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Sample records for carbon ion radiotherapy

  1. Experience with carbon ion radiotherapy at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaekel, O. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: o.jaekel@dkfz.de; Schulz-Ertner, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Karger, C.P. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heeg, P. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    At GSI, a radiotherapy facility was established using beam scanning and active energy variation. Between December 1997 and April 2004, 220 patients have been treated at this facility with carbon ions. Most patients are treated for chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the base of skull, using a dose of 60 Gye (Gray equivalent) in 20 fractions. Carbon ion therapy is also offered in a combination with conventional radiotherapy for a number of other tumors (adenoidcystic carcinoma, chordoma of the cervical spine and sacrum, atypical menningeoma). The patients treated for skull base tumors showed an overall local control rate after two years of 90%. The overall treatment toxicity was mild. This shows that carbon ion radiotherapy can safely be applied using a scanned beam and encouraged the Heidelberg university hospital to build a hospital based facility for ion therapy.

  2. Carbon ion radiotherapy for sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    Principles of heavy ion therapy, its application to bone and soft tissue sarcomas and outline of its general state are described. The heavy ion therapy has advantages of its high dose distribution to the target and strong biological effect due to the Bragg peak formation and high linear energy transfer, respectively. The authors use carbon ion generated by Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) for the therapy of performance state 0-2 patients with the sarcomas unresectable, diagnosed pathologically, and of 60 y, 45% and teens, 8%) have been treated, whose tumor site has been the pelvis in 73%, volume >600 mL in 63%, tissue type of bone tumor in 70% (where cordoma has amounted to>200 cases). Five-year local control rate is found 71% and survival, 59%. In 175 therapeutically fresh cases with sacral cordoma of median age 67 y, with median clinical target volume 9 cm, treated with median dose 70.4 GyE/16 irradiations, the 8-y local control rate is found to be 69% and survival, 74%, within the median follow-up 54 months; with severe skin ulcer in 2 cases and deterioration of nervous dysfunction in 15 cases; suggesting the therapy is as effective and useful as surgical resection. At present, the therapy is not applicable to Japan health insurance. In the author's hospital, the heavy ion therapy has been conducted to total of >6,000 patients, which amounting to the largest number in the world. Now, 3 Japanese facilities can do the therapy as well and 3 countries in the world.(T.T.)

  3. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Unresectable Retroperitoneal Sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, Itsuko; Kagei, Kenji; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Sugahara, Shinji; Okada, Tohru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ito, Hisao; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the applicability of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for unresectable retroperitoneal sarcomas with regard to normal tissue morbidity and local tumor control. Methods and Materials: From May 1997 to February 2006, 24 patients (17 male and 7 female) with unresectable retroperitoneal sarcoma received CIRT. Age ranged from 16 to 77 years (median, 48.6 years). Of the patients, 16 had primary disease and 8 recurrent disease. Histologic diagnoses were as follows: malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 6, liposarcoma in 3, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 3, Ewing/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) in 2, and miscellaneous in 10 patients. The histologic grades were as follows: Grade 3 in 15, Grade 2-3 in 2, Grade 2 in 3, and unknown in 4. Clinical target volumes ranged between 57 cm 3 and 1,194 cm 3 (median 525 cm 3 ). The delivered carbon ion dose ranged from 52.8 to 73.6 GyE in 16 fixed fractions over 4 weeks. Results: The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 6-143 months). The overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 75% and 50%, respectively. The local control rates at 2 and 5 years were 77% and 69%. No complications of the gastrointestinal tract were encountered. No other toxicity greater than Grade 2 was observed. Conclusions: Use of CIRT is suggested to be effective and safe for retroperitoneal sarcomas. The results obtained with CIRT were a good overall survival rate and local control, notwithstanding the fact that most patients were not eligible for surgical resection and had high-grade sarcomas.

  4. What's next in carbon ion radiotherapy at NIRS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    Since its launch by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in 1994, cancer therapy using heavy ion beams (carbon ion beams) has been used in approximately 5,500 patients. Accumulated clinical experience has identified certain types of malignant tumors that respond exclusively to this treatment. It has also been made clear that this therapy is capable of treating several other types of cancers safely in a relatively short period of time, effecting remission and/or cure without pain or discomfort in a few days or weeks. We can reasonably state that heavy ion radiotherapy has been established as a safe and effective treatment method. NIRS researchers are continuing to make every effort to develop more effective, efficient, and patient-friendly heavy ion irradiation systems. The result of this research and development is also expected to slash the attendant costs of heavy ion radiotherapy. (author)

  5. Carbon ion radiotherapy in bone and soft tissue sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Kagei, Kenji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Heavy ions have superior depth-dose distribution and greater cell-killing capability. In June 1996, clinical research for the treatment of bone and soft tissue sarcomas was begun using carbon ions generated by the HIMAC. As of February 2006, a total of the 278 patients with bone and soft tissue sarcoma had been enrolled into the clinical trial. Most of the patients had locally advanced and/or medically inoperable tumors. The clinical trial revealed that carbon ion radiotherapy provided definite local control and offered a survival advantage without unacceptable morbidity in bone and soft tissue sarcomas that were hard to cure with other modalities. (author)

  6. Treatment planning for carbon ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Scholz, D.; Weber, U.; Jaekel, O.

    2001-01-01

    The GSI facility realizes for the first time a combination of an active field shaping, using a scanned beam, with an active energy variation of the beam, thus making full use of the advantages of heavy charged particles for therapy. This novel irradiation technique requires a method for dose calculation and optimization which is radically different from conventional approaches used for example in photon and even proton therapy, due to the strong dependence of the RBE on particle charge, energy and absorbed dose. A prerequisite is the development of a physical beam model as well as a radiobiological model to describe the interactions of ion beams with biological material. (orig.)

  7. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for marginal lymph node recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Tomoaki; Nakano, Takashi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Noda, Shin-ei; Ohkubo, Yu; Ando, Ken; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Kato, Shingo; Kamada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy often occur at common iliac or para-aortic lymph nodes as marginal lymph node recurrences. Patients with these recurrences have a chance of long-term survival by optimal re-treatment with radiotherapy. However, the re-irradiation often overlaps the initial and the secondary radiotherapy fields and can result in increased normal tissue toxicities in the bowels or the stomach. Carbon-ion radiotherapy, a form of particle beam radiotherapy using accelerated carbon ions, offers more conformal and sharp dose distribution than X-ray radiotherapy. Therefore, this approach enables the delivery of high radiation doses to the target while sparing its surrounding normal tissues. Marginal lymph node recurrences in common iliac lymph nodes after radiotherapy were treated successfully by carbon-ion radiotherapy in two patients. These two patients were initially treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy and intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy. However, the diseases recurred in the lymph nodes near the border of the initial radiotherapy fields after 22 months and 23 months. Because re-irradiation with X-ray radiotherapy may deliver high doses to a section of the bowels, carbon-ion radiotherapy was selected to treat the lymph node recurrences. A total dose of 48 Gy (RBE) in 12 fractions over 3 weeks was given to the lymph node recurrences, and the tumors disappeared completely with no severe acute toxicities. The two patients showed no evidence of disease for 75 months and 63 months after the initial radiotherapy and for 50 months and 37 months after the carbon-ion radiotherapy, respectively. No severe late adverse effects are observed in these patients. The two presented cases suggest that the highly conformal dose distribution of carbon-ion radiotherapy may be beneficial in the treatment of marginal lymph node recurrences after radiotherapy. In addition, the higher biological effect of carbon-ion

  8. Quality of life (QOL) assessment in patients received carbon ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Miyamoto, Tada-aki; Kato, Hirotoshi; Oono, Tatsuya; Yamada, Shigeru; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2003-01-01

    Until February 2003, a total of 1,463 patients were enrolled in clinical trials of carbon ion radiotherapy. Most of the patients had locally advanced and/or medically inoperable tumors. The clinical trials revealed that carbon ion radiotherapy provided definite local control and offered a survival advantage without unacceptable morbidity in a variety of tumors that were hard to cure by other modalities. In this study, quality of life (QOL) outcomes of patients with unresectable bone and soft tissue sarcoma after carbon ion radiotherapy are investigated. (author)

  9. Evolution of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Osama; Makishima, Hirokazu; Kamada, Tadashi

    2018-03-06

    Charged particles can achieve better dose distribution and higher biological effectiveness compared to photon radiotherapy. Carbon ions are considered an optimal candidate for cancer treatment using particles. The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Chiba, Japan was the first radiotherapy hospital dedicated for carbon ion treatments in the world. Since its establishment in 1994, the NIRS has pioneered this therapy with more than 69 clinical trials so far, and hundreds of ancillary projects in physics and radiobiology. In this review, we will discuss the evolution of carbon ion radiotherapy at the NIRS and some of the current and future projects in the field.

  10. Development of C{sup 6+} laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, T., E-mail: takayuki1.sako@toshiba.co.jp; Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama 235-8522 (Japan); Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T. [Cancer Research Center, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Takeuchi, T. [Accelerator Engineering Corporation, Chiba 263-0043 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A prototype C{sup 6+} injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  11. Development of C6+ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K.; Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T.; Takeuchi, T.

    2016-02-01

    A prototype C6+ injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  12. Development of C⁶⁺ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, T; Yamaguchi, A; Sato, K; Goto, A; Iwai, T; Nayuki, T; Nemoto, K; Kayama, T; Takeuchi, T

    2016-02-01

    A prototype C(6+) injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  13. Development of C6+ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K.; Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T.; Takeuchi, T.

    2016-01-01

    A prototype C 6+ injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4

  14. Clinical Outcome of Sacral Chordoma With Carbon Ion Radiotherapy Compared With Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Yoshihiro; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Yamada, Yoshihisa; Sugiura, Hideshi; Shido, Yoji; Wasa, Junji; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy, post-treatment function, toxicity, and complications of carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) for sacral chordoma compared with surgery. Methods and Materials: The records of 17 primary sacral chordoma patients treated since 1990 with surgery (n = 10) or carbon ion RT (n = 7) were retrospectively analyzed for disease-specific survival, local recurrence-free survival, complications, and functional outcome. The applied carbon ion dose ranged from 54.0 Gray equivalent (GyE) to 73.6 GyE (median 70.4). Results: The mean age at treatment was 55 years for the surgery group and 65 years for the carbon ion RT group. The median duration of follow-up was 76 months for the surgery group and 49 months for the carbon ion RT group. The local recurrence-free survival rate at 5 years was 62.5% for the surgery and 100% for the carbon ion RT group, and the disease-specific survival rate at 5 years was 85.7% and 53.3%, respectively. Urinary-anorectal function worsened in 6 patients (60%) in the surgery group, but it was unchanged in all the patients who had undergone carbon ion RT. Postoperative wound complications requiring reoperation occurred in 3 patients (30%) after surgery and in 1 patient (14%) after carbon ion RT. The functional outcome evaluated using the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society scoring system revealed 55% in the surgery group and 75% in the carbon ion RT group. Of the six factors in this scoring system, the carbon ion RT group had significantly greater scores in emotional acceptance than did the surgery group. Conclusion: Carbon ion RT results in a high local control rate and preservation of urinary-anorectal function compared with surgery.

  15. Radiotherapy for chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Haberer, Thomas; Jaekel, Oliver; Thilmann, Christoph; Kraemer, Michael; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Kraft, Gerhard; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Compared to photon irradiation, carbon ions provide physical and biologic advantages that may be exploited in chordomas and chondrosarcomas. Methods and Materials: Between August 1998 and December 2000, 37 patients with chordomas (n=24) and chondrosarcomas (n=13) were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy within a Phase I/II trial. Tumor conformal application of carbon ion beams was realized by intensity-controlled raster scanning with pulse-to-pulse energy variation. Three-dimensional treatment planning included biologic plan optimization. The median tumor dose was 60 GyE (GyE Gy x relative biologic effectiveness). Results: The mean follow-up was 13 months. The local control rate after 1 and 2 years was 96% and 90%, respectively. We observed 2 recurrences outside the gross tumor volume in patients with chordomas. Progression-free survival was 100% for chondrosarcomas and 83% for chordomas at 2 years. Partial remission after carbon ion radiotherapy was observed in 6 patients. Treatment toxicity was mild. Conclusion: These are the first data demonstrating the clinical feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of scanning beam delivery of ion beams in patients with skull base tumors. The preliminary results in patients with skull base chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas are encouraging, although the follow-up was too short to draw definite conclusions concerning outcome. In the absence of major toxicity, dose escalation might be considered

  16. Peripheral lymphocyte subset variation predicts prostate cancer carbon ion radiotherapy outcomes

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    Shi, Ze-Liang; Li, Bing-Xin; Wu, Xian-Wei; Li, Ping; Zhang, Qing; Wei, Xun-Bin; Fu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    The immune system plays a complementary role in the cytotoxic activity of radiotherapy. Here, we examined changes in immune cell subsets after heavy ion therapy for prostate cancer. The lymphocyte counts were compared with acute radiotherapy-related toxicity, defined according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, and short-term local efficacy, defined based on prostate-specific antigen concentrations. Confirmed prostate cancer patients who had not received previous radiotherapy were administered carbon ion radiotherapy (CIR) in daily fractions of 2.74 GyE with a total dose of 63-66 GyE. Lymphocyte subset counts were investigated before, during and after radiotherapy, and at a 1 month follow-up. Most notable among our findings, the CD4/CD8 ratio and CD19+ cell counts were consistently higher in patients with a complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) to CIR than in those classified in the stable disease (SD) group (P<0.05 for both). But CD3+ and CD8+ cell counts were lower in the CR and PR groups than in the SD group. These results indicate that variations in peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations are predictive of outcome after CIR for prostate cancer. PMID:27029063

  17. Five-year quality of life assessment after carbon ion radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Katsuya; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Nomiya, Takuma; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Akakura, Koichiro; Shimazaki, Jun; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively assess 5-year health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients treated with carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for clinically localized prostate cancer. A total of 417 patients received carbon ion radiotherapy at a total dose of 63–66 Gray-equivalents (GyE) in 20 fractions over 5 weeks, and neoadjuvant and adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were administered for intermediate and high-risk patients. A HRQOL assessment was performed at five time points (immediately before the initiation of C-ion RT, immediately after, and at 12, 36 and 60 months after completion of C-ion RT) using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT) questionnaires. FACT-G and FACT-P scores were significantly decreased; however, the absolute change after 60 months was minimal. The transient decreases in the Trial Outcome Index (TOI) score returned to their baseline levels. Use of ADT, presence of adverse events, and biochemical failure were related to lower scores. Scores of subdomains of FACT instruments indicated characteristic changes. The pattern of HRQOL change after C-ion RT was similar to that of other modalities. Further controlled studies focusing on a HRQOL in patients with prostate cancer are warranted.

  18. Health-related quality of life after carbon-ion radiotherapy for prostate cancer. A 3-year prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    To assess 3-year health-related quality of life of patients treated with carbon ion radiotherapy for prostate cancer. A total of 213 patients received carbon-ion radiotherapy at a total dose of 66 Gy equivalent in 20 fractions over 5 weeks, and neoadjuvant and adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy were administered for high-risk patients for at least 12 months. A health-related quality of life assessment was carried out at four time-points (immediately before the initiation of carbon-ion radiotherapy, immediately after, 12 and 36 months after completion of carbon-ion radiotherapy) using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy General and for Prostate Cancer Patients. The evaluable response rates among all responses were more than 94%. Overall, a significant decrease in the scores of the health-related quality of life 12 months after carbon-ion radiotherapy returned to their baseline levels at 36 months. Additionally, no significant decrease was observed in the scores at any of the assessment time-points compared with their baseline scores in the group of carbon-ion radiotherapy without androgen deprivation therapy; however, the presence of morbidity and biochemical failure significantly worsened the scores, and the decreases in the scores did not improve even at 36 months after carbon-ion radiotherapy. An assessment based on a subjective scoring system shows a significant decrease in health-related quality of life at 12 months after carbon-ion radiation therapy, which tends to return to baseline levels at 36 months. The presence of morbidity and bio-chemical failure significantly worsen health-related quality of life scores. Further controlled studies focusing on health-related quality of life assessment in patients with prostate cancer are warranted. (author)

  19. Simulating demand for innovative radiotherapies: An illustrative model based on carbon ion and proton radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommier, Pascal; Lievens, Yolande; Feschet, Fabien; Borras, Josep M.; Baron, Marie Helene; Shtiliyanova, Anastasiya; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Innovative therapies are not only characterized by major uncertainties regarding clinical benefit and cost but also the expected recruitment of patients. An original model was developed to simulate patient recruitment to a costly particle therapy by varying layout of the facility and patient referral (one vs. several countries) and by weighting the treated indication by the expected benefit of particle therapy. Material and methods: A multi-step probabilistic spatial model was used to allocate patients to the optimal treatment strategy and facility taking into account the estimated therapeutic gain from the new therapy for each tumour type, the geographical accessibility of the facilities and patient preference. Recruitment was simulated under different assumptions relating to the demand and supply. Results: Extending the recruitment area, reducing treatment capacity, equipping all treatment rooms with a carbon ion gantry and inclusion of proton protocols in carbon ion facilities led to an increased proportion of indications with the highest expected benefit. Assuming the existence of a competing carbon ions facility, lower values of therapeutic gain, and a greater unwillingness of patients to travel for treatment increased the proportion of indications with low expected benefit. Conclusions: Modelling patient recruitment may aid decision-making when planning new and expensive treatments.

  20. Relative clinical effectiveness of carbon ion radiotherapy. Theoretical modelling for H and N tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonovic, Laura; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Dasu, Alexandru; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of the efficiency of photon and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) administered with the same number of fractions might be of limited clinical interest, since a wide range of fractionation patterns are used clinically today. Due to advanced photon treatment techniques, hypofractionation is becoming increasingly accepted for prostate and lung tumours, whereas patients with head and neck tumours still benefit from hyperfractionated treatments. In general, the number of fractions is considerably lower in carbon ion RT. A clinically relevant comparison would be between fractionation schedules that are optimal within each treatment modality category. In this in silico study, the relative clinical effectiveness (RCE) of carbon ions was investigated for human salivary gland tumours, assuming various radiation sensitivities related to their oxygenation. The results indicate that, for hypoxic tumours in the absence of reoxygenation, the RCE (defined as the ratio of D 50 for photons to carbon ions) ranges from 3.5 to 5.7, corresponding to carbon ion treatments given in 36 and 3 fractions, respectively, and 30 fractions for photons. Assuming that interfraction local oxygenation changes take place, results for RCE are lower than that for an oxic tumour if only a few fractions of carbon ions are used. If the carbon ion treatment is given in more than 12 fractions, the RCE is larger for the hypoxic than for the well-oxygenated tumour. In conclusion, this study showed that in silico modelling enables the study of a wide range of factors in the clinical considerations and could be an important step towards individualisation of RT treatments. (author)

  1. Feasibility of carbon-ion radiotherapy for re-irradiation of locoregionally recurrent, metastatic, or secondary lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Karube, Masataka; Nakajima, Mio; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Kamada, Tadashi

    2018-03-02

    Intrathoracic recurrence after carbon-ion radiotherapy for primary or metastatic lung tumors remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths. However, treatment options are limited. Herein, we report on the toxicity and efficacy of re-irradiation with carbon-ion radiotherapy for locoregionally recurrent, metastatic, or secondary lung tumors. Data of 95 patients with prior intrathoracic carbon-ion radiotherapy who were treated with re-irradiation with carbon-ion radiotherapy at our institution between 2006 and 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. Seventy-three patients (76.8%) had primary lung tumors and 22 patients (23.2%) had metastatic lung tumors. The median dose of initial carbon-ion radiotherapy was 52.8 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) and the median dose of re-irradiation was 66.0 Gy (relative biological effectiveness). None of the patients received concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up period after re-irradiation was 18 months. In terms of grade ≥3 toxicities, one patient experienced each of the following: grade 5 bronchopleural fistula, grade 4 radiation pneumonitis, grade 3 chest pain, and grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. The 2-year local control and overall survival rates were 54.0% and 61.9%, respectively. In conclusion, re-irradiation with carbon-ion radiotherapy was associated with relatively low toxicity and moderate efficacy. Re-irradiation with carbon-ion radiotherapy might be an effective treatment option for patients with locoregionally recurrent, metastatic, or secondary lung tumors. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  2. A case of remnant pancreatic cancer after pancreatoduodenectomy successfully treated using chemotherapy and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuhito; Tokunou, Kazuhisa; Yamamoto, Hisato; Kamei, Ryoji; Kitamura, Yoshinori; Ando, Seiichiro

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of remnant pancreatic cancer after pancreatoduodenectomy that was successfully treated using chemotherapy and carbon-ion radiotherapy. A 68-year-old woman received SSPPD for pancreatic head cancer. Gemcitabine (GEM) was administered for a year as postoperative chemotherapy. One year 8 months after surgery, abdominal CT showed a 20 mm solid mass in the stump of the remnant pancreas and dilation of the distal pancreatic duct. FDG-PET revealed a solitary tumor without any recurrence. We diagnosed the patient with a solitary recurrence of pancreatic cancer. Chemotherapy (GEM) and carbon-ion radiotherapy were performed. After treatment, the lesion was not detected on CT or FDG-PET. Chemotherapy (GEM) and carbon-ion radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer seems to be effective and there might result in a survival benefit. (author)

  3. Clinical oxygen enhancement ratio of tumors in carbon ion radiotherapy: the influence of local oxygenation changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonovic, Laura; Lindblom, Emely; Dasu, Alexandru

    2014-01-01

    , using the repairable–conditionally repairable (RCR) damage model with parameters for human salivary gland tumor cells. The clinical oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was defined as the ratio of doses required for a tumor control probability of 50% for hypoxic and well-oxygenated tumors. The resulting OER...... was well above unity for all fractionations. For the hypoxic tumor, the tumor control probability was considerably higher if LOCs were assumed, rather than static oxygenation. The beneficial effect of LOCs increased with the number of fractions. However, for very low fraction doses, the improvement related...... to LOCs did not compensate for the increase in total dose required for tumor control. In conclusion, our results suggest that hypoxia can influence the outcome of carbon ion radiotherapy because of the non-negligible oxygen effect at the low LETs in the SOBP. However, if LOCs occur, a relatively high...

  4. Carbon ion radiotherapy for oligo-recurrent lung metastases from colorectal cancer: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Wataru; Nakajima, Mio; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Yamashita, Hideomi; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for oligo-recurrent lung tumors from colorectal cancer (CRC). From May 1997 to October 2012, 34 consecutive patients with oligo-recurrent pulmonary metastases from CRC were treated with CIRT. The patients were not surgical candidates for medical reasons or patient refusal. Using a respiratory-gated technique, carbon ion therapy was delivered with curative intent using 4 coplanar beam angles. A median dose of 60 GyE (range, 44–64.8 GyE) was delivered to the planning target volume (PTV), with a median daily dose of 15 GyE (range, 3.6–44 GyE). Treatment outcome was analyzed in terms of local control rate (LCR), survival rate, and treatment-related complications. In total, 34 patients with 44 oligo-recurrent pulmonary lesions were treated with CIRT. Median follow-up period was 23.7 months. The 2- and 3-year actuarial LCRs of the treated patients were 85.4% ± 6.2% and 85.4% ± 6.2%, respectively. Overall survival was 65.1% ± 9.5% at 2 years, and 50.1% ± 10.5% at 3 years. Although survival rates were relatively worse in the subsets of patients aged < 63 years or with early metastasis (< 36 months after resection of primary site), these factors were not significantly correlated with overall survival (P = 0.13 and 0.19, respectively). All treatment-related complications were self-limited, without any grade 3–5 toxicity. CIRT is one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for colorectal lung metastases, which are relatively resistant to stereotactic body radiotherapy. CIRT is considered to be the least invasive approach even in patients who have undergone repeated prior thoracic metastasectomies

  5. Clinical Impact of Re-irradiation with Carbon-ion Radiotherapy for Lymph Node Recurrence of Gynecological Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Shintaro; Okonogi, Noriyuki; Kato, Shingo; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Kobayashi, Daijiro; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Karasawa, Kumiko; Nakano, Takashi; Kamada, Tadashi

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of re-irradiation with carbon-ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for lymph node recurrence of gynecological cancers after definitive radiotherapy. Data regarding patients with unresectable and isolated recurrent lymph node from gynecological cancer after definitive radiotherapy were analyzed. Total dose of C-ion RT was 48-57.6 Gy (RBE) in 12 or 16 fractions. Sixteen patients received re-irradiation by C-ion RT were analyzed. Median follow-up was 37 months. Median tumor size was 27 mm. None developed Grade 1 or higher acute toxicities and Grade 3 or higher late toxicities. The 3-year overall survival, local control and disease-free survival rates after C-ion RT were 74%, 94% and 55%, respectively. Re-irradiation with C-ion RT for lymph node recurrence of gynecological cancers after definitive radiotherapy can be safe and effective. This result suggested that C-ion RT could be a curative treatment option for conventionally difficult-to-cure patients. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. Randomised phase I/II study to evaluate carbon ion radiotherapy versus fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with recurrent or progressive gliomas: The CINDERELLA trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Wick, Wolfgang; Debus, Jürgen; Burkholder, Iris; Edler, Lutz; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Jäkel, Oliver; Haberer, Thomas; Haselmann, Renate; Unterberg, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of patients with recurrent glioma includes neurosurgical resection, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. In most cases, a full course of radiotherapy has been applied after primary diagnosis, therefore application of re-irradiation has to be applied cauteously. With modern precision photon techniques such as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), a second course of radiotherapy is safe and effective and leads to survival times of 22, 16 and 8 months for recurrent WHO grade II, III and IV gliomas. Carbon ions offer physical and biological characteristics. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 2 and 5 depending on the GBM cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Protons, however, offer an RBE which is comparable to photons. First Japanese Data on the evaluation of carbon ion radiation therapy for the treatment of primary high-grade gliomas showed promising results in a small and heterogeneous patient collective. In the current Phase I/II-CINDERELLA-trial re-irradiation using carbon ions will be compared to FSRT applied to the area of contrast enhancement representing high-grade tumor areas in patients with recurrent gliomas. Within the Phase I Part of the trial, the Recommended Dose (RD) of carbon ion radiotherapy will be determined in a dose escalation scheme. In the subsequent randomized Phase II part, the RD will be evaluated in the experimental arm, compared to the standard arm, FSRT with a total dose of 36 Gy in single doses of 2 Gy. Primary endpoint of the Phase I part is toxicity. Primary endpoint of the randomized part II is survival after re-irradiation at 12 months, secondary endpoint is progression-free survival. The Cinderella trial is the first study to evaluate carbon ion

  7. Influence of nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaniwa, T., E-mail: taku@nirs.go.jp; Kanematsu, N. [Medical Physics Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tsuji, H.; Kamada, T. [Hospital, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning, the planar integrated dose (PID) measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling using the stopping power ratio. Since body tissues are chemically different from water, this dose calculation can be subject to errors, particularly due to differences in inelastic nuclear interactions. In recent studies, the authors proposed and validated a PID correction method for these errors. In the present study, the authors used this correction method to assess the influence of these nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in various clinical cases. Methods: Using 10–20 cases each of prostate, head and neck (HN), bone and soft tissue (BS), lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine neoplasms, the authors first used treatment plans for carbon-ion radiotherapy without nuclear interaction correction to derive uncorrected dose distributions. The authors then compared these distributions with recalculated distributions using the nuclear interaction correction (corrected dose distributions). Results: Median (25%/75% quartiles) differences between the target mean uncorrected doses and corrected doses were 0.2% (0.1%/0.2%), 0.0% (0.0%/0.0%), −0.3% (−0.4%/−0.2%), −0.1% (−0.2%/−0.1%), −0.1% (−0.2%/0.0%), −0.4% (−0.5%/−0.1%), and −0.3% (−0.4%/0.0%) for the prostate, HN, BS, lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine cases, respectively. The largest difference of −1.6% in target mean and −2.5% at maximum were observed in a uterine case. Conclusions: For most clinical cases, dose calculation errors due to the water nonequivalence of the tissues in nuclear interactions would be marginal compared to intrinsic uncertainties in treatment planning, patient setup, beam delivery, and clinical response. In some extreme cases, however, these errors can be substantial. Accordingly, this correction method should be routinely applied to treatment planning in clinical practice.

  8. Outcomes of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy: Analysis of dose-volume histograms and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Azusa; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Mizota, Atsushi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the tolerance dose for retention of visual acuity in patients with head-and-neck tumors treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From June 1994 to March 2000, 163 patients with tumors in the head and neck or skull base region were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Analysis was performed on 54 optic nerves (ONs) corresponding to 30 patients whose ONs had been included in the irradiated volume. These patients showed no evidence of visual impairment due to other factors and had a follow-up period of >4 years. All patients had been informed of the possibility of visual impairment before treatment. We evaluated the dose-complication probability and the prognostic factors for the retention of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy, using dose-volume histograms and multivariate analysis. Results: The median age of 30 patients (14 men, 16 women) was 57.2 years. Median prescribed total dose was 56.0 gray equivalents (GyE) at 3.0-4.0 GyE per fraction per day (range, 48-64 GyE; 16-18 fractions; 4-6 weeks). Of 54 ONs that were analyzed, 35 had been irradiated with max ]) resulting in no visual loss. Conversely, 11 of the 19 ONs (58%) irradiated with >57 GyE (D max ) suffered a decrease of visual acuity. In all of these cases, the ONs had been involved in the tumor before carbon ion radiotherapy. In the multivariate analysis, a dose of 20% of the volume of the ON (D 2 ) was significantly associated with visual loss. Conclusions: The occurrence of visual loss seems to be correlated with a delivery of >60 GyE to 20% of the volume of the ON

  9. Comparison of clinical and functional outcome between surgical treatment and carbon ion radiotherapy for pelvic chondrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outani, Hidetatsu; Hamada, Kenichiro; Imura, Yoshinori; Oshima, Kazuya; Sotobori, Tsukasa; Demizu, Yusuke; Kakunaga, Shigeki; Joyama, Susumu; Imai, Reiko; Okimoto, Tomoaki; Naka, Norifumi; Kudawara, Ikuo; Ueda, Takafumi; Araki, Nobuhito; Kamada, Tadashi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2016-02-01

    As there are no reports of studies in patients with pelvic chondrosarcoma treated with carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT), the aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of CIRT for patients with chondrosarcoma of the pelvis. The medical records of 31 patients with chondrosarcoma of the pelvis treated either by surgical resection or by CIRT between 1983 and 2014 were reviewed. There were 22 males and 9 females with a median age of 43 years (range 16-77 years). The median duration of follow-up was 66 months (range 5-289 months). Twenty-four patients underwent surgery, and 7 patients received CIRT (70.4 GyE in 16 fractions over 4 weeks). The overall local recurrence rate was 32 %, and the estimated overall 5- and 10-year survival rates were 72 and 57 %, respectively. The mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society functional score was 59 %. The treatment procedures (surgery or CIRT) did not affect overall survival (P = 0.347). However, the patients who underwent surgery had impaired function compared with those who received CIRT (P = 0.03). Although more patients need to be monitored to assess the clinical and functional outcomes of CIRT for patients with chondrosarcoma of the pelvis, this treatment might offer an acceptable alternative.

  10. Quality of life (QOL) assessment in patients received carbon ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in quality of life (QoL) of medically inoperable bone and soft tissue sarcoma treated carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT). Fifty-eight patients followed over 1 year were reviewed in this report. The questionnaire, European Organaization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (EORTC-QLQ-C30) was assessed before the start of CIRT, and subsequently at the end of CIRT, 3, 6, 12, 24 months after CIRT. During follow-up, it was send to the patients by mail. The compliance was 98% for all follow-up period in this study. The scores about QoL and functioning did not significantly change for 1 year. QoL scores tended to decrease in large clinical target volume (CTV) (>600 cc) group compared to small CTV group. CIRT could keep QoL levels of patients with medically inoperable bone and soft tissue tumors. (author)

  11. Carbon ion radiotherapy for chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base. Results in 67 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz-Ertner, D.; Wannenmacher, M. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Nikoghosyan, A.; Thilmann, C.; Jaekel, O.; Karger, C. [German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, T.; Scholz, M.; Kraft, G. [Dept. of Biophysics, German Ion Research Center (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Debus, J. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate outcome and toxicity after carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) in chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas. Patients and Methods: Between September 1998 and December 2001, 74 patients were treated for chordomas and chondrosarcomas with carbon ion RT at the ''Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung'' (GSI). Seven patients reirradiated with reduced carbon ion doses after conventional RT were excluded from the analysis, leaving 67 evaluable patients (44 chordomas and 23 chondrosarcomas) who received a full course of carbon ion therapy. Tumor-conform application of carbon ion beams was realized by intensity-controlled raster scanning with active energy variation. Three-dimensional treatment planning included intensity modulation and biological plan optimization. A median dose of 60 GyE was applied to the target volume within 20 consecutive days at a dose of 3.0 GyE per fraction. Results: Median follow-up was 15 months (range 3-46 months). At 3 years, actuarial local control was 100% for chondrosarcomas and 87% for chordomas, respectively. Partial tumor remission was observed in 14/44 (31%) chordoma patients and in 4/23 (17%) chondrosarcoma patients. At 3 years, actuarial overall survival was 100% for chondrosarcomas and 89% for chordomas, respectively. No severe side effects > CTC III have been observed. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the clinical efficiency and safety of scanning beam delivery of carbon ion beams in patients with skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas. The observation of tumor regressions at a dose level of 60 GyE may indicate that the biological effectiveness of carbon ions in chordomas and chondrosarcomas is higher than initially estimated. (orig.)

