forestry, and land-use change can be expected to be. With respect to national GHG emissions trading, the main issues studied in this paper are: Should trading of fossil fuel emissions allowances be coupled with trading of biotic credits and debits? Should credits for carbon sequestration in forests be auctioned or grandfathered? Should there be a distinction between a carbon permit issued for an additional biotic sink and those issued for fossil fuel carbon emissions? Is there a difference for biotic carbon sinks and sources between one-time permits and permits that allow a continued release of GHG over some pre-specified time? Should permits be issued only for the carbon-stock changes that count under the KP? With respect to national carbon taxation schemes, two questions are investigated: Should a tax credit be given for afforestation/reforestation (and a tax debit for deforestation)? Should tax credits also be given for projects that sequester carbon but do not count under the KP (such as forest protection rather than forest management)? For both schemes a crucial point is that by the formulation chosen in the KP two different classes of forest are created (i.e. those counted and those not counted under the KP), so that the implications for land prices might be significant. From a conceptual point of view this paper addresses the above-mentioned questions and contrasts some of the major

  16. Achieving high performance in intermediate temperature direct carbon fuel cells with renewable carbon as a fuel source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Bamboo fiber and waste paper were pyrolyzed to generate bamboo carbon and waste paper carbon as anode fuels of IT-DCFC. • Superior cell performance was achieved with the waste paper carbon. • The results suggested the high performance was due to the highest thermal reactivity and the catalytic inherent impurities. • Calcite and kaolinite as inherent impurities favored the thermal decomposition and the electrooxidation of carbon. - Abstract: Three kinds of carbon sources obtained from carbon black, bamboo fiber and waste paper were investigated as anode fuels in an intermediate temperature direct carbon fuel cell. The carbon sources were characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, etc. The results indicated that the waste paper carbon was more abundant in calcite and kaolinite, and showed higher thermal reactivity in the intermediate temperature range compared with the other two carbon sources. The cell performance was tested at 650 °C in a hybrid single cell, using Sm0.20Ce0.80O2−x as the electrolyte. As a result, the cell fed with waste paper carbon showed the highest performance among the three carbon sources, with a peak power density of 225 mW cm−2. The results indicated that its inherent impurities, such as calcite and kaolinite, might favor the thermal gasification of renewable carbon sources, which resulted in the enhanced performance of the intermediate temperature direct carbon fuel cell

  17. Carbonaceous aerosols on the south edge of the Tibetan Plateau: concentrations, seasonality and sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Cong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To quantitatively evaluate the effect of carbonaceous aerosols on the south edge of the Tibetan Plateau, aerosol samples were collected weekly from August 2009 to July 2010 at Mt. Everest (Qomolangma Station for Atmospheric and Environmental Observation and Research, briefly QOMS, 28.36° N, 86.95° E, 4276 m a.s.l.. The samples were analyzed for organic carbon (OC, elemental carbon (EC, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC and major ions. The average concentrations of OC, EC and WSOC were 1.43, 0.25 and 0.77 μg m−3, respectively. The concentration levels of OC and EC at QOMS are comparable to those at high elevation sites on the southern slopes of the Himalayas (Langtang and NCO-P, but three to six times lower than those at Manora Peak, India and Godavari, Nepal. Sulfate was the most abundant anion species followed by nitrate, accounting for 25 and 12% of total ionic mass, respectively. Ca2+ was the most abundant cation species (annual average of 0.88 μg m−3. The various aerosol compositions showed distinctive seasonality. The dust loading, represented by Ca2+ concentration, was relatively constant throughout the year. While OC, EC and other ionic species (NH4+, K+, NO3−, and SO42− exhibited a pronounced peak in the pre-monsoon period and a minimum in the monsoon season. Similar seasonal trends of aerosol composition were also reported previously from the southern slope of the Himalayas, such as Langtang and NCO-P. This phenomenon indicates that both slopes of Himalayas share a common atmospheric environment regime. The strong correlation of OC and EC in QOMS aerosols with K+ and levoglucosan indicates that they were mainly originated from biomass burning. The active fire spots observed by MODIS and their backward trajectories further demonstrate that in pre-monsoon season, agricultural and forest fires in the northern India and Nepal were most likely sources of carbonaceous aerosol at QOMS. In addition to large-scale atmospheric

  18. Utilization of carbon sources in a northern Brazilian mangrove ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarrizzo, Tommaso; Schwamborn, Ralf; Saint-Paul, Ulrich

    2011-12-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios ( 13C and 15N) and trophic level (TL) estimates based on stomach content analysis and published data were used to assess the contribution of autotrophic sources to 55 consumers in an intertidal mangrove creek of the Curuçá estuary, northern Brazil. Primary producers showed δ 13C signatures ranging between -29.2 and -19.5‰ and δ 15N from 3.0 to 6.3‰. The wide range of the isotopic composition of carbon of consumers (-28.6 to -17.1‰) indicated that different autotrophic sources are important in the intertidal mangrove food webs. Food web segregation structures the ecosystem into three relatively distinct food webs: (i) mangrove food web, where vascular plants contribute directly or indirectly via POM to the most 13C-depleted consumers (e.g. Ucides cordatus and zooplanktivorous food chains); (ii) algal food web, where benthic algae are eaten directly by consumers (e.g. Uca maracoani, mullets, polychaetes, several fishes); (iii) mixed food web where the consumers use the carbon from different primary sources (mainly benthivorous fishes). An IsoError mixing model was used to determine the contributions of primary sources to consumers, based on δ 13C values. Model outputs were very sensitive to the magnitude of trophic isotope fractionation and to the variability in 13C data. Nevertheless, the simplification of the system by a priori aggregation of primary producers allowed interpretable results for several taxa, revealing the segregation into different food webs.

  19. Ligninolytic Activity of Ganoderma strains on Different Carbon Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TYPUK ARTININGSIH

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is a phenylpropanoid polymers with only few carbon bonds might be hydrolized. Due to its complexity, lignin is particularly difficult to decompose. Ganoderma is one of white rot fungi capable of lignin degradation. The ligninolytic of several species Ganoderma growing under different carbon sources was studied under controlled conditions which P. chrysosporium was used as standard comparison.Three types of ligninolytic, namely LiP, MnP, and laccase were assessed quantitatively and qualitatively. Ratio between clear zone and diameter of fungal colony was used for measuring specific activity qualitatively.Four sspecies of Ganoderma showed positive ligninolytic qualitatively that G. lucidum KT2-32 gave the highest ligninolytic. Activity of LiP and MnP in different carbon sources was consistently resulted by G. lucidum KT2-32, while the highest activity of laccase was shown by G. ochrolaccatum SA2-14. Medium of Indulin AT affected production of protein extracellular and induced ligninolytic. Glucose, BMC, and pine sawdust did not affect the activity of ligninolytic. The specific activity of Ganoderma species was found to be higher than the one of P. chrysosporium.

  20. Black carbon concentration and deposition estimations in Finland by the regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Hienola

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The prediction skill of the regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM was assessed against the black carbon (BC concentration measurements from five locations in Finland, with focus on Hyytiälä station for the year 2005. We examined to what extent the model is able to reproduce the measurements using several statistical tools: median comparison, overlap coefficient OVL (the common area under two probability distributions curves and Z-score (a measure of standard deviation, shape and spread of the distributions. The results of the statistics showed that the model is biased low, suggesting either an excessive loss of black carbon in the model, or missing emissions. A further examination of the precipitation data from both measurements and model showed that there is no correlation between REMO's excessive precipitation and BC underestimation. This suggests that the excessive wet removal is not the main cause for the low black carbon concentration output. In addition, a comparison of wind directions in relation with high black carbon concentrations shows that REMO-HAM is able to predict the BC source directions relatively well. Cumulative black carbon deposition fluxes over Finland were estimated, including the deposition on snow.

  1. Geochemistry of dissolved inorganic carbon in a Coastal Plain aquifer. 2. Modeling carbon sources, sinks, and δ13C evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Peter B.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    1991-01-01

    Stable isotope data for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), carbonate shell material and cements, and microbial CO2 were combined with organic and inorganic chemical data from aquifer and confining-bed pore waters to construct geochemical reaction models along a flowpath in the Black Creek aquifer of South Carolina. Carbon-isotope fractionation between DIC and precipitating cements was treated as a Rayleigh distillation process. Organic matter oxidation was coupled to microbial fermentation and sulfate reduction. All reaction models reproduced the observed chemical and isotopic compositions of final waters. However, model 1, in which all sources of carbon and electron-acceptors were assumed to be internal to the aquifer, was invalidated owing to the large ratio of fermentation CO2 to respiration CO2 predicted by the model (5–49) compared with measured ratios (two or less). In model 2, this ratio was reduced by assuming that confining beds adjacent to the aquifer act as sources of dissolved organic carbon and sulfate. This assumption was based on measured high concentrations of dissolved organic acids and sulfate in confining-bed pore waters (60–100 μM and 100–380 μM, respectively) relative to aquifer pore waters (from less than 30 μM and 2–80 μM, respectively). Sodium was chosen as the companion ion to organic-acid and sulfate transport from confining beds because it is the predominant cation in confining-bed pore waters. As a result, excessive amounts of Na-for-Ca ion exchange and calcite precipitation (three to four times more cement than observed in the aquifer) were required by model 2 to achieve mass and isotope balance of final water. For this reason, model 2 was invalidated. Agreement between model-predicted and measured amounts of carbonate cement and ratios of fermentation CO2 to respiration CO2 were obtained in a reaction model that assumed confining beds act as sources of DIC, as well as organic acids and sulfate. This assumption was

  2. Influence of carbon source on alpha-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, M; Nielsen, J

    2001-10-01

    The influence of the carbon source on alpha-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae was quantified in carbon-limited chemostat cultures. The following carbon sources were investigated: maltose, maltodextrin (different chain lengths), glucose, fructose, galactose, sucrose, glycerol, mannitol and acetate. A. oryzae did not grow on galactose as the sole carbon source, but galactose was co-metabolized together with glucose. Relative to that on low glucose concentration (below 10 mg/l), productivity was found to be higher during growth on maltose and maltodextrins, whereas it was lower during growth on sucrose, fructose, glycerol, mannitol and acetate. During growth on acetate there was no production of alpha-amylase, whereas addition of small amounts of glucose resulted in alpha-amylase production. A possible induction by alpha-methyl-D-glucoside during growth on glucose was also investigated, but this compound was not found to be a better inducer of a-amylase production than glucose. The results strongly indicate that besides acting as a repressor via the CreA protein, glucose acts as an inducer. PMID:11759683

  3. A computational study of tomographic measurement of carbon monoxide at minor concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop a chemical species tomography system, this paper carries out various computational steps to address the problem of measuring minor species concentration using single-pass, short path-length absorption techniques in the mid-infrared. It focuses on the imaging of carbon monoxide (CO) in combustion exhaust as a case study, with an average concentration of 10 ppm over a 50 mm diameter cross-section, taking account of the presence of other absorbing species. CO absorption transitions R6, R7, R9 and R10 are identified as possible measurement targets. The joint effects of spectral absorption linewidth and laser source linewidth are considered at length, resulting in recommendations for laser linewidth to achieve appropriate levels of CO absorption signal purity. Measurement strategies are considered for achievement of the necessary sensitivity, noise and bandwidth performance. A feasible beam arrangement for tomographic imaging is discussed, providing 48 measurements of path concentration integral. Representative phantom reconstructions are presented, with encouraging results for application to such dynamic gaseous subjects

  4. Carbon Isotopic Constraints on Arctic Methane Sources, 2008-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, R. E.; Lowry, D.; Lanoiselle, M.; Sriskantharajah, S.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2010-12-01

    Arctic methane source strengths are particularly vulnerable to large changes with year-to year meteorological variations and with climatic change. A global increase in methane seen in 2007 (Dlugokencky et al., 2009) may have been in part be due to elevated wetland emissions caused by a warm, wet summer over large parts of Siberia. In 2010 wildfires over large areas of Russia will have added methane to the Arctic atmosphere. Carbon isotopic composition of methane in air from the Arctic arriving at a measurement station can be used to identify sources of the gas. Measurement of methane δ13C in air close to sources, including wetlands, permafrost, pine forest and submarine methane clathrate has extended the available data of source signatures of methane from northern sources. Keeling plot analysis of diurnal records from field campaigns in Arctic wetlands show that bulk wetland methane emissions are typically close to δ13CCH4 -69±1 ‰. Air samples from Zeppelin (Spitsbergen, Norway), Pallas (Finland) and Barra (Outer Hebrides, Scotland) have been regularly analysed for methane δ13C. Summer campaigns at Zeppelin point to a 13C depleted bulk Arctic source of dominantly biogenic origin, at -67‰. In spring, while the wetlands are still frozen, the source signature is more enriched, -53‰, with trajectory analysis implying a large contribution from onshore gas fields. Arctic methane emissions respond rapidly to warming with strong positive feedbacks. With rapid warming there is the potential to release large stores of carbon from permafrost and methane hydrates. Isotopic data are powerful discriminants of sources. High frequency, ideally continuous, monitoring of methane δ13C from a number of Arctic sites, onshore and offshore, coupled with back-trajectory analysis and regional modelling, will be important if future changes in Arctic source strengths are to be quantified. Reference: Dlugokencky, E. J., et al. (2009), Observational constraints on recent increases

  5. Growth and xanthan production of Xanthomonas campestris depending on the N-source concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prell, A. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Microbiology; Lasik, J. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Microbiology; Konicek, J. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Microbiology; Sobotka, M. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Microbiology; Sys, J. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Microbiology

    1995-11-01

    Growth of X. campestris and production of xanthan were studied in several batch fermentations with different starting concentrations of N-source. The dependencies of growth, productivity and yields on initial N-source concentration were observed. The maximum yields in the course of cultivations were identified. (orig.)

  6. Effects of light intensity, oxygen concentration, and carbon dioxide concentration on photosynthesis in algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, D H

    1975-03-01

    The effects of various combinations of light intensity, oxygen concentration, and CO2 concentration on photosynthesis and growth in several algal types were studied. The results suggest the following. (1) Different algae show different responses to high oxygen concentrations and high light intensities. (2) Inhibition of photosynthesis (CO2 fixation and growth), if seen, increases with increasing oxygen concentration and with increasing light intensity (at light intensities greater than saturation). (3) The inhibition of net photosynthesis observed cannot be attributed to high light intensity alone. (4) The inhibition cannot be attributed to increased rates of excretion of organic materials under conditions of high oxygen concentration and high light intensity. (5) Increased concentrations of CO2 can decrease the effect of high oxygen and light in some algae. (6) The decrease in net photosynthesis observed is probably the result of photorespiration. (7) The effect of light intensity, oxygen concentration, or CO2 concentration on algal photosynthesis should not be studied without considering the effect of the other factors. Some implications of these results, as related to primary productivity measurements, are also discussed. PMID:24241158

  7. Sources, transformations, and hydrological processes that control stream nitrate and dissolved organic matter concentrations during snowmelt in an upland forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestyen, S.D.; Boyer, E.W.; Shanley, J.B.; Kendall, C.; Doctor, D.H.; Aiken, G.R.; Ohte, N.

    2008-01-01

    We explored catchment processes that control stream nutrient concentrations at an upland forest in northeastern Vermont, USA, where inputs of nitrogen via atmospheric deposition are among the highest in the nation and affect ecosystem functioning. We traced sources of water, nitrate, and dissolved organic matter (DOM) using stream water samples collected at high frequency during spring snowmelt. Hydrochemistry, isotopic tracers, and end-member mixing analyses suggested the timing, sources, and source areas from which water and nutrients entered the stream. Although stream-dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) both originated from leaching of soluble organic matter, flushing responses between these two DOM components varied because of dynamic shifts of hydrological flow paths and sources that supply the highest concentrations of DOC and DON. High concentrations of stream water nitrate originated from atmospheric sources as well as nitrified sources from catchment soils. We detected nitrification in surficial soils during late snowmelt which affected the nitrate supply that was available to be transported to streams. However, isotopic tracers showed that the majority of nitrate in upslope surficial soil waters after the onset of snowmelt originated from atmospheric sources. A fraction of the atmospheric nitrogen was directly delivered to the stream, and this finding highlights the importance of quick flow pathways during snowmelt events. These findings indicate that interactions among sources, transformations, and hydrologic transport processes must be deciphered to understand why concentrations vary over time and over space as well as to elucidate the direct effects of human activities on nutrient dynamics in upland forest streams. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. High-resolution carbon dioxide concentration record 650,000-800,000 years before present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthi, Dieter; Le Floch, Martine; Bereiter, Bernhard;

    2008-01-01

    Changes in past atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations can be determined by measuring the composition of air trapped in ice cores from Antarctica. So far, the Antarctic Vostok and EPICA Dome C ice cores have provided a composite record of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels over the past 650...... is strongly correlated with Antarctic temperature throughout eight glacial cycles but with significantly lower concentrations between 650,000 and 750,000 yr before present. Carbon dioxide levels are below 180 parts per million by volume (p.p.m.v.) for a period of 3,000 yr during Marine Isotope Stage 16......,000 years. Here we present results of the lowest 200 m of the Dome C ice core, extending the record of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by two complete glacial cycles to 800,000 yr before present. From previously published data and the present work, we find that atmospheric carbon dioxide...

  9. Kupier prize lecture: Sources of solar-system carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Edward; Zinner, Ernst

    1994-01-01

    We have tried to deconvolve Solar-System carbon into its sources, on the basis of C-12/C-13 ratios (equivalent to R). Interstellar SiC in meteorites, representing greater than 4.6-Ga-old stardust from carbon stars, is isotopically heavier (bar R = 38 +/- 2) than Solar-System carbon (89), implying that the latter contains an additional, light component. A likely source are massive stars, mainly Type II supernovae and Wolf-Rayet stars, which, being O-rich, eject their C largely as CO rather than carbonaceous dust. The fraction of such light C in the Solar System depends on R(sub light) in the source. For R(sub light) = 180-1025 (as in 'Group 4' meteoritic graphite spherules, which apparently came from massive stars greater than 4.6 Ga ago), the fraction of light C is 0.79-0.61. Similar results are obtained for present-day data on red giants and interstellar gas. Although both have become enriched in C-13 due to galactic evolution (to bar-R = 20 and 57), the fraction of the light component in interstellar gas again is near 0.7. (Here bar R represents the mean of a mixture calculated via atom fractions; it is not identical to the arithmetic mean R). Interstellar graphite, unlike SiC, shows a large peak at R approximately equal 90, near the solar value. Although some of the grains may be of local origin, others show anomalies in other elements and hence are exotic. Microdiamonds, with R = 93, also are exotic on the basis of their Xe and N. Apparently R approximately 90 was a fairly common composition 4.6 Ga ago, of stars as well as the ISM.

  10. A Low Carbon EU Energy System and Unconventional Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper investigates the potential role of unconventional fossil fuels in a global low carbon energy system. Making use of a systemic approach, the paper presents an original application of a global partial equilibrium energy system model (TIAM-JET). In order to give a worldwide perspective with higher detail on European energy systems, the model links a set of extra-European macro-regions to the 30 European countries. First, a review of the most recent estimates of the available stocks of unconventional hydrocarbon resources is used to build the set of assumption for the scenario analysis. Secondly, a set of scenarios assuming different availability and cost of unconventional fuels are added to both a Current Trend scenario and a Carbon Constrained (CC) scenario, to explore the perspectives of unconventional gas and oil in a scenario halving CO2 emissions by 2050, which is consistent with a 2 degree temperature increase. The results show if/how unconventional sources can contribute to the robustness of the European energy system with respect to the stress of a strong carbon constraint. We define this robustness as the capacity of the energy system to adapt its evolution to long-term constraints and keep delivering energy services to end users. In our approach robustness represents the long-term dimension of energy security. Assessing this ''system property'' requires analysing the wide range of factors that can exercise a stabilizing influence on the energy services delivery system, together with their relations, actual interactions and synergies. The energy system approach used for the analysis seeks to take into account as much of this complexity as possible. We assess the robustness of the EU system to the carbon constraint by looking at how the CC scenario affects energy system costs and energy prices under scenarios with different deployment of unconventional sources. This provides insights on the synergies and/or trade-offs between energy security and

  11. Determination of Concentration Dependent Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon in Expanded Austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. In the present paper various experimental procedures to experimentally determine the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of carbon in expanded austenite are evaluated. To this end thermogravimetric carburization was simulated for various experimental conditions and the evaluated...

  12. Rapid biological oxidation of methanol in the tropical Atlantic: significance as a microbial carbon source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Dixon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Methanol is the second most abundant organic gas in the atmosphere after methane, and is ubiquitous in the troposphere. It plays a significant role in atmospheric oxidant chemistry and is biogeochemically active. Large uncertainties exist about whether the oceans are a source or sink of methanol to the atmosphere. Even less is understood about what reactions in seawater determine its concentration, and hence flux across the sea surface interface. We report here concentrations of methanol between 151–296 nM in parts of the oligotrophic North Atlantic, with corresponding microbial uptake rates between 2–146 nM d−1, suggesting turnover times as low as 1 day (1–25 days in surface waters of the oligotrophic tropical North East Atlantic. Methanol is mainly (≥97% used by microbes for obtaining energy in oligotrophic regions, which contrasts with shelf and coastal areas where between 20–50% can be used for cell growth. Comparisons of microbial methanol oxidation rates with parallel determinations of bacterial leucine uptake suggest that methanol contributes on average 13% to bacterial carbon demand in the central northern Atlantic gyre (maximum of 54%. In addition, the contribution that methanol makes to bacterial carbon demand varies as a power function of chlorophyll a concentrations; suggesting for concentrations <0.2 μg l−1 that methanol can make a significant contribution to bacterial carbon demand. However, our low air to sea methanol flux estimates of 7.2–13 μmol m−2 d−1 suggest that the atmosphere is not a major methanol source. We conclude that there must be a major, as yet unidentified, in situ oceanic methanol source in these latitudes which we suggest is sunlight driven decomposition of organic matter.

  13. Comparison of manufactured and black carbon nanoparticle concentrations in aquatic sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Nowack, B.; Wiesner, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we show that concentrations of manufactured carbon-based nanoparticles (MCNPs) in aquatic sediments will be negligible compared to levels of black carbon nanoparticles (BCNPs). This is concluded from model calculations accounting for MCNP sedimentation fluxes, removal rates due to agg

  14. Quantification of carbon sources for isoprene emission in poplar leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzwieseer, J.; Graus, M.; Schnitzler, J. P.; Heizmann, U.; Rennenberg, H.; Hansel, A.

    2003-12-01

    Isoprene is the most abundant volatile organic compound emitted by plants and in particular by trees. Current interest in understanding its biosynthesis in chloroplasts is forced by the important role isoprene plays in atmospheric chemistry. Leaf isoprene formation is closely linked to photosynthesis by a dynamic use of recently fixed photosynthetic precursors in the chloroplast. Under steady state conditions in [13C]CO2 atmosphere approximately 75 % of isoprene became labeled within minutes. The source of unlabeled C is suggested to be of extra-chloroplastidic and/or from starch degradation. In order to test whether these alternative carbon sources - leaf internal C-pools and xylem-transported carbohydrates, contribute to leaf isoprene formation in poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba) on-line proton-transfer-reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to follow 13C-labeling kinetics.

  15. Air-source heat pump carbon footprints: HFC impacts and comparison to other heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    European governments see that heat pumps could reduce carbon emissions in space- and hot-water heating. EU's Renewable Energy Directive designates heat pumps as renewable - eligible for various subsidies - if their carbon footprints are below an implied, average threshold. This threshold omits carbon generated by manufacture and emission of a heat-pump's fluorocarbon refrigerant. It also omits the footprint of the heat pump's hardware. To see if these omissions are significant, this study calculated carbon footprints of representative, residential heat pumps in the UK. Three findings emerged. First, in relation to power generation, which accounts for most of a heat-pump's greenhouse-gas emissions, fluorocarbons add another 20% to the footprint. Second, at UK efficiencies a heat-pump footprint (in kg CO2e emitted per kWh delivered) is comparable or higher than footprints of gaseous fuels used in heating. It is lower than the footprint of heating oil and far lower than the footprints of solid fuels. Third, production and disposal of a heat pump's hardware is relatively insignificant, accounting for only 2-3% of the overall heat-pump footprint. Sensitivities to the results were assessed: key factors are footprint of electricity generation, F-gas composition and leak rates and type of wall construction. - Research highlights: → Refrigerant emissions add 20% to a UK air-source heat pump's carbon footprint. → This contribution is so far ignored by regulations. → UK heat pump footprints are comparable to those of gaseous fuels.

  16. Effects of carbon sources, oxygenation and ethanol on the production of inulinase by Kluyveromyces marxianus YX01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIAOQI GAO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inulinase is one of the most important factors in consolidated bioprocessing, which combines enzyme production, inulin saccharification, and ethanol fermentation into a single process. In our study, inulinase production and cell growth of Kluyveromyces marxianus YX01 under different conditions were studied. Carbon source was shown to be significant on the production of inulinase, because the activity of inulinase was higher using inulin as a carbon source compared with glucose or fructose. The concentration of the carbon source had a repressive effect on the activity of inulinase. When the concentration was increased to 60 g/L, inulinase activity was only 50% compared with carbon source concentration of 20 g/L. Enzyme activity was also strongly influenced by aeration rate. It has been shown that the activity of inulinase and cell growth under anaerobic conditions were maintained at low levels, but aeration at 1.0 vvm (air volume/broth volume minute led to higher activity. Inulinase activity per unit biomass was not significantly different under different aeration rates. Ethanol had a repressive effect on the cell growth. Cells ceased growing when the level of ethanol was greater than 9% (v/v, but ethanol did not affect the activity of secreted inulinase and the enzyme was stable at ethanol concentration up to 15%.

  17. Black carbon concentration and deposition estimations in Finland by the regional aerosol–climate model REMO-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Hienola

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The prediction skill of the regional aerosol–climate model REMO-HAM was assessed against the black carbon (BC concentration measurements from five locations in Finland, with focus on Hyytiälä station for the year 2005. We examined to what extent the model is able to reproduce the measurements using several statistical tools: median comparison, overlap coefficient (OVL; the common area under two probability distributions curves and Z score (a measure of standard deviation, shape and spread of the distributions. The results of the statistics showed that the model is biased low. The local and regional emissions of BC have a significant contribution, and the model tendency to flatten the observed BC is most likely dominated by the lack of domestic burning of biofuel in the emission inventories. A further examination of the precipitation data from both measurements and model showed that there is no correlation between REMO's excessive precipitation and BC underestimation. This suggests that the excessive wet removal is not the main cause of the low black carbon concentration output. In addition, a comparison of wind directions in relation with high black carbon concentrations shows that REMO-HAM is able to predict the BC source directions relatively well. Cumulative black carbon deposition fluxes over Finland were estimated, including the deposition on snow.

  18. Parametric uncertainties in global model simulations of black carbon column mass concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Hana; Lee, Lindsay; Reddington, Carly; Carslaw, Ken; Mann, Graham

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have deduced that the annual mean direct radiative forcing from black carbon (BC) aerosol may regionally be up to 5 W m‑2 larger than expected due to underestimation of global atmospheric BC absorption in models. We have identified the magnitude and important sources of parametric uncertainty in simulations of BC column mass concentration from a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP-Mode). A variance-based uncertainty analysis of 28 parameters has been performed, based on statistical emulators trained on model output from GLOMAP-Mode. This is the largest number of uncertain model parameters to be considered in a BC uncertainty analysis to date and covers primary aerosol emissions, microphysical processes and structural parameters related to the aerosol size distribution. We will present several recommendations for further research to improve the fidelity of simulated BC. In brief, we find that the standard deviation around the simulated mean annual BC column mass concentration varies globally between 2.5 x 10‑9 g cm‑2 in remote marine regions and 1.25 x 10‑6 g cm‑2 near emission sources due to parameter uncertainty Between 60 and 90% of the variance over source regions is due to uncertainty associated with primary BC emission fluxes, including biomass burning, fossil fuel and biofuel emissions. While the contributions to BC column uncertainty from microphysical processes, for example those related to dry and wet deposition, are increased over remote regions, we find that emissions still make an important contribution in these areas. It is likely, however, that the importance of structural model error, i.e. differences between models, is greater than parametric uncertainty. We have extended our analysis to emulate vertical BC profiles at several locations in the mid-Pacific Ocean and identify the parameters contributing to uncertainty in the vertical distribution of black carbon at these locations. We will present preliminary

  19. Carbon dioxide as a carbon source in organic transformation: carbon-carbon bond forming reactions by transition-metal catalysts.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuji, Yasushi; Fujihara, Tetsuaki

    2012-01-01

    Recent carbon-carbon bond forming reactions of carbon dioxide with alkenes, alkynes, dienes, aryl zinc compounds, aryl boronic esters, aryl halides, and arenes having acidic C-H bonds are reviewed in which transition-metal catalysts play an important role.

  20. Indoor carbon monoxide and PM{sub 2.5} concentrations by cooking fuels in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, A.R. (Aga Khan Univ., Dept. Community Health Sciences, Karachi (Pakistan)); Lee, K. (Seoul National Univ., Graduate School of Public Health (Korea)); Bennett, D.; Yang, X.; Gold, E.B. (Univ. California at Davis, Dept. of Public Health, CA (United States)); Brown, K.H. (Univ. California at Davis, Program in Int. Nutrition, CA (United States)); Bhutta, Z.A. (Aga Khan Univ., Dep. of Pediatrics, Karachi (Pakistan))

    2009-02-15

    In developing countries biomass combustion is a frequently used source of domestic energy and may cause indoor air pollution. Carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 mum or less (PM{sub 2.5}) were measured in kitchens using wood or natural gas (NG) in a semi-rural community in Pakistan. Daytime CO and PM{sub 2.5} levels were measured for eight continuous hours in 51 wood and 44 NG users from December 2005 to April 2006. The laser photometer PM{sub 2.5} (Dustrak, TSI) was calibrated for field conditions and PM{sub 2.5} measurements were reduced by a factor of 2.77. CO was measured by an electrochemical monitor (Model T15v, Langan). The arithmetic mean for daytime CO concentration was 29.4 ppm in wood users; significantly higher than 7.5 ppm in NG users (P < 0.001). The arithmetic mean for daytime PM{sub 2.5} concentrations was 2.74 mg/m3 in wood users; significantly higher than 0.38 mg/m3 in NG users (P < 0.001). Higher peak levels of CO and PM{sub 2.5} were also observed in wood users. Time spent in the kitchen during fuel burning was significantly related to increasing CO and PM{sub 2.5} concentrations in wood users. These findings suggest that cooking with wood fuel may lead to hazardous concentrations of CO and PM{sub 2.5}. (au)

  1. Were kinetics of Archean calcium carbonate precipitation related to oxygen concentration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, D. Y.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Archean carbonates commonly contain decimetre- to metre-thick beds consisting entirely of fibrous calcite and neomorphosed fibrous aragonite that precipitated in situ on the sea floor. The fact that such thick accumulations of precipitated carbonate are rare in younger marine carbonates suggests an important change in the modes of calcium carbonate precipitation through time. Kinetics of carbonate precipitation depend on the concentration of inhibitors to precipitation that reduce crystallization rates and crystal nuclei formation, leading to kinetic maintenance of supersaturated solutions. Inhibitors also affect carbonate textures by limiting micrite precipitation and promoting growth of older carbonate crystals on the sea floor. Fe2+, a strong calcite-precipitation inhibitor, is thought to have been present at relatively high concentrations in Archean seawater because oxygen concentrations were low. The rise in oxygen concentration at 2.2-1.9 Ga led to the removal of Fe2+ from seawater and resulted in a shift from Archean facies, which commonly include precipitated beds, to Proterozoic facies, which contain more micritic sediment and only rare precipitated beds.

  2. Dynamics of Intracellular Polymers in Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Processes under Different Organic Carbon Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhen Xing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR may deteriorate or fail during low organic carbon loading periods. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs in EBPR were acclimated under both high and low organic carbon conditions, and then dynamics of polymers in typical cycles, anaerobic conditions with excess organic carbons, and endogenous respiration conditions were examined. After long-term acclimation, it was found that organic loading rates did not affect the yield of PAOs and the applied low organic carbon concentrations were advantageous for the enrichment of PAOs. A low influent organic carbon concentration induced a high production of extracellular carbohydrate. During both anaerobic and aerobic endogenous respirations, when glycogen decreased to around 80 ± 10 mg C per gram of volatile suspended solids, PAOs began to utilize polyphosphate significantly. Regressed by the first-order reaction model, glycogen possessed the highest degradation rate and then was followed by polyphosphate, while biomass decay had the lowest degradation rate.

  3. How low can you go? Assessing minimum concentrations of NSC in carbon limited tree saplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Guenter; Hartmann, Henrik; Schwendener, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Tissue concentrations of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) are frequently used to determine the carbon balance of plants. Over the last years, an increasing number of studies have inferred carbon starvation in trees under environmental stress like drought from low tissue NSC concentrations. However, such inferences are limited by the fact that minimum concentrations of NSC required for survival are not known. So far, it was hypothesized that even under lethal carbon starvation, starch and low molecular sugar concentrations cannot be completely depleted and that minimum NSC concentrations at death vary across tissues and species. Here we present results of an experiment that aimed to determine minimum NSC concentrations in different tissues of saplings of two broad-leaved tree species (Acer pseudoplatanus and Quercus petratea) exposed to lethal carbon starvation via continuous darkening. In addition, we investigated recovery rates of NSC concentrations in saplings that had been darkened for different periods of time and were then re-exposed to light. Both species survived continuous darkening for about 12 weeks (confirmed by testing the ability to re-sprout after darkness). In all investigated tissues, starch concentrations declined close to zero within three to six weeks of darkness. Low molecular sugars also decreased strongly within the first weeks of darkness, but seemed to stabilize at low concentrations of 0.5 to 2 % dry matter (depending on tissue and species) almost until death. NSC concentrations recovered surprisingly fast in saplings that were re-exposed to light. After 3 weeks of continuous darkness, tissue NSC concentrations recovered within 6 weeks to levels of unshaded control saplings in all tissues and in both species. To our knowledge, this study represents the first experimental attempt to quantify minimum tissue NSC concentrations at lethal carbon starvation. Most importantly, our results suggest that carbon-starved tree saplings are able to

  4. New Adsorption Cycles for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Ritter; Armin Ebner; Steven Reynolds Hai Du; Amal Mehrotra

    2008-07-31

    The objective of this three-year project was to study new pressure swing adsorption (PSA) cycles for CO{sub 2} capture and concentration at high temperature. The heavy reflux (HR) PSA concept and the use of a hydrotalcite like (HTlc) adsorbent that captures CO{sub 2} reversibly at high temperatures simply by changing the pressure were two key features of these new PSA cycles. Through the completion or initiation of nine tasks, a bench-scale experimental and theoretical program has been carried out to complement and extend the process simulation study that was carried out during Phase I (DE-FG26-03NT41799). This final report covers the entire project from August 1, 2005 to July 31, 2008. This program included the study of PSA cycles for CO{sub 2} capture by both rigorous numerical simulation and equilibrium theory analysis. The insight gained from these studies was invaluable toward the applicability of PSA for CO{sub 2} capture, whether done at ambient or high temperature. The rigorous numerical simulation studies showed that it is indeed possible to capture and concentrate CO{sub 2} by PSA. Over a wide range of conditions it was possible to achieve greater than 90% CO{sub 2} purity and/or greater than 90% CO{sub 2} recovery, depending on the particular heavy reflux (HR) PSA cycle under consideration. Three HR PSA cycles were identified as viable candidates for further study experimentally. The equilibrium theory analysis, which represents the upper thermodynamic limit of the performance of PSA process, further validated the use of certain HR PSA cycles for CO{sub 2} capture and concentration. A new graphical approach for complex PSA cycle scheduling was also developed during the course of this program. This new methodology involves a priori specifying the cycle steps, their sequence, and the number of beds, and then following a systematic procedure that requires filling in a 2-D grid based on a few simple rules, some heuristics and some experience. It has been

  5. Thermal hydrolysis of sludge and the use of hydrolysate as carbon source for denitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlindhaug, J.

    1995-10-01

    As a consequence of the North Sea- and the Baltic Sea Treaties as well as the Wastewater Directive of the EU, several large wastewater treatment plants discharging to sensitive receiving waters have to include phosphorus as well as nitrogen removal. This thesis evaluates the so called NTH-process for nutrient removal. In this process pre-precipitation is used in front of a biological nitrogen removal step that is based on a combination of pre- and post-denitrification in moving bed biofilm reactors. The biological step is followed by a final separation step, possibly after coagulant addition. Carbon source for the post denitrification step is made available by hydrolysis of the sludge produced. The idea is that the particulate organic matter, which in a traditional pre-denitrification step would have to be enzymatically hydrolyzed, can be more efficiently hydrolyzed in a concentrated sidestream and used in a post-denitrification step. In the thesis hydrolyzed sludge is used as a carbon source for denitrification. The objective is to investigate the influence of varying hydrolysis conditions on the composition and amount of the thermal hydrolysate produced, as well as the quality of the hydrolysate as a carbon source for denitrification. 201 refs., 78 refs., 53 tabs.

  6. Production of Cyclodextrin Glycosyltransferase (CGTase by Bacillus lehensis S8 using Sago Starch as Carbon Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan-Kit Woo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase is influenced by the reaction of the CGTase-producing strain towards various types of substrates. Variations in environmental factors such as concentrations of carbon and nitrogen sources possess significant effects on CGTase production. The present study was conducted with the prime purpose to optimise the cultivation medium in enhancing the CGTase production by a locally isolated alkalophilic Bacillus sp. The CGTase fermentation processes were performed in 250 mL Erlenmeyer flasks containing 200 mL of production medium with continuous shaking at 200 rpm and 37°C. Optimisation process was conducted by using change-a-factor-at-a-time method. From the study, an indigenous Malaysian carbon source, i.e., sago starch was found capable in improving the CGTase production with the CGTase yield of 18452 U g-1 at 0.1% w/v of starch. In addition to that, by using yeast extract as the sole nitrogen source in the medium, the CGTase excretion by the isolate is greatly enhanced as compared to the basal medium which employed two types of nitrogenous compounds. The optimised growth medium that has been successfully developed for high level of CGTase production by using the locally isolated Bacillus lehensis in 250 mL Erlenmeyer flask is comprised of (% w/v: 0.1% sago starch, 1% yeast extract, 1% sodium carbonate, 0.009% magnesium sulphate and 0.1% di-potassium hydrogen phosphate.

  7. Wine wastes as carbon source for biological treatment of acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M C; Santos, E S; Barros, R J; Pires, C; Martins, M

    2009-05-01

    Possible use of wine wastes containing ethanol as carbon and energy source for sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) growth and activity in the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) is studied for the first time. The experiments were performed using anaerobic down-flow packed bed reactors in semi-continuous systems. The performance of two bioreactors fed with wine wastes or ethanol as carbon sources is compared in terms of sulphate reduction, metals removal and neutralization. The results show that efficient neutralization and high sulphate removal (>90%) were attained with the use of wine wastes as substrate allowing the production of effluents with concentrations below the required local legislation for irrigation waters. This is only possible provided that the AMD and wine wastes are contacted with calcite tailing, a waste material that neutralizes and provides buffer capacity to the medium. The removal of metals using wine wastes as carbon source was 61-91% for Fe and 97% for both Zn and Cu. The lower removal of iron, when wine waste is used instead of ethanol, may be due to the presence of iron-chelating compounds in the waste, which prevent the formation of iron sulphide, and partial unavailability of sulphide because of re-oxidation to elemental sulphur. However, that did not affect significantly the quality of the effluent for irrigation. This work demonstrates that wine wastes are a potential alternative to traditional SRB substrates. This finding has direct implication to sustainable operation of SRB bioreactors for AMD treatment. PMID:19201010

  8. Fossil and Nonfossil Sources of Organic and Elemental Carbon Aerosols in the Outflow from Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Agrios, Konstantinos; Lee, Meehye; Salazar, Gary; Szidat, Sönke

    2016-06-21

    Source quantification of carbonaceous aerosols in the Chinese outflow regions still remains uncertain despite their high mass concentrations. Here, we unambiguously quantified fossil and nonfossil contributions to elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) of total suspended particles (TSP) from a regional receptor site in the outflow of Northeast China using radiocarbon measurement. OC and EC concentrations were lower in summer, representing mainly marine air, than in other seasons, when air masses mostly traveled over continental regions in Mongolia and northeast China. The annual-mean contribution from fossil-fuel combustion to EC was 76 ± 11% (0.1-1.3 μg m(-3)). The remaining 24 ± 11% (0.03-0.42 μg m(-3)) was attributed to biomass burning, with slightly higher contribution in the cold period (∼31%) compared to the warm period (∼21%) because of enhanced emissions from regional biomass combustion sources in China. OC was generally dominated by nonfossil sources, with an annual average of 66 ± 11% (0.5-2.8 μg m(-3)), approximately half of which was apportioned to primary biomass-burning sources (34 ± 6%). In winter, OC almost equally originated from primary OC (POC) emissions and secondary OC (SOC) formation from fossil fuel and biomass-burning sources. In contrast, summertime OC was dominated by primary biogenic emissions as well as secondary production from biogenic and biomass-burning sources, but fossil-derived SOC was the smallest contributor. Distinction of POC and SOC was performed using primary POC-to-EC emission ratios separated for fossil and nonfossil emissions. PMID:27203471

  9. Nitrification and denitrification in biological activated carbon filter for treating high ammonia source water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguang LIU; Xiaojian ZHANG; Zhansheng WANG

    2008-01-01

    Since the ammonia in the effluent of the tradi-tional water purification process could not meet the supply demand, the advanced treatment of a high concentration of NH4+-N micro-polluted source water by biological activated carbon filter (BACF) was tested. The filter was operated in the downflow manner and the results showed that the remov-ing rate of NH4+-N was related to the influent concentration of NH4+-N. Its removing rate could be higher than 95% when influent concentration was under 1.0 mg/L. It could also decrease with the increasing influent concentration when the NH4+-N concentration was in the range from 1.5-to 4.9 mg/L and the dissolved oxygen (DO) in the infuent was under 10 mg/L, and the minimum removing rate could be 30%. The key factor of restricting nitrifcation in BACF was the influent DO. When the influent NH4+-N concentration was high, the DO in water was almost depleted entirely by the nitrifying and hetetrophic bacteria in the depth of 0.4 m filter and the filter layer was divided into aerobic and anoxic zones. The nitrification and degradation of organic matters existed in the aerobic zone, while the denitrification occurred in the anoxic zone. Due to the limited carbon source, the denitrification could not be carried out properly, which led to the accu-mulation of the denitrification intermediates such as NO2-. In addition to the denitrification bacteria, the nitrification and the heterotrophic bacteria existed in the anoxic zone.

  10. Crescimento de Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli sob diferentes temperaturas, pH, concentrações de cloreto de sódio e fontes de carbono Growth of Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli under different variable temperature, pH, sodium chloride concentrations and carbon sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Tanajura Cavalcanti

    2005-12-01

    growth was 7.4 with minimum and maximum of 4 and 10.8, respectively e; Aac growth was reduced with the elevation of NaCl concentration and, 6.2% was lethal. All tested carbohydrates were utilized by Aac strains as carbon source. However small growth variations were observed by the speed and intensity of substrate utilization with acid production.

  11. The effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration on carbon isotope fractionation in C3 land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Brian A.; Jahren, A. Hope

    2012-11-01

    Because atmospheric carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of all land-plant carbon, workers have suggested that pCO2 level may exert control over the amount of 13C incorporated into plant tissues. However, experiments growing plants under elevated pCO2 in both chamber and field settings, as well as meta-analyses of ecological and agricultural data, have yielded a wide range of estimates for the effect of pCO2 on the net isotopic discrimination (Δδ13Cp) between plant tissue (δ13Cp) and atmospheric CO2 (δ13CCO2). Because plant stomata respond sensitively to plant water status and simultaneously alter the concentration of pCO2 inside the plant (ci) relative to outside the plant (ca), any experiment that lacks environmental control over water availability across treatments could result in additional isotopic variation sufficient to mask or cancel the direct influence of pCO2 on Δδ13Cp. We present new data from plant growth chambers featuring enhanced dynamic stabilization of moisture availability and relative humidity, in addition to providing constant light, nutrient, δ13CCO2, and pCO2 level for up to four weeks of plant growth. Within these chambers, we grew a total of 191 C3 plants (128 Raphanus sativus plants and 63 Arabidopsis thaliana) across fifteen levels of pCO2 ranging from 370 to 4200 ppm. Three types of plant tissue were harvested and analyzed for carbon isotope value: above-ground tissues, below-ground tissues, and leaf-extracted nC31-alkanes. We observed strong hyperbolic correlations (R ⩾ 0.94) between the pCO2 level and Δδ13Cp for each type of plant tissue analyzed; furthermore the linear relationships previously suggested by experiments across small (10-350 ppm) changes in pCO2 (e.g., 300-310 ppm or 350-700 ppm) closely agree with the amount of fractionation per ppm increase in pCO2 calculated from our hyperbolic relationship. In this way, our work is consistent with, and provides a unifying relationship for, previous work on carbon isotopes

  12. Organic carbon in Antarctic snow: spatial trends and possible sources

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Antony, R.; Mahalinganathan, K.; Thamban, M.; Nair, S.

    Organic carbon records in Antarctic snow are sparse despite the fact that it is of great significance to global carbon dynamics, snow photochemistry, and air–snow exchange processes. Here, surface snow total organic carbon (TOC) along with sea...