  12. Carbon ion radiotherapy for chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base. Results in 67 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz-Ertner, D.; Wannenmacher, M.; Nikoghosyan, A.; Thilmann, C.; Jaekel, O.; Karger, C.; Haberer, T.; Scholz, M.; Kraft, G.; Debus, J.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate outcome and toxicity after carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) in chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas. Patients and Methods: Between September 1998 and December 2001, 74 patients were treated for chordomas and chondrosarcomas with carbon ion RT at the ''Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung'' (GSI). Seven patients reirradiated with reduced carbon ion doses after conventional RT were excluded from the analysis, leaving 67 evaluable patients (44 chordomas and 23 chondrosarcomas) who received a full course of carbon ion therapy. Tumor-conform application of carbon ion beams was realized by intensity-controlled raster scanning with active energy variation. Three-dimensional treatment planning included intensity modulation and biological plan optimization. A median dose of 60 GyE was applied to the target volume within 20 consecutive days at a dose of 3.0 GyE per fraction. Results: Median follow-up was 15 months (range 3-46 months). At 3 years, actuarial local control was 100% for chondrosarcomas and 87% for chordomas, respectively. Partial tumor remission was observed in 14/44 (31%) chordoma patients and in 4/23 (17%) chondrosarcoma patients. At 3 years, actuarial overall survival was 100% for chondrosarcomas and 89% for chordomas, respectively. No severe side effects > CTC III have been observed. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the clinical efficiency and safety of scanning beam delivery of carbon ion beams in patients with skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas. The observation of tumor regressions at a dose level of 60 GyE may indicate that the biological effectiveness of carbon ions in chordomas and chondrosarcomas is higher than initially estimated. (orig.)

  13. Dose escalation study of carbon ion radiotherapy for locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shingo; Ohno, Tatsuya; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nakano, Takashi; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Kamada, Tadashi; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kandatsu, Susumu; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Ezawa, Hidefumi; Suzuki, Michiya

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer by two phase I/II clinical trials. Methods and Materials: Between June 1995 and January 2000, 44 patients were treated with CIRT. Thirty patients had Stage IIIB disease, and 14 patients had Stage IVA disease. Median tumor size was 6.5 cm (range, 4.2-11.0 cm). The treatment consisted of 16 fractions of whole pelvic irradiation and 8 fractions of local boost. In the first study, the total dose ranged from 52.8 to 72.0 gray equivalents (GyE) (2.2-3.0 GyE per fraction). In the second study, the whole pelvic dose was fixed at 44.8 GyE, and an additional 24.0 or 28.0 GyE was given to the cervical tumor (total dose, 68.8 or 72.8 GyE). Results: No patient developed severe acute toxicity. In contrast, 8 patients developed major late gastrointestinal complications. The doses resulting in major complications were ≥60 GyE. All patients with major complications were surgically salvaged. The 5-year local control rate for patients in the first and second studies was 45% and 79%, respectively. When treated with ≥62.4 GyE, the local control was favorable even for the patients with stage IVA disease (69%) or for those with tumors ≥6.0 cm (64%). Conclusions: In CIRT for advanced cervical cancer, the dose to the intestines should be limited to <60 GyE to avoid major complications. Although the number of patients in this study was small, the results support continued investigation to confirm therapeutic efficacy

  14. Evaluation of Risk Factors for Vertebral Compression Fracture after Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy for Primary Spinal and Paraspinal Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Matsumoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Carbon-ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT was effective therapy for inoperable spinal and paraspinal sarcomas. However, a significant adverse event following radiotherapies is vertebral compression fractures (VCFs. In this study, we investigated the incidence of and risk factors for post-C-ion RT VCFs in patients with spinal or paraspinal sarcomas. Material and Methods. Thirty consecutive patients with spinal or paraspinal sarcomas treated with C-ion RT were retrospectively reviewed. Various clinical parameters and the Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS were used to evaluate the risk factors for post-C-ion RT VCFs. Results. The overall incidence of VCFs was 23% (median time: 7 months. Patients with VCFs showed a markedly higher SINS score (median value, 9 points than those without VCF (5 points. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the SINS score was 0.88, and the optimum SINS cut-off score was 8 points. The cumulative incidence of VCFs at 1 year was 9% for patients with a SINS score under 8 points, versus 80% for those with a SINS score of 8 points or higher (p<0.0001. Conclusions. In patients with a SINS score of 8 points or higher, referral to a spine surgeon for stabilization and multidisciplinary discussion is appropriate.

  15. Customized mouthpieces designed to reduce tongue mucositis in carbon-ion radiotherapy for tumors of the nasal and paranasal sinuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Musha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mouthpieces are used to fix the positions of the lower jaw and teeth during carbon-ion radiotherapy for head and neck tumors. We used a customized mouthpiece to reduce radiation mucositis by displacing the tongue. Acute radiation mucositis gradually increased for the palate and tongue after approximately six irradiation fractions (maximal mean grade: palate, 2.5 during radiation fractions 15; tongue, 0.8 during radiation fractions 12 and 13. The mean grade of mucositis was significantly lower for the tongue than for the palate from irradiation fraction six until two weeks after irradiation.

  16. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Shornikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  17. Quantification of the Relative Biological Effectiveness for Ion Beam Radiotherapy: Direct Experimental Comparison of Proton and Carbon Ion Beams and a Novel Approach for Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsaesser, Thilo; Weyrather, Wilma K.; Friedrich, Thomas; Durante, Marco; Iancu, Gheorghe; Kraemer, Michael; Kragl, Gabriele; Brons, Stephan; Winter, Marcus; Weber, Klaus-Josef; Scholz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present the first direct experimental in vitro comparison of the biological effectiveness of range-equivalent protons and carbon ion beams for Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed in a three-dimensional phantom using a pencil beam scanning technique and to compare the experimental data with a novel biophysical model. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was measured in the phantom after irradiation with two opposing fields, thus mimicking the typical patient treatment scenario. The novel biophysical model represents a substantial extension of the local effect model, previously used for treatment planning in carbon ion therapy for more than 400 patients, and potentially can be used to predict effectiveness of all ion species relevant for radiotherapy. A key feature of the new approach is the more sophisticated consideration of spatially correlated damage induced by ion irradiation. Results: The experimental data obtained for Chinese hamster ovary cells clearly demonstrate that higher cell killing is achieved in the target region with carbon ions as compared with protons when the effects in the entrance channel are comparable. The model predictions demonstrate agreement with these experimental data and with data obtained with helium ions under similar conditions. Good agreement is also achieved with relative biological effectiveness values reported in the literature for other cell lines for monoenergetic proton, helium, and carbon ions. Conclusion: Both the experimental data and the new modeling approach are supportive of the advantages of carbon ions as compared with protons for treatment-like field configurations. Because the model predicts the effectiveness for several ion species with similar accuracy, it represents a powerful tool for further optimization and utilization of the potential of ion beams in tumor therapy.

  18. Carbon Ion Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Herrmann, Rochus

    On the importance of choice of target size for selective boosting of hypoxic tumor subvolumina in carbon ion therapy Purpose: Functional imaging methods in radiotherapy are maturing and can to some extent uncover radio resistant structures found within a tumour entity. Selective boost of identified...... effect. All cell lines investigated here did not reach an OER of 1, even for the smaller structures, which may indicate that the achievable dose average LET of carbon ions is too low, and heavier ions than carbon may be considered for functional LET-painting....

  19. Development of electronic clinical path for patients with H and N cancer treated with carbon ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisutani, Asuka; Okabe, Satsuki; Murakami, Masao; Kagawa, Kazufumi; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an electronic clinical path for patients with head and neck (H and N) tumor treated with carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) focusing on acute reactions of the oral mucosa and the skin. Between January and July, 2002, fifteen patients with H and N tumor had been treated with carbon ion radiotherapy including oral cavity in the RT fields. Acute reactions of the oral mucosa and the skin were analyzed together with face scales (FS) that is an indicator of quality of life obtained daily from patients during RT courses. Medical interventions including prescription for mucositis or dermatitis, nursing care, and changes of meal were also analyzed. Average period of being in hospital was 42.6±3.6 days and that of radiation was 27.0±1.9 days. Radiation mucositis appeared 5 days (10.8 GyE) after start of carbon ion RT, reached a maximum reaction at 20 days (Grade 1: 7%, Grade 2: 33%, Grade 3: 60%), and recovered less than Grade 1 at 44 days on average. Radiation dermatitis also appeared 8 days (18 GyE), reached a maximum at 33 days (Grade 1: 47%, Grade 2: 40%, Grade 3: 13%), and recovered less than Grade 1 at 51 days on average. Changes of FS showed deterioration 23 days after start of therapy. At the latter half of RT courses, mucositis, FS, and dermatitis reached a maximum in that order. Through analyses of the time-score plots, the change of FS seemed corresponding to that of dermatitis. The required medical interventions were change of meal in 10, analgesics in 8, and gargles in 15 patients. Based on these results, we established a clinical path as a trial piece. We confirmed that there was a specific pattern in ups and downs of acute reactions of the oral mucosa and the skin during a RT course. We concluded that a clinical path is useful for patients with H and N cancer treated with carbon ion RT. (author)

  20. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen; Haberer, Thomas; Jaekel, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications

  1. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications.

  2. Evaluation of plastic materials for range shifting, range compensation, and solid-phantom dosimetry in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Koba, Yusuke; Ogata, Risa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Beam range control is the essence of radiotherapy with heavy charged particles. In conventional broad-beam delivery, fine range adjustment is achieved by insertion of range shifting and compensating materials. In dosimetry, solid phantoms are often used for convenience. These materials should ideally be equivalent to water. In this study, the authors evaluated dosimetric water equivalence of four common plastics, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polyoxymethylene (POM). Methods: Using the Bethe formula for energy loss, the Gottschalk formula for multiple scattering, and the Sihver formula for nuclear interactions, the authors calculated the effective densities of the plastics for these interactions. The authors experimentally measured variation of the Bragg peak of carbon-ion beams by insertion of HDPE, PMMA, and POM, which were compared with analytical model calculations. Results: The theoretical calculation resulted in slightly reduced multiple scattering and severely increased nuclear interactions for HDPE, compared to water and the other plastics. The increase in attenuation of carbon ions for 20-cm range shift was experimentally measured to be 8.9% for HDPE, 2.5% for PMMA, and 0.0% for POM while PET was theoretically estimated to be in between PMMA and POM. The agreement between the measurements and the calculations was about 1% or better. Conclusions: For carbon-ion beams, POM was dosimetrically indistinguishable from water and the best of the plastics examined in this study. The poorest was HDPE, which would reduce the Bragg peak by 0.45% per cm range shift, although with marginal superiority for reduced multiple scattering. Between the two clear plastics, PET would be superior to PMMA in dosimetric water equivalence.

  3. Phase I study evaluating the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer with carbon ion radiotherapy: the PHOENIX-01 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Debus, Jürgen; Habermehl, Daniel; Kieser, Meinhard; Dreher, Constantin; Werner, Jens; Haselmann, Renate; Jäkel, Oliver; Jäger, Dirk; Büchler, Markus W

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer include surgery, chemotherapy as well as radiotherapy. In many cases, surgical resection is not possible, and therefore treatment alternatives have to be performed. Chemoradiation has been established as a convincing treatment alternative for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Carbon ions offer physical and biological characteristics. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 1.16 and 2.46 depending on the pancreatic cancer cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Japanese Data on the evaluation of carbon ion radiation therapy showed promising results for patients with pancreatic cancer. The present PHOENIX-01 trial evaluates carbon ion radiotherapy using the active rasterscanning technique in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in combination with weekly gemcitabine and adjuvant gemcitabine. Primary endpoint is toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall survival, progression-free survival and response. The physical and biological properties of the carbon ion beam promise to improve the therapeutic ratio in patients with pancreatic cancer: Due to the inverted dose profile dose deposition in the entry channel of the beam leads to sparing of normal tissue; the Bragg peak can be directed into the defined target volume, and the sharp dose fall-off thereafter again spares normal tissue behind the target volume. The higher RBE of carbon ions, which has been shown also for pancreatic cancer cell lines in the preclinical setting, is likely to contribute to an increase in local control, and perhaps in OS. Early data from Japanese centers have shown promising results. In conclusion, this is the first trial to evaluate actively delivered carbon

  4. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for locally advanced primary or postoperative recurrent epithelial carcinoma of the lacrimal gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Toyama, Shingo; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nakayama, Yuko; Mizota, Atsushi; Ohnishi, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the applicability of carbon ion beams for the treatment of carcinoma of the lacrimal gland with regard to normal tissue morbidity and local tumor control. Methods and materials: Between April 2002 and January 2011, 21 patients with locally advanced primary epithelial carcinoma of the lacrimal gland were enrolled in a Phase I/II clinical trial of carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. Acute radiation toxicity was the primary endpoint of this dose-escalation study and the late toxicity, local control, and overall survival were additionally evaluated as secondary endpoints. Of the 21 subjects enrolled, all patients were followed for more than 6 months and analyzed. Results: The radiation dose was increased from the initial dose of 48.0 Gy equivalents (GyE)/12 fractions at 10% increments up to 52.8 GyE. Of the 21 patients, five received a total dose of 48.0 GyE, and 16 received a total dose of 52.8 GyE. No patient developed grade 3 or higher skin toxicity. As late ocular/visual toxicity, three patients had grade 3 retinopathy and seven patients lost their vision. Among the 10 patients treated until May 2005, five patients had local recurrence, three of whom had marginal recurrence. Therefore, the margin for the CTV (clinical target volume) was set to a range according to the orbital exenteration since June 2005. After the application of the extended margin, no local recurrence has been observed. The three-year overall survival and local control rates were 82.2% and 79.0%, respectively. Conclusion: CIRT can be applied for primary epithelial carcinoma of the lacrimal gland, with a borderline acceptable morbidity and sufficient antitumor effect when an extended margin is adopted

  5. GPU-accelerated automatic identification of robust beam setups for proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammazzalorso, F; Jelen, U; Bednarz, T

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate acceleration on graphic processing units (GPU) of automatic identification of robust particle therapy beam setups, minimizing negative dosimetric effects of Bragg peak displacement caused by treatment-time patient positioning errors. Our particle therapy research toolkit, RobuR, was extended with OpenCL support and used to implement calculation on GPU of the Port Homogeneity Index, a metric scoring irradiation port robustness through analysis of tissue density patterns prior to dose optimization and computation. Results were benchmarked against an independent native CPU implementation. Numerical results were in agreement between the GPU implementation and native CPU implementation. For 10 skull base cases, the GPU-accelerated implementation was employed to select beam setups for proton and carbon ion treatment plans, which proved to be dosimetrically robust, when recomputed in presence of various simulated positioning errors. From the point of view of performance, average running time on the GPU decreased by at least one order of magnitude compared to the CPU, rendering the GPU-accelerated analysis a feasible step in a clinical treatment planning interactive session. In conclusion, selection of robust particle therapy beam setups can be effectively accelerated on a GPU and become an unintrusive part of the particle therapy treatment planning workflow. Additionally, the speed gain opens new usage scenarios, like interactive analysis manipulation (e.g. constraining of some setup) and re-execution. Finally, through OpenCL portable parallelism, the new implementation is suitable also for CPU-only use, taking advantage of multiple cores, and can potentially exploit types of accelerators other than GPUs.

  6. GPU-accelerated automatic identification of robust beam setups for proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammazzalorso, F.; Bednarz, T.; Jelen, U.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate acceleration on graphic processing units (GPU) of automatic identification of robust particle therapy beam setups, minimizing negative dosimetric effects of Bragg peak displacement caused by treatment-time patient positioning errors. Our particle therapy research toolkit, RobuR, was extended with OpenCL support and used to implement calculation on GPU of the Port Homogeneity Index, a metric scoring irradiation port robustness through analysis of tissue density patterns prior to dose optimization and computation. Results were benchmarked against an independent native CPU implementation. Numerical results were in agreement between the GPU implementation and native CPU implementation. For 10 skull base cases, the GPU-accelerated implementation was employed to select beam setups for proton and carbon ion treatment plans, which proved to be dosimetrically robust, when recomputed in presence of various simulated positioning errors. From the point of view of performance, average running time on the GPU decreased by at least one order of magnitude compared to the CPU, rendering the GPU-accelerated analysis a feasible step in a clinical treatment planning interactive session. In conclusion, selection of robust particle therapy beam setups can be effectively accelerated on a GPU and become an unintrusive part of the particle therapy treatment planning workflow. Additionally, the speed gain opens new usage scenarios, like interactive analysis manipulation (e.g. constraining of some setup) and re-execution. Finally, through OpenCL portable parallelism, the new implementation is suitable also for CPU-only use, taking advantage of multiple cores, and can potentially exploit types of accelerators other than GPUs.

  7. submitter Dose prescription in carbon ion radiotherapy: How to compare two different RBE-weighted dose calculation systems

    CERN Document Server

    Molinelli, Silvia; Mairani, Andrea; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Mirandola, Alfredo; Russo, Stefania; Mastella, Edoardo; Hasegawa, Azusa; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Vischioni, Barbara; Vitolo, Viviana; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ciocca, Mario; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Orecchia, Roberto; Fossati, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: In carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT), the use of different relative biological effectiveness (RBE) models in the RBE-weighted dose $(D_{RBE})$ calculation can lead to deviations in the physical dose $(D_{phy})$ delivered to the patient. Our aim is to reduce target $D_{phy}$ deviations by converting prescription dose values. Material and methods: Planning data of patients treated at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) were collected, with prescribed doses per fraction ranging from 3.6 Gy (RBE) to 4.6 Gy (RBE), according to the Japanese semi-empirical model. The $D_{phy}$ was Monte Carlo (MC) re-calculated simulating the NIRS beamline. The local effect model (LEM)_I was then applied to estimate $D_{RBE}$. Target median $D_{RBE}$ ratios between MC + LEM_I and NIRS plans determined correction factors for the conversion of prescription doses. Plans were re-optimized in a LEM_I-based commercial system, prescribing the NIRS uncorrected and corrected $D_{RBE}$. Results: The MC ...

  8. Review on heavy ion radiotherapy facilities and related ion sources (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, A.; Fujita, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Biri, S.; Drentje, A. G.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy ion radiotherapy awakens worldwide interest recently. The clinical results obtained by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan have clearly demonstrated the advantages of carbon ion radiotherapy. Presently, there are four facilities for heavy ion radiotherapy in operation, and several new facilities are under construction or being planned. The most common requests for ion sources are a long lifetime and good stability and reproducibility. Sufficient intensity has been achieved by electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at the present facilities.

  9. Carbon ion radiotherapy for localized primary sarcoma of the extremities: Results of a phase I/II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, Shinji; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kameda, Noriaki; Okada, Tohru; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shinichirou

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for localized primary sarcomas of the extremities in a prospective study. Patients and materials: From April 2000 to May 2010, 17 (male/female: 12/5) patients with localized primary sarcoma of the extremities received CIRT. The median age was 53 years (range: 14–87 years). Nine patients had primary diseases and eight had recurrent diseases. Of the 17 patients, eight refused amputation, and the remaining nine refused surgical resection. Tumors were located in the upper limbs in four patients and lower limbs in 13. Histological diagnosis was osteosarcoma in three patients, liposarcoma in two, synovial sarcoma in two, rhabdomyosarcoma in two, pleomorphic sarcoma in two, and miscellaneous in six. The CIRT dose to the limb was 52.8 GyE for one patient, 64 GyE for three, 70.4 GyE for 13 in 16 fixed fractions over 4 weeks. Records were reviewed and outcomes including radiologic response, local control (progression-free), and survival were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 37 months (range: 11–97 months). Radiological response rate was 65% (PR in 11, SD in 5, and PD in 1). The local control rate at 5 years was 76%. The overall survival rate at 5 years was 56%. Of the 17 patients, 10 survived without disease progression. Four patients had local recurrences, one was salvaged by repeated CIRT and the other three died due to systemic diseases. Distant failure was observed in six patients. One patient suffered from femoral fracture (grade 3) and received surgical fixation 27 months after CIRT. No other severe reactions (grade 3) were observed. Conclusions: CIRT is suggested to be an effective and safe treatment for patients who refuse surgery for localized primary sarcomas of the extremities.

  10. A preliminary Monte Carlo study for the treatment head of a carbon-ion radiotherapy facility using TOPAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongdong; Zhang, Lian; Chen, Zhi; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Li, Qiang; Xu, Xie George

    2017-09-01

    In medical physics it is desirable to have a Monte Carlo code that is less complex, reliable yet flexible for dose verification, optimization, and component design. TOPAS is a newly developed Monte Carlo simulation tool which combines extensive radiation physics libraries available in Geant4 code, easyto-use geometry and support for visualization. Although TOPAS has been widely tested and verified in simulations of proton therapy, there has been no reported application for carbon ion therapy. To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of TOPAS simulations for carbon ion therapy, a licensed TOPAS code (version 3_0_p1) was used to carry out a dosimetric study of therapeutic carbon ions. Results of depth dose profile based on different physics models have been obtained and compared with the measurements. It is found that the G4QMD model is at least as accurate as the TOPAS default BIC physics model for carbon ions, but when the energy is increased to relatively high levels such as 400 MeV/u, the G4QMD model shows preferable performance. Also, simulations of special components used in the treatment head at the Institute of Modern Physics facility was conducted to investigate the Spread-Out dose distribution in water. The physical dose in water of SOBP was found to be consistent with the aim of the 6 cm ridge filter.

  11. Reformulation of a clinical-dose system for carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2015-01-01

    At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), more than 8,000 patients have been treated for various tumors with carbon-ion (C-ion) radiotherapy in the past 20 years based on a radiobiologically defined clinical-dose system. Through clinical experience, including extensive dose escalation studies, optimum dose-fractionation protocols have been established for respective tumors, which may be considered as the standards in C-ion radiotherapy. Although the therapeutic appropriateness of the clinical-dose system has been widely demonstrated by clinical results, the system incorporates several oversimplifications such as dose-independent relative biological effectiveness (RBE), empirical nuclear fragmentation model, and use of dose-averaged linear energy transfer to represent the spectrum of particles. We took the opportunity to update the clinical-dose system at the time we started clinical treatment with pencil beam scanning, a new beam delivery method, in 2011. The requirements for the updated system were to correct the oversimplifications made in the original system, while harmonizing with the original system to maintain the established dose-fractionation protocols. In the updated system, the radiation quality of the therapeutic C-ion beam was derived with Monte Carlo simulations, and its biological effectiveness was predicted with a theoretical model. We selected the most used C-ion beam with α r = 0.764 Gy −1 and β = 0.0615 Gy −2 as reference radiation for RBE. The C-equivalent biological dose distribution is designed to allow the prescribed survival of tumor cells of the human salivary gland (HSG) in entire spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region, with consideration to the dose dependence of the RBE. This C-equivalent biological dose distribution is scaled to a clinical dose distribution to harmonize with our clinical experiences with C-ion radiotherapy. Treatment plans were made with the original and the updated clinical-dose systems, and both

  12. Reformulation of a clinical-dose system for carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2015-04-01

    At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), more than 8,000 patients have been treated for various tumors with carbon-ion (C-ion) radiotherapy in the past 20 years based on a radiobiologically defined clinical-dose system. Through clinical experience, including extensive dose escalation studies, optimum dose-fractionation protocols have been established for respective tumors, which may be considered as the standards in C-ion radiotherapy. Although the therapeutic appropriateness of the clinical-dose system has been widely demonstrated by clinical results, the system incorporates several oversimplifications such as dose-independent relative biological effectiveness (RBE), empirical nuclear fragmentation model, and use of dose-averaged linear energy transfer to represent the spectrum of particles. We took the opportunity to update the clinical-dose system at the time we started clinical treatment with pencil beam scanning, a new beam delivery method, in 2011. The requirements for the updated system were to correct the oversimplifications made in the original system, while harmonizing with the original system to maintain the established dose-fractionation protocols. In the updated system, the radiation quality of the therapeutic C-ion beam was derived with Monte Carlo simulations, and its biological effectiveness was predicted with a theoretical model. We selected the most used C-ion beam with αr = 0.764 Gy-1 and β = 0.0615 Gy-2 as reference radiation for RBE. The C-equivalent biological dose distribution is designed to allow the prescribed survival of tumor cells of the human salivary gland (HSG) in entire spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region, with consideration to the dose dependence of the RBE. This C-equivalent biological dose distribution is scaled to a clinical dose distribution to harmonize with our clinical experiences with C-ion radiotherapy. Treatment plans were made with the original and the updated clinical-dose systems, and both

  13. In vitro evaluation of photon and raster-scanned carbon ion radiotherapy in combination with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafie, Rami A. El; Habermehl, Daniel; Rieken, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, being responsible for 6% of all cancer-related deaths. Conventional radiotherapy with or without additional chemotherapy has been applied in the past in the context of neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy concepts with only modest results, however new radiation modalities, such as particle therapy with promising physical and biological characteristics, present an alternative treatment option for patients with pancreatic cancer. Up until now the raster scanning technique employed at our institution for the application of carbon ions has been unique, and no radiobiological data using pancreatic cancer cells has been available yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytotoxic effects that can be achieved by treating pancreatic cancer cell lines with combinations of X-rays and gemcitabine, or alternatively with carbon ion irradiation and gemcitabine, respectively. Human pancreatic cancer cell lines AsPC-1, BxPC-3 and Panc-1 were irradiated with photons and carbon ions at various doses and treated with gemcitabine. Photon irradiation was applied with a biological cabin X-ray irradiator, and carbon ion irradiation was applied with an extended Bragg peak (linear energy transfer (LET) 103 keV/μm) using the raster scanning technique at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Responsiveness of pancreatic cancer cells to the treatment was measured by clonogenic survival. Clonogenic survival curves were then compared to predicted curves that were calculated employing the local effect model (LEM). Cell survival curves were calculated from the surviving fractions of each combination experiment and compared to a drug control that was only irradiated with X-rays or carbon ions, without application of gemcitabine. In terms of cytotoxicity, additive effects were achieved for the cell lines Panc-1 and BxPC-3, and a slight radiosensitizing effect was observed for AsPC-1. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon

  14. Results of heavy ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, J.R.

    1994-04-01

    The potential of heavy ion therapy for clinical use in cancer therapy stems from the biological parameters of heavy charged particles, and their precise dose localization. Biologically, carbon, neon and other heavy ion beams (up to about silicon) are clinically useful in overcoming the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors, thus increasing biological effectiveness relative to low-LET x-ray or electron beams. Cells irradiated by heavy ions show less variation in cell-cycle related radiosensitivity and decreased repair of radiation injury. The physical parameters of these heavy charged particles allow precise delivery of high radiation doses to tumors while minimizing irradiation of normal tissues. Clinical use requires close interaction between radiation oncologists, medical physicists, accelerator physicists, engineers, computer scientists and radiation biologists

  15. Historical aspects of heavy ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents historical developments of heavy-ion radiotherapy including discussion of HILAC and HIMAC and discussion of cooperation between Japan and the United States, along with personal reflections

  16. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy with TPF followed by radioimmunotherapy with Cetuximab and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in combination with a carbon ion boost for locally advanced tumours of the oro-, hypopharynx and larynx - TPF-C-HIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavtratzas Athanasios

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term locoregional control in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN remains challenging. While recent years have seen various approaches to improve outcome by intensification of treatment schedules through introduction of novel induction and combination chemotherapy regimen and altered fractionation regimen, patient tolerance to higher treatment intensities is limited by accompanying side-effects. Combined radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab as well as modern radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and carbon ion therapy (C12 are able to limit toxicity while maintaining treatment effects. In order to achieve maximum efficacy with yet acceptable toxicity, this sequential phase II trial combines induction chemotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-FU (TPF followed by radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab as IMRT plus carbon ion boost. We expect this approach to result in increased cure rates with yet manageable accompanying toxicity. Methods/design The TPF-C-HIT trial is a prospective, mono-centric, open-label, non-randomized phase II trial evaluating efficacy and toxicity of the combined treatment with IMRT/carbon ion boost and weekly cetuximab in 50 patients with histologically proven locally advanced SCCHN following TPF induction chemotherapy. Patients receive 24 GyE carbon ions (8 fractions and 50 Gy IMRT (2.0 Gy/fraction in combination with weekly cetuximab throughout radiotherapy. Primary endpoint is locoregional control at 12 months, secondary endpoints are disease-free survival, progression-free survival, overall survival, acute and late radiation effects as well as any adverse events of the treatment as well as quality of life (QoL analyses. Discussion The primary objective of TPF-C-HIT is to evaluate efficacy and toxicity of cetuximab in combination with combined IMRT/carbon ion therapy following TPF induction in locally advanced SCCHN. Trial Registration

  17. A study on the precise examination needed to decide an optimal planning target volume for carbon ion radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hirotoshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Mizoe, Junetsu; Kandatsu, Susumu; Ezawa, Hidefumi; Kishimoto, Riwa; Minohara, Shinichi; Ohto, Masao

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to make two pictures of the randomly-selected cross section of the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesion using three dimensional (3D) image data obtained from the three dimensional computed tomography (CT) and the three dimensional ultrasonography (US), and to prove their identity as an image of the same cross section. Using the measurement system of three inclined angles of a cross section from the three planes, a horizontal plane and two vertical planes in the three dimensional space, we obtained two images of the same cross section of the HCC lesion originating from 3D-US and 3D-CT image data (US-CT 3D-dual image). To prove the identity of the two images of the US-CT 3D-dual image, 3D-US and 3D-CT images, we compared the two images to the original cross section of the resected HCC specimen. We could visually prove the identity of the two images consisting in the US-CT 3D-dual image originating from the 3D-US image data and 3D-CT image data. The US-CT 3D-dual image seems to be effective to make an exact treatment plan of carbon ion radiotherapy for HCC. (author)

  18. Changes in Rectal Dose Due to Alterations in Beam Angles for Setup Uncertainty and Range Uncertainty in Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Kubota

    Full Text Available Carbon-ion radiotherapy of prostate cancer is challenging in patients with metal implants in one or both hips. Problems can be circumvented by using fields at oblique angles. To evaluate the influence of setup and range uncertainties accompanying oblique field angles, we calculated rectal dose changes with oblique orthogonal field angles, using a device with fixed fields at 0° and 90° and a rotating patient couch.Dose distributions were calculated at the standard angles of 0° and 90°, and then at 30° and 60°. Setup uncertainty was simulated with changes from -2 mm to +2 mm for fields in the anterior-posterior, left-right, and cranial-caudal directions, and dose changes from range uncertainty were calculated with a 1 mm water-equivalent path length added to the target isocenter in each angle. The dose distributions regarding the passive irradiation method were calculated using the K2 dose algorithm.The rectal volumes with 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° field angles at 95% of the prescription dose were 3.4±0.9 cm3, 2.8±1.1 cm3, 2.2±0.8 cm3, and 3.8±1.1 cm3, respectively. As compared with 90° fields, 30° and 60° fields had significant advantages regarding setup uncertainty and significant disadvantages regarding range uncertainty, but were not significantly different from the 90° field setup and range uncertainties.The setup and range uncertainties calculated at 30° and 60° field angles were not associated with a significant change in rectal dose relative to those at 90°.

  19. Beam modulation for heavy ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, T.; Minohara, S.; Sudou, M.

    1993-01-01

    The first clinical trial of heavy ion radiation therapy is scheduled in 1994 by using the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). In order to start the clinical trial, first, it is necessary to know the physical characteristics of high energy heavy ions in human bodies, for example, dose and linear energy transfer (LET) distribution. Also the knowledge on the biological effectiveness of heavy ions is required. Based on these biophysical properties of heavy ions, monoenergetic heavy ion beam should be modulated so as to make the spread Bragg peak suitable to heavy ion radiation therapy. In order to establish a methodology to obtain the most effective spread Bragg peak for heavy ion radiation therapy, a heavy ion irradiation port at the RIKEN ring cyclotron facility was constructed. By using a 135 MeV/u carbon beam, the biophysical properties of the heavy ions were investigated, and a range modulator was designed to have uniform biological response in the spread Bragg peak. The physical and biological rationality of the spread Bragg peak were investigated. The dose, LET and biological effect of a monoenergetic heavy ion beam, the design of the range modulator, and the distributions of LET and biological dose for the spread Bragg peak are reported. (K.I.)

  20. Heavy-ion radiography applied to charged particle radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Holley, W.R.; Tobias, C.A.; Castro, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of the heavy-ion radiography research program applied to the clinical cancer research program of charged particle radiotherapy have a twofold purpose: (1) to explore the manner in which heavy-ion radiography and CT reconstruction can provide improved tumor localization, treatment planning, and beam delivery for radiotherapy with accelerated heavy charged particles; and (2) to explore the usefulness of heavy-ion radiography in detecting, localizing, and sizing soft tissue cancers in the human body. The techniques and procedures developed for heavy-ion radiography should prove successful in support of charged particle radiotherapy

  1. submitter Next generation multi-scale biophysical characterization of high precision cancer particle radiotherapy using clinical proton, helium-, carbon- and oxygen ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Dokic, Ivana; Niklas, Martin; Zimmermann, Ferdinand; Chaudhri, Naved; Krunic, Damir; Tessonnier, Thomas; Ferrari, Alfredo; Parodi, Katia; Jäkel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Haberer, Thomas; Abdollahi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    The growing number of particle therapy facilities worldwide landmarks a novel era of precision oncology. Implementation of robust biophysical readouts is urgently needed to assess the efficacy of different radiation qualities. This is the first report on biophysical evaluation of Monte Carlo simulated predictive models of prescribed dose for four particle qualities i.e., proton, helium-, carbon- or oxygen ions using raster-scanning technology and clinical therapy settings at HIT. A high level of agreement was found between the in silico simulations, the physical dosimetry and the clonogenic tumor cell survival. The cell fluorescence ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) technology was employed to detect particle traverse per cell nucleus. Across a panel of radiobiological surrogates studied such as late ROS accumulation and apoptosis (caspase 3/7 activation), the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) chiefly correlated with the radiation species-specific spatio-temporal pattern of DNA double strand break ...

  2. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  3. Development of irradiation techniques and assessment of tumor response carbon ion radiotherapy in ultra-short fraction and time for a small lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Sugawara, Toshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    For planning safety carbon therapy for lung cancer, the minimum (threshold) dose to generate lung reaction on CT image was investigated at each fraction regimen. From 1995 January to 2003 December, 44 patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with carbon ion beams of various fractions (1-12 fractions a port) and total doses (28-90 GyE). The 78 irradiated fields for the early reaction (within 6 months) and 67 for the late (1 year after) were divided into the two groups: the positive (+) and the negative (-) after the reactions on CT image were graded according to Libshits's criteria. The α/βvalue of biological effective dose (BED) responsive curve was determined by assuming the biserial correlation coefficient between positive rate of lung reaction and BED dose. From the BED responsive curve, in turn, the dose responsive curve for lung reaction rate at each fraction regimen was obtained. Based on the curve, D10 (to generate the lung reaction at 10% of the patients) in single fraction regimen was determined to be 10.6 GyE for the late reaction and 9.96 GyE for the early reaction, respectively. These doses seem to be very useful to estimate lung injuries in singe-dose irradiation. (author)

  4. SU-F-T-124: Radiation Biological Equivalent Presentations OfLEM-1 and MKM Approaches in the Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi, W; Jiang, G; Sheng, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study the correlations of the radiation biological equivalent doses (BED) along depth and lateral distance between LEM-1 and MKM approaches. Methods: In NIRS-MKM (Microdosimetric Kinetic Model) approach, the prescribed BED, referred as C-Eq, doses aims to present the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for different energies of carbon-ions on a fixed 10% survival value of HCG cell with respect to convention X-ray. Instead of a fixed 10% survival, the BED doses of LEM-1 (Local Effect Model) approach, referred as X-Eq, aims to present the RBE over the whole survival curve of chordoma-like cell with alpha/beta ratio of 2.0. The relationship of physical doses as a function of C-Eq and X-Eq doses were investigated along depth and lateral distance for various sizes of cubic targets in water irradiated by carbon-ions. Results: At the center of each cubic target, the trends between physical and C-Eq or X-Eq doses can be described by a linear and 2nd order polynomial functions, respectively. Using fit functions can then calculate a scaling factor between C-Eq and X-Eq doses to have similar physical doses. With equalized C-Eq and X-Eq doses at the depth of target center, over- and under-estimated X-Eq to C-Eq are seen for depths before and after the target center, respectively. Near the distal edge along depth, sharp rising of RBE value is observed for X-Eq, but sharp dropping of RBE value is observed for C-Eq. For lateral locations near and just outside 50% dose level, sharp raising of RBE value is also seen for X-Eq, while only minor increasing with fast dropping for C-Eq. Conclusion: An analytical function to model the differences between the CEq and X-Eq doses along depth and lateral distance need to further investigated to explain varied clinic outcome of specific cancers using two different approaches to calculated BED doses.

  5. Neoplastic transformation induced by carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettega, Daniela; Calzolari, Paola; Hessel, Petra; Stucchi, Claudio G; Weyrather, Wilma K

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this experiment was to compare the oncogenic potential of carbon ion beams and conventional photon beams for use in radiotherapy. The HeLa X human skin fibroblast cell line CGL1 was irradiated with carbon ions of three different energies (270, 100, and 11.4 MeV/u). Inactivation and transformation data were compared with those for 15 MeV photons. Inactivation and transformation frequencies for the 270 MeV/u carbon ions were similar to those for 15-MeV photons. The maximal relative biologic effectiveness (RBE(alpha)) values for 100MeV/u and 11.4 MeV/u carbon ions, respectively, were as follows: inactivation, 1.6 +/- 0.2 and 6.7 +/- 0.7; and transformation per surviving cell, 2.5 +/- 0.6 and 12 +/- 3. The curve for dose-transformation per cell at risk exhibited a maximum that was shifted toward lower doses at lower energies. Transformation induction per cell at risk for carbon ions in the entrance channel was comparable to that for photons, whereas for the lower energies, 100 MeV/u and 11 MeV/u, which are representative of the energies delivered to the tumor margins and volume, respectively, the probability of transformation in a single cell was greater than it was for photons. In addition, at isoeffective doses with respect to cell killing, the 11.4-MeV/u beam was more oncogenic than were photons.

  6. Microdosimetry of proton and carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin [Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology, Ongkharak, Nakhon Nayok 26120 (Thailand); Hultqvist, Martha [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-10691 (Sweden); Lindborg, Lennart; Nikjoo, Hooshang, E-mail: hooshang.nikjoo@ki.se [Radiation Biophysics Group, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Box 260 SE-17176, Stockholm (Sweden); Uehara, Shuzo [School of Health Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    carbon ion beams. The results are useful for characterizing ion beams of practical importance for biophysical modeling of radiation-induced DNA damage response and repair in the depth profiles of protons and carbon ions used in radiotherapy.

  7. Physical, biological and clinical basis of light ions using in radiotherapy: EULIMA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvel, P.

    1991-01-01

    Improving the efficiency of radiotherapy is a constant concern in oncology: more than half of the patients who contract cancer receive radiotherapy at some stage. Use of charged particles in radiotherapy represents indisputable progress in localization of the dose delivered to tumour masses, thereby allowing reduction of dose received by adjacent healthy tissues. Protons improve the physical selectivity of the irradiation, i.e. the dose distribution. High-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) radiations produce different biological effects, decreasing the differences in radiosensitivity, and allowing radiation therapy to control radioresistant tumours. Fast neutrons represent the most known of these high-LET particles, but they suffer of a relatively poor physical selectivity. The two approaches (physical selectivity and biological advantages) are joined in by light ions (Carbon, Oxygen, Neon). Highly selective high-LET radiation therapy can be performed for radioresistant tumours without damage to healthy tissues. Preliminary results obtained in Berkeley (USA) demonstrate an improved local control of unresectable, slowly growing tumours, confirming what could be extrapolated from proton and neutrontherapy. Furthermore, radioactive light ion beams can be used to verify the accuracy of treatment planning by checking the range of the particle with a PET camera, and in the future for the treatment itself. In the framework of its programme Europe against Cancer, the Commission of the European Communities participates in the funding of the EULIMA (European Light Ion Medical Accelerator) project feasibility study, aiming to design an hospital-based light ion therapy facility in Europe [fr

  8. Evaluation of beam wobbling methods for heavy-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonai, Shunsuke; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Komori, Masataka; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Takei, Yuka; Takahashi, Osamu; Isobe, Yoshiharu; Tashiro, Mutsumi; Koikegami, Hajime; Tomita, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) has extensively studied carbon-ion radiotherapy at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) with some positive outcomes, and has established its efficacy. Therefore, efforts to distribute the therapy to the general public should be made, for which it is essential to enable direct application of clinical and technological experiences obtained at NIRS. For widespread use, it is very important to reduce the cost through facility downsizing with minimal acceleration energy to deliver the HIMAC-equivalent clinical beams. For the beam delivery system, the requirement of miniaturization is translated to reduction in length while maintaining the clinically available field size and penetration range for range-modulated uniform broad beams of regular fields that are either circular or square for simplicity. In this paper, we evaluate the various wobbling methods including original improvements, especially for application to the compact facilities through the experimental and computational studies. The single-ring wobbling method used at HIMAC is the best one including a lot of experience at HIMAC but the residual range is a fatal problem in the case of a compact facility. On the other hand, uniform wobbling methods such as the spiral and zigzag wobbling methods are effective and suitable for a compact facility. Furthermore, these methods can be applied for treatment with passive range modulation including respiratory gated irradiation. In theory, the choice between the spiral and zigzag wobbling methods depends on the shape of the required irradiation field. However, we found that it is better to use the zigzag wobbling method with transformation of the wobbling pattern even when a circular uniform irradiation field is required, because it is difficult to maintain the stability of the wobbler magnet due to the rapid change of the wobbler current in the spiral wobbling method. The regulated wobbling method

  9. Multiply charged carbon-ion production for medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Sasaki, N.; Takasugi, W.; Wakaisami, S.; Biri, S.; Drentje, A. G.

    2008-01-01

    Over 3000 cancer patients have already been treated by the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences since 1994. The clinical results have clearly verified the effectiveness and safety of heavy-ion radiotherapy. The most important result has been to establish that the carbon ion is one of the most effective radiations for radiotherapy. The ion source is required to realize a stable beam with the same conditions for daily operation. However, the deposition of carbon ions on the wall of the plasma chamber is normally unavoidable. This causes an ''anti-wall-coating effect,'' i.e., a decreasing of the beam, especially for the higher charge-state ions due to the surface material of the wall. The ion source must be required to produce a sufficiently intense beam under the bad condition. Other problems were solved by improvements and maintenance, and thus we obtained enough reproducibility and stability along with decreased failures. We summarize our over 13 years of experience, and show the scope for further developments

  10. TECHNOLOGIES FOR DELIVERY OF PROTON AND ION BEAMS FOR RADIOTHERAPY

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, H; Alonso, J; Mackay, R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments for the delivery of proton and ion beam therapy have been significant, and a number of technological solutions now exist for the creation and utilisation of these particles for the treatment of cancer. In this paper we review the historical development of particle accelerators used for external beam radiotherapy and discuss the more recent progress towards more capable and cost-effective sources of particles.

  11. The prospect of carbon fiber implants in radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao‐bin, Tang; Chang‐ran, Geng; Da, Chen

    2012-01-01

    Because of their superior characteristics, carbonaceous materials, which are still at their early stage of development, have garnered significant interest. Because of their low atomic number, carbonaceous orthopedic implants possess radiation properties similar to biological tissues and, therefore, they are more suitable to patients in need of radiotherapy. The effects of stainless steel, titanium, and carbon plates on radiation dose distributions were investigated in this work using Monte Carlo simulations and TLD measurements for 6 MV photon beams. It is found that carbon plates will neither increase the incident surface dose, nor lead to the decrease of exit surface dose (the effect of a second build‐up). Carbon fiber orthopedic implants have a good prospect for radiotherapy patients because they have minimal perturbation effects on the radiotherapy dose distribution. PACS number: 87.55.K‐,87.55.Gh, 87.55.ne PMID:22766953

  12. HEATHER - HElium Ion Accelerator for RadioTHERapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Jordan [Huddersfield U.; Edgecock, Thomas [Huddersfield U.; Green, Stuart [Birmingham U.; Johnstone, Carol [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    A non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient (nsFFAG) accelerator is being designed for helium ion therapy. This facility will consist of 2 superconducting rings, treating with helium ions (He²⁺ ) and image with hydrogen ions (H + 2 ). Currently only carbon ions are used to treat cancer, yet there is an increasing interest in the use of lighter ions for therapy. Lighter ions have reduced dose tail beyond the tumour compared to carbon, caused by low Z secondary particles produced via inelastic nuclear reactions. An FFAG approach for helium therapy has never been previously considered. Having demonstrated isochronous acceleration from 0.5 MeV to 900 MeV, we now demonstrate the survival of a realistic beam across both stages.

  13. Heavy-ion transport codes for radiotherapy and radioprotection in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancusi, Davide

    2006-06-01

    Simulation of the transport of heavy ions in matter is a field of nuclear science that has recently received attention in view of its importance for some relevant applications. Accelerated heavy ions can, for example, be used to treat cancers (heavy-ion radiotherapy) and show some superior qualities with respect to more conventional treatment systems, like photons (x-rays) or protons. Furthermore, long-term manned space missions (like a possible future mission to Mars) pose the challenge to protect astronauts and equipment on board against the harmful space radiation environment, where heavy ions can be responsible for a significant share of the exposure risk. The high accuracy expected from a transport algorithm (especially in the case of radiotherapy) and the large amount of semi-empirical knowledge necessary to even state the transport problem properly rule out any analytical approach; the alternative is to resort to numerical simulations in order to build treatment-planning systems for cancer or to aid space engineers in shielding design. This thesis is focused on the description of HIBRAC, a one-dimensional deterministic code optimised for radiotherapy, and PHITS (Particle and Heavy- Ion Transport System), a general-purpose three-dimensional Monte-Carlo code. The structure of both codes is outlined and some relevant results are presented. In the case of PHITS, we also report the first results of an ongoing comprehensive benchmarking program for the main components of the code; we present the comparison of partial charge-changing cross sections for a 400 MeV/n 40 Ar beam impinging on carbon, polyethylene, aluminium, copper, tin and lead targets

  14. Heavy-ion transport codes for radiotherapy and radioprotection in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancusi, Davide

    2006-06-15

    Simulation of the transport of heavy ions in matter is a field of nuclear science that has recently received attention in view of its importance for some relevant applications. Accelerated heavy ions can, for example, be used to treat cancers (heavy-ion radiotherapy) and show some superior qualities with respect to more conventional treatment systems, like photons (x-rays) or protons. Furthermore, long-term manned space missions (like a possible future mission to Mars) pose the challenge to protect astronauts and equipment on board against the harmful space radiation environment, where heavy ions can be responsible for a significant share of the exposure risk. The high accuracy expected from a transport algorithm (especially in the case of radiotherapy) and the large amount of semi-empirical knowledge necessary to even state the transport problem properly rule out any analytical approach; the alternative is to resort to numerical simulations in order to build treatment-planning systems for cancer or to aid space engineers in shielding design. This thesis is focused on the description of HIBRAC, a one-dimensional deterministic code optimised for radiotherapy, and PHITS (Particle and Heavy- Ion Transport System), a general-purpose three-dimensional Monte-Carlo code. The structure of both codes is outlined and some relevant results are presented. In the case of PHITS, we also report the first results of an ongoing comprehensive benchmarking program for the main components of the code; we present the comparison of partial charge-changing cross sections for a 400 MeV/n {sup 40}Ar beam impinging on carbon, polyethylene, aluminium, copper, tin and lead targets.

  15. Direct Comparison of Biologically Optimized Spread-out Bragg Peaks for Protons and Carbon Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkens, Jan J.; Oelfke, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy with hadrons, it is anticipated that carbon ions are superior to protons, mainly because of their biological properties: the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for carbon ions is supposedly higher in the target than in the surrounding normal tissue, leading to a therapeutic advantage over protons. The purpose of this report is to investigate this effect by using biological model calculations. Methods and Materials: We compared spread-out Bragg peaks for protons and carbon ions by using physical and biological optimization. The RBE for protons and carbon ions was calculated according to published biological models. These models predict increased RBE values in regions of high linear energy transfer (LET) and an inverse dependency of the RBE on dose. Results: For pure physical optimization, protons yield a better dose distribution along the central axis. In biologically optimized plans, RBE variations for protons were relatively small. For carbon ions, high RBE values were found in the high-LET target region, as well as in the low-dose region outside the target. This means that the LET dependency and dose dependency of the RBE can cancel each other. We show this for radioresistant tissues treated with two opposing beams, for which the predicted carbon RBE within the target volume was lower than outside. Conclusions: For tissue parameters used in this study, the model used does not predict a biologic advantage of carbon ions. More reliable model parameters and clinical trials are necessary to explore the true potential of radiotherapy with carbon ions

  16. Protontherapy versus carbon ion therapy advantages, disadvantages and similarities

    CERN Document Server

    d’Ávila Nunes, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comparison analysis of two cancer treatment therapies: carbon ion therapy and protontherapy. It is divided in 5 sections. The first ones gives the reader a brief history of Radiotherapy and types of radiation. In the second section, the techniques and equipments, including new ones in development such as Cyclinac , Laser and DWA, are described. The third section describes biophysical (such as stopping power and LET) and biological (such as RBE and OER) properties, the fundamental experiments and clinical area. The fourth section presents models and the fifth section compares both techniques, showing advantages and disadvantages of each, and their similarities.

  17. Ethical aspect of the clinical research. Informed consent in the clinical research for heavy ion radiotherapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Hajime

    2003-01-01

    The research center for heavy ion therapy of cancer was decided to be built in 1984 as a part of the national 10-year anticancer campaign, and construction of Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) was completed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in 1993. The HIMAC is the first heavy ion accelerator for only medical use in the world, and the clinical research of cancer radiotherapy was begun in 1994 using carbon ion generated by HIMAC. The purposes of the clinical research are to evaluate the safety and usefulness of carbon ion for cancer treatment, and to establish carbon ion therapy as a new and valuable tool for cancer therapy. Therefore, to obtain exact data in ethical aspect as well as scientific aspect of the clinical research, many special committees have been organized like as the committees of protocol planning for each organ, clinical study groups for each organ, evaluating committee of clinical data, and the ethical committee. Each clinical research is performed according to the research protocol of each organ, in which study purpose, rationale, patient condition, end-point of the study, adverse reaction are described. The document of informed consent (IC) contains study purpose, patient condition, method, predicted effect and demerit, protection of privacy, etc.. IC to each patient is done precisely by the doctor, and the freely-given IC of the patient is obtained. After the IC was completed, judgement of propriety for carbon ion therapy is done by the ethical committee for IC of each patient. Since 1994 carbon ion therapy has been performed over 1300 patients with cancer in various organs, and its safety and usefulness for cancer treatment has been clarified gradually. The carbon ion therapy is thought to be a new and promising tool for cancer treatment near future. (authors)

  18. Precision, high dose radiotherapy: helium ion treatment of uveal melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, W.M.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.; Castro, J.R.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Cartigny, A.; Blakely, E.A.; Lyman, J.T.; Zink, S.R.

    1985-02-01

    The authors report on 75 patients with uveal melanoma who were treated by placing the Bragg peak of a helium ion beam over the tumor volume. The technique localizes the high dose region very tightly around the tumor volume. This allows critical structures, such as the optic disc and the macula, to be excluded from the high dose region as long as they are 3 to 4 mm away from the edge of the tumor. Careful attention to tumor localization, treatment planning, patient immobilization and treatment verification is required. With a mean follow-up of 22 months (3 to 60 months) the authors have had only five patients with a local recurrence, all of whom were salvaged with another treatment. Pretreatment visual acuity has generally been preserved as long as the tumor edge is at least 4 mm away from the macula and optic disc. The only serious complication to date has been an 18% incidence of neovascular glaucoma in the patients treated at our highest dose level. Clinical results and details of the technique are presented to illustrate potential clinical precision in administering high dose radiotherapy with charged particles such as helium ions or protons.

  19. Precision, high dose radiotherapy: helium ion treatment of uveal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, W.M.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors report on 75 patients with uveal melanoma who were treated by placing the Bragg peak of a helium ion beam over the tumor volume. The technique localizes the high dose region very tightly around the tumor volume. This allows critical structures, such as the optic disc and the macula, to be excluded from the high dose region as long as they are 3 to 4 mm away from the edge of the tumor. Careful attention to tumor localization, treatment planning, patient immobilization and treatment verification is required. With a mean follow-up of 22 months (3 to 60 months) the authors have had only five patients with a local recurrence, all of whom were salvaged with another treatment. Pretreatment visual acuity has generally been preserved as long as the tumor edge is at least 4 mm away from the macula and optic disc. The only serious complication to date has been an 18% incidence of neovascular glaucoma in the patients treated at our highest dose level. Clinical results and details of the technique are presented to illustrate potential clinical precision in administering high dose radiotherapy with charged particles such as helium ions or protons

  20. Erythrocyte stiffness during morphological remodeling induced by carbon ion radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoping Zhang

    Full Text Available The adverse effect induced by carbon ion radiation (CIR is still an unavoidable hazard to the treatment object. Thus, evaluation of its adverse effects on the body is a critical problem with respect to radiation therapy. We aimed to investigate the change between the configuration and mechanical properties of erythrocytes induced by radiation and found differences in both the configuration and the mechanical properties with involving in morphological remodeling process. Syrian hamsters were subjected to whole-body irradiation with carbon ion beams (1, 2, 4, and 6 Gy or X-rays (2, 4, 6, and 12 Gy for 3, 14 and 28 days. Erythrocytes in peripheral blood and bone marrow were collected for cytomorphological analysis. The mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were determined using atomic force microscopy, and the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was analyzed via western blotting. The results showed that dynamic changes were evident in erythrocytes exposed to different doses of carbon ion beams compared with X-rays and the control (0 Gy. The magnitude of impairment of the cell number and cellular morphology manifested the subtle variation according to the irradiation dose. In particular, the differences in the size, shape and mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were well exhibited. Furthermore, immunoblot data showed that the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was changed after irradiation, and there was a common pattern among its substantive characteristics in the irradiated group. Based on these findings, the present study concluded that CIR could induce a change in mechanical properties during morphological remodeling of erythrocytes. According to the unique characteristics of the biomechanical categories, we deduce that changes in cytomorphology and mechanical properties can be measured to evaluate the adverse effects generated by tumor radiotherapy. Additionally, for the first time, the current study

  1. The possibility of heavy ion radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Takehiko

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among malignant tumors in Japan and statisticians predict that the death rate by lung cancer will increase twice or 2.5 times within 10 years. Early detection and early resection are the first task to decrease the death rate, and radiotherapy and chemotherapy should be improved. In this paper, the present status of surgical treatment for lung cancer was summarized and the possibility of heavy ion therapy for lung cancer was discussed in comparison with surgical result. Overall 5-year survival rates in stages I, II, III and IV were 78%, 42% 29% and 16% respectively. The survival rate in stage I was correlated with tumor size and that in lung cancer of tumor size 2 cm or less was about 90%. If lung cancer is found at early stage, lung cancer can be cured. Limitation of detection of lung cancer is 2.3 mm in hilar squamous cell carcinoma by autofluorescence bronchoscopy and 5-10 mm in peripheral adenocarcinoma by high resolution CT. Less invasive surgery by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was applied to stage I lung cancer and the result was satisfactory. However, most lung cancer patients are heavy smokers with underlying lung diseases including chronic obstructive plumonary disease (COPD) and there are many patients not indicative for less invasive surgery. Preliminary results of heavy ion therapy showed remarkable improvement compared with that with conventional radiation therapy. Three-year survival rate of stage I in Protocol 9802 is 80%, almost the same with that in surgical result, indicating the possibility becoming the established therapeutic modality in stage I lung cancers, in patients with marginal biological function for surgical treatment, in particular. (authors)

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibition sensitizes osteosarcoma to heavy ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattmann, Claudia; Oertel, Susanne; Thiemann, Markus; Dittmar, Anne; Roth, Eva; Kulozik, Andreas E.; Ehemann, Volker; Weichert, Wilko; Huber, Peter E.; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Debus, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Minimal improvements in treatment or survival of patients with osteosarcoma have been achieved during the last three decades. Especially in the case of incomplete tumor resection, prognosis remains poor. Heavy ion radiotherapy (HIT) and modern anticancer drugs like histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have shown promising effects in osteosarcoma in vitro. In this study, we tested the effect of HIT and the combination of HIT and the HDACi suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) in a xenograft mouse model. Osteosarcoma xenografts were established by subcutaneous injection of KHOS-24OS cells and treated with either vehicle (DMSO), SAHA, HIT or HIT and SAHA. Tumor growth was determined and tumor necrosis, proliferation rate, apoptotic rate as well as vessel density were evaluated. Here, we show that the combination of HIT and SAHA induced a significant delay of tumor growth through increased rate of apoptosis, increased expression of p53 and p21 Waf1/Cip1 , inhibition of proliferation and angiogenesis compared to tumors treated with HIT only. HIT and in particular the combination of HIT and histone deacetylase inhibition is a promising treatment strategy in OS and may be tested in clinical trials

  3. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12 C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code is in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. To this end 48 patients have been successfully planned and treated. (orig.)

  4. Treatment planning for heavy-ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, M.; Jäkel, O.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-11-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows us to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40 000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code has been in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. Forty-eight patients have been successfully planned and treated.

  5. Mechanical Design of Carbon Ion Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Carbon Ion Optics are expected to provide much longer thruster life due to their resistance to sputter erosion. There are a number of different forms of carbon that have been used for fabricating ion thruster optics. The mechanical behavior of carbon is much different than that of most metals, and poses unique design challenges. In order to minimize mission risk, the behavior of carbon must be well understood, and components designed within material limitations. Thermal expansion of the thruster structure must be compatible with thermal expansion of the carbon ion optics. Specially designed interfaces may be needed so that grid gap and aperture alignment are not adversely affected by dissimilar material properties within the thruster. The assembled thruster must be robust and tolerant of launch vibration. The following paper lists some of the characteristics of various carbon materials. Several past ion optics designs are discussed, identifying strengths and weaknesses. Electrostatics and material science are not emphasized so much as the mechanical behavior and integration of grid electrodes into an ion thruster.

  6. Past, present and future aspects of studies of heavy ion radiotherapy. 2. Future view of clinical studies of heavy ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamata, Tadashi

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of clinical studies of heavy ion radiotherapy (HIR, using carbon beam) in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) is, in treatment of cancers, to elucidate its potential and significance for establishing the methodology for curing the disease safely and reliably to further spread the therapy. Here is presented a future view of clinical studies of HIR based on the past results and along authorities' medical policy. NIRS has treated 3,100 or more cancer patients in about 50 clinical trials from the start of HIR in 1994. In those studies, curing the intractable malignancies has become possible in a short term of therapy, and the irradiating machine is being miniaturized (actually under construction in Gunma Univ.). At the end of 2006, about 4,000 patients have been treated with HIR globally: the impact of NIRS HIR. There are such future HIR plans as the promotion of clinical trials, development of irradiation technology, promotion and efficient practice as an advanced frontier medicare, imaging diagnosis for the aim of treatment, biological studies, and comparative studies to elucidate the usefulness. Cooperation of NIRS, manufacturers and authorities will make HIR a more useful, less burdensome mean to treat patients with more intractable cancers. (R.T.)

  7. Dose-volume histogram analysis of hepatic toxicity related to carbon ion radiation therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Shigeo; Kato, Hirotoshi; Tsujii, Hitohiko; Mizoe, Junetsu

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the correlation of hepatic toxicity with dose-volume factors of carbon ion radiotherapy in the liver. Forty-nine patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy delivered in 4 fractions over 4 to 7 days. Six patients received a total dose of 48 GyE and 43 received 52.8 GyE. The correlation of various blood biochemistry data with dose-volume histogram (DVH) data in non-cancerous liver were evaluated. The strongest significant correlation was seen between percent volume of non-cancerous liver with radiation dose more than 11 GyE (V 11 GyE ) and elevation of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) level as early adverse response after carbon ion beam radiation therapy (p=0.0003). In addition, significant correlation between DVH data and change of several other blood biochemistry data were also revealed in early phase. In late phase after carbon ion radiotherapy, the strongest significant correlation was seen between decrease of platelet count and V 26GyE (p=0.015). There was no significant correlation between other blood biochemistry data and DVH data in the late phase. It was suggested that dose-volume factors of carbon ion radiotherapy influenced only transient aggravation of liver function, which improved in the long term after irradiation. (author)

  8. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  9. Toshiba's advanced technologies contributing to heavy-ion radiotherapy for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iikura, Takahiko

    2013-01-01

    Toshiba has been focusing effects on cancer treatment in the healthcare field, which is likely to continue to expand in the future. Our objective is to offer healthcare processes from early detection by means of regular cancer examinations, through to precise diagnosis, treatment ensuring the quality of life (QOL) appropriate to individual patients, and aftercare. In particular, we are promoting the development of heavy-ion radiotherapy systems incorporating our range of technologies for particle accelerators, irradiation devices, superconducting magnets, and information processing and networks. By offering heathcare processes with advanced heavy-ion radiotherapy systems as a core, our approach is expected to contribute to high-quality cancer treatment. (author)

  10. On the cost-effectiveness of Carbon ion radiation therapy for skull base chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaekel, Oliver; Land, Beate; Combs, Stephanie Elisabeth; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Debus, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The cost-effectiveness of Carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) for patients with skull base chordoma is analyzed. Materials and Methods: Primary treatment costs and costs for recurrent tumors are estimated. The costs for treatment of recurrent tumors were estimated using a sample of 10 patients presenting with recurrent chordoma at the base of skull at DKFZ. Using various scenarios for the local control rate and reimbursements of Carbon ion therapy the cost-effectiveness of ion therapy for these tumors is analyzed. Results: If local control rate for skull base chordoma achieved with carbon ion therapy exceeds 70.3%, the overall treatment costs for carbon RT are lower than for conventional RTI. The cost-effectiveness ratio for carbon RT is 2539 Euro per 1% increase in survival, or 7692 Euro per additional life year. Conclusion: Current results support the thesis that Carbon ion RT, although more expensive, is at least as cost-effective as advanced photon therapies for these patients. Ion RT, however, offers substantial benefits for the patients such as improved control rates and less severe side effects

  11. Commercial Prospect of Hadronic Radiotherapy Using Ion Accelerator in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunto-Wiharto; N-Supriana; R-Susworo; G-Suyitno

    2000-01-01

    In order to anticipate the construction of accelerator based laboratory of which one of its applications is for radiotherapy of cancer patients at Research and Development Center for Advanced Technology belonging to National Nuclear Energy Agency, Yogyakarta, in the next 7th. Five Year Development Plan (Repelita VII), it is considered important to perform a study on its commercial prospect. It is found, through calculations based on the available data and realistic assumptions, that patients from neighboring countries are needed to make the operation of radiotherapy facility effective and efficient. (author)

  12. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  13. Combination of heavy-ion radiotherapy and p53-gene therapy by radio- and hypoxia-sensitizing promoter for glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oga, Masaru; Koshikawa, Nobuko; Takenaga, Keizo; Iwadate, Yasuo; Nojima, Kumie

    2006-01-01

    In this study we have started to investigate the anti-tumor effect of the combination of heavy-ion radiotherapy, inducing p53-independent apoptosis, and p53-gene therapy, inducing p53-dependent apoptosis for glioma. To enhance the p53-dependent apoptosis, we chose the strategy to utilize the heavy-ion irradiation itself as a ''trigger'' by using radio-sensitizing E 9ns-2 /cytomegalovirus (CMV) chimeric promoter (Scott et al: 2003) in p53-gene therapy. Our study in the first year, however, suggested the uselessness of E 9ns-2 /CMV chimeric promoter. Then we applied E 9ns-2 /Epo5/CMV-radio and hypoxia-sensitizing chimeric promoter to amplify p53 gene exopression. P53 gene with E 9ns2 /Epo5/CMV chimeric promoter was transfected in p53-mutant U373MG human glioma cell-line and the transfected-cell bulk was irradiated at dose of 1 Gy of high linear energy transfer (LET)-carbon ion beam or low-LET X-ray under various hypoxic conditions. The result suggested the possible role of 1 Gy of high LET-carbon ion beam as a ''useful trigger'' to enhance a selective anti-tumor effect toward glioma under hypoxic condition through amplification of p53 gene expression. (author)

  14. Focused ion beam milling of carbon fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huson, Mickey G.; Church, Jeffrey S.; Hillbrick, Linda K.; Woodhead, Andrea L.; Sridhar, Manoj; Van De Meene, Allison M.L.

    2015-01-01

    A focused ion beam has been used to mill both individual carbon fibres as well as fibres in an epoxy composite, with a view to preparing flat surfaces for nano-indentation. The milled surfaces have been assessed for damage using scanning probe microscopy nano-indentation and Raman micro-probe analysis, revealing that FIB milling damages the carbon fibre surface and covers surrounding areas with debris of disordered carbon. The debris is detected as far as 100 μm from the milling site. The energy of milling as well as the orientation of the beam was varied and shown to have an effect when assessed by Raman spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Focused ion beam (FIB) milling was used to mill flat surfaces on carbon fibres. • Raman spectroscopy showed amorphous carbon was generated during FIB milling. • The amorphous debris is detected as far as 100 μm from the milling site. • This surface degradation was confirmed by nano-indentation experiments.

  15. Facilities for radiotherapy with ion beams status and worldwide developments

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, B H

    1999-01-01

    Forty-five years after the first ion beam therapy in Berkeley around 25,000 cancer patients worldwide have been treated successfully. Ion accelerators, designed for nuclear research, delivered most of this treatment. The first hospital-based facility started operation in 1998 at Loma Linda California, the first for heavier ions at Chiba, Japan in 1994 and the first commercially delivered facilities started operation in 1998 at Kashiwa, Japan. In 2000, the Harvard Medical Centre, Boston, US, will commence operation and several new facilities are planned or under construction worldwide, although none in Australia. This paper will discuss the physical and biological advantages of ion beams over x-rays and electrons. In the treatment of cancer patients ion beam therapy is especially suited for localised tumours in radiation sensitive areas like skull or spine. Heavier ions are also effective in anoxic tumour cells (found around the normally oxygenated cell population). An additional advantage of the heavier carbo...