  13. Determination of differential carbon dioxide concentration by conductimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, J.M. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    There are many applications in such disciplines as agronomy, plant physiology, and ecology where it is necessary to measure the difference in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration [CO{sub 2}] between two points. This is commonly done with an infrared gas analyzer, but such instruments are expensive, representing a substantial and sometimes prohibitive share of the cost of CO{sub 2}-related research. The goal of this project was to explore a simple inexpensive alternative, in which the difference in [CO{sub 2}] between two air streams is determined by bubbling the air through cells containing deionized water while measuring the ratio of their conductivities with a half-bridge measurement of electrode pairs suspended in each cell. The underlying principles are presented, and it is shown that (i) differential [CO{sub 2}] is directly proportional to the conductivity ratio minus its inverse and (ii) the coefficient of proportionality is equal to the mean [CO{sub 2}] of the two air streams. A system was designed and constructed to test these principles, and the results confirmed them. Dynamic response was characterized, and shown to be proportional to Q/V, where Q is the air flow rate and V is the water-filled volume of the cell. Differential resolution was found to be in the range of 0.4 to 0.8 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}, but better resolution is theoretically possible. Differential measurement of [CO{sub 2}] by conductometry shows considerable promise, particularly considering the straightforward nature of the relationship and the relatively low cost of the required components.

  14. Application of biogenic carbon dioxide produced by yeast with different carbon sources for attraction of mosquitoes towards adult mosquito traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, D; Ponmariappan, S; Sharma, Atul K; Jha, Hemendra K; Wasu, Yogesh H; Sharma, Ajay K

    2016-04-01

    Surveillance is a prime requisite for controlling arthropod vectors like mosquitoes that transmit diseases such as malaria, dengue and chikungunya. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the main cues from vertebrate breath that attracts mosquitoes towards the host. Hence, CO2 is used as an attractant during surveillance of mosquitoes either from commercial cylinders or dry ice for mosquito traps. In the present study, the biogenic carbon dioxide production was optimized with different carbon sources such as glucose, simple sugar and jaggery with and without yeast peptone dextrose (YPD) media using commercial baker's yeast. The results showed that yeast produced more biogenic CO2 with simple sugar as compared to other carbon sources. Further substrate concentration was optimized for the continuous production of biogenic CO2 for a minimum of 12 h by using 10 g of baker's yeast with 50 g of simple sugar added to 1.5 l distilled water (without YPD media) in a 2-l plastic bottle. This setup was applied in field condition along with two different mosquito traps namely Mosquito Killing System (MKS) and Biogents Sentinel (BGS) trap. Biogenic CO2 from this setup has increased the trapping efficiency of MKS by 6.48-fold for Culex quinquefasciatus, 2.62-fold for Aedes albopictus and 1.5-fold for Anopheles stephensi. In the case of BGS, the efficiency was found to be increased by 3.54-fold for Ae. albopictus, 4.33-fold for An. stephensi and 1.3-fold for Armigeres subalbatus mosquitoes. On the whole, plastic bottle setup releasing biogenic CO2 from sugar and yeast has increased the efficiency of MKS traps by 6.38-fold and 2.74-fold for BGS traps as compared to traps without biogenic CO2. The present study reveals that, among different carbon sources used, simple sugar as a substance (which is economical and readily available across the world) yielded maximum biogenic CO2 with yeast. This setup can be used as an alternative to CO2 cylinder and dry ice in any adult mosquito traps to

  15. Carbon Nanotube/Magnesium Composite as a Hydrogen Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min Kyu; Se, Kwon Oh; Kim, Min Joong; Hwang, Jae Won; Yoon, Byoung Young; Kwon, Hyuk Sang

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen produced using the steam reforming process contains sulfur and carbon monoxide that are harmful to the Pt catalyst in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). However, CO-free hydrogen can be generated from the hydrolysis of either Al in strongly alkaline water or Mg in neutral water with chlorides such as sea water. The hydrogen generation rate from the hydrolysis of Mg is extremely slow and linearly proportional to the corrosion rate of Mg in chloride water. In this work, we fabricated a carbon nanotube (CNT)--reinforced Mg--matrix composite by Spark Plasma Sintering as a fast hydrogen generation source for a PEMFC. The CNTs distributed in the Mg matrix act as numerous local cathodes, and hence cause severe galvanic corrosion between the Mg-matrix anode and CNT-cathode in NaCl solution. It was found that the hydrogen generation rate from the hydrolysis of the 5 vol.% CNT/Mg composite is 3300 times faster than that of the Mg without CNTs due primarily to the galvanic corrosion effect. PMID:26726603

  16. Constraining terrestrial ecosystem CO2 fluxes by integrating models of biogeochemistry and atmospheric transport and data of surface carbon fluxes and atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Q.; Zhuang, Q.; D. Henze; Bowman, K.; M. Chen; Liu, Y.; He, Y.; Matsueda, H.; Machida, T.; Sawa, Y.; W. Oechel

    2014-01-01

    Regional net carbon fluxes of terrestrial ecosystems could be estimated with either biogeochemistry models by assimilating surface carbon flux measurements or atmospheric CO2 inversions by assimilating observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here we combine the ecosystem biogeochemistry modeling and atmospheric CO2 inverse modeling to investigate the magnitude and spatial distribution of the terrestrial ecosystem CO2 sources and sinks. First, we constrain a terrestri...

  17. Use of Plackett-Burman design for rapid screening of nitrogen and carbon sources for the production of lipase in solid state fermentation by Yarrowia lipolytica from mustard oil cake (Brassica napus)

    OpenAIRE

    Sarat Babu Imandi; Sita Kumari Karanam; Hanumantha Rao Garapati

    2014-01-01

    Mustard oil cake (Brassica napus), the residue obtained after extraction of mustard oil from mustard oil seeds, was investigated for the production of lipase under solid state fermentation (SSF) using the marine yeast Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589. Process parameters such as incubation time, biomass concentration, initial moisture content, carbon source concentration and nitrogen source concentration of the medium were optimized. Screening of ten nitrogen and five carbon sources has been acco...

  18. Land use effects on terrestrial carbon sources and sinks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Josep; G.; Canadell

    2002-01-01

    Current and past land use practices are critical in determining the distribution and size of global terrestrial carbon (C) sources and sinks. Althoughfossil fuel emissions dominate the anthropogenic perturbation of the global C cycle, land use still drives the largest portion of anthropogenic emissions in a number of tropical regions of Asia. The size of the emission flux owing to land use change is still the biggest uncertainty in the global C budget. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reported a flux term of 1.7 PgC@a-1 for 1990-1995 but more recent estimates suggest the magnitude of this source may be only of 0.96 PgC@a-1 for the 1990s. In addition, current and past land use practices are now thought to contribute to a large degree to the northern hemisphere terrestrial sink, and are the dominant driver for some regional sinks. However, mechanisms other than land use change need to be invoked in order to explain the inferred C sink in the tropics. Potential candidates are the carbon dioxide (CO2) fertilization and climate change; fertilization due to nitrogen (N) deposition is believed to be small or nil. Although the potential for managing C sinks is limited, improved land use management and new land uses such as reforestation and biomass fuel cropping, can further enhance current terrestrial C sinks. Best management practices in agriculture alone could sequester 0.4-0.8 PgC per year in soils if implemented globally. New methodologies to ensure verification and permanency of C sequestration need to be developed.

  19. Subterranean Carbon Dioxide Concentration Analysis Utilizing a Scalable Optical Fiber-Based Absorption Cell Array for Carbon Capture and Storage Site Integrity Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, G. R.; Soukup, B.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration is a means to mitigate the increasing atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) by capturing the CO2 at a source such as a power generation facility and storing the captured CO2 in geologic formations. Many technological advances will need to occur for successful carbon sequestration, including near surface monitoring tools and techniques to ensure site integrity and public safety. Researchers at Montana State University (MSU) are developing a scalable fiber sensor array in a call/return configuration for monitoring near sub-surface CO2 concentrations for the purpose of carbon sequestration site integrity monitoring. The system measures CO2 concentrations through the application of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). The instrument utilizes four fiber probes (absorption cells) connected to a detector, a fiber-optic beam splitter, and a 1 x 4 fiber-optic micro-electromechanical (MEMS) switch that can direct the light to one of the four probes, and employs a single tunable distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser with a center wavelength of 2.004 μm to access CO2 absorption features. The fiber sensor array can easily be reconfigured by simply moving the fiber probes. Low cost is achieved by using inexpensive passive components in the probes while limiting the number of the more expensive components including the DFB laser, the detector, and the 1 X 4 MEMS switch. The fiber sensor system was tested over a sixty day period centered on a thirty day controlled CO2 release at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) facility that was developed for sub-surface and near surface carbon sequestration monitoring research. In this presentation, the design of the fiber sensor array system will be presented, along with the system performance during the sixty day monitoring experiment.

  20. Atmospheric concentrations and potential sources of PCBs, PBDEs, and pesticides to Acadia National Park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study assessed concentrations and investigated potential source regions for PCBs, PBDEs, and organochlorine pesticides in Acadia National Park, Maine, USA. Back-trajectories and potential source contribution function (PSCF) values were used to map potential source areas for total-PCBs, BDE-47, and 10 organochlorine pesticides. The constructed PSCF maps showed that ANP receives high pollutant concentrations in air masses that travel along four main pathways: (1) from the SW along the eastern Atlantic seaboard, (2) from the WSW over St. Louis, and Columbus regions, (3) from the west over Chicago, and Toronto regions, and (4) from WNW to NNW over the Great Lakes, and Quebec regions. Transport of all studied pollutants were equally distributed between the first three pathways, with only minor contributions from the last pathway. This study concludes that the high-pollutant concentrations arriving at ANP do not exclusively originate from the major urban centers along the eastern Atlantic seaboard. -- Highlights: ► POP concentrations and source areas were determined for Acadia National Park. ► ANP receives high air mass pollutant concentrations from four main pathways. ► Highest PCB concentration events were summer samples derived from three different pathways. ► OCPs arriving at ANP have southern, midwestern, and eastern US source regions. ► POPs do not exclusively originate from urban centers along the eastern seaboard. -- This study concludes that the high-pollutant concentrations arriving at ANP do not exclusively originate from the major urban centers along the eastern Atlantic seaboard

  1. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations and compositions, and trihalomethane formation potentials in waters from agricultural peat soils, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California; implications for drinking-water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Roger; Ranalli, Anthony J.; Aiken, George R.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    1998-01-01

    Water exported from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River delta (Delta) is an important drinking-water source for more than 20 million people in California. At times, this water contains elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and bromide, and exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level for trihalomethanes of 0.100 milligrams per liter if chlorinated for drinking water. About 20 to 50 percent of the trihalomethane precursors to Delta waters originates from drainage water from peat soils on Delta islands. This report elucidates some of the factors and processes controlling and affecting the concentration and quality of dissolved organic carbon released from peat soils and relates the propensity of dissolved organic carbon to form trihalomethanes to its chemical composition.Soil water was sampled from near-surface, oxidized, well-decomposed peat soil (upper soil zone) and deeper, reduced, fibrous peat soil (lower soil zone) from one agricultural field in the west central Delta over 1 year. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon in the upper soil zone were highly variable, with median concentrations ranging from 46.4 to 83.2 milligrams per liter. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon in samples from the lower soil zone were much less variable and generally slightly higher than samples from the upper soil zone, with median concentrations ranging from 49.3 to 82.3 milligrams per liter. The dissolved organic carbon from the lower soil zone had significantly higher aromaticity (as measured by specific ultraviolet absorbance) and contained significantly greater amounts of aromatic humic substances (as measured by XAD resin fractionation and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of XAD isolates) than the dissolved organic carbon from the upper soil zone. These results support the conclusion that more aromatic forms of dissolved organic carbon are produced under anaerobic conditions compared to aerobic conditions

  2. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes of Few Walls Using Aliphatic Alcohols as a Carbon Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Espinosa-Magaña

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes with single and few walls are highly appreciated for their technological applications, regardless of the limited availability due to their high production cost. In this paper we present an alternative process that can lead to lowering the manufacturing cost of CNTs of only few walls by means of the use of the spray pyrolysis technique. For this purpose, ferrocene is utilized as a catalyst and aliphatic alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol or butanol as the carbon source. The characterization of CNTs was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The study of the synthesized carbon nanotubes (CNTs show important differences in the number of layers that constitute the nanotubes, the diameter length, the quantity and the quality as a function of the number of carbons employed in the alcohol. The main interest of this study is to give the basis of an efficient synthesis process to produce CNTs of few walls for applications where small diameter is required.

  3. Reduction of the environmental concentration of air pollutants by proper geometrical orientation of industrial line sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of an Israeli study of two line sources, one composed of 10 and the other of 20 individual sources. The height of release ranged from 15.7 to 39.6 m, with a uniform rate of release of a gaseous pollutant of 1 Ci/s for each source. Average pollutant concentration was plotted as a function of the rotation angle of the line sources. Reduction of pollutant concentration by a particular rotation of the line sources attained values of up to 50%. At certain rotation angles of the line sources, the environmental concentration was lower even as compared with a single high source. Results also depended on atmospheric conditions. It is suggested that considering the increase in cost of augmenting the height of release as a means of reducing the air pollutant concentration, determination of the optimum geometric orientation of the line sources should be considered as an economical means of improving environmental air quality. (U.K.)

  4. Exposition by inhalation to the formaldehyde in the air. Source, measures and concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the main techniques today available to characterize the formaldehyde concentrations in the air for different contexts: urban and rural areas or around industrial installations but also indoor and occupational area. It provides information to guide laboratories and research departments. A synthesis gives also the main emissions sources of these compounds as reference concentrations measured in different environments. (A.L.B.)

  5. Comparative study on bacterial carbon sources in lake sediments : the role of methanotrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Steger, Kristin; K. Premke; Gudasz, Cristian; Boschker, H.T.S.; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2015-01-01

    Methane-derived carbon can be important in both benthic and pelagic food webs. Either generated in the anaerobic layers of the sediment or in the anaerobic hypolimnion of stratified eutrophic lakes, methane is an excellent carbon source for aerobic methanotrophic bacteria. The very negative methane delta C-13-signal in the methanotrophic biomass provides an excellent opportunity to trace the use of methane-derived carbon in food webs. We studied carbon sources of benthic bacteria in a range o...

  6. Concentrations, loads, and yields of organic carbon in streams of agricultural watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronholm, Scott; Capel, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Carbon is cycled to and from large reservoirs in the atmosphere, on land, and in the ocean. Movement of organic carbon from the terrestrial reservoir to the ocean plays an important role in the global cycling of carbon. The transition from natural to agricultural vegetation can change the storage and movement of organic carbon in and from a watershed. Samples were collected from 13 streams located in hydrologically and agriculturally diverse watersheds, to better understand the variability in the concentrations and loads of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) in the streams, and the variability in watershed yields. The overall annual median concentrations of DOC and POC were 4.9 (range: 2.1–6.8) and 1.1 (range: 0.4–3.8) mg C L−1, respectively. The mean DOC watershed yield (± SE) was 25 ± 6.8 kg C ha−1 yr−1. The yields of DOC from these agricultural watersheds were not substantially different than the DOC yield from naturally vegetated watersheds in equivalent biomes, but were at the low end of the range for most biomes. Total organic carbon (DOC + POC) annually exported from the agricultural watersheds was found to average 0.03% of the organic carbon that is contained in the labile plant matter and top 1 m of soil in the watershed. Since the total organic carbon exported from agricultural watersheds is a relatively small portion of the sequestered carbon within the watershed, there is the great potential to store additional carbon in plants and soils of the watershed, offsetting some anthropogenic CO2 emissions.

  7. Atmospheric speciated mercury concentrations on an island between China and Korea: sources and transport pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gang-San; Kim, Pyung-Rae; Han, Young-Ji; Holsen, Thomas M.; Seo, Yong-Seok; Yi, Seung-Muk

    2016-03-01

    As a global pollutant, mercury (Hg) is of particular concern in East Asia, where anthropogenic emissions are the largest. In this study, speciated Hg concentrations were measured on Yongheung Island, the westernmost island in Korea, located between China and the Korean mainland to identify the importance of local and regional Hg sources. Various tools including correlations with other pollutants, conditional probability function, and back-trajectory-based analysis consistently indicated that Korean sources were important for gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) whereas, for total gaseous mercury (TGM) and particulate bound mercury (PBM), regional transport was also important. A trajectory cluster based approach, considering both Hg concentration and the fraction of time each cluster was impacting the site, was developed to quantify the effect of Korean sources and out-of-Korean sources. This analysis suggests that contributions from out-of-Korean sources were similar to Korean sources for TGM whereas Korean sources contributed slightly more to the concentration variations of GOM and PBM compared to out-of-Korean sources. The ratio of GOM/PBM decreased when the site was impacted by regional transport, suggesting that this ratio may be a useful tool for identifying the relative significance of local sources vs. regional transport. The secondary formation of PBM through gas-particle partitioning with GOM was found to be important at low temperatures and high relative humidity.

  8. EFFECT OF NITROGEN SOURCE AND INITIAL SUGAR CONCENTRATION ON LACTIC ACID FERMENTATION OF PINEAPPLE WASTE USING L.DELBRUECKII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Moch Busairi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The liquid pineapple waste contains mainly sucrose, glucose, fructose and other nutrients. It therefore can potentially be used as carbon source for lactic acid fermentation. The lactic acid is utilised in food technology as pH regulator, microbial preservative, buffering agent and in the chemical industry. Recently, lactic acid has been considered to be an important raw material for production of biodegradable lactate polymer. The experiments were carried out in batch fermentation at anaerobic condition with stirring speed: 50 rpm, temperature: 40 oC, pH: 6.0, and inoculum size: 5%. Effect of nitrogen source and initial sugar concentration were studied. The effect of nitrogen source on lactic acid production shows that the yeast extract is highest yield , followed by urea , corn steep liquor, malt sprout and ammonium sulphates with the yield of 78.52; 26.68; 19.14; 14.10 and 5.6 %, respectively. The highest yield of initial sugar concentration on lactic acid production obtained was 78.52 % (54.97 g/l at 70 g/l, if the concentration of sugar was increased to 110 g/l , the lactic acid production or yield decrease to51.53 g/l or 54.24%.

  9. Reduction of formaldehyde concentrations in the air and cadaveric tissues by ammonium carbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamata, Seiichi; Kodera, Haruo

    2004-01-01

    The reduction of formaldehyde by ammonium carbonate was examined in cadavers and in vitro. Formaldehyde concentrations in the air (10 cm above human cadavers) and in various cadaveric tissues were measured with or without perfusion of ammonium carbonate solution into formaldehyde-fixed cadavers. Air samples were monitored using Kitagawa gas detector tubes. For measurement of formaldehyde in tissues, muscles and organs were cut into small pieces and tissue fluids were separated out by centrifu...

  10. Determination of Concentration Dependent Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon in Expanded Austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    Abstract. In the present paper various experimental procedures to experimentally determine the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of carbon in expanded austenite are evaluated. To this end thermogravimetric carburization was simulated for various experimental conditions and the evaluated...... composition dependent diffusivity of carbon derived from the simulated experiments was compared with the input data. The most promising procedure for an accurate determination is shown to be stepwise gaseous carburizing of thin foils in a gaseous atmosphere; the finer the stepsize, the more accurate the...

  11. Enrichment of yttrium from rare earth concentrate by ammonium carbonate leaching and peroxide precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rare earth elements (REE) solubility with ammonium carbonate vary progressively from element to element, the heavy rare earth elements (HRE) being more soluble than the light rare earth elements (LRE). Their solubility is function of the carbonate concentration and the kind of carbonate as sodium, potassium and ammonium. In this work, it is explored this ability of the carbonate for the dissolution of the REE and an easy separation of yttrium was achieved using the precipitation of the peroxide from complex yttrium carbonate. For this work is used a REE concentrate containing (%) Y2O3 2.4, Dy2O3 0.6, Gd2O3 2.7, CeO2 2.5, Nd2O3 33.2, La2O3 40.3, Sm2O3 4.1 and Pr6O11 7.5. The mentioned concentrate was produced industrially from the chemical treatment of monazite sand by NUCLEMON in Sao Paulo. The yttrium concentrate was treated with 200 g L-1 ammonium carbonate during 10 and 30 min at room temperature. The experiments indicated that a single leaching operation was sufficient to get a rich yttrium solution with about 60.3% Y2O3. In a second step, this yttrium solution was treated with an excess of hydrogen peroxide (130 volumes), cerium, praseodymium and neodymium peroxides being completely precipitated and separated from yttrium. Yttrium was recovered from the carbonate solution as the oxalate and finally as oxide. The final product is an 81% Y2O3. This separation envisages an industrial application. The work discussed the solubility of the REE using ammonium carbonate and the subsequent precipitation of the correspondent peroxides

  12. Carbonic anhydrase levels and internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations in aquatic macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, C.I.

    1979-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase levels were examined in a variety of aquatic macrophytes from different habitats. In general, carbonic anhydrase levels increased across the habitat gradient such that activities were low in submersed aquatic macrophytes and high in emergent macrophytes with floating-leaved and free-floating plants exhibiting intermediate activities. Internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations were analyzed in relation to carbonic anhydrase activities. There was no correlation between these two parameters. Internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations ranged from low to high in submersed macrophytes, but were low in floating-leaved and emergent macrophytes. The observed internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations are discussed in relation to the individual morphologies of the plants and the environments in which they occurred.

  13. Seasonal variability of organic matter composition in an Alaskan glacier outflow: insights into glacier carbon sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glacier ecosystems are a significant source of bioavailable, yet ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Characterizing DOC in Mendenhall Glacier outflow (southeast Alaska) we document a seasonal persistence to the radiocarbon-depleted signature of DOC, highlighting ancient DOC as a ubiquitous feature of glacier outflow. We observed no systematic depletion in Δ 14C-DOC with increasing discharge during the melt season that would suggest mobilization of an aged subglacial carbon store. However, DOC concentration, δ 13C-DOC, Δ 14C-DOC and fluorescence signatures appear to have been influenced by runoff from vegetated hillslopes above the glacier during onset and senescence of melt. In the peak glacier melt period, the Δ 14C-DOC of stream samples at the outflow (−181.7 to −355.3‰) was comparable to the Δ 14C-DOC for snow samples from the accumulation zone (−207.2 to −390.9‰), suggesting that ancient DOC from the glacier surface is exported in glacier runoff. The pre-aged DOC in glacier snow and runoff is consistent with contributions from fossil fuel combustion sources similar to those documented previously in ice cores and thus provides evidence for anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon cycle. Overall, our results emphasize the need to further characterize DOC inputs to glacier ecosystems, particularly in light of predicted changes in glacier mass and runoff in the coming century. (papers)

  14. Influence of carbon source on the stable carbon isotopic composition of the seagrass Thalassia testudinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of isotopically distinct organic carbon sources in sediments and CO2 enrichment on the stable carbon isotope composition of Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) seedlings were investigated. Seedling leaves became increasingly 13C depleted in all treatments with time. In the CO2 enriched treatment, δ13C values for seedlings declined from -9.1 to -57.1 per mille over the nine month culture period; the latter value is the lightest stable carbon isotope composition ever reported for a higher plant. In all non-CO2-enriched treatments, δ13C values declined from -9.1 per mille at T=0 to between -18.3 and -22.2 per mille after nine months. The lack of treatment effect in the non-CO2-enriched cultures was probably due to the release and exchange of isotopically light CO2 from the CO2 enriched treatment within the relatively closed environment of the culture room. This exchange was reflected in media dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) δ13C values that indicated increasing 13C depletion relative to the initial compositions of the synthetic seawater salts. Depletion of 13C in leaf tissue of seedlings in the non-CO2-enriched treatments occurred faster than did media DIC 13C depletion, suggesting an increase in isotopic fractionation as seedlings grew. The reasons for this increasing fractionation are unclear, but they may reflect a decreasing contribution of isotopically heavy seed research and/or increasing availability of exogenous carbon. 18 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  15. [Advanced nitrogen removal using innovative denitrification biofilter with sustained-release carbon source material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lei; Li, Peng; Zuo, Jian-e; Yuan, Lin; Li, Zai-xing

    2013-09-01

    An innovative denitrification biofilter was developed with polycaprolactone (PCL) as the carbon source and biofilm carrier. The performance of nitrogen removal was investigated with biologically treated effluent from secondary clarifier, and the results indicated that a maximum TN removal efficiency of 98.9% was achieved under the following conditions: influent total nitrogen (TN) concentration 30.0 mg x L(-1), denitrification load 54.0 mg (L x h)(-1), operating temperature 20. 1-22.0 degrees C, hydraulic retention time 0. 5 h; the total organic carbon (TOC) in effluent was 6.5-8.4 mg x L(-1), which was increased by 2.0-3.0 mg x L(-1) compared with that in the influent; the suspended solids (SS) concentration was less than 4.0 mg x L(-1) during operation; nearly 84.2% of the total released organic carbon which was used as electron donor in the denitrification process, was derived in the presence of microbes. The surface of the PCL pellets was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), it was shown that thick biofilm was formed on the surface of pellets, and the main microbial species were Bacillus and Trichobacteria. PMID:24289000

  16. Influence of relative trophic position and carbon source on selenium bioaccumulation in turtles from a coal fly-ash spill site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selenium (Se) is a bioaccumulative constituent of coal fly-ash that can disrupt reproduction of oviparous wildlife. In food webs, the greatest enrichment of Se occurs at the lowest trophic levels, making it readily bioavailable to higher consumers. However, subsequent enrichment at higher trophic levels is less pronounced, leading to mixed tendencies for Se to biomagnify. We used stable isotopes (15N and 13C) in claws to infer relative trophic positions and relative carbon sources, respectively, of seven turtle species near the site of a recently-remediated coal fly-ash spill. We then tested whether Se concentrations differed with relative trophic position or relative carbon source. We did not observe a strong relationship between δ15N and Se concentration. Instead, selenium concentrations decreased with increasing δ13C among species. Therefore, in an assemblage of closely-related aquatic vertebrates, relative carbon source was a better predictor of Se bioaccumulation than was relative trophic position. -- Highlights: •Stable isotope results showed trophic separation among turtle species. •Selenium concentrations did not biomagnify with relative trophic position. •Selenium concentrations decreased with increasing δ13C among species. •Carbon source influenced Se bioaccumulation in an assemblage of related vertebrates. -- Stable isotope differences indicate that claw selenium concentrations differ among relative carbon sources, and not among relative trophic positions, in an assemblage of aquatic turtles

  17. Spatiotemporally resolved black carbon concentration, schoolchildren's exposure and dose in Barcelona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, I; Donaire-Gonzalez, D; Bouso, L; Esnaola, M; Pandolfi, M; de Castro, M; Viana, M; Àlvarez-Pedrerol, M; Nieuwenhuijsen, M; Alastuey, A; Sunyer, J; Querol, X

    2016-06-01

    At city level, personal monitoring is the best way to assess people's exposure. However, it is usually estimated from a few monitoring stations. Our aim was to determine the exposure to black carbon (BC) and BC dose for 45 schoolchildren with portable microaethalometers and to evaluate the relationship between personal monitoring and fixed stations at schools (indoor and outdoor) and in an urban background (UB) site. Personal BC concentra-tions were 20% higher than in fixed stations at schools. Linear mixed-effect models showed low R(2) between personal measurements and fixed stations at schools (R(2)  ≤ 0.28), increasing to R(2)  ≥ 0.70 if considering only periods when children were at schools. For the UB station, the respective R(2) were 0.18 and 0.45, indicating the importance of the distance to the monitoring station when assessing exposure. During the warm season, the fixed stations agreed better with personal measurements than during the cold one. Children spent 6% of their time on commuting but received 20% of their daily BC dose, due to co-occurrence with road traffic rush hours and the close proximity to the source. Children received 37% of their daily-integrated BC dose at school. Indoor environments (classroom and home) were responsible for the 56% BC dose. PMID:25924870

  18. Tracing the sources of organic carbon in freshwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendell, Miriam; Meersmans, Jeroen; Barclay, Rachel; Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Barker, Sam; Jones, Richard; Hartley, Iain; Dungait, Jennifer; Quine, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    both terrestrial and aquatic sources as recorded in lake sediments to the measured rates of soil erosion and terrestrial & aquatic CO2 respiration rates, this study has paved a way towards a novel and cross-disciplinary approach to investigate and further improve current status of knowledge as regards C-cycling across the entire terrestrial-aquatic continuum. 137Cs was found to be useful to understand the dynamics and spatial pattern of lateral fluxes of sediment & C at the catchment scale, while tracing chemical composition of C using n-alkanes and stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) allowed distinguishing between the terrestrial vs. aquatic origin of C and determining main sources of particulate organic carbon in the aquatic environment within the two study catchments.

  19. Silicon nanowire and carbon nanotube hybrid for room temperature multiwavelength light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Faro, Maria Josè; D'Andrea, Cristiano; Messina, Elena; Fazio, Barbara; Musumeci, Paolo; Reitano, Riccardo; Franzò, Giorgia; Gucciardi, Pietro Giuseppe; Vasi, Cirino; Priolo, Francesco; Iacona, Fabio; Irrera, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    The realization of an innovative hybrid light source operating at room temperature, obtained by embedding a carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersion inside a Si nanowire (NW) array is reported. The NW/CNT system exhibits a peculiar photoluminescence spectrum, consisting of a wide peak, mainly observed in the visible range, due to quantum confined Si NWs, and of several narrower IR peaks, due to the different CNT chiralities present in the dispersion. The detailed study of the optical properties of the hybrid system evidences that the ratio between the intensity of the visible and the IR emissions can be varied within a wide range by changing the excitation wavelength or the CNT concentration; the conditions leading to the prevalence of one signal with respect to the other are identified. The multiplicity of emission spectra obtainable from this composite material opens new perspectives for Si nanostructures as active medium in light sources for Si photonics applications. PMID:26592198

  20. Batch fermentation model of propionic acid production by Propionibacterium acidipropionici in different carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral, Jefferson; Karp, Susan Grace; Porto de Souza Vandenberghe, Luciana; Parada, José Luis; Pandey, Ashok; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2008-12-01

    Propionic acid (PA) is widely used as additive in animal feed and also in the manufacturing of cellulose-based plastics, herbicides, and perfumes. Salts of propionic acid are used as preservative in food. PA is mainly produced by chemical synthesis. Nowadays, PA production by fermentation of low-cost industrial wastes or renewable sources has been an interesting alternative. In the present investigation, PA production by Propionibacterium acidipropionici ATCC 4965 was studied using a basal medium with sugarcane molasses (BMSM), glycerol or lactate (BML) in small batch fermentation at 30 and 36 degrees C. Bacterial growth was carried out under low dissolved oxygen concentration and without pH control. Results indicated that P. acidipropionici produced more biomass in BMSM than in other media at 30 degrees C (7.55 g l(-1)) as well as at 36 degrees C (3.71 g l(-1)). PA and biomass production were higher at 30 degrees C than at 36 degrees C in all cases studied. The best productivity was obtained by using BML (0.113 g l(-1) h(-1)), although the yielding of this metabolite was higher when using glycerol as carbon source (0.724 g g(-1)) because there was no detection of acetic acid. By the way, when using the other two carbon sources, acetic acid emerged as an undesirable by-product for further PA purification. PMID:18386184

  1. Modelling soil organic carbon concentration of mineral soils in arable lands using legacy soil data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suuster, E; Ritz, Christian; Roostalu, H;

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration is an essential factor in biomass production and soil functioning. SOC concentration values are often obtained by prediction but the prediction accuracy depends much on the method used. Currently, there is a lack of evidence in the soil science literature as...... map for the case study area of Tartu County where the SOC predictions ranged from 0.6 to 4.8%. Our study indicates that predictions using legacy soil maps can be used in national inventories and for up-scaling estimates of carbon concentrations from county to country scales....... to the advantages and shortcomings of the different commonly used prediction methods. Therefore, we compared and evaluated the merits of the median approach, analysis of covariance, mixed models and random forests in the context of prediction of SOC concentrations of mineral soils under arable...

  2. Slow strain rate testing of carbon steel in solutions with high nitrate concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processing of high-level nuclear waste for permanent disposal will cause changes to the present inhibited compositions at the Savannah River Site. Temperature and nitrate concentration may reach new high levels during salt dissolution in the carbon steel waste tanks with certain removal methods. Proper inhibitor concentrations are necessary to minimize the potential for nitrate-induced stress corrosion cracking to maintain the integrity of the waste tanks. Slow strain rate testing and potentiodynamic polarization were used to investigate whether stress corrosion cracking would initiate under bounding removal conditions. Test conditions for two carbon steels included nitrate concentrations of 5.5 and 9.7 M at a maximum temperature of 95 degrees C. The steels were found to be resistant to SCC in the more aggressive waste compositions at the present inhibitor concentrations of 0.6 M sodium hydroxide and 0.5 M sodium nitrite

  3. Concentration-dependent polyparameter linear free energy relationships to predict organic compound sorption on carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Qing; YANG Kun; Li, Wei; Xing, Baoshan

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of organic compounds on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), governed by interactions between molecules and CNTs surfaces, is critical for their fate, transport, bioavailability and toxicity in the environment. Here, we report a promising concentration-dependent polyparameter linear free energy relationships (pp-LFERs) model to describe the compound-CNTs interactions and to predict sorption behavior of chemicals on CNTs in a wide range of concentrations (over five orders of magnitude). The dev...

  4. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X M; Drury, C F; Reynolds, W D; Yang, J Y

    2016-01-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2-53 μm) and sand (53-2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg(-1) soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg(-1), but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation. PMID:27251365

  5. Temporal Variation of Carbon Monoxide Concentration at Congested Urban Roadways Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanshyam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbon monoxide (CO is dominant among major traffic emitted pollutants such as respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM, oxides of nitrogen (NOx, volatile organic carbons(VOCs and ozone (O3 etc. It is generated by automobiles due to incomplete combustion of the fuel. The vehicles that queue up at an intersection spend more time in idle driving mode generating more pollutant leading to higher pollutant concentrations. Therefore, the trends of average hourly CO concentrations at various locations of congested roadways intersection have been investigated. The four approach roads making intersection have been selected for the present study. CO monitoring has been carried out at 2 selected locations of each approach road. The CO concentration has been monitored from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM at each location using portable online CO monitor. The average hourly CO concentrations data have been analyzed using MS excel spread sheet for each approach road. The average hourly concentration of monitored CO concentration at all receptors locations shows two peak CO concentration values (i.e., the morning peak and evening peak throughout the monitoring programme (March to May, 2011. The comparison of monitored values of average 1 hourly CO concentration levels as well as 8 hourly average concentration levels of CO showed non compliance with the prescribed standards (4000 µg/m3 average hourly and 2000 µg/m3 average 8 hourly CO concentration. The temporal CO concentration at various approach roads making roadway intersection shows non-uniform. The highest CO concentration has been observed to be towards high rise building and vice-versa. The least CO concentration has been observed towards either low rise building or open area.

  6. Carbon nanotube based field emission X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan

    This dissertation describes the development of field emission (FE) x-ray sources with a carbon-nanotube (CNT) cathode. Field emission x-rays have advantages over conventional x-rays by replacing the thermionic cathode with a cold cathode so that electrons are emitted at room temperature and emission is voltage controllable. CNTs are found to be excellent electron emitters with low threshold fields and high current density which makes them ideal for generate field emission x-rays. Macroscopic CNT cold cathodes are prepared and the parameters to tune their field emission properties are studied: structure and morphology of CNT cathodes, temperature as well as electronic work function of CNT. Macroscopic CNT cathodes with optimized performance are chosen to build a high-resolution x-ray imaging system. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution up to nanoseconds and spatial resolution down to 10 micron. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging and micro-computed tomography are also demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for non-destructive testing and for non-invasive small-animal imaging for biomedical research.

  7. Integrated Data Fusion and Mining Techniques for Monitoring Total Organic Carbon Concentrations in a Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total organic carbon (TOC) in surface waters, markedly of seasonal variations, is a known precursor of disinfection byproducts such as Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM) in drinking water treatment. Real-time knowledge of TOC distribution in source water can help treatment operation to...

  8. Low powdered activated carbon concentrations to improve MBR sludge filterability at high salinity and low temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remy, M.J.J.; Temmink, B.G.; Brink, van den P.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that powdered activated carbon (PAC), when applied at very low dosages and long SRTs, reduces membrane fouling in membrane bioreactor (MBRs). This effect was related to stronger flocs which are less sensitive to shear. Low temperature and high salt concentration ar

  9. Linking CDOM spectral absorption to dissolved organic carbon concentrations and loadings in boreal estuaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmala, Eero; Stedmon, Colin A.; Thomas, David N.

    2012-01-01

    The quantity of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in three Finnish estuaries (Karjaanjoki, Kyrönjoki and Kiiminkijoki) was investigated, with respect to predicting DOC concentrations and loadings from spectral CDOM absorption measurements. Altogether 87...

  10. The determination of hydroxide and carbonate in concentrated sodium chloride solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Roolvink, W.B.; Bos, M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer method for the determination of carbonate and hydroxide in concentrated (2.89 M) sodium chloride solutions is described. The method is based on multiparametric curve-fitting and can also be applied to salts of dibasic acids with unknown equilibrium constants. The systematic error is not more than 1%. The titration and calculation takes less than 20 min.

  11. Genotypic Variation in Soybean Molecular Responses to Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    A critical step in maximizing crop yield in a future of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) is identifying genotypic variability in response to elevated [CO2] and understanding the molecular basis for the variation. We compared photosynthesis, leaf metabolites and global gene e...

  12. Carbon monoxide concentrations evaluated by traffic noise data in urban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that variations in carbon monoxide concentrations can be evaluated by measuring environmental noise, wind velocity and vertical thermal stability. The results can be justified on the basis of the theory of the street canyon effect. The methodology proposed was verified in two Italian cities with different characteristics: Milan and Ravenna (Italy)

  13. Photosynthesis in tropical cover crop legumes influenced by irradiance, external carbon dioxide concentration and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    In plantation crops perennial tropical legumes are grown as understory plants, receive limited irradiance, and are subjected to elevated levels of CO2 and temperature. Independent short-term effects of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), external carbon dioxide concentration [CO2] and temper...

  14. Measurement of low concentration and nano-quantity hydrogen sulfide in sera using unfunctionalized carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced in small amounts by certain cells in the mammalian body and has a number of biological functions. H2S gas naturally produced by the body is not simply a toxic gas; it could be a vascular dilator and play a physiological role in regulating cardiovascular functions. In order to know the effects of H2S, it is necessary to accurately know its concentrations in the body. Conventional measurement methods have their limitations concerning the small amount and low concentration of H2S in the body. A new paradigm of using carbon nanotubes in H2S measurement expresses its potential. However, the influence of proteins in the mammalian body must be studied in the measurement of H2S by carbon nanotubes. In this paper, we demonstrate a successful measurement of low concentration (20 µM) and nano-quantity (0.5 µg) H2S in the serum by using carbon nanotubes and further with the fluorescence of confocal laser scanning microscopy and the luminescence of Raman microscopy. Statistical analysis of the experimental data shows that the relationship between concentrations and intensities is linear, which thus makes the carbon nanotube sensor highly promising for the measurement of H2S in sera

  15. Examining the Role of Multiple Carbon Sources in Isoprene Synthesis in Plants Using Stable Isotope Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, J. L.; Mak, J. E.; Lerdau, M. T.

    2001-12-01

    The carbon source for phytogenc isoprene is an issue with important ramifications for both atmospheric and biological science because of its impact on the isotopic signature of isoprene and its oxidation products and because it lends insight into the function that isoprene serves within leaves. Although recently assimilated carbon is believed to be the primary carbon source for isoprene production in plants, variation in diurnal and seasonal isoprene fluxes that cannot be explained by temperature, light, and leaf development have led to the suggestion that alternative carbon sources may contribute. Stable isotopes of carbon can be used to identify changes in carbon partitioning into isoprene synthesis, and mixing models can assess the relative importance of each source. In preliminary studies, we document an additional 8-10 \\permil discrimination in isoprene emitted in the absence of photosynthesis. This change in signature suggests that the carbon source is switched from recently obtained photosynthate to a source more depleted in 13C. We propose that intermediates from carbohydrate degradation and/or re-fixation of CO2 from mitichondrial respiration and photorespiration can contribute to isoprene production. In addition, we expect alternative carbon sources to be most important when photosynthate is limiting (e.g. during water stress events). Photosynthesis, respiration, and isoprene emission measurements are used to calculate the isotopic signatures of the three potential carbon pools: photosynthate derived from ambient CO2, photosynthate derived from respired CO2, and carbohydrate-derived intermediates.

  16. Determination of neutral carbon concentration in electron cyclotron resonance generated plasma discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, A B; Lindner, P; Stirn, R; Schumacher, U

    2007-12-01

    Carbon containing plasmas play an important role not only in plasma technology but also in thermonuclear fusion research. In order to understand and control the processes taking place in the plasma, the knowledge of the carbon ground state density is of major importance. It can be determined by absorption and emission spectroscopy. Detailed measurements were performed in the past to determine the silicon ground state density by means of spectroscopy of the self-absorbed spectral lines of the silicon ground state multiplet at 251 nm. The same procedure was applied for the determination of the carbon concentration, for which the carbon multiplet at 165 nm was analyzed and compared to a simulated spectrum. The ground state density was determined by two independent methods. PMID:18163723

  17. Effects of increasing seawater carbon dioxide concentrations on chain formation of the diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Barcelos e Ramos

    Full Text Available Diatoms can occur as single cells or as chain-forming aggregates. These two strategies affect buoyancy, predator evasion, light absorption and nutrient uptake. Adjacent cells in chains establish connections through various processes that determine strength and flexibility of the bonds, and at distinct cellular locations defining colony structure. Chain length has been found to vary with temperature and nutrient availability as well as being positively correlated with growth rate. However, the potential effect of enhanced carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations and consequent changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on chain formation is virtually unknown. Here we report on experiments with semi-continuous cultures of the freshly isolated diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis grown under increasing CO2 levels ranging from 320 to 3400 µatm. We show that the number of cells comprising a chain, and therefore chain length, increases with rising CO2 concentrations. We also demonstrate that while cell division rate changes with CO2 concentrations, carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cellular quotas vary proportionally, evident by unchanged organic matter ratios. Finally, beyond the optimum CO2 concentration for growth, carbon allocation changes from cellular storage to increased exudation of dissolved organic carbon. The observed structural adjustment in colony size could enable growth at high CO2 levels, since longer, spiral-shaped chains are likely to create microclimates with higher pH during the light period. Moreover increased chain length of Asterionellopsis glacialis may influence buoyancy and, consequently, affect competitive fitness as well as sinking rates. This would potentially impact the delicate balance between the microbial loop and export of organic matter, with consequences for atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  18. Soil concentrations, occurrence, sources and estimation of air-soil exchange of polychlorinated biphenyls in Indian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Paromita; Zhang, Gan; Li, Jun; Selvaraj, Sakthivel; Breivik, Knut; Jones, Kevin C

    2016-08-15

    Past studies have shown potentially increasing levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Indian environment. This is the first attempt to investigate the occurrence of PCBs in surface soil and estimate diffusive air-soil exchange, both on a regional scale as well as at local level within the metropolitan environment of India. From the north, New Delhi and Agra, east, Kolkata, west, Mumbai and Goa and Chennai and Bangalore in the southern India were selected for this study. 33 PCB congeners were quantified in surface soil and possible sources were derived using positive matrix factorization model. Net flux directions of PCBs were estimated in seven major metropolitan cities of India along urban-suburban-rural transects. Mean Σ33PCBs concentration in soil (12ng/g dry weight) was nearly twice the concentration found in global background soil, but in line with findings from Pakistan and urban sites of China. Higher abundance of the heavier congeners (6CB-8CB) was prevalent mostly in the urban centers. Cities like Chennai, Mumbai and Kolkata with evidence of ongoing PCB sources did not show significant correlation with soil organic carbon (SOC). This study provides evidence that soil is acting as sink for heavy weight PCB congeners and source for lighter congeners. Atmospheric transport is presumably a controlling factor for occurrence of PCBs in less polluted sites of India. PMID:27136304

  19. Effect of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate as inorganic carbon sources on growth and adaptation of autohydrogenotrophic denitrifying bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acclimation of autohydrogenotrophic denitrifying bacteria using inorganic carbon source (CO2 and bicarbonate) and hydrogen gas as electron donor was performed in this study. In this regard, activated sludge was used as the seed source and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) technique was applied for accomplishing the acclimatization. Three distinct strategies in feeding of carbon sources were applied: (I) continuous sparging of CO2, (II) bicarbonate plus continuous sparging of CO2, and (III) only bicarbonate. The pH-reducing nature of CO2 showed an unfavorable impact on denitrification rate; however bicarbonate resulted in a buffered environment in the mixed liquor and provided a suitable mean to maintain the pH in the desirable range of 7-8.2. As a result, bicarbonate as the only carbon source showed a faster adaptation, while carbon dioxide as the only carbon source as well as a complementary carbon source added to bicarbonate resulted in longer acclimation period. Adapted hydrogenotrophic denitrifying bacteria, using bicarbonate and hydrogen gas in the aforementioned pH range, caused denitrification at a rate of 13.33 mg NO3--N/g MLVSS/h for degrading 20 and 30 mg NO3--N/L and 9.09 mg NO3--N/g MLVSS/h for degrading 50 mg NO3--N/L

  20. Acute phase IL-10 plasma concentration associates with the high risk sources of cardiogenic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otso Arponen

    Full Text Available Etiological assessment of stroke is essential for accurate treatment decisions and for secondary prevention of recurrence. There is evidence that interleukin-10 (IL-10 associates with ischemic stroke. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the levels of IL-10 in ischemic stroke with unknown or suspected cardiogenic etiology, and evaluate the correlation between IL-10 plasma concentration and the number of diagnosed high risk sources for cardioembolism.A total of 141 patients (97 males; mean age 61±11 years with acute ischemic stroke with unknown etiology or suspected cardiogenic etiology other than known atrial fibrillation (AF underwent imaging investigations to assess high risk sources for cardioembolic stroke established by the European Association of Echocardiography (EAE. IL-10 was measured on admission to the hospital and on a three month follow-up visit.Acute phase IL-10 concentration was higher in patients with EAE high risk sources, and correlated with their number (p<0.01. In patients with no risk sources (n = 104, the mean IL-10 concentration was 2.7±3.1 ng/L (range 0.3-16.3 ng/L, with one risk source (n = 26 3.7±5.5 ng/L (0.3-23.6 ng/L, with two risk sources (n = 10 7.0±10.0 ng/L (1.29-34.8 ng/L and with three risk sources (n = 1 37.2 ng/L. IL-10 level was not significantly associated with cerebral infarct volume, presence of previous or recent myocardial infarction, carotid/vertebral artery atherosclerosis, paroxysmal AF registered on 24-hour ECG Holter monitoring or given intravenous thrombolytic treatment.IL-10 plasma concentration correlates independently with the number of EAE cardioembolic risk sources in patients with acute stroke. IL-10 may have potential to improve differential diagnostics of stroke with unknown etiology.