  16. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  17. Robotic-based carbon ion therapy and patient positioning in 6 degrees of freedom: setup accuracy of two standard immobilization devices used in carbon ion therapy and IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Alexandra D; Winter, Marcus; Kuhn, Sabine P; Debus, Jürgen; Nairz, Olaf; Münter, Marc W

    2012-03-29

    To investigate repositioning accuracy in particle radiotherapy in 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, 3 DOF) for two immobilization devices (Scotchcast masks vs thermoplastic head masks) currently in use at our institution for fractionated radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients. Position verifications in patients treated with carbon ion therapy and IMRT for head and neck malignancies were evaluated. Most patients received combined treatment regimen (IMRT plus carbon ion boost), immobilization was achieved with either Scotchcast or thermoplastic head masks. Position corrections in robotic-based carbon ion therapy allowing 6 DOF were compared to IMRT allowing corrections in 3 DOF for two standard immobilization devices. In total, 838 set-up controls of 38 patients were analyzed. Robotic-based position correction including correction of rotations was well tolerated and without discomfort. Standard deviations of translational components were between 0.5 and 0.8 mm for Scotchcast and 0.7 and 1.3 mm for thermoplastic masks in 6 DOF and 1.2-1.4 mm and 1.0-1.1 mm in 3 DOF respectively. Mean overall displacement vectors were between 2.1 mm (Scotchcast) and 2.9 mm (thermoplastic masks) in 6 DOF and 3.9-3.0 mm in 3 DOF respectively. Displacement vectors were lower when correction in 6 DOF was allowed as opposed to 3 DOF only, which was maintained at the traditional action level of >3 mm for position correction in the pre-on-board imaging era. Setup accuracy for both systems was within the expected range. Smaller shifts were required when 6 DOF were available for correction as opposed to 3 DOF. Where highest possible positioning accuracy is required, frequent image guidance is mandatory to achieve best possible plan delivery and maintenance of sharp gradients and optimal normal tissue sparing inherent in carbon ion therapy.

  18. Comparison of Individual Radiosensitivity to γ-Rays and Carbon Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Grace; Normil, Marie Delna; Testard, Isabelle; Hempel, William M; Ricoul, Michelle; Sabatier, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ions are an up-and-coming ion species, currently being used in charged particle radiotherapy. As it is well established that there are considerable interindividual differences in radiosensitivity in the general population that can significantly influence clinical outcomes of radiotherapy, we evaluate the degree of these differences in the context of carbon ion therapy compared with conventional radiotherapy. In this study, we evaluate individual radiosensitivity following exposure to carbon-13 ions or γ-rays in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy individuals based on the frequency of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that was either misrepaired or left unrepaired to form chromosomal aberrations (CAs) (simply referred to here as DSBs for brevity). Levels of DSBs were estimated from the scoring of CAs visualized with telomere/centromere-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TC-FISH). We examine radiosensitivity at the dose of 2 Gy, a routinely administered dose during fractionated radiotherapy, and we determined that a wide range of DSBs were induced by the given dose among healthy individuals, with highly radiosensitive individuals harboring more IR-induced breaks in the genome than radioresistant individuals following exposure to the same dose. Furthermore, we determined the relative effectiveness of carbon irradiation in comparison to γ-irradiation in the induction of DSBs at each studied dose (isodose effect), a quality we term "relative dose effect" (RDE). This ratio is advantageous, as it allows for simple comparison of dose-response curves. At 2 Gy, carbon irradiation was three times more effective in inducing DSBs compared with γ-irradiation (RDE of 3); these results were confirmed using a second cytogenetic technique, multicolor-FISH. We also analyze radiosensitivity at other doses (0.2-15 Gy), to represent hypo- and hyperfractionation doses and determined that RDE is dose dependent: high ratios at low doses

  19. Adsorption of palladium ions by modified carbons from rice husks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafa, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    Steam activated carbon of high surface area does not show palladium ions adsorption. Treatment of this carbon with HF acid increases to a great extent the gas adsorption capacity expressed as nitrogen surface area as well as the adsorption capacity of palladium ions from aqueous solution. HHB was loaded in different amounts on to these carbons. The acid sites represent the active fraction of the surface on which the adsorption palladium ions proceed. The uptake of palladium ions by HHB treated carbons is related to the total number of HHB molecules loaded on the carbon surface. (author)

  20. Uterine cervix cancer treatment in IIB, IIIA and IIIB stages with external radiotherapy versus external radiotherapy and scintiscanning of low dose. ION SOLCA. Years 1998-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Doris; Falquez, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    We realized study of retrospective accomplished in course of years 1998-2000, reviewing clinical charts of statistical department of ION SOLCA. We reviewed 544 cases in 1998, 603 patients in 1999, and 630 cases in 2000. In the radiotherapy service, 133 patients received treatment with external radiotherapy between February 1998 to February 1999 in IIB, IIIA, IIIB stages and only 80 patients were treated with external radiotherapy and scintiscanning of low dose rate in the same stages between March 1999 to March 2000. (The author)

  1. Chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of prostate cancer patients treated with IMRT and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartel, Carola; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Durante, Marco; Sommer, Sylwester; Nasonova, Elena; Fournier, Claudia; Lee, Ryonfa; Debus, Juergen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Ritter, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the cytogenetic damage in blood lymphocytes of patients treated for prostate cancer with different radiation qualities and target volumes. Materials and methods: Twenty patients receiving carbon-ion boost irradiation followed by IMRT or IMRT alone for the treatment of prostate cancer entered the study. Cytogenetic damage induced in peripheral blood lymphocytes of these patients was investigated at different times during the radiotherapy course using Giemsa staining and mFISH. A blood sample from each patient was taken before initiation of radiation therapy and irradiated in vitro to test for individual radiosensitivity. In addition, in vitro dose-effect curves for the induction of chromosomal exchanges by X-rays and carbon ions of different energies were measured. Results: The yield of chromosome aberrations increased during the therapy course, and the frequency was lower in patients irradiated with carbon ions as compared to patients treated with IMRT with similar target volumes. A higher frequency of aberrations was measured by increasing the target volume. In vitro, high-LET carbon ions were more effective than X-rays in inducing aberrations and yielded a higher fraction of complex exchanges. The yield of complex aberrations observed in vivo was very low. Conclusion: The investigation showed no higher aberration yield induced by treatment with a carbon-ion boost. In contrast, the reduced integral dose to the normal tissue is reflected in a lower chromosomal aberration yield when a carbon-ion boost is used instead of IMRT alone. No cytogenetic 'signature' of exposure to densely ionizing carbon ions could be detected in vivo.

  2. Amorphous molecular junctions produced by ion irradiation on carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhenxia; Yu Liping; Zhang Wei; Ding Yinfeng; Li Yulan; Han Jiaguang; Zhu Zhiyuan; Xu Hongjie; He Guowei; Chen Yi; Hu Gang

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and molecular dynamics have demonstrated that electron irradiation could create molecular junctions between crossed single-wall carbon nanotubes. Recently molecular dynamics computation predicted that ion irradiation could also join single-walled carbon nanotubes. Employing carbon ion irradiation on multi-walled carbon nanotubes, we find that these nanotubes evolve into amorphous carbon nanowires, more importantly, during the process of which various molecular junctions of amorphous nanowires are formed by welding from crossed carbon nanotubes. It demonstrates that ion-beam irradiation could be an effective way not only for the welding of nanotubes but also for the formation of nanowire junctions

  3. Cost-effectiveness of carbon ion radiation therapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobaraki, A.; Ohno, Tatsuya; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Nakano, Takashi; Yamada Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of carbon ion radiotherapy compared with conventional multimodality therapy in the treatment of patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Direct costs for diagnosis, recurrent treatment, follow-up, visits, supportive therapy, complications, and admission were computed for each individual using a sample of 25 patients presenting with local recurrent rectal cancer at the National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) and Gunma University Hospital (GUH). Patients received only radical surgery for primary rectal adenocarcinoma and had isolated unresectable pelvic recurrence. Fourteen and 11 patients receiving treatment for the local recurrence between 2003 and 2005 were followed retrospectively at NIRS and GUH, respectively. Treatment was carried out with carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) alone at NIRS, while multimodality therapy including three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hyperthermia was performed at GUH. The 2-year overall survival rate was 85% and 55% for CIRT and multimodality treatment, respectively. The mean cost was 4803946 yen for the CIRT group and 4611100 yen for the multimodality treatment group. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for CIRT was 6428 yen per 1% increase in survival. The median duration of total hospitalization was 37 days for CIRT and 66 days for the multimodality treatment group. In conclusion, by calculating all direct costs, CIRT was found to be a potential cost effective treatment modality as compared to multimodality treatment for locally recurrent rectal cancer. (author)

  4. Experimental control of the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Munib

    2008-12-01

    The laser generation of energetic high quality beams of protons and heavier ions has opened up the door to a plethora of applications. These beams are usually generated by the interaction of a short pulse high power laser with a thin metal foil target. They could already be applied to probe transient phenomena in plasmas and to produce warm dense matter by isochoric heating. Other applications such as the production of radioisotopes and tumour radiotherapy need further research to be put into practice. To meet the requirements of each application, the properties of the laser-accelerated particle beams have to be controlled precisely. In this thesis, experimental means to control the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions are investigated. The production and control of proton and carbon ion beams is studied using advanced ion source designs: Experiments concerning mass-limited (i.e. small and isolated) targets are conducted. These targets have the potential to increase both the number and the energy of laser-accelerated protons. Therefore, the influence of the size of a plane foil target on proton beam properties is measured. Furthermore, carbon ion sources are investigated. Carbon ions are of particular interest in the production of warm dense matter and in cancer radiotherapy. The possibility to focus carbon ion beams is investigated and a simple method for the production of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion beams is presented. This thesis also provides an insight into the physical processes connected to the production and the control of laser-accelerated ions. For this purpose, laser-accelerated protons are employed to probe plasma phenomena on laser-irradiated targets. Electric fields evolving on the surface of laser-irradiated metal foils and hollow metal foil cylinders are investigated. Since these fields can be used to displace, collimate or focus proton beams, understanding their temporal and spatial evolution is crucial for the design of

  5. Experimental control of the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Munib

    2008-12-15

    The laser generation of energetic high quality beams of protons and heavier ions has opened up the door to a plethora of applications. These beams are usually generated by the interaction of a short pulse high power laser with a thin metal foil target. They could already be applied to probe transient phenomena in plasmas and to produce warm dense matter by isochoric heating. Other applications such as the production of radioisotopes and tumour radiotherapy need further research to be put into practice. To meet the requirements of each application, the properties of the laser-accelerated particle beams have to be controlled precisely. In this thesis, experimental means to control the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions are investigated. The production and control of proton and carbon ion beams is studied using advanced ion source designs: Experiments concerning mass-limited (i.e. small and isolated) targets are conducted. These targets have the potential to increase both the number and the energy of laser-accelerated protons. Therefore, the influence of the size of a plane foil target on proton beam properties is measured. Furthermore, carbon ion sources are investigated. Carbon ions are of particular interest in the production of warm dense matter and in cancer radiotherapy. The possibility to focus carbon ion beams is investigated and a simple method for the production of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion beams is presented. This thesis also provides an insight into the physical processes connected to the production and the control of laser-accelerated ions. For this purpose, laser-accelerated protons are employed to probe plasma phenomena on laser-irradiated targets. Electric fields evolving on the surface of laser-irradiated metal foils and hollow metal foil cylinders are investigated. Since these fields can be used to displace, collimate or focus proton beams, understanding their temporal and spatial evolution is crucial for the design of

  6. A semi-analytical radiobiological model may assist treatment planning in light ion radiotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kundrát, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 23 (2007), s. 6813-6830 ISSN 0031-9155 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : Bragg peak * light ions * hadron * hadron radiotherapy * biological effectiveness * treatment planning Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 2.528, year: 2007

  7. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannenmacher, M.; Debus, J.; Wenz, F.

    2006-01-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  8. Carbon-ion radiation enhances migration ability and invasiveness of the pancreatic cancer cell, PANC-1, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Mayumi; Otsuka, Yoshimi; Imadome, Kaori; Endo, Satoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Imai, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease that responds poorly to conventional photon radiotherapy. Carbon-ion (C-ion) radiation has advantages compared with conventional radiotherapy, because it enables more accurate dose distribution and more efficient tumor cell killing. To elucidate the effects of local radiotherapy on the characteristics of metastatic tumors, it is necessary to understand the nature of motility in irradiated tumor cells; this will, in turn, facilitate the development of effective strategies to counter tumor cell motility, which can be used in combination with radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to examine the invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells exposed to C-ion irradiation. We found that C-ion irradiation suppressed the migration of MIAPaCa-2, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1; diminished the invasiveness of MIAPaCa-2; and tended to reduce the invasion of BxPC-3 and AsPC-1. However, C-ion irradiation increased the invasiveness of PANC-1 through the activation of plasmin and urokinase-type plasiminogen activator. Administration of serine protease inhibitor (SerPI) alone failed to reduce C-ion-induced PANC-1 invasiveness, whereas the combination of SerPI and Rho-associated coiled-coil forming protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor suppressed it. Furthermore, PANC-1 showed mesenchymal-amoeboid transition when we treated with SerPI alone. In conclusion, C-ion irradiation is effective in suppressing the invasive potential of several pancreatic tumor cell lines, but not PANC-1; this is the first study showing that C-ion irradiation induces the invasive potential of a tumor cell line. Further in vivo studies are required to examine the therapeutic effectiveness of radiotherapy combined with inhibitors of both mesenchymal and amoeboid modes of tumor cell motility. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. Secondary radiation measurements for particle therapy applications: charged particles produced by 4He and 12C ion beams in a PMMA target at large angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucinski, A.; Battistoni, G.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Muraro, S.; Paramatti, R.; Piersanti, L.; Pinci, D.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Toppi, M.; Traini, G.; Voena, C.; Patera, V.

    2018-03-01

    Proton and carbon ion beams are used in the clinical practice for external radiotherapy treatments achieving, for selected indications, promising and superior clinical results with respect to x-ray based radiotherapy. Other ions, like \

  10. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.; Segal, M.N.; Adler, R.J.; Glatstein, E.

    1995-01-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use, innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d( 3 He,p) 4 He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction's production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data are also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in 'nested'-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output 3 He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment

  11. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, K. M.; Doyle, B.; Segal, M. N.; Hamm, R. W.; Adler, R. J.; Glatstein, E.

    1995-12-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery — with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use and innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d( 3He,p) 4 He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction's production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data is also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in "nested"-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output 3He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.

  12. Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  13. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-08-19

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  14. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  15. Electronic structure of incident carbon ions on a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Takeuchi, Takae; Yamamoto, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure of an incident carbon ion on a graphite surface is discussed on the basis of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. A carbon cation forms a covalent bond with the graphite, and a carbon nonion is attracted to the graphite surface through van der Waals interaction. A carbon anion has no stable state on a graphite surface. The charge effects of incident ions become clear upon detailed examination of the electronic structure. (author)

  16. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y. [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm{sup 2} at the peak of the pulse.

  17. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse.

  18. Potential application of garlic on heavy ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shuai; Zhang Hong; Liu Yang

    2012-01-01

    Garlic has beneficial effects to protect against many diseases. It can not only protect normal cells from lesion, but also prevent tumorigenesis, proliferation, adhesion, invasion and metastasis. In this paper, the mechanisms of these functions of garlic were summarized and compared with radioprotector and radiosensitizer. We presented that garlic has both radioprotective effect on normal cells and radiosensitive effect on tumor cells. By right of its superiority, garlic can improve biological effect in the therapy of heavy ion. Therefore, it has potential value in clinical practice. That is worth for us to explore whether garlic has radioprotective and radiosensitive effect or not. (authors)

  19. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF DOSIMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF GAFCHROMIC EBT3 AND EBT-XD FILMS FOR CLINICAL CARBON ION BEAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonai, Shunsuke; Arai, Chinatsu; Shimoyama, Kaoru; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie

    2018-02-03

    Radiochromic film is a very useful tool for 2D dosimetric measurements in radiotherapy because it is self-developing and has very high-spatial resolution. However, considerable care has to be taken in ion beam radiotherapy owing to the quenching effect of high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. In this study, the dose responses of GAFchromic EBT3 and EBT-XD films were experimentally investigated using the clinical carbon ion beam at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba. Results showed that the relations between absorbed dose and net optical density could be expressed well using an equation proposed by Reinhardt (2015). The quenching effect was evaluated by determining their relative efficiencies for photon irradiation as a function of LET. A correction equation derived in this study allowed the absorbed dose to be determined in the small irradiation field used for carbon ion radiotherapy eye treatments. This study contributes to establishing an absolute dosimetry procedure for heavy ion beams using radiochromic film. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  1. Specification of carbon ion dose at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Nakai, Tatsuaki; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    The clinical dose distributions of therapeutic carbon beams, currently used at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), are based on in-vitro Human Salivary Gland (HSG) cell survival response and clinical experience from fast neutron radiotherapy. Moderate radiosensitivity of HSG cells is expected to be a typical response of tumours to carbon beams. At first, the biological dose distribution is designed so as to cause a flat biological effect on HSG cells in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region. Then, the entire biological dose distribution is evenly raised in order to attain a RBE (relative biological effectiveness)=3.0 at a depth where dose-averaged LET (linear energy transfer) is 80 keV/μm. At that point, biological experiments have shown that carbon ions can be expected to have a biological effect identical to fast neutrons, which showed a clinical RBE of 3.0 for fast neutron radiotherapy at NIRS. The resulting clinical dose distribution in this approximation is not dependent on dose level, tumour type or fractionation scheme and thus reduces the unknown parameters in the analysis of the clinical results. The width SOBP and the clinical/physical dose at the center of SOBP specify the dose distribution. The clinical results analyzed in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) were found to show good agreement with the expected RBE value at higher TCP levels. The TCP analysis method was applied for the prospective dose estimation of hypofractionation. (author)

  2. 15 years experience with helium ion radiotherapy for uveal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, J.R.; Char, D.H.; Petti, P.L.; Daftari, I.K.; Quivey, J.M.; Singh, R.P.; Phillips, T.L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: In this study we review our long term experience with helium ion therapy in treating uveal melanoma. Materials and Methods: At UCSF-LBL, 347 patients with uveal melanoma were treated with helium ions from December 1978 - May 1992. A non randomized dose searching study was undertaken beginning with 80 GyE in 5 fractions and subsequently lowered through several levels to 48 GyE in 4 fractions. The treatment period ranged from 3 to 15 days, with a mean of 7 days. The various dose groups were similar in tumor characteristics and size. Results: An overall local control rate of 96% has been achieved, with no dose response being seen at 80, 70, 60 or 50 GyE in 5 fxs. At the lowest dose level of 48 GyE in 4 fxs, the local control rate fell to 87%. Fifteen patients (4%) had local failure in the eye requiring enucleation (12 pts), laser (1 pt) or reirradiation (2 pts). The time of appearance of local failures ranges from 4 to 64 months with most occurring within 2 years. Eight of the 15 patients with local failure are dead of distant metastases. Of the 347 patients, 308 had (20(200)) vision or better in the affected eye prior to treatment. Of these, 125 (41%) have retained at least(20(200)) vision in the treated eye. Patients with tumors greater than 5 mm in ultrasound height or close to the optic nerve or fovea have a reduced chance of retaining useful vision. The total enucleation rate is 15%, 1% for local failure and 14% because of complications of the helium RT, mostly secondary to severe glaucoma. Of the 347 patients, 230 are still alive. The median follow up is 75 months, range 3-206 months. Kaplan-Maier (K-M) survival for all 347 patients was 80% at 5 years, 77% at 10 years and 68% at 15 years post treatment. Results for patients whose tumor involves the ciliary body is much worse with a 15 year K-M survival of 42%, whereas patients not having ciliary involvement have a 15 year K-M survival of 75%. The K-M survival in patients with local failure in

  3. On the probability of cure for heavy-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanin, Leonid; Zaider, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The probability of a cure in radiation therapy (RT)—viewed as the probability of eventual extinction of all cancer cells—is unobservable, and the only way to compute it is through modeling the dynamics of cancer cell population during and post-treatment. The conundrum at the heart of biophysical models aimed at such prospective calculations is the absence of information on the initial size of the subpopulation of clonogenic cancer cells (also called stem-like cancer cells), that largely determines the outcome of RT, both in an individual and population settings. Other relevant parameters (e.g. potential doubling time, cell loss factor and survival probability as a function of dose) are, at least in principle, amenable to empirical determination. In this article we demonstrate that, for heavy-ion RT, microdosimetric considerations (justifiably ignored in conventional RT) combined with an expression for the clone extinction probability obtained from a mechanistic model of radiation cell survival lead to useful upper bounds on the size of the pre-treatment population of clonogenic cancer cells as well as upper and lower bounds on the cure probability. The main practical impact of these limiting values is the ability to make predictions about the probability of a cure for a given population of patients treated to newer, still unexplored treatment modalities from the empirically determined probability of a cure for the same or similar population resulting from conventional low linear energy transfer (typically photon/electron) RT. We also propose that the current trend to deliver a lower total dose in a smaller number of fractions with larger-than-conventional doses per fraction has physical limits that must be understood before embarking on a particular treatment schedule. (paper)

  4. Evaluation of a combination tumor treatment using thermo-triggered liposomal drug delivery and carbon ion irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokuryo, Daisuke; Aoki, Ichio; Yuba, Eiji; Kono, Kenji; Aoshima, Sadahito; Kershaw, Jeff; Saga, Tsuneo

    2017-07-01

    The combination of radiotherapy with chemotherapy is one of the most promising strategies for cancer treatment. Here, a novel combination strategy utilizing carbon ion irradiation as a high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiotherapy and a thermo-triggered nanodevice is proposed, and drug accumulation in the tumor and treatment effects are evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging relaxometry and immunohistology (Ki-67, n = 15). The thermo-triggered liposomal anticancer nanodevice was administered into colon-26 tumor-grafted mice, and drug accumulation and efficacy was compared for 6 groups (n = 32) that received or did not receive the radiotherapy and thermo trigger. In vivo quantitative R 1 maps visually demonstrated that the multimodal thermosensitive polymer-modified liposomes (MTPLs) can accumulate in the tumor tissue regardless of whether the region was irradiated by carbon ions or not. The tumor volume after combination treatment with carbon ion irradiation and MTPLs with thermo-triggering was significantly smaller than all the control groups at 8 days after treatment. The proposed strategy of combining high-LET irradiation and the nanodevice provides an effective approach for minimally invasive cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of carbon ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikazono, N.; Suzuki, C.; Kitamura, S.; Watanabe, H.; Tano, S.; Tanaka, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana by carbon ions was carried out to investigate the mutational effect of ion particles in higher plants. The averaged mutation rate of carbon ions was 2.0 X 10 -6 / Gy, which was 18-fold higher than that of electrons. PCR analysis of the carbon ion-induced mutants showed that, out of 28 mutant alleles, 14 had point-like mutations within the gene, while 14 contained large structural alterations. In the case of 12 electron-induced mutants, 9 had point-like mutations within the gene, while 3 contained large structural alterations. These results suggest that carbon ions are more likely to induce large structural alterations compared with electrons. Further sequence analysis revealed that most of the point-like mutations induced by carbon ions were short deletions. In the case of rearrangements, DNA strand breaks were found to be rejoined using, if present, short homologous sequences for both types of radiation. After carbon ion-irradiation, small deletions were frequently observed around the breakpoints, whereas duplications of terminal sequence were found after electron-irradiation. These results suggest that non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway operates after plant cells are exposed to both ion particles and electrons but that different mode of rejoining deals with the broken ends produced by each radiation. From the present results, it seems reasonable to assume that carbon ions could predominantly induce null mutations in Arabidopsis. The fact that the molecular nature of carbon ion-induced mutation was different from that of electrons and that the molecular mechanisms of cells to induce mutations appeared to be also different implicates that ion particle is not only valuable as a new mutagen but also useful as a new tool to study repair mechanisms of certain types of DNA damage

  6. Iterative reconstruction with boundary detection for carbon ion computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Deepak; Qin, Nan; Zhang, You; Kalantari, Faraz; Niu, Shanzhou; Jia, Xun; Pompos, Arnold; Jiang, Steve; Wang, Jing

    2018-03-01

    In heavy ion radiation therapy, improving the accuracy in range prediction of the ions inside the patient’s body has become essential. Accurate localization of the Bragg peak provides greater conformity of the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. We investigated the use of carbon ions directly for computed tomography (carbon CT) to create the relative stopping power map of a patient’s body. The Geant4 toolkit was used to perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the carbon ion trajectories, to study their lateral and angular deflections and the most likely paths, using a water phantom. Geant4 was used to create carbonCT projections of a contrast and spatial resolution phantom, with a cone beam of 430 MeV/u carbon ions. The contrast phantom consisted of cranial bone, lung material, and PMMA inserts while the spatial resolution phantom contained bone and lung material inserts with line pair (lp) densities ranging from 1.67 lp cm-1 through 5 lp cm-1. First, the positions of each carbon ion on the rear and front trackers were used for an approximate reconstruction of the phantom. The phantom boundary was extracted from this approximate reconstruction, by using the position as well as angle information from the four tracking detectors, resulting in the entry and exit locations of the individual ions on the phantom surface. Subsequent reconstruction was performed by the iterative algebraic reconstruction technique coupled with total variation minimization (ART-TV) assuming straight line trajectories for the ions inside the phantom. The influence of number of projections was studied with reconstruction from five different sets of projections: 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90. Additionally, the effect of number of ions on the image quality was investigated by reducing the number of ions/projection while keeping the total number of projections at 60. An estimation of carbon ion range using the carbonCT image resulted in improved range prediction compared to the range calculated using a

  7. Non-invasive monitoring of therapeutic carbon ion beams in a homogeneous phantom by tracking of secondary ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwosch, K.; Hartmann, B.; Jakubek, J.; Granja, C.; Soukup, P.; Jäkel, O.; Martišíková, M.

    2013-06-01

    Radiotherapy with narrow scanned carbon ion beams enables a highly accurate treatment of tumours while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. Changes in the patient’s geometry can alter the actual ion range in tissue and result in unfavourable changes in the dose distribution. Consequently, it is desired to verify the actual beam delivery within the patient. Real-time and non-invasive measurement methods are preferable. Currently, the only technically feasible method to monitor the delivered dose distribution within the patient is based on tissue activation measurements by means of positron emission tomography (PET). An alternative monitoring method based on tracking of prompt secondary ions leaving a patient irradiated with carbon ion beams has been previously suggested. It is expected to help in overcoming the limitations of the PET-based technique like physiological washout of the beam induced activity, low signal and to allow for real-time measurements. In this paper, measurements of secondary charged particle tracks around a head-sized homogeneous PMMA phantom irradiated with pencil-like carbon ion beams are presented. The investigated energies and beam widths are within the therapeutically used range. The aim of the study is to deduce properties of the primary beam from the distribution of the secondary charged particles. Experiments were performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center, Germany. The directions of secondary charged particles emerging from the PMMA phantom were measured using an arrangement of two parallel pixelated silicon detectors (Timepix). The distribution of the registered particle tracks was analysed to deduce its dependence on clinically important beam parameters: beam range, width and position. Distinct dependencies of the secondary particle tracks on the properties of the primary carbon ion beam were observed. In the particular experimental set-up used, beam range differences of 1.3 mm were detectable. In addition, variations

  8. Carbon contaminant in the ion processing of aluminum oxide film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaug, Y.; Roy, N.

    1989-01-01

    Ion processing can induce contamination on the bombarded surface. However, this process is essential for the microelectronics device fabrication. Auger electron spectroscopy has been used to study the simultaneous deposition of carbon impurity during ion bombardment of magnetron rf-sputtering deposited aluminum oxide film. Ion bombardment on aluminum oxide results in a preferential removal of surface oxygen and a formation of a metastable state of aluminum suboxide. Cosputtered implanted carbon contaminant appears to have formed a new state of stoichiometry on the surface of the ion bombarded aluminum oxide and existed as an aluminum carbide. This phase has formed due to the interaction of the implanted carbon and the aluminum suboxide. The Ar + ion sputter etching rate is reduced for the carbon contaminated oxide. The electrical resistance of the aluminum oxide between two gold strips has been measured. It is found that the electrical resistance is also reduced due to the formation of the new stoichiometry on the surface

  9. Combination of Heavy-ion radiotherapy and p53-gene therapy by radio-sensitizing promoter for glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oga, Masaru; Koshikawa, Nobuko; Takenaga, Keizo; Iwadate, Yasuo; Nojima, Kumie

    2005-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the anti-tumor effect of the combination of heavy-ion radiotherapy, inducing p53-independent apoptosis, and p53-gene therapy, inducing p53-dependent apoptosis for glioma. To enhance the p53-dependent apoptosis, we chose the strategy to utilize the heavy-ion irradiation itself as a ''trigger'' by using radio-sensitizing promoter-E9ns-2/CMV chimeric promoter (Scott et al:2003) in p53-gene therapy. First, EGFP reporter gene with E9ns-2/CMV chimeric promoter was transfected in C6 rat glioma cell-line and the transfected-cell bulk was irradiated at dose of 3, 5, 10 Gy respectively with charged carbon particle (290 MeV/nucleon). The light upregulation of EGFP was observed in 24 hours after 5 Gy irradiation. On the basis of this result, p53 gene with E9ns-2/CMV chimeric promoter was transfected in p53-mutant U373MG human glioma cell-line and the transfected-cell bulk was irradiated at dose of 5 Gy. There was, however, no obvious p53-upregulation at any time-point, so far. Further investigation is needed to clarify the appropriate experimental system. (author)

  10. Corrosion resistance of uranium with carbon ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Hongwei; Yan Dongxu; Bai Bin; Lang Dingmu; Xiao Hong; Wang Xiaohong

    2008-01-01

    The carbon modified layers prepared on uranium surface by carbon ion implantation, gradient implantation, recoil implantation and ion beam assisted deposition process techniques were studied. Depth profile elements of the samples based on Auger electron spectroscopy, phase composition identified by X-ray diffraction as well as corrosion resistance of the surface modified layers by electrochemistry tester and humid-thermal oxidation test were carried out. The carbon modified layers can be obtained by above techniques. The samples deposited with 45 keV ion bombardment, implanted by 50 keV ions and implanted with gradient energies are of better corrosion resistance properties. The samples deposited carbon before C + implantation and C + assisted deposition exhibit worse corrosion resistance properties. The modified layers are dominantly dot-corraded, which grows from the dots into substructure, however, the assisted deposition samples have comparatively high carbon composition and are corraded weakly. (authors)

  11. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  12. Ions in carbon dioxide at an atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezoe, Yasumasa; Onuki, Kaoru; Shimizu, Saburo; Nakajima, Hayato; Sato, Shoichi; Matsuoka, Shingo; Nakamura, Hirone; Tamura, Takaaki

    1985-01-01

    The formation and the subsequent reactions of positive and negative ions were observed by a time resolved atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer (TRAPI) in an atmospheric pressure carbon dioxide added with small amounts of carbon monoxide and oxygen. A relatively stable ion of (44 x n) + (n >= 2) having a different reactivity from that of (CO 2 ) + sub(n) was found to be one of major ionic species in this gas system. This species was tentatively assigned as [O 2 (CO) 2 ] + (CO 2 )sub(n-2). A new reaction sequence of positive ions is proposed which can be operative in the radiolysis of carbon dioxide at 1 atm. (author)

  13. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Katagiri, K.; Noda, K.; Ponkin, D. O.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Salnikov, V. V.; Shutov, V. B.

    2015-08-01

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 1010 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5 × 109 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 1011 C6+ ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the 11C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C4+ ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of 11C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated 11C4+ beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the 11C4+ beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons.

  14. Modified carbon black materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostecki, Robert; Richardson, Thomas; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Pollak, Elad; Lux, Simon

    2016-06-14

    A lithium (Li) ion battery comprising a cathode, a separator, an organic electrolyte, an anode, and a carbon black conductive additive, wherein the carbon black has been heated treated in a CO.sub.2 gas environment at a temperature range of between 875-925 degrees Celsius for a time range of between 50 to 70 minutes to oxidize the carbon black and reduce an electrochemical reactivity of the carbon black towards the organic electrolyte.

  15. Particles that fight cancer: the use of protons and carbon ions in cancer therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Particles that fight cancer: the use of protons and carbon ions in cancer therapy Cancer is a major societal issue. A key challenge for cancer therapy is the complex and multifaceted nature of the disease, which calls for personalised treatment. Radiotherapy has been used to treat tumours for more than a century, and is still a staple in oncology: today, 50 % of cancer patients receive radiotherapy, half of them with curative intent. Hadrontherapy is one of the most technologically advanced methods of delivering radiation dose to the tumour while protecting surrounding healthy tissues. In addition, hadrontherapy can reach otherwise difficult to access deep-seated tumours and can be used for radio resistant tumours as in hypoxia. This year marks 60 years since the first patient was treated with protons in the US and 20 years since the use of carbon ions in Japan. Join us in learning about the journey of particle therapy in Japan and Europe, its challenges, clinical results and future prospects. Thursday 2...

  16. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: calculation and optimization of biologically effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Scholz, M.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel approach to treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy based on the local effect model (LEM) which allows to calculate the biologically effective dose not only for the target region but for the entire irradiation volume. LEM is ideally suited to be used as an integral part of treatment planning code systems for active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. Thus, it has been incorporated into our standard treatment planning system for ion therapy (TRiP). Single intensity modulated fields can be optimized with respect to homogeneous biologically effective dose. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is calculated separately for each voxel of the patient CT. Our radiobiologically oriented code system is in use since 1995 for the planning of irradiation experiments with cell cultures and animals such as rats and minipigs. Since 1997 it is in regular and successful use for patient treatment planning. (orig.)