  1. Rapid biological oxidation of methanol in the tropical Atlantic: significance as a microbial carbon source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Dixon

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Methanol is the second most abundant organic gas in the atmosphere after methane, and is ubiquitous in the troposphere. It plays a significant role in atmospheric oxidant chemistry and is biogeochemically active. Large uncertainties exist about whether the oceans are a source or sink of methanol to the atmosphere. Even less is understood about what reactions in seawater determine its concentration, and hence flux across the sea surface interface. We report here concentrations of methanol up to 300 nM, with corresponding microbial uptake rates between 2–146 nM d−1, suggesting turnover times as low as 1 day in surface waters of the oligotrophic tropical North East Atlantic. Comparisons with parallel determinations of bacterial leucine uptake suggest that methanol contributes on average 13% to bacterial carbon demand in the central northern Atlantic gyre (maximum of 54%. However, our low air to sea methanol flux estimates of 7.2–13 μmol m−2 d−1 suggest that the atmosphere is not a major source. We conclude that there must be a major, as yet unidentified, in situ oceanic methanol source in these latitudes which we suggest is sunlight driven decomposition of organic matter.

  2. Planktonic Foraminiferal Shell Weight Variability From The Cariaco Basin: Insights Into Carbon Dioxide Concentrations During The Last Glacial Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, M. C.; Thunell, R.; Peterson, L. C.; Astor, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Here we present decadal scale records of sediment color reflectance, planktonic foraminiferal shell weight variability, and planktonic foraminiferal carbon isotope composition (δ13C) from the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela for the last glacial period (Marine Isotope Stage 3; ~32-55kyrBP) and demonstrate that the temporal variability in the records is associated with established stadial/interstadial climate oscillations. Sediment trap results from the Cariaco Basin suggest that the shell weight variability is driven, in part, by changes in the surface water carbonate ion concentration [CO3=]. Using the modern relationship between shell weight and [CO3=] for this location, we estimate down-core [CO3=] variability during MIS 3 in order to assess past changes in the surface seawater partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2). This record also provides insight into past changes in pH. We find that the Cariaco Basin was a source for atmospheric carbon dioxide during this time interval and that pCO2 underwent large stadial/interstadial oscillations with higher values during interstadials than during stadials.

  3. Glucosamine as carbon source for amino acid-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhde, Andreas; Youn, Jung-Won; Maeda, Tomoya; Clermont, Lina; Matano, Christian; Krämer, Reinhard; Wendisch, Volker F; Seibold, Gerd M; Marin, Kay

    2013-02-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum grows with a variety of carbohydrates and carbohydrate derivatives as sole carbon sources; however, growth with glucosamine has not yet been reported. We isolated a spontaneous mutant (M4) which is able to grow as fast with glucosamine as with glucose as sole carbon source. Glucosamine also served as a combined source of carbon, energy and nitrogen for the mutant strain. Characterisation of the M4 mutant revealed a significantly increased expression of the nagB gene encoding the glucosamine-6P deaminase NagB involved in degradation of glucosamine, as a consequence of a single mutation in the promoter region of the nagAB-scrB operon. Ectopic nagB overexpression verified that the activity of the NagB enzyme is in fact the growth limiting factor under these conditions. In addition, glucosamine uptake was studied, which proved to be unchanged in the wild-type and M4 mutant strains. Using specific deletion strains, we identified the PTS(Glc) transport system to be responsible for glucosamine uptake in C. glutamicum. The affinity of this uptake system for glucosamine was about 40-fold lower than that for its major substrate glucose. Because of this difference in affinity, glucosamine is efficiently taken up only if external glucose is absent or present at low concentrations. C. glutamicum was also examined for its suitability to use glucosamine as substrate for biotechnological purposes. Upon overexpression of the nagB gene in suitable C. glutamicum producer strains, efficient production of both the amino acid L-lysine and the diamine putrescine from glucosamine was demonstrated. PMID:22854894

  4. Investigation of the spatiotemporal variation and influencing factors on fine particulate matter and carbon monoxide concentrations near a road intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanyong; Lu, Qing-Chang; He, Hong-Di; Wang, Dongsheng; Gao, Ya; Peng, Zhong-Ren

    2016-05-01

    The minute-scale variations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations near a road intersection in Shanghai, China were investigated to identify the influencing factors at three traffic periods. Measurement results demonstrate a synchronous variation of pollutant concentrations at the roadside and setbacks, and the average concentration of PM2.5 at the roadside is 7% (44% for CO) higher than that of setbacks within 500 m of the intersection. The pollution level at traffic peak periods is found to be higher than that of off-peak periods, and the morning peak period is found to be the most polluted due to a large amount of diesel vehicles and unfavorable dispersion conditions. Partial least square regressions were constructed for influencing factors and setback pollutant concentrations, and results indicate that meteorological factors are the most significant, followed by setback distance from the intersection and traffic factors. CO is found to be sensitive to distance from the traffic source and vehicle type, and highly dependent on local traffic conditions, whereas PM2.5 originates more from other sources and background levels. These findings demonstrate the importance of localized factors in understanding spatiotemporal patterns of air pollution at intersections, and support decision makers in roadside pollution management and control.

  5. Photorespiration and carbon concentrating mechanisms: two adaptations to high O2, low CO2 conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroney, James V; Jungnick, Nadine; Dimario, Robert J; Longstreth, David J

    2013-11-01

    This review presents an overview of the two ways that cyanobacteria, algae, and plants have adapted to high O2 and low CO2 concentrations in the environment. First, the process of photorespiration enables photosynthetic organisms to recycle phosphoglycolate formed by the oxygenase reaction catalyzed by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Second, there are a number of carbon concentrating mechanisms that increase the CO2 concentration around Rubisco which increases the carboxylase reaction enhancing CO2 fixation. This review also presents possibilities for the beneficial modification of these processes with the goal of improving future crop yields. PMID:23771683

  6. Determination of the Carbon Nanotube Concentration and Homogeneity in Resin Films by THz Spectroscopy and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ole; Busch, Stefan Frederik; Fischer, Bernd Michael; Koch, Martin

    2012-12-01

    We have recorded the concentration dependent extinction coefficient and refractive index of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) embedded in a resin fiber matrix using broadband terahertz time domain spectroscopy. The MWNT concentration levels of the samples range from 0.1 to 1 wt%. The good correlation between the measured absolute values of the transmission and the MWNT concentration reconfirms the potential of THz techniques for monitoring the loading levels. Inhomogenieties in the sample lead to strong fluctuations of the detected terahertz signal. We show that THz line scans and THz images, respectively, are therefore well suited to localize and visualize such accumulations.

  7. Evaluation of an Industrial Byproduct Glycol Mixture as a Carbon Source for Denitrification

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    In order to meet increasingly stringent total nitrogen limits, supplemental carbon must be added to improve the performance of the biological nutrient removal process. An industrial by-product that contained ethylene glycol and propylene glycol was used as a substitute carbon source for methanol in this study. The objectives of this study were to investigate the efficiency of using the glycol mixture as carbon source, including the calculation of denitrification rate and yield at two differen...

  8. Rising atmospheric CO2 is reducing the protein concentration of a floral pollen source essential for North American bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziska, Lewis H; Pettis, Jeffery S; Edwards, Joan; Hancock, Jillian E; Tomecek, Martha B; Clark, Andrew; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Loladze, Irakli; Polley, H Wayne

    2016-04-13

    At present, there is substantive evidence that the nutritional content of agriculturally important food crops will decrease in response to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, Ca However, whether Ca-induced declines in nutritional quality are also occurring for pollinator food sources is unknown. Flowering late in the season, goldenrod (Solidago spp.) pollen is a widely available autumnal food source commonly acknowledged by apiarists to be essential to native bee (e.g. Bombus spp.) and honeybee (Apis mellifera) health and winter survival. Using floral collections obtained from the Smithsonian Natural History Museum, we quantified Ca-induced temporal changes in pollen protein concentration of Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), the most wide spread Solidago taxon, from hundreds of samples collected throughout the USA and southern Canada over the period 1842-2014 (i.e. a Ca from approx. 280 to 398 ppm). In addition, we conducted a 2 year in situtrial of S. Canadensis populations grown along a continuous Ca gradient from approximately 280 to 500 ppm. The historical data indicated a strong significant correlation between recent increases in Ca and reductions in pollen protein concentration (r(2)= 0.81). Experimental data confirmed this decrease in pollen protein concentration, and indicated that it would be ongoing as Ca continues to rise in the near term, i.e. to 500 ppm (r(2)= 0.88). While additional data are needed to quantify the subsequent effects of reduced protein concentration for Canada goldenrod on bee health and population stability, these results are the first to indicate that increasing Ca can reduce protein content of a floral pollen source widely used by North American bees. PMID:27075256

  9. Sources and concentrations of indoor nitrogen dioxide in Hamburg (west Germany) and Erfurt (east Germany)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we report indoor and outdoor concentrations of NO2 for Erfurt and Hamburg and assess the contribution of the most important indoor sources (e.g. the presence of gas cooking ranges, smoking) and outdoor sources (traffic exhaust emissions). We examined the relative contribution of the different sources of NO2 to the total indoor NO2 levels in Erfurt and Hamburg. NO2 indoor concentrations in Hamburg were slightly higher than those in Erfurt (i.e. living room: 15 μg m-3 for Erfurt and 17 μg m-3 for Hamburg). A linear regression model including the variables, place of residence, season and outdoor NO2 levels, location of the home within the city, housing and occupant characteristics accounted for 38% of the NO2 variance. The most important predictors of indoor NO2 concentrations were gas in cooking followed by other characteristics, such as ventilation or outdoor NO2 level. Residences in which gas was used for cooking, or in which occupants smoked, had substantially higher indoor NO2 concentrations (41 or 18% increase, respectively). An increase in the outdoor NO2 concentration from the 25th to the 75th-percentile (17 μg m-3) was associated with a 33% increase in the living room NO2 concentration. Multiple regression analysis for both cities separately illustrated that use of gas for cooking was the major indoor source of NO2. This variable caused a similar increase in the indoor NO2 levels in each city (43% in Erfurt and 47% in Hamburg). However, outdoor sources of NO2 (motor vehicle traffic) contributed more to indoor NO2 levels in Hamburg than in Erfurt

  10. Investigating effectiveness of activated carbons of natural sources on various supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Md. Shahnewaz Sabit; Rahman, Muhammad M.; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbon can be produced from natural sources, such as pistachio and acorn shells, which can be an inexpensive and sustainable sources of natural wastes for the energy storage devices, such as supercapacitors. The carbonaceous materials used in this study were carbonized at the temperatures of 700°C and 900°C after the stabilization process at 240°C for two hours. These shells showed approximately 60% carbon yield. Carbonized nutshells were chemically activated using1wt% potassium hydroxide (KOH). Activated carbon powders with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) were used to construct carbon electrodes. A 1M of tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF4) and propylene carbonate (PC) were used as electrolytes. Electrochemical techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used for the characterization of the supercapacitors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to inspect the surface texture of the activated carbons. Activated pistachio shells carbonized at 700°C showed more porous surface texture than those carbonized at 900°C. Effects of the carbonization temperatures were studied for their electrochemical characteristics. The shells carbonized at 700°C showed better electrochemical characteristics compared to those carbonized at 900°C. The test results provided about 27,083 μF/g specific capacitance at a scan rate of 10mV/s. This study showed promising results for using these activated carbons produced from the natural wastes for supercapacitor applications.

  11. Comparative study on bacterial carbon sources in lake sediments: the role of methanotrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Steger, K.; K. Premke; Gudasz, C.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Tranvik, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Methane-derived carbon can be important in both benthic and pelagic food webs.Either generated in the anaerobic layers of the sediment or in the anaerobic hypolimnion of stratifiedeutrophic lakes, methane is an excellent carbon source for aerobic methanotrophic bacteria.The very negative methane d13C-signal in the methanotrophic biomass provides an excellentopportunity to trace the use of methane-derived carbon in food webs. We studied carbon sourcesof benthic bacteria in a range of Swedish l...

  12. Effect of plant photosynthesis, carbon sources and ammonium availability on nitrogen fixation rates in the rhizosphere of Zostera noltii

    OpenAIRE

    Welsh, Dt; Bourgues, S; Dewit, R; Auby, Isabelle

    1997-01-01

    Rates of nitrogen fixation (measured as acetylene reduction) in the rhizosphere of the seagrass Zostera noltii were highly dependent upon plant photosynthetic activity being significantly stimulated at elevated CO2 concentrations and by light, both in the short-term and over diurnal cycles. Stimulation by light became insignificant when 5 mM sucrose was added to the sediment porewater, indicating that in the absence of added carbon sources, light stimulation was due to direct inputs of plant ...

  13. Boreal Lake Sediments as Sources and Sinks of Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Gudasz, Cristian

    2011-01-01

    Inland waters process large amounts of organic carbon, contributing to CO2 and CH4 emissions, as well as storing organic carbon (OC) over geological timescales. Recently, it has been shown that the magnitude of these processes is of global significance. It is therefore important to understand what regulates OC cycling in inland waters and how is that affected by climate change. This thesis investigates the constraints on microbial processing of sediment OC, as a key factor of the carbon cycli...

  14. Sources and metabolism of carbon in a Canadian boreal hydroelectric reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using isotopic approaches, we try to document the sources and pathways of this CO2 with special attention to seasonal patterns and to the cycling of organic carbon in the reservoir Robert-Bourassa . It is located in the Boreal forest area, south-east of Hudson Bay and is part of a series of 8 reservoirs. It has a mean surface area of 2835 km2 and was flooded in 1979. The isotopic monitoring of the reservoir started in 1998. However, we will essentially refer here to data collected during the summers of 2001 and 2002. Three sampling strategies were retained: i) sampling in surface waters of 15 sites scattered across the reservoir, ii) sampling along three water columns (from shallow to deep sites), and iii) sampling of of inflow and outflow waters of the reservoir, once a month during 1 year. At each sampling site, in situ measurements included: water and air temperatures, pH, alkalinity and wind speed. Samples were collected at each site for the measurement of concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), C/N ratios of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and isotopic compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), DOC, air CO2 and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON)

  15. Application of plant carbon source for denitrification by constructed wetland and bioreactor: review of recent development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Qianyu; Wang, Haiyan; Chu, Zhaosheng; Ye, Bibi; Li, Chunmei; Hou, Zeying

    2016-05-01

    Water quality standard for nitrate becomes more and more strict, and the plant carbon source is widely used for denitrification by constructed wetland (CW) and bioreactor. However, the nitrate removal efficiency by different types of plant carbon source are not evaluated comprehensively. Denitrification performance of different plant carbon sources, and the influence of dosing method and pretreatment are thoroughly reviewed in this paper, which aims to investigate the accurate utilization of plant carbon source for nitrogen (as nitrate) removal. It is concluded that plant carbon source addition for all types of CWs and bioreactors can improve the nitrate removal efficiency to some extent, and the dosing method of plant carbon source for denitrification should be further studied and optimized in the future. The popular carbon sources for CW and bioreactor denitrification enhancement are woodchip, chopped macrophytes, crop plants, macrophytes litters, etc. The recommended optimum C:N ratios for CW and bioreactor are 4.0:5.0 and 1.8:3.0, respectively. The physical and biological pretreatments are selected to supply organic carbon for long-term denitrification. PMID:26971521

  16. Reduction of nitrous oxide emissions from partial nitrification process by using innovative carbon source (mannitol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinwen; Wang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Xiaoyu; Wei, Dong; Lan, Wei; Hu, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of mannitol as carbon source on nitrogen removal and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission during partial nitrification (PN) process. Laboratory-scale PN sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated with mannitol and sodium acetate as carbon sources, respectively. Results showed that mannitol could remarkably reduce N2O-N emission by 41.03%, without influencing the removal efficiency of NH4(+)-N. However, it has a significant influence on nitrite accumulation ratio (NAR) and TN removal, which were 19.97% and 13.59% lower than that in PN with sodium acetate, respectively. Microbial analysis showed that the introduction of mannitol could increase the abundance of bacteria encoding nosZ genes. In addition, anti-oxidant enzymes (T-SOD, POD and CAT) activities were significantly reduced and the dehydrogenase activity had an obvious increase in mannitol system, indicating that mannitol could alleviate the inhibition of N2O reductase (N2OR) activities caused by high NO2(-)-N concentration. PMID:27423546

  17. Influence of carbon source and temperature on the denitrifying phosphorus removal process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yayi; WANG Shuying; PENG Yongzhen; Zhu Guibing; LING Yunfang

    2007-01-01

    To supply the valuable operating parameters for the popular usage of the new denitrifying phosphors removal process,it is essential to study the dominant biochemical reactions and the characteristics of denitriflying phosphorus removing bacteria(DPB).Thus,parallel batch experiments using DPB sludge were carried out to assess the effect of substrates(sewage,HAc,and endogenous carbon source)on denitriflying dephosphorus removal efficiency in this study.The results showed that the initial specific phosphorus release rate increased with the high concentration of the short-chain volatile fatty acids ratio in the influent,and sufficient phosphorus was released by DPB.This improved the subsequent denitrification and phosphorus uptake efficiency.The specific endogenous denitrification mainly relies on the internal carbon source(PHB)stored by poly-P bacteria.Denitrifying phosphorus removing bacteria were very hungry when the internal PHB was consumed.Consequently,the specific endogenous denitrification rate was low and the phosphorus uptake did not happen.On the other hand,in the experiment,the denitrifying phosphorus removal performance under two temperature conditions(8-10℃ and 25-26℃)was also investigated and analyzed.It was found that the lower temperature decreased the specific phosphorus release and uptake rate,but did not inhibit the denitrifying phosphorus removal completely.Therefore,the negative influence of the low temperature on the overall phosphorus removal was not significant.

  18. CONTRIBUTION OF RADON FLOWS AND RADON SOURCES TO THE RADON CONCENTRATION IN A DWELLING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEIJER, RJ; STOOP, P; PUT, LW

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a model is presented for analysis of the radon concentrations in a compartment in terms of contributions from transport by flows of air between compartments and from radon sources in the compartment. Measurements were made to study the effect of increased natural ventilation of the cra

  19. [Testing of Concentration and Characteristics of Particulate Matters Emitted from Stationary Combustion Sources in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue-qi; Wu, Xiao-dong; Wang, Chen; Liang, Yun-ping; Ma, Zhao-hui

    2016-05-15

    A self-built monitoring sampling system on particulate matters and water soluble ions emitted from stationary combustion sources and a size separated sampling system on particulate matters based on FPS4000 and ELPI + were applied to test particulate matters in fumes of typical stationary combustion sources in Beijing. The results showed that the maximum concentration of total particulate matters in fumes of stationary combustion sources in Beijing was 83.68 mg · m⁻³ in standard smoke oxygen content and the minimum was 0.12 mg · m⁻³. And particle number concentration was in the 10⁴-10⁶ cm⁻³ number of grade. Both mass and number concentration ranking order of particulate matters emitted from stationary combustion sources in Beijing was: heating gas fired boilers power plant coal fired boilers coal fired boilers. And two or three peaks existed under 1 µm of particulate size for both number size distribution and mass size distribution. The number concentration for PM₂.₅ accounted for over 99.8% of that for PM₁₀ and that for PM₀.₁ accounted for over 83% of that for PM₂.₅. But the proportions of PM₀.₁, and PM₂.₅ in PM₁₀ were significantly lower in quality analysis,the proportion of PM₂.₅ in PM₁₀ was about 82%, and that of PM₀.₁ in PM₂.₅ was about 27%-33%. PMID:27506016

  20. Contribution from indoor sources to particle number and mass concentrations in residential houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Congrong; Morawska, Lidia; Hitchins, Jane; Gilbert, Dale

    As part of a large study investigating indoor air in residential houses in Brisbane, Australia, the purpose of this work was to quantify emission characteristics of indoor particle sources in 15 houses. Submicrometer particle number and approximation of PM 2.5 concentrations were measured simultaneously for more than 48 h in the kitchen of all the houses by using a condensation particle counter (CPC) and a photometer (DustTrak), respectively. In addition, characterizations of particles resulting from cooking conducted in an identical way in all the houses were measured by using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and a DustTrak. All the events of elevated particle concentrations were linked to indoor activities using house occupants diary entries, and catalogued into 21 different types of indoor activities. This enabled quantification of the effect of indoor sources on indoor particle concentrations as well as quantification of emission rates from the sources. For example, the study found that frying, grilling, stove use, toasting, cooking pizza, cooking, candle vaporizing eucalyptus oil and fan heater use, could elevate the indoor submicrometer particle number concentration levels by more than five times, while PM 2.5 concentrations could be up to 3, 30 and 90 times higher than the background levels during smoking, frying and grilling, respectively.

  1. Point source pollution and variability of nitrate concentrations in water from shallow aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemčić-Jurec, Jasna; Jazbec, Anamarija

    2016-01-01

    Agriculture is one of the several major sources of nitrate pollution, and therefore the EU Nitrate Directive, designed to decrease pollution, has been implemented. Point sources like septic systems and broken sewage systems also contribute to water pollution. Pollution of groundwater by nitrate from 19 shallow wells was studied in a typical agricultural region, middle Podravina, in northwest Croatia. The concentration of nitrate ranged from R6, there was no statistically significant difference in nitrate concentrations (F = 1.98; p = 0.15) during the years 2002-2007. Average concentrations of nitrate in all 19 wells for all the analyzed years were between recommended limit value of 25 mg/l (RLV) and MAV except in 2002 (concentration was under RLV). The results of the repeated measures ANOVA showed statistically significant differences between the wells at the point source distance (proximity) of 20 m (F = 10.6; p < 0.001). Average annual concentrations of nitrate during the years studied are not statistically different, but interaction between proximity and years is statistically significant (F = 2.07; p = 0.04). Results of k-means clustering confirmed division into four clusters according to the pollution. Principal component analysis showed that there is only one significant factor, proximity, which explains 91.6 % of the total variability of nitrate. Differences in water quality were found as a result of different environmental factors. These results will contribute to the implementation of the Nitrate Directive in Croatia and the EU.

  2. Impact of Monthly Radioxenon Source Time-Resolution on Atmospheric Concentration Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöppner, Michael; Kalinowski, Martin; Plastino, Wolfango; Budano, Antonio; de Vincenzi, Mario; Ringbom, Anders; Ruggieri, Federico; Schlosser, Clemens

    2014-03-01

    The general characterisation of the global radioxenon background is of interest for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Since the major background sources are only a few isotope production facilities, their source term has an emphasized influence on the worldwide monitoring process of radioxenon. In this work, two different datasets of source terms are applied through atmospheric transport modelling, to estimate the concentration at two radioxenon detection stations in Germany and Sweden. One dataset relies on estimated average annual emissions; the other includes monthly resolved measurements from an isotope production facility in Fleurus, Belgium. The quality of the estimations is then validated by comparing them to the radioxenon concentrations that have been sampled at two monitoring stations over the course of 1 year.

  3. Food sources for the mangrove tree crab aratus pisonii: a carbon isotopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscle tissues from the mangrove tree crab Aratus pisonii was analysed for carbon isotopic composition, in order to trace its major food sources. Potential food sources: mangrove leaves epi phytic green algae, mangrove sediments and open water and mangrove suspended matter; were also analysed. The results show that A. pisonii is basically omnivorous, with major food sources from marine origin. However, mangrove carbon can contribute with 16% to 42% in the crab's diet. (author)

  4. Power source life cycle assessment by the Bilan Carbone method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilan Carbone is a method to assess the amount of spent energy in the form of CO2 formation and its impacts on climate change (carbon footprint). The method assesses each steps in power production, finds hidden energy flows for modelling future energy scenarios. The principles of the method are outlined and an example of its application is presented. (orig.)

  5. Effects of elevated carbon dioxide and sucrose concentrations on Arabidopsis thaliana root architecture and anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant root growth is known to be influenced by higher levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Roots of some species grown in hydroponics under elevated CO2 concentrations may be more competitive sinks for photosynthetic assimilates than roots grown under lower CO2 conditions. Root branching patterns may also be influenced by elevated CO2 concentrations. Studies have also shown that factors such as soil compaction, salinity and the availability of nitrate, phosphorous, oxygen and water also influence root growth, and the effects of higher CO2 on roots can be confounded by such environmental factors. This study evaluated the effects of elevated carbon dioxide and sucrose concentrations on Arabidopsis thaliana root growth, morphology, and architecture. Both ambient and elevated CO2 levels were used along with various sucrose concentrations. The study revealed that A. thaliana plants grown on a phytagar medium in small chambers with elevated CO2 had longer roots, more lateral root growth than plants grown in ambient CO2. Roots in elevated CO2 were found to have wider root diameters, and more secondary growth. The addition of sucrose to the media closely resembled the effects of elevated CO2. In addition, the increase in sucrose concentration had a bigger effect on root morphology under ambient, than elevated CO2. Therefore, both elevated CO2 and increased sucrose concentrations promote root growth by increasing their number, length, and diameter. The dichotomy branching index (DBI) also dropped resulting in a more dichotomous branching pattern. 34 refs., 5 figs

  6. Deriving realistic source boundary conditions for a CFD simulation of concentrations in workroom air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigley, Charles E; Do, Thanh H; Khan, Jamil; Lee, Emily; Schnaufer, Nicholas D; Salzberg, Deborah C

    2011-05-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used increasingly to simulate the distribution of airborne contaminants in enclosed spaces for exposure assessment and control, but the importance of realistic boundary conditions is often not fully appreciated. In a workroom for manufacturing capacitors, full-shift samples for isoamyl acetate (IAA) were collected for 3 days at 16 locations, and velocities were measured at supply grills and at various points near the source. Then, velocity and concentration fields were simulated by 3-dimensional steady-state CFD using 295K tetrahedral cells, the k-ε turbulence model, standard wall function, and convergence criteria of 10(-6) for all scalars. Here, we demonstrate the need to represent boundary conditions accurately, especially emission characteristics at the contaminant source, and to obtain good agreement between observations and CFD results. Emission rates for each day were determined from six concentrations measured in the near field and one upwind using an IAA mass balance. The emission was initially represented as undiluted IAA vapor, but the concentrations estimated using CFD differed greatly from the measured concentrations. A second set of simulations was performed using the same IAA emission rates but a more realistic representation of the source. This yielded good agreement with measured values. Paying particular attention to the region with highest worker exposure potential-within 1.3 m of the source center-the air speed and IAA concentrations estimated by CFD were not significantly different from the measured values (P = 0.92 and P = 0.67, respectively). Thus, careful consideration of source boundary conditions greatly improved agreement with the measured values. PMID:21422277

  7. Particulate Matter 2.5 and Black Carbon concentrations in underground San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, A.; Williams, N.; Quartey, R.; Quintana, M.; Bell, B.; Biswas, N.; Hunter, S.; Marks-Block, T.; Yu, X.

    2013-12-01

    A previous Particulate Matter (PM) 2.5 study within Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) train stations found that concentrations of PM 2.5 at San Francisco's (SF) Embarcadero station were significantly high relative to within the rail system. To follow up on that study, PM 2.5 data was collected within other underground BART stations and the streets surrounding them using the DustTrak Aerosol monitor that measures concentrations every second. In addition, black carbon (BC) data was collected using a microAeth aerosol monitor that also measures concentrations every minute. During each day that measurements were made along three different train routes originating from West Oakland BART station: 1) toward the San Francisco Civic Center station: en route to the Lake Merritt station in Oakland; and toward the Downtown Berkeley station. All of these stations are located underground, and at each one the DustTrak instrument was taken from the train to the ticket level, and on each route data was collected outside of the stations. Black carbon (BC) concentrations were recorded only on the San Francisco route. The highest PM 2.5 concentrations were recorded at SF underground stations, particularly at Embarcadero where concentrations exceeded 100 μg/m3 at train level. These values were much greater than those obtained outside the station, which ranged between 10-20 μg/m3. Other stations along the route to Civic Center had values ranging from 30-64 μg/m3, higher than stations along the route to the Downtown Berkeley station (17-42 μg/m3 ) and the Lake Merritt station (10-38 μg/m3). PM concentrations outside of stations were lower, ranging from 14-33 μg/m3 and 8-27 μg/m3 outside 12th Street Oakland City Center and Lake Merritt stations respectively. Additionally, PM concentration was directly related to depth at all stations. For example, one day at Embarcadero the highest concentrations from train to middle to top level were 119, 84, and 59 μg/m3 respectively. We believe the

  8. Application of central composite design to optimize the amount of carbon source and prebiotics for Bifidobacterium bifidum BB01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Guowei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to obtain the optimum proportion of the carbon source and prebiotics for Bifidobacterium bifidum BB01 by the central composite design (CCD. The effect of carbon source (lactose and two prebiotics (inulin and fructooligosaccharides on the BB01 were observed by measuring the OD600 value, pH value and the viable counts at 18h. The final optimized concentrations of carbon source and prebiotics were: lactose 1.6%, inulin 0.26%, and fructooligosaccharides 0.22%. The result indicates that the growth of B. bifidum BB01 shows an significant increase in the optimized culture medium (p < 0.05, the OD600 value reached 1.434 at 18h, which increased 6.58% compared to the control. And the viable counts of B. bifidum BB01 increased 24.36% and reached (2.17±0.06 ×109cfu/mL. The results show that the optimization of the carbon source and prebiotics using CCD in this study is workable and necessary.

  9. Indoor concentrations of radon 222 and its daughters: sources, range, and environmental influences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author here reviews what is presently known about factors affecting indoor concentrations of radon 222 and its daughters. In US single-family homes, radon concentrations are found to average about 1.5 pCi/1, but substantially higher concentrations occur frequently: perhaps a million US homes have concentrations exceeding 8 pCi/1 (from which occupants receive radiation doses comparable to those now experienced by uranium miners). The major contributor to indoor radon is ordinary soil underlying homes, with this radon being transported indoors primarily by the slight depressurization that occurs toward the bottom of a house interior (due to indoor-outdoor temperature differences and winds). Water from underground sources contributes significantly in a minority of cases, primarily residences with private wells, with public water supplies contributing only a few percent of indoor radon, even when drawn from wells. The strong variability in indoor concentrations is associated primarily with variability in the amount of radon entering homes from these various sources, and secondarily with differences in ventilation rates. However, for a given entry rate, the ventilation rate is the key determinant of indoor concentrations. Human doses are also influenced strongly by the chemical behavior of the daughters (i.e., decay products of radon), and considerable progress has been made recently in investigating a major aspect of this behavior, i.e., the manner in which daughters attach to airborne particles, to walls, and - indeed - to the lining of the lung itself, where the key radiation dose occurs

  10. Sources and Dynamics of Inorganic Carbon within the Upper Reaches of the Xi River Basin, Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Junyu

    2016-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of dissolved and particulate inorganic carbon (DIC; PIC) was used to compare and analyze the origin, dynamics and evolution of inorganic carbon in two headwater tributaries of the Xi River, Southwest China. Carbonate dissolution and soil CO2 were regarded as the primary sources of DIC on the basis of δ13CDIC values which varied along the Nanpan and Beipan Rivers, from −13.9‰ to 8.1‰. Spatial trends in DIC differed between the two rivers (i.e., the tributaries), in part because factors controlling pCO2, which strongly affected carbonate dissolution, differed between the two river basins. Transport of soil CO2 and organic carbon through hydrologic conduits predominately controlled the levels of pCO2 in the Nanpan River. However, pCO2 along the upper reaches of the Nanpan River also was controlled by the extent of urbanization and industrialization relative to agriculture. DIC concentrations in the highly urbanized upper reaches of the Nanpan River were typical higher than in other carbonate-dominated areas of the upper Xi River. Within the Beipan River, the oxidation of organic carbon is the primary process that maintains pCO2 levels. The pCO2 within the Beipan River was more affected by sulfuric acid from coal industries, inputs from a scenic spot, and groundwater than along the Nanpan River. With regards to PIC, the contents and δ13C values in the Nanpan River were generally lower than those in the Beipan River, indicating that chemical and physical weathering contributes more marine carbonate detritus to the PIC along the Beipan River. The CO2 evasion flux from the Nanpan River was higher than that in the Beipan River, and generally higher than along the middle and lower reaches of the Xi River, demonstrating that the Nanpan River is an important net source of atmospheric CO2 in Southwest China. PMID:27513939

  11. Degraded peatlands as a source of riverine organic carbon and enhanced river outgassing in Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wit, Francisca; Rixen, Tim

    2014-05-01

    Sumatra, Indonesia, is well known for its widespread tropical peat lands. However, silvi- and agricultural purposes are currently inducing large-scale degradation of peat lands, transforming the landscape into mainly palm-oil plantations. The degradation induces loss of carbon via direct CO2 emissions, but also via riverine outflow of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC and POC, respectively) due to leaching. This organic carbon is then decomposed along the way towards the coast and is hypothesized to enhance coastal and river outgassing of CO2. In the framework of SPICE III, Science for the Protection of Indonesian Coastal Ecosystems, we are quantifying these carbon budgets and fluxes in the rivers and coastal areas of northeast Sumatra. Using underway instruments, we have gathered continuous measurements of various parameters, including pCO2, pH, temperature, salinity and oxygen. In addition, water samples were obtained for DOC, POC, δ13CDIC, alkalinity and nutrient analyses. The results of the first analyses show that pCO2 values in the coastal areas range between 400-600 μatm. However, in the vicinity of the rivers pCO2 concentrations increase tremendously, ranging from 600 near the estuaries to a staggering 9000 μatm further upstream. These values are much higher than the marine pCO2 value of 390 μatm in the South China Sea. When adding carbon isotope results into the story, while knowing that upstream river life is greatly reduced due to oxygen depletion as a result of high DOC decomposition, it appears to be clear from the values, which range between -20 to -24‰ δ13CDIC, that the main source of the organic carbon is indeed originating from the degrading peat lands. In conclusion, our hypothesis can be deemed correct: degrading peat lands enhance organic carbon outflow and therefore elevated decomposition in the rivers, which results in increased river outgassing of CO2. Further analyses will be conducted to precisely quantify the budgets and

  12. Dissolved black carbon in Antarctic lakes: Chemical signatures of past and present sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Alia L.; Jaffé, Rudolf; Ding, Yan; McKnight, Diane M.

    2016-06-01

    The perennially ice-covered, closed-basin lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, serve as sentinels for understanding the fate of dissolved black carbon from glacial sources in aquatic ecosystems. Here we show that dissolved black carbon can persist in freshwater and saline surface waters for thousands of years, while preserving the chemical signature of the original source materials. The ancient brines of the lake bottom waters have retained dissolved black carbon with a woody chemical signature, representing long-range transport of black carbon from wildfires. In contrast, the surface waters are enriched in contemporary black carbon from fossil fuel combustion. Comparison of samples collected 25 years apart from the same lake suggests that the enrichment in anthropogenic black carbon is recent. Differences in the chemical composition of dissolved black carbon among the lakes are likely due to biogeochemical processing such as photochemical degradation and sorption on metal oxides.

  13. Black carbon concentrations and diesel vehicle emission factors derived from coefficient of haze measurements in California: 1967-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Fairley, David; Novakov, T.

    We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived coefficient of haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population's exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of ˜3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has been retired.

  14. Wetlands as a large carbon source for inland waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Gwenaël; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Artigas, L. Felipe; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Benedetti, Marc F.; Vidal, Luciana; Meziane, Tarik; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Bernardes, Marcelo C.; Deborde, Jonathan; Lima Souza, Edivaldo; Albéric, Patrick; Landim de Souza, Marcelo F.; Roland, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    Recent estimates suggests that up to 3 PgC y-1 could be emitted as CO2 from global inland waters, offsetting the carbon uptake by terrestrial ecosystems. It is generally assumed that inland waters emit carbon previously fixed upstream by land plant photosynthesis and subsequently transported downstream with runoff. But the observed carbon fluxes from first-order streams do not account for all of the CO2 outgassing at the scale of entire watersheds. Three-quarters of the world's flooded land are temporary wetlands. However, the contribution of these productive ecosystems to the inland water carbon budget has been largely overlooked. Based on observations in rivers and floodplains of the central Amazon, we suggest that wetlands pump large amounts of atmospheric CO2 into river waters. Indeed, the magnitude of CO2 outgassing in Amazonian waters is spatially and temporally related to their connection with the semi-aquatic vegetation that performs aerial photosynthesis (Flooded forests and floating macrophytes). These wetlands export half of their gross primary production to waters as dissolved CO2 and organic carbon, compared to only a few percent of gross primary production in upland ecosystems. Global carbon budgets should explicitly address temporary or vegetated flooded areas, as these ecosystems combine high aerial primary production with a large and fast carbon export capacity, potentially supporting a significant fraction of CO2 evasion from inland waters.

  15. Sub-Surface Carbon Dioxide Concentration Measurement Using a Fiber Based Sensor in a Call/Return Geometry for Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, G. R.; Soukup, B.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.; Barr, J. L.; Dobeck, L.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration is a means to mitigate the increasing atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) by capturing the CO2 at a source such as a power generation facility and storing the captured CO2 in geologic formations. Many technologic advances will need to occur for successful carbon sequestration including near surface monitoring tools and techniques to ensure site integrity and public safety. Researchers at Montana State University (MSU) are developing a scalable fiber sensor array in a call/return configuration for monitoring near sub-surface CO2 concentrations. The low cost fiber sensor array being developed at MSU for sub-surface CO2 detection for monitoring carbon sequestration sites will utilize a series of fiber probes connected to a two detectors and a 1 x N fiber switch that can direct the light to one of N fiber probes. The fiber sensor array will utilize a single tunable distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser with a center wavelength of 2.004 μm to access CO2 absorption features. The output from the DFB laser is incident on an inline fiber splitter that directs part of the light to a reference detector while the remaining light is directed to a fiber probe where the laser light interacts with the CO2. The light from the fiber probe is directed back through the switch and is incident on a transmission detector. The transmission as a function of wavelength is measured and a CO2 concentration is calculated. The fiber sensor array can easily be reconfigured by simply moving the fiber probes. Low cost is achieved by using inexpensive passive components in the fiber probes while limiting the number of the more expensive components including the DFB laser, the two detectors, and the single fiber switch. The fiber sensor was tested over a thirty day period at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) facility that was developed for testing surface and near surface carbon sequestration monitoring instrumentation using a controlled

  16. Thermoascus aurantiacus CBHI/Cel7A Production in Trichoderma reesei on Alternative Carbon Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkő, Zsuzsa; Drahos, Eszter; Szengyel, Zsolt; Puranen, Terhi; Vehmaanperä, Jari; Réczey, Kati

    To develop functional enzymes in cellulose hydrolysis at or above 70°C the cellobiohydrolase (CBHI/Cel7A) of Thermoascus aurantiacus was cloned and expressed in Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30 under the strong cbh1 promoter. Cellulase production of the parental strain and the novel strain (RF6026) was examined in submerged fermentation experiments using various carbon sources, which were lactose, Solka Floc 200 cellulose powder, and steam pretreated corn stover. An industrially feasible production medium was used containing only distiller's spent grain, KH2PO4, and (NH4)2SO4. Enzyme production was followed by measurements of protein concentration, total cellulase enzyme activity (filter paper activity), β-glucosidase activity, CBHI activity, and endogenase I (EGI) activity. The Thermoascus CBHI/Cel7A activity was taken as an indication of the heterologous gene expression under the cbh1 promoter.

  17. PM10 mass concentration, chemical composition, and sources in the typical coal-dominated industrial city of Pingdingshan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoyan; Yang, Shushen; Shao, Longyi; Fan, Jingsen; Liu, Yanfei

    2016-11-15

    The atmospheric pollution created by coal-dominated industrial cities in China cannot be neglected. This study focuses on the atmospheric PM10 in the typical industrial city of Pingdingshan City in North China. A total of 44 PM10 samples were collected from three different sites (power plant, mining area, and roadside) in Pingdingshan City during the winter of 2013, and were analyzed gravimetrically and chemically. The Pingdingshan PM10 samples were composed of mineral matter (average of 118.0±58.6μg/m(3), 20.6% of the total PM10 concentration), secondary crystalline particles (338.7±122.0μg/m(3), 59.2%), organic matter (77.3±48.5μg/m(3), 13.5%), and elemental carbon (38.0±28.3μg/m(3), 6.6%). Different sources had different proportions of these components in PM10. The power plant pollutant source was characterized by secondary crystalline particles (377.1μg/m(3)), elemental carbon (51.5μg/m(3)), and organic matter (90.6μg/m(3)) due to coal combustion. The mining area pollutant source was characterized by mineral matter (124.0μg/m(3)) due to weathering of waste dumps. The roadside pollutant source was characterized by mineral matter (130.0μg/m(3)) and organic matter (81.0μg/m(3)) due to road dust and vehicle exhaust, respectively. A positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis was performed for PM10 source apportionment to identify major anthropogenic sources of PM10 in Pingdingshan. Six factors-crustal matter, coal combustion, vehicle exhaust and abrasion, local burning, weathering of waste dumps, and industrial metal smelting-were identified and their contributions to Pingdingshan PM10 were 19.0%, 31.6%, 7.4%, 6.3%, 9.8%, and 25.9%, respectively. Compared to other major cities in China, the source of PM10 in Pingdingshan was characterized by coal combustion, weathering of waste dumps, and industrial metal smelting. PMID:27450962

  18. 5.3. Obtaining of cryolite-alumina concentrate from carbon-, and fluorine containing wastes by burning method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of obtaining of cryolite-alumina concentrate from carbon-, and fluorine containing wastes by means of burning method was elaborated. The flowsheet of obtaining of cryolite-alumina concentrate from carbon-, and fluorine containing wastes by means of burning method was considered and presented in this article.

  19. Predicting Effects of Ocean Acidification and Warming on Algae Lacking Carbon Concentrating Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübler, Janet E; Dudgeon, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Seaweeds that lack carbon-concentrating mechanisms are potentially inorganic carbon-limited under current air equilibrium conditions. To estimate effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and ocean acidification on photosynthetic rates, we modeled rates of photosynthesis in response to pCO2, temperature, and their interaction under limiting and saturating photon flux densities. We synthesized the available data for photosynthetic responses of red seaweeds lacking carbon-concentrating mechanisms to light and temperature. The model was parameterized with published data and known carbonate system dynamics. The model predicts that direction and magnitude of response to pCO2 and temperature, depend on photon flux density. At sub-saturating light intensities, photosynthetic rates are predicted to be low and respond positively to increasing pCO2, and negatively to increasing temperature. Consequently, pCO2 and temperature are predicted to interact antagonistically to influence photosynthetic rates at low PFD. The model predicts that pCO2 will have a much larger effect than temperature at sub-saturating light intensities. However, photosynthetic rates under low light will not increase proportionately as pCO2 in seawater continues to rise. In the range of light saturation (Ik), both CO2 and temperature have positive effects on photosynthetic rate and correspondingly strong predicted synergistic effects. At saturating light intensities, the response of photosynthetic rates to increasing pCO2 approaches linearity, but the model also predicts increased importance of thermal over pCO2 effects, with effects acting additively. Increasing boundary layer thickness decreased the effect of added pCO2 and, for very thick boundary layers, overwhelmed the effect of temperature on photosynthetic rates. The maximum photosynthetic rates of strictly CO2-using algae are low, so even large percentage increases in rates with climate change will not contribute much to

  20. Water cycle dynamic increases resilience of vegetation under higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemordant, L. A.; Gentine, P.; Stéfanon, M.; Drobinski, P. J.; Fatichi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plant stomata couple the energy, water and carbon cycles. Photosynthesis requires stomata to open to take up carbon dioxide. In the process water vapor is released as transpiration. As atmospheric CO2 concentration rises, for the same amount of CO2 uptake, less water vapor is transpired, translating into higher water use efficiency. Reduced water vapor losses will increase soil water storage if the leaf area coverage remains similar. This will in turn alter the surface energy partitioning: more heat will be dissipated as sensible heat flux, resulting in possibly higher surface temperatures. In contrast with this common hypothesis, our study shows that the water saved during the growing season by increased WUE can be mobilized by the vegetation and help reduce the maximum temperature of mid-latitude heat waves. The large scale meteorological conditions of 2003 are the basis of four regional model simulations coupling an atmospheric model to a surface model. We performed two simulations with respectively 2003 (CTL) and 2100 (FUT) atmospheric CO2 applied to both the atmospheric and surface models. A third (RAD) and a fourth (FER) simulations are run with 2100 CO2 concentration applied to respectively the atmospheric model only and the surface model only. RAD investigates the impact of the radiative forcing, and FER the response to vegetation CO2 fertilization. Our results show that the water saved through higher water use efficiency during the growing season enabled by higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations helps the vegetation to cope during severe heat and dryness conditions in the summer of mid-latitude climate. These results demonstrate that consideration of the vegetation carbon cycle is essential to model the seasonal water cycle dynamic and land-atmosphere interactions, and enhance the accuracy of the model outputs especially for extreme events. They also have important implications for the future of agriculture, water resources management, ecosystems

  1. Equilibrium concentration of radionuclides in cement/groundwater/carbon steel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equilibrium concentration of major elements in an underground repository with a capacity of 100,000 drums have been simulated using the geochemical computer code (EQMOD). The simulation has been carried out at the conditions of pH 12 to 13.5, and Eh 520 and -520 mV. Solubilities of magnesium and calcium decrease with the increase of pH. The solubility of iron increases with pH at Eh -520 mV of reducing environment, while it almost entirely exists as the precipitate of Fe(OH)3(s) at Eh 520 mV of oxidizing environment. All of cobalt and nickel are predicted to be dissolved in the liquid phase regardless of pH since the solubility limit is greater than the total concentration. In the case of cesium and strontium, all forms of both ions are present in the liquid phase because they have negligible sorption capacity on cement and large solubility under disposal atmosphere. And thus the total concentration determines the equilibrium concentration. Adsorbed amounts of iodide and carbonate are dependent on adsorption capacity and adsorption equilibrium constant. Especially, the calcite turns out to be a solubility-limiting phase on the carbonate system. In order to validate the model, the equilibrium concentrations measured for a number of systems which consist of iron, cement, synthetic groundwater and radionuclides are compared with those predicted by the model. The concentrations between the model and the experiment of nonadsorptive elements - cesium, strontium, cobalt, nickel and iron, are well agreed. It indicates that the assumptions and the thermodynamic data in this work are valid. Using the adsorption equilibrium constant as a free parameter, the experimental data of iodide and carbonate have been fitted to the model. The model is in a good agreement with the experimental data of the iodide system. (author)

  2. The influences of cultivation setting on inflorescence lipid distributions, concentrations, and carbon isotope ratios of Cannabis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipple, Brett J; Hambach, Bastian; Barnette, Janet E; Chesson, Lesley A; Ehleringer, James R

    2016-05-01

    While much is known about how the growth environment influences many aspects of floral morphology and physiology, little is known about how the growth setting influences floral lipid composition. We explored variations in paraffin wax composition in Cannabis sp., a cash crop grown both indoors and outdoors across the United States today. Given an increased focus on regulation of this crop, there are additional incentives to certify the setting of Cannabis cultivation. To understand the impacts of the growth environment, we studied distributions, concentrations, and carbon isotope ratios of n-alkanes isolated from Cannabis sp. inflorescences to assess if variations within these lipid parameters were related to known growth settings of specimens seized by federal agents. We found that Cannabis plants cultivated under open-field settings had increased inflorescence paraffin wax abundances and greater production of lower molecular weight n-alkanes relative to plants grown in enclosed environments. Further, the carbon isotope ratios of n-C29 from Cannabis plants grown in enclosed environments had relatively lower carbon isotope (δ(13)C) values compared to plants from open-field environments. While this set of observations on seized plant specimens cannot address the particular driver behind these observations, we posit that (a) variations in irradiance and/or photoperiod may influence the distribution and concentration of inflorescence lipids, and (b) the δ(13)C value of source CO2 and lipid concentration regulates the δ(13)C values of inflorescence n-C29 and bulk Cannabis plant materials. Nonetheless, by using a cultivation model based on δ(13)C values of n-C29, the model correctly identified the growth environment 90% of time. We suggest that these lipid markers may be used to trace cultivation methods of Cannabis sp. now and become a more powerful marker in the future, once the mechanism(s) behind these patterns is uncovered. PMID:27045381

  3. Sources and their contribution to two water-soluble organic carbon fractions at a roadway site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung-Shik; Schauer, James J.; Cho, Sung-Yong

    2013-10-01

    24-h PM2.5 samples were collected at a roadway site every 6th day for one year (September 2010 through August 2011) and analyzed for organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), hydrophilic and hydrophobic fractions of WSOC (WSOCHPI and WSOCHPO), and ionic species, to provide important seasonal quantitative information on the primary and secondary sources of two WSOC fractions. Five minute black carbon (BC) concentrations were also measured using a seven-channel wavelength aethalometer to investigate the relationship of biomass burning (BB)-derived BC data from a BC@880 nm tracer method and WSOC. There has been increased interest in the light adsorption of WSOC and water-insoluble OC but most of the tools that have been used to understand these relationships have limited to extracts of filter-based samples. The impact of BB emissions on WSOC fractions was examined using the relationship between ΔBC (=BC@370 nm - BC@880 nm) and WSOC (or K+), and between BB tracers (WSOC and K+) and BB-derived BC (BCBB) estimated. The moderate correlation (R2 = 0.41) of WSOC and ΔBC during the cold months of November through April may support the contribution of BB emissions to the observed WSOC. Predicted BCBB correlated well with K+, WSOCHPI, and WSOCHPO concentrations (R2 of 0.65, 0.43, and 0.61, respectively), suggesting BB emissions may have an influence on the WSOC fractions observed. Contributions of non-BB, BB, and secondary OC (SOC) to both WSOCHPI and WSOCHPO were estimated using a multiple linear regression analysis. The monthly average contribution of non-BB emissions ranged from 12.6% to 29.4% of the WSOCHPI and from 21.5% to 44.1% of the WSOCHPO, with high contributions occurring during the cold months and low contributions occurred during the warm months. BB emissions contributed more to WSOCHPI (2.7%-13.1%) than WSOCHPO (0.2%-1.1%), and the SOC contribution to both WSOC fractions was significant. SOC accounted for 57.2%-79.7% of

  4. High-rate nitrogen removal by the Anammox process with a sufficient inorganic carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiachun; Zhang, Li; Fukuzaki, Yasuhiro; Hira, Daisuke; Furukawa, Kenji

    2010-12-01

    This study focused on high-rate nitrogen removal by the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process with a sufficient inorganic carbon (IC) source. Experiments were carried out in an up-flow column Anammox reactor fed with synthetic inorganic wastewater for 110 days. The IC source was added into the influent tank in the form of bicarbonate. The results confirmed the positive impact of inorganic matter on stimulating Anammox activity. After the addition of sufficient IC, the nitrogen removal rate sharply increased from 5.2 to 11.8 kg-Nm(-3)day(-1) within only 32 days. NO(2)-N inhibition was not observed even at NO(2)-N concentrations greater than 460 mgN/L, indicating the enriched Anammox consortium adapted to high NO(2)-N concentrations. The ratio of NO(2)-N removal, NO(3)-N production and NH(4)-N removal for the reactor was correspondingly changed from 1.21:0.21:1 to 1.24:0.18:1. Simultaneously, the sludge volume index of the Anammox granules decreased markedly from 36.8 to 21.5 mL/g, which was attributed to the implementation of proper operational strategy. In addition, DNA analysis revealed that a shift from the KSU-1 strain to the KU2 strain occurred in the Anammox community. PMID:20709538

  5. Identifying dissolved organic carbon sources at a gaged headwater catchment using FDOM sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malzone, J. M.; Shanley, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The United States Geological Survey's (USGS) W-9 gage at the headwaters of Sleepers River, Vermont has been monitored for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration for more than 20 years. However, the sources of this DOC during base flow and hydrologic events remain unclear. The major objectives of this research were to identify sources of DOC during storm events and to explain the observed DOC-streamflow counterclockwise hysteresis during hydrologic events. Two main hypotheses to explain hysteresis during hydrologic events were tested: (1) distant headwater wetlands are the major DOC source, which lags behind peak flow due to travel time; and (2) the entire watershed contributes to the DOC at the gage, but the response of DOC lags behind the period when groundwater contributes most to streamflow. Sources of DOC were tracked using fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) sensors in surface water and groundwater wells. Wells were installed at four depths, 0.3, 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2 m, at four sites: a peaty low-gradient riparian area near the headwaters; a mid-hillslope area on a long hillslope mid-watershed; a near-stream area on a long hillslope mid-watershed; and a low-gradient tributary confluence area just above the gage. During storm events, FDOM and hydraulic head were measured at the nested groundwater wells. Samples for DOC analysis were also taken to determine the relationship between FDOM and DOC. Results suggest that both distant sources and the greater watershed played a role in the transport of DOC to the W-9 gage. Distant peaty sources dominated during large storms and contributed the highest surface water FDOM measurements. The peak FDOM at the gage was therefore best described as a result of transport. However, export from these distant sources terminated rapidly and did not explain continued elevated FDOM at the gage. Groundwater across the watershed exhibited hysteresis analogous to that in the stream itself, with FDOM peaking as head receded

  6. Carbon and metal concentrations, size distributions and fluxes in major rivers of the Amazon basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Marc F.; Mounier, Stephane; Filizola, Naziano; Benaim, Jean; Seyler, Patrick

    2003-05-01

    The chemical composition of the Amazon River results from the mixing of two water types: black water and white water. On-site fractionation by sequential tangential ultrafiltration (STUF) was used to differentiate transported organic carbon and to determine the distribution and association of major and trace elements with different size fraction of the organic carbon (OC). Several sampling campaigns (1994-1996) allow a monthly quantification of particulate (OCP, MeP), colloidal (OCC, MeC) and dissolved (OCD, MeD) organic carbon and metal ions inputs. In white rivers the OC is mainly concentrated in the low molecular weight fraction (OCD 5 kDa). For Mg, Ca and K, 50% of the total amount of each element is found in fraction MeD while 15% and 35% are found in fractions MeC and MeP, respectively. Al and Fe are in the particulate fraction at 99% of the total metal concentration for all river samples. This work emphasizes the coagulation processes and the sink for elements in the mixing zone. These physicochemical transformations of the organic matter vary seasonally. The changes happen during the transition periods: before high-level waters and before low-level waters. By way of flux measurement, a seasonal carbon loss was observed. The estimated annual organic carbon flux of the Amazon at Òbidos is 28 × 106 t. At the same time, an average of 9 × 106 t of organic carbon per year is retained in the reach between Manaus and Òbidos, probably via coagulation processes.

  7. Temporal Variations in Concentrations of Ozone, Nitrogen Dioxide, and Carbon Monoxide at Osijek, Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Kovač-Andrić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the ozone, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide variations and their correlation with meteorological parameters in Osijek (Eastern Croatia during the summer seasons of 2002, 2007, and 2012. The measured data are discussed in relation to the EU guidelines (Directive 2002/3/EC, Directive 2008/50/EC. In order to characterize ambient air with respect to ozone photochemical pollution we calculated three photochemical pollution indicators. These indicators may also be a valid measure for harmful effects on living organisms. The influence of local meteorological parameters on the measured concentrations of ozone, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide was also investigated. We have attempted to establish correlations between measured pollutant concentrations and meteorological parameters using the technique of multivariate principal component analysis (PCA.

  8. An inversion algorithm for determining area-source emissions from downwind concentration measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehning, M; Shonnard, D R; Chang, D P; Bell, R L

    1994-10-01

    Measuring emissions from nonuniform area sources, such as waste repository sites, has been a difficult problem. A simple but reliable method is not available. An objective method of inverting downwind concentration measurements, utilizing an assumed form of atmospheric dispersion to reconstruct total emission rate and distribution, is described in this study. The Gaussian dispersion model is compared to a more realistic model based on K-theory and similarity expressions. A sensitivity analysis is presented indicating the atmospheric conditions under which a successful application of the method could be anticipated. Field releases of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) from a simulated area source in flat terrain were conducted to check the method, ability to reconstruct source distribution, and total emission rate. The sensitivity analysis and the field study confirm that a few ground-level concentration measurements and a simple determination of the atmospheric dispersion characteristics are sufficient, under neutral to stable conditions, to obtain the total emission rate accurately. Reconstruction of the spatial pattern of the source is possible by utilizing concentration information from samplers located on two separate ground-level receptor lines, if a shift in the wind direction occurs and if it can be assumed that the total emission rate is time invariant. A method of cross-checking the accuracy of the reconstruction, using a simultaneous tracer release, is presented. PMID:7812684

  9. Preparation of Palm Oil Based Carbon Nano tubes at Various Ferrocene Concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, different ferrocene concentration (1.0-10.0 wt %) in bio hydrocarbon palm oil precursor were utilized to investigate its effect on the produced carbon nano tubes (CNT). The palm oil-ferrocene mixture was vaporized at 450 degree Celsius and pyrolyzed at 800 degree Celsius for 30 min time in argon ambient. The CNT were analyzed using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The analysis confirmed different growth rate, diameter and morphologies of CNT were formed when different ferrocene concentration were used. Raman spectra revealed the presence of G-band and D-band peaks with varying ID/ IG ratio depending on the catalyst concentration used. The 4.0 wt % was considered to be the most optimum concentration to produce bulk amount with better crystallinity CNT production. (author)

  10. Potential source identification for aerosol concentrations over a site in Northwestern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payra, Swagata; Kumar, Pramod; Verma, Sunita; Prakash, Divya; Soni, Manish

    2016-03-01

    The collocated measurements of aerosols size distribution (ASD) and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) are analyzed simultaneously using Grimm aerosol spectrometer and MICROTOP II Sunphotometer over Jaipur, capital of Rajasthan in India. The contrast temperature characteristics during winter and summer seasons of year 2011 are investigated in the present study. The total aerosol number concentration (TANC, 0.3-20 μm) during winter season was observed higher than in summer time and it was dominated by fine aerosol number concentration (FANC work, Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) analysis is applied to identify locations of sources that influenced concentrations of aerosols over study area in two different seasons. PSCF analysis shows that the dust particles from Thar Desert contribute significantly to the coarse aerosol number concentration (CANC). Higher values of the PSCF in north from Jaipur showed the industrial areas in northern India to be the likely sources of fine particles. The variation in size distribution of aerosols during two seasons is clearly reflected in the log normal size distribution curves. The log normal size distribution curves reveals that the particle size less than 0.8 μm is the key contributor in winter for higher ANC.

  11. Urban background levels of particle number concentration and sources in Vilnius, Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byčenkienė, Steigvilė; Plauškaitė, Kristina; Dudoitis, Vadimas; Ulevicius, Vidmantas

    2014-06-01

    This study presents results of research on urban aerosol particles with a focus on the aerosol particle number concentration (PNC) and the particle size distribution. The real time measurements of aerosol PNC (> 4.5 nm) and number size distributions (9-840 nm) were performed. The seasonal variations essentially comprised the minimum monthly mean in October 2010 (3400 ± 3000 cm- 3) and the maximum in April 2011 (19,000 ± 15,000 cm- 3). The mean annual PNC was 10,000 ± 8000 cm- 3 with an average mode size of 30-50 nm. The presence of strong diurnal patterns in aerosol PNC was evident as a direct effect of three sources of aerosol particles (nucleation, traffic, and residential heating). Hybrid receptor modeling potential source contribution function (PSCF) and concentration weighted trajectory (CWT) were used by incorporating 72-h backward trajectories and measurements of PNC in Vilnius. The results of trajectory clustering and the PSCF method demonstrated that possible additional source areas contributing to the elevated particle number concentration in Vilnius could be industrial areas in central Europe. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed highest loadings for PNC, PM10, NOx, NO, NO2 and SO2 concentrations, indicating combustion processes occurring in vehicle engines and use of sulfur-containing fossil fuels for residential heating.

  12. Production of Feruloyl Esterase from Aspergillus niger by Solid-State Fermentation on Different Carbon Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyi Ou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A mixture of wheat bran with maize bran as a carbon source and addition of (NH4SO4 as nitrogen source was found to significantly increase production of feruloyl esterase (FAE enzyme compared with wheat bran as a sole carbon and nitrogen source. The optimal conditions in conical flasks were carbon source (30 g to water 1 : 1, maize bran to wheat bran 1 : 2, (NH4SO4 1.2 g and MgSO4 70 mg. Under these conditions, FAE activity was 7.68 mU/g. The FAE activity on the mixed carbon sources showed, high activity against the plant cell walls contained in the cultures.

  13. Effects of carbon sources and strength of MS medium on germination of somatic embryos of oil palm (Elaeis quineensis Jacq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslan Hilae

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Various sources of carbon and strengths of Murashige and Skoog (MS medium were investigated for their effect on oil palm somatic embryo germination or induction of shoots and roots from haustoriumstaged embryos. It was found that the highest percentage of shoot formation was obtained in 0.2 M sorbitol containing basal MS medium. A high concentration of alcohol sugar and reduced strength of MS medium enhanced root formation. A high concentration of sucrose or sorbitol also promoted root formation. Percentage of root formation was the highest (31.25% when excised shoots were cultured on root induction medium supplemented with 0.2 M sucrose.

  14. The effect of cation source and dietary cation-anion difference on rumen ion concentrations in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catterton, T L; Erdman, R A

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have focused on the influence of dietary cation-anion difference (DCAD) on animal performance but few have examined the effect of DCAD on the rumen ionic environment. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of DCAD, cation source (Na vs. K), and anion source (Cl vs. bicarbonate or carbonate) on rumen environment and fermentation. The study used 5 rumen-fistulated dairy cows and 5 dietary treatments that were applied using a 5×5 Latin square design with 2-wk experimental periods. Treatments consisted of (1) the basal total mixed ration (TMR); (2) the basal TMR plus 340mEq/kg of Na (dry matter basis) using NaCl; (3) the basal TMR plus 340mEq/kg of K using KCl; (4) the basal TMR plus 340mEq/kg of Na using NaHCO3; and (5) the basal TMR plus 340mEq/kg of K using K2CO3. On the last day of each experimental period, rumen samples were collected and pooled from 5 different locations at 0, 1.5, 3, 4.5, 6, 9, and 12h postfeeding for measurement of rumen pH and concentrations of strong ions and volatile fatty acids (VFA). Dietary supplementation of individual strong ions increased the corresponding rumen ion concentration. Rumen Na was decreased by 24mEq/L when K was substituted for Na in the diet, but added dietary Na had no effect on rumen K. Rumen Cl was increased by 10mEq/L in diets supplemented with Cl. Cation source had no effect on rumen pH or total VFA concentration. Increased DCAD increased rumen pH by 0.10 pH units and increased rumen acetate by 4mEq/L but did not increase total VFA. This study demonstrated that rumen ion concentrations can be manipulated by dietary ion concentrations. If production and feed efficiency responses to DCAD and ionophores in the diet are affected by rumen Na and K concentrations, then manipulating dietary Na and K could be used either to enhance or diminish those responses. PMID:27289159

  15. Relation of Whole Blood Carboxyhemoglobin Concentration to Ambient Carbon Monoxide Exposure Estimated Using Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Rudra, Carole B.; Williams, Michelle A.; Sheppard, Lianne; Koenig, Jane Q.; Schiff, Melissa A.; Frederick, Ihunnaya O; Dills, Russell

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) and other ambient air pollutants is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. While there are several methods of estimating CO exposure, few have been evaluated against exposure biomarkers. The authors examined the relation between estimated CO exposure and blood carboxyhemoglobin concentration in 708 pregnant western Washington State women (1996–2004). Carboxyhemoglobin was measured in whole blood drawn around 13 weeks’ gestation. CO exposure during the mon...

  16. Hepatoprotective effects of Rubus coreanus miquel concentrates on liver injuries induced by carbon tetrachloride in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Chae, Hyun-Jung; Yim, Jung-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Chyun, Jong-Hee

    2014-01-01

    As well-being foods pursuing healthy life are becoming popular, interest in Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCM) fruit, a type of Korean blackberry, is increasing due to its medicinal actions including protecting the liver, brightening the eyes, and alleviating diabetes. This study was carried out to evaluate the hepatoprotective effects of RCM concentrates on liver injuries induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rats. RCM, produced in June ~ July 2008 at Chunbook, Gochang (South Korea), was finely...

  17. Terrestrial sources and sinks of carbon inferred from terrestrial data

    OpenAIRE

    Houghton, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Two approaches have been used to calculate changes in terrestrial carbon storage with data obtained from terrestrial ecosystems, rather than with atmospheric or oceanographic data. One approach is based on the changes in carbon that result from changes in land use (conversion of forest to agricultural land, abandonment of agricultural land, harvest and regrowth). The other approach uses measurements of forest biomass obtained through forests inventories to determine change directly. These lat...

  18. Organic carbon concentration profiles in recent cave sediments: records of agricultural pollution or diagenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrell, S H

    1996-01-01

    Recent (<7 years old) cave sediments in Speedwell Cavern, Derbyshire, show an approximately exponential decay of organic carbon with depth. This phenomenon was thought to be due to one of two causes: (i) changing agricultural practice within the catchment feeding the cave, especially the increased use of sewage sludge and animal slurry as fertilizer; (ii) a relatively constant organic carbon concentration over time in the input sediment, with subsequent carbon mineralization during diagenesis. Carbon isotope composition of the organic material and the evolution of H/C ratio with depth indicate that the latter hypothesis is correct and that the profiles result from microbial diagenesis, not increased organic carbon inputs. By comparison with sediment of known (7 years) age, temporal decay constants for organic matter can be derived; these lie between rates previously determined for organic matter decomposition in marine sediments and soils. The H/C ratio of organic matter can be modelled as a function of time and proceeds in a similar fashion to soil organic material. PMID:15091425

  19. Optimal Medium Composition to Enhance Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate Production by Ralstonia eutropha Using Cane Molasses as Sole Carbon Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bozorg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the costs associated with Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production, growth and Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production of Ralstonia eutropha were studied in batch culture on different carbon sources. Experiments were designed and conducted to not only lower the cost of Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production by using inexpensive substrates, but also to increase Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production by optimizing the culture medium composition. Low cost, abundant carbon sources, including cane molasses, beet molasses, soya bean, and corn steep liquor were used to investigate the possibility of Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production in such renewable carbon sources. Based on the experimental results, cane molasses with production of 0.49 g/L Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate was selected as the most efficient carbon source. To improve bacterial growth and Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production, different chemicals were then used to pretreat the cane molasses. Sulfuric acid, with 33% enhancement in Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production, revealed the highest efficiency in removing heavy metals and suspended impurities and was used to pretreat cane molasses in the subsequent experiments. Additionally, to make the process even more efficient and ultimately more effective, urea and corn steep liquor were used as nitrogen/minerals and vitamin sources, respectively. Using the Response Surface Methodology and through a 2n factorial Central Composite Design, the medium composition was then optimized, and maximum biomass concentration of 5.03 g/L and Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate concentration of 1.63 g/L were obtained.

  20. Black carbon concentrations in snow at Tronsen Meadow in Central Washington from 2012 to 2013: Temporal and spatial variations and the role of local forest fire activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Ian; Kaspari, Susan; Jenkins, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    Characterizing black carbon (BC) concentrations in the seasonal snowpack is of interest because BC deposition on snow can reduce albedo and accelerate melt. In Washington State, USA snowmelt from the seasonal snowpack provides an important source of water resources, but minimal work has been done characterizing BC concentrations in snow in this region. BC concentrations in snow were monitored over two winters (2012 and 2013) at Tronsen Meadow, located near Blewett Pass in the eastern Cascade Mountains in Central Washington, to characterize spatial and temporal variations in BC concentrations, and the processes affecting BC concentrations in the snowpack. BC concentrations were measured using a Single Particle Soot Photometer. Snowpit BC concentrations at spatial scales ranging from centimeter to 100 m scales were fairly homogenous during the accumulation season, with greater spatial variability during the melt season due to variable melt patterns. BC concentrations in snow increased in late winter-spring due to an increase in atmospheric BC concentrations and trapping of BC on the snow surface during melt. However, during a period of intense melt in 2013 BC concentrations decreased, likely caused by meltwater scavenging. In summer 2012 the Table Mountain forest fire burned adjacent to the study site, and BC concentrations in the snowpack in 2013 were far higher than in previous years, with charred trees postfire the likely source of the elevated BC.

  1. An Analytical Simple Formula for the Ground Level Concentration from a Point Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Buske

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Advection-Diffusion Equation is solved for a constant pollutant emission from a point-like source placed inside an unstable Atmospheric Boundary Layer. The solution is obtained adopting the novel analytical approach: Generalized Integral Laplace Transform Technique. The concentration solution of the equation is expressed through an infinite series expansion. After setting a realistic scenario through the wind and diffusivity parameterizations, the Ground Level Concentration (GLC is determined, and an explicit approximate expression is provided for it, allowing an analytically simple expression for the position and value of the maximum. Remarks arise regarding the ability to express value and position of the GLC as explicit functions of the parameters defining the Atmospheric Boundary Layer scenario and the source height.

  2. Novel ferulic acid esterases from Bifidobacterium sp. produced on selected synthetic and natural carbon sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Szwajgier

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ferulic acid esterases (or feruloyl esterases, a common group of hydrolases are very well distributed in the plant kongdom. The fungal feruloyl esterases were very extensively studied whereas probiotic lactic acid bacteria as the source of this enzyme were generally omitted. Free phenolic acids – strong antioxidants can be released from the dietary fiber by the action of intestinal lactic acid bacteria. The aim of this study was to examine the three probiotic Bifidobacterium strains to produce extracellular FAE on different synthetic and natural carbon sources. Material and methods. Studies were carried out using Bifidibacteriumstrains (B. animalis Bi30, B. catenulatum KD 14 and B. longum KN 29. The strains were cultivated using minimal growth media containing selected natural and synthetic carbon sources: German wheat bran, rye bran, barley spent grain, isolated larchwood arabinogalactan, apple pectin, corn pectin, methyl esters of phenolic acids. The production of extracellular feruloyl esterase was estimated using the post cultivation supernatants and methyl ferulate. The concentration of ferulic acid released from the ester was determined using HPLC with DAD detection. Results. The most efficient bacterial strain for FAE production was B. animalis cultivated in the presence of methyl p-coumarate and methyl ferulate as the main carbon sources (14.95 nmol·ml-1·min-1 and 4.38 nmol·ml-1·min-1, respectively. In the case of each FAE, the highest activity was obtained at 37oC (pH 6.3 in Theorell/Steinhagen buffer (B. animalis Bi30 or in Tris/HCl buffer (B. catenulatum KD14 and B. longum KN29. Taking under consideration all results, it should be noticed that the highest feruloyl esterase activities were obtained using synthetic methyl esters of phenolic acids. Conclusions. The presented resultsbroaden the knowledgeabout the production of the feruloyl esterase by probiotic bacteria. Although the enzyme is only accessory during

  3. Pan-European modelling of riverine nutrient concentrations - spatial patterns, source detection, trend analyses, scenario modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosova, Alena; Arheimer, Berit; Capell, Rene; Donnelly, Chantal; Strömqvist, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient transport models are important tools for large scale assessments of macro-nutrient fluxes (nitrogen, phosphorus) and thus can serve as support tool for environmental assessment and management. Results from model applications over large areas, i.e. from major river basin to continental scales can fill a gap where monitoring data is not available. Here, we present results from the pan-European rainfall-runoff and nutrient transfer model E-HYPE, which is based on open data sources. We investigate the ability of the E-HYPE model to replicate the spatial and temporal variations found in observed time-series of riverine N and P concentrations, and illustrate the model usefulness for nutrient source detection, trend analyses, and scenario modelling. The results show spatial patterns in N concentration in rivers across Europe which can be used to further our understanding of nutrient issues across the European continent. E-HYPE results show hot spots with highest concentrations of total nitrogen in Western Europe along the North Sea coast. Source apportionment was performed to rank sources of nutrient inflow from land to sea along the European coast. An integrated dynamic model as E-HYPE also allows us to investigate impacts of climate change and measure programs, which was illustrated in a couple of scenarios for the Baltic Sea. Comparing model results with observations shows large uncertainty in many of the data sets and the assumptions used in the model set-up, e.g. point source release estimates. However, evaluation of model performance at a number of measurement sites in Europe shows that mean N concentration levels are generally well simulated. P levels are less well predicted which is expected as the variability of P concentrations in both time and space is higher. Comparing model performance with model set-ups using local data for the Weaver River (UK) did not result in systematically better model performance which highlights the complexity of model

  4. Carbon source from the toroidal pumped limiter during long discharge operation in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufour, E.; Brosset, C.; Lowry, C.; Bucalossi, J.; Chappuis, P.; Corre, Y.; Desgranges, C.; Guirlet, R.; Gunn, J.; Loarer, T.; Mitteau, R.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Pegourie, B.; Reichle, R.; Thomas, P.; Tsitrone, E. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA-Cadarache, 13 - St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Hogan, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2 Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Roubin, P.; Martin, C.; Arnas, C. [CNRS-Universite de Provence, LPIIM, UMR 6633, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2005-07-01

    A better understanding of deuterium retention mechanisms requires the knowledge of carbon sources in Tore-Supra. The main source of carbon in the vacuum vessel during long discharges is the toroidal pumped limiter (TPL). This work is devoted to the experimental characterisation of the carbon source from the TPL surface during long discharges using a visible spectroscopy diagnostic. Moreover, we present an attempt to perform a carbon balance over a typical campaign and we discuss it with regards to the deuterium in-vessel inventory deduced from particle balance and the deuterium content of the deposited layers. The study shows that only a third of the estimated deuterium trapped in the vessel is trapped in the carbon deposits. Thus, in the present state of our knowledge and characterisation of the permanent retention, one has to search for mechanisms other than co-deposition to explain the deuterium retention in Tore Supra. (A.C.)

  5. The Effects of Three Mineral Nitrogen Sources and Zinc on Maize and Wheat Straw Decomposition and Soil Organic Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ogunniyi Jumoke Esther; GUO Chun-hui; TIAN Xiao-hong; LI Hong-yun; ZHOU Yang-xue

    2014-01-01

    The incorporation of straw in cultivated ifelds can potentially improve soil quality and crop yield. However, the presence of recalcitrant carbon compounds in straw slow its decomposition rate. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different nitrogen sources, with and without the application of zinc, on straw decomposition and soil quality. Soils were treated with three different nitrogen sources, with and without zinc: urea (CO(NH2)2), ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4), and ammonium chloride (NH4Cl). The combined treatments were as follows:maize (M) and wheat (W) straw incorporated into urea-, ammonium sulfate-, or ammonium chloride-treated soil (U, S, and C, respectively) with and without zinc (Z) (MU, MUZ, WU, WUZ;MS, MSZ, WS, WSZ;MC, MCZ, WC, WCZ, respectively);straw with zinc only (MZ, WZ);straw with untreated soil (MS, WS);and soil-only or control conditions (NT). The experiment consisted of 17 treatments with four replications. Each pot contained 150 g soil and 1.125 g straw, had a moisture content of 80%of the ifeld capacity, and was incubated for 53 days at 25°C. The rates of CO2-C emission, cumulative CO2-C evolution, total CO2 production in the soils of different treatments were measured to infer decomposition rates. The total organic carbon (TOC), labile organic carbon (LOC), and soil microbial biomass in the soils of different treatments were measured to infer soil quality. All results were signiifcantly different (P<0.05) with the exception of the labile organic carbon (LOC). The maize and wheat straw showed different patterns in CO2 evolution rates. For both straw types, Zn had a synergic effect with U, but an antagonistic effect with the other N sources as determined by the total CO2 produced. The MUZ treatment showed the highest decomposition rate and cumulative CO2 concentration (1 120.29 mg/pot), whereas the WACZ treatment had the lowest cumulative CO2 concentration (1 040.57 mg/pot). The addition of NH4Cl resulted in the

  6. Power plant design with a combined cycle and double concentrated solar thermal power sources

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal i Parreu, Arnau

    2010-01-01

    The electricity has become an indispensable element of today’s society. Demand is growing continuously and the production is still based on limited sources of energy such as coal and petroleum derivate products. Environmental issues, such as global warming, and the uncertainty about the quantity of the conventional fossil fuels are forcing suppliers to find new solutions for the near future. In this assignment, concentrated solar thermal technologies for electricity generation could pla...

  7. Concentrations and Sources of Airborne Particles in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Licina, Dusan; Bhangar, Seema; Brooks, Brandon; Baker, Robyn; Firek, Brian; Tang, Xiaochen; Morowitz, Michael J; Banfield, Jillian F; Nazaroff, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have underdeveloped immune systems, making them susceptible to adverse health consequences from air pollutant exposure. Little is known about the sources of indoor airborne particles that contribute to the exposure of premature infants in the NICU environment. In this study, we monitored the spatial and temporal variations of airborne particulate matter concentrations along with other indoor environmental parameters and human occupanc...

  8. Concentrations and Sources of Airborne Particles in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Licina, D; Bhangar, S; Brooks, B.; Baker, R; Firek, B; Tang, X; Morowitz, MJ; Banfield, JF; Nazaroff, WW

    2016-01-01

    Premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have underdeveloped immune systems, making them susceptible to adverse health consequences from air pollutant exposure. Little is known about the sources of indoor airborne particles that contribute to the exposure of premature infants in the NICU environment. In this study, we monitored the spatial and temporal variations of airborne particulate matter concentrations along with other indoor environmental parameters and human occupanc...

  9. Characterization of size distributions of elemental mass concentrations in atmospheric aerosols derived from different sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric aerosol samples were collected at six representative sites with an 8-stage cascade impactor sampler and analyzed for their elemental mass concentrations by the PIXE analytic method. Based on some indicator elements, the characteristic of size distributions of particles from different sources were obtained. According to these characteristics, we inferred the origins of the ultrafine particles around the Great Wall Station in the Antarctic. (orig.)

  10. Regional background aerosols over the Balearic Islands over the last 3 years: ground-based concentrations, atmospheric deposition and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerro, Jose Carlos; Pey, Jorge; Bujosa, Carles; Caballero, Sandra; Alastuey, Andres; Sicard, Michael; Artiñano, Begoña; Querol, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    %), sulphate (14%), sea spray (10%), nitrate (7%), NH4 (7%) and elemental carbon (1%), with 21% of the mass unexplained (though as being principally water). Intensive sampling campaigns were positive to assess the concentrations of black carbon and number of ultrafine particles and their time-variability. Accordingly, black carbon followed a similar pattern to that of PM1 but also displayed fresh anthropogenic inputs from road traffic. Number concentration peaked frequently at midday because of new-formation of particles from photochemical reactions, occasionally at hourly values above 100.000 particles per cm3. A preliminary source exploration by means of Principal Component Analysis has been done with the 30-samples group characterized more in detail in terms of chemical determinations. This first examination encountered 6 sources: mineral, sea spray, biomass burning, regional pollution, industry and biogenic emissions. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation and FEDER funds (CGL2011-13580-E/CLI). ENDESA, through AMBILINE, has been taking care of the instruments most of the time, has provided all the necessary support for the campaign, and has provided data on gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters.

  11. Anthropogenic lead concentrations and sources in Baltic Sea sediments based on lead isotopic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pb concentrations reach even 147 μg/g at Gdansk Basin sediments. • Marine sediments deposited before 1860 are not contaminated by Pb. • Contemporary inventories of anthropogenic Pb in marine sediments was of 0.5–11 g for m2. • The lowest 206Pb/207Pb (1.165) were measured in sediments deposited between 1970s–90s. • Coal burning was always the most important Pb source in Poland. - Abstract: The Gulf of Gdańsk is influenced by heavy metals of anthropogenic origin. In this study, temporal concentration changes of Pb, Zn, Cd, and Cu were studied in six, 50 cm long sediment cores. The main aim of the study was to concentrate on the history of Pb fluxes and Pb isotopic composition (206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/206Pb) to trace Pb sources. The lowest Pb concentrations (19 μg g−1) were measured in sediments deposited circa 1860, while the highest Pb concentrations (63–147 μg g−1) were measured in sediments deposited between 1960s and 70s. Pre-industrial Pb fluxes were 7 Pb m2 year−1, while after WWII they reached 199 Pb m2 year−1. Highest 206Pb/207Pb ratios (∼1.22) were measured in the oldest sediment layers, and the lowest 206Pb/207Pb ratios (∼1.165) were measured in the sediments deposited in 1970s–90s. During the period of highest Pb contamination, the anthropogenic Pb fraction reached up to 93%. A general discussion of the Pb sources, emissions, and loads for Poland is included

  12. Colored dissolved organic matter in shallow estuaries: relationships between carbon sources and light attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestreich, W. K.; Ganju, N. K.; Pohlman, J. W.; Suttles, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    Light availability is of primary importance to the ecological function of shallow estuaries. For example, benthic primary production by submerged aquatic vegetation is contingent upon light penetration to the seabed. A major component that attenuates light in estuaries is colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). CDOM is often measured via a proxy, fluorescing dissolved organic matter (fDOM), due to the ease of in situ fDOM sensor measurements. Fluorescence must be converted to CDOM absorbance for use in light attenuation calculations. However, this CDOM-fDOM relationship varies among and within estuaries. We quantified the variability in this relationship within three estuaries along the mid-Atlantic margin of the eastern United States: West Falmouth Harbor (MA), Barnegat Bay (NJ), and Chincoteague Bay (MD/VA). Land use surrounding these estuaries ranges from urban to developed, with varying sources of nutrients and organic matter. Measurements of fDOM (excitation and emission wavelengths of 365 nm (±5 nm) and 460 nm (±40 nm), respectively) and CDOM absorbance were taken along a terrestrial-to-marine gradient in all three estuaries. The ratio of the absorption coefficient at 340 nm (m-1) to fDOM (QSU) was higher in West Falmouth Harbor (1.22) than in Barnegat Bay (0.22) and Chincoteague Bay (0.17). The CDOM : fDOM absorption ratio was variable between sites within West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay, but consistent between sites within Chincoteague Bay. Stable carbon isotope analysis for constraining the source of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay yielded δ13C values ranging from -19.7 to -26.1 ‰ and -20.8 to -26.7 ‰, respectively. Concentration and stable carbon isotope mixing models of DOC (dissolved organic carbon) indicate a contribution of 13C-enriched DOC in the estuaries. The most likely source of 13C-enriched DOC for the systems we investigated is Spartina cordgrass. Comparison of DOC source to CDOM : f

  13. Food sources and carbon dudget of chinese prawn Penaeus chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuang-Lin; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Fang

    2002-03-01

    This study deals with contribution of artificial food pellet and natural food to Chinese prawn ( Penaeus orientalis) growth in a semi-intensive culture pond. The prawn carbon consumption, budget, and the effects of some factors on the budget were investigated. The results showed that 26.2% of P. orientalis growth carbon came from formulated feed at the initial culture stage (when the prawns were 0.06±0.01 g in wet weight), and was 62.5% when the prawns were 9.56±1.04 g. The remaining part of the growth carbon was derived from organic fertilizer and natural food. The highest growth rate occurred at 20×10-3 salinity. Suitable salinity for culturing Chinese prawn was (20 28)×10-3.

  14. FOOD SOURCES AND CARBON BUDGET OF CHINESE PRAWN PENAEUS CHINENSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董双林; 张硕; 王芳

    2002-01-01

    This study deals with contribution of artificial food pellet and natural food to Chinese prawn (Penaeus orientalis) growth in a semiintensive culture pond. The prawn carbon consumption, budget, and the effects of some factors on the budget were investigated. The results showed that 26.2% of P. orientalis growth carbon came from formulated feed at the initial culture stage (when the prawns were 0.06±0.01 g in wet weight), and was 62.5% when the prawns were 9.56±1.04 g. The remaining part of the growth carbon was derived from organic fertilizer and natural food. The highest growth rate occurred at 20×10-3 salinity. Suitable salinity for culturing Chinese prawn was (20-28)×10-3.

  15. Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water with Sodium Citrate as Sole Carbon Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Bo; ZHAO Lin; TAN Xin

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of using sodium citrate(NaC6H5O6*2H2O)as sole carbon source for nitrate removal from drinking water.With sodium citrate as sole carbon source, batch experiments have been conducted to study the law of denitrification influenced by pH, C/N and temperature. Results show that a denitrification rate reaching 1.32 g NO-3-N /(g Biomass*d) was obtained when pH was at 7.5,C/N at 1.7(atom ratio), and temperature from 20 ℃ to 30 ℃. The results also show that denitrification rate with sodium citrate as carbon source approaches to that with methanol as carbon source.

  16. Microarray analysis of Neosartorya fischeri using different carbon sources, petroleum asphaltenes and glucose-peptone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna L. Hernández-López

    2015-09-01

    Here we describe experimental procedures and methods about our dataset (NCBI GEO accession number GSE68146 and describe the data analysis to identify different expression levels in N. fischeri using this recalcitrant carbon source.

  17. Quasi-steady carbon plasma source for neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon plasma is successfully sustained during 1000 s without any carrier gas in the bucket type ionization chamber with cusp magnetic field. Every several seconds, seed plasmas having ∼3 ms duration time are injected into the ionization chamber by a shunting arch plasma gun. The weakly ionized carbon plasma ejected from the shunting arch is also ionized by 2.45 GHz microwave at the electron cyclotron resonance surface and the plasma can be sustained even in the interval of gun discharges. Control of the gun discharge interval allows to keep high pressure and to sustain the plasma for long duration

  18. Quasi-steady carbon plasma source for neutral beam injector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2014-02-01

    Carbon plasma is successfully sustained during 1000 s without any carrier gas in the bucket type ionization chamber with cusp magnetic field. Every several seconds, seed plasmas having ∼3 ms duration time are injected into the ionization chamber by a shunting arch plasma gun. The weakly ionized carbon plasma ejected from the shunting arch is also ionized by 2.45 GHz microwave at the electron cyclotron resonance surface and the plasma can be sustained even in the interval of gun discharges. Control of the gun discharge interval allows to keep high pressure and to sustain the plasma for long duration. PMID:24593646

  19. Modified Weighting for Calculating the Average Concentration of Non-Point Source Pollutant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟瑞芳

    2004-01-01

    The concentration of runoff depends upon that of soil loss and the latter is assumed to be linear to the value of EI that equals the product of total storm energy E times the maximum 30-min intensity I30 for a given rainstorm. Usually, the maximum accumulative amount of rain for a rainstorm might bring on the maximum amount of runoff, but it does not equal the maximum erosion and not always lead the maximum concentration. Thus, the average concentration weighted by amount of runoff is somewhat unreasonable. An improvement for the calculation method of non-point source pollution load put forward by professor Li Huaien is proposed. In replacement of the weight of runoff, EI value of a single rainstorm is introduced as a new weight. An example of Fujing River watershed shows that its application is effective.

  20. The effect of mitigation measures on size distributed mass concentrations of atmospheric particles and black carbon concentrations during the Olympic Summer Games 2008 in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Nina; Norra, Stefan; Dietze, Volker; Yu, Yang; Fricker, Mathieu; Kaminski, Uwe; Chen, Yuan; Cen, Kuang

    2011-12-15

    The period of the 2008 Olympic Summer Games in Beijing can be considered as a unique opportunity to study the influences of emission reduction measures on air quality improvement. Within this study atmospheric particles of different size classes (2.5 to 80 μm) were investigated before, during, and after the Olympic Games period in order to observe and assess the success of short-term measures to mitigate extreme urban aerosol pollution and also to investigate, which particle size classes were reduced most effectively. Furthermore, black carbon (BC) concentrations in fine particles (PM(2.5)) during the source control period were compared to those of the previous years in order to investigate the decrease of combustion-derived aerosols. It is shown that besides the implemented mitigation measures precipitation decisively contributed to a considerable decrease of particulate air pollution in Beijing compared to the respective concentrations during the time directly before and after the Olympic Games, and also compared to average August concentrations during the previous years and the following year 2009. Particles of the fine fraction of the coarse mode (2.5 to 5 μm), which have a residence time in the order of several days and which, therefore, are typically transported over long distances from outside of Beijing, were less efficiently reduced than coarser particles. This indicates that long-range transport of atmospheric particles is difficult to control and that presumably the established mitigation area was not large enough to also reduce the fine fraction of the coarse mode more efficiently. Furthermore, the study showed that coarse geogenic particles, which originated to a high percentage from construction sites and resuspension processes due to traffic seemed to be reduced most efficiently during the Olympic Games period. PMID:22035559

  1. Theoretical study on the carbon nanotube used ashard x—radiation source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LuJing-Han; QinXi-Jun

    1998-01-01

    Calculations and analyses are made on the interaction between the carbon nanotube and the incident positron of high energy.The results obtained show that it is possible to use carbon nanotube as hard X-radiation source with high intensity and good monochromaticity.

  2. Comparative study on bacterial carbon sources in lake sediments: the role of methanotrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steger, K.; Premke, K.; Gudasz, C.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Tranvik, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Methane-derived carbon can be important in both benthic and pelagic food webs.Either generated in the anaerobic layers of the sediment or in the anaerobic hypolimnion of stratifiedeutrophic lakes, methane is an excellent carbon source for aerobic methanotrophic bacteria.The very negative methane d13

  3. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignati, E.; Karl, M.; Krol, M.C.; Wilson, J.; Stier, P.; Cavalli, F.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC) cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in th

  4. Tracing organic matter sources of estuarine tidal flat nematodes with stable carbon isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moens, T.; Luyten, C.; Middelburg, J.J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Vincx, M.