  17. Heavy metal ion adsorption onto polypyrrole-impregnated porous carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Moonjung; Jang, Jyongsik

    2008-09-01

    Polypyrrole-impregnated porous carbon was readily synthesized using vapor infiltration polymerization of pyrrole monomers. The results show that the functionalized polymer layer was successfully coated onto the pore surface of carbon without collapse of mesoporous structure. The modified porous carbon exhibited an improved complexation affinity for heavy metal ions such as mercury, lead, and silver ions due to the amine group of polypyrrole. The introduced polypyrrole layer could provide the surface modification to be applied for heavy metal ion adsorbents. Especially, polymer-impregnated porous carbon has an enhanced heavy metal ion uptake, which is 20 times higher than that of adsorbents with amine functional groups. Furthermore, the relationship between the coated polymer amount and surface area was also investigated in regard to adsorption capacity.

  18. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L J; Sood, D K; Manory, R R [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 {mu}m thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10{sup 17} - 8x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}. Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Sorption studies of nickel ions onto activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Parth; Vyas, Meet; Patel, Chirag

    2018-05-01

    Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. The use of low-cost activated carbon derived from azadirachta indica, an agricultural waste material, has been investigated as a replacement for the current expensive methods of removing nickel ions from wastewater. The temperature variation study showed that the nickel ions adsorption is endothermic and spontaneous with increased randomness at the solid solution interface. Significant effect on adsorption was observed on varying the pH of the nickel ion solutions. Therefore, this study revealed that azadirachta indica can serve as a good source of activated carbon with multiple and simultaneous metal ions removing potentials and may serve as a better replacement for commercial activated carbons in applications that warrant their use.

  20. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L.J.; Sood, D.K.; Manory, R.R. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 {mu}m thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10{sup 17} - 8x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}. Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.J.; Sood, D.K.; Manory, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 μm thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10 17 - 8x10 17 ions cm -2 . Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs

  2. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Ponkin, D. O.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Salnikov, V. V.; Shutov, V. B. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Katagiri, K.; Noda, K. [National Institute of Radiological Science, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C{sup 4+} and C{sup 6+} ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 10{sup 10} C{sup 4+} ions per pulse and about 5 × 10{sup 9} C{sup 6+} ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 10{sup 11} C{sup 6+} ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the {sup 11}C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C{sup 4+} ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of {sup 11}C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated {sup 11}C{sup 4+} beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the {sup 11}C{sup 4+} beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons.

  3. Studies on advantages of heavy ions in radiotherapy compared with γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Chuanling; Wang Jufang; Jin Xiaodong; Jing Xigang; Li Renmin; Wei Wei; Li Wenjian

    2007-01-01

    Hepatoma and melanoma cells were exposed to 12 C 6+ beams generated by HIRFL facility and γ-rays and the cell response was studied by colony assays as well as the analysis of RBE of carbon ions was evolved. The survival curves of cells irradiated by heavy ions were different from those of cells irradiated by γ-rays. And two kinds of cell showed the obvious discrepancy in response to the photon and ion irradiation. The results showed that heavy ions have special physical properties and mighty potency to kill cell in both single and fractional irradiation meanwhile it can kill tumor cells with high radioresistance more efficiently. When involved in clinical therapy, heavy ions will enhance the therapy efficiency and decrease the suffering of patients because it can impair the repair for sublethal damage of cells which can lead to fewer irradiation fractions

  4. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  5. Non-randomized therapy trial to determine the safety and efficacy of heavy ion radiotherapy in patients with non-resectable osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bischof Marc

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. For effective treatment, local control of the tumor is absolutely critical, because the chances of long term survival are EURAMOS1. Local photon radiotherapy has previously been used in small series and in an uncontrolled, highly individualized fashion, which, however, documented that high dose radiotherapy can, in principle, be used to achieve local control. Generally the radiation dose that is necessary for a curative approach can hardly be achieved with conventional photon radiotherapy in patients with non-resectable tumors that are usually located near radiosensitive critical organs such as the brain, the spine or the pelvis. In these cases particle Radiotherapy (proton therapy (PT/heavy ion therapy (HIT may offer a promising new alternative. Moreover, compared with photons, heavy ion beams provide a higher physical selectivity because of their finite depth coverage in tissue. They achieve a higher relative biological effectiveness. Phase I/II dose escalation studies of HIT in adults with non-resectable bone and soft tissue sarcomas have already shown favorable results. Methods/Design This is a monocenter, single-arm study for patients ≥ 6 years of age with non-resectable osteosarcoma. Desired target dose is 60-66 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (Gy E with 45 Gy PT (proton therapy and a carbon ion boost of 15-21 GyE. Weekly fractionation of 5-6 × 3 Gy E is used. PT/HIT will be administered exclusively at the Ion Radiotherapy Center in Heidelberg. Furthermore, FDG-PET imaging characteristics of non-resectable osteosarcoma before and after PT/HIT will be investigated prospectively. Systemic disease before and after PT/HIT is targeted by standard chemotherapy protocols and is not part of this trial. Discussion The primary objectives of this trial are the determination of feasibility and toxicity of HIT. Secondary objectives are tumor response

  6. Homologous recombination in Arabidopsis seeds along the track of energetic carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ting; Li Fanghua; Liu Qingfang; Bian Po; Wang Jufang; Wu Yuejin; Wu Lijun; Li Wenjian

    2012-01-01

    Heavy ion irradiation has been used as radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors, and is also an inevitable health concern for astronauts in space mission. Unlike photons such as X-rays and γ-rays, a high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ion has a varying energy distribution along its track. Therefore, it is important to determine the correlation of biological effects with the Bragg curve energy distribution of heavy ions. In this study, a continuous biological tissue equivalent was constructed using a layered cylinder of Arabidopsis seeds, which was irradiated with carbon ions of 87.5 MeV/nucleon. The position of energy loss peak in the seed pool was determined with CR-39 track detectors. The mutagenic effect in vivo along the path of carbon ions was investigated with the seeds in each layer as an assay unit, which corresponded to a given position in physical Bragg curve. Homologous recombination frequency (HRF), expression level of AtRAD54 gene, germination rate of seeds, and survival rate of young seedlings were used as checking endpoints, respectively. Our results showed that Arabidopsis S0 and S1 plants exhibited significant increases in HRF compared to their controls, and the expression level of AtRAD54 gene in S0 plants was significantly up-regulated. The depth-biological effect curves for HRF and the expression of AtRAD54 gene were not consistent with the physical Bragg curve. Differently, the depth-biological effect curves for the developmental endpoints matched generally with the physical Bragg curve. The results suggested a different response pattern of various types of biological events to heavy ion irradiation. It is also interesting that except for HRF in S0 plants, the depth-biological effect curves for each biological endpoint were similar for 5 Gy and 30 Gy of carbon irradiation.

  7. Homologous recombination in Arabidopsis seeds along the track of energetic carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ting [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei 230026 (China); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Li Fanghua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu Qingfang [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Bian Po, E-mail: bianpo@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang Jufang [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wu Yuejin; Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Li Wenjian [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2012-09-01

    Heavy ion irradiation has been used as radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors, and is also an inevitable health concern for astronauts in space mission. Unlike photons such as X-rays and {gamma}-rays, a high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ion has a varying energy distribution along its track. Therefore, it is important to determine the correlation of biological effects with the Bragg curve energy distribution of heavy ions. In this study, a continuous biological tissue equivalent was constructed using a layered cylinder of Arabidopsis seeds, which was irradiated with carbon ions of 87.5 MeV/nucleon. The position of energy loss peak in the seed pool was determined with CR-39 track detectors. The mutagenic effect in vivo along the path of carbon ions was investigated with the seeds in each layer as an assay unit, which corresponded to a given position in physical Bragg curve. Homologous recombination frequency (HRF), expression level of AtRAD54 gene, germination rate of seeds, and survival rate of young seedlings were used as checking endpoints, respectively. Our results showed that Arabidopsis S0 and S1 plants exhibited significant increases in HRF compared to their controls, and the expression level of AtRAD54 gene in S0 plants was significantly up-regulated. The depth-biological effect curves for HRF and the expression of AtRAD54 gene were not consistent with the physical Bragg curve. Differently, the depth-biological effect curves for the developmental endpoints matched generally with the physical Bragg curve. The results suggested a different response pattern of various types of biological events to heavy ion irradiation. It is also interesting that except for HRF in S0 plants, the depth-biological effect curves for each biological endpoint were similar for 5 Gy and 30 Gy of carbon irradiation.

  8. Radiation therapy using high-energy heavy-ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki

    1995-01-01

    The clinical trial of the heavy-ion radiotherapy was started at June 1994 after pre-clinical experiments using 290 MeV/u carbon beam. In this paper, an irradiation system for the heavy-ion radiotherapy installed at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) and the physical characteristics of the therapeutic beam were discussed. (author)

  9. NIRS methods of specifying carbon ion dose verification of RBE and tumour specific radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Clinical dose distribution of therapeutic carbon beams, currently used at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), is designed based on in-vitro Human Salivary Gland (HSG) cell survival response and clinical experiences of fast neutron radiotherapy. At first, the biological dose distribution is designed so as to cause a flat biological effect on HSG cells in spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region. Then, the entire biological dose distribution is evenly raised in order to attain relative biological effectiveness (RBE)=3.0 at a depth where dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET) is 80 keV/μm. A retrospective analysis was made to examine appropriateness on the estimation of the biological effectiveness of carbon-ion radiotherapy using resultant data of clinical trials at HIMAC. Using this RBE system, over 2,700 patients have been treated by carbon beams. As a part of these patient data, local control rate of non-small lung cancer, were analysed to verify the clinical RBE of the carbon beam. The local control rate was compared with those for published by groups of Gunma University and Massachusetts General Hospital. Using a simplified tumour control probability (TCP) model, clinical RBE values were obtained for different level of the tumour control probability. For the 50% level of the clinical TCP, the RBE values nearly coincide with those of in-vitro human salivary gland cell survival at 10%. For the higher level of the clinical TCP, the RBE values approach closer to those adapted in clinical trials at HIMAC. The approach was also applied for those of chordoma, bone and soft tissue sarcoma and rectal cancer. Difference in radiosensitivity is observed for the tumours. (author)

  10. Helium ions for radiotherapy? Physical and biological verifications of a novel treatment modality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krämer, Michael, E-mail: m.kraemer@gsi.de; Scifoni, Emanuele; Schuy, Christoph; Rovituso, Marta; Maier, Andreas; Kaderka, Robert; Kraft-Weyrather, Wilma [Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Tinganelli, Walter; Durante, Marco [Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany and Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Application (TIFPA-INFN), 38123, via Sommarive 14, Trento (Italy); Brons, Stephan; Tessonnier, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum (HIT), Im Neuenheimer Feld 450, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Universitätsklinikums Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Parodi, Katia [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum (HIT), Im Neuenheimer Feld 450, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Universitätsklinikums Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU Munich), Department of Medical Physics, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Munich (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Modern facilities for actively scanned ion beam radiotherapy allow in principle the use of helium beams, which could present specific advantages, especially for pediatric tumors. In order to assess the potential use of these beams for radiotherapy, i.e., to create realistic treatment plans, the authors set up a dedicated {sup 4}He beam model, providing base data for their treatment planning system TRiP98, and they have reported that in this work together with its physical and biological validations. Methods: A semiempirical beam model for the physical depth dose deposition and the production of nuclear fragments was developed and introduced in TRiP98. For the biological effect calculations the last version of the local effect model was used. The model predictions were experimentally verified at the HIT facility. The primary beam attenuation and the characteristics of secondary charged particles at various depth in water were investigated using {sup 4}He ion beams of 200 MeV/u. The nuclear charge of secondary fragments was identified using a ΔE/E telescope. 3D absorbed dose distributions were measured with pin point ionization chambers and the biological dosimetry experiments were realized irradiating a Chinese hamster ovary cells stack arranged in an extended target. Results: The few experimental data available on basic physical processes are reproduced by their beam model. The experimental verification of absorbed dose distributions in extended target volumes yields an overall agreement, with a slight underestimation of the lateral spread. Cell survival along a 4 cm extended target is reproduced with remarkable accuracy. Conclusions: The authors presented a simple simulation model for therapeutical {sup 4}He beams which they introduced in TRiP98, and which is validated experimentally by means of physical and biological dosimetries. Thus, it is now possible to perform detailed treatment planning studies with {sup 4}He beams, either exclusively or in

  11. ADSORPTION OF STRONTIUM IONS FROM WATER ON MODIFIED ACTIVATED CARBONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Ciobanu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of strontium ions from aqueous solutions on active carbons CAN-7 and oxidized CAN-8 has been studied. It has been found that allure of the adsorption isotherms for both studied active carbons are practically identical. Studies have shown that the adsorption isotherms for strontium ions from aqueous solutions are well described by the Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations, respectively. The surface heterogeneity of activated carbons CAN-7 and oxidized CAN-8 has been assessed by using Freundlich equation.

  12. Carbon ion therapy for advanced sinonasal malignancies: feasibility and acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Alexandra D; Nikoghosyan, Anna V; Ecker, Swantje; Ellerbrock, Malte; Debus, Jürgen; Münter, Marc W

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate feasibility and toxicity of carbon ion therapy for treatment of sinonasal malignancies. First site of treatment failure in malignant tumours of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity is mostly in-field, local control hence calls for dose escalation which has so far been hampered by accompanying acute and late toxicity. Raster-scanned carbon ion therapy offers the advantage of sharp dose gradients promising increased dose application without increase of side-effects. Twenty-nine patients with various sinonasal malignancies were treated from 11/2009 to 08/2010. Accompanying toxicity was evaluated according to CTCAE v.4.0. Tumor response was assessed according to RECIST. Seventeen patients received treatment as definitive RT, 9 for local relapse, 2 for re-irradiation. All patients had T4 tumours (median CTV1 129.5 cc, CTV2 395.8 cc), mostly originating from the maxillary sinus. Median dose was 73 GyE mostly in mixed beam technique as IMRT plus carbon ion boost. Median follow- up was 5.1 months [range: 2.4 - 10.1 months]. There were 7 cases with grade 3 toxicity (mucositis, dysphagia) but no other higher grade acute reactions; 6 patients developed grade 2 conjunctivits, no case of early visual impairment. Apart from alterations of taste, all symptoms had resolved at 8 weeks post RT. Overall radiological response rate was 50% (CR and PR). Carbon ion therapy is feasible; despite high doses, acute reactions were not increased and generally resolved within 8 weeks post radiotherapy. Treatment response is encouraging though follow-up is too short to estimate control rates or evaluate potential late effects. Controlled trials are warranted

  13. MRI-based treatment plan simulation and adaptation for ion radiotherapy using a classification-based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rank, Christopher M; Tremmel, Christoph; Hünemohr, Nora; Nagel, Armin M; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    In order to benefit from the highly conformal irradiation of tumors in ion radiotherapy, sophisticated treatment planning and simulation are required. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of MRI for ion radiotherapy treatment plan simulation and adaptation using a classification-based approach. Firstly, a voxelwise tissue classification was applied to derive pseudo CT numbers from MR images using up to 8 contrasts. Appropriate MR sequences and parameters were evaluated in cross-validation studies of three phantoms. Secondly, ion radiotherapy treatment plans were optimized using both MRI-based pseudo CT and reference CT and recalculated on reference CT. Finally, a target shift was simulated and a treatment plan adapted to the shift was optimized on a pseudo CT and compared to reference CT optimizations without plan adaptation. The derivation of pseudo CT values led to mean absolute errors in the range of 81 - 95 HU. Most significant deviations appeared at borders between air and different tissue classes and originated from partial volume effects. Simulations of ion radiotherapy treatment plans using pseudo CT for optimization revealed only small underdosages in distal regions of a target volume with deviations of the mean dose of PTV between 1.4 - 3.1% compared to reference CT optimizations. A plan adapted to the target volume shift and optimized on the pseudo CT exhibited a comparable target dose coverage as a non-adapted plan optimized on a reference CT. We were able to show that a MRI-based derivation of pseudo CT values using a purely statistical classification approach is feasible although no physical relationship exists. Large errors appeared at compact bone classes and came from an imperfect distinction of bones and other tissue types in MRI. In simulations of treatment plans, it was demonstrated that these deviations are comparable to uncertainties of a target volume shift of 2 mm in two directions indicating that especially

  14. SU-F-T-198: Dosimetric Comparison of Carbon and Proton Radiotherapy for Recurrent Nasopharynx Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Y; Zhao, J; Wang, W; Lin, L; Liu, X; Shahnazi, K [Shanghai Proton and Heavy Ion Center, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Various radiotherapy planning methods for locally recurrent nasopharynx carcinoma (R-NPC) have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to compare carbon and proton therapy for the treatment of R-NPC in terms of dose coverage for target volume and sparing for organs at risk (OARs). Methods: Six patients who were suffering from R-NPC and treated using carbon therapy were selected for this study. Treatment plans with a total dose of 57.5Gy (RBE) in 23 fractions were made using SIEMENS Syngo V11. An intensity-modulated radiotherapy optimization method was chosen for carbon plans (IMCT) while for proton plans both intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMPT) and single beam optimization (proton-SBO) methods were chosen. Dose distributions, dose volume parameters, and selected dosimetric indices for target volumes and OARs were compared for all treatment plans. Results: All plans provided comparable PTV coverage. The volume covered by 95% of the prescribed dose was comparable for all three plans. The average values were 96.11%, 96.24% and 96.11% for IMCT, IMPT, and proton-SBO respectively. A significant reduction of the 80% and 50% dose volumes were observed for the IMCT plans compared to the IMPT and proton-SBO plans. Critical organs lateral to the target such as brain stem and spinal cord were better spared by IMPT than by proton-SBO, while IMCT spared those organs best. For organs in the beam path, such as parotid glands, the mean dose results were similar for all three plans. Conclusion: Carbon plans yielded better dose conformity than proton plans. They provided similar or better target coverage while significantly lowering the dose for normal tissues. Dose sparing for critical organs in IMPT plans was better than proton-SBO, however, IMPT is known to be more sensitive to range uncertainties. For proton plans it is essential to find a balance between the two optimization methods.

  15. Ion conducting fluoropolymer carbonates for alkali metal ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSimone, Joseph M.; Pandya, Ashish; Wong, Dominica; Balsara, Nitash P.; Thelen, Jacob; Devaux, Didier

    2017-09-05

    Liquid or solid electrolyte compositions are described that comprise a homogeneous solvent system and an alkali metal salt dissolved in said solvent system. The solvent system may comprise a fluoropolymer, having one or two terminal carbonate groups covalently coupled thereto. Batteries containing such electrolyte compositions are also described.

  16. Geant4 simulation of clinical proton and carbon ion beams for the treatment of ocular melanomas with the full 3-D pencil beam scanning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, Edoardo; Riccardi, Cristina; Rimoldi, Adele; Tamborini, Aurora [University of Pavia and the INFN section of Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Piersimoni, Pierluigi [Division of Radiation Research, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Ciocca, Mario [Medical Physics Unit, CNAO Foundation, Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates the possibility to use carbon ion beams delivered with active scanning modality, for the treatment of ocular melanomas at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) in Pavia. The radiotherapy with carbon ions offers many advantages with respect to the radiotherapy with protons or photons, such as a higher relative radio-biological effectiveness (RBE) and a dose release better localized to the tumor. The Monte Carlo (MC) Geant4 10.00 patch-03 toolkit is used to reproduce the complete CNAO extraction beam line, including all the active and passive components characterizing it. The simulation of proton and carbon ion beams and radiation scanned field is validated against CNAO experimental data. For the irradiation study of the ocular melanoma an eye-detector, representing a model of a human eye, is implemented in the simulation. Each element of the eye is reproduced with its chemical and physical properties. Inside the eye-detector a realistic tumor volume is placed and used as the irradiation target. A comparison between protons and carbon ions eye irradiations allows to study possible treatment benefits if carbon ions are used instead of protons. (authors)

  17. Fluoro-Carbonate Solvents for Li-Ion Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NAGASUBRAMANIAN, GANESAN

    1999-01-01

    A number of fluoro-carbonate solvents were evaluated as electrolytes for Li-ion cells. These solvents are fluorine analogs of the conventional electrolyte solvents such as dimethyl carbonate, ethylene carbonate, diethyl carbonate in Li-ion cells. Conductivity of single and mixed fluoro carbonate electrolytes containing 1 M LiPF(sub 6) was measured at different temperatures. These electrolytes did not freeze at -40 C. We are evaluating currently, the irreversible 1st cycle capacity loss in carbon anode in these electrolytes and the capacity loss will be compared to that in the conventional electrolytes. Voltage stability windows of the electrolytes were measured at room temperature and compared with that of the conventional electrolytes. The fluoro-carbon electrolytes appear to be more stable than the conventional electrolytes near Li voltage. Few preliminary electrochemical data of the fluoro-carbonate solvents in full cells are reported in the literature. For example, some of the fluorocarbonate solvents appear to have a wider voltage window than the conventional electrolyte solvents. For example, methyl 2,2,2 trifluoro ethyl carbonate containing 1 M LiPF(sub 6) electrolyte has a decomposition voltage exceeding 6 V vs. Li compared to and lt;5 V for conventional electrolytes. The solvent also appears to be stable in contact with lithium at room temperature

  18. Ion irradiation effects on tensile properties of carbon fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurumada, A.; Ishihara, M.; Baba, S.; Aihara, J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composite materials have high thermal conductivity and excellent mechanical properties at high temperatures. They have been used as structural materials at high temperatures in fission and experimental fusion reactors. The changes in the microstructures and the mechanical properties due to irradiation damage must be measured for the safety design and the life assessment of the materials. The purpose of this study is to obtain a basic knowledge of the development of new carbon composite materials having high thermal conductivity and excellent resistance to irradiation damage. Five kinds of carbon fibres were selected, including a vapour growth carbon fibre (VGCF; K1100X), a polyacrylonitrile-based fibre (PAN; M55JB by Toray Corp.), two meso-phase pitch-based fibres (YS-15-60S and YS-70-60S by Nippon Graphite Fiber Corp.) and a pitch-based fibre (K13C2U by Mitsubishi Chemical Co.). They were irradiated by high-energy carbon, nickel and argon ions. Irradiation damages in the carbon fibres are expected to be uniform across the cross-section, as the diameters of the carbon fibres are about 20 μm and are sufficiently smaller than the ranges of ions. The cross-sectional areas increased due to ion irradiation, with the exception of the K1100X of VGCF. One of the reasons for the increases is the swelling of carbon basal planes due to lattice defects in the graphite interlayer. The tensile strengths and the Young's moduli decreased due to ion irradiation except for the K1100X of VGCF and the YS-15-60S of meso-phase pitch-based fibres. One of the reasons for the decreases is thought to be that the microstructures of carbon fibres are damaged in the axial direction, as ions were irradiated vertically with respect to the longitudinal direction of carbon fibres. The results of this study indicate that the VGCF and the meso-phase pitch-based carbon fibres could be useful as reinforcement fibres of new carbon composite materials having high thermal conductivity and

  19. Ion-irradiation-induced defects in bundles of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salonen, E.; Krasheninnikov, A.V.; Nordlund, K.

    2002-01-01

    We study the structure and formation yields of atomic-scale defects produced by low-dose Ar ion irradiation in bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes. For this, we employ empirical potential molecular dynamics and simulate ion impact events over an energy range of 100-1000 eV. We show that the most common defects produced at all energies are vacancies on nanotube walls, which at low temperatures are metastable but long-lived defects. We further calculate the spatial distribution of the defects, which proved to be highly non-uniform. We also show that ion irradiation gives rise to the formations of inter-tube covalent bonds mediated by carbon recoils and nanotube lattice distortions due to dangling bond saturation. The number of inter-tube links, as well as the overall damage, linearly grows with the energy of incident ions

  20. Chromosome inversions in lymphocytes of prostate cancer patients treated with X-rays and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignalosa, Diana; Lee, Ryonfa; Hartel, Carola; Sommer, Sylvester; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Debus, Jürgen; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the cytogenetic damage of the intrachange type in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients treated for prostate cancer with different radiation qualities. Material and methods: Prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a clinical trial based at the Heidelberg University Hospital and at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in 2006. Patients were treated either with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) alone or with a carbon-ion boost followed by IMRT. Blood samples were collected at the end of the therapy and the mBAND technique was used to investigate the cytogenetic damage of the inter and intrachange types. Moreover, the mBAND analysis was performed on healthy donor cells irradiated in vitro with X-rays or C-ions. Results: Our results show no statistically significant differences in the yield and the spectrum of chromosome aberrations among patients treated only with IMRT and patients receiving the combined treatment when similar target volumes and doses to the target are compared. Conclusion: The study suggests that the risks of normal tissue late effects and second malignancies in prostate cancer patients are comparable when heavy ions or IMRT radiotherapy are applied

  1. Stoichiometric carbon nitride synthesized by ion beam sputtering and post nitrogen ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valizadeh, R.; Colligon, J.S.; Katardiev, I.V.; Faunce, C.A.; Donnelly, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Carbon nitride films have been deposited on Si (100) by ion beam sputtering a vitreous graphite target with nitrogen and argon ions with and without concurrent N2 ion bombardment at room temperature. The sputtering beam energy was 1000 eV and the assisted beam energy was 300 eV with ion / atom arrival ratio ranging from 0.5 to 5. The carbon nitride films were deposited both as single layer directly on silicon substrate and as multilayer between two layers of stoichiometric amorphous silicon nitride and polycrystalline titanium nitride. The deposited films were implanted ex-situ with 30 keV nitrogen ions with various doses ranging from 1E17 to 4E17 ions.cm -2 and 2 GeV xenon ion with a dose of 1E12 ions.cm -2 . The nitrogen concentration of the films was measured with Rutherford Backscattering (RBS), Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS) and Parallel Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (PEELS). The nitrogen concentration for as deposited sample was 34 at% and stoichiometric carbon nitride C 3 N 4 was achieved by post nitrogen implantation of the multi-layered films. Post bombardment of single layer carbon nitride films lead to reduction in the total nitrogen concentration. Carbon K edge structure obtained from PEELS analysis suggested that the amorphous C 3 N 4 matrix was predominantly sp 2 bonded. This was confirmed by Fourier Transforrn Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the single CN layer which showed the nitrogen was mostly bonded with carbon in nitrile (C≡N) and imine (C=N) groups. The microstructure of the film was determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) which indicated that the films were amorphous

  2. Biological effects of accelerated boron, carbon, and neon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryev, Yu.G.; Ryzhov, N.I.; Popov, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    The biological effects of accelerated boron, carbon, and neon ions on various biological materials were determined. The accelerated ions included 10 B, 11 B, 12 C, 20 Ne, 22 Ne, and 40 Ar. Gamma radiation and x radiation were used as references in the experiments. Among the biological materials used were mammalian cells and tissues, yeasts, unicellular algae (chlorella), and hydrogen bacteria. The results of the investigation are given and the biophysical aspects of the problem are discussed

  3. Quality of Life in Men Treated With Carbon Ion Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatsuki, Masaru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Yanagi, Takeshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Nakano, Takashi; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Akakura, Koichiro; Shimazaki, Jun; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess patient quality of life (QOL) after carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for prostate cancer, using established questionnaires. Methods and Material: The subjects were 150 patients who underwent C-ion RT. Of these, 25 patients with low-risk prostate cancer received C-ion RT alone, whereas the remaining 125 patients with a high-risk tumor also received androgen deprivation therapy. Quality of life was assessed using the self-administered Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) questionnaire in all patients three times. In addition, University of California-Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) was conducted in the low-risk patients. Results: The FACT-General (FACT-G) and FACT-P scores at 12 months after treatment averaged over all 150 patients showed no significant change compared with those before C-ion RT. In FACT-P subscales, emotional well-being increased significantly just after and 12 months after treatment. In contrast, physical well-being (PWB) and social/family well-being (S/FWB) decreased significantly at 12 months, whereas the prostate cancer subscale (PCS) decreased significantly just after treatment. Average scores for FACT-G, FACT-P, PWB, S/FWB, and PCS for the 125 patients receiving hormone therapy showed substantial detrimental changes at 12 months. In contrast, those of the 25 low-risk patients who had no hormone therapy showed no significant change. Similarly no significant change in the average of the UCLA-PCI scores in the low-risk patients was seen at 12 months. Conclusions: Average QOL parameters reported by patients with localized prostate cancer treated with C-ion RT, in the absence of hormone therapy, showed no significant decrease 12 months after C-ion RT

  4. Dosimetric properties of Gafchromic (registered) EBT films in medical carbon ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MartisIkova, Maria; Jaekel, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    High spatial resolution is desired for dosimetrical verification of patient plans for radiotherapy treatments employing scanned ion beams. This is provided by Gafchromic EBT film, the ancestor of currently available EBT2 films. In this contribution, dosimetric properties of EBT films were investigated. Measurements of depth response were performed for monoenergetic fields (250 MeV/u) for different ion fluences as well as for an energy-modulated spread-out Bragg peak of 5 x 5 x 5 cm 3 in 10 cm depth. The films were positioned perpendicular to the incoming carbon ion beams. The observed quenching of the response relative to the same dose of photons was quantified by the relative efficiency. In monenenergetic beams, a relative efficiency of about 0.73 was found in the plateau, 0.4 in the peak and 0.55 in the tail region. No dependence of the relative efficiency on the ion fluence was observed well beyond the clinically used levels. This gives a constant peak to plateau ratio, which is about 1.8 times lower than that for the delivered dose. In the spread-out Bragg peak, the relative efficiency was found to decrease from 0.64 to 0.54 toward the distal end. Thus when aiming for a prediction of the film response in mixed ion beams, the efficiency of the film has to be parametrized as a function of the ion type and energy over the whole ion spectrum. In addition, the relative water-equivalent range of EBT films was measured here to be 1.291 ± 0.015.

  5. Microstructure evolution in carbon-ion implanted sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orwa, J. O.; McCallum, J. C.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Peng, J. L.; Rubanov, S.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon ions of MeV energy were implanted into sapphire to fluences of 1x10 17 or 2x10 17 cm -2 and thermally annealed in forming gas (4% H in Ar) for 1 h. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy results obtained from the lower dose implant showed retention of implanted carbon and accumulation of H near the end of range in the C implanted and annealed sample. Three distinct regions were identified by transmission electron microscopy of the implanted region in the higher dose implant. First, in the near surface region, was a low damage region (L 1 ) composed of crystalline sapphire and a high density of plateletlike defects. Underneath this was a thin, highly damaged and amorphized region (L 2 ) near the end of range in which a mixture of i-carbon and nanodiamond phases are present. Finally, there was a pristine, undamaged sapphire region (L 3 ) beyond the end of range. In the annealed sample some evidence of the presence of diamond nanoclusters was found deep within the implanted layer near the projected range of the C ions. These results are compared with our previous work on carbon implanted quartz in which nanodiamond phases were formed only a few tens of nanometers from the surface, a considerable distance from the projected range of the ions, suggesting that significant out diffusion of the implanted carbon had occurred.

  6. Application of ion beams for polymeric carbon based biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evelyn, A.L.

    2001-01-01

    Ion beams have been shown to be quite suitable for the modification and analysis of carbon based biomaterials. Glassy polymeric carbon (GPC), made from cured phenolic resins, has a high chemical inertness that makes it useful as a biomaterial in medicine for drug delivery systems and for the manufacture of heart valves and other prosthetic devices. Low and high-energy ion beams have been used, with both partially and fully cured phenolic resins, to enhance biological cell/tissue growth on, and to increase tissue adhesion to GPC surfaces. Samples bombarded with energetic ion beams in the keV to MeV range exhibited increased surface roughness, measured using optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Ion beams were also used to perform nuclear reaction analyses of GPC encapsulated drugs for use in internal drug delivery systems. The results from the high energy bombardment were more dramatic and are shown in this paper. The interaction of energetic ions has demonstrated the useful application of ion beams to enhance the properties of carbon-based biomaterials

  7. Out-of-field dose measurements in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaderka, Robert

    2011-07-13

    This thesis describes the results from measurements of the out-of-field dose in radiotherapy. The dose outside the treatment volume has been determined in a water phantom and an anthropomorphic phantom. Measurements were performed with linac photons, passively delivered protons, scanned protons, passively delivered carbon ions as well as scanned carbon ions. It was found that the use of charged particles for radiotherapy reduces the out-of-field dose by up to three orders of magnitude compared to conventional radiotherapy with photons.