    2002-01-01

    The present study explores the use of stable carbon isotopes to trace organic matter sources of intertidal nematodes in the Schelde estuary (SW Netherlands). Stable carbon isotope signatures of nematodes from a saltmarsh and 4 tidal flat stations were determined in spring and winter situations, and

  5. Constraining carbon sources and cycling of endolithic microbial communities in the Atacama Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolkowski, L. A.; Slater, G. F.; Davila, A.; Wierzchos, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on Earth, is considered a suitable analog for the extremely arid, oxidizing conditions on the surface of Mars. Recent observations suggest the presence of evaporitic deposits on the surface of Mars, such as those found in the Atacama. Halites in the Atacama have been shown to be hygroscopic and are colonized by photosynthetic microbes. While there is considerable evidence for the decrease in abundance and diversity of microbes closer to the hyper-arid core of the Atacama, experimental studies have thus far have yet to estimate the sources of carbon to these communities and the rate at which they cycle. To address these questions, we characterized the isotopic composition (13C and 14C) microbial community biomarkers from four distinct sites in the Atacama. Sites ranged from halites in the hyper-arid core (Yungay, Salar Grande) to volcanic rock and gypsum near the Monturaqui Crater. Our analysis of the phospholipids fatty acids (PLFA) and glycolipid fatty acid (GLFA) methyl esters of the endoliths agreed with previous studies: the abundance and diversity of microbes decreases approaching the hyper-arid core. The total PLFA and GLFA concentrations were lower at Yungay than Salar Grande and higher in the gypsum and volcanic rock samples. Changes in the mole percentage distribution of the PLFA and GLFA illustrated that the endolithic communities inhabiting the volcanic rock and gypsum were more complex than those inhabiting the halites. ∂13C of both PLFA and GLFA showed that non-halite lipids were less depleted in 13C than halite-lipids. This suggested a difference in carbon source or cycling. The 14C content of PLFA and GLFA varied by up to 250 per mil. Endolith PLFA and GLFA from the gypsum had radiocarbon signatures comparable to the modern atmosphere, which suggests that the predominant source of carbon to the system is the modern atmosphere and that lipids are cycling rapidly in this system. However, at the other three

  6. A repeat protein links Rubisco to form the eukaryotic carbon-concentrating organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinder, Luke C M; Meyer, Moritz T; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Chen, Vivian K; Mitchell, Madeline C; Caspari, Oliver; Freeman Rosenzweig, Elizabeth S; Pallesen, Leif; Reeves, Gregory; Itakura, Alan; Roth, Robyn; Sommer, Frederik; Geimer, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Goodenough, Ursula; Stitt, Mark; Griffiths, Howard; Jonikas, Martin C

    2016-05-24

    Biological carbon fixation is a key step in the global carbon cycle that regulates the atmosphere's composition while producing the food we eat and the fuels we burn. Approximately one-third of global carbon fixation occurs in an overlooked algal organelle called the pyrenoid. The pyrenoid contains the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco and enhances carbon fixation by supplying Rubisco with a high concentration of CO2 Since the discovery of the pyrenoid more that 130 y ago, the molecular structure and biogenesis of this ecologically fundamental organelle have remained enigmatic. Here we use the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to discover that a low-complexity repeat protein, Essential Pyrenoid Component 1 (EPYC1), links Rubisco to form the pyrenoid. We find that EPYC1 is of comparable abundance to Rubisco and colocalizes with Rubisco throughout the pyrenoid. We show that EPYC1 is essential for normal pyrenoid size, number, morphology, Rubisco content, and efficient carbon fixation at low CO2 We explain the central role of EPYC1 in pyrenoid biogenesis by the finding that EPYC1 binds Rubisco to form the pyrenoid matrix. We propose two models in which EPYC1's four repeats could produce the observed lattice arrangement of Rubisco in the Chlamydomonas pyrenoid. Our results suggest a surprisingly simple molecular mechanism for how Rubisco can be packaged to form the pyrenoid matrix, potentially explaining how Rubisco packaging into a pyrenoid could have evolved across a broad range of photosynthetic eukaryotes through convergent evolution. In addition, our findings represent a key step toward engineering a pyrenoid into crops to enhance their carbon fixation efficiency. PMID:27166422

  7. Using liquid waste streams as the moisture source during the hydrothermal carbonization of municipal solid wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Hale, McKenzie; Olsen, Petra; Berge, Nicole D

    2014-11-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a thermal conversion process that can be an environmentally beneficial approach for the conversion of municipal solid wastes to value-added products. The influence of using activated sludge and landfill leachate as initial moisture sources during the carbonization of paper, food waste and yard waste over time at 250°C was evaluated. Results from batch experiments indicate that the use of activated sludge and landfill leachate are acceptable alternative supplemental liquid sources, ultimately imparting minimal impact on carbonization product characteristics and yields. Regression results indicate that the initial carbon content of the feedstock is more influential than any of the characteristics of the initial liquid source and is statistically significant when describing the relationship associated with all evaluated carbonization products. Initial liquid-phase characteristics are only statistically significant when describing the solids energy content and the mass of carbon in the gas-phase. The use of these alternative liquid sources has the potential to greatly increase the sustainability of the carbonization process. A life cycle assessment is required to quantify the benefits associated with using these alternative liquid sources. PMID:25074717

  8. Black carbon emissions from Russian diesel sources: case study of Murmansk

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, M.; N. Kholod; Malyshev, V.; Tretyakova, S.; Gusev, E.; Yu, S.; Barinov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a potent pollutant because of its effects on climate change, ecosystems and human health. Black carbon has a particularly pronounced impact as a climate forcer in the Arctic because of its effect on snow albedo and cloud formation. We have estimated BC emissions from diesel sources in Murmansk Region and Murmansk City, the largest city in the world above the Arctic Circle. In this study we developed a detailed inventory of diesel sources including on-road ...

  9. Black carbon emissions from Russian diesel sources: case study of Murmansk

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, M.; N. Kholod; Malyshev, V.; Tretyakova, S.; Gusev, E.; Yu, S.; Barinov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a potent pollutant because of its effects on climate change, ecosystems and human health. Black carbon has a particularly pronounced impact as a climate forcer in the Arctic because of its effect on snow albedo and cloud formation. We have estimated BC emissions from diesel sources in the Murmansk Region and Murmansk City, the largest city in the world above the Arctic Circle. In this study we developed a detailed inventory of diesel sources including on...

  10. The investments in renewable energy sources: do low carbon economies better invest in green technologies?

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Angelo Romano; Giuseppe Scandurra (eds.)

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the driving of investment in renewable energy sources in low carbon and high carbon economies. To address these issues, a dynamic panel analysis of the renewable investment in a sample of 29 countries was proposed. Results demonstrate that the dynamic of investments in renewable sources is similar in the two panels, and depends by nuclear power generation, GDP and technological efficiency. Results show that countries try to reduce their environmental footpr...

  11. Effect of Different Carbon Source on Expression of Carotenogenic Genes and Astaxanthin Production in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wu; Xin Yu

    2013-01-01

    The present research gives an insight into astaxanthin production, as well as transcription differences of four key carotenogenic genes, in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous when cultured with various carbon sources and soybean oil as co-substrates. Glucose was found to be the carbon source with best culture growth and astaxanthin production and the addition of 2% (v/v) soybean oil resulted in even higher astaxanthin producing. In addition, four carotenogenic genes encoding geranylgeranyl diphosp...

  12. Effect of carbon source type on intracellular stored polymers during endogenous denitritation (ED) treating landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Lei; Wang, Shuying; Li, Baikun; Cao, Tianhao; Zhang, Fangzhai; Wang, Zhong; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) capable of storing organic compounds as polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) have been used for endogenous denitritation (ED), but the effect of carbon sources type on nitrogen removal performance of GAOs treating landfill leachate is unclear. In this study, a successful ED system treating landfill leachate (COD/NH4(+)-N (C/N): 4) without external carbon source addition was applied. The mature leachate with C/N of 1 was used as the feeding base solution, with acetate, propionate, and glucose examined as the carbon sources, and their effects on yields and compositions of PHA produced by GAOs were determined and associated with nitrogen removal performance. In the case of sole carbon source, acetate was much easier to be stored than propionate and glucose, which led to a higher nitrogen removal efficiency. Glucose had the lowest amount of PHA storage and led to the lowest performance. In the case of composite carbon sources (two scenarios: acetate + propionate; acetate + propionate + glucose), GAOs stored sufficient PHA and exhibited similar nitrogen removal efficiencies. Moreover, type of carbon source influenced the compositions of PHA. The polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) fraction in PHA was far more than polyhydroxyvalerate (PHV) in all tests. PHV was synthesized only when acetate existed in carbon source. The microbial diversity analysis revealed that Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum. Among the 108 genera detected in this ED system, the genera responsible for denitritation were Thauera, Paracoccus, Ottowia and Comamonadaceae_unclassified, accounting for 46.21% of total bacteria. Especially, Paracoccus and Comamonadaceae_unclassified transformed the carbon source into PHA for denitritation, and carried out endogenous denitritation. PMID:27232984

  13. [Optimization Study on the Nitrogen and Phosphorus Removal of Modified Two- sludge System Under the Condition of Low Carbon Source].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei-qiang; Wang, Dong-bo; Li, Xiao-ming; Yang, Qi; Xu, Qiu-xiang; Zhang, Zhi-bei; Li, Zhi-jun; Xiang, Hai-hong; Wang, Ya-li; Sun, Jian

    2016-04-15

    This paper explored the method of resolving insufficient carbon source in urban sewage by comparing and analyzing denitrification and phosphorus removal (NPR) effect between modified two-sludge system and traditional anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic process under the condition of low carbon source wastewater. The modified two-sludge system was the experimental reactor, which was optimized by adding two stages of micro-aeration (aeration rate 0.5 L · mm⁻¹) in the anoxic period of the original two-sludge system, and multi-stage anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic SBR was the control reactor. When the influent COD, ammonia nitrogen, SOP concentration were respectively 200, 35, 10 mg · L⁻¹, the NPR effect of the experimental reactor was hetter than that of thecontrol reactor with the removal efficiency of TN being 94.8% vs 60.9%, and TP removal being 96.5% vs 75%, respectively. The effluent SOP, ammonia, TN concentration of the experimental reactor were 0.35, 0.50, 1.82 mg · L⁻¹, respectively, which could fully meet the first class of A standard of the Pollutants Emission Standard of Urban Wastewater Treatment Firm (GB 18918-2002). Using the optimized treatment process, the largest amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus removal per unit carbon source (as COD) were 0.17 g · g⁻¹ and 0.048 g · g⁻¹ respectively, which could furthest solve the lower carbon concentration in current municipal wastewater. PMID:27548974

  14. Fungal Culture Systems for Production of Antioxidant Phenolics Using Pecan Nut Shells as Sole Carbon Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Medina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Many agro-industrial wastes have little or none utilization, when these materials could be a very rich source of several value-added compounds, such as: the pecan nut shells, which contain Antioxidant Phenolic (AP molecules like tannins. Approach: In this study, a bioprocess for the liberation of AP from Pecan Nut Shells (PNS was described. A chemical characterization of raw material was evaluated to determine polyphenolic content of PNS, among other components. Several fungal culture systems were evaluated at 96 h fermentation processes and using PNS as sole carbon source. Solid (SSC and Submerged (SmC fermentations were carried out using three strains of Aspergillus niger. Culture medium was composed of a solid (10-50% and a liquid (90- 50% part in order to complete the 100% of the medium. Results: A high concentration (19% of tannins was found in PNS on a dry basis, from which condensed tannins and their monomers were found as the main fraction (14% of tannins of PNS, also on a dry basis. In the strain selection step, Aspergillus niger GH1 showed better growth on pecan nut shells compared to A. niger PSH strain, therefore, A. niger GH1 was used for later experiments. The highest concentration of AP was obtained with SSC inoculated with spores of A. niger GH1 on the 40% of solids system and in 20% solids system where, among the other systems both presented 114 mg TP g-1 of phenolics liberation at 24 h of fermentation. PNS is an important source of catechin, being this kind of compound which can be liberated in higher proportion compared to other phenolics compounds. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that fermenting PNS represent a good alternative to both use residues and obtaining AP.

  15. Effects of elevated carbon dioxide and sucrose concentrations on Arabidopsis thaliana root architecture and anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee-Ho, E.; Walton, L.J.; Reid, D.M.; Yeung, E.C.; Kurepin, L.V. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Biology

    2007-03-15

    Plant root growth is known to be influenced by higher levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Roots of some species grown in hydroponics under elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations may be more competitive sinks for photosynthetic assimilates than roots grown under lower CO{sub 2} conditions. Root branching patterns may also be influenced by elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations. Studies have also shown that factors such as soil compaction, salinity and the availability of nitrate, phosphorous, oxygen and water also influence root growth, and the effects of higher CO{sub 2} on roots can be confounded by such environmental factors. This study evaluated the effects of elevated carbon dioxide and sucrose concentrations on Arabidopsis thaliana root growth, morphology, and architecture. Both ambient and elevated CO{sub 2} levels were used along with various sucrose concentrations. The study revealed that A. thaliana plants grown on a phytagar medium in small chambers with elevated CO{sub 2} had longer roots, more lateral root growth than plants grown in ambient CO{sub 2}. Roots in elevated CO{sub 2} were found to have wider root diameters, and more secondary growth. The addition of sucrose to the media closely resembled the effects of elevated CO{sub 2}. In addition, the increase in sucrose concentration had a bigger effect on root morphology under ambient, than elevated CO{sub 2}. Therefore, both elevated CO{sub 2} and increased sucrose concentrations promote root growth by increasing their number, length, and diameter. The dichotomy branching index (DBI) also dropped resulting in a more dichotomous branching pattern. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Using an explicit emission tagging method in global modeling of source-receptor relationships for black carbon in the Arctic: Variations, sources, and transport pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Singh, Balwinder; Zhang, Rudong; Ma, Po-Lun; Qian, Yun; Ghan, Steven J.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2014-11-01

    We introduce an explicit emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model to quantify source-region-resolved characteristics of black carbon (BC), focusing on the Arctic. Explicit tagging of BC source regions without perturbing the emissions provides a physically consistent and computationally efficient approach to establish source-receptor relationships and transport pathways. Our analysis shows that the contributions of major source regions to the global BC burden are not proportional to the respective emissions due to strong region-dependent removal rates and lifetimes, while the contributions to BC direct radiative forcing show a near-linear dependence on their respective contributions to the burden. Arctic BC concentrations, deposition, and source contributions all have strong seasonal variations. Eastern Asia contributes the most to the wintertime Arctic BC burden, but has much less impact on lower-level concentrations and deposition. Northern Europe emissions are more important to both surface concentration and deposition in winter than in summer. The largest contribution to Arctic BC in the summer is from Northern Asia. Although local emissions contribute less than 10% to the annual mean BC burden and deposition within the Arctic, the per-emission efficiency is much higher than for non-Arctic sources. The interannual variability (1996-2005) due to meteorology is small in annual mean BC burden and radiative forcing but is significant in yearly seasonal means over the Arctic. When a slow aging treatment of BC is introduced, the increase of BC lifetime and burden is source dependent. Global BC forcing-per-burden efficiency also increases primarily due to changes in BC vertical distributions.

  17. Distribution of organic carbon and petroleum source rock potential of Cretaceous and lower Tertiary carbonates, South Florida Basin: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacas, James George

    1978-01-01

    Analyses of 134 core samples from the South Florida Basin show that the carbonates of Comanchean age are relatively richer in average organic carbon (0.41 percent) than those of Coahuilan age (0.28 percent), Gulfian age (0.18 percent) and Paleocene age (0.20 percent). They are also nearly twice as rich as the average world, wide carbonate (average 0.24 percent). The majority of carbonates have organic carbons less than 0.30 percent but the presence of many relatively organic rich beds composed of highly bituminous, argillaceous, highly stylolitic, and algal-bearing limestones and dolomites accounts for the higher percentage of organic carbon in some of the stratigraphic units. Carbonate rocks that contain greater than 0.4 percent organic carbon and that might be considered as possible petroleum sources were noted in almost each subdivision of the Coahuilan and Comanchean Series but particularly the units of Fredericksburg 'B', Trinity 'A', Trinity 'F', and Upper Sunniland. Possible source rocks have been ascribed by others to the Lower Sunniland, but lack of sufficient samples precluded any firm assessment in this initial report. In the shallower section of the basin, organic-rich carbonates containing as much as 3.2 percent organic carbon were observed in the lowermost part of the Gulfian Series and carbonate rocks with oil staining or 'dead' and 'live oil' were noted by others in the uppermost Gulfian and upper Cedar Keys Formation. It is questionable whether these shallower rocks are of sufficient thermal maturity to have generated commercial oil. The South Florida basin is still sparsely drilled and produces only from the Sunniland Limestone at an average depth of 11,500 feet (3500 m). Because the Sunniland contains good reservoir rocks and apparently adequate source rocks, and because the success rate of new oil field discoveries has increased in recent years, the chances of finding additional oil reserves in the Sunniland are promising. Furthermore, the

  18. Simulation and Optimization of a Carbon Nanotube Electron Source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knápek, Alexandr; Radlička, Tomáš; Krátký, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, S4 (2015), s. 60-65. ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : carbon nanotube * electron beam lithography Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.877, year: 2014

  19. Design and simulation of a carbon nanotube electron source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knápek, Alexandr; Radlička, Tomáš; Krátký, Stanislav

    Brno: Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v. v. i, 2014. s. 62. ISBN 978-80-87441-11-4. [International Conference on Charged Parrticle Optics /9./. 31.08.2014-05.09.2014, Brno] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : field emission * carbon nanotube s * Monte-Carlo simulation s * finite element method Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  20. Conductivity of carbon materials for alternative energy sources

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichý, J.; Novák, V.; Barath, Peter

    Brno : University of technology Brno, 2009, s. 192-194. ISBN 978-80-214-3943-6. [International Conference Advanced Batteries, Accumulators and Fuel Cells /10./. Brno (CZ), 30.08.2009-02.10.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : electrodes with carbon materials Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  1. Intertidal zones as carbon dioxide sources to coastal oceans

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.; George, M.D.; Rajagopal, M.D.

    To understand the factors controlling carbon dioxide (CO sub(2)) exchanges near land-sea boundary diurnal observations have been made twice on CO sub(2) in the air and water in a coastal region. The results suggest that CO sub(2) enrichment...

  2. Optimization of an Atmospheric Carbon Source for Extremophile Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaubien, Courtney

    This thesis examines the use of the moisture swing resin materials employed at the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions (CNCE) in order to provide carbon dioxide from ambient air to photobioreactors containing extremophile cyanobacteria cultured at the Arizona Center for Algae Technology and Innovation (AzCATI). For this purpose, a carbon dioxide feeding device was designed, built, and tested. The results indicate how much resin should be used with a given volume of algae medium: approximately 500 grams of resin can feed 1% CO2 at about three liters per minute to a ten liter medium of the Galdieria sulphuraria 5587.1 strain for one hour (equivalent to about 0.1 grams of carbon dioxide per hour per seven grams of algae). Using the resin device, the algae grew within their normal growth range: 0.096 grams of ash-free dry weight per liter over a six hour period. Future applications in which the resin-to-algae process can be utilized are discussed.

  3. Estimation of local concentration from measurements of stochastic adsorption dynamics using carbon nanotube-based sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hong; Lee, Jay H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Braatz, Richard D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This paper proposes a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method for estimating time varying local concentration of the target molecule proximate to the sensor from the time profile of monomolecular adsorption and desorption on the surface of the sensor at nanoscale. Recently, several carbon nanotube sensors have been developed that can selectively detect target molecules at a trace concentration level. These sensors use light intensity changes mediated by adsorption or desorption phenomena on their surfaces. The molecular events occurring at trace concentration levels are inherently stochastic, posing a challenge for optimal estimation. The stochastic behavior is modeled by the chemical master equation (CME), composed of a set of ordinary differential equations describing the time evolution of probabilities for the possible adsorption states. Given the significant stochastic nature of the underlying phenomena, rigorous stochastic estimation based on the CME should lead to an improved accuracy over than deterministic estimation formulated based on the continuum model. Motivated by this expectation, we formulate the MLE based on an analytical solution of the relevant CME, both for the constant and the time-varying local concentrations, with the objective of estimating the analyte concentration field in real time from the adsorption readings of the sensor array. The performances of the MLE and the deterministic least squares are compared using data generated by kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of the stochastic process. Some future challenges are described for estimating and controlling the concentration field in a distributed domain using the sensor technology.

  4. Beam test of compact ECR ion source for carbon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion source for medical facilities should have characteristics of easy maintenance, low electric power, good stability and long operation time without maintenance (one year or more). Based on the proto type compact source, a 10 GHz compact ECR ion source with all permanent magnets has been developed. Peaks of the mirror magnetic field along the beam axis are 0.59 T at the extraction side and 0.87 T at the gas injection side, respectively, while the minimum B strength is 0.25 T. The source has a diameter of 320 mm and a length of 295 mm. The result of beam tests shows that a C4+ intensity of 530 μA was obtained under an extraction voltage of 45 kV. This paper describes the design detail and the experimental results for the new source. (author)

  5. Characterization of aerosol composition, concentrations, and sources at Baengnyeong Island, Korea using an aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taehyoung; Choi, Jinsoo; Lee, Gangwoong; Ahn, Junyoung; Park, Jin Soo; Atwood, Samuel A.; Schurman, Misha; Choi, Yongjoo; Chung, Yoomi; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2015-11-01

    To improve understanding of the sources and chemical properties of particulate pollutants on the western side of the Korean Peninsula, an Aerodyne High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) measured non-refractory fine (PM1) particles from May to November, 2011 at Baengnyeong Island, South Korea. Organic matter and sulfate were generally the most abundant species and exhibited maximum concentrations of 36 μg/m3 and 39 μg/m3, respectively. Nitrate concentrations peaked at 32 μg/m3 but were typically much lower than sulfate and organic matter concentrations. May, September, October, and November featured the highest monthly average concentrations, with lower concentrations typically observed from June through August. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis and individual case studies revealed that transport from eastern China, an area with high SO2 emissions, was associated with high particulate sulfate concentrations at the measurement site. Observed sulfate aerosol sometimes was fully neutralized by ammonium but often was acidic; the average ammonium to sulfate molar ratio was 1.49. Measured species size distributions revealed a range of sulfate particle size distributions with modes between 100 and 600 nm. Organic aerosol source regions were widespread, including contributions from eastern China and South Korea. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis indicated three "factors," or types of organic aerosol, comprising one primary, hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and two oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) components, including a more oxidized (MO-OOA) and a less oxidized (LO-OOA) oxidized organic aerosol. On average, HOA and OOA contributed 21% and 79% of the organic mass (OM), respectively, with the MO-OOA fraction nearly three times as abundant as the LO-OOA fraction. Biomass burning contributions to observed OM were low during the late spring/early summer agricultural burning season in eastern China, since

  6. Development of a stationary carbon emission inventory for Shanghai using pollution source census data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianzhe; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Weichun

    2016-03-01

    This study utilizes 521,631 activity data points from the 2007 Shanghai Pollution Source Census to compile a stationary carbon emission inventory for Shanghai. The inventory generated from our dataset shows that a large portion of Shanghai's total energy use consists of coal-oriented energy consumption. The electricity and heat production industries, iron and steel mills, and the petroleum refining industry are the main carbon emitters. In addition, most of these industries are located in Baoshan District, which is Shanghai's largest contributor of carbon emissions. Policy makers can use the enterpriselevel carbon emission inventory and the method designed in this study to construct sound carbon emission reduction policies. The carbon trading scheme to be established in Shanghai based on the developed carbon inventory is also introduced in this paper with the aim of promoting the monitoring, reporting and verification of carbon trading. Moreover, we believe that it might be useful to consider the participation of industries, such as those for food processing, beverage, and tobacco, in Shanghai's carbon trading scheme. Based on the results contained herein, we recommend establishing a comprehensive carbon emission inventory by inputting data from the pollution source census used in this study.

  7. Using hydrocarbon as a carbon source for synthesis of carbon nanotube by electric field induced needle-pulsed plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work different hydrocarbons are used as the carbon source, in the production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nano onions. An electric field induced needle pulse arc-discharge reactor is used. The influence of starting carbon on the synthesis of CNTs is investigated. The production efficiency is compared for Acetone, Isopropanol and Naphthalene as simple hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbons are preheated and then pretreated by electric field before being exposed to plasma. The hydrocarbon vapor is injected into plasma through a graphite spout in the cathode assembly. The pulsed plasma takes place between two graphite rods while a strong electric field has been already established alongside the electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. Mechanism of precursor decomposition is discussed by describing three forms of energy that are utilized to disintegrate the precursor molecules: thermal energy, electric field and kinetic energy of plasma. Molecular polarity of a hydrocarbon is one of the reasons for choosing carbon raw material as a precursor in an electric field induced low power pulsed-plasma. The results show that in order to obtain high quality carbon nanotubes, Acetone is preferred to Isopropanol and Naphthalene. Scanning probe microscopy techniques are used to investigate the products. - Highlights: • We synthesized CNTs (carbon nano tubes) by needle pulsed plasma. • We use different hydrocarbons as carbon source in the production of CNTs. • We investigated the influence of starting carbon on the synthesis of CNTs. • Thermal energy, electric field and kinetic energy are used to break carbon bonds. • Polar hydrocarbon molecules are more efficient than nonpolar ones in production

  8. Changing sources and sinks of carbon in boreal ecosystems of Interior Alaska: Current and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, T. A.; Jones, M.; Hiemstra, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Future climate scenarios predict a roughly 5°C increase in mean annual air temperatures for the Alaskan Interior over the next 80 years. Increasing temperatures and greater frequency and severity of climate-induced disturbances such as wildfires will be enough to initiate permafrost degradation in many areas of Alaska, leading to major changes in surface hydrology and ecosystem structure and function. This, in turn, is expected to alter the current inventories of carbon sources and sinks in the region and provide a management challenge for carbon itemization efforts. To assist land managers in adapting and planning for potential changes in Interior Alaska carbon cycling we synthesize information on climate, ecosystem processes, vegetation, and soil, permafrost, and hydrologic regimes in Interior Alaska. Our goal is to provide an assessment of the current and likely future regime of Interior Alaska carbon sources and sinks. For our carbon assessment we: 1) synthesize the most recent results from numerous studies on the carbon cycle with a focus on research from the Alaskan boreal biome, 2) assemble a summary of estimates of carbon sources in soil and vegetation in Interior Alaska, 3) categorize carbon sources and sinks for predominant Interior Alaska ecosystems, and 4) identify expected changes in sources and sinks with climate change and human activities. This information is used to provide recommendations on potential actions land managers can take to minimize carbon export from the boreal forest. Though the results from our project are geared primarily toward policy makers and land managers we also provide recommendations for filling research gaps that currently present uncertainty in our understanding of the carbon cycle in boreal forest ecosystems of Interior Alaska.

  9. Dynamic balancing of isoprene carbon sources reflects photosynthetic and photorespiratory responses to temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Kolby; Chambers, Jeffrey; Alves, Eliane G; Teixeira, Andrea; Garcia, Sabrina; Holm, Jennifer; Higuchi, Niro; Manzi, Antonio; Abrell, Leif; Fuentes, Jose D; Nielsen, Lars K; Torn, Margaret S; Vickers, Claudia E

    2014-12-01

    The volatile gas isoprene is emitted in teragrams per annum quantities from the terrestrial biosphere and exerts a large effect on atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene is made primarily from recently fixed photosynthate; however, alternate carbon sources play an important role, particularly when photosynthate is limiting. We examined the relative contribution of these alternate carbon sources under changes in light and temperature, the two environmental conditions that have the strongest influence over isoprene emission. Using a novel real-time analytical approach that allowed us to examine dynamic changes in carbon sources, we observed that relative contributions do not change as a function of light intensity. We found that the classical uncoupling of isoprene emission from net photosynthesis at elevated leaf temperatures is associated with an increased contribution of alternate carbon. We also observed a rapid compensatory response where alternate carbon sources compensated for transient decreases in recently fixed carbon during thermal ramping, thereby maintaining overall increases in isoprene production rates at high temperatures. Photorespiration is known to contribute to the decline in net photosynthesis at high leaf temperatures. A reduction in the temperature at which the contribution of alternate carbon sources increased was observed under photorespiratory conditions, while photosynthetic conditions increased this temperature. Feeding [2-(13)C]glycine (a photorespiratory intermediate) stimulated emissions of [(13)C1-5]isoprene and (13)CO2, supporting the possibility that photorespiration can provide an alternate source of carbon for isoprene synthesis. Our observations have important implications for establishing improved mechanistic predictions of isoprene emissions and primary carbon metabolism, particularly under the predicted increases in future global temperatures. PMID:25318937

  10. On the source contribution to Beijing PM2.5 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zíková, Naděžda; Wang, Yungang; Yang, Fumo; Li, Xinghua; Tian, Mi; Hopke, Philip K.

    2016-06-01

    Beijing is a city with some of the world's worst particulate air pollution. Although there have been various control strategies implemented since 1998, there are still episodes of PM2.5 concentrations of hundreds of micrograms per cubic meter. In this study, samples were collected over a year in Beijing, chemically characterized, and the resulting data analyzed for source apportionment. The new error analysis capabilities built into EPA PMF V5.0 have been employed to better evaluate the profiles and assign them to source types. Secondary sulfate, local coal combustion and secondary nitrate were the major contributors to the PM2.5 mass. However, in this study, traffic was found to be more important as a PM compared to prior studies. It was actually the largest PM2.5 source in autumn and winter although local coal combustion is also a large source of PM in the winter months. These results demonstrate the value of using the displacement method to assess the variability in source profiles to improve our interpretation of PMF results. They also suggest more attention needs to be paid to traffic emissions in Beijing.

  11. Understanding and modelling the variability in Dissolved Organic Carbon concentrations in catchment drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Martin; Waldron, Susan; Scott, Marian; Drew, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Our knowledge of dynamic natural habitats could be improved through the deployment of automated sensor technology. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations, [DOC], are of interest to water companies as purification removes this pool and currently in environmental science, due in part to rising DOC levels and also as respiration of this C pool can lead to an increased CO2 efflux. Manual sampling of catchment drainage systems has revealed seasonal patterns in DOC (Williams, P.J.L., 1995) and that hydrological events export most DOC(Raymond, P.A. and J.E. Saiers, 2010). However, manual sampling precludes detailed characterisation of the dynamic fluctuation of DOC over shorter but important time periods e.g. immediately prior to an event; the transition from base flow to a surface run-off dominated system as surface flow pathways defrost. Such insight is only gained through deployment of continuous-monitoring equipment. Since autumn 2010 we have deployed an S::CAN Spectrolyser (which from absorbance gives a measurement of [DOC]) in a 7.5 kilometre squared peaty catchment draining Europe's largest windfarm, Whitelee. Since autumn 2011, we have an almost complete time series of [DOC] every 30. Here [DOC] has ranged from 12.2 to 58.4 mg/l C and during event flow DOC had a maximum variation of 23.5 mg/l within a single day. Simultaneously with the Spectrolyser, we have logged stage height, pH and conductivity using an In-Situ Inc MD Troll 9000. Generally there is an inverse relationship between [DOC] and both pH and conductivity, but a positive relationship (albeit with seasonal differences) with [DOC] and stage height, from which we can infer hydrological changes in the source of the DOC. Here, in addition to presenting the time series of the data, and a more accurate export budget estimate, I will explore statistical methods for the handling of large datasets. Trends in the data of such large and dynamic data sets are challenging to model. Simple relationships with stage

  12. Development of compact ECR ion source for carbon therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 10 GHz compact Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source with all permanent magnets has been developed. Peaks of the mirror magnetic field along the beam axis are 0.59 T at the extraction side and 0.87 T at the gas injection side, respectively, while the minimum B strength is 0.25 T. The source has a diameter of 320 mm and a length of 295 mm. The result of beam tests shows that a C4+ intensity of 500 μA was obtained under an extraction voltage of 30 kV. This paper describes the design detail and the experimental results for the new source. (author)

  13. Mapping Air Pollution Concentrations and Sources in China from Ground-Level Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, R. A.; Muller, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    China has recently established an extensive air quality monitoring system with over 1500 sites providing hourly data on airborne particulate matter (PM2.5 / PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), and carbon monoxide (CO). Based on Kriging interpolation of these surface data, we derive a detailed map of air pollution across the eastern half of China. In northern and central China, the pollution is widespread; contrary to popular belief, pollution is not simply localized to major cities such as Beijing, Shanghai, or Chongqing, or in geologic basins. Pollution levels are lower in southern China, in part due to frequent rains. By incorporating wind measurements and estimating pollution transport, we also infer source distributions for key pollutants. Sources are widespread, but many of the largest sources are often situated in or near major population centers. A northeast corridor extending from near Shanghai to north of Beijing includes many of the most significant pollution sources in China. Roughly 5% of the study region accounts for 25% of observed particulate matter emissions. During the analysis period, roughly half of the population of China was subjected to a long-term average pollution level in the unhealthy range, according to standards used by the US Environmental Protection Agency. In addition, nearly all of China's population (>90%) was exposed to unhealthy levels of air pollution at least some of the time. Based on health impact estimates from the Huai River Study, we estimate that the observed levels of particulate matter pollution contribute to about 1.4 million deaths every year in China, about 3500 per day, in agreement with prior estimates. Identification of sources from pollution data was facilitated by the reporting of hourly measurements, and we encourage other nations around the world to follow China's example and provide such time-resolved data.

  14. Study on the threshold value of organic enrichment of carbonate as gas source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Haitao; LU Shuangfang; ZHONG Ningning; WANG Bo

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, calculations have been performed about gas quantity of generation, adsorption, dissolving in oil, dissolving in water, diffusion of unit area carbonate rocks at different geologic conditions in the Tarim basin. According to the material balance principle, the corresponding organic carbon content when gas started expelling from source rocks with separate phases has been worked out. We regard it as the theoretical threshold value (TOCmin) of gas source rocks under the same geologic condition. Based on the simulating calculation, a fact has been discovered that TOCmin decreases with the increasing source rocks thickness, decreases at the beginning and then increases with the increasing maturity and decreases with the better type of organic matter. TOCmin evaluation table of carbonate gas source rocks in the Tarim basin has been established. Investigations indicate that the TOCmin of carbonate gas source rocks varies greatly with the differences of geologic conditions, and gas source rocks cannot be evaluated with a unified TOC threshold value. And we also establish a preliminary evaluation table of TOC industrial threshold value, TOCgy, of carbonate gas source rocks in the Tarim basin.

  15. Influence of various carbohydrate sources on postprandial glucose, insulin and NEFA concentrations in obese cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, A; Ueda, K; Lee, P; Oda, H; Ishioka, K; Sako, T

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate is an important source of energy, which can significantly affect postprandial blood glucose and insulin levels in cats. In healthy animals, this is not a big concern; however, in obese and diabetic animals, this is an important detail. In the present study, the impact of four different carbohydrate sources (glucose, maltose, corn starch, and trehalose) on short-term post-prandial serum glucose, insulin, and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations was investigated with four obese cats. Each of the carbohydrate sources was added to a commercial wet food diet for feeding the animals. A significant difference was observed in postprandial glucose, insulin, and NEFA area under the curve (AUC) values between each carbohydrate source in obese cats. Furthermore, glucose and maltose induced the highest postprandial glucose and insulin AUC values, whereas trehalose induced the lowest postprandial glucose and insulin AUC value amongst all carbohydrate sources, respectively, in obese cats. However, trehalose has a higher risk of inducing side effects, such as diarrhea, as compared to other carbohydrate sources. As such, different carbohydrate sources appear to have a very significant impact on post-prandial glycemia and subsequent insulin requirement levels in obese cats. These results might be useful when selecting a prescription diet for obese or diabetic cats. In addition, maltose appears to be capable of inducing experimentally evoked postprandial hyperglycemia in obese cats, which may serve as a good tool for use to check the impact and effectiveness of newly developed oral hypoglycemic drugs or supplements for cats in future experiments. PMID:27487514

  16. Estimating the seasonal carbon source-sink geography of a natural, steady-state terrestrial biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, Elgene O.

    1988-01-01

    The estimation of the seasonal dynamics of biospheric-carbon sources and sinks to be used as an input to global atmospheric CO2 studies and models is discussed. An ecological biosphere model is given and the advantages of the model are examined. Monthly maps of estimated biospheric carbon source and sink regions and estimates of total carbon fluxes are presented for an equilibrium terrestrial biosphere. The results are compared with those from other models. It is suggested that, despite maximum variations of atmospheric CO2 in boreal latitudes, the enormous contributions of tropical wet-dry regions to global atmospheric CO2 seasonality can not be ignored.

  17. Antifungal activity of clotrimazole against Candida albicans depends on carbon sources, growth phase and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Lydia; Miramón, Pedro; Jablonowski, Nadja; Wisgott, Stephanie; Wilson, Duncan; Brunke, Sascha; Hube, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis, a superficial infection caused predominantly by the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, is frequently treated with clotrimazole. Some drug formulations contain lactate for improved solubility. Lactate may modify C. albicans physiology and drug sensitivity by serving as a carbon source for the fungus and/or affecting local pH. Here, we explored the effects of lactate, in combination with pH changes, on C. albicans proliferation, morphology and clotrimazole sensitivity. Moreover, we determined the influence of growth phase and morphology per se on drug sensitivity. We showed that utilization of lactate as a carbon source did not promote fast fungal proliferation or filamentation. Lactate had no influence on clotrimazole-mediated killing of C. albicans in standard fungal cultivation medium but had an additive effect on the fungicidal clotrimazole action under in vitro vagina-simulative conditions. Moreover, clotrimazole-mediated killing was growth-phase and morphology dependent. Post-exponential cells were resistant to the fungicidal action of clotrimazole, whilst logarithmic cells were sensitive, and hyphae showed the highest susceptibility. Finally, we showed that treatment of pre-formed C. albicans hyphae with sublethal concentrations of clotrimazole induced a reversion to yeast-phase growth. As C. albicans hyphae are considered the pathogenic morphology during mucosal infections, these data suggest that elevated fungicidal activity of clotrimazole against hyphae plus clotrimazole-induced hyphae-to-yeast reversion may help to dampen acute vaginal infections by reducing the relative proportion of hyphae and thus shifting to a non-invasive commensal-like population. In addition, lactate as an ingredient of clotrimazole formulations may potentiate clotrimazole killing of C. albicans in the vaginal microenvironment. PMID:25976001

  18. Diurnal variability of polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) concentrations: Relationship with meteorological conditions and inferred sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammed S.; Keyte, Ian J.; Yin, Jianxin; Stark, Christopher; Jones, Alan M.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2015-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their nitro and oxy derivatives have been sampled every three hours over one week in winter at two sites in Birmingham UK. One site is heavily influenced by road traffic and is close to residential dwellings, while the other site is a background urban location at some distance from both sources of emission. The time series of concentrations has been examined along with the ratio of concentrations between the two sampling sites. A comparison of averaged diurnal profiles has shown different patterns of behaviour which has been investigated through calculating ratios of concentration at 18:00-21:00 h relative to that at 06:00-09:00 h. This allows identification of those compounds with a strong contribution to a traffic-related maximum at 06:00-09:00 h which are predominantly the low molecular weight PAHs, together with a substantial group of quinones and nitro-PAHs. Changes in partitioning between vapour and particulate forms are unlikely to influence the ratio as the mean temperature at both times was almost identical. Most compounds show an appreciable increase in concentrations in the evening which is attributed to residential heating emissions. Compounds dominated by this source show high ratios of 18:00-21:00 concentrations relative to 06:00-09:00 concentrations and include higher molecular weight PAH and a substantial group of both quinones and nitro-PAH. The behaviour of retene, normally taken as an indicator of biomass burning, is suggestive of wood smoke only being one contributor to the evening peak in PAH and their derivatives, with coal combustion presumably being the other main contributor. Variations of PAH concentrations with wind speed show a dilution behaviour consistent with other primary pollutants, and high concentrations of a range of air pollutants were observed in an episode of low temperatures and low wind speeds towards the end of the overall sampling period consistent with poor local dispersion

  19. Carbon sources of natural cyanamide in Vicia villosa subsp. varia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Tsunashi; Kasahara, Ryohei; Abe, Shun; Hirota, Mitsuru; Sugano, Mami; Yamaya, Hiroko; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Fujii, Yoshiharu

    2010-10-01

    The ¹³C labels of [¹³C]carbon dioxide and D-[¹³C₆]glucose were incorporated into cyanamide (NH₂CN) when they were administered to Vicia villosa subsp. varia shoots. In contrast, the administration of sodium [2,3-¹³C₂]pyruvate did not affect the relative area of the [M + 1]+ ion of cyanamide in the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. [2,3-¹³C₂]pyruvate was incorporated into organic acids that are part of the citric acid cycle, such as succinate and fumarate, confirming that the shoots absorbed and metabolised it. These observations demonstrated that the carbon atom of cyanamide is derived from any of the carbohydrates that are present upstream of pyruvate in the metabolic pathway. PMID:20954091

  20. Metabolism of various carbon sources by Azospirillum brasilense.

    OpenAIRE

    Westby, C A; Cutshall, D S; Vigil, G V

    1983-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 and two mutants were examined for 19 carbon metabolism enzymes. The results indicate that this nitrogen fixer uses the Entner-Doudoroff pathway for gluconate dissimilation, lacks a catabolic but has an anabolic Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas hexosephosphate pathway, has amphibolic triosephosphate enzymes, lacks a hexose monophosphate shunt, and has lactate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and glycerokinase. The mutants are severely deficient in phosphoglycerate and pyr...

  1. Using Ozone Lidar to Investigate Sources of High Ozone Concentrations in the Western United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senff C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used NOAA’s Tunable Optical Profiler for Aerosol and oZone (TOPAZ ozone lidar to investigate the sources of high surface ozone concentrations in two different regions of the western United States (US: the Uintah Basin in northeast Utah and Clark County in southern Nevada, which includes the city of Las Vegas. The Uintah Basin is a booming oil and gas producing region that often suffers from very high wintertime ozone concentrations. Clark County experiences violations of the US ozone standard primarily in spring and early summer despite a lack of any major local pollution sources. TOPAZ lidar observations, in conjunction with surface in situ measurements and model results, provided strong evidence that the high wintertime ozone concentrations in the Uintah Basin are primarily driven by local emissions associated with oil and gas exploration, whereas the Clark County ozone exceedances are often caused by ozone-rich air that is transported from the lower stratosphere all the way down to the earth’s surface.

  2. Effect of Dietary Inulin Source on Piglet Performance, Immunoglobulin Concentration, and Plasma Lipid Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grela Eugeniusz R.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of an inulin source (aqueous or aqueous-alcoholic extract, dried chicory root, or dried Jerusalem artichoke tubers on piglet performance, plasma lipid profile, and immunoglobulin concentration. The study was conducted on 534 piglets (44 litters allocated to five nutritional groups: group I (control - fed basal diet, groups II and III receiving basal diet supplemented with 2% of inulin (aqueous and aqueous-alcoholic extract respectively, and groups IV and V -4% additive of dried artichoke or dried chicory respectively. During the trial, piglets’ body weight, feed intake, diarrhoea incidence, and mortality were controlled. Blood samples were collected twice from six animals of each group. In blood plasma, indices of lipid profile and concentrations of IgA, IgG and IgM were measured. The addition of inulin, regardless of its form (extracts or dried plants, significantly improved the rearing indices. In piglets of groups III, IV and V a significant improvement of daily weight gains and feed efficiency was noted. Inulin showed hypolipidemic activity (lowered total cholesterol level and stimulated piglet immune system manifested by elevated IgA and IgG concentrations. Irrespective of the inulin source, a lower mortality rate resulting from the improvement of animal health was noted in all experimental groups.

  3. Using Ozone Lidar to Investigate Sources of High Ozone Concentrations in the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senff, C. J.; Langford, A. O.; Alvarez, R. J.; Brewer, Wm. A.; Banta, R. M.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Sandberg, S. P.; Weickmann, A. M.; Holloway, J. S.; Williams, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    We have used NOAA's Tunable Optical Profiler for Aerosol and oZone (TOPAZ) ozone lidar to investigate the sources of high surface ozone concentrations in two different regions of the western United States (US): the Uintah Basin in northeast Utah and Clark County in southern Nevada, which includes the city of Las Vegas. The Uintah Basin is a booming oil and gas producing region that often suffers from very high wintertime ozone concentrations. Clark County experiences violations of the US ozone standard primarily in spring and early summer despite a lack of any major local pollution sources. TOPAZ lidar observations, in conjunction with surface in situ measurements and model results, provided strong evidence that the high wintertime ozone concentrations in the Uintah Basin are primarily driven by local emissions associated with oil and gas exploration, whereas the Clark County ozone exceedances are often caused by ozone-rich air that is transported from the lower stratosphere all the way down to the earth's surface.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban air : concentration levels and patterns and source analysis in Nairobi, Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthini, M.; Yoshimichi, H.; Yutaka, K.; Shigeki, M. [Yokohama National Univ., Yokohama (Japan). Graduate School of Environment and Information Sciences

    2005-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in the environment are often the result of incomplete combustion processes. This paper reported concentration levels and patterns of high molecular weight PAHs in Nairobi, Kenya. Daily air samples for 30 different PAHs were collected at residential, industrial and business sites within the city. Samples were then extracted using deuterated PAH with an automated Soxhlet device. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with a capillary column was used to analyze the extracts using a selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Statistical analyses were then performed. PAH concentration levels were reported for average, median, standard deviation, range, and Pearson's correlation coefficients. Data were then analyzed for sources using a principal component analysis (PCA) technique and isomer ratio analysis. Nonparametric testing was then conducted to detect inherent differences in PAH concentration data obtained from the different sites. Results showed that pyrene was the most abundant PAH. Carcinogenic PAHs were higher in high-traffic areas. The correlation coefficient between coronene and benzo(ghi)pyrene was high. The PAH isomer ratio analysis demonstrated that PAHs in Nairobi are the product of traffic emissions and oil combustion. Results also showed that PAH profiles were not well separated. It was concluded that source distinction methods must be improved in order to better evaluate PAH emissions in the city. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  5. Sources of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde in North America determined from high-resolution atmospheric data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Miller

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the North American budget for carbon monoxide using data for CO and formaldehyde concentrations from tall towers and aircraft in a model-data assimilation framework. The Stochastic Time-Inverted, Lagrangian Transport model for CO (STILT-CO determines local to regional-scale CO contributions associated with production from fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning, and oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs using an ensemble of Lagrangian particles driven by high resolution assimilated meteorology. In most cases, the model demonstrates high fidelity simulations of hourly surface data from tall towers and point measurements from aircraft, with somewhat less satisfactory performance in coastal regions and when CO from large biomass fires in Alaska and the Yukon Territory influence the continental US.

    Inversions of STILT-CO simulations for CO and formaldehyde show that current inventories of CO emissions from fossil fuel combustion are significantly too high, by almost a factor of three in summer and a factor two in early spring, consistent with recent analyses of data from the INTEX-A aircraft program. Formaldehyde data help to show that sources of CO from oxidation of CH4 and other VOCs represent the dominant sources of CO over North America in summer.

  6. Optimization of probiotic lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 production using date powder as carbon source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahravy A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to optimize culture conditions for economic production of a probiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334, in which palm date powder was applied for the first time as a low-cost main carbon source. The effect of eleven factors on bacterial growth was investigated using the Taguchi experimental design, and three factors including palm date powder, tryptone and agitation rate were found to be the most significant parameters. The optimum conditions including date powder concentration, 38 g/L; tryptone concentration, 30 g/L; and an agitation rate of 320 rpm were determined by response surface methodology of Box-Behnken. A third-order polynomial model was suggested to predict the design space following which the predicted values were validated experimentally. The maximum log value of the viable cells in the optimized alternative medium was 9.97 at 24 h of incubation which was comparable to that obtained in the complex and expensive MRS medium (10.06.

  7. Characteristics and relevant remote sources of black carbon aerosol in Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Shuping; Cheng, Tiantao; Tao, Jun; Zhang, Renjian; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Yunwei; Leng, Chunpeng; Zhang, Deqin; Du, Jianfei

    2014-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol was measured continuously at an urban site in Shanghai (31°18‧N, 121°30‧E) from January 2011 to January 2012, and the characteristics and relevant remote sources of BC were examined. Daily BC concentrations varied within the range of 0.3-11.4 μg m- 3 with an annual average of 2.3 μg m- 3. Comparably, monthly BC concentrations were usually high in the dry season (November-April) but low in the wet season (May-October). Hourly BC showed a similar diurnal pattern with two peaks, one at 7:00-9:00 LT and another at 19:00-21:00 LT, in the four seasons. BC level was always relatively higher during daytime than nighttime. There also existed a workday/weekend difference of BC due to anthropogenic activities. The correlation analyses between BC and meteorological factors indicated that (1) wind speed was an important contributor to BC diffusion in the boundary atmosphere, (2) atmospheric visibility was not highly sensitive to BC, and (3) northwesterly, westerly and southwesterly wind directions related closely to BC. The increase of BC is likely associated with fossil fuel combustion during the winter heating period and agricultural waste burning over the surrounding areas during the summer harvest period, as well as the air masses originating from and/or transiting through these regions.

  8. Sources and mixing state of size-resolved elemental carbon particles in a European megacity: Paris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Healy

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS was deployed to investigate the size-resolved chemical composition of single particles at an urban background site in Paris, France, as part of the MEGAPOLI winter campaign in January/February 2010. ATOFMS particle counts were scaled to match coincident Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS data in order to generate hourly size-resolved mass concentrations for the single particle classes observed. The total scaled ATOFMS particle mass concentration in the size range 150–1067 nm was found to agree very well with the sum of concurrent High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS and Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP mass concentration measurements of organic carbon (OC, inorganic ions and black carbon (BC (R2 = 0.91. Clustering analysis of the ATOFMS single particle mass spectra allowed the separation of elemental carbon (EC particles into four classes: (i EC attributed to biomass burning (ECbiomass, (ii EC attributed to traffic (ECtraffic, (iii EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium sulfate (ECOCSOx, and (iv EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium nitrate (ECOCNOx. Average hourly mass concentrations for EC-containing particles detected by the ATOFMS were found to agree reasonably well with semi-continuous quantitative thermal/optical EC and optical BC measurements (r2 = 0.61 and 0.65–0.68 respectively, n = 552. The EC particle mass assigned to fossil fuel and biomass burning sources also agreed reasonably well with BC mass fractions assigned to the same sources using seven-wavelength aethalometer data (r2 = 0.60 and 0.48, respectively, n = 568. Agreement between the ATOFMS and other instrumentation improved noticeably when a period influenced by significantly aged, internally mixed EC particles was removed from the intercomparison. 88% and 12% of EC particle

  9. Sources and mixing state of size-resolved elemental carbon particles in a European megacity: Paris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Healy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available An Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS was deployed to investigate the size-resolved chemical composition of single particles at an urban background site in Paris, France, as part of the MEGAPOLI winter campaign in January/February 2010. ATOFMS particle counts were scaled to match coincident Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS data in order to generate hourly size-resolved mass concentrations for the single particle classes observed. The total scaled ATOFMS particle mass concentration in the size range 150–1067 nm was found to agree very well with the sum of concurrent High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS and Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP mass concentration measurements of organic carbon (OC, inorganic ions and black carbon (BC (R2 = 0.91. Clustering analysis of the ATOFMS single particle mass spectra allowed the separation of elemental carbon (EC particles into four classes: (i EC attributed to biomass burning (ECbiomass, (ii EC attributed to traffic (ECtraffic, (iii EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium sulfate (ECOCSOx, and (iv EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium nitrate (ECOCNOx. Average hourly mass concentrations for EC-containing particles detected by the ATOFMS were found to agree reasonably well with semi-continuous quantitative thermal/optical EC and optical BC measurements (r2 = 0.61 and 0.65–0.68, respectively, n = 552. The EC particle mass assigned to fossil fuel and biomass burning sources also agreed reasonably well with BC mass fractions assigned to the same sources using seven-wavelength aethalometer data (r2 = 0.60 and 0.48, respectively, n = 568. Agreement between the ATOFMS and other instrumentation improved noticeably when a period influenced by significantly aged, internally mixed EC particles was removed from the intercomparison. 88 % and 12 % of EC

  10. Sources and mixing state of size-resolved elemental carbon particles in a European megacity: Paris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Kamili, K.; Merkel, M.; Müller, T.; Wiedensohler, A.; Eckhardt, S.; Stohl, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Wenger, J. C.

    2012-02-01

    An Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) was deployed to investigate the size-resolved chemical composition of single particles at an urban background site in Paris, France, as part of the MEGAPOLI winter campaign in January/February 2010. ATOFMS particle counts were scaled to match coincident Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS) data in order to generate hourly size-resolved mass concentrations for the single particle classes observed. The total scaled ATOFMS particle mass concentration in the size range 150-1067 nm was found to agree very well with the sum of concurrent High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) mass concentration measurements of organic carbon (OC), inorganic ions and black carbon (BC) (R2 = 0.91). Clustering analysis of the ATOFMS single particle mass spectra allowed the separation of elemental carbon (EC) particles into four classes: (i) EC attributed to biomass burning (ECbiomass), (ii) EC attributed to traffic (ECtraffic), (iii) EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium sulfate (ECOCSOx), and (iv) EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium nitrate (ECOCNOx). Average hourly mass concentrations for EC-containing particles detected by the ATOFMS were found to agree reasonably well with semi-continuous quantitative thermal/optical EC and optical BC measurements (r2 = 0.61 and 0.65-0.68 respectively, n = 552). The EC particle mass assigned to fossil fuel and biomass burning sources also agreed reasonably well with BC mass fractions assigned to the same sources using seven-wavelength aethalometer data (r2 = 0.60 and 0.48, respectively, n = 568). Agreement between the ATOFMS and other instrumentation improved noticeably when a period influenced by significantly aged, internally mixed EC particles was removed from the intercomparison. 88% and 12% of EC particle mass was apportioned to fossil fuel and biomass burning respectively using the ATOFMS data

  11. Possible increase of the atmospheric methane and carbon monoxide concentrations during the last decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various published measurements of the background concentrations of ground level atmospheric methane suggest an increase from approx.1.6 ppM to approx.1.7 ppM over the past decade. To supplement these analyses, we have analyzed ten years of continuous data from three urban/suburban sites and find that the annual minima in the monthly midmeans of daily minima follow this suggested pattern in both direction and magnitude. A similar but less well-characterized result is obtained for carbon monoxide as well

  12. Strength of briquettes made of Cu concentrate and carbon-bearing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Oleksiak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, results of the research on application of residual fine-grained, carbon-bearing materials as coke substitutes in the shaft process of copper matter smelting are discussed. The addition was introduced into the charge as a component of concentrate-made briquettes, then, its effects on properties of the obtained briquettes were analysed for their compressive and drop strengths. The results of investigations confirmed the potential use of proposed alternative fuels (as briquette components in the process of copper matte smelting.

  13. Relationship between carbon-14 concentrations in atmospheric CO2 and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentration of organically-bound 14C in the tree-ring cellulose of a pine tree grown in Shika-machi (37.1degN, 136.5degE), Ishikawa prefecture, Japan, was measured for the ring-years from 1949 to 1999 and compared with those in several trees from East Asia region reported by other researchers. Temporal variation of organically-bound 14C concentration in the tree-ring cellulose in Shika-machi showed essentially similar variations to those of other reports. However, small difference of Δ14C values was found during the period of 1970-1981 between our data and those of other reports, in addition to the difference during the period of 1963-1967 caused by the so-called latitude dependence of the 14C variations in the northern troposhere. These results suggest that the 14C concentration in atmospheric CO2 was considerably disturbed during the period of 1970-1981, especially in 1970, 1976, and 1978-1981, in the East Asia region. This phenomenon may be interpreted by the possibility of the several times of injections of 14C originated from a series of Chinese thermonuclear bomb tests. Temporal variation of 14C concentration in atmospheric CO2 in Kanazawa city, Ishikawa prefecture, Japan (36.3degN, 136.4degE), was also measured during the period of 1991-1999. An interesting result in comparing 14C concentrations in the tree-ring cellulose with those of atmospheric CO2 is that each of 14C concentrations in a series of tree rings reflected summer means of 14C concentrations in atmospheric CO2. It suggests that the carbon necessary for synthesizing tree-ring cellulose was mainly supplied from atmospheric CO2 in summer season. It is noteworthy that surface soils collected from different sites were found to demonstrate extremely low 14C concentrations than atmospheric CO2. It may be ascribed to the slow exchange rate of carbon between soils and atmospheric CO2. (author)

  14. Variability of levels of PM, black carbon and particle number concentration in selected European cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Reche

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In many large cities of Europe standard air quality limit values of particulate matter (PM are exceeded. Emissions from road traffic and biomass burning are frequently reported to be the major causes. As a consequence of these exceedances a large number of air quality plans, most of them focusing on traffic emissions reductions, have been implemented in the last decade. In spite of this implementation, a number of cities did not record a decrease of PM levels. Thus, is the efficiency of air quality plans overestimated? Or do we need a more specific metric to evaluate the impact of the above emissions on the levels of urban aerosols?

    This study shows the results of the interpretation of the 2009 variability of levels of PM, black carbon (BC, aerosol number concentration (N and a number of gaseous pollutants in seven selected urban areas covering road traffic, urban background, urban-industrial, and urban-shipping environments from southern, central and northern Europe.

    The results showed that variations of PM and N levels do not always reflect the variation of the impact of road traffic emissions on urban aerosols. However, BC levels vary proportionally with those of traffic related gaseous pollutants, such as CO, NO2 and NO. Due to this high correlation, one may suppose that monitoring the levels of these gaseous pollutants would be enough to extrapolate exposure to traffic-derived BC levels. However, the BC/CO, BC/NO2 and BC/NO ratios vary widely among the cities studied, as a function of distance to traffic emissions, vehicle fleet composition and the influence of other emission sources such as biomass burning. Thus, levels of BC should be measured at air quality monitoring sites.

    During traffic rush hours, a narrow variation in the N/BC ratio was evidenced, but a wide variation of this ratio was determined for the noon period. Although in central and northern Europe N and BC levels tend to vary

  15. Non-destructive radiochemical method for determining carbon concentrations in thin sheet 3% Si-Fe alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-destructive radiochemical method for determining carbon concentrations in thin sheet 3% Si-Fe has been developed. An ingot of 3% Si-Fe was doped with 14C during the melting operation, and subsequently processed to give a 0.30-mm thick sheet. Decarburising annealing conditions were controlled in order to obtain sheets having final carbon concentrations in the range 1.5 to 110 ppm. The β-radiation emanating from a thin surface layer of these sheets was found to be independent of sheet thickness, and linearly correlated to the bulk carbon content determined by the Leco carbon analyser, in the range 1.5 to 110 ppm. The radiochemical method is more sensitive for carbon concentrations below 20 ppm than techniques which rely on sample combustion. (author)

  16. A shift of thermokarst lakes from carbon sources to sinks during the Holocene epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter Anthony, K. M.; Zimov, S. A.; Grosse, G.; Jones, Miriam C.; Anthony, P.; Chapin, F. S., III; Finlay, J. C.; Mack, M. C.; Davydov, S.; Frenzel, P.F.; Frolking, S.

    2014-01-01

    Thermokarst lakes formed across vast regions of Siberia and Alaska during the last deglaciation and are thought to be a net source of atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide during the Holocene epoch1,2,3,4. However, the same thermokarst lakes can also sequester carbon5, and it remains uncertain whether carbon uptake by thermokarst lakes can offset their greenhouse gas emissions. Here we use field observations of Siberian permafrost exposures, radiocarbon dating and spatial analyses to quantify Holocene carbon stocks and fluxes in lake sediments overlying thawed Pleistocene-aged permafrost. We find that carbon accumulation in deep thermokarst-lake sediments since the last deglaciation is about 1.6 times larger than the mass of Pleistocene-aged permafrost carbon released as greenhouse gases when the lakes first formed. Although methane and carbon dioxide emissions following thaw lead to immediate radiative warming, carbon uptake in peat-rich sediments occurs over millennial timescales. We assess thermokarst-lake carbon feedbacks to climate with an atmospheric perturbation model and find that thermokarst basins switched from a net radiative warming to a net cooling climate effect about 5,000 years ago. High rates of Holocene carbon accumulation in 20 lake sediments (47±10 grams of carbon per square metre per year; mean±standard error) were driven by thermokarst erosion and deposition of terrestrial organic matter, by nutrient release from thawing permafrost that stimulated lake productivity and by slow decomposition in cold, anoxic lake bottoms. When lakes eventually drained, permafrost formation rapidly sequestered sediment carbon. Our estimate of about 160petagrams of Holocene organic carbon in deep lake basins of Siberia and Alaska increases the circumpolar peat carbon pool estimate for permafrost regions by over 50 per cent (ref. 6). The carbon in perennially frozen drained lake sediments may become vulnerable to mineralization as permafrost disappears7

  17. Short-term forecast of the carbon monoxide concentration over the Moscow megacity region by COSMO-ART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislov, Alexander; Revokatova, Anastasia; Surkova, Galina; Rivin, Gdaliy

    2016-04-01

    Introduction. Atmospheric pollution in the cities is constantly increasing. It makes air pollution forecast extremely important for modern meteorology. Short-range spatial detailed forecast of air pollutants distribution should be done as a part of weather forecast. A short-term forecast of city 'chemical weather' requires real daily data on pollutant emissions. For the operational daily forecast of pollutant concentrations, long-term emissions averages are usually used, which may differ significantly from real emissions on the particular day, especially in big cities. Methodology. The method of calculation of pollutant emissions is described for the short-term forecast. An on-line coupled chemical transport model, COSMO-ART (https://www.imk-tro.kit.edu/english/3509.php), was applied for the Moscow megasity region, Russia. Because it is impossible to have real daily emissions values, the method of emission estimation on the basis of measurements of the concentrations of air pollutants is proposed. The method is based on the assumption that the pollutant concentrations reflect the intensity of emissions sources. The proposed method allows the hourly measurements of air pollutant concentrations to be transformed into emissions values as fast as the measurements can be done. Results. This method is described and its application is shown for carbon monoxide (one of the most dangerous pollutant). Around 90% of CO in Moscow is emitted by traffic. Conclusions. Verification of the COSMO-ART results demonstrates that the calculated emissions gave better results compared with the results from mean emission values (TNO emissions dataset) that were used previously. This approach provides the possibility of running an operational short-term pollutant concentration forecast with more detailed spatial structure.

  18. Compact ECR ion source with permanent magnets for carbon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion sources for the medical facilities should have the following characteristics of easy maintenance, low electric power, good stability, and long operation time without trouble (1 year or longer). For this, a 10 GHz compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) with all permanent magnets was developed. The beam intensity and stability for C4+ were 280 e μA and better than 6% during 20 h with no adjustment of any source parameters. These results were acceptable for the medical requirements. Recently, many plans were proposed to construct the next generation cancer treatment facility. For such a facility we have designed an all permanent magnet ECRIS, in which a high magnetic field is chosen for increasing the beam intensity. The maximum mirror magnetic fields on the beam axis are 0.59 T at the extraction side and 0.87 T at the gas injection side, while the minimum B strength is 0.25 T. The source has a diameter of 32 cm and a length of 29.5 cm. Details of the design of this source and its background are described in this article

  19. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

    2015-01-01

    The Electron String type of Ion Sources (ESIS) was developed, constructed and tested first in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These ion sources can be the appropriate sources for production of pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams which can be used for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact the test ESIS Krion-6T already now at the solenoid magnetic field only 4.6 T provides more than 10^10 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5*10^9 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable for application at synchrotrons. It was also found, that Krion-6T can provide more than 10^11 C6+ ions per second at 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. As for production of 11C radioactive ion beams ESIS can be the most economic kind of ion source. To proof that the special cryogenic cell for pulse injection of gaseous species into electron string was successfully tested using the ESIS Krion-2M.

  20. Control of phosphorus concentration through adsorption and desorption in shallow groundwater of subtropical carbonate estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Hilary; Rains, Mark; Lewis, David; Zhang, Jia-Zhong; Price, René

    2016-02-01

    The changes in the proportion of fresh and marine water sources in coastal mixing zones can affect phosphorus (P) availability, one of the important drivers of primary productivity. This study focuses on an abiotic portion of the P cycle in the mangrove ecotone of Taylor Slough, coastal Everglades, Florida. We investigated the P sorption properties of sediment with three distinct water sources in this region: 1) fresh groundwater from the inland Everglades, 2) bicarbonate enriched groundwater from the mangrove ecotone, and 3) surface saltwater from Florida Bay. Soluble reactive P (SPR) in ecotone groundwater exhibit markedly low sorption efficiency (Kd = 0.2 L g-1) onto the sediment compared to fresh groundwater and Florida Bay water (11.3 L g-1 and 3.4 L g-1, respectively). The low SRP buffering capacity of the sediment in ecotone groundwater would maintain a higher ambient water SRP concentration in ecotone groundwater than in the other two waters. The relative sorption efficiency is consistent with the measured zero equilibrium SRP concentration being highest in ecotone groundwater (0.094 ± 0.003 μM) and lower in fresh groundwater and Florida Bay surface water (0.075 ± 0.005 μM and 0.058 ± 0.004 μM, respectively). The temporal variability of SRP concentration in groundwater at the ecotone field station is greater than the range of zero equilibrium SRP concentration for all three waters, so very low SRP concentration in the ambient water would induce desorption of P from the sediment. Such desorption processes would result in a higher ambient SRP concentration in ecotone groundwater than the other two water types. Our results suggest that ecotone groundwater, due to its higher bicarbonate content, would release more SRP from mangrove sediments compared to the upstream and downstream waters, as evidenced by both its lower P sorption efficiency and its higher zero equilibrium SRP concentration.

  1. Carbon source/sink function of a subtropical, eutrophic lake determined from an overall mass balance and a gas exchange and carbon burial balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although studies on carbon burial in lake sediments have shown that lakes are disproportionately important carbon sinks, many studies on gaseous carbon exchange across the water-air interface have demonstrated that lakes are supersaturated with CO2 and CH4 causing a net release of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere. In order to more accurately estimate the net carbon source/sink function of lake ecosystems, a more comprehensive carbon budget is needed, especially for gaseous carbon exchange across the water-air interface. Using two methods, overall mass balance and gas exchange and carbon burial balance, we assessed the carbon source/sink function of Lake Donghu, a subtropical, eutrophic lake, from April 2003 to March 2004. With the overall mass balance calculations, total carbon input was 14 905 t, total carbon output was 4950 t, and net carbon budget was +9955 t, suggesting that Lake Donghu was a great carbon sink. For the gas exchange and carbon burial balance, gaseous carbon (CO2 and CH4) emission across the water-air interface totaled 752 t while carbon burial in the lake sediment was 9477 t. The ratio of carbon emission into the atmosphere to carbon burial into the sediment was only 0.08. This low ratio indicates that Lake Donghu is a great carbon sink. Results showed good agreement between the two methods with both showing Lake Donghu to be a great carbon sink. This results from the high primary production of Lake Donghu, substantive allochthonous carbon inputs and intensive anthropogenic activity. Gaseous carbon emission accounted for about 15% of the total carbon output, indicating that the total output would be underestimated without including gaseous carbon exchange. - Due to high primary production, substantive allochthonous carbon inputs and intensive anthropogenic acitivity, subtropical, eutrophic Lake Donghu is a great carbon sink

  2. Longitudinal dispersion with time-dependent source concentration in semi-infinite aquifer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mritunjay Kumar Singh; Nav Kumar Mahato; Premlata Singh

    2008-12-01

    An analytical solution is obtained to predict the contaminant concentration along unsteady ground-water flow in semi-in finite aquifer. Initially,the aquifer is not supposed to be solute free ,i.e.,aquifer is not clean.A time-dependent source concentration is considered at the origin of the aquifer and at the other end of the aquifer, it is supposed to be zero. The time-dependent forms of unsteady velocities are considered in which one such form ,i.e., sinusoidal form represents the seasonal pattern in a year in tropical regions. The Laplace Transformation Technique (LTT)is used to get an analytical solution and a graphical representation is made through MATLAB.

  3. Determination, Source Identification and GIS Mapping for Nitrate Concentration in Groundwater from Bara Aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to determine the level of nitrate concentration in well water from Bara aquifer in north Kordofan state (west central sudan). The analysis was conducted for 69 wells from different villages within the Bara basin. Spectophotometric analysis was used to determine nitrate, nitrite and ammonia. Results revealed that nitrate concentration range was from 9.68 to 891 mg L in the sampled well with 81% exceeding the maximum permissible limits set for drinking water by WHO and SSMO. Animal waste and organic soil nitrogen were found to be the source of nitrate in these wells as indicated by 15N. The majority of wells with high nitrate are in the north and the north east part of the study area are shown by the GIS predictive map. (author)

  4. Morphological Comparison of U3O8 Ore Concentrates from Canada Key Lake and Namibia Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Daniel S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Patrick Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    Uranium ore concentrates from two different sources were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The ore powders are referred to as Namibia (id. no. 90036, LIMS id. no. 18775) and Canada Key Lake (id. no. 90019, LIMS id. no. 18774). Earlier work identified the ores as the U₃O₈ phase of uranium oxide using x-ray diffraction. Both sets of powders were in the form of dark brown to black powder fines. However, the Canada Key Lake concentrates contained larger chunks of material on the millimeter scale that were easily visible to the unaided eye. The powders were mounted for SEM examination by hand dispersing a small amount onto conductive sticky tape. Two types of applicators were used and compared: a fine-tipped spatula and a foam-tipped applicator. The sticky tape was on a standard SEM “tee” mount, which was tapped to remove loose contamination before being inserted into the SEM.

  5. Bisphenol A in Urine of Chinese Young Adults: Concentrations and Sources of Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chongjing; Liu, Liyan; Ma, Wanli; Zhu, Ningzheng; Jiang, Ling; Ren, Nanqi; Li, Yi-Fan; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2016-02-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting environmental chemical. Urinary concentrations of BPA were measured in samples collected nationwide from Chinese young adults. The geometric mean urinary concentration of BPA in Chinese young adults was 2.23 ng/mL. The estimated daily exposure dose for BPA was 64.8 ng/kg bw/day. Contributions of various BPA sources to exposure in Chinese young adults were estimated. Dietary intake was the primary exposure pathway. The contribution of dietary intake, indoor dust, paper products and personal care products to BPA intake was 72.5 %, 0.74 %, 0.98 %, 0.22 % of the total exposure dose, respectively. This is the first study on the occurrence of BPA in young adults from most provinces and autonomous regions of China. The results can be used to establish a database for BPA exposure assessment for Chinese general population. PMID:26679324

  6. Carbon sources in the Beaufort Sea revealed by molecular lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotope analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Tolosa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular lipid biomarkers (hydrocarbons, alcohols, sterols and fatty acids and compound specific isotope analysis of suspended particulate organic matter (SPM and surface sediments of the Mackenzie Shelf and slope (Southeast Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean, were studied in summer 2009. The concentrations of the molecular lipid markers, characteristic of known organic matter sources, were grouped and used as proxies to evaluate the relative importance of fresh algal, detrital algal, fossil, C3 terrestrial plants, bacterial and zooplankton material in the sedimentary organic matter (OM.

    Fossil and detrital algal contributions were the major fractions of the freshwater SPM from the Mackenzie River with ~34% each of the total molecular biomarkers. Fresh algal, C3 terrestrial, bacterial and zooplanktonic components represented much lower percentages, 17, 10, 4 and < 1%, respectively. In marine SPM from the Mackenzie slope, the major contributions were fresh and detrital algal components (> 80% with a minor contribution of fossil and C3 terrestrial biomarkers. Characterization of the sediments revealed a major sink of refractory algal material mixed with some fresh algal material, fossil hydrocarbons and a small input of C3 terrestrial sources. In particular, the sediments from the shelf and at the mouth of the Amundsen Gulf presented the highest contribution of detrital algal material (60–75% whereas those from the slope contained the highest proportion of fossil (40% and C3 terrestrial plant material (10%. Overall, considering that the detrital algal material is marine derived, autochthonous sources contributed more than allochthonous sources to the OM lipid pool. Using the ratio of an allochthonous biomarker (normalized to total organic carbon, TOC found in the sediments to those measured at the river mouth water, we estimated that the fraction of terrestrial material preserved in the

  7. Latitudinal distribution of the sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide derived from surface observations and an atmospheric transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tans, Pieter P.; Conway, Thomas J.; Nakazawa, Takakiyo

    1989-04-01

    Determination of the present global budget of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from the small and persistent concentration gradients that exist in the atmosphere is discussed. The CO2 concentration at any site results from a combination of two factors: local sources or sinks and long-range transport. To separate these two effects, an atmospheric transport model is needed. The extensive sets of global CO2 measurements of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Geophysical Monitoring for Climatic Change (GMCC) division and of the Upper Atmosphere and Space Research Laboratory of Tohoku University are combined with a two-dimensional transport model to derive, in an "inverse" calculation, the latitudinal and seasonal distributions of sources and sinks of CO2 necessary to reproduce the observed concentrations. The model transport parameters were previously derived from a three-dimensional general circulation model. It is found that the southern oceans are a sink of carbon of 0.8-1.5 Gt yr-1 (1 Gt equals 1015g) and that the equatorial areas are a source to the atmosphere of 1.4-2.8 Gt yr-1. Tropical deforestation as a major source of CO2 must be smaller than that because the oceans account for a significant part of the equatorial flux. There seems to be significant seasonality in the sources and sinks of CO2, both in the tropics and in the southern oceans. The seasonal net ecosystem production north of 25°N is found to be 6.2-8.2 Gt of carbon, but these estimates are probably somewhat too low. The source deduction problem is difficult to solve, especially for the middle and high latitudes in the northern hemisphere. This is due to a lack of observations over the continents, which occupy more than half of the global area at these latitudes and are the regions where the sources and sinks are most intense. Evidence is found in the results obtained for the GMCC and Tohoku data that the longitudinal variability of the data is large enough, even in

  8. Carbon dioxide as working fluid for medium and high-temperature concentrated solar thermal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Duong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the benefits and drawbacks of using carbon dioxide in solar thermal systems at medium and high operating temperatures. For medium temperatures, application of CO2 in non-imaging-optics based compound parabolic concentrators (CPC combined with evacuated-tube collectors is studied. These collectors have been shown to obtain efficiencies higher than 40% operating at around 200℃ without the need of tracking. Validated numerical models of external compound parabolic concentrators (XCPCs are used to simulate their performance using CO2 as working fluid. For higher temperatures, a mathematical model is implemented to analyze the operating performance of a parabolic trough solar collector (PTC using CO2 at temperatures between 100℃ and 600℃.

  9. Energy efficiency of growing ram lambs fed concentrate-based diets with different roughage sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvani, D B; Pires, A V; Susin, I; Gouvêa, V N; Berndt, A; Chagas, L J; Dórea, J R R; Abdalla, A L; Tedeschi, L O

    2014-01-01

    Poor-quality roughages are widely used as fiber sources in concentrate-based diets for ruminants. Because roughage quality is associated with the efficiency of energy use in forage-based diets, the objective of this study was to determine whether differing the roughage source in concentrate-based diets could change the energy requirements of growing lambs. Eighty-four 1/2 Dorper × 1/2 Santa Inês ram lambs (18.0 ± 3.3 kg BW) were individually penned and divided into 2 groups according to primary source of dietary roughage: low-quality roughage (LQR; sugarcane bagasse) or medium-quality roughage (MQR; coastcross hay). Diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous (2.6% N) and to meet 20% of physically effective NDF. After a 10-d ad libitum adaptation period, 7 lambs from each group were randomly selected and slaughtered (baseline). Twenty-one lambs in each diet group were fed ad libitum and slaughtered at 25, 35, or 45 kg BW. The remaining 28 lambs (14 from each diet group) were submitted to 1 of 2 levels of feed restriction: 70% or 50% of the ad libitum intake. Retentions of body fat, N, and energy were determined. Additionally, 6 ram lambs (44.3 ± 5.6 kg BW) were kept in metabolic cages and used in a 6 × 6 Latin square experiment designed to establish the ME content of the 2 diets at the 3 levels of DM intake. There was no effect of intake level on diet ME content, but it was greater in the diet with LQR than in the diet with MQR (3.18 vs. 2.94 Mcal/kg, respectively; P < 0.01). Lambs fed the diet with LQR had greater body fat (g/kg of empty BW) and energy concentrations (kcal/kg of empty BW) because of a larger visceral fat deposition (P < 0.05). Using a low-quality roughage as a primary source of forage in a concentrate-based diet for growing lambs did not change NEm and the efficiency of ME use for maintenance, which averaged 71.6 kcal/kg(0.75) of shrunk BW and 0.63, respectively. On the other hand, the greater nonfibrous carbohydrate content of the diet with

  10. Yield and Mineral Element Concentration of Beetroot in Response to Nutrient Source in Hydroponic Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Egilla, Jonathan N.

    2009-01-01

    The yield and mineral element concentration of beetroot (Beta vulgaris ‘Bulls Blood’) was determined in a closed nutrient-recirculating ‘Nutrient Film Technique’ (NFT) hydroponic experiment. Seedlings were grown and harvested 42 days after transfer into NFT system (DAT), either with a commercial hydroponic fertilizer or a non-hydroponic soluble fertilizer containing in mg liter-1: 108 nitrogen (N) and 12 calcium (Ca) (N1Ca1), or 200 N and 66.7 Ca (N2Ca2), respectively. Nutrient source had no ...

  11. Identifying urban sources as cause of elevated grass pollen concentrations using GIS and remote sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Ørby, Pia Viuf; Becker, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    between the three urban traps and an operational trap located just 60 km away. This finding suggests that during intense flowering, the grass pollen concentration mirrors the local source distribution and is thus a local-scale phenomenon. Model simulations aimed at assessing population exposure to pollen...... with other components that simulate pollen release in order to calculate urban-scale variations in the grass pollen load. The gridded inventory with a resolution of 14m is therefore made available as supplementary material to this paper, and the verifying grass pollen observations are additionally available...

  12. Comparison of different combined treatment processes to address the source water with high concentration of natural organic matter during snowmelt period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengfei Lin; Xiaojian Zhang; Jun Wang; Yani Zeng; Shuming Liu; Chao Chen

    2015-01-01

    The source water in one forest region of the Northeast China had very high natural organic matter (NOM) concentration and heavy color during snowmelt period.The efficiency of five combined treatment processes was compared to address the high concentration of NOM and the mechanisms were also analyzed.Conventional treatment can hardly remove dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the source water.KMnO4 pre-oxidization could improve the DOC removal to 22.0%.Post activated carbon adsorption improved the DOC removal of conventional treatment to 28.8%.The non-sufficient NOM removal could be attributed to the dominance of large molecular weight organic matters in raw water,which cannot be adsorbed by the micropore upon activated carbon.O3 + activated carbon treatment are another available technology for eliminating the color and UV254 in water.However,its performance of DOC removal was only 36.4%,which could not satisfy the requirement for organic matter.The limited ozone dosage is not sufficient to mineralize the high concentration of NOM.Magnetic ion-exchange resin combined with conventional treatment could remove 96.2% of color,96.0% of UV254 and 87.1% of DOC,enabling effluents to meet the drinking water quality standard.The high removal efficiency could be explained by the negative charge on the surface of NOM which benefits the static adsorption of NOM on the anion exchange resin.The results indicated that magnetic ion-exchange resin combined with conventional treatment is the best available technology to remove high concentration of NOM.

  13. Comparison of sources of submicron particle number concentrations measured at two sites in Rochester, NY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sources contributing to the submicron particles (100-470 nm) measured between January 2002 and December 2007 at two different New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC) sites in Rochester, NY were identified and apportioned using a bilinear receptor model, positive matrix factorization (PMF). Measurements of aerosol size distributions and number concentrations for particles in the size range of 10-500 nm have been made since December 2001 to date in Rochester. The measurements are being made using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) consisting of a DMA and a CPC (TSI models 3071 and 3010, respectively). From December 2001 to March 2004, particle measurements were made at the NYS DEC site in downtown Rochester, but it was moved to the eastside of Rochester in May 2004. Each measurement period was divided into three seasons i.e., winter (December, January, and February), summer (June, July, and August), and the transitional periods (March, April, May, September, October, and November) so as to avoid experimental uncertainty resulting from too large season-to-season variability in ambient temperature and solar photon intensity that would lead to unstable/non-stationary size distributions. Therefore, the seasons were analyzed independently for possible sources. Ten sources were identified at both sites and these include traffic, nucleation, residential/commercial heating, industrial emissions, secondary nitrate, ozone- rich secondary aerosol, secondary sulfate, regionally transported aerosol, and a mixed source of nucleation and traffic. These results show that the measured total outdoor particle number concentrations in Rochester generally vary with similar temporal patterns, suggesting that the central monitoring site data can be used to estimate outdoor exposure in other parts of the city.

  14. Immobilized Tannin from Sanseviera trifasciata on Carbon as Adsorbent For Iron(II in Polluted Water Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Hanafi Arif

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The organic-agricultural waste resulted from local farmer or community gardening recently paid public attention. The presence and easily grown of “Lidah Mertua” or Sanseviera trifasciata being focused on potency investigation for its prospecting application. It was reported contain some phenolic and also tannin extracted from aqueous solvents. This paper revealed recent investigation applying of its isolated tannin from leave part to modifying of activated carbon. The previous report published that carbon were able to adsorb some toxic heavy metals. However, it has some limitation including lower capacity adsorption. Impregnated or immobilized the tannin-isolated from S. trifasciata leaves was able to modify the carbon functionality, physical appearance, pores size, and it adsorption capacity. Both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption mechanism model also disclosed the developed adsorbent mechanism of iron(II adsorption on the adsorbent tannin-immobolized on carbon. The real test using community well drilling water source also gave important finding on the concentration of iron(II contained on water source.

  15. A one-step single source route to carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tao Cheng; Zhiyong Fang; Guifu Zou; Qixiu Hu; Biao Hu; Xiaozhi Yang; Youjin Zhang

    2006-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been synthesized via directly pyrolyzing ferrocene in the autoclave. The nanotubes with several micrometers in length have outer and inner diameters in the range of 40–100 nm and 20–40 nm, respectively. An yield of ∼70% of CNTs can be obtained without any accessorial solvents and catalysts. Experimental results showed that a temperature higher than 600°C in conjunction with proper pressure was favourable for achievement of the nanotubes. The growth mechanism of CNTs was also discussed.

  16. Variation in the concentration and age of nonstructural carbon stored in different tree tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Andrew; Carbone, Mariah; Huggett, Brett; Furze, Morgan; Czimczik, Claudia I.; Xu, Xiaomei

    2014-05-01

    Trees store nonstructural carbon (NSC), in the form of sugars and starch, in the ray parenchyma cells of woody tissues. These reserves provide a carbon buffer when demand (growth, protection, or metabolism) exceeds supply (photosynthesis). This is particularly important in the context of resilience to stress and disturbance, such as might be associated with various global change factors. However, storage allocation processes and the availability of stored reserves remain poorly understood in woody plants. To better understand how NSC reserves are distributed throughout the tree, and the degree to which NSC reserves mix across ring boundaries and tissue types, we destructively sampled two 30-year-old trees (one red oak, Quercus rubra L., and one white pine, Pinus strobus L.) growing at Harvard Forest, an oak-dominated temperate forest in the northeastern United States. We analyzed stemwood samples (divided into individual rings, bark, and phloem), coarse and fine branches, and coarse (separated into three depths) and fine roots for concentrations of total sugars and starch. For a subset of samples we used the radiocarbon (14C) "bomb spike" method to estimate the mean age of extracted sugars and starch. In oak, stemwood sugar and starch concentrations were highest (50 mg/g) in the youngest (most recently-formed) rings, and dropped off rapidly (to 10 mg/g or less) across the 10 most recent rings. In oak phloem tissue, sugar concentrations were high (90 mg/g) compared to starch (10 mg/g). In pine, sugar concentrations dropped off rapidly across the three most recent rings (from 30 mg/g to 10 mg/g) whereas starch concentrations were low even for the youngest rings (10 mg/g or less). In pine, phloem concentrations of both sugar (190 mg/g) and starch (20 mg/g) were both substantially higher than in oak. Such strong radial trends must be accounted for when scaling up to whole-tree budgets, as whole increment cores cannot properly integrate (on a ring-area basis) across the

  17. Long-term natural attenuation of carbon and nitrogen within a groundwater plume after removal of the treated wastewater source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repert, D.A.; Barber, L.B.; Hess, K.M.; Keefe, S.H.; Kent, D.B.; LeBlanc, D.R.; Smith, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    Disposal of treated wastewater for more than 60 years onto infiltration beds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts produced a groundwater contaminant plume greater than 6 km long in a surficial sand and gravel aquifer. In December 1995 the wastewater disposal ceased. A long-term, continuous study was conducted to characterize the post-cessation attenuation of the plume from the source to 0.6 km downgradient. Concentrations and total pools of mobile constituents, such as boron and nitrate, steadily decreased within 1-4 years along the transect. Dissolved organic carbon loads also decreased, but to a lesser extent, particularly downgradient of the infiltration beds. After 4 years, concentrations and pools of carbon and nitrogen in groundwater were relatively constant with time and distance, but substantially elevated above background. The contaminant plume core remained anoxic for the entire 10-year study period; temporal patterns of integrated oxygen deficit decreased slowly at all sites. In 2004, substantial amounts of total dissolved carbon (7 mol C m-2) and fixed (dissolved plus sorbed) inorganic nitrogen (0.5 mol N m-2) were still present in a 28-m vertical interval at the disposal site. Sorbed constituents have contributed substantially to the dissolved carbon and nitrogen pools and are responsible for the long-term persistence of the contaminant plume. Natural aquifer restoration at the discharge location will take at least several decades, even though groundwater flow rates and the potential for contaminant flushing are relatively high.

  18. A series of tufted carbon fiber cathodes designed for different high power microwave sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lie; Li, Limin; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Wen, Jianchun; Liu, Yonggui

    2008-06-01

    We report the fabrication technique of tufted carbon fiber cathodes for different microwave sources. Three carbon fiber cathodes were constructed, including a planar cathode, an annular cathode, and a cylindrical cathode for radial emission. Experimental investigations on these cathodes were performed in a reflex triode virtual cathode oscillator (vircator), a backward wave oscillator (BWO), and a magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO), respectively. The pulse duration of microwave emission from the reflex triode vircator was lengthened by using the planar carbon fiber cathode. In the BWO with the annular carbon fiber cathode, the uniform electron beam with a kA /cm2 current density was observed. In addition, carbon fiber has great promise as field emitter for MILOs. These results show that the carbon fiber cathodes can be utilized for electron emission in high power diodes with different structures.

  19. Interrelated modules in cyanobacterial photosynthesis: the carbon-concentrating mechanism, photorespiration, and light perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Beronda L; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2016-05-01

    Here we consider the cyanobacterial carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) and photorespiration in the context of the regulation of light harvesting, using a conceptual framework borrowed from engineering: modularity. Broadly speaking, biological 'modules' are semi-autonomous functional units such as protein domains, operons, metabolic pathways, and (sub)cellular compartments. They are increasingly recognized as units of both evolution and engineering. Modules may be connected by metabolites, such as NADPH, ATP, and 2PG. While the Calvin-Benson-Bassham Cycle and photorespiratory salvage pathways can be considered as metabolic modules, the carboxysome, the core of the cyanobacterial CCM, is both a structural and a metabolic module. In photosynthetic organisms, which use light cues to adapt to the external environment and which tune the photosystems to provide the ATP and reducing power for carbon fixation, light-regulated modules are critical. The primary enzyme of carbon fixation, RuBisCO, uses CO2 as a substrate, which is accumulated via the CCM. However RuBisCO also has a secondary reaction in which it utilizes O2, a by-product of the photochemical modules, which leads to photorespiration. A complete understanding of the interplay among CCM and photorespiration is predicated on uncovering their connections to the light reactions and the regulatory factors and pathways that tune these modules to external cues. We probe this connection by investigating light inputs into the CCM and photorespiratory pathways in the chromatically acclimating cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon. PMID:27117337

  20. Heavy Metal Concentration in Drinking Water Sources Affected by Dredge Mine Operations of a Gold Mining Company in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Apori Ntiforo; Maxwell Anim-Gyampo; Frank K. Nyame

    2012-01-01

    The study assesses concentration of certain heavy metals in water sources affected by the operations of defunct dredged gold mine operations more than a decade to evaluate its quality as a source of drinking water. The concentration of heavy metals were determined from nine (9) surface water sampling points and three (3) boreholes in the Awusu-River basin in comparison with their maximum contaminant levels to assess their suitability as drinking water sources. Results obtained from the analys...

  1. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng, Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5×10)...

  2. Source and age of carbon in peatland surface waters: new insights from 14C analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billett, Michael; Garnett, Mark; Dinsmore, Kerry; Leith, Fraser

    2013-04-01

    Peatlands are a significant source of carbon to the aquatic environment which is increasingly being recognised as an important flux pathway (both lateral and vertical) in total landscape carbon budgets. Determining the source and age of the carbon (in its various forms) is a key step to understanding the stability of peatland systems as well as the connectivity between the soil carbon pool and the freshwater environment. Novel analytical and sampling methods using molecular sieves have been developed for (1) within-stream, in situ sampling of CO2 in the field and (2) for the removal/separation of CO2 in the laboratory prior to 14C analysis of CH4. Here we present dual isotope (δ13C and 14C) data from freshwater systems in UK and Finnish peatlands to show that significant differences exist in the source and age of CO2, DOC (dissolved organic carbon) and POC (particulate organic carbon). Individual peatlands clearly differ in terms of their isotopic freshwater signature, suggesting that carbon cycling may be "tighter" in some systems compared to others. We have also measured the isotopic signature of different C species in peatland pipes, which appear to be able to tap carbon from different peat depths. This suggests that carbon cycling and transport within "piped-peatlands" may be more complex than previously thought. Some of our most recent work has focussed on the development of a method to measure the 14C component of CH4 in freshwaters. Initial results suggest that CH4 in peatland streams is significantly older than CO2 and derived from a much deeper source. We have also shown that the age (but not the source) of dissolved CO2 changes over the hydrological year in response to seasonal changes in discharge and temperature. Radiocarbon measurements in the peat-riparian-stream system suggest that a significant degree of connectivity exists in terms of C transport and cycling, although the degree of connectivity differs for individual C species. In summary, 14C

  3. Estimation of the upper limit of carbon concentration in boron carbide crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalikhin, S. V.; Ponomarev, V. I.

    2010-08-01

    The existence of a boron carbide phase with ˜25 at % carbon was proven experimentally. To evaluate the maximum possible concentration of C atoms in boron carbide (B12 - x C x )(BC2) crystals, we performed quantum-chemical calculations of (B12 - x C x )(BH2)6(CH3)6 model compounds ( x = 0-4; the goal of calculations was to determine the upper limiting number of C atoms in the B12 - x C x icosahedron) by the density functional theory method (B3LYP, 6-31G** basis set, full geometry optimization). A comparison of the experimental and calculated data showed that the calculations of the model compounds reproduced the experimental dependences of the structural parameters of the icosahedron (mean bond length and volume) on the number of C atoms in it. The icosahedra were found to be stable at x ≤ 3. According to the results of the quantum-chemical calculations, the maximum carbon concentration in boron carbide was 33 at %, which corresponded to the composition B10C5 and the structural formula (B9C3)(BC2).

  4. Effect of temperature and concentration on thermal conductivity and viscosity of ferrofluid loaded with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavar, A.; Saghafian, M.; Salimpour, M. R.; Shafii, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the thermal conductivity and viscosity of a hybrid nanofluid containing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles and gum arabic (GA) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs), experimentally. The magnetic nanoparticles and CNTs are physically attached as the result of interaction between the TMAH and GA molecules. The morphology and structure of the samples are characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experiments are carried out in the magnetic nanoparticles volume concentration range of 0.1-0.9 %, CNT volume concentration range of 0.05-1.35 % and the temperature range of 25-55 °C. The viscosity of the hybrid nanofluid increases with the increase of volume concentration, while it decreases with the increase of temperature. Besides, results show that hybrid nanofluid behaves as a shear thinning fluid. Furthermore, it is observed that the thermal conductivity of the hybrid nanofluid enhances with temperature and volume concentration.

  5. Method for the determination of concentration and stable carbon isotope ratios of atmospheric phenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saccon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A method for the determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrophenols in the gas and particulate phases is presented. It has been proposed to use the combination of concentration and isotope ratio measurements of precursor and product to test the applicability of results of laboratory studies to the atmosphere. Nitrophenols are suspected to be secondary products formed specifically from the photooxidation of volatile organic compounds. XAD-4™ resin was used as an adsorbent on quartz filters to sample ambient phenols using conventional high-volume air samplers at York University in Toronto, Canada. Filters were extracted in acetonitrile, with a HPLC clean-up step and a solid phase extraction step prior to derivatization with BSTFA. Concentration measurements were done with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry was used for isotope ratio analysis. The technique presented allows for atmospheric compound-specific isotopic composition measurements for five semi-volatile phenols with an estimated accuracy of 0.3‰ to 0.5‰ at atmospheric concentrations exceeding 0.1 ng m−3 while the detection limits for concentration measurements are in the pg m−3 range. Isotopic fractionation throughout the entire extraction procedure and analysis was proven to be below the precision of the isotope ratio measurements. The method was tested by conducting ambient measurements from September to December 2011.