  8. Mutagenic effects of nitrogen and carbon ions on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Shen Mei; Lu Ting; Shu Shizhen

    1998-06-01

    Dry seeds of stevia were implanted by 60∼100 keV nitrogen ion and 75 keV carbon ion with various doses. The biological effects in M 1 and mutation in M 2 were studied. The results showed that ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure and inhibited mitosis action in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with the increase of ion beam energy and dose. Energy effects of mitosis were presented between 75 keV and 60, 100 keV. As compared with γ-rays, the effects of ion beam were lower on chromosomal aberration but were higher on frequency of the mutation. The rate of cell with chromosome aberration and M 2 useful mutation induced by implantation of carbon ion was higher than those induced by implantation of nitrogen ion. Mutagenic effects of Feng 1 x Ri Yuan and of Ri Yuan x Feng 2 are higher than that of Ji Ning and Feng 2

  9. Development and clinical application of respiration gated irradiation system (ReGIS) in heavy ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osaka, Yasuhiro; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu

    1999-01-01

    In order to achieve maximal radiation dose concentration for thoraco-abdominal tumors and spare normal surrounding tissue in heavy ion therapy, compensation for respiration-related movement is desirable. Hence, a respiration-gated irradiation system (ReGIS) was introduced to the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) in June 1996. In this report, the development and clinical application of ReGIS, as well as the analysis of respiration-related movement and reduction of target volumes are described. When using ReGIS, a sensor emitting infrared rays is attached to the thoracic or abdominal wall to measure respiratory movement. A position-sensitive device (camera) senses these rays to detect sensor locations and data are forwarded to a computer system. A curve representing respiratory cycles is displayed, upon which a trigger level that is part of a respiratory cycle (about a fourth or fifth of the expiratory phase). Beams can be delivered while the respiratory curve is under the trigger level. Thirty-five patients involving 37 irradiated sites (19 lung cancers, 13 hepatomas, 2 mediastinal tumors, and 3 metastatic lung tumors) were retrospectively analyzed. Target volumes were reduced an average of 29.5% (11.0 to 57.9%) using ReGIS. Average tumor respiration-related movement in gated phase was 3.7 mm (0 mm to 14.6 mm). Although irradiation using ReGIS took more time to perform (average 1.62 times non-gated irradiation), it was considered to be acceptable for routine heavy ion therapy. ReGIS has proved to be useful for compensation of respiration-related movement and reduction of target volume in radiotherapy, and this method is sufficiently simple for practical clinical application. (author)

  10. Trapping behaviour of deuterium ions implanted into tungsten simultaneously with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Suzuki, Sachiko; Wang, Wanjing; Kurata, Rie; Kida, Katsuya; Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji; Ashikawa, Naoko; Sagara, Akio; Yoshida, Naoaki

    2009-01-01

    The trapping behaviour of deuterium ions implanted into tungsten simultaneously with carbon ions was investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The D 2 TDS spectrum consisted of three desorption stages, namely desorption of deuterium trapped by intrinsic defects, ion-induced defects and carbon with the formation of the C-D bond. Although the deuterium retention trapped by intrinsic defects was almost constant, that by ion-induced defects increased as the ion fluence increased. The retention of deuterium with the formation of the C-D bond was saturated at an ion fluence of 0.5x10 22 D + m -2 , where the major process was changed from the sputtering of tungsten with the formation of a W-C mixture to the formation of a C-C layer, and deuterium retention as the C-D bond decreased. It was concluded that the C-C layer would enhance the chemical sputtering of carbon with deuterium with the formation of CD x and the chemical state of carbon would control the deuterium retention in tungsten under C + -D 2 + implantation.

  11. Modelling carcinogenesis after radiotherapy using Poisson statistics: implications for IMRT, protons and ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Bleddyn [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Bleddyn.Jones@rob.ox.ac.uk

    2009-06-01

    Current technical radiotherapy advances aim to (a) better conform the dose contours to cancers and (b) reduce the integral dose exposure and thereby minimise unnecessary dose exposure to normal tissues unaffected by the cancer. Various types of conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using x-rays can achieve (a) while charged particle therapy (CPT)-using proton and ion beams-can achieve both (a) and (b), but at greater financial cost. Not only is the long term risk of radiation related normal tissue complications important, but so is the risk of carcinogenesis. Physical dose distribution plans can be generated to show the differences between the above techniques. IMRT is associated with a dose bath of low to medium dose due to fluence transfer: dose is effectively transferred from designated organs at risk to other areas; thus dose and risk are transferred. Many clinicians are concerned that there may be additional carcinogenesis many years after IMRT. CPT reduces the total energy deposition in the body and offers many potential advantages in terms of the prospects for better quality of life along with cancer cure. With C ions there is a tail of dose beyond the Bragg peaks, due to nuclear fragmentation; this is not found with protons. CPT generally uses higher linear energy transfer (which varies with particle and energy), which carries a higher relative risk of malignant induction, but also of cell death quantified by the relative biological effect concept, so at higher dose levels the frank development of malignancy should be reduced. Standard linear radioprotection models have been used to show a reduction in carcinogenesis risk of between two- and 15-fold depending on the CPT location. But the standard risk models make no allowance for fractionation and some have a dose limit at 4 Gy. Alternatively, tentative application of the linear quadratic model and Poissonian statistics to chromosome breakage and cell kill simultaneously allows estimation of

  12. Physical and biological basis of hadron radiotherapy. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-09-01

    The Workshop was a satellite event of the 14 th International Congress of Radiation Research (ICRR-2011). It was held in Cracow, Poland, on the 2 and 3 September 2011, at the Collegium Novum of the Jagiellonian University. The Workshop organized, jointly by the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences and the Polish Radiation Research Society, would provide its participants with an opportunity to discuss current topics in proton and carbon radiotherapy, clinical aspects of ion radiotherapy, ion beam dosimetry, unwanted patient exposure, radiobiology for ion radiotherapy and other relevant subjects. Book of Abstracts contains abstracts of 33 oral presentations and 12 posters.

  13. Repair of skin damage during fractionated irradiation with gamma rays and low-LET carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Uzawa, Akiko; Takai, Nobuhiko; Fukawa, Takeshi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Aoki, Mizuho; Hirayama, Ryoichi

    2006-01-01

    In clinical use of carbon-ion beams, a deep-seated tumor is irradiated with a Spread-Out Bragg peak (SOBP) with a high-linear energy transfer (LET) feature, whereas surface skin is irradiated with an entrance plateau, the LET of which is lower than that of the peak. The repair kinetics of murine skin damage caused by an entrance plateau of carbon ions was compared with that caused by photons using a scheme of daily fractionated doses followed by a top-up dose. Right hind legs received local irradiations with either 20 keV/μm carbon ions or γ rays. The skin reaction of the irradiated legs was scored every other day up to Day 35 using a scoring scale that consisted of 10 steps, ranging from 0.5 to 5.0. An isoeffect dose to produce a skin reaction score of 3.0 was used to obtain a total dose and a top-up dose for each fractionation. Dependence on a preceding dose and on the time interval of a top-up dose was examined using γ rays. For fractionated γ rays, the total dose linearly increased while the top-up dose linearly decreased with an increase in the number of fractions. The magnitude of damage repair depended on the size of dose per fraction, and was larger for 5.2 Gy than 12.5 Gy. The total dose of carbon ions with 5.2 Gy per fraction did not change till 2 fractions, but abruptly increased at the 3rd fraction. Factors such as rapid repopulation, induced repair and cell cycle synchronization are possible explanations for the abrupt increase. As an abrupt increase/decrease of normal tissue damage could be caused by changing the number of fractions in carbon-ion radiotherapy, we conclude that, unlike photon therapy, skin damage should be carefully studied when the number of fractions is changed in new clinical trials. (author)

  14. Quantitative evaluation of potential irradiation geometries for carbon-ion beam grid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubouchi, Toshiro; Henry, Thomas; Ureba, Ana; Valdman, Alexander; Bassler, Niels; Siegbahn, Albert

    2018-03-01

    Radiotherapy using grids containing cm-wide beam elements has been carried out sporadically for more than a century. During the past two decades, preclinical research on radiotherapy with grids containing small beam elements, 25 μm-0.7 mm wide, has been performed. Grid therapy with larger beam elements is technically easier to implement, but the normal tissue tolerance to the treatment is decreasing. In this work, a new approach in grid therapy, based on irradiations with grids containing narrow carbon-ion beam elements was evaluated dosimetrically. The aim formulated for the suggested treatment was to obtain a uniform target dose combined with well-defined grids in the irradiated normal tissue. The gain, obtained by crossfiring the carbon-ion beam grids over a simulated target volume, was quantitatively evaluated. The dose distributions produced by narrow rectangular carbon-ion beams in a water phantom were simulated with the PHITS Monte Carlo code. The beam-element height was set to 2.0 cm in the simulations, while the widths varied from 0.5 to 10.0 mm. A spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) was then created for each beam element in the grid, to cover the target volume with dose in the depth direction. The dose distributions produced by the beam-grid irradiations were thereafter constructed by adding the dose profiles simulated for single beam elements. The variation of the valley-to-peak dose ratio (VPDR) with depth in water was thereafter evaluated. The separation of the beam elements inside the grids were determined for different irradiation geometries with a selection criterion. The simulated carbon-ion beams remained narrow down to the depths of the Bragg peaks. With the formulated selection criterion, a beam-element separation which was close to the beam-element width was found optimal for grids containing 3.0-mm-wide beam elements, while a separation which was considerably larger than the beam-element width was found advantageous for grids containing 0.5-mm

  15. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  16. Water equivalent thickness values of materials used in beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Taddei, Phillip J; Fitzek, Markus M; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-05-07

    Heavy charged particle beam radiotherapy for cancer is of increasing interest because it delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume. Accurate knowledge of the range of a heavy charged particle beam after it penetrates a patient's body or other materials in the beam line is very important and is usually stated in terms of the water equivalent thickness (WET). However, methods of calculating WET for heavy charged particle beams are lacking. Our objective was to test several simple analytical formulas previously developed for proton beams for their ability to calculate WET values for materials exposed to beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions. Experimentally measured heavy charged particle beam ranges and WET values from an iterative numerical method were compared with the WET values calculated by the analytical formulas. In most cases, the deviations were within 1 mm. We conclude that the analytical formulas originally developed for proton beams can also be used to calculate WET values for helium, carbon and iron ion beams with good accuracy.

  17. Carbon ion irradiation of the human prostate cancer cell line PC3: A whole genome microarray study

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUETENS, ANNELIES; MOREELS, MARJAN; QUINTENS, ROEL; CHIRIOTTI, SABINA; TABURY, KEVIN; MICHAUX, ARLETTE; GRÉGOIRE, VINCENT; BAATOUT, SARAH

    2014-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is a form of external radiation therapy, which uses beams of charged particles such as carbon ions. Compared to conventional radiotherapy with photons, the main advantage of carbon ion therapy is the precise dose localization along with an increased biological effectiveness. The first results obtained from prostate cancer patients treated with carbon ion therapy showed good local tumor control and survival rates. In view of this advanced treatment modality we investigated the effects of irradiation with different beam qualities on gene expression changes in the PC3 prostate adenocarcinoma cell line. For this purpose, PC3 cells were irradiated with various doses (0.0, 0.5 and 2.0 Gy) of carbon ions (LET=33.7 keV/μm) at the beam of the Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds (Caen, France). Comparative experiments with X-rays were performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre. Genome-wide gene expression was analyzed using microarrays. Our results show a downregulation in many genes involved in cell cycle and cell organization processes after 2.0 Gy irradiation. This effect was more pronounced after carbon ion irradiation compared with X-rays. Furthermore, we found a significant downregulation of many genes related to cell motility. Several of these changes were confirmed using qPCR. In addition, recurrence-free survival analysis of prostate cancer patients based on one of these motility genes (FN1) revealed that patients with low expression levels had a prolonged recurrence-free survival time, indicating that this gene may be a potential prognostic biomarker for prostate cancer. Understanding how different radiation qualities affect the cellular behavior of prostate cancer cells is important to improve the clinical outcome of cancer radiation therapy. PMID:24504141

  18. RBE of cells irradiated by carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjian; Zhou Guangming; Wei Zengquan; Wang Jufang; Dang Bingrong; Li Qiang; Xie Hongmei

    2002-01-01

    The mouse melanoma cells (B16), human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (HeLa), Chinese hamster pulmonary cells V79, and human hepatoma cells (SMMC-7721) were collected for studying. The cells of 5 x 10 5 /ml were seeded in 35 mm diameter petri dish and allowed to grow one day, and then the medium in petri dishes was removed away, the cells were washed once with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), petri dishes was covered with 4μm thickness Mylar film. The cells were irradiated by 12 C ion beam with LETs of 125.5, 200, 700 keV/μm in water generated from HIRFL (Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou). For 60 Co γ-ray experiment, the cells of 5 x 10 4 /ml were grown in 20 ml culture flasks including 1.5 ml cell suspension and directly used for irradiation. Following irradiation, the cells were trypsinized, counted, plated at appropriate densities in growth medium and then seeded in 60 mm diameter culture dishes. Each dish was filled 4 ml standard medium, and incubated for 8-12 days at 37 degree C incubator containing 5% CO 2 . The cultures were then rinsed with PBS buffer at pH 6.8, fixed with Carnoy's fluid, stained for 8 min with Giemsa (1:20, pH 6.8), and colonies containing more than 50 cells were scored. Their relative biological effectivenesses (RBE) were investigated. The results show that RBE depends on cellular types and increases with increasing of cellular survival level when LET is at 125.5 keV/μm, and decreases with increasing LET when LET ≥ 125.5 keV/μm

  19. Precision high-dose radiotherapy with helium-ion beams: treatment of malignant tumors in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, W.S.; Castro, J.R.; Austin-Seymour, M.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Zink, S.R.; Capra-Young, D.; Pitluck, S.; Walton, R.E.; Pascale, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    The advantages of the Bragg peak and sharp penumbra of the helium-ion beam emphasize its importance in radiotherapy. Perhaps the best example of this type of treatment is that for the treatment of malignant melanoma of the eye. The authors treated 181 such patients, 46 in the last 12 months. They continue to have very encouraging results in this group. Only eight patients have had a recurrence of their tumor, and in all eight a second treatment, usually removal of the eye, has apparently cured the tumor. They have generally been able to preserve the pretreatment visual acuity as long as the edge of the tumor is at least 3-4 mm away from the optic disc or macula. Four different tumor doses have been used since this program was begun. The first 20 patients received 70 GyE; the dose was then raised to 80 GyE for the next 69 patients. The group of patients treated with 80 GyE began to develop an unacceptable incidence of glaucoma in the treated eye, so the dose was then decreased to 60 GyE. So far, 4 of 61 patients (or 7%) in the 60-GyE group have developed glaucoma

  20. Regional MLEM reconstruction strategy for PET-based treatment verification in ion beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianoli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Fattori, Giovanni; Baselli, Giuseppe; Baroni, Guido; Bauer, Julia; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia; De Bernardi, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    In ion beam radiotherapy, PET-based treatment verification provides a consistency check of the delivered treatment with respect to a simulation based on the treatment planning. In this work the region-based MLEM reconstruction algorithm is proposed as a new evaluation strategy in PET-based treatment verification. The comparative evaluation is based on reconstructed PET images in selected regions, which are automatically identified on the expected PET images according to homogeneity in activity values. The strategy was tested on numerical and physical phantoms, simulating mismatches between the planned and measured β + activity distributions. The region-based MLEM reconstruction was demonstrated to be robust against noise and the sensitivity of the strategy results were comparable to three voxel units, corresponding to 6 mm in numerical phantoms. The robustness of the region-based MLEM evaluation outperformed the voxel-based strategies. The potential of the proposed strategy was also retrospectively assessed on patient data and further clinical validation is envisioned. (paper)

  1. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Cavoto, G.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-06-24

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (~ 10 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with ...

  2. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavoto, G.; Cirillo, E.N.M.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (∼ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency. (orig.)

  3. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavoto, G. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Cirillo, E.N.M. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento SBAI, Rome (Italy); Cocina, F. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Ferretti, J. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Polosa, A.D. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); CERN, Theory Division, Geneva (Switzerland); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (∼ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency. (orig.)

  4. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoto, G; Cirillo, E N M; Cocina, F; Ferretti, J; Polosa, A D

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs ([Formula: see text] GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency.

  5. Optical emission spectroscopy of carbon laser plasma ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balki, Oguzhan; Rahman, Md. Mahmudur; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2018-04-01

    Carbon laser plasma generated by an Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse width 7 ns, fluence 4-52 J cm-2) is studied by optical emission spectroscopy and ion time-of-flight. Up to C4+ ions are detected with the ion flux strongly dependent on the laser fluence. The increase in ion charge with the laser fluence is accompanied by observation of multicharged ion lines in the optical spectra. The time-integrated electron temperature Te is calculated from the Boltzmann plot using the C II lines at 392.0, 426.7, and 588.9 nm. Te is found to increase from ∼0.83 eV for a laser fluence of 22 J cm-2 to ∼0.90 eV for 40 J cm-2. The electron density ne is obtained from the Stark broadened profiles of the C II line at 392 nm and is found to increase from ∼ 2 . 1 × 1017cm-3 for 4 J cm-2 to ∼ 3 . 5 × 1017cm-3 for 40 J cm-2. Applying an external electric field parallel to the expanding plume shows no effect on the line emission intensities. Deconvolution of ion time-of-flight signal with a shifted Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for each charge state results in an ion temperature Ti ∼4.7 and ∼6.0 eV for 20 and 36 J cm-2, respectively.

  6. Coprecipitation of alkali metal ions with calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Minoru; Kitano, Yasushi

    1986-01-01

    The coprecipitation of alkali metal ions Li + , Na + , K + and Rb + with calcium carbonate has been studied experimentally and the following results have been obtained: (1) Alkali metal ions are more easily coprecipitated with aragonite than with calcite. (2) The relationship between the amounts of alkali metal ions coprecipitated with aragonite and their ionic radii shows a parabolic curve with a peak located at Na + which has approximately the same ionic radius as Ca 2+ . (3) However, the amounts of alkali metal ions coprecipitated with calcite decrease with increasing ionic radius of alkali metals. (4) Our results support the hypothesis that (a) alkali metals are in interstitial positions in the crystal structure of calcite and do not substitute for Ca 2+ in the lattice, but (b) in aragonite, alkali metals substitute for Ca 2+ in the crystal structure. (5) Magnesium ions in the parent solution increase the amounts of alkali metal ions (Li + , Na + , K + and Rb + ) coprecipitated with calcite but decrease those with aragonite. (6) Sodium-bearing aragonite decreases the incorporation of other alkali metal ions (Li + , K + and Rb + ) into the aragonite. (author)

  7. Brain Injury After Proton Therapy or Carbon Ion Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer and Skull Base Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyawaki, Daisuke; Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Sasaki, Ryohei; Niwa, Yasue; Terashima, Kazuki; Nishimura, Hideki; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of early delayed or late morbidity of Brain after particle therapy for skull base tumors and head-and-neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Between May 2001 and December 2005, 59 patients with cancerous invasion of the skull base were treated with proton or carbon ion therapy at the Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center. Adverse events were assessed according to the magnetic resonance imaging findings (late effects of normal tissue-subjective, objective, management, analytic [LENT-SOMA]) and symptoms (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [CTCAE], version 3.0). Dose-volume histograms were used to analyze the relationship between the dose and volume of the irradiated brain and the occurrence of brain injury. The median follow-up time was 33 months. Results: Of the 48 patients treated with proton therapy and 11 patients treated with carbon ion radiotherapy, 8 (17%) and 7 (64%), respectively, developed radiation-induced brain changes (RIBCs) on magnetic resonance imaging (LENT-SOMA Grade 1-3). Four patients (7%) had some clinical symptoms, such as vertigo and headache (CTCAE Grade 2) or epilepsy (CTCAE Grade 3). The actuarial occurrence rate of RIBCs at 2 and 3 years was 20% and 39%, respectively, with a significant difference in the incidence between the proton and carbon ion radiotherapy groups. The dose-volume histogram analyses revealed significant differences between Brain lobes with and without RIBCs in the actuarial volume of brain lobes receiving high doses. Conclusion: Particle therapies produced minimal symptomatic brain toxicities, but sequential evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging detected a greater incidence of RIBCs. Significant differences were observed in the irradiated brain volume between Brain lobes with and without RIBCs.

  8. Solvation of lithium ion in dimethoxyethane and propylene carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2015-07-01

    Solvation of the lithium ion (Li+) in dimethoxyethane (DME) and propylene carbonate (PC) is of scientific significance and urgency in the context of lithium-ion batteries. I report PM7-MD simulations on the composition of Li+ solvation shells (SH) in a few DME/PC mixtures. The equimolar mixture features preferential solvation by PC, in agreement with classical MD studies. However, one DME molecule is always present in the first SH, supplementing the cage formed by five PC molecules. As PC molecules get removed, DME gradually substitutes vacant places. In the PC-poor mixtures, an entire SH is populated by five DME molecules.

  9. Dose Response of Alanine Detectors Irradiated with Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type, when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behaviour of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results with model predictions......-dose curves deviate from predictions in the peak region, most pronounced at the distal edge of the peak. Conclusions: The used model and its implementation show a good overall agreement for quasi mono energetic measurements. Deviations in depth-dose measurements are mainly attributed to uncertainties...

  10. Carbonic anhydrase XII expression is associated with histologic grade of cervical cancer and superior radiotherapy outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Chong Woo; Nam, Byung-Ho; Kim, Joo-Young; Shin, Hye-Jin; Lim, Hyunsun; Lee, Sun; Lee, Su-Kyoung; Lim, Myong-Cheol; Song, Yong-Jung

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether expression of carbonic anhydrase XII (CA12) is associated with histologic grade of the tumors and radiotherapy outcomes of the patients with invasive cervical cancer. CA12 expression was examined by immunohistochemical stains in cervical cancer tissues from 183 radiotherapy patients. Histological grading was classified as well (WD), moderately (MD) or poorly differentiated (PD). Oligonucleotide microarray experiment was performed using seven cervical cancer samples to examine differentially expressed genes between WD and PD cervical cancers. The association between CA12 and histological grade was analyzed by chi-square test. CA12 and histological grades were analyzed individually and as combined CA12 and histologic grade categories for effects on survival outcome. Immunohistochemical expression of CA12 was highly associated with the histologic grade of cervical cancer. Lack of CA12 expression was associated with PD histology, with an odds ratio of 3.9 (P = 0.01). Microarray analysis showed a fourfold reduction in CA12 gene expression in PD tumors. CA12 expression was marginally associated with superior disease-free survival. Application of the new combined categories resulted in further discrimination of the prognosis of patients with moderate and poorly differentiated tumor grade. Our study indicates that CA12 may be used as a novel prognostic marker in combination with histologic grade of the tumors

  11. Oxidation processes on conducting carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    La Mantia, Fabio; Huggins, Robert A.; Cui, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The oxidation processes at the interface between different types of typical carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries and carbonates electrolyte above 5 V versus Li/Li+ were investigated. Depending on the nature and surface area of the carbon

  12. EPR characterization of carbonate ion effect on TCE and PCE decomposition by gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, J.H.; Chung, H.H.; Lee, M.J.; Jung, J.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonate ions significantly inhibit the decomposition of TCE (trichloroethylene) and PCE (perchloroethylene) by gamma-rays. The inhibition effect is larger in the case of TCE than PCE due to a greater dependence of TCE decomposition on hydroxyl radicals. The inhibition effect of carbonate ions was characterized by an EPR/spin-trapping technique. The intensity of DMPO-OH adduct signal decreased as the carbonate ion concentration increased and the percent of signal reduction was linearly proportional to the logarithm of carbonate ion concentration. This directly proves that the carbonate ions inhibit the decomposition of TCE and PCE by scavenging hydroxyl radicals. (author)

  13. Bystander effects on mammalian cells induced by carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jufang; Zhao Jing; Ma Qiufeng; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Li Weijian; Zhou Guangming; Dang Bingrong; Mao Limin; Feng Yan

    2004-01-01

    Bystander effects on unirradiated V79 cells were observed by irradiated conditioned medium (ICM) method and co-cultured with carbon-ion-irradiated V79 cells. The results showed that the colony formation efficiency of unirradiated cells is obviously decreased by ICM. After co-culture with carbon-ion-irradiated cells for some time, the colony formation efficiency of co-cultured cells was lower than expected results assuming no bystander effects. The micronucleus frequency and hprt gene mutation rate was almost the same as expected results. Cytotoxic factor(s), which was effective for cell growth but not for micronucleus and mutation on unirradiated cells, might be released by irradiated cells. (authors)

  14. Design and performance of daily quality assurance system for carbon ion therapy at NIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saotome, N.; Furukawa, T.; Hara, Y.; Mizushima, K.; Tansho, R.; Saraya, Y.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2017-09-01

    At National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), we have been commissioning a rotating-gantry system for carbon-ion radiotherapy. This rotating gantry can transport heavy ions at 430 MeV/u to an isocenter with irradiation angles of ±180° that can rotate around the patient so that the tumor can be irradiated from any direction. A three-dimensional pencil-beam scanning irradiation system equipped with the rotating gantry enables the optimal use of physical characteristics of carbon ions to provide accurate treatment. To ensure the treatment quality using such a complex system, the calibration of the primary dose monitor, output check, range check, dose rate check, machine safety check, and some mechanical tests should be performed efficiently. For this purpose, we have developed a measurement system dedicated for quality assurance (QA) of this gantry system: the Daily QA system. The system consists of an ionization chamber system and a scintillator system. The ionization chamber system is used for the calibration of the primary dose monitor, output check, and dose rate check, and the scintillator system is used for the range check, isocenter, and gantry angle. The performance of the Daily QA system was verified by a beam test. The stability of the output was within 0.5%, and the range was within 0.5 mm. The coincidence of the coordinates between the patient-positioning system and the irradiation system was verified using the Daily QA system. Our present findings verified that the new Daily QA system for a rotating gantry is capable of verifying the irradiation system with sufficient accuracy.

  15. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    OpenAIRE

    N. S. Lovenduski; M. C. Long; K. Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−]) on the basis of a long control simulation with a fully-coupled Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical...

  16. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Lovenduski, N. S.; Long, M. C.; Lindsay, K.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−]) on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and ...

  17. Constructing carbon nanotube junctions by Ar ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishaq, Ahmad; Ni Zhichun; Yan Long; Gong Jinlong; Zhu Dezhang

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) irradiated by Ar ion beams at elevated temperature were studied. The irradiation-induced defects in CNTs are greatly reduced by elevated temperature. Moreover, the two types of CNT junctions, the crossing junction and the parallel junction, were formed. And the CNT networks may be fabricated by the two types of CNT junctions. The formation process and the corresponding mechanism of CNT networks are discussed.

  18. Carbon Nanotube-Based Ion Selective Sensors for Wearable Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Soumyendu; David-Pur, Moshe; Hanein, Yael

    2017-10-11

    Wearable electronics offer new opportunities in a wide range of applications, especially sweat analysis using skin sensors. A fundamental challenge in these applications is the formation of sensitive and stable electrodes. In this article we report the development of a wearable sensor based on carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode arrays for sweat sensing. Solid-state ion selective electrodes (ISEs), sensitive to Na + ions, were prepared by drop coating plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) doped with ionophore and ion exchanger on CNT electrodes. The ion selective membrane (ISM) filled the intertubular spaces of the highly porous CNT film and formed an attachment that was stronger than that achieved with flat Au, Pt, or carbon electrodes. Concentration of the ISM solution used influenced the attachment to the CNT film, the ISM surface morphology, and the overall performance of the sensor. Sensitivity of 56 ± 3 mV/decade to Na + ions was achieved. Optimized solid-state reference electrodes (REs), suitable for wearable applications, were prepared by coating CNT electrodes with colloidal dispersion of Ag/AgCl, agarose hydrogel with 0.5 M NaCl, and a passivation layer of PVC doped with NaCl. The CNT-based REs had low sensitivity (-1.7 ± 1.2 mV/decade) toward the NaCl solution and high repeatability and were superior to bare Ag/AgCl, metals, carbon, and CNT films, reported previously as REs. CNT-based ISEs were calibrated against CNT-based REs, and the short-term stability of the system was tested. We demonstrate that CNT-based devices implemented on a flexible support are a very attractive platform for future wearable technology devices.

  19. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-Joon Jin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have displayed great potential as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs due to their unique structural, mechanical, and electrical properties. The measured reversible lithium ion capacities of CNT-based anodes are considerably improved compared to the conventional graphite-based anodes. Additionally, the opened structure and enriched chirality of CNTs can help to improve the capacity and electrical transport in CNT-based LIBs. Therefore, the modification of CNTs and design of CNT structure provide strategies for improving the performance of CNT-based anodes. CNTs could also be assembled into free-standing electrodes without any binder or current collector, which will lead to increased specific energy density for the overall battery design. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of lithium ion intercalation and diffusion in CNTs, and the influence of different structures and morphologies on their performance as anode materials for LIBs.

  20. Alanine Radiation Detectors in Therapeutic Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo

    of the depth dose curves. Solid state detectors, such as diamond detectors, radiochromic films, TLDs and the amino acid alanine are used due to there good spatial resolution. If used in particle beams their response often exhibits a dependence on particle energy and type, so the acquired signal is not always...... proportional to absorbed dose. A model by Hansen and Olsen, based on the Track Structure Theory is available, which can predict the relative efficiency of some detectors, when the particle spectrum is known. For alanine detectors the model was successfully validated by Hansen and Olsen for several ion species...... at energies below 20 MeV/u. We implemented this model in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. At the GSI heavy ion facility in Darmstadt, Germany, alanine has been irradiated with carbon ions at energies between 88 an 400 MeV/u, which is the energy range used for therapy. The irradiation and the detector response have...

  1. Adsorption of heavy metal ions on activated carbon, (5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hisayoshi; Kamegawa, Katsumi; Arita, Seiji

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption effect of heavy metal ions Cd 2+ , Zn 2+ and Hg 2+ on activated carbon by adding EDTA is reported, utilizing the experimental data. The activated carbons used for the experiment are mostly D, and B, C and F partly. As for the experimental procedure, the solutions of 100 ml which are composed of activated carbon, pH adjusting liquid, EDTA solution and solutions of heavy metals Cd, Zn and Hg, are shaken for 24 hours at 20 deg C, and after the activated carbon is centrifuged and separated for 15 minutes at 3000 rpm, the remaining heavy metal concentrations and pH in the supernatant are measured. The experimental results showed the useful effect on the adsorption of heavy metal ions of Cd, Zn and Hg by adding about 1 mol ratio of (EDTA/heavy metals). The individual experimental results are presented in detail. Concerning the adsorption quantity, 83% of Cd ions remained in the supernatant without addition of EDTA, but less than 1% with addition of about 1 to 5 mol ratio of (EDTA/Cd), and this adsorption effect was almost similar to Zn and Hg, i.e. 100% to 1% in Zn and 70% to 2 or 3% in Hg, under the condition written above. As for the influence of pH on Cd adsorption, the remaining Cd ratio is less than 10%, when pH is 7 to 10.5 at the mol ratio of 1 and 5.5 to 9 at the mol ratio of 10. The adsorption effect was different according to the kinds of activated carbon. The influencing factors for adsorption effect are the concentration of coexisting cations in the solution and the mixing time, etc. The effects of pH on Zn and Hg adsorption were almost similar to Cd. (Nakai, Y.)

  2. Dose- and time-dependent gene expression alterations in prostate and colon cancer cells after in vitro exposure to carbon ion and X-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetens, Annelies; Moreels, Marjan; Quintens, Roel; Soors, Els; Buset, Jasmine; Chiriotti, Sabina; Tabury, Kevin; Gregoire, Vincent; Baatout, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is an advanced form of radiotherapy that uses beams of charged particles (such as protons and carbon ions). Compared with conventional radiotherapy, the main advantages of carbon ion therapy are the precise absorbed dose localization, along with an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE). This high ballistic accuracy of particle beams deposits the maximal dose to the tumor, while damage to the surrounding healthy tissue is limited. Currently, hadrontherapy is being used for the treatment of specific types of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have shown that, under certain circumstances, exposure to charged particles may inhibit cell motility and migration. In the present study, we investigated the expression of four motility-related genes in prostate (PC3) and colon (Caco-2) cancer cell lines after exposure to different radiation types. Cells were irradiated with various absorbed doses (0, 0.5 and 2 Gy) of accelerated 13C-ions at the GANIL facility (Caen, France) or with X-rays. Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the RBE. RT-qPCR analysis showed dose- and time-dependent changes in the expression of CCDC88A, FN1, MYH9 and ROCK1 in both cell lines. However, whereas in PC3 cells the response to carbon ion irradiation was enhanced compared with X-irradiation, the effect was the opposite in Caco-2 cells, indicating cell-type–specific responses to the different radiation types. PMID:25190155

  3. Cancer therapy with ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandrillon, P.

    1993-01-01

    The treatment of tumours with charged particles, ranging from protons to 'light ions' (Carbon, Oxygen, Neon) has many advantages, but up to now has been little used because of the absence of facilities. After the successful pioneering work carried out with accelerators built for physics research, machines dedicated to this new radiotherapy are planned or already in construction. The rationale for this new radiotherapy, the accelerators and the beam delivery systems needed are presented in this paper. (orig.)

  4. Late quaternary fluctuations in carbonate and carbonate ion content in the northern Indian ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.

    -normalized carbonate ion (CO3=*) range from 90 to 125µmol kg-1 in the tropical region of the world oceans with a weight los of 0.3 ± 0.05µg mol -1kg-1 (Broecker and Clark, 201d). Botm water CO3=* concentration bathing the core tops are in the range of 88 to 13 μmolkg-1...

  5. Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries Based on Carbon Cryogels and Carbon Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nanofoams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  6. Carbon Cryogel and Carbon Paper-Based Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 6 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-5 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  7. Carbon nanotube/carbon nanotube composite AFM probes prepared using ion flux molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesmore, Grace; Roque, Carrollyn; Barber, Richard

    The performance of carbon nanotube-carbon nanotube composite (CNT/CNT composite) atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes is compared to that of conventional Si probes in AFM tapping mode. The ion flux molding (IFM) process, aiming an ion beam at the CNT probe, aligns the tip to a desired angle. The result is a relatively rigid tip that is oriented to offset the cantilever angle. Scans using these probes reveal an improvement in image accuracy over conventional tips, while allowing higher aspect ratio imaging of 3D surface features. Furthermore, the lifetimes of CNT-CNT composite tips are observed to be longer than both conventional tips and those claimed for other CNT technologies. Novel applications include the imaging of embiid silk. Supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholars Award and Carbon Design Innovations.