  6. Carbon Dioxide Concentrations and Temperatures within Tour Buses under Real-Time Traffic Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Fu Chiu

    Full Text Available This study monitored the carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations and temperatures of three 43-seat tour buses with high-passenger capacities in a course of a three-day, two-night school excursion. Results showed that both driver zones and passenger zones of the tour buses achieved maximum CO2 concentrations of more than 3000 ppm, and maximum daily average concentrations of 2510.6 and 2646.9 ppm, respectively. The findings confirmed that the CO2 concentrations detected in the tour buses exceeded the indoor air quality standard of Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (8 hr-CO2: 1000 ppm and the air quality guideline of Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department (1 hr-CO2: 2500 ppm for Level 1 for buses. Observations also showed that high-capacity tour bus cabins with air conditioning system operating in recirculation mode are severely lacking in air exchange rate, which may negatively impact transportation safety. Moreover, the passenger zones were able to maintain a temperature of between 20 and 25°C during travel, which effectively suppresses the dispersion of volatile organic compounds. Finally, the authors suggest that in the journey, increasing the ventilation frequency of tour bus cabin, which is very beneficial to maintain the travel safety and enhance the quality of travel.

  7. Properties of a biosurfactant produced by Bacillus pumilus using vinasse and waste frying oil as alternative carbon sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Guerra de Oliveira

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants are chemical molecules produced by the microorganisms with potential for application in various industrial and environmental sectors. The production parameters and the physicochemical properties of a biosurfactant synthesized by Bacillus pumilus using different concentrations of vinasse and waste frying oil as alternative carbon sources were analyzed. The microorganism was able to grow and produce a biosurfactant using both the residues. The surface tension was reduced up to 45 mN/m and the maximum production of crude biosurfactant was 27.7 and 5.7 g/l for vinasse and waste frying oil, respectively, in concentration of 5%. The critical micelle concentration (CMC results of 1.5 and 0.2 g/l showed the efficiency of the biosurfactant produced on both the substrates. The results showed that the alternative substrates could be used for the production of an efficient biosurfactant by B. pumilus. These properties have potential for industrial and environmental applications.

  8. Feasibility study of nitrogen removal with the mecellulose wasted liquor as an external carbon source in the two-stage denitrification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C H; Chung, C W; Lee, Y J; Han, G B

    2005-06-01

    The utilization of mecellulose wasted liquor (MWL) as an external carbon source was investigated to find an alternative for methanol in the two-stage denitrification pilot process. The pilot plant was supplied with the raw water from the J-Municipal Sewage Treatment Plant (J-MSTP) in Korea. The raw water of J-Municipal Sewage Treatment Plant contains low and high concentration of biodegradable organics and nitrogen source, respectively, due to the inflow of industrial wastewater and landfill leachate. Methanol was fed to provide external carbon source for high concentration of nitrogen source removal by denitrification in this J-Municipal Sewage Treatment Plant, and thus this study was performed to test effects to the effluent quality and efficiencies of nitrogen source removal with an alternative carbon source for the cost reduction. The 6.5mg 1(-1) and 5.7mg l(-1) of total nitrogen (TN) concentration in the effluent were achieved with mecellulose and methanol, whereas mecellulose and methanol were fed to give the same ratio of gCODgNO,-N(-1), respectively. The 60% of COD in mecellulose wasted liquor was used as a carbon source for denitrification and the stable denitrification rate was earned when one half of the required total carbon source for denitrification was fed to pre-anoxic tank in the pilot plant. The required gCODgNO,-N(-1) ratio with mecellulose wasted liquor was 1.4 times higher than with methanol. Mecellulose wasted liquor is feasible to be used as external carbon source for organic loading, nitrogen and phosphorus removal. If mecellulose wasted liquor is considered as an alternative external carbon source to substitute methanol 26-28m3 mecellulose wasted liquor per 1 m3 methanol will be required. However, to meet with the effluent standard (10 mg BOD l(-1)) for J-Municipal Sewage Treatment Plant, the feed concentration of mecellulose wasted liquor should be recommended to be lower than 200 mgl(-1). PMID:16035652

  9. The potential of non-carbon energy sources in developing countries - The case of the PRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While developing countries presently account for a small share of the world's carbon emissions, in coming years, the quantity of energy-related CO2 generated by developing nations will surpass the amount produced by industrialized countries. In response to this trend, an increasing amount o attention has been paid to the prospect of reducing emissions in developing countries by exploiting non-carbon energy resources. To date, however, financial constraints have limited the development of non-carbon alternatives; the costs of these sources typically loom far above the costs of conventional forms of energy. Due to its heavy reliance on coal energy, China makes a disproportionately high contribution to global CO2. In 1990, China's energy-related activities consumed 8% of the world's commercial energy, but accounted for 11% of global carbon emissions. While financial constraints will continue to hinder the exploration of non-carbon alternatives, increasing the roles of hydropower, nuclear energy, solar radiation and wind energy could play a major role in curtailing the growth of carbon emissions in the PRC. This paper evaluates the potential for integrating various non-carbon energy sources in China and provides possible strategies for deploying these sources

  10. Evaluation criteria for gas source rocks of marine carbonate in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhaoyun; ZHAO Wenzhi; WANG Yunpeng

    2005-01-01

    Hydrocarbon generating and expulsion simulation experiments are carried out using samples artifically matched between the acid-dissolved residue of relatively low-maturity limestone and the original sample. This work makes up for the insufficiency of source rock samples with high abundance of organic matters and low maturity in China. The organic carbon content of the 10 prepared samples varies between 0.15 % and 0.74 %. Pyrolysis data and simulation experiment results of hydrocarbon generating and expulsion, which were obtained by a high-temperature and high-pressure open system, indicate that the lower limit of organic carbon content for marine carbonate rock to generate and expel hydrocarbons is 0.23 %-0.31%. In combination with the numerical analysis of organic carbon in marine carbonate rocks from Tarim Basin, Sichuan Basin, Ordos Basin and North China, as well as the contribution of these gas source rocks to the discovered gas pools, we think that the organic carbon criterion for carbonate gas source rocks should be 0.3%.

  11. Introducing an algal carbon-concentrating mechanism into higher plants: location and incorporation of key components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Nicky; Feike, Doreen; Mackinder, Luke C M; Meyer, Moritz T; Griffiths, Howard; Jonikas, Martin C; Smith, Alison M; McCormick, Alistair J

    2016-05-01

    Many eukaryotic green algae possess biophysical carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) that enhance photosynthetic efficiency and thus permit high growth rates at low CO2 concentrations. They are thus an attractive option for improving productivity in higher plants. In this study, the intracellular locations of ten CCM components in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were confirmed. When expressed in tobacco, all of these components except chloroplastic carbonic anhydrases CAH3 and CAH6 had the same intracellular locations as in Chlamydomonas. CAH6 could be directed to the chloroplast by fusion to an Arabidopsis chloroplast transit peptide. Similarly, the putative inorganic carbon (Ci) transporter LCI1 was directed to the chloroplast from its native location on the plasma membrane. CCP1 and CCP2 proteins, putative Ci transporters previously reported to be in the chloroplast envelope, localized to mitochondria in both Chlamydomonas and tobacco, suggesting that the algal CCM model requires expansion to include a role for mitochondria. For the Ci transporters LCIA and HLA3, membrane location and Ci transport capacity were confirmed by heterologous expression and H(14) CO3 (-) uptake assays in Xenopus oocytes. Both were expressed in Arabidopsis resulting in growth comparable with that of wild-type plants. We conclude that CCM components from Chlamydomonas can be expressed both transiently (in tobacco) and stably (in Arabidopsis) and retargeted to appropriate locations in higher plant cells. As expression of individual Ci transporters did not enhance Arabidopsis growth, stacking of further CCM components will probably be required to achieve a significant increase in photosynthetic efficiency in this species. PMID:26538195

  12. Organic carbon source and burial during the past one hundred years in Jiaozhou Bay, North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuegang; YUAN Huamao; LI Ning; SONG Jinming

    2008-01-01

    Organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), and 210Pb in core sediment were measured to quantify the burial of organic carbon and the relative importance of allochthonous and autochthonous contributions during the past one hundred years in Jiaozhou Bay, North China. The core sediment was dated using 210Pb chronology, which is the most promising method for estimation of sedimentation rate on a time scale of 100-150 years. The variation of the burial flux of organic carbon in the past one hundred years can be divided into the following three stages: (1) relatively steady before 1980s; (2) increasing rapidly from the 1980s to a peak in the 1990s, and (3) decreasing from the 1990s to the present. The change is consistent with the amount of solid waste and sewage emptied into the bay. The OC:TN ratio was used to evaluate the source of organic carbon in the Jiaozhou Bay sediment. In the inner bay and bay mouth, the organic carbon was the main contributor from terrestrial sources, whereas only about half of organic carbon was contributed from terrestrial source in the outer bay. In the inner bay, the terrestrial source of organic carbon showed a steady change with an increase in the range of 69%-77% before 1990 to 93% in 2000, and then decreased from 2000 because of the decrease in the terrestrial input. In the bay mouth, the percentage of organic carbon from land reached the highest value with 94% in 1994. In the outer bay, the sediment source maintained steady for the past one hundred years.

  13. Evaluation of phosphorus source coefficients as predictors of runoff phosphorus concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matt C; White, John W; Coale, Frank J

    2009-01-01

    Many states have adopted a P site index (PSI) as a risk assessment tool to determine when P-based nutrient management is required for a given agricultural field. Some PSIs use a weighting factor, the phosphorus source coefficient (PSC), to account for differences in P solubility between organic P sources. Information relating to appropriate values of PSC for various organic P sources is limited. The objectives of this study were to determine PSCs for organic P sources and to examine the relationship between PSCs and P concentrations measured in simulated rainfall runoff. An incubation study was used to calculate PSCs based on the extractability of P from organic P sources (separated and unseparated liquid dairy manure, digested dairy manure, dairy manure solids, poultry litter, and compost) relative to P from triple superphosphate fertilizer. The PSCs from the 14-d incubations were the best predictors of runoff P after 14 d soil equilibration in the runoff boxes. The values for iron-oxide strip phosphorus (FeO-P) PSC ranged from 78% for compost to 28% for poultry litter and were significantly related to runoff DR-P (r(2) = 0.80***) and FeO-P (r(2) = 0.76***) during the 14-d runoff event. Mehlich 3 PSCs ranged from 59% for compost to 30% for unseparated dairy manure and were better predictors of DR-P and FeO-P during the 56-d event (r(2) = 0.73*** and 0.65***, respectively). The results of this study indicate that PSCs based on soil incubations may improve the ability of PSCs to predict the risk of runoff transport, particularly after manure incorporation. PMID:19202029

  14. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ(199)Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ(15)N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ(13)C and Δ(199)Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:27151563

  15. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ199Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ15N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ13C and Δ199Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions.

  16. Linking mercury, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotopes in Tibetan biota: Implications for using mercury stable isotopes as source tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan Plateau is located at a mountain region isolated from direct anthropogenic sources. Mercury concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and mercury were analyzed in sediment and biota for Nam Co and Yamdrok Lake. Biotic mercury concentrations and high food web magnification factors suggested that Tibetan Plateau is no longer a pristine site. The primary source of methylmercury was microbial production in local sediment despite the lack of direct methylmercury input. Strong ultraviolet intensity led to extensive photochemical reactions and up to 65% of methylmercury in water was photo-demethylated before entering the food webs. Biota displayed very high Δ199Hg signatures, with some highest value (8.6%) ever in living organisms. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg in sediment and biotic samples increased with trophic positions (δ15N) and %methylmercury. Fish total length closely correlated to δ13C and Δ199Hg values due to dissimilar carbon sources and methylmercury pools in different living waters. This is the first mercury isotope study on high altitude lake ecosystems that demonstrated specific isotope fractionations of mercury under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:27151563

  17. Concentrations and sources of an emerging pollutant,decabromodiphenylethane(DBDPE), in sewage sludge for land application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De la Torre A; Concejero M A; Martínez M A

    2012-01-01

    The presence of an emerging brominated flame retardant,decabromodiphenylethane(DBDPE),has been confirmed in Spanish sewage sludge.Thirty one samples from different urban wastewater treatment plants(WWTPs)were analyzed for this brominated flame retardant.DBDPE was positively identified and quantified in all samples at lower concentrations(47.0 ± 29.7 ng/g dry weight(dw);mean ± SD)than those obtained for decabromodiphenyl ether(BDE-209)(290 ± 236 ng/g dw; mean ± SD)in a previous study.Influence of the WWTP characteristics in the pollutant levels was evaluated.No significant correlations were obtained between DBDPE concentrations and the population or sewage sludge production rate associated with the plants,neither wastewater treatment method.Sources of DBDPE in the sludge were also evaluated.Data indicate a common origin for DBDPE and BDE-209,which may be related to leaching processes during the use and disposal of consumer products containing these chemicals.Nevertheless,DBDPE contents are not influenced by industrial activities,which suggests that the infusion of DBDPE commercial mixture is not a source of this chemical into the environment,and indicates that the use of DBDPE in the Spanish industry is still low compared to deca-BDE.

  18. Physiological responses of Pinus sylvestris to changing carbon dioxide and ozone concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holopainen, T. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science; Palomaeki, V. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Faculty of Forestry; Helmisaari, H.S. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this research is to study the effects of elevated ozone, carbon dioxide and their combination on ultrastructural, physiological and biochemical responses of Scots pine needles and how these effects are reflected to photosynthesis, carbohydrate and nutrient allocation and finally to shoot and root growth of trees. In addition the interactions of the studied trees and mycorrhizal fungi as well as insect herbivores are studied. The exposures have been running only for two growing periods and it seems necessary to continue the experiment over the third growing season in 1996. Since the analyses are partially incomplete, only preliminary conclusions are possible at the moment. The slightly increased shoot growth and needle width and increased amount of starch in chloroplasts point to the slight stimulating effect of elevated CO{sub 2} among the chamber treatments. Altogether the growth of the seedlings was best in the chamberless treatment indicating a negative chamber effect. The elevated ozone significantly increased the chlorotic mottling and overall yellowing of second year needles as well as caused increased density of chloroplast stroma and declined photosynthesis, all these responses being often related to ozone exposures. The ozone related responses appeared at both CO{sub 2} levels indicating no clear protection due to elevated CO{sub 2}. The ozone or carbon dioxide treatments were not able to significantly change nutrient concentrations, insect herbivory or carbon allocation among the secondary compounds of needles. A tendency of increased carbon allocation to fine roots due to ozone but not so clearly to CO{sub 2} was observed

  19. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  20. Helicopter survey of methane and carbon dioxide sources on the Laptev Sea shelf near the Lena River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyuk, A.; Semiletov, I.; Nesterov, V.; Shakhova, N.

    2009-04-01

    Carbon dioxide and methane have recently been recognized not only as key sources but also as great tracers of global climate change. The release of CH4 and CO2 from geological and biological sources on the Laptev Sea shelf was investigated during a flight on the helicopter Mi-8 20 September 2006 organized by POI FEB RAS. Gas concentrations were measured on the height of about 100 m over sea surface on the route more than 1200 km long and area over 40 000 km2 using Fast CH4 analyzer LosGatos DLT-100 and CO2 and H2O analyzer Li-8100 (LiCor). Vertical structure of atmosphere were investigated in 5 points with different air-sea interaction environment with maximal height up to 2 000 m in northernmost point. Our data reveal that Arctic air-sea exchange processes have a substantial impact on overlying atmospheric CH4 and CO2 composition. Enhanced concentrations of CH4 were measured along the entire helicopter route (>1.85 ppm Latitudinal mean average), reaching up to 1.97 ppm (6.5% increase) in particular areas. Some anomalies in air CH4 were spatially correlated with anomalies in distribution of dissolved CH4 in water which could be associated with fault zones and Lena River discharge. Vertical profiles of methane and carbon dioxide exhibit a significant increase near the sea surface, what prove later as a source of CH4 and CO2 into the atmosphere. Possibly massive escape both of these gases may be related additionally with already intensified autumn ocean convection. Offshore helicopter survey near the Lena River Delta show that the Laptev Sea surface is a strong source of carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. Aircraft survey may be used for mapping of the methane anomalies on the shelf.

  1. Sugarcane Juice as an Alternative Carbon Source for in vitro Culture of Plantains and Bananas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Addae

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The suitability of sugarcane juice for the in vitro culture of bananas and plantains was investigated in this study. Two concentrations of sugar cane juice 5, 10% and 30 g L-1 laboratory sucrose were used. There was also a control medium without carbon source. Explants were prepared from field grown sword suckers. The preparation of the explants involved, sterilization with 70% ethanol, followed by 1% Sodium hypochlorite+1% tween 20. The explants were cultured at 26°C, under 16 h photoperiod, light intensity of 3000 lux and a relative humidity of 60%. Plants that were cultured on 5% sugarcane juice had higher average fresh weight values of 16.6 g per plant compared to those that were cultured on the 30 g L-1 sucrose and 10% sugarcane juice which had fresh weight of 15.6 g per plant and 11.0 g per plant, respectively. Oniba had higher fresh weight on medium supplemented with 5% sugarcane juice compared to the two other cultivars. In terms of dry weight, ‘Oniaba’ again had the highest value of 7.2 g per plant which was obtained on medium supplemented with 5% sugarcane juice. Plants that were cultured on 5% sugarcane juice were better in terms of shoot height and number of shoots per plant than those cultured on 30 g L-1 sucrose and the differences between the 5% sugarcane juice and the other treatments were statistically different. The various carbon sources and their concentrations also affected the water potential of the media. Medium supplemented with 10% sugarcane juice had the lowest water potential of -0.8 MPa compared to the control medium that had a water potential of -0.1 MPa. Medium supplemented with 5% sugarcane juice and 30 g L-1 sucrose had in a medium water potential of -0.3 MPa. Five percent sugarcane juice was found to be a better substitute for laboratory grade sucrose for the in vitro propagation of Musa sp.

  2. Determining sources of dissolved organic carbon and disinfection byproduct precursors to the McKenzie River, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, T.E.C.; Anderson, C.A.; Morgenstern, K.; Downing, B.D.; Pellerin, B.A.; Bergamaschi, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the main sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors to the McKenzie River, Oregon (USA). Water samples collected from the mainstem, tributaries, and reservoir outflows were analyzed for DOC concentration and DBP formation potentials (trihalomethanes [THMFPs] and haloacetic acids [HAAFPs]). In addition, optical properties (absorbance and fluorescence) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were measured to provide insight into DOM composition and assess whether optical properties are useful proxies for DOC and DBP precursor concentrations. Optical properties indicative of composition suggest that DOM in the McKenzie River mainstem was primarily allochthonous - derived from soils and plant material in the upstream watershed. Downstream tributaries had higher DOC concentrations than mainstem sites (1.6 ?? 0.4 vs. 0.7 ?? 0.3 mg L-1) but comprised <5% of mainstem flows and had minimal effect on overall DBP precursor loads. Water exiting two large upstream reservoirs also had higher DOC concentrations than the mainstem site upstream of the reservoirs, but optical data did not support in situ algal production as a source of the added DOC during the study. Results suggest that the first major rain event in the fall contributes DOM with high DBP precursor content. Although there was interference in the absorbance spectra in downstream tributary samples, fluorescence data were strongly correlated to DOC concentration (R 2 = 0.98), THMFP (R2 = 0.98), and HAAFP (R2 = 0.96). These results highlight the value of using optical measurements for identifying the concentration and sources of DBP precursors in watersheds, which will help drinking water utilities improve source water monitoring and management programs. Copyright ?? 2010 by the American Society of Agronomy.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Direct Cycle Modular Reactors for Decentralized Energy Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide is achievable higher cycle efficiency than helium in a direct gas turbine cycle system due to the real gas effect or inter molecular attraction force in the compression process especially in the vicinity of the critical points. Analyzing the cycle thermal performance of full, partial and non condensation cycles, the cycle efficiency is highest in the partial condensation cycle. A fast reactor employing the partial condensation cycle is expected to be a potential alternative option to LMFRs, allowing higher cycle efficiency than LMFRs at the same core outlet temperature, and excluding the problems related to safety, cost and maintenance. A thermal reactor employing the partial condensation cycle provides higher cycle efficiency (48%) at the moderate core outlet temperature of 650? than that of PBMR (46%) operated at 900? (author)

  4. Sugarcane Juice as an Alternative Carbon Source for in vitro Culture of Plantains and Bananas

    OpenAIRE

    G. Addae; J.W. Tachie-Menson; J.N. Buah; Asare, P.

    2011-01-01

    The suitability of sugarcane juice for the in vitro culture of bananas and plantains was investigated in this study. Two concentrations of sugar cane juice 5, 10% and 30 g L-1 laboratory sucrose were used. There was also a control medium without carbon source. Explants were prepared from field grown sword suckers. The preparation of the explants involved, sterilization with 70% ethanol, followed by 1% Sodium hypochlorite+1% tween 20. The explants were cultured at 26°C, under 16 h photoperiod,...

  5. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Katagiri, K.; Noda, K.; Ponkin, D. O.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Salnikov, V. V.; Shutov, V. B.

    2015-08-01

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 1010 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5 × 109 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 1011 C6+ ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the 11C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C4+ ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of 11C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated 11C4+ beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the 11C4+ beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons.

  6. Carbon isotopes and iodine concentrations in a Mississippi River delta core recording land use, sediment transport, and dam building in the river's drainage basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santschi, Peter H; Oktay, Sarah D; Cifuentes, Luis

    2007-04-01

    Sedimentary material from coastal and nearshore areas in the Mississippi Delta region are comprised of different organic carbon sources with diverse ages that require isotopic and elemental records for resolving the various sources of plant residues. Carbon isotopic ((13)C, (14)C) values were used to differentiate contributions from plants using the C3, C4, and/or CAM (crassulacean acid metabolism) carbon fixation pathways., and iodine concentrations indicated that wetland plant residues are a significant source of organic carbon in a sediment core from the Mississippi River delta region collected at a 60 m water depth. This sediment core had been extensively described in Oktay et al. [Oktay, S.D., Santschi, P.H., Moran, J.E., Sharma, P., 2000. The (129)Iodine Bomb Pulse Recorded in Mississippi River delta Sediments: Results from Isotopes of I, Pu, Cs, Pb, and C. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64 (6), 989-996.] and significantly, includes unique features that had not previously been seen in the marine environment. These special features include a plutonium isotopic close-in fallout record that indicates a purely terrestrial source for these sediment particles and the elements associated with it, and a distinct iodine isotopic peak (as well as peaks for plutonium and cesium isotopes) that indicate little bioturbation in this core. Our carbon isotopic and iodine data can thus be compared to published records of changes in drainage basin land use, river hydrology, and hydrodynamic sorting of suspended particles to elucidate if these changes are reflected in nearshore sediments. This comparison suggests a significant contribution for organic carbon (OC) from C4 plants to these sediments during the 1950's to early 1960's. Relative older carbon isotopes, and episodically high iodine concentrations (up to 34 ppm) were observed during this time period that (1) indicate sediment deposition that is coincident with the times of major hydrological changes induced from dam and levee

  7. [Carbon emissions and low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Feng-ming; Liang, Wen-juan; Niu, Ming-fen; Wang, Jiao-yue

    2016-02-01

    Carbon emissions due to land use change have an important impact on global climate change. Adjustment of regional land use patterns has a great scientific significance to adaptation to a changing climate. Based on carbon emission/absorption parameters suitable for Liaoning Province, this paper estimated the carbon emission of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province. The results showed that the carbon emission and absorption were separately 308.51 Tg C and 11.64 Tg C from 1997 to 2010. It meant 3.8% of carbon emission. was offset by carbon absorption. Among the 296.87 Tg C net carbon emission of land use change, carbon emission of remaining land use type was 182.24 Tg C, accounting for 61.4% of the net carbon emission, while the carbon emission of land use transformation was 114.63 Tg C, occupying the rest 38.6% of net carbon emission. Through quantifying the mapping relationship between land use change and carbon emission, it was shown that during 1997-2004 the contributions of remaining construction land (40.9%) and cropland transform ation to construction land (40.6%) to carbon emission were larger, but the greater contributions to carbon absorption came from cropland transformation to forest land (38.6%) and remaining forest land (37.5%). During 2004-2010, the land use types for carbon emission and absorption were the same to the period of 1997-2004, but the contribution of remaining construction land to carbon emission increased to 80.6%, and the contribution of remaining forest land to carbon absorption increased to 71.7%. Based on the carbon emission intensity in different land use types, we put forward the low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use in two aspects. In carbon emission reduction, we should strict control land transformation to construction land, increase the energy efficiency of construction land, and avoid excessive development of forest land and water. In carbon sink increase, we should

  8. Effect of emissions uncertainty and variability on high-resolution concentrations of carbon monoxide, fine particle black carbon, and nitrogen oxides in Fort Collins, Colorado: development of a Bayesian uncertainty modeling and evaluation framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, D. L.; Stuart, A. L.; Dagne, G.; Yu, H.

    2013-12-01

    Uncertainties in emissions estimates are known to be one of the primary sources of uncertainty in calculating concentrations and subsequent exposure estimates. Despite continued improvement in the accuracy of emissions downscaling, the quantification of uncertainties is necessary in order to generate a representative emissions product. Bayesian data assimilation is a promising approach to uncertainty estimation when used to calibrate model results with measurement data. This study discusses an emissions inventory and concentration estimates for carbon monoxide (CO), fine particle (PM2.5) black carbon, and nitrogen oxides (NOx) for the city of Fort Collins, Colorado. The development of a Bayesian framework for updating estimates of emissions and concentrations in multiple stages, using measurement data, is also presented. The emissions inventory was constructed using the 2008 National Emissions Inventory (NEI). The spatial and temporal allocation methods from the Emission Modeling Clearinghouse data set are used to downscale the NEI data from annual and county-level resolution for point, nonpoint, and nonroad sources. Onroad mobile source emissions were estimated by combining a bottom-up emissions calculation approach (using emission factors and activities) for large roadway links within Fort Collins with a top-down spatial allocation approach for other roadways. Vehicle activity data for road links were obtained from local 2009 travel demand model results and automatic traffic recorder (ATR) data. The CALPUFF Gaussian puff dispersion model was used to estimate air pollutant concentrations. Hourly, 1.33 km x 1.33 km MM5 meteorological data was used to capture temporal variability in transport. Distributions of concentrations are obtained for spatial locations and time spans using a Monte Carlo sampling approach. Data for ensemble members are sampled from distributions defined from the emissions inventory and meteorological data. Modeled concentrations of CO, PM2

  9. Microbial lipid production by oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus sp. in the batch cultures using corncob hydrolysate as carbon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To realize the feasibility of biodiesel production from high-lipid cell culture, microbial lipid production by the oleaginous yeasts was studied using glucose and sucrose as carbon source. Among the tested strains, Cryptococcus sp. SM5S05 accumulated the highest levels of intracellular lipids. The crude lipid contents of Cryptococcus sp. cultured in yeast malt agar reached 30% on a dry weight basis. The accumulation of lipids strongly depended on carbon/nitrogen ratio and nitrogen concentration. The highest content of lipids, measured at a carbon/nitrogen ratio of 60–90 and at a nitrogen concentration of 0.2%, was 60–57% lipids in the dry biomass. Batch cultures using corncob hydrolysate demonstrated that there was minimal inhibitory effect with a reducing sugar concentration of 60 g l−1 or higher. Batch cultures of Cryptococcus sp. SM5S05 in the corncob hydrolysate medium with 60 g l−1 glucose resulted in a dry biomass, lipid yields, and content of 12.6 g l−1, 7.6 g l−1, and 60.2%, respectively. The lipids contained mainly long-chain saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with 16 and 18 carbon atoms. The fatty acid profile of Cryptococcus oils was quite similar to that of conventional vegetable oil. The cost of lipid production could be further reduced with corncob hydrolysate being utilized as the raw material for the oleaginous yeast. The results showed that the microbial lipid from Cryptococcus sp. was a potential alternative resource for biodiesel production. - Highlights: • Microbial oil production from oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus sp. was studied. • Accumulation of lipid strongly depended on C/N ratio and nitrogen concentration. • Cultures in hydrolysate medium with 60 g/l glucose resulted in maximum lipid yields. • Maximal lipid content in the Cryptococcus sp. were 60.2% on dried weight basis

  10. Benzonphenone-type UV filters in urine of Chinese young adults: Concentration, source and exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzophenone (BP)-type UV filters are commonly used in our daily life. 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy benzophenone (BP-3), 4-hydroxy benzophenone (4-HBP), 2,4-dihydroxy benzophenone (BP-1), 2,2′,4,4′-tetrahydroxy benzophenone (BP-2) and 2,2′-dihydroxy-4-methoxy benzophenone (BP-8) were measured in urine samples from Chinese young adults. The results indicated that Chinese young adults were widely exposed to BP-3, BP-1, and 4-HBP, with the median concentrations of 0.55, 0.21, and 0.08 ng/mL, respectively. No significant difference was found between males and females, between urban and rural population. The correlations between urinary concentrations provided important indications for sources and metabolic pathways of target compounds. The estimated daily excretion doses of BP-3, 4-HBP, BP-1, BP-2 and BP-8 were 27.2, 2.24, 5.86, 0.76 and 0.30 ng/kg-bw/day, respectively. The ratio of exposure to excretion must be considered for the exposure assessment with chemicals based on urine measurement. This is the first nationwide study on BP-derivatives with young adults in China. - Highlights: • Five BP-derivatives in urine were analyzed for Chinese young adults over China. • No difference was found between males and females, between urban and rural groups. • Concentration correlation provide indications for sources and metabolic pathways. • Ratio of exposure to excretion must be considered for the exposure assessment. - Benzophenone (BP)-type UV filters were frequently detected in urine samples from Chinese young adults, indicating their wide applications in China

  11. An assessment on in-vehicle concentration of carbon monoxide for taxis in central business district of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi ollah Mansouri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Carbon monoxide is colorless and odorless gas. In high concentrations, CO is deadly poisonous and in low concentrations can cause fatigue, headache, dizziness and seizures. Carbon monoxide has a high affinity to combines hemoglobin which can decrease oxygen capacity in blood. To address this problem, human body begins to produce red blood cells, this can increases blood viscosity and thus increase diseases such as stroke and heart attack. About 60 percent of total emissions of carbon monoxide are associated automobile exhaust. In this study, concentration of carbon monoxide has been measured in the cabin space of taxis in high-traffic areas of Tehran.Materials and Methods: This study is carried out in spring and summer 2011. Concentrations of carbon monoxide in different types of taxi cabin space (Peugeot, Samand, Pride and Peykan were measured by carbon monoxide meter Q RAE 2 models in different conditions of motion: high speed (over 45 kilometers per hour, low speed (15-30 kilometers per hour and stop (0 kilometers per hour. Results: Results showed that concentration of carbon monoxide in old vehicles (above 10 years is more than three times compared to new vehicles and outdoor. In addition, according to the measured values, at low speeds, values of CO rapidly increased, so that in speeds of less than 15 km, values of CO go beyond standard values (9 ppm.Conclusion: Results show that the mean value of the measured concentration of carbon monoxide is higher than amounts recommended by WHO and EPA and local authorities such as Air Quality Control Organization of Tehran. Concentrations observed in this study are up to 40 more than results of a study by German researchers in summer 1995 and winter 1996.

  12. Mineral Carbonation Potential of CO2 from Natural and Industrial-based Alkalinity Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, J.; Kirchofer, A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral carbonation is a Carbon Capture and Storage (CSS) technology where gaseous CO2 is reacted with alkaline materials (such as silicate minerals and alkaline industrial wastes) and converted into stable and environmentally benign carbonate minerals (Metz et al., 2005). Here, we present a holistic, transparent life cycle assessment model of aqueous mineral carbonation built using a hybrid process model and economic input-output life cycle assessment approach. We compared the energy efficiency and the net CO2 storage potential of various mineral carbonation processes based on different feedstock material and process schemes on a consistent basis by determining the energy and material balance of each implementation (Kirchofer et al., 2011). In particular, we evaluated the net CO2 storage potential of aqueous mineral carbonation for serpentine, olivine, cement kiln dust, fly ash, and steel slag across a range of reaction conditions and process parameters. A preliminary systematic investigation of the tradeoffs inherent in mineral carbonation processes was conducted and guidelines for the optimization of the life-cycle energy efficiency are provided. The life-cycle assessment of aqueous mineral carbonation suggests that a variety of alkalinity sources and process configurations are capable of net CO2 reductions. The maximum carbonation efficiency, defined as mass percent of CO2 mitigated per CO2 input, was 83% for CKD at ambient temperature and pressure conditions. In order of decreasing efficiency, the maximum carbonation efficiencies for the other alkalinity sources investigated were: olivine, 66%; SS, 64%; FA, 36%; and serpentine, 13%. For natural alkalinity sources, availability is estimated based on U.S. production rates of a) lime (18 Mt/yr) or b) sand and gravel (760 Mt/yr) (USGS, 2011). The low estimate assumes the maximum sequestration efficiency of the alkalinity source obtained in the current work and the high estimate assumes a sequestration efficiency

  13. The impact of NRC guidance on concentration averaging on low level waste sealed source disposal - 11424

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitworth, Julia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stewart, Bill [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuthbertson, Abigail [DOE

    2011-01-20

    As part of its ongoing efforts to revise the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) current position on blending to be risk-informed and performance based and its current review of the low-level waste classification codified in 10 CFR 61.55, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has stated that it may review the 1995 'Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation' (BTP), which is still commonly used today. Such a review will have timely advantages, given the lack of commercial disposal availability within the United States for radioactive sealed sources that are in wide beneficial use across the country. The current application of the BTP guidance has resulted in an effective cap on commercial disposal for sources larger than 1.1 TBq (30 Ci). This paper will analyze how the BTP has been implemented with respect to sealed sources, what the implications have been for commercial disposal availability, and whether alternative packaging configurations could be considered for disposal.

  14. Effects of carbon dioxide concentration and nutrition on photosynthetic functions of white birch seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S. [Lakehead Univ., Thunder Bay, ON (Canada). Faculty of Forestry and the Forest Environment; Dang, Q.L. [Lakehead Univ., Thunder Bay, ON (Canada). Faculty of Forest and the Forest Environment; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Botany, Laboratory of Quantitative Vegetation Ecology

    2006-11-15

    Increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) can impact photosynthesis and dry mass production of plants. This study investigated the physiological responses of white birch seedlings to elevated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) at low and high supplies of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). A 2-way factorial experiment was carried out with birch seedlings grown for 4 months in environment-controlled greenhouses. Elevated CO{sub 2} enhanced maximal carboxylation rate and photosynthetically active radiation-saturated electron transport rates were measured after 2.5 and 3.5 months of treatment, as well as actual photochemical efficiency and photosynthetic linear electron transport to carboxylation. Net photosynthetic rate increases were observed as well as increases in photosynthetic water use efficiency (WUE); photosynthetic N efficiency and P efficiency. Stomatal conductance, transpiration rate and the fraction of total photosynthetic linear electron transport partitioned to oxygenation were reduced. Low nutrient availability decreased net photosynthetic rates, WUE, and triose phosphate utilization. However, photosynthetic linear electron transport and N use efficiency increased. There were significant interactive effects of CO{sub 2} and nutrition over time, with evidence of photosynthetic up-regulation in response to elevated CO{sub 2} in seedlings receiving high nutrition. Photosynthetic depression in response to low nutrient availability was attributed to biochemical limitation rather than stomatal limitation. Elevated CO{sub 2} reduced leaf N concentration in seedlings receiving low nutrition, but had no significant effect on leaf P or K concentrations. High nutrient availability generally increased area-based leaf N, P and K concentrations but had negligible effects on K after 2.5 months of treatment. Results suggested that increases in electron partitioning to photorespiration in response to low nutrient availability may be related to

  15. Effects of carbon dioxide concentration and nutrition on photosynthetic functions of white birch seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) can impact photosynthesis and dry mass production of plants. This study investigated the physiological responses of white birch seedlings to elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) at low and high supplies of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). A 2-way factorial experiment was carried out with birch seedlings grown for 4 months in environment-controlled greenhouses. Elevated CO2 enhanced maximal carboxylation rate and photosynthetically active radiation-saturated electron transport rates were measured after 2.5 and 3.5 months of treatment, as well as actual photochemical efficiency and photosynthetic linear electron transport to carboxylation. Net photosynthetic rate increases were observed as well as increases in photosynthetic water use efficiency (WUE); photosynthetic N efficiency and P efficiency. Stomatal conductance, transpiration rate and the fraction of total photosynthetic linear electron transport partitioned to oxygenation were reduced. Low nutrient availability decreased net photosynthetic rates, WUE, and triose phosphate utilization. However, photosynthetic linear electron transport and N use efficiency increased. There were significant interactive effects of CO2 and nutrition over time, with evidence of photosynthetic up-regulation in response to elevated CO2 in seedlings receiving high nutrition. Photosynthetic depression in response to low nutrient availability was attributed to biochemical limitation rather than stomatal limitation. Elevated CO2 reduced leaf N concentration in seedlings receiving low nutrition, but had no significant effect on leaf P or K concentrations. High nutrient availability generally increased area-based leaf N, P and K concentrations but had negligible effects on K after 2.5 months of treatment. Results suggested that increases in electron partitioning to photorespiration in response to low nutrient availability may be related to photoprotective mechanisms. Low carboxylation

  16. Concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic carbon in runoff from a forested catchment: insights from high frequency measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Strohmeier

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in runoff from catchments are often subject to substantial short-term variations. The aim of this study was to identify the compartmental sources of DOC in a forested catchment and the causes for short-term variations in runoff. Furthermore, we investigated the implication of short-term variations for the calculation of annual runoff fluxes. High frequency measurements (30 min intervals of DOC in runoff, of discharge and groundwater table were conducted for one year in the 4.2 km2 forested Lehstenbach catchment, Germany. Riparian wetland soils represent about 30% of the catchment area. The quality of DOC was investigated by three dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrices in samples taken from runoff, deep groundwater and shallow groundwater from the riparian wetland soils. The concentrations of DOC in runoff were highly variable at an hourly to daily time scale, ranging from 2.6 mg L−1 to 34 mg L−1 with an annual average of 9.2 mg L−1. The concentrations were positively related to discharge, with a counter clockwise hysteresis. Relations of DOC to discharge were steeper and the degree of hysteresis larger in the summer/fall than in the winter/spring period. Dynamics of groundwater table, discharge, DOC concentrations and DOC quality parameters indicated that DOC in runoff originated mainly from the riparian wetland soils, both under low and high flow conditions. The annual export of DOC from the catchment was 84 kg C ha−1 yr−1 when calculated from the high frequency measurements. If the annual export was calculated by simulated samplings of >2 days intervals substantial deviations resulted.

    Predicted changes in precipitation and discharge patterns as well as generally increasing temperatures likely will cause raising DOC exports from this catchment.

  17. Concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic carbon in runoff from a forested catchment: insights from high frequency measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeier, S.; Knorr, K.-H.; Reichert, M.; Frei, S.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Peiffer, S.; Matzner, E.

    2013-02-01

    Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in runoff from catchments are often subject to substantial short-term variations. The aim of this study was to identify the compartmental sources of DOC in a forested catchment and the causes for short-term variations in runoff. Furthermore, we investigated the implication of short-term variations for the calculation of annual runoff fluxes. High frequency measurements (30 min intervals) of DOC in runoff, of discharge and groundwater table were conducted for one year in the 4.2 km2 forested Lehstenbach catchment, Germany. Riparian wetland soils represent about 30% of the catchment area. The quality of DOC was investigated by three dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrices in samples taken from runoff, deep groundwater and shallow groundwater from the riparian wetland soils. The concentrations of DOC in runoff were highly variable at an hourly to daily time scale, ranging from 2.6 mg L-1 to 34 mg L-1 with an annual average of 9.2 mg L-1. The concentrations were positively related to discharge, with a counter clockwise hysteresis. Relations of DOC to discharge were steeper and the degree of hysteresis larger in the summer/fall than in the winter/spring period. Dynamics of groundwater table, discharge, DOC concentrations and DOC quality parameters indicated that DOC in runoff originated mainly from the riparian wetland soils, both under low and high flow conditions. The annual export of DOC from the catchment was 84 kg C ha-1 yr-1 when calculated from the high frequency measurements. If the annual export was calculated by simulated samplings of >2 days intervals substantial deviations resulted. Predicted changes in precipitation and discharge patterns as well as generally increasing temperatures likely will cause raising DOC exports from this catchment.

  18. Determination, source identification and GIS mapping for nitrate concentration in ground water from Bara aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was carried-out determine the level of nitrate concentration in well water from Bara aquifer in North Kordofan State. The analysis was conducted for 69 wells from different villages within Bara basin. Physical characteristics were measured including pH, electrical conductivity and dissolved oxygen. Spectrophotometric analysis was used to determine nitrate, nitrite and ammonia. Chloride and hardness were determined telemetrically and flame photometer was used for major elements namely sodium and potassium, whereas atomic absorption spectroscopy was used for trace elements namely iron, manganese, zinc and copper. Results revealed that nitrate concentration range from 9.68 to 891 mg/1 in sampled wells with 81% exceeding the maximum permissible limits set for drinking water by WHO and SSMO. Animal waste and organic soil nitrogen were found to be the sources of nitrate in these wells as indicated by 15N%. Majority of wells with high nitrate are located in the north and the north-east part of the study area as shown by GIS predictive map. On the average, the concentrations of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc and copper were found to be within WHO limits for drinking water. (Author)

  19. Measurements of 222Rn activity concentration in domestic water sources in Penang, northern peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, B G; Jaafar, M S; Azhar, A R; Akpa, T C

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of (222)Rn activity concentration were carried out in 39 samples collected from the domestic and drinking water sources used in the island and mainland of Penang, northern peninsular, Malaysia. The measured activity concentrations ranged from 7.49 to 26.25 Bq l(-1), 0.49 to 9.72 Bq l(-1) and 0.58 to 2.54 Bq l(-1) in the raw, treated and bottled water samples collected, respectively. This indicated relatively high radon concentrations compared with that from other parts of the world, which still falls below the WHO recommended treatment level of 100 Bq l(-1). From this data, the age-dependent associated committed effective doses due to the ingestion of (222)Rn as a consequence of direct consumption of drinking water were calculated. The committed effective doses from (222)Rn resulting from 1 y's consumption of these water were estimated to range from 0.003 to 0.048, 0.001 to 0.018 and 0.002 to 0.023 mSv y(-1), for age groups 0-1, 2-16 and >16 y, respectively. PMID:21642647

  20. Trace elements in particulate matter from metropolitan regions of Northern China: Sources, concentrations and size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuepeng; Tian, Shili; Li, Xingru; Sun, Ying; Li, Yi; Wentworth, Gregory R; Wang, Yuesi

    2015-12-15

    Public concerns over airborne trace elements (TEs) in metropolitan areas are increasing, but long-term and multi-site observations of size-resolved aerosol TEs in China are still lacking. Here, we identify highly elevated levels of atmospheric TEs in megacities and industrial sites in a Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei urban agglomeration relative to background areas, with the annual mean values of As, Pb, Ni, Cd and Mn exceeding the acceptable limits of the World Health Organization. Despite the spatial variability in concentrations, the size distribution pattern of each trace element was quite similar across the region. Crustal elements of Al and Fe were mainly found in coarse particles (2.1-9 μm), whereas the main fraction of toxic metals, such as Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd and Pb, was found in submicron particles (soil dust, fossil fuel combustion and industrial emissions, at different sites. In addition, higher elemental concentrations coincided with westerly flow, indicating that polluted soil and fugitive dust were major sources of TEs on the regional scale. However, the contribution of coal burning, iron industry/oil combustion and non-ferrous smelters to atmospheric metal pollution in Northern China should be given more attention. Considering that the concentrations of heavy metals associated with fine particles in the target region were significantly higher than those in other Asian sites, the implementations of strict environmental standards in China are required to reduce the amounts of these hazardous pollutants released into the atmosphere. PMID:26278373

  1. Modelling street level PM10 concentrations across Europe: source apportionment and possible futures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kiesewetter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing emission controls, particulate matter (PM has remained a critical issue for European air quality in recent years. The various sources of PM, both from primary particulate emissions as well as secondary formation from precursor gases, make this a complex problem to tackle. In order to allow for credible predictions of future concentrations under policy assumptions, a modelling approach is needed that considers all chemical processes and spatial dimensions involved, from long-range transport of pollution to local emissions in street canyons. Here we describe a modelling scheme which has been implemented in the GAINS integrated assessment model to assess compliance with PM10 (PM with aerodynamic diameter 10 across Europe. Furthermore, we analyse the predicted evolution of PM10 concentrations in the European Union until 2030 under different policy scenarios. Significant improvements in ambient PM10 concentrations are expected assuming successful implementation of already agreed legislation; however, these will not be large enough to ensure attainment of PM10 limit values in hot spot locations such as Southern Poland and major European cities. Remaining issues are largely eliminated in a scenario applying the best available emission control technologies to the maximal technically feasible extent.

  2. Comprehensive Study of Carbonaceous Species in Arctic Snow: from Snow Type to Carbon Sources and Sinks in the Snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, D.; Cozic, J.; Houdier, S.; Barret, M.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; King, M. D.; Beine, H. J.; Domine, F.