  8. Ameliorating mitochondrial dysfunction restores carbon ion-induced cognitive deficits via co-activation of NRF2 and PINK1 signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon ion therapy is a promising modality in radiotherapy to treat tumors, however, a potential risk of induction of late normal tissue damage should still be investigated and protected. The aim of the present study was to explore the long-term cognitive deficits provoked by a high-linear energy transfer (high-LET carbon ions in mice by targeting to hippocampus which plays a crucial role in memory and learning. Our data showed that, one month after 4 Gy carbon ion exposure, carbon ion irradiation conspicuously resulted in the impaired cognitive performance, neurodegeneration and neuronal cell death, as well as the reduced mitochondrial integrity, the disrupted activities of tricarboxylic acid cycle flux and electron transport chain, and the depressed antioxidant defense system, consequently leading to a decline of ATP production and persistent oxidative damage in the hippocampus region. Mechanistically, we demonstrated the disruptions of mitochondrial homeostasis and redox balance typically characterized by the disordered mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy and glutathione redox couple, which is closely associated with the inhibitions of PINK1 and NRF2 signaling pathway as the key regulators of molecular responses in the context of neurotoxicity and neurodegenerative disorders. Most importantly, we found that administration with melatonin as a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant promoted the PINK1 accumulation on the mitochondrial membrane, and augmented the NRF2 accumulation and translocation. Moreover, melatonin pronouncedly enhanced the molecular interplay between NRF2 and PINK1. Furthermore, in the mouse hippocampal neuronal cells, overexpression of NRF2/PINK1 strikingly protected the hippocampal neurons from carbon ion-elicited toxic insults. Thus, these data suggest that alleviation of the sustained mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress through co-modulation of NRF2 and PINK1 may be in charge of restoration of the cognitive

  9. TAS-116, a novel Hsp90 inhibitor, selectively enhances radio-sensitivity of human cancer cells to X-rays and carbon ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Younghyun; Sunada, Shigeaki; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Fujimori, Akira; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Hsp90 inhibitors have been investigated as cancer therapeutics in mono-therapy and to augment radiotherapy, however serious adverse effects of early generation Hsp90 inhibitors limited their development. TAS-116 is a novel Hsp90 inhibitor with lower adverse effects than other Hsp90 inhibitors, and here we investigated the radio-sensitizing effects of TAS-116 in low LET X-ray, and high LET carbon ion irradiated human cancer cells and mouse tumor xenografts. TAS-116 decreased cell survival of both X-ray and carbon ion-irradiated human cancer cell lines (HeLa and H1299 cells), and similar to other Hsp90 inhibitors, it did not affect radiosensitivity of non-cancerous human fibroblasts. TAS-116 increased the number of radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci, and delayed the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). TAS-116 reduced the expression of proteins that mediate repair of DSBs by homologous recombination (RAD51) and non-homologous end joining (Ku, DNA-PKcs), and suppressed formation of RAD51 foci and phosphorylation/activation of DNA-PKcs. TAS-116 also decreased expression of the cdc25 cell cycle progression marker, markedly increasing G2/M arrest. Combined treatment of mouse tumor xenografts with carbon ions and TAS-116 showed promising delay in tumor growth compared to either individual treatment. These results demonstrate that TAS-116 radio-sensitizes human cancer cells to both X rays and carbon ions by inhibiting the two major DSB repair pathways, and these effects were accompanied by marked cell cycle arrest. The promising results of combination TAS-116 + carbon ion radiation therapy of tumor xenografts justify further exploration of TAS-116 as an adjunct to radiotherapy using low or high LET radiation. PMID:28062703

  10. Mutagenic effects of carbon ions near the range end in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hase, Yoshihiro, E-mail: hase.yoshihiro@jaea.go.jp [Ion Beam Mutagenesis Research Group, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Nozawa, Shigeki; Narumi, Issay [Ion Beam Mutagenesis Research Group, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2012-03-01

    To gain insight into the mutagenic effects of accelerated heavy ions in plants, the mutagenic effects of carbon ions near the range end (mean linear energy transfer (LET): 425 keV/{mu}m) were compared with the effects of carbon ions penetrating the seeds (mean LET: 113 keV/{mu}m). Mutational analysis by plasmid rescue of Escherichia coli rpsL from irradiated Arabidopsis plants showed a 2.7-fold increase in mutant frequency for 113 keV/{mu}m carbon ions, whereas no enhancement of mutant frequency was observed for carbon ions near the range end. This suggested that carbon ions near the range end induced mutations that were not recovered by plasmid rescue. An Arabidopsis DNA ligase IV mutant, deficient in non-homologous end-joining repair, showed hyper-sensitivity to both types of carbon-ion irradiation. The difference in radiation sensitivity between the wild type and the repair-deficient mutant was greatly diminished for carbon ions near the range end, suggesting that these ions induce irreparable DNA damage. Mutational analysis of the Arabidopsis GL1 locus showed that while the frequency of generation of glabrous mutant sectors was not different between the two types of carbon-ion irradiation, large deletions (>{approx}30 kb) were six times more frequently induced by carbon ions near the range end. When 352 keV/{mu}m neon ions were used, these showed a 6.4 times increase in the frequency of induced large deletions compared with the 113 keV/{mu}m carbon ions. We suggest that the proportion of large deletions increases with LET in plants, as has been reported for mammalian cells. The nature of mutations induced in plants by carbon ions near the range end is discussed in relation to mutation detection by plasmid rescue and transmissibility to progeny.

  11. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Kai; Wang, Yibo [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Zhuguo, E-mail: lizg@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, 2.4 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, and 4.8 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation.

  12. Focused Ion Beam Nanopatterning for Carbon Nanotube Ropes Based Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera LA FERRARA

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Focused Ion Beam (FIB technology has been used to realize electrode patterns for contacting Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs ropes for chemical gas sensor applications. Two types of transducers, based on a single rope and on bundles, have been realized starting from silicon/Si3N4 substrate. Electrical behaviour, at room temperature, in toxic gas environments, has been investigated and compared to evaluate contribution of a single rope based sensor respect to bundles one. For all the devices, upon exposure to NO2 and NH3, the conductance has been found to increase or decrease respectively. Conductance signal is stronger for sensor based on bundles, but it also evident that response time in NO2 is faster for device based on a single rope. FIB technology offers, then, the possibility to contact easily a single sensitive nanowire, as carbon nanotube rope.

  13. Ion beam analysis of hydrogen retained in carbon nanotubes and carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, F.D.; Holland, O.W.; Naab, F.U.; Mitchell, L.J.; Dhoubhadel, M.; Duggan, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are studied as a possible hydrogen storage medium for future energy needs. Typically, hydrogen is stored in the CNTs by exposure of the material to a high-pressure H 2 atmosphere at different temperatures. The maximum hydrogen concentrations stored following this method and measured using ion beam analysis do not exceed 1 wt.%. Introduction of defects by ion irradiation (i.e. implantation) prior to high-pressure H 2 treatment, offers an alternative method to activate H adsorption and enhance the chemisorption of hydrogen. This is a preliminary work where hydrogen was introduced into single-wall nanotubes and carbon films by low-energy (13.6 keV) hydrogen ion implantation. Elastic recoil detection was used to measure the quantity and depth distribution of hydrogen retained in the carbonaceous materials. Results show that there are substantial differences in the measured profiles between the CNT samples and the vitreous carbon. On another hand, only ∼43% of the implanted hydrogen in the CNTs is retained in the region where it should be located according to the SRIM simulations for a solid carbon sample

  14. Particulate inverse opal carbon electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Da-Young; Kim, Sang-Ok; Chae, Yu Jin; Lee, Joong Kee; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2013-01-29

    Inverse opal carbon materials were used as anodes for lithium ion batteries. We applied particulate inverse opal structures and their dispersion in the formation of anode electrodes via solution casting. We prepared aminophenyl-grafted inverse opal carbons (a-IOC), inverse opal carbons with mesopores (mIOC), and bare inverse opal carbons (IOC) and investigated the electrochemical behavior of these samples as anode materials. Surface modification by aminophenyl groups was confirmed by XPS measurements. TEM images showed mesopores, and the specific area of mIOC was compared with that of IOC using BET analysis. A half-cell test was performed to compare a-IOC with IOC and mIOC with IOC. In the case of the a-IOC structure, the cell test revealed no improvement in the reversible specific capacity or the cycle performance. The mIOC cell showed a reversible specific capacity of 432 mAh/g, and the capacity was maintained at 88%-approximately 380 mAh/g-over 20 cycles.

  15. EUD-based biological optimization for carbon ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brüningk, Sarah C.; Kamp, Florian; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment planning for carbon ion therapy requires an accurate modeling of the biological response of each tissue to estimate the clinical outcome of a treatment. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) accounts for this biological response on a cellular level but does not refer to the actual impact on the organ as a whole. For photon therapy, the concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) represents a simple model to take the organ response into account, yet so far no formulation of EUD has been reported that is suitable to carbon ion therapy. The authors introduce the concept of an equivalent uniform effect (EUE) that is directly applicable to both ion and photon therapies and exemplarily implemented it as a basis for biological treatment plan optimization for carbon ion therapy. Methods: In addition to a classical EUD concept, which calculates a generalized mean over the RBE-weighted dose distribution, the authors propose the EUE to simplify the optimization process of carbon ion therapy plans. The EUE is defined as the biologically equivalent uniform effect that yields the same probability of injury as the inhomogeneous effect distribution in an organ. Its mathematical formulation is based on the generalized mean effect using an effect-volume parameter to account for different organ architectures and is thus independent of a reference radiation. For both EUD concepts, quadratic and logistic objective functions are implemented into a research treatment planning system. A flexible implementation allows choosing for each structure between biological effect constraints per voxel and EUD constraints per structure. Exemplary treatment plans are calculated for a head-and-neck patient for multiple combinations of objective functions and optimization parameters. Results: Treatment plans optimized using an EUE-based objective function were comparable to those optimized with an RBE-weighted EUD-based approach. In agreement with previous results from photon

  16. Low-dose ion-based transmission radiography and tomography for optimization of carbon ion-beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magallanes Hernandez, Lorena

    2017-02-21

    In the last few decades, ion-beam radiotherapy has emerged as a highly effective tumor treatment modality. Its success relies on the capability to precisely confine the prescribed dose within the target volume, due to the inverted depth-dose profile and the finite range featured by charged particles. However, to fully exploit the physical and biological advantages of ion-beams, it is necessary to prioritize on innovative imaging techniques to monitor the ion-range inside the patient. Main range uncertainties result from X-ray-based calibration of the ion relative Water Equivalent Path Length (rWEPL) during the planning phase, and patient anatomical or positioning variation during the treatment. In this thesis, low-dose carbon-ion transmissionimaging performed with a Residual Range Detector (RRD) is proposed as imaging strategy for actively scanned beam delivery facilities. It enables the verification of the beam range and the patient positioning with ion-radiographies (iRAD), and ion computed tomographies (iCT) can directly provide the ion stopping-power of the traversed tissue for treatment planning purposes. First experimental investigations aiming to minimize the imaging dose to the object are presented. The performance of the integration-mode multi-channel array of 61 parallel-plate ionization chambers (PPICs), interleaved with 3 mm thickness PMMA slabs, was thoroughly investigated for low-fluence irradiation. This characterization has been pursued in terms of beam-monitoring performance at the Heidelberg Ion-beam Therapy Center (HIT, Heidelberg, Germany), RRD signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), RRD charge-collection efficiency and drift voltage applied to the PPICs. Pixel-wise metrics for signal quality evaluation based on specific channel-charge features have been developed to support the visual assessment of the acquired images. Phantoms of different complexity and tissue-equivalent composition were imaged with high (5000 primaries per raster-scanning point (RP

  17. Low-dose ion-based transmission radiography and tomography for optimization of carbon ion-beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magallanes Hernandez, Lorena

    2017-01-01

    In the last few decades, ion-beam radiotherapy has emerged as a highly effective tumor treatment modality. Its success relies on the capability to precisely confine the prescribed dose within the target volume, due to the inverted depth-dose profile and the finite range featured by charged particles. However, to fully exploit the physical and biological advantages of ion-beams, it is necessary to prioritize on innovative imaging techniques to monitor the ion-range inside the patient. Main range uncertainties result from X-ray-based calibration of the ion relative Water Equivalent Path Length (rWEPL) during the planning phase, and patient anatomical or positioning variation during the treatment. In this thesis, low-dose carbon-ion transmissionimaging performed with a Residual Range Detector (RRD) is proposed as imaging strategy for actively scanned beam delivery facilities. It enables the verification of the beam range and the patient positioning with ion-radiographies (iRAD), and ion computed tomographies (iCT) can directly provide the ion stopping-power of the traversed tissue for treatment planning purposes. First experimental investigations aiming to minimize the imaging dose to the object are presented. The performance of the integration-mode multi-channel array of 61 parallel-plate ionization chambers (PPICs), interleaved with 3 mm thickness PMMA slabs, was thoroughly investigated for low-fluence irradiation. This characterization has been pursued in terms of beam-monitoring performance at the Heidelberg Ion-beam Therapy Center (HIT, Heidelberg, Germany), RRD signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), RRD charge-collection efficiency and drift voltage applied to the PPICs. Pixel-wise metrics for signal quality evaluation based on specific channel-charge features have been developed to support the visual assessment of the acquired images. Phantoms of different complexity and tissue-equivalent composition were imaged with high (5000 primaries per raster-scanning point (RP

  18. In vitro co-culture experiments on prostate cancer and small intestine cells irradiated with carbon ions and x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubeck, C. von; Weyrather, W.-K.; Durante, M.

    2009-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivers the dose in many small irradiation fields of different beam direction to achieve a 3 dimensional tumour conformal dose overlapping with a maximum of normal tissue protection. In 2006 a study was started at GSI to treat prostate cancer patients with a boost irradiation of carbon ions in combination with an IMRT treatment administered at the Uniklinikum Heidelberg. The carbon ions are delivered in two opposing fields. So IMRT irradiation includes more normal tissue than carbon ion treatment but even here parts of the rectum and the bladder are in the irradiated field. This raises the question whether the irradiated tumor cells influence the normal cells (irradiated/ unirradiated) but also whether the normal irradiated cells influences normal tissue in a different way for carbon and photon irradiation. To study this problem, we established an in vitro co-culture model of prostate cancer and small intestine cells of the rat to simulate the patient treatment situation for analyzing tissue reaction exemplary. For characterization of the cells lines the parameters alpha and beta (linear quadratic model) for clonogenic survival were determined for x-rays and for carbon ions of different energies. For co-culture experiments unirradiated and irradiated cells were seeded together and the survival was analyzed

  19. Contributions of secondary fragmentation by carbon ion beams in water phantom: Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, C K; Bolst, David; Tran, Linh T.; Guatelli, Susanna; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Kamil, W A

    2017-01-01

    Heavy-particle therapy such as carbon ion therapy is currently very popular because of its superior conformality in terms of dose distribution and higher Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE). However, carbon ion beams produce a complex mixed radiation field, which needs to be fully characterised. In this study, the fragmentation of a 290 MeV/u primary carbon ion beam was studied using the Geant4 Monte Carlo Toolkit. When the primary carbon ion beam interacts with water, secondary light charged particles (H, He, Li, Be, B) and fast neutrons are produced, contributing to the dose, especially after the distal edge of the Bragg peak. (paper)

  20. Study of carbon ion behavior by using collisional radiative model in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Kubota, Yuusuke; Saito, Masashi; Matama, Ken; Itakura, Akiyoshi; Cho, Teruji; Kato, Takako

    2006-01-01

    In a plasma experiment, collisional radiative model (CRM) is very useful model to evaluate impurity behaviors and plasma parameters with line emission from a plasma. CRMs for carbon and oxygen have been developed. However verification and application of the model for analysis of experimental results are not enough. Then we applied CRM calculation results to observed impurity spectra in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror to evaluate the impurity density profile and the particle balance of each charge state of carbon ion. We calculated the effective ionization rate for each charge state of carbon ion and obtained the density profile of each ion. Moreover, we calculated absolute emission intensities from all carbon ions. (author)

  1. Ionized carbon investigation (spectroscopic terms, radiative lifetimes) using ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchet-Poulizac, M.-C.

    1974-01-01

    The spectra of carbon in all its ionization states were studied by the beam-foil technique, from the far ultraviolet (30A) to 6000A. This excitation process gives the spectra of strongly charged ions with great intensity and favours population of the high levels of these ions. It has led to new identifications, mainly in the CIV, CV, and CVI spectra. The results of radiative lifetime measurements are given for many levels of C II, C III, C IV and C V. The chief cause of error on these measurements is the cascade phenomenon. Various methods of decay curve analysis accounting for these processes were examined and showed that lifetime values of precision better than 10% can be obtained. The transition probabilities were estimated from the lifetime measurements whenever possible. The spectra obtained in the laboratory were compared with those observed in the Wolf-Rayet stars of the carbon sequence. The similarities and dissimilarities which appear yield information on the physical conditions prevailing in the atmosphere of these stars [fr

  2. Assessment of Early Toxicity and Response in Patients Treated With Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center Using the Raster Scanning Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Jensen, Alexandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Muenter, Marc W.; Welzel, Thomas; Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E., E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-hedielberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-12-01

    Puropose: To asses early toxicity and response in 118 patients treated with scanned ion beams to validate the safety of intensity-controlled raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. Patients and Methods: Between November 2009 and June 2010, we treated 118 patients with proton and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) using active beam delivery. The main indications included skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, salivary gland tumors, and gliomas. We evaluated early toxicity within 6 weeks after RT and the initial clinical and radiologic response for quality assurance in our new facility. Results: In all 118 patients, few side effects were observed, in particular, no high numbers of severe acute toxicity were found. In general, the patients treated with particle therapy alone showed only a few single side effects, mainly Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/Common Terminology Criteria grade 1. The most frequent side effects and cumulative incidence of single side effects were observed in the head-and-neck patients treated with particle therapy as a boost and photon intensity-modulated RT. The toxicities included common radiation-attributed reactions known from photon RT, including mucositis, dysphagia, and skin erythema. The most predominant imaging responses were observed in patients with high-grade gliomas and those with salivary gland tumors. For skull base tumors, imaging showed a stable tumor outline in most patients. Thirteen patients showed improvement of pre-existing clinical symptoms. Conclusions: Side effects related to particle treatment were rare, and the overall tolerability of the treatment was shown. The initial response was promising. The data have confirmed the safe delivery of carbon ions and protons at the newly opened Heidelberg facility.

  3. Large area diamond-like carbon coatings by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, A.R.; Proctor, G.; Jones, A.M.; Bull, S.J.; Chivers, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) coatings have been deposited onto large geometry components in the Harwell Blue Tank ion implantation facility. To modify the substrate surface and to crack the low vapour pressure oil which is evaporated and condensed onto the surface, a 40 Kev nitrogen ion bucket ion source is used. The coating of areas up to 1 metre in diameter is common and with component manipulation larger areas may be coated. Since the component temperature never exceeds 80 o C during the process, a wide range of materials may be coated including specialist tool steels and even certain high density polymers. In order to produce hard wear resistant coatings with extremely low coefficients of friction (0.02-0.15) and a range of mechanical and electrical properties, various oil precursors have been investigated. The production and assessment of such coatings, including measurements of their tribiological performance, is presented. Applications for wear resistance, corrosion protection and electrically conducting coatings are discussed with examples drawn from engineering, electronics and biomedicine. (7 figures, 13 references). (UK)

  4. Nano mechanical properties of carbon films modified by ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, C.E.; Serbena, F.C.; Lepienski, C.M.; Odo, G.Y.; Zawislak, F.C.; Lopes, J.M.J.; Baptista, D.L.; Garcia, I.T.S.

    2000-01-01

    In present work it is measured hardness, Young modulus and friction coefficient values for different types of carbon films. These films were submitted to different ion bombardment conditions (energy and fluencies). The mechanical behavior was obtained by nano indentation technique and analyzed by the Oliver/Pharr method. For friction coefficient determination the nano scratch procedure is used. Pristine C 60 films (fullerenes) has a hardness of 0.33 GPa. After irradiation with different ions (He, N and Bi), the hardness raise to about 14 GPa and the Young modulus change from 20 to about 200 GPa. For photoresist film AZ-1350J irradiation with Ar and He change the hardness from 0.4 to about 14 GPa and the Young modulus raise from 4 to 80 GPa. In a-C-H the hardness change from 3.5 to 11 GPa when submitted to N irradiation. In PPA films the hardness value raise from 0.5 to 11 GPa after irradiation with Ar. These mechanical and tribological results were analyzed in terms of deposited energy by the ion irradiation and compared with those presented in the literature. (author)

  5. Contribution of secondary particles to the dose in 12C radiotherapy and other heavy ion beams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jadrníčková, Iva; Spurný, František; Molokanov, A. G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 126, 1-4 (2007), s. 657-659 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/0795 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : secondery particles * radiotherapy * LET spectrometer Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.528, year: 2007

  6. Perturbation effects of the carbon fiber-PEEK screws on radiotherapy dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevelsky, Alexander; Borzov, Egor; Daniel, Shahar; Bar-Deroma, Raquel

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy, in conjunction with surgical implant fixation, is a common combined treatment in cases of bone metastases. However, metal implants generally used in orthopedic implants perturb radiation dose distributions. Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) material has been recently introduced for production of intramedullary nails and plates. The purpose of this work was to investigate the perturbation effects of the new CFR-PEEK screws on radiotherapy dose distributions and to evaluate these effects in comparison with traditional titanium screws. The investigation was performed by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a 6 MV photon beam. The project consisted of two main stages. First, a comparison of measured and MC calculated doses was performed to verify the validity of the MC simulation results for different materials. For this purpose, stainless steel, titanium, and CFR-PEEK plates of various thicknesses were used for attenuation and backscatter measurements in a solid water phantom. For the same setup, MC dose calculations were performed. Next, MC dose calculations for titanium, CFR-PEEK screws, and CFR-PEEK screws with ultrathin titanium coating were performed. For the plates, the results of our MC calculations for all materials were found to be in good agreement with the measurements. This indicates that the MC model can be used for calculation of dose perturbation effects caused by the screws. For the CFR-PEEK screws, the maximum dose perturbation was less than 5%, compared to more than 30% perturbation for the titanium screws. Ultrathin titanium coating had a negligible effect on the dose distribution. CFR-PEEK implants have good prospects for use in radiotherapy because of minimal dose alteration and the potential for more accurate treatment planning. This could favorably influence treatment efficiency and decrease possible over- and underdose of adjacent tissues. The use of such implants has potential clinical advantages

  7. Tumour control in ion beam radiotherapy with different ions in the presence of hypoxia: an oxygen enhancement ratio model based on the microdosimetric kinetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strigari, L.; Torriani, F.; Manganaro, L.; Inaniwa, T.; Dalmasso, F.; Cirio, R.; Attili, A.

    2018-03-01

    Few attempts have been made to include the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) in treatment planning for ion beam therapy, and systematic studies to evaluate the impact of hypoxia in treatment with the beam of different ion species are sorely needed. The radiobiological models used to quantify the OER in such studies are mainly based on the dose-averaged LET estimates, and do not explicitly distinguish between the ion species and fractionation schemes. In this study, a new type of OER modelling, based on the microdosimetric kinetic model, taking into account the specificity of the different ions, LET spectra, tissues and fractionation schemes, has been developed. The model has been benchmarked with published in vitro data, HSG, V79 and CHO cells in aerobic and hypoxic conditions, for different ion irradiation. The model has been included in the simulation of treatments for a clinical case (brain tumour) using proton, lithium, helium, carbon and oxygen ion beams. A study of the tumour control probability (TCP) as a function of oxygen partial pressure, dose per fraction and primary ion type has been performed. The modelled OER depends on both the LET and ion type, also showing a decrease for an increased dose per fraction with a slope that depends on the LET and ion type, in good agreement with the experimental data. In the investigated clinical case, a significant increase in TCP has been found upon increasing the ion charge. Higher OER variations as a function of dose per fraction have also been found for low-LET ions (up to 15% varying from 2 to 8 Gy(RBE) for protons). This model could be exploited in the identification of treatment condition optimality in the presence of hypoxia, including fractionation and primary particle selection.

  8. Ameliorating mitochondrial dysfunction restores carbon ion-induced cognitive deficits via co-activation of NRF2 and PINK1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yan, Jiawei; Sun, Cao; Li, Guo; Li, Sirui; Zhang, Luwei; Di, Cuixia; Gan, Lu; Wang, Yupei; Zhou, Rong; Si, Jing; Zhang, Hong

    2018-07-01

    Carbon ion therapy is a promising modality in radiotherapy to treat tumors, however, a potential risk of induction of late normal tissue damage should still be investigated and protected. The aim of the present study was to explore the long-term cognitive deficits provoked by a high-linear energy transfer (high-LET) carbon ions in mice by targeting to hippocampus which plays a crucial role in memory and learning. Our data showed that, one month after 4 Gy carbon ion exposure, carbon ion irradiation conspicuously resulted in the impaired cognitive performance, neurodegeneration and neuronal cell death, as well as the reduced mitochondrial integrity, the disrupted activities of tricarboxylic acid cycle flux and electron transport chain, and the depressed antioxidant defense system, consequently leading to a decline of ATP production and persistent oxidative damage in the hippocampus region. Mechanistically, we demonstrated the disruptions of mitochondrial homeostasis and redox balance typically characterized by the disordered mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy and glutathione redox couple, which is closely associated with the inhibitions of PINK1 and NRF2 signaling pathway as the key regulators of molecular responses in the context of neurotoxicity and neurodegenerative disorders. Most importantly, we found that administration with melatonin as a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant promoted the PINK1 accumulation on the mitochondrial membrane, and augmented the NRF2 accumulation and translocation. Moreover, melatonin pronouncedly enhanced the molecular interplay between NRF2 and PINK1. Furthermore, in the mouse hippocampal neuronal cells, overexpression of NRF2/PINK1 strikingly protected the hippocampal neurons from carbon ion-elicited toxic insults. Thus, these data suggest that alleviation of the sustained mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress through co-modulation of NRF2 and PINK1 may be in charge of restoration of the cognitive impairments in a mouse

  9. The co-effect of collagen and magnesium ions on calcium carbonate biomineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Yunfeng; Feng Qingling; Li Xiaoming

    2006-01-01

    The process of calcium carbonate biomineralization in the solution containing collagen and magnesium ions was studied in this paper. The results were characterized by using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect rules were obtained by the cooperation of collagen and magnesium ions in different concentration. The experiment results showed that in the presence of both collagen and magnesium ions, aragonite and vaterite were precipitated at low Mg/Ca ion concentration ratio, while only aragonite with regular spherical morphology was precipitated at high Mg/Ca ion concentration ratio. It indicated that collagen has a promotional effect on magnesium ions in controlling the polymorph of calcium carbonate crystal. A much wider range of calcium carbonate morphologies was observed in the presence of both collagen and magnesium ions. The experiments suggested that collagen acts in combination with magnesium ions to inhibit calcite crystal growth, while favoring the formation of aragonite crystals

  10. Bystander effect in human hepatoma HepG2 cells caused by medium transfers at different times after high-LET carbon ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qingfeng; Li Qiang; Jin Xiaodong; Liu Xinguo; Dai Zhongying

    2011-01-01

    Although radiation-induced bystander effects have been well documented in a variety of biological systems, whether irradiated cells have the ability to generate bystander signaling persistently is still unclear and the clinical relevance of bystander effects in radiotherapy remains to be elucidated. This study examines tumor cellular bystander response to autologous medium from cell culture irradiated with high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at a therapeutically relevant dose in terms of clonogenic cell survival. In vitro experiments were performed using human hepatoma HepG2 cell line exposed to 100 keV/μm carbon ions at a dose of 2 Gy. Two different periods (2 and 12 h) after irradiation, irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) and replenished fresh medium were harvested and then transferred to unirradiated bystander cells. Cellular bystander responses were measured with the different medium transfer protocols. Significant higher survival fractions of unirradiated cells receiving the media from the irradiated cultures at the different times post-irradiation than those of the control were observed. Even replenishing fresh medium for unirradiated cells which had been exposed to the ICCM for 12 h could not prevent the bystander cells from the increased survival fraction. These results suggest that the irradiated cells could release unidentified signal factor(s), which induced the increase in survival fraction for the unirradiated bystander cells, into the media sustainedly and the carbon ions triggered a cascade of signaling events in the irradiated cells rather than secreting the soluble signal factor(s) just at a short period after irradiation. Based on the observations in this study, the importance of bystander effect in clinical radiotherapy was discussed and incorporating the bystander effect into the current radiobiological models, which are applicable to heavy ion radiotherapy, is needed urgently.

  11. Exposure to carbon ions triggers pro-inflammatory signals, changes in homeostasis and epidermal tissue organization to a similar extent as photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palma eSimoniello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing application of charged particles in radiotherapy requires a deeper understanding of early and late side effects occurring in skin, which is exposed in all radiation treatments. We measured cellular and molecular changes related to the early inflammatory response of human skin irradiated with carbon ions, in particular cell death induction and changes in differentiation and proliferation of epidermal cells during the first days after exposure.Model systems for human skin from healthy donors of different complexity, i.e. keratinocytes, co-culture of skin cells, 3D skin equivalent and skin explants, were used to investigate the alterations induced by carbon ions (spread-out Bragg-peak, dose averaged LET 100 keV/µm in comparison to X-ray and UV-B exposure. After exposure to ionizing radiation, in none of the model systems apoptosis/necrosis was observed. Carbon ions triggered inflammatory signalling and accelerated differentiation of keratinocytes to a similar extent as X-rays at the same doses. High doses of carbon ions were more effective than X-rays in reducing proliferation and inducing abnormal differentiation. In contrast, changes identified following low dose exposure (≤ 0.5 Gy were induced more effectively after X-ray exposure, i.e. enhanced proliferation and change in the polarity of basal cells.

  12. Evaluating uncertainties in the cross-calibration of parallel ion chambers used in electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Ernani; Travassos, Paulo; Ferreira, Max da Silva; Carvalho, Samira Marques de; Silva, Michele Maria da; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira; Salmon Junior, Helio Augusto

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to estimative the combined standard uncertainty for a detector parallel plate used for dosimetry of electron beams in linear accelerators for radiotherapy, which has been calibrated by the cross-calibration method. Keeping the combined standard uncertainty next of the uncertainty informed in the calibration certificate of the reference chamber, become possible establish the calibration factor of the detector. The combined standard uncertainty obtained in this study was 2.5 %. (author)

  13. Radial dose distribution from carbon ion incident on liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scifoni, E.; Surdutovich, E.; Solov'yov, A.V.; Surdutovich, E.

    2010-01-01

    We report calculations of the radial dose deposited along carbon-ion tracks in liquid water using different techniques depending on the energy range of secondary electrons. The models are developed in relation with the experimental data on electron penetration lengths. For electrons with energies higher than 45 eV, we use the Katz model. However, the main focus is on the low-energy electrons, which are largely responsible for DNA damage within 10 nm from the tracks. For these electrons, the dose calculation is based on their random walk behaviour. The results of this combined approach are compared to experimental measurements. Contributions to the deposited energy by electrons of different ranges of energy are discussed. (authors)

  14. Innershell ionization by fast protons, alpha particles and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, J.H. van.

    1984-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the study of inner-shell excitations of atoms induced by fast charged particle collisions. A new method is described for measuring the spectrum of delta-electrons emitted by 208 Pb after excitation by 15 MeV protons or 50 MeV alpha particles. Experimental equipment is described. Results of both experiments are presented and compared with PWBA models and with calculations based on a semi-classical approximation. The small-impact-parameter ionization probabilities obtained are then compared with literature. Also small-impact-parameter measurements done with 100 MeV carbon ions are described. Besides K-shell measurements, the author also presents L-subshell ionization probability results for Pb. An appendix is added in which energy straggling problems in solid targets are treated. (Auth./G.J.P.)

  15. Transport of Carbonate Ions by Novel Cellulose Fiber Supported Solid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Gaikwad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Transport of carbonate ions was explored through fiber supported solid membrane. A novel fiber supported solid membrane was prepared by chemical modification of cellulose fiber with citric acid, 2′2-bipyridine and magnesium carbonate. The factors affecting the permeability of carbonate ions such as immobilization of citric acid-magnesium metal ion -2′2-bipyridine complex (0 to 2.5 mmol/g range over cellulose fiber, carbon-ate ion concentration in source phase and NaOH concentration in receiving phase were investigated. Ki-netic of carbonate, sulfate, and nitrate ions was investigated through fiber supported solid membrane. Transport of carbonate ions with/without bubbling of CO2 (0 to 10 ml/min in source phase was explored from source to receiving phase. The novel idea is to explore the adsorptive transport of CO2 from source to receiving phase through cellulose fiber containing magnesium metal ion organic framework. Copyright © 2012 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.Received: 25th November 2011; Revised: 17th December 2011; Accepted: 19th December 2011[How to Cite: A.G. Gaikwad. (2012. Transport of Carbonate Ions by Novel Cellulose Fiber Supported Solid Membrane. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (1: 49– 57.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1225.49-57][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1225.49-57 ] | View in 

  16. Precipitation characteristics of uranyl ions at different pHs depending on the presence of carbonate ions and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Wook; Kim, Yeon-Hwa; Lee, Se-yoon; Lee, Jae-Won; Joe, Kih-Soo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Jong-Seung; Song, Kyuseok; Song, Kee-Chan

    2009-04-01

    This work studied the dissolution of uranium dioxide and precipitation characteristics of uranyl ions in alkaline and acidic solutions depending on the presence of carbonate ions and H2O2 in the solutions at different pHs controlled by adding HNO3 or NaOH in the solution. The chemical structures of the precipitates generated in different conditions were evaluated and compared by using XRD, SEM, TG-DT, and IR analyses together. The sizes and forms of the precipitates in the solutions were evaluated, as well. The uranyl ions were precipitated in the various forms, depending on the solution pH and the presences of hydrogen peroxide and carbonate ions in the solution. In a 0.5 M Na2CO3 solution with H2O2, where the uranyl ions formed mixed uranyl peroxy-carbonato complexes, the uranyl ions were precipitated as a uranium peroxide of UO4(H20)4 at pH 3-4, and precipitated as a clarkeite of Na2U2Ox(OH)y(H2O)z above pH 13. In the same carbonate solution without H2O2, where the uranyl ions formed uranyl tris-carbonato complex, the uranyl ions were observed to be precipitated as a different form of clarkeite above pH 13. The precipitate of uranyl ions in a nitrate solution without carbonate ions and H2O2 at a high pH were studied together to compare the precipitate forms in the carbonate solutions.