    2012-04-01

    Carbonaceous species play critical roles in the interaction of snow with the overlying atmosphere. Elemental or Black Carbon strongly increases solar energy uptake and snow melt, therefore influencing the snow-climate feedback loop. Carbonyls and complex organic molecules such as Humic Like Substances also absorb UV and visible light, therefore influencing photochemistry and light penetration depths in the snowpack. It has been proposed that some of those complex organic molecules, acting as electron donors in photochemical reactions might change the photolysis paths of nitric acid from NO / NO2 to HONO. Yet, comprehensive investigations of the organic matter in arctic snowpack are scarce, and often limited to a few specific species. Such a comprehensive representation of carbonaceous species in Arctic snow is the focus of the present work, lead during the OASIS field campaign in Barrow and focuses on major classes of carbonaceous species, defined operationally: Elemental Carbon (EC), which is close to BC; Water Insoluble Organic Carbon (WInOC); Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC), which altogether represent the Total Carbon Content (TCC) of the snowpack. Among DOC species, we will more particularly focus on HUmic LIke Substances (HULIS), C2 - C5 dicarboxylic acids and short chain aldehydes, as these compounds are most particularly involved in snow photochemistry, especially HULIS, whose optical properties (UV-Vis absorbance) are measured and discussed. In order to link observed concentrations to physico-chemical processes in the snow pack, we use snow type as a morphological marker of those processes and of the snowpack's history. Similarly, as the different classes of compounds measured are differently affected by the physical processes that lead the transformation of the snowpack, they can be used to probe into those processes. This strategy enables us to discuss in a common framework physical and chemical processes affecting carbonaceous species and the snowpack

  3. Carbon Sequestration through Sustainably Sourced Algal Fertilizer: Deep Ocean Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Drawing down carbon from the atmosphere happens in the oceans when marine plants are growing due to the use of carbon dioxide for biological processes and by raising the pH of the water. Macro- and microscopic marine photosynthesizers are limited in their growth by the availability of light and nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorous, iron, etc.) Deep ocean water (DOW), oceanic water from bellow about 1000m, is a natural medium for marine algae, which contains all (except in rare circumstances) necessary components for algal growth and represents over 90% of the volume of the ocean. The introduction of DOW to a tropical or summer sea can increase chlorophyll from near zero to 60 mg per M3 or more. The form of the utilization infrastructure for DOW can roughly be divided into two effective types; the unconstrained release and the open pond system. Unconstrained release has the advantage of having relatively low infrastructure investment and is available to any area of the ocean. The open pond system has high infrastructure costs but enables intensive use of DOW for harvesting macro- and microalgae and sustainable mariculture. It also enables greater concomitant production of DOW's other potential products such as electricity or potable water. However, unlike an unconstrained release the open pond system can capture much of the biomaterial from the water and limits the impact to the surrounding ecosystem. The Tidal Irrigation and Electrical System (TIESystem), is an open pond that is to be constructed on a continental shelf. It harnesses the tidal flux to pump DOW into the pond on the rising tide and then uses the falling tide to pump biologically rich material out of the pond. This biomaterial represents fixed CO2 and can be used for biofuel or fertilizers. The TIESystem benefits from an economy of scale that increases at a rate that is roughly equal to the relationship of the circumference of a circle (the barrier that creates the open pond) to the area of the pond

  4. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  5. Observation of vertical variability of black carbon concentration in lower troposphere on campaigns in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilinski, M. T.; Markowicz, K. M.; Markowicz, J.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents two methods for observation of black carbon (BC) vertical profiles in lower troposphere based on the micro-aethalometer AE-51. In the first method micro-aethalometer was carried by observer along trail on slope of mountain valley. Second method uses unmanned aerial vehicle as a platform for collecting data up to 1500 m above ground. Our study presents vertical profiles collected in and above Subcarphatian Wislok valley. Profiles measured on trial on slopes of Wislok valley, were collected during strong smog conditions during autumn/winter season, when BC concentration reached values above 60 μg/m3. The smog intensive layer is usually close to the surface (up to 100 m) as a results of surface inversion and the mountain breeze circulation, which during the night transports air pollution emitted from houses toward the valley's bottom. Usually the vertical profiles of BC concentration show significant reduction with the altitude, however, some multilayered structures are also observed during night time inversion conditions. It has found that smog condition can develop in clean air mass, and in those cases local pollution has significant impact on the columnar aerosol properties. During such conditions the aerosol optical depth shows diurnal cycle which is rather not observed in the long-term data. UAV flights in the lower troposphere were conducted during two sessions, one with clean polar air masses (BC concentration < 1 μg/m3) and second with moderate aerosol conditions (BC concentration 1-5 μg/m3). Profile of BC concentration shows stratification of absorbing aerosols in a shape of multi-layer structures similarly to the lidar/ceilometer signals.

  6. Sources and sinks of carbon in boreal ecosystems of interior Alaska: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Thomas A.; Jones, Miriam C.; Hiemstra, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Boreal regions store large quantities of carbon but are increasingly vulnerable to carbon loss due to disturbance and climate warming. The boreal region, underlain by discontinuous permafrost, presents a challenging landscape for itemizing current and potential carbon sources and sinks in the boreal soil and vegetation. The roles of fire, forest succession, and the presence (or absence) of permafrost on carbon cycle, vegetation, and hydrologic processes have been the focus of multidisciplinary research in this area for the past 20 years. However, projections of a warming future climate, an increase in fire severity and extent, and the potential degradation of permafrost could lead to major landscape process changes over the next 20 to 50 years. This provides a major challenge for predicting how the interplay between land management activities and impacts of climate warming will affect carbon sources and sinks in Interior Alaska. To assist land managers in adapting and managing for potential changes in the Interior Alaska carbon cycle we developed this review paper incorporating an overview of the climate, ecosystem processes, vegetation types, and soil regimes in Interior Alaska with a focus on ramifications for the carbon cycle. Our objective is to provide a synthesis of the most current carbon storage estimates and measurements to support policy and land management decisions on how to best manage carbon sources and sinks in Interior Alaska. To support this we have surveyed relevant peer reviewed estimates of carbon stocks in aboveground and belowground biomass for Interior Alaska boreal ecosystems. We have also summarized methane and carbon dioxide fluxes from the same ecosystems. These data have been converted into the same units to facilitate comparison across ecosystem compartments. We identify potential changes in the carbon cycle with climate change and human disturbance including how compounding disturbances can affect the boreal system. Finally, we provide

  7. Sources of uncertainties in modelling black carbon at the global scale

    OpenAIRE

    Vignati, E.; Karl, M; M. Krol; Wilson, J.(School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom); Stier, P; F. Cavalli

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the global black carbon (BC) cycle is essentially qualitative due to uncertainties in our knowledge of its properties. This work investigates two source of uncertainties in modelling black carbon: those due to the use of different schemes for BC ageing and its removal rate in the global Transport-Chemistry model TM5 and those due to the uncertainties in the definition and quantification of the observations, which propagate through to both the emission inventories, and the...

  8. Morphology and Electrochemical Properties of Thermal Modified Nanoporous Carbon as Electrode of Lithium Power Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Mandzyuk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper explored the effect of thermal modification on morphology of porous carbon material and specific energy parameters of lithium power sources formed on it bases. The structural and sorption properties of these materials – specific surface area, micropore surface, total pore volume, micropore volume, average pore diameter, are defined by low-temperature porometry method. The electro-stimulated diffusion coefficient of lithium ions into porous carbon material is calculated on the bases of galvanostatic intermittent titration.

  9. Carbon sources supporting a diverse fish community in a tropical coastal ecosystem (Gazi Bay, Kenya)

    OpenAIRE

    Nyunja, J.; Ntiba, M.; Onyari, J.; Mavuti, K.; K. Soetaert; BOUILLON, S

    2009-01-01

    Interlinked mangrove-seagrass ecosystems are characteristic features of many tropical coastal areas, where they act as feeding and nursery grounds for a variety of fishes and invertebrates. The autotrophic carbon sources supporting fisheries in Gazi bay (Kenya) were studied in three sites, two located in the tidal creeks flowing through extensive mangrove forests, another site located in the subtidal seagrass meadows, approximately 2.5 km away from the forest. Carbon and nitrogen stable isoto...

  10. Hydrogen concentration of co-deposited carbon films produced in the vicinity of local island divertor in Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is quite important to evaluate hydrogen concentration of co-deposited carbon film/dust to estimate in-vessel tritium inventory in ITER. The co-deposited carbon films were prepared at the wall of pumping duct in Local Island Divertor experiments of LHD. The hydrogen concentration of the co-deposited carbon film at the wall not facing to the plasma with a low temperature was extremely high, 1.3 in the atomic ratio of H/C. This value is triple times higher than the previous value obtained by hydrogen ion irradiation to graphite. The crystal structure of the co-deposited carbon film observed by Raman spectroscopy showed very unique structure (polymeric a-C:H), which is well consistent with the high hydrogen concentration. The accumulation of in-vessel tritium inventory is also discussed. (author)

  11. Comparison of various sources of high surface area carbon prepared by different types of activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activated carbon has been known as an excellent adsorbent and is widely used due to its large adsorption capacity. Activation condition and types of activation influence the surface area and porosity of the activated carbon produced. In this study, palm kernel shells and commercially activated carbon were used. To convert palm kernel shells into coal, two methods were employed, namely chemical activation and physical activation. For chemical activation, two activating agents, zinc chloride and potassium carbonate, were used. The activated carbons were analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, single point BET and free emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The commercial activated carbon was also characterized. FTIR results indicate that all the palm kernel shells were successfully converted to carbon. Single point BET surface area of all the carbons prepared were obtained. From FESEM micrograph, the chemically activated palm kernel shells shows well highly defined cavities and pores. This study also shows that palm kernel shells can be used to be a better source of high surface area carbon. (author)

  12. Comparison of different polysaccharides as carbon source for super capacitor electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Philippine is one of the world's largest producers of carrageenan, a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from indigenous seaweed varieties. Aside from its traditional food and dairy uses, carrageenan may be a source of carbon for high performance super capacitor. A super capacitor is an energy storage device similar to batteries. It is also known as electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC). The charge is stored in the electrochemical double layer at the electrode-electrolyte interface. High capacitance is achieved because of the high surface area of the carbon material that is typically used. In this study, carbonized materials from kappa-and iota-carrageenan were compared with other polysaccharide such as sodium alginate and chitosan. Carbonization was done by pyrolysis of the polysaccharide under flowing nitrogen at 600 degree centigrade for 3 hours. The carbonized materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, BET surface area analysis and cyclic voltammetry. The carbonization yields for the different polysaccharide range from 36 to 72% with no particular trend with respect to type of polysaccharide. The FTR spectra show the expected polar functionalities typical of activated carbon which show vibration frequencies of C=O at 1650 cm-1 and C-O stretching around 1000-1200 cm-1. The CV measurements using the carbonized material as working electrode ar different cycling rates between -200 mV to 500 mV relative to Ag/AgC1 reference electrode show capacitive behavior for the carbon derived from the carrageenans. (author)

  13. Characteristics and source of black carbon aerosol over Taklimakan Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU; S.Joshua

    2010-01-01

    Black carbon(BC) and PM10 in the center of the Taklimakan Desert were online monitored in the whole year of 2007.In addi-tion,TSP samples were also synchronously daily collected by medium-volume samplers with Whatman41 filters in the spring of 2007.BC in the dust aerosol was up to 1.14%of the total mass of PM10.A remarkable seasonal variation of BC in the aerosol was observed in the order of winter>spring>autumn>summer.The peak value of BC appeared at midnight while the lowest one in the evening each day,which was just the reverse of that in the urban area.The contribution of BC to the total mass of PM10 on non-dust storm days was~11 times of that in dust storm.Through back trajectory and principal component analysis,it was found that BC in the dust aerosol over Taklimakan Desert might be attributed to the emission from the anthropogenic activities,including domestic heating,cooking,combustion of oil and natural gas,and the medium-range transport from those oases located in the margins of the desert.The total BC aerosol from the Taklimakan Desert to be transported to the eastward downstream was estimated to be 6.3×104 ton yr-1.

  14. Source characterization using compound composition and stable carbon isotope ratio of PAHs in sediments from lakes, harbor, and shipping waterway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular compositions and compound specific stable carbon isotope ratios of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) isolated from sediments were used to characterize possible sources of contamination at an urban lake, a harbor, a shipping waterway, and a relatively undisturbed remote lake in the northwest United States. Total PAH concentrations in urban lake sediments ranged from 66.0 to 16,500 μg g-1 dry wt. with an average of 2600 μg g-1, which is ∼ 50, 100, and 400 times higher on average than PAH in harbor (48 μg g-1 on average), shipping waterway (26 μg g-1), and remote lake (7 μg g-1) sediments, respectively. The PAH distribution patterns, methyl phenanthrene/phenanthrene ratios, and a pyrogenic index at the sites suggest a pyrogenic origin for PAHs. Source characterization using principal component analysis and various molecular indices including C2-dibenzothiophenes/C2-phenanthrenes, C3-dibenzothiophenes/C3-phenanthrenes, and C2-chrysenes/C2-phenanthrenes ratios, was able to differentiate PAH deposited in sediments from the four sites. The uniqueness of the source of the sediment PAHs from urban lake was also illustrated by compound specific stable carbon isotope analysis. It was concluded that urban lake sediments are accumulating PAH from sources that are unique from contamination detected at nearby sites in the same watershed

  15. Biotechnological Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid Using Aurantiochytrium limacinum: Carbon Sources Comparison And Growth Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Sergi; Turon, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Aurantiochytrium limacinum, a marine heterotrophic protist/microalga has shown interesting yields of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) when cultured with different carbon sources: glucose, pure and crude glycerol. A complete study in a lab-scale fermenter allowed for the characterization and comparison of the growth kinetic parameters corresponding to each carbon source. Artificial Marine Medium (AMM) with glucose, pure and crude glycerol offered similar biomass yields. The net growth rates (0.10-0.12 h(-1)), biomass (0.7-0.8 g cells/g Substrate) and product (0.14-0.15 g DHA/g cells) yields, as well as DHA productivity were similar using the three carbon sources. Viable potential applications to valorize crude glycerol are envisioned to avoid an environmental problem due to the excess of byproduct. PMID:26690180

  16. Biotechnological Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid Using Aurantiochytrium limacinum: Carbon Sources Comparison And Growth Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Abad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aurantiochytrium limacinum, a marine heterotrophic protist/microalga has shown interesting yields of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA when cultured with different carbon sources: glucose, pure and crude glycerol. A complete study in a lab-scale fermenter allowed for the characterization and comparison of the growth kinetic parameters corresponding to each carbon source. Artificial Marine Medium (AMM with glucose, pure and crude glycerol offered similar biomass yields. The net growth rates (0.10–0.12 h−1, biomass (0.7–0.8 g cells/g Substrate and product (0.14–0.15 g DHA/g cells yields, as well as DHA productivity were similar using the three carbon sources. Viable potential applications to valorize crude glycerol are envisioned to avoid an environmental problem due to the excess of byproduct.

  17. Sources and delivery of carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery. Final report, October 1977--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hare, M.; Perlich, H.; Robinson, R.; Shah, M.; Zimmerman, F.

    1978-12-01

    Results are presented from a comprehensive study by Pullman Kellogg, with assistance from Gulf Universities Research Consortium (GURC) and National Cryo-Chemics Incorporated (NCI), of the carbon dioxide supply situation for miscible flooding operations to enhance oil recovery. A survey of carbon dioxide sources within the geographic areas of potential EOR are shown on four regional maps with the tabular data for each region to describe the sources in terms of quantity and quality. Evaluation of all the costs, such as purchase, production, processing, and transportation, associated with delivering the carbon dioxide from its source to its destination are presented. Specific cases to illustrate the use of the maps and cost charts generated in this study have been examined.

  18. Corrosion Behavior of Medium Carbon Steel in Simulated Concentrated Yucca Mountain Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, A; Chandra, D; Rebak, R B

    2004-04-09

    Medium carbon steel (MCS) is the candidate material for rock bolts to reinforce the borehole liners and emplacement drifts of the proposed Yucca Mountain (YM) high-level nuclear waste repository. Corrosion performance of this structural steel -AISI 1040- was investigated by techniques such as linear polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and laboratory immersion tests in lab simulated concentrated YM ground waters. Corrosion rates of the steel were determined for the temperatures in the range from 25 C to 85 C, for the ionic concentrations of 1 time (1x), 10 times (10x), and hundred times (100x) ground waters. The MCS corroded uniformly at the penetration rates of 35-200 {micro}m/year in the de-aerated YM waters, and 200-1000 {micro}m/year in the aerated waters. Increasing temperatures in the de-aerated waters increased the corrosion rates of the steel. However, increasing ionic concentrations influenced the corrosion rates only slightly. In the aerated 1x and 10x waters, increasing temperatures increased the rates of MCS significantly. Inhibitive precipitates, which formed in the aerated 100x waters at higher temperatures (65 C and up) decreased the corrosion rates to the values that obtained for the de-aerated YM aqueous environments. The steel suffered pitting corrosion in the both de-aerated and aerated hot YM environments after anodic polarization.

  19. Effect of nitrite concentration on pit depth in carbon steel exposed to simulated radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of pits in carbon steel exposed to dilute (0.055 M nitrate-bearing) alkaline salt solutions that simulate radioactive waste was investigated in coupon immersion tests. Most coupons were tested in the as-received condition, with the remainder having been heat treated to produce an oxide film. Nitrite, which is an established pitting inhibitor in these solutions, was present in concentrations from 0 to 0.031 M to 0.16 M; the last concentration is known to prevent pitting initiation in the test solution at the 50 degrees C test temperature. The depths of the deepest pits on coupons of particular exposure conditions were measure microscopically and were analyzed as simple, type 1 extreme value statistical distributions, to predict the deepest expected pit in a radioactive waste tank subject to the test conditions. While the growth rate of pits could not be established from these tests, the absolute value of the deepest pits predicted is of the order of 100 mils after 448 days of exposure. The data indicate that even nitrite concentrations insufficient to prevent pitting have a beneficial effect on limiting the growth of deepest pits

  20. Using ANN and EPR models to predict carbon monoxide concentrations in urban area of Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shakerkhatibi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Forecasting of air pollutants has become a popular topic of environmental research today. For this purpose, the artificial neural network (AAN technique is widely used as a reliable method for forecasting air pollutants in urban areas. On the other hand, the evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR model has recently been used as a forecasting tool in some environmental issues. In this research, we compared the ability of these models to forecast carbon monoxide (CO concentrations in the urban area of Tabriz city. Methods: The dataset of CO concentrations measured at the fixed stations operated by the East Azerbaijan Environmental Office along with meteorological data obtained from the East Azerbaijan Meteorological Bureau from March 2007 to March 2013, were used as input for the ANN and EPR models. Results: Based on the results, the performance of ANN is more reliable in comparison with EPR. Using the ANN model, the correlation coefficient values at all monitoring stations were calculated above 0.85. Conversely, the R2 values for these stations were obtained <0.41 using the EPR model. Conclusion: The EPR model could not overcome the nonlinearities of input data. However, the ANN model displayed more accurate results compared to the EPR. Hence, the ANN models are robust tools for predicting air pollutant concentrations.

  1. Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Schuller; Frank Little; Darren Malik; Matt Betts; Qian Shao; Jun Luo; Wan Zhong; Sandhya Shankar; Ashwin Padmanaban

    2012-03-30

    We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials, including the specific heat, thermal conductivity, latent heat, and melting point. We also assessed the stability of the composite material with repeated thermal cycling and the effects of adding the nanoparticles on the corrosion of stainless steel by the composite salt. Our results indicate that stable, repeatable 25-50% improvements in specific heat are possible for these materials. We found that using these composite salts as the thermal energy storage material for a concentrating solar thermal power system can reduce the levelized cost of electricity by 10-20%. We conclude that these materials are worth further development and inclusion in future concentrating solar power systems.

  2. Flushing of distal hillslopes as an alternative source of stream dissolved organic carbon in a headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, John P; Bailey, Scott W.; McGuire, Kevin J.; Shanley, James B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated potential source areas of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in headwater streams by examining DOC concentrations in lysimeter, shallow well, and stream water samples from a reference catchment at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest. These observations were then compared to high-frequency temporal variations in fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) at the catchment outlet and the predicted spatial extent of shallow groundwater in soils throughout the catchment. While near-stream soils are generally considered a DOC source in forested catchments, DOC concentrations in near-stream groundwater were low (mean = 2.4 mg/L, standard error = 0.6 mg/L), less than hillslope groundwater farther from the channel (mean = 5.7 mg/L, standard error = 0.4 mg/L). Furthermore, water tables in near-stream soils did not rise into the carbon-rich upper B or O horizons even during events. In contrast, soils below bedrock outcrops near channel heads where lateral soil formation processes dominate had much higher DOC concentrations. Soils immediately downslope of bedrock areas had thick eluvial horizons indicative of leaching of organic materials, Fe, and Al and had similarly high DOC concentrations in groundwater (mean = 14.5 mg/L, standard error = 0.8 mg/L). Flow from bedrock outcrops partially covered by organic soil horizons produced the highest groundwater DOC concentrations (mean = 20.0 mg/L, standard error = 4.6 mg/L) measured in the catchment. Correspondingly, stream water in channel heads sourced in part by shallow soils and bedrock outcrops had the highest stream DOC concentrations measured in the catchment. Variation in FDOM concentrations at the catchment outlet followed water table fluctuations in shallow to bedrock soils near channel heads. We show that shallow hillslope soils receiving runoff from organic matter-covered bedrock outcrops may be a major source of DOC in headwater catchments in forested mountainous regions

  3. Temperature-dependent accumulation mode particle and cloud nuclei concentrations from biogenic sources during WACS 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ahlm

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Submicron aerosol particles collected simultaneously at the mountain peak (2182 m a.s.l. and at a forested mid-mountain site (1300 m a.s.l. on Whistler Mountain, British Columbia, Canada, during June and July 2010 were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy for quantification of organic functional groups. Positive matrix factorization (PMF was applied to the FTIR spectra. Three PMF factors associated with (1 combustion, (2 biogenics, and (3 vegetative detritus, were identified at both sites. The biogenic factor was correlated with both temperature and several volatile organic compounds (VOCs. The combustion factor dominated the submicron particle mass during the beginning of the campaign when the temperature was lower and advection was from the Vancouver area, but as the temperature started to rise in early July the biogenic factor came to dominate as a result of increased emissions of biogenic VOCs and thereby increased formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. On average, the biogenic factor represented 69% and 49% of the submicron organic particle mass at Whistler Peak and at the mid-mountain site, respectively. The lower fraction at the mid-mountain site was a result of more vegetative detritus there, and also higher influence from local combustion sources.

    The biogenic factor was strongly correlated (r ~ 0.9 to number concentration of particles with diameter (Dp> 100 nm, whereas the combustion factor was better correlated to number concentration of particles with Dp < 100 nm (r~ 0.4. The number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN was correlated (r ~ 0.7 to the biogenic factor for supersaturations (S of 0.2% or higher, which indicates that particle condensational growth from biogenic vapors was an important factor in controlling the CCN concentration for clouds where S≥0.2%. Both the number concentration of particles with

  4. Temperature-dependent accumulation mode particle and cloud nuclei concentrations from biogenic sources during WACS 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ahlm

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Submicron aerosol particles collected simultaneously at the mountain peak (2182 m a.s.l. and at a forested mid-mountain site (1300 m a.s.l. on Whistler Mountain, British Columbia, Canada, during June and July 2010 were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy for quantification of organic functional groups. Positive matrix factorization (PMF was applied to the FTIR spectra. Three PMF factors associated with (1 combustion, (2 biogenics, and (3 vegetative detritus were identified at both sites. The biogenic factor was correlated with both temperature and several volatile organic compounds (VOCs. The combustion factor dominated the submicron particle mass during the beginning of the campaign, when the temperature was lower and advection was from the Vancouver area, but as the temperature started to rise in early July, the biogenic factor came to dominate as a result of increased emissions of biogenic VOCs, and thereby increased formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. On average, the biogenic factor represented 69% and 49% of the submicron organic particle mass at Whistler Peak and at the mid-mountain site, respectively. The lower fraction at the mid-mountain site was a result of more vegetative detritus there, and also higher influence from local combustion sources. The biogenic factor was strongly correlated (r~0.9 to number concentration of particles with diameter (Dp> 100 nm, whereas the combustion factor was better correlated to number concentration of particles with Dpr~0.4. The number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN was correlated (r~0.7 to the biogenic factor for supersaturations (S of 0.2% or higher, which indicates that particle condensational growth from biogenic vapors was an important factor in controlling the CCN concentration for clouds where S≥0.2%. Both the number concentration of particles with Dp>100 nm and numbers of CCN for S≥0.2% were correlated to temperature. Considering the biogenic

  5. The effects of different carbon sources on biosynthesis of pectinolytic enzymes by Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiro Mojsov

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of different carbon sources on the nourishing base on the production of pectinolytic enzymes by Aspergillus niger with the aim of optimizing the medium for maximal enzyme production. Growth and enzymes production by Aspergillus niger were evaluated on glucose, fructose, galactose, xylose, lactose, apple pectin and the dry apple pulp. Results of different carbon sources on base showed maximal endo-pectinolytic activity, endo-PG/328 U L-1 with the pressed apple pulp, compared with endo-PG/140 U L-1 with apple pectin, endo-PG/62 U L-1 with galactose, endo-PG/28 U L-1 with lactose, endo-PG/0.0 U L-1 with glucose and fructose and endo-PG/5.0 U L-1 without carbon source (control. The growth of the microorganism (dry biomass on different carbon sources showed maximum dry biomass, 4.5 g L-1 with glucose, compared with dry biomass, 4.3 g L-1 with fructose, 4.0 g L-1 with the pressed apple pulp, 3.5 g L-1 with galactose, 3.0 g L-1 with lactose, 2.2 g L-1 with apple pectin and 0.8 g L-1 without carbon source (control. Maximal endo-PG production, 328 U L-1 and dry biomass, 4.0 g L-1 by fungus Aspergillus niger was observed in a medium at pH initial, 4.0. The results presented here will be of commercial importance for using apple pulp as a carbon source for production of pectinolytic enzymes in submerged fermentation.

  6. Amorphous carbon film deposition on inner surface of tubes using atmospheric pressure pulsed filamentary plasma source

    OpenAIRE

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Uniform amorphous carbon film is deposited on the inner surface of quartz tube having the inner diameter of 6 mm and the outer diameter of 8 mm. A pulsed filamentary plasma source is used for the deposition. Long plasma filaments (~ 140 mm) as a positive discharge are generated inside the tube in argon with methane admixture. FTIR-ATR, XRD, SEM, LSM and XPS analyses give the conclusion that deposited film is amorphous composed of non-hydrogenated sp2 carbon and hydrogenated sp3 carbon. Plasma...

  7. Concentrations and Sources of Airborne Particles in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licina, Dusan; Bhangar, Seema; Brooks, Brandon; Baker, Robyn; Firek, Brian; Tang, Xiaochen; Morowitz, Michael J.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have underdeveloped immune systems, making them susceptible to adverse health consequences from air pollutant exposure. Little is known about the sources of indoor airborne particles that contribute to the exposure of premature infants in the NICU environment. In this study, we monitored the spatial and temporal variations of airborne particulate matter concentrations along with other indoor environmental parameters and human occupancy. The experiments were conducted over one year in a private-style NICU. The NICU was served by a central heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system equipped with an economizer and a high-efficiency particle filtration system. The following parameters were measured continuously during weekdays with 1-min resolution: particles larger than 0.3 μm resolved into 6 size groups, CO2 level, dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity, and presence or absence of occupants. Altogether, over sixteen periods of a few weeks each, measurements were conducted in rooms occupied with premature infants. In parallel, a second monitoring station was operated in a nearby hallway or at the local nurses’ station. The monitoring data suggest a strong link between indoor particle concentrations and human occupancy. Detected particle peaks from occupancy were clearly discernible among larger particles and imperceptible for submicron (0.3–1 μm) particles. The mean indoor particle mass concentrations averaged across the size range 0.3–10 μm during occupied periods was 1.9 μg/m3, approximately 2.5 times the concentration during unoccupied periods (0.8 μg/m3). Contributions of within-room emissions to total PM10 mass in the baby rooms averaged 37–81%. Near-room indoor emissions and outdoor sources contributed 18–59% and 1–5%, respectively. Airborne particle levels in the size range 1–10 μm showed strong dependence on human activities, indicating the importance of indoor

  8. Concentrations and Sources of Airborne Particles in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Licina

    Full Text Available Premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs have underdeveloped immune systems, making them susceptible to adverse health consequences from air pollutant exposure. Little is known about the sources of indoor airborne particles that contribute to the exposure of premature infants in the NICU environment. In this study, we monitored the spatial and temporal variations of airborne particulate matter concentrations along with other indoor environmental parameters and human occupancy. The experiments were conducted over one year in a private-style NICU. The NICU was served by a central heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC system equipped with an economizer and a high-efficiency particle filtration system. The following parameters were measured continuously during weekdays with 1-min resolution: particles larger than 0.3 μm resolved into 6 size groups, CO2 level, dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity, and presence or absence of occupants. Altogether, over sixteen periods of a few weeks each, measurements were conducted in rooms occupied with premature infants. In parallel, a second monitoring station was operated in a nearby hallway or at the local nurses' station. The monitoring data suggest a strong link between indoor particle concentrations and human occupancy. Detected particle peaks from occupancy were clearly discernible among larger particles and imperceptible for submicron (0.3-1 μm particles. The mean indoor particle mass concentrations averaged across the size range 0.3-10 μm during occupied periods was 1.9 μg/m3, approximately 2.5 times the concentration during unoccupied periods (0.8 μg/m3. Contributions of within-room emissions to total PM10 mass in the baby rooms averaged 37-81%. Near-room indoor emissions and outdoor sources contributed 18-59% and 1-5%, respectively. Airborne particle levels in the size range 1-10 μm showed strong dependence on human activities, indicating the importance of indoor

  9. Sources and transportation of suspended matter and sediment in the southern Yellow Sea: Evidence from stable carbon isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The concentrations of total suspended matter (TSM) and the compositions of organic stable carbon isotopes of TSM and bottom sediments were analyzed to study the sources of TSM and sediments and the transportation processes. For this study, 284 TSM samples and 64 sediment ones taken from 67 stations along 7 transects and in 5 layers were collected in the southern Yellow Sea on the cruise in May, 1998. The main sediment transportation pattern in the southern Yellow Sea was obtained by analyzing the distribution characteristics of TSM concentration and particulate organic carbon Δ13c values. It was confirmed from the pattern that the bottom layer plays a more important role than the surface one in the transportation processes of terrigenous material to the central deep-water area of the southern Yellow Sea. The Yellow Sea circulation is an important control factor in determining the sediment transportation pattern in the southern Yellow Sea. The carbon isotope signals of sedimentary organic matter confirmed that the main material in sediments with high sedimentation rate in the Shandong subaqueous delta originated from the modern Yellow River. The terrigenous sediments in the deep-water area of the southern Yellow Sea are mainly from the abandoned Yellow River and the modern Yellow River, and a small portion of them are from the modern Yangtze material. The amount of terrigenous material from Korean Peninsula and its influen- ce range are relatively limited. The conclusions derived from TSM and stable carbon isotopes were further confirmed by another independent material source tracer--PAHs.

  10. The effect of various carbon sources on the growth of single-celled cyanophyta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilov, I. A.; Sidorenkova, E. S.

    1983-01-01

    In 19 strains of unicellular blue-green algae, belonging to general Synechococcus, Synechocystis, Aphanocapsa and Aphanothece, the capacity of growth under mixotrophic conditions in mineral media with organic carbon sources (carbohydrates, polyols) was investigated. At moderate light intensity (1200 lx) and 0.5% of carbon source there was revealed: (1) Stimulation of growth; (2) Partial or complete inhibition of growth; (3) No influence of carbohydrate and polyols on the growth of some algae strains. Three physiological groups for the investigated strains have been outlined on the basis of data obtained. The possibility of using the differences revealed in classification of unicellular blue-green algae is discussed.

  11. Numerical Study on the Acetylene Concentration in the Hydrogen-Carbon System in a Hydrogen Plasma Torch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Longwei; SHEN Jie; SHU Xingsheng; FANG Shidong; ZHANG Lipeng; MENG Yuedong

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the hydrogen/carbon mole ratio and pyrolysis gas pressure on the acetylene concentration in the hydrogen-carbon system in a plasma torch were numerically calculated by using the chemical thermodynamic equilibrium method of Gibbs free energy. The calculated results indicate that the hydrogen concentration and the pyrolysis gas pressure play crucial roles in acetylene formation. Appropriately abundant hydrogen, with a mole ratio of hydrogen to carbon about 1 or 2, and a relatively high pyrolysis gas pressure can enhance the acetylene concentration. In the experiment, a compromised project consisting of an appropriate hydrogen flow rate and a feasible high pyrolysis gas pressure needs to be carried out to increase the acetylene concentration from coal pyrolysis in the hydrogen plasma torch.

  12. Effect of Phosphoric Acid Concentration on the Characteristics of Sugarcane Bagasse Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, M. R. M.; Suraya, W. M. S. W.; Rafidah, H.; Amirza, A. R. M.; Attahirah, M. H. M. N.; Hani, M. S. N. Q.; Adnan, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Impregnation method is one of the crucial steps involved in producing activated carbon using chemical activation process. Chemicals employed in this step is effective at decomposing the structure of material and forming micropores that helps in adsorption of contaminants. This paper explains thorough procedures that have been involved in producing sugarcane bagasse activated carbon (SBAC) by using 5%, 10%, 20%, 30% phosphoric acid (H3PO4) during the impregnation step. Concentration of H3PO4 used in the process of producing SBAC was optimized through several tests including bulk density, ash content, iodine adsorption and pore size diameter and the charactesristic of optimum SBAC produced has been compared with commercial activated carbon (CAC). Batch study has been carried out by using the SBAC produced from optimum condition to investigate the performance of SBAC in removal of turbidity and chemical oxygen demand (COD) from textile wastewater. From characteristic study, SBAC with 30% H3PO4 has shown the optimum value of bulk density, ash content, iodine adsorption and pore size diameter of 0.3023 g cm-3, 4.35%, 974.96 mg/g and 0.21-0.41 µm, respectively. These values are comparable to the characteristics of CAC. Experimental result from the batch study has been concluded that the SBAC has a promising potential in removing turbidity and COD of 75.5% and 66.3%, respectively which was a slightly lower than CAC which were able to remove 82.8% of turbidity and 70% of COD. As a conclusion, the SBAC is comparable with CAC in terms of their characteristics and the capability of removing contaminants from textile wastewater. Therefore, it has a commercial value to be used as an alternative of low-cost material in producing CAC.

  13. Contribution of picoplankton to the total particulate organic carbon (POC concentration in the eastern South Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Grob

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, picophytoeukaryotes and bacterioplankton abundances and contributions to the total particulate organic carbon concentration (POC, derived from the total particle beam attenuation coefficient (cp, were determined across the eastern South Pacific between the Marquesas Islands and the coast of Chile. All flow cytometrically derived abundances decreased towards the hyper-oligotrophic centre of the gyre and were highest at the coast, except for Prochlorococcus, which is not detected under eutrophic conditions. Temperature and nutrient availability appeared important in modulating picophytoplankton abundance, according to the prevailing trophic conditions. Although the non-vegetal particles tended to dominate the cp signal everywhere along the transect (50 to 83%, this dominance seemed to weaken from oligo- to eutrophic conditions, the contributions by vegetal and non-vegetal particles being about equal under mature upwelling conditions. Spatial variability in the vegetal compartment was more important than the non-vegetal one in shaping the water column particulate attenuation coefficient. Spatial variability in picophytoplankton biomass could be traced by changes in both Tchla and cp. Finally, picophytoeukaryotes contributed with ~38% on average to the total integrated phytoplankton carbon biomass or vegetal attenuation signal along the transect, as determined by direct size measurements on cells sorted by flow cytometry and optical theory. The role of picophytoeukaryotes in carbon and energy flow would therefore be very important, even under hyper-oligotrophic conditions.

  14. GEMAS - Tin and Tungsten: possible sources of enriched concentrations in soils in European countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    João Batista, Maria; Filipe, Augusto; Reimann, Clemens

    2014-05-01

    Tin and tungsten occur related with magmatic differentiation and can be installed in fissures and veins of magmatic rocks or in the neighbor metasediments. Generally, both elements have low chemical mobility in the superficial environment although effectively mobile in detrital media such as stream sediments and deposited in alluvial soils. The most important tin-tungsten deposits in Europe are in Variscides. From the northern Europe, 985 samples and from southern Europe 1123 samples were collected both in agricultural and grazing lands. Analysis were made of Sn , W, pH, TOC, SiO2 from the upper 20 and 10 cm of agricultural and grazing soils, respectively. The present study is part of the GEMAS project a joint project of European geochemical mapping between the EuroGeoSurvey Geochemical Expert Group and EuroMetaux. The results show that in general, at the European (continental) scale natural processes are dominant. It is clear the distinction between NE Europe and SW European tin and tungsten concentrations in soils. Tin geometric mean concentrations in the northern Europe is 0.57 mg kg-1 in agricultural soils and 0.62 mg kg-1 in grazing land; southern Europe 0.91 mg kg-1 in agricultural soils and 0.95 mg kg-1 in grazing land. Tungsten geometric mean concentrations in northern Europe is 0.067 mg kg-1 in agricultural soils and 0.073 mg kg-1 in grazing land and in southern Europe is 0.085 mg kg-1 in agricultural soils and 0.090 mg kg-1 in grazing land. Limit between north and south is the maximum extent of the last glaciation. Grazing land, undisturbed soils for a period of several years, have higher concentrations of Sn and W than agricultural soils which raises the question that if only natural processes are observed. Parent material seems to be the main source of Sn and W to soil. Sn-W rich Variscan granitic intrusions of Central Iberian Zone, Massif Central, Brittany, Cornwall and Bohemia are reflected in soil concentrations. TOC is higher in northern than in

  15. Statistical analysis of inhibitor concentrations for radioactive waste in carbon steel tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on a logistic regression approach, a model was developed using the explanatory variables log([NO3-]), log([NO2-]), and temperature to estimate the probability of pitting in a carbon steel exposed to high-level radioactive waste. Pitting susceptibility data obtained by the two techniques of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and coupon immersion were separately and jointly analyzed with the model. Similar predictive ability is seen for equations based on both electrochemical and coupon immersion data. Using the theory associated with the determination of confidence intervals for the estimated probability, a methodology was developed to provide a lower bound for the nitrite concentration which inhibits pitting, i.e., which holds the estimated probability of pitting to a reasonably low level of 0.05

  16. Determination of molybdenum in silicates through atomic absorption spectrometry using pre-concentration by active carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical procedure for molybdenum determination in geological materials through Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, after pre-concentration of the Mo-APDC complex in activated carbon, has been developed, which is needed in order to reduce the dilution effect in the sample decomposition. During the development of this method the influence of pH, the amount of APDC for complexation of Mo and the interference of Fe, Ca, Mn, Al, K, Na, Mg and Ti were tested. It was shown that none of these causes any significant effect on the Mo determination proposed. The results of the analysis at the international geochemical reference samples JB-1 (basalt) and GH (granite) were very accurate and showed that the detection limit in rocks (1,00g) is 0,6 ppm, when using sample dilution of 1 ml and microinjection techniques. (author)

  17. Carbon nanotube based X-ray sources: Applications in pre-clinical and medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field emission offers an alternate method of electron production for Bremsstrahlung based X-ray tubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serve as very effective field emitters, allowing them to serve as electron sources for X-ray sources, with specific advantages over traditional thermionic tubes. CNT derived X-ray sources can create X-ray pulses of any duration and frequency, gate the X-ray pulse to any source and allow the placement of many sources in close proximity. We have constructed a number of micro-CT systems based on CNT X-ray sources for applications in small animal imaging, specifically focused on the imaging of the heart and lungs. This paper offers a review of the pre-clinical applications of the CNT based micro-CT that we have developed. We also discuss some of the current and potential clinical applications of the CNT X-ray sources.

  18. Comparing carbon capture and storage (CCS) with concentrating solar power (CSP): Potentials, costs, risks, and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal power coupled with Carbon [Dioxide] Capture and Storage (CCS), and Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) technologies are often included in the portfolio of climate change mitigation options intended to decarbonize electricity systems. Both of these technologies can provide baseload electricity, are in early stages of maturity, and have benefits, costs, and obstacles. We compare and contrast CCS applied to coal-fired power plants with CSP. At present, both technologies are more expensive than existing electricity-generating options, but costs should decrease with large-scale deployment, especially in the case of CSP. For CCS, technological challenges still remain, storage risks must be clarified, and regulatory and legal uncertainties remain. For CSP, current challenges include electricity transmission and business models for a rapid and extensive expansion of high-voltage transmission lines. The need for international cooperation may impede CSP expansion in Europe. Highlights: ► Both technologies could provide low-carbon base load power. ► Both technologies require new networks, for either CO2 or power transmission. ► CSP is closer to being a viable technology ready for pervasive diffusion. ► The costs associated with market saturation would be lower for CSP. ► The regulatory changes required for CSP diffusion are somewhat greater than for CCS.

  19. Observations of the uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS by trees under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sandoval-Soto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Global change affects ecosystems to adapt to elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2. We understand that carbonyl sulfide (COS, a trace gas which is involved in building up the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer, is taken up by vegetation with the same triad of the enzmyes which are metabolizing the CO2, i.e. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase-Oxygenase (Rubisco, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase (PEP-Co and carbonic anhydrase (CA. Therefore, we discuss a physiological/biochemical adaptation of these enzymes to affect the sink strength of vegetation for COS. We investigated the adaption of two European tree species, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus ilex, grown inside chambers under elevated CO2 and determined the exchange characteristics and the content of CA after a 1–2 yr period of adaption from 350 ppm to 800 ppm CO2. We could demonstrate that the COS compensation point, the CA activity and the deposition velocities may change and cause a decrease of the COS uptake by plant ecosystems. As a consequence, the atmospheric COS level may rise leading to higher input of this trace gas into the stratosphere and causing a higher energy reflection by the stratospheric sulfur aerosol into space, thus counteracting the direct radiative forcing by the tropospheric COS.

  20. Cathodic electrodeposition of cerium-based oxides on carbon steel from concentrated cerium nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlaoui, Y. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs (LEMMA), Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Pedraza, F. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs (LEMMA), Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France)], E-mail: fpedraza@univ-lr.fr; Remazeilles, C.; Cohendoz, S.; Rebere, C. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs (LEMMA), Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France); Tifouti, L. [Laboratoire de Genie de l' Environnement, Universite Badji Mokhtar, BP 1223, 23020 El Hadjar-Annaba (Algeria); Creus, J. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs (LEMMA), Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 1 (France)

    2009-02-15

    In this work the elaboration by cathodic electrodeposition of cerium-based oxides on carbon steel from relatively concentrated cerium nitrate solutions is investigated. In particular, the study presented here (Part I) focuses on the electrochemical and analytical characterisation of the films and on the correlations between the electrochemical features and the characteristics of the layers. The effect of other parameters such as concentration, temperature, pH and additives to improve the behaviour of the film against corrosion will be investigated in part II of the study. The electrochemical characterisation will reveal that Ce(IV)-steel interactions can be responsible for some weak electrochemical waves appearing in the cyclic voltammograms that often are attributed to oxygen or nitrates reduction. This results from the oxidation of Ce(III) solutions to Ce(IV) in contact with air. Furthermore, the deposits strongly depend on the applied current density. Low current densities do not render fully covering deposits on the steel and a carbonated green rust will appear. On the contrary, the increase of the current density leads to denser layers of relatively small crystallite size that readily covers the steel surface. The deposits have a needle-like morphology and the Ce content achieves a plateau of about 20-22 at.%. However, a significant network of cracks appears probably occurring during the deposition process itself. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results indicate that the deposits are not fully crystalline after 550 deg. C in contrast with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns that unambiguously show a fluorite-type CeO{sub 2} phase whose crystallite size decreases with increasing the current density. The rinsing medium also brings about different features of the films. Rinsing with water allows to incorporate more nitrates and to adsorb CO{sub 2} than when rinsing with ethanol. However, R-OH bonds will be trapped in the latter.

  1. Cathodic electrodeposition of cerium-based oxides on carbon steel from concentrated cerium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the elaboration by cathodic electrodeposition of cerium-based oxides on carbon steel from relatively concentrated cerium nitrate solutions is investigated. In particular, the study presented here (Part I) focuses on the electrochemical and analytical characterisation of the films and on the correlations between the electrochemical features and the characteristics of the layers. The effect of other parameters such as concentration, temperature, pH and additives to improve the behaviour of the film against corrosion will be investigated in part II of the study. The electrochemical characterisation will reveal that Ce(IV)-steel interactions can be responsible for some weak electrochemical waves appearing in the cyclic voltammograms that often are attributed to oxygen or nitrates reduction. This results from the oxidation of Ce(III) solutions to Ce(IV) in contact with air. Furthermore, the deposits strongly depend on the applied current density. Low current densities do not render fully covering deposits on the steel and a carbonated green rust will appear. On the contrary, the increase of the current density leads to denser layers of relatively small crystallite size that readily covers the steel surface. The deposits have a needle-like morphology and the Ce content achieves a plateau of about 20-22 at.%. However, a significant network of cracks appears probably occurring during the deposition process itself. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results indicate that the deposits are not fully crystalline after 550 deg. C in contrast with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns that unambiguously show a fluorite-type CeO2 phase whose crystallite size decreases with increasing the current density. The rinsing medium also brings about different features of the films. Rinsing with water allows to incorporate more nitrates and to adsorb CO2 than when rinsing with ethanol. However, R-OH bonds will be trapped in the latter

  2. CO2 mitigation potential of mineral carbonation with industrial alkalinity sources in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchofer, Abby; Becker, Austin; Brandt, Adam; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2013-07-01

    The availability of industrial alkalinity sources is investigated to determine their potential for the simultaneous capture and sequestration of CO2 from point-source emissions in the United States. Industrial alkalinity sources investigated include fly ash, cement kiln dust, and iron and steel slag. Their feasibility for mineral carbonation is determined by their relative abundance for CO2 reactivity and their proximity to point-source CO2 emissions. In addition, the available aggregate markets are investigated as possible sinks for mineral carbonation products. We show that in the U.S., industrial alkaline byproducts have the potential to mitigate approximately 7.6 Mt CO2/yr, of which 7.0 Mt CO2/yr are CO2 captured through mineral carbonation and 0.6 Mt CO2/yr are CO2 emissions avoided through reuse as synthetic aggregate (replacing sand and gravel). The emission reductions represent a small share (i.e., 0.1%) of total U.S. CO2 emissions; however, industrial byproducts may represent comparatively low-cost methods for the advancement of mineral carbonation technologies, which may be extended to more abundant yet expensive natural alkalinity sources. PMID:23738892

  3. Use of high concentrations of carbon dioxide for stunning rabbits reared for meat production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dalmau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: An investigation was p