  17. Structure carbon materials: clusters, nanotubes, ion-implant polymers and diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapchuk, N.M.; Odzhaev, V.B.; Poklonskij, N.A.; Sviridov, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes the series of research works dealing with the physics of nanostructured carbon materials, which were awarded a Sevchenko Prize in 2008. The paper considers the mechanism of synthesis of 3D carbon nanospecies and their nanomechanics, magnetic properties of ion-implanted diamonds, as well as the regularities of formation of novel forms of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and metal-carbon nanocomposites via ion bombardment of polymers, as well as electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of ion-implanted polymers an their possible applications in micro- and nanoelectronics. (authors)

  18. Carbon nanotori as traps for atoms and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Yue; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotori surely represent an ideal location to trap both charged and uncharged atoms, since they are open, accessible and possess strong attractive energy. In this paper, we investigate the plausibility of carbon nanotori as atomic traps and we use the continuum approximation together with the Lennard-Jones potential to model the encapsulation of an atom or ion by a nanotorus. The critical geometric factors such as the minor and major radii, i.e. r and R of the nanotorus, for which the maximum interaction between the atom and the nanotorus occurs, are determined. For various atoms, assumed situated along the axis of the torus, the minimum potential energy between the atom and the nanotorus is calculated and compared, and shown to be approximately kηεσ 2 , where η is the uniform atomic density, ε and σ are the Lennard-Jones well depth and the van der Waals radius, respectively, and k is a universal non-dimensional constant with the approximate value -12.42. The results given in this paper might be used for future drug delivery and biosensing design.

  19. Characterization of the interaction between therapeutical carbon ions and bone-like materials and related impact on treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichhorn, Anna; Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwereionen, Darmstadt (Germany); TU Darmstadt (Germany); Carlino, Antonio [University of Palermo (Italy); Kaderka, Robert; Kraemer, Michael; La Tessa, Chiara; Scifoni, Emanuele [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwereionen, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most common and effective therapies for cancer. The treatment planning system for ions TRiP98 was developed at GSI, Darmstadt. In TRiP98, the interaction between primary radiation and tissue is modeled from experimental data measured in water and rescaled to other tissue. This approximation is not accurate enough for biological materials whose elemental composition besides density deviates significantly from water. The nuclear attenuation of carbon beams in bone-like materials was measured and an estimation of the fragmentation cross section was done. In parallel, the dose profile inhomogeneity predicted by TRiP98 at the interface between water and bones was investigated and measured at HIT (Heidelberg). A 3D treatment plan was delivered in a water phantom equipped with bone targets. Pin-point ionization chambers and X-ray dosimetric films were used for measuring the dose at different positions. As a further step, the measured cross sections of carbon ions in bone have been implemented in TRiP98. The comparison of the dose profiles calculated with the standard and benchmarked versions of the treatment planning will give an estimate of the improvement.

  20. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean time series sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30-year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these results

  1. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovenduski, N. S.; Long, M. C.; Lindsay, K.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]) on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32-] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32-] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32-] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite) are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean time series sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32-] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in association with El Niño-Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32-] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20-30-year periods. North Atlantic [CO32-] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these results will aid the interpretation of trends

  2. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, K; Chen, Y J; Ohira, C; Nojima, K; Ando, S; Kobayashi, N; Ohbuchi, T; Shimizu, W [Space and Particle Radiation Science Research Group, Chiba (Japan); Koike, S; Kanai, T [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Accelerator Physics

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/{mu}m also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/{mu}m in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/{mu}m were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/{mu} steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  3. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, K.; Chen, Y.J.; Ohira, C.; Nojima, K.; Ando, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Ohbuchi, T.; Shimizu, W.; Koike, S.; Kanai, T.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/μm also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/μm in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/μm were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/μ steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  4. Clinical investigation on RBE estimation for heavy particle radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Yanagi, Takeshi; Mizoe, Junetsu; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of the clinical updated data of the prostate cancer patients treated with carbon-ions was performed for the purpose of investigating the clinical relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of carbon ion beams. Most of the patients received the carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) with the dose of 66.0 GyE/20 fractions. Probabilities of the late urethral morbidity and biochemical tumor control with this dose fractionation were calculated using the actual updated clinical data. The linear energy transfer (LET) values and physical carbon ion doses of urethra were obtained from treatment planning data. RBE values were calculated from the ratio of average carbon physical doses and photon doses which cause the same grade of urethra reaction with the same probabilities. Obtained RBE values were compared with the values that are being used in actual carbon ion radiotherapy in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). In addition, relative RBE of carbon ion beams for biochemical tumor control was calculated using the data from the literature. As a result, the RBE values being used for the treatment were thought to be proper enough for both the urethra reaction and tumor control. (author)

  5. Adsorption efficiencies of calcium (II ion and iron (II ion on activated carbon obtained from pericarp of rubber fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orawan Sirichote

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of adsorption efficiencies of activated carbon from pericarp of rubber fruit for calcium (II ion and iron (II ion has been performed by flowing the solutions of these ions through a column of activated carbon. The weights of activated carbon in 500 mL buret column (diameter 3.2 cm for flowing calcium (II ion and iron (II ion solutions were 15 g and 10 g, respectively. The initial concentration of calcium ion was prepared to be about eight times more diluted than the true concentration found in the groundwater from the lower part of southern Thailand. Calcium (II ion concentrations were analysed by EDTA titration and its initial concentration was found to be 23.55 ppm. With a flow rate of 26 mL/min, the adsorption efficiency was 11.4 % with passed through volume 4.75 L. Iron (II ion concentrations were analysed by spectrophotometric method; its initial concentration was found to be 1.5565 ppm. At a flow rate of 22 mL/min, the adsorption efficiency was 0.42 % with passed through volume of 34.0 L.

  6. Na-ion capacitor using sodium pre-doped hard carbon and activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuratani, Kentaro; Yao, Masaru; Senoh, Hiroshi; Takeichi, Nobuhiko; Sakai, Tetsuo; Kiyobayashi, Tetsu

    2012-01-01

    We assembled a sodium-ion capacitor (Na-IC) by combining sodium pre-doped hard carbon (HC) as the negative- and activated carbon (AC) as the positive-electrode. The electrochemical properties were compared with two lithium-ion capacitors (Li-ICs) in which the negative electrodes were prepared with Li pre-doped HC and mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB). The positive and negative electrodes were prepared using the established doctor blade method. The negative electrodes were galvanostatically pre-doped with Na or Li to 80% of the full capacity of carbons. The potential of the negative electrodes after pre-doping was around 0.0 V vs. Na/Na + or Li/Li + , which resulted in the higher output potential difference of the Na-IC and Li-ICs than that of the conventional electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) because AC positive electrode works in the same principle both in the ion capacitors and in the EDLC. The state-of-charge of the negative electrode varied 80 ± 10% during the electrochemical charging and discharging. The capacity of the cell was evaluated using galvanostatic charge–discharge measurement. At the discharge current density of 10 mA cm −2 , the Na-IC maintained 70% of the capacity that obtained at the current density of 0.5 mA cm −2 , which was comparable to the Li-ICs. At 50 mA cm −2 , the capacities of the Li-IC(MCMB) and the Na-IC dropped to 20% whereas the Li-IC(HC) retained 30% of the capacity observed at 0.5 mA cm −2 . The capacities of the Na-IC and Li-ICs decreased by 9% and 3%, respectively, after 1000 cycles of charging and discharging.

  7. Extraction of Co ions from ion-exchange resin by supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Min Su; Koh, Moon Sung; Yang, Sung Woo; Park, Kwang Heon; Kim, Hak Won; Kim, Hong Doo

    2005-01-01

    well as low surface tension, it is potentially suitable for cleaning substance. The operational costs of CO 2 cleaning were estimated to be lower than other cleaning processes. In this paper, we considered the possible use of supercritical CO 2 fluid in extracting radioactive contaminants from contaminated resin (simulated). We measured the extraction efficiency of Co-ions from the resin using supercritical carbon dioxide, and discussed the possible use in decontamination

  8. Method for fabricating carbon/lithium-ion electrode for rechargeable lithium cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Attia, Alan I. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The method includes steps for forming a carbon electrode composed of graphitic carbon particles adhered by an ethylene propylene diene monomer binder. An effective binder composition is disclosed for achieving a carbon electrode capable of subsequent intercalation by lithium ions. The method also includes steps for reacting the carbon electrode with lithium ions to incorporate lithium ions into graphitic carbon particles of the electrode. An electrical current is repeatedly applied to the carbon electrode to initially cause a surface reaction between the lithium ions and to the carbon and subsequently cause intercalation of the lithium ions into crystalline layers of the graphitic carbon particles. With repeated application of the electrical current, intercalation is achieved to near a theoretical maximum. Two differing multi-stage intercalation processes are disclosed. In the first, a fixed current is reapplied. In the second, a high current is initially applied, followed by a single subsequent lower current stage. Resulting carbon/lithium-ion electrodes are well suited for use as an anode in a reversible, ambient temperature, lithium cell.

  9. Randomised trial of proton vs. carbon ion radiation therapy in patients with low and intermediate grade chondrosarcoma of the skull base, clinical phase III study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikoghosyan, Anna V; Rauch, Geraldine; Münter, Marc W; Jensen, Alexandra D; Combs, Stephanie E; Kieser, Meinhard; Debus, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    particle therapies, i.e. protons and carbon ions, directly at the same facility in connection with the treatment of low grade skull base chondrosarcomas. This trial is a phase III study to demonstrate that carbon ion radiotherapy (experimental treatment) is not relevantly inferior and at least as good as proton radiotherapy (standard treatment) with respect to 5 year LPFS in the treatment of chondrosarcomas. Additionally, we expect less toxicity in the carbon ion treatment arm. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01182753

  10. Binding of nickel and zinc ions with activated carbon prepared from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Activated carbon was prepared from sugar cane fibre by carbonizing at 500 oC for 30 minutes. This was followed by activation with ammonium chloride. The activated carbon was characterised in terms of pH, bulk density, ash content, surface area and surface charge. Equilibrium sorption of nickel and zinc ions by the ...

  11. SU-D-BRB-02: Investigations of Secondary Ion Distributions in Carbon Ion Therapy Using the Timepix Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwosch, K; Hartmann, B; Jakubek, J; Granja, C; Soukup, P; Jaekel, O; Martisikova, M

    2012-06-01

    Due to the high conformity of carbon ion therapy, unpredictable changes in the patient's geometry or deviations from the planned beam properties can result in changes of the dose distribution. PET has been used successfully to monitor the actual dose distribution in the patient. However, it suffers from biological washout processes and low detection efficiency. The purpose of this contribution is to investigate the potential of beam monitoring by detection of prompt secondary ions emerging from a homogeneous phantom, simulating a patient's head. Measurements were performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (Germany) using a carbon ion pencil beam irradiated on a cylindrical PMMA phantom (16cm diameter). For registration of the secondary ions, the Timepix detector was used. This pixelated silicon detector allows position-resolved measurements of individual ions (256×256 pixels, 55μm pitch). To track the secondary ions we used several parallel detectors (3D voxel detector). For monitoring of the beam in the phantom, we analyzed the directional distribution of the registered ions. This distribution shows a clear dependence on the initial beam energy, width and position. Detectable were range differences of 1.7mm, as well as vertical and horizontal shifts of the beam position by 1mm. To estimate the clinical potential of this method, we measured the yield of secondary ions emerging from the phantom for a beam energy of 226MeV/u. The differential distribution of secondary ions as a function of the angle from the beam axis for angles between 0 and 90° will be presented. In this setup the total yield in the forward hemisphere was found to be in the order of 10 -1 secondary ions per primary carbon ion. The presented measurements show that tracking of secondary ions provides a promising method for non-invasive monitoring of ion beam parameters for clinical relevant carbon ion fluences. Research with the pixel detectors was carried out in frame of the Medipix

  12. Radiotherapy in Cancer Care: Facing the Global Challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Zubizarreta, Eduardo

    2017-06-01

    Cancer treatment is complex and calls for a diverse set of services. Radiotherapy is recognized as an essential tool in the cure and palliation of cancer. Currently, access to radiation treatment is limited in many countries and non-existent in some. This lack of radiotherapy resources exacerbates the burden of disease and underscores the continuing health care disparity among States. Closing this gap represents an essential measure in addressing this global health equity problem. This publication presents a comprehensive overview of the major topics and issues to be taken into consideration when planning a strategy to address this problem, in particular in low and middle income countries. With contributions from leaders in the field, it provides an introduction to the achievements and issues of radiation therapy as a cancer treatment modality around the world. Dedicated chapters focus on proton therapy, carbon ion radiotherapy, intraoperative radiotherapy, radiotherapy for children, HIV/AIDS related malignancies, and costing and quality management issues.

  13. Anodic stripping voltammetric determination of silver ion at a carbon paste electrode modified with carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashkhourian, J.; Javadi, S.; Ana, F.N.

    2011-01-01

    A carbon paste electrode (CPE) was modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes and successfully applied to the determination of silver ion by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. Compared to a conventional CPE, a remarkably improved peak current response and sensitivity is observed. The analytical procedure consisted of an open circuit accumulation step for 2 min in -0.4 V, this followed by an anodic potential scan between +0.2 and + 0.6 V to obtain the voltammetric peak. The oxidation peak current is proportional to the concentration of silver ion in the range from 1.0 x 10 -8 to 1.0 x 10 -5 mol L -1 , with a detection limit of 1.8 x 10 -9 mol L -1 after an accumulation time of 120 s. The relative standard deviation for 7 successive determinations of Ag(I) at 0.1 μM concentration is 1.99%. The procedure was validated by determining Ag(I) in natural waters. (author)

  14. Effect of carbon on ion beam mixing of Fe-Ti bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, J.P.; Nastasi, M.; Lappalainen, R.; Sickafus, K. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The influence of implanted carbon on ion beam mixing of a Fe-Ti system was investigated. Carbon was introduced into bilayer samples by implanting {sup 13}C isotopes. The implantation energies were selected to set the mean range of carbon ions in either the iron or titanium layer. The effect of implanted carbon on 400 keV Ar ion mixing in the temperature range from 0 to 300{degree}C was studied using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy at the energy of 5 MeV. Changes in carbon concentration profiles were probed utilizing the resonance of the nuclear reaction {sup 13}C(p,{gamma}){sup 14}N at the proton energy of 1.748 MeV. The measurements revealed that mixing was not affected by carbon implanted into the titanium layer. However, carbon in the iron layer remarkably retarded mixing at all temperatures investigated. Significant changes in carbon depth distributions were observed only when the sample with implanted carbon in the iron layer was mixed at 300{degree}C. These results are explained in terms of the enhanced mobility of carbon in an evaporated iron film which allows segregation to the interface. At low temperatures, however, vacancy-carbon interaction in iron may have a contribution to the retarded ion beam mixing. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  15. A rechargeable iodine-carbon battery that exploits ion intercalation and iodine redox chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ke; Hu, Ziyu; Ma, Jizhen; Ma, Houyi; Dai, Liming; Zhang, Jintao

    2017-09-13

    Graphitic carbons have been used as conductive supports for developing rechargeable batteries. However, the classic ion intercalation in graphitic carbon has yet to be coupled with extrinsic redox reactions to develop rechargeable batteries. Herein, we demonstrate the preparation of a free-standing, flexible nitrogen and phosphorus co-doped hierarchically porous graphitic carbon for iodine loading by pyrolysis of polyaniline coated cellulose wiper. We find that heteroatoms could provide additional defect sites for encapsulating iodine while the porous carbon skeleton facilitates redox reactions of iodine and ion intercalation. The combination of ion intercalation with redox reactions of iodine allows for developing rechargeable iodine-carbon batteries free from the unsafe lithium/sodium metals, and hence eliminates the long-standing safety issue. The unique architecture of the hierarchically porous graphitic carbon with heteroatom doping not only provides suitable spaces for both iodine encapsulation and cation intercalation but also generates efficient electronic and ionic transport pathways, thus leading to enhanced performance.Carbon-based electrodes able to intercalate Li + and Na + ions have been exploited for high performing energy storage devices. Here, the authors combine the ion intercalation properties of porous graphitic carbons with the redox chemistry of iodine to produce iodine-carbon batteries with high reversible capacities.

  16. MgO-templated carbon as a negative electrode material for Na-ion capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kado, Yuya; Soneda, Yasushi

    2016-12-01

    In this study, MgO-templated carbon with different pore structures was investigated as a negative electrode material for Na-ion capacitors. With increasing the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, the irreversible capacity increased, and the coulombic efficiency of the 1st cycle decreased because of the formation of solid electrolyte interface layers. MgO-templated carbon annealed at 1000 °C exhibited the highest capacity and best rate performance, suggesting that an appropriate balance between surface area and crystallinity is imperative for fast Na-ion storage, attributed to the storage mechanism: combination of non-faradaic electric double-layer capacitance and faradaic Na intercalation in the carbon layers. Finally, a Na-ion capacitor cell using MgO-templated carbon and activated carbon as the negative and positive electrodes, respectively, exhibited an energy density at high power density significantly greater than that exhibited by the cell using a commercial hard carbon negative electrode.

  17. Study on the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes controlled by ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Biben; Zhang Bing; Zheng Kun; Hao Wei; Wang Wanlu; Liao Kejun

    2004-01-01

    Aligned carbon nanotubes were prepared by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition using CH 4 , H 2 and NH 3 as reaction gases. It was investigated how different negative bias affects the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes. The results indicate that the average diameter of the aligned carbon nanotubes is reduced and the average length of the aligned carbon nanotubes is increased with increasing negative bias. Because of the occurrence of glow discharge, a cathode sheath forms near the substrate surface, and a number of ions are produced in it, and a very strong electrical field builds up near the substrate surface. Under the effect of the field, the strong bombardment of ions on the substrate surface will influence the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes. Combined with related theories, authors have analyzed and discussed the ion bombardment effects on the growth of the aligned carbon nanotudes

  18. Molecular analysis of carbon ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikazono, Naoya; Tanaka, Atsushi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Tano, Shigemitsu; Yokota, Yukihiko

    1998-01-01

    In order to elucidate the characteristics of the mutations induced by ion particles at the molecular level in plants, mutated loci in carbon ion-induced mutants of Arabidopsis were investigated by PCR and Southern blot analyses. In the present study, two lines of gl1 mutant and two lines of tt4 mutant were isolated after carbon ion-irradiation. Out of four mutants, one had a deletion, other two contained rearrangements, and one had a point-like mutation. From the present result, it was suggested that ion particles induced different kinds of alterations of the DNA and therefore they could produce various types of mutant alleles in plants. (author)

  19. Behavior of the extraction of metallic ions in carbonate medium, using N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine (BPHA) - benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipriani, M.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility of separating quantitatively trace impurities like Cu, Fe, In and Pb, present in uranium base materials of nuclear grade, is demonstrated. A solvent extraction is employed which makes use of -benzoylphenylhydroxylamine(BPHA)-benzene solution and separation is effected in a medium containing 252 moles per liter of sodium-uranyl tricarbonate at pH of 9,0. Carbonate ions under such conditions inhibit uranium extraction by masking uranyl ion-BPHA reaction. The uranyl ions show a demasking action, releasing, thereby, Pb(II) ions which are being extracted from carbonate medium. The Atomic Absorption Spectrophometry technique is used to obtain the experimental data [pt

  20. Solvation behavior of carbonate-based electrolytes in sodium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresce, Arthur V; Russell, Selena M; Borodin, Oleg; Allen, Joshua A; Schroeder, Marshall A; Dai, Michael; Peng, Jing; Gobet, Mallory P; Greenbaum, Steven G; Rogers, Reginald E; Xu, Kang

    2016-12-21

    Sodium ion batteries are on the cusp of being a commercially available technology. Compared to lithium ion batteries, sodium ion batteries can potentially offer an attractive dollar-per-kilowatt-hour value, though at the penalty of reduced energy density. As a materials system, sodium ion batteries present a unique opportunity to apply lessons learned in the study of electrolytes for lithium ion batteries; specifically, the behavior of the sodium ion in an organic carbonate solution and the relationship of ion solvation with electrode surface passivation. In this work the Li + and Na + -based solvates were characterized using electrospray mass spectrometry, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, 17 O, 23 Na and pulse field gradient double-stimulated-echo pulse sequence nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and conductivity measurements. Spectroscopic evidence demonstrate that the Li + and Na + cations share a number of similar ion-solvent interaction trends, such as a preference in the gas and liquid phase for a solvation shell rich in cyclic carbonates over linear carbonates and fluorinated carbonates. However, quite different IR spectra due to the PF 6 - anion interactions with the Na + and Li + cations were observed and were rationalized with the help of density functional theory (DFT) calculations that were also used to examine the relative free energies of solvates using cluster - continuum models. Ion-solvent distances for Na + were longer than Li + , and Na + had a greater tendency towards forming contact pairs compared to Li + in linear carbonate solvents. In tests of hard carbon Na-ion batteries, performance was not well correlated to Na + solvent preference, leading to the possibility that Na + solvent preference may play a reduced role in the passivation of anode surfaces and overall Na-ion battery performance.

  1. Highly porous carbon with large electrochemical ion absorption capability for high-performance supercapacitors and ion capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijie; Wang, Rutao; Zhang, Yabin; Zhang, Li

    2017-11-01

    Carbon-based supercapacitors have attracted extensive attention as the complement to batteries, owing to their durable lifespan and superiority in high-power-demand fields. However, their widespread use is limited by the low energy storage density; thus, a high-surface-area porous carbon is urgently needed. Herein, a highly porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area up to 3643 m2 g-1 has been synthesized by chemical activation of papayas for the first time. This sp2-bonded porous carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form narrow mesopores of 2 ˜ 5 nm in width, which can be systematically tailored with varied activation levels. Two-electrode symmetric supercapacitors constructed by this porous carbon achieve energy density of 8.1 Wh kg-1 in aqueous electrolyte and 65.5 Wh kg-1 in ionic-liquid electrolyte. Furthermore, half-cells (versus Li or Na metal) using this porous carbon as ion sorption cathodes yield high specific capacity, e.g., 51.0 and 39.3 mAh g-1 in Li+ and Na+ based organic electrolyte. These results underline the possibility of obtaining the porous carbon for high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors and ion capacitors in a readily scalable and economical way.

  2. Highly porous carbon with large electrochemical ion absorption capability for high-performance supercapacitors and ion capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijie; Wang, Rutao; Zhang, Yabin; Zhang, Li

    2017-11-03

    Carbon-based supercapacitors have attracted extensive attention as the complement to batteries, owing to their durable lifespan and superiority in high-power-demand fields. However, their widespread use is limited by the low energy storage density; thus, a high-surface-area porous carbon is urgently needed. Herein, a highly porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area up to 3643 m 2 g -1 has been synthesized by chemical activation of papayas for the first time. This sp 2 -bonded porous carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form narrow mesopores of 2 ∼ 5 nm in width, which can be systematically tailored with varied activation levels. Two-electrode symmetric supercapacitors constructed by this porous carbon achieve energy density of 8.1 Wh kg -1 in aqueous electrolyte and 65.5 Wh kg -1 in ionic-liquid electrolyte. Furthermore, half-cells (versus Li or Na metal) using this porous carbon as ion sorption cathodes yield high specific capacity, e.g., 51.0 and 39.3 mAh g -1 in Li + and Na + based organic electrolyte. These results underline the possibility of obtaining the porous carbon for high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors and ion capacitors in a readily scalable and economical way.

  3. Operation of low-energy ion implanters for Si, N, C ion implantation into silicon and glassy carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carder, D.A.; Markwitz, A.

    2009-01-01

    This report details the operation of the low-energy ion implanters at GNS Science for C, N and Si implantations. Two implanters are presented, from a description of the components through to instructions for operation. Historically the implanters have been identified with the labels 'industrial' and 'experimental'. However, the machines only differ significantly in the species of ions available for implantation and sample temperature during implantation. Both machines have been custom designed for research purposes, with a wide range of ion species available for ion implantation and the ability to implant two ions into the same sample at the same time from two different ion sources. A fast sample transfer capability and homogenous scanning profiles are featured in both cases. Samples up to 13 mm 2 can be implanted, with the ability to implant at temperatures down to liquid nitrogen temperatures. The implanters have been used to implant 28 Si + , 14 N + and 12 C + into silicon and glassy carbon substrates. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy has been used to analyse the implanted material. From the data a Si 30 C 61 N 9 layer was measured extending from the surface to a depth of about 77 ± 2 nm for (100) silicon implanted with 12 C + and 14 N + at multiple energies. Silicon and nitrogen ion implantation into glassy carbon produced a Si (40.5 %), C (38 %), N (19.5 %) and O (2%) layer centred around a depth of 50 ± 2 nm from the surface. (author). 8 refs., 20 figs

  4. Tuning the Solid Electrolyte Interphase for Selective Li- and Na-Ion Storage in Hard Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Fernando A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3122 USA; Yan, Pengfei [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Marzouk, Asma [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, P.O. Box 5825 Doha Qatar; Wang, Chongmin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Xu, Guiliang [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Chen, Zonghai [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Sprenkle, Vincent L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, P.O. Box 5825 Doha Qatar; Balbuena, Perla B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3122 USA; Li, Xiaolin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-03-07

    Solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) with controllable properties are highly desirable to improve battery performance. In this paper, we use a combined experimental and simulation approach to study the SEI formation on hard carbon in Li and Na-ion batteries. We show that with proper additives, stable SEI can be formed on hard carbon by pre-cycling the electrode materials in Li or Na-ion electrolyte. Detailed mechanistic studies suggest that the ion transport in the SEI layer is kinetically controlled and can be tuned by the applied voltage. Selective Na and Li-ion SEI membranes are produced using the Na or Li-ion based electrolytes respectively. The large Na ion SEI allows easy transport of Li ions, while the small Li ion SEI shuts off the Na-ion transport. Na-ion storage can be manipulated by tuning the SEI with film-forming electrolyte additives or preforming a SEI on the electrodes’ surface. The Na specific capacity can be controlled to <25 mAh/g, ~1/10 of the normal capacity (250 mAh/g). Unusual selective/preferential transport of Li-ion is demonstrated by preforming a SEI on the electrode’s surface and corroborated with a mixed electrolyte. This work may provide new guidance for preparing good ion selective conductors using electrochemical approaches in the future.

  5. Effect of ion irradiation on the structure and the surface topography of carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligacheva, E.A.; Galyaeva, L.V.; Gavrilov, N.V.; Belykh, T.A.; Ligachev, A.E.; Sokhoreva, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of C + ion irradiation (40 keV, 10 15 - 10 19 cm -2 ) on the structure and surface topography of high-module carbon fibers is investigated. Interplanar distance and internal stress values are found to be minimal at a radiation dose of 10 17 cm -2 , the height of a layer pack being practically unchanged. The relief of ion irradiated carbon fiber surface constitutes regularly repetitive valleys and ridges spaced parallel with the fiber axis [ru

  6. Luminescence imaging of water during carbon-ion irradiation for range estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Morishita, Yuki; Sekihara, Eri [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Akagi, Takashi; Yamashita, Tomohiro [Hygo Ion Beam Medical Center, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The authors previously reported successful luminescence imaging of water during proton irradiation and its application to range estimation. However, since the feasibility of this approach for carbon-ion irradiation remained unclear, the authors conducted luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation and estimated the ranges. Methods: The authors placed a pure-water phantom on the patient couch of a carbon-ion therapy system and measured the luminescence images with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device camera during carbon-ion irradiation. The authors also carried out imaging of three types of phantoms (tap-water, an acrylic block, and a plastic scintillator) and compared their intensities and distributions with those of a phantom containing pure-water. Results: The luminescence images of pure-water phantoms during carbon-ion irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured carbon-ion ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained by simulation. The image of the tap-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as that of the pure-water phantom. The acrylic block phantom’s luminescence image produced seven times higher luminescence and had a 13% shorter range than that of the water phantoms; the range with the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The plastic scintillator showed ∼15 000 times higher light than that of water. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation of water is not only possible but also a promising method for range estimation in carbon-ion therapy.

  7. Luminescence imaging of water during carbon-ion irradiation for range estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Morishita, Yuki; Sekihara, Eri; Akagi, Takashi; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously reported successful luminescence imaging of water during proton irradiation and its application to range estimation. However, since the feasibility of this approach for carbon-ion irradiation remained unclear, the authors conducted luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation and estimated the ranges. Methods: The authors placed a pure-water phantom on the patient couch of a carbon-ion therapy system and measured the luminescence images with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device camera during carbon-ion irradiation. The authors also carried out imaging of three types of phantoms (tap-water, an acrylic block, and a plastic scintillator) and compared their intensities and distributions with those of a phantom containing pure-water. Results: The luminescence images of pure-water phantoms during carbon-ion irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured carbon-ion ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained by simulation. The image of the tap-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as that of the pure-water phantom. The acrylic block phantom’s luminescence image produced seven times higher luminescence and had a 13% shorter range than that of the water phantoms; the range with the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The plastic scintillator showed ∼15 000 times higher light than that of water. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation of water is not only possible but also a promising method for range estimation in carbon-ion therapy.

  8. Reprint of: Negative carbon cluster ion beams: New evidence for the special nature of C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; O'brien, S. C.; Zhang, Q.; Heath, J. R.; Tittel, F. K.; Curl, R. F.; Kroto, H. W.; Smalley, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Cold carbon cluster negative ions are formed by supersonic expansion of a plasma created at the nozzle of a supersonic cluster beam source by an excimer laser pulse. The observed distribution of mass peaks for the Cn- ions for n > 40 demonstrates that the evidence previously given for the special stability of neutral C60 and the existence of spheroidal carbon shells cannot be an artifact of the ionization conditions.

  9. The use of multi-gap resistive plate chambers for in-beam PET in proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Watts, David; Sauli, Fabio; Amaldi, Ugo

    2013-01-01

    On-line verification of the delivered dose during proton and carbon ion radiotherapy is currently a very desirable goal for quality assurance of hadron therapy treatment plans. In-beam positron emission tomography (ibPET), which can provide an image of the β+ activity induced in the patient during irradiation, which in turn is correlated to the range of the ion beam, is one of the modalities for achieving this goal. Application to hadron therapy requires that the scanner geometry be modified from that which is used in nuclear medicine. In particular, PET detectors that allow a sub-nanosecond time-of-flight (TOF) registration of the collinear photons have been proposed. Inclusion of the TOF information in PET data leads to more effective PET sensitivity. Considering the challenges inherent in the ibPET technique, namely limited β+ activity and the effect of biological washout due to blood flow, TOF-PET technologies are very attractive. In this context, the TERA Foundation is investigating the use of resistiv...

  10. A semi-analytical model of biological effectiveness for treatment planning in light ion radiotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kundrát, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 6 (2007), s. 2654-2654 ISSN 0094-2405. [AAPM Annual Meeting. Minneapolis, 22.07.2007-26.07.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : treatment planning * light-ion therapy * radiobiological models Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 3.198, year: 2007

  11. Carbon nanotubes in Li-ion batteries: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehrawat, Poonam [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), Jamia Nagar, New Delhi 110025 (India); Julien, C. [Sorbonne Universities, University Pierre and Marie CURIE – Paris-6, Paris (France); Islam, S.S., E-mail: sislam@jmi.ac.in [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), Jamia Nagar, New Delhi 110025 (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • LIBs are gaining immense attention among rechargeable battery systems. • HEVs and portables demand higher power and life than the conventional systems. • CNTs owing to their unique 1D structure can enhance performance of LIBs. • We report contemporary advancements in CNTs technology as applicable to LIBs. • CNTs-composite systems have also been reviewed. - Abstract: Portable-electronics epitomizing technological breakthrough in history of mankind, are universal reality thanks to rechargeable batteries. LIBs, lithium-ion batteries, owing to high-reversible capacity, high-power capability, good-safety, long-life and zero-memory effects are at the heart of this revolution. Nonetheless, longer-battery-life, higher-current- and power-density, better-safety, and flexibility, crucial for portables and hybrid-electric-vehicles further fuel the research to better their electrochemistry. Electrode materials are vital for performance of batteries. Recent developments in nanoscience and nanotechnology offer potential prospects to devise novel-nanostructured electrode materials for next-generation better-performing LIBs. Nanostructured materials are pivotal to these progresses due to their manageable surface-area, stunted mass and charge-diffusion span, and volume change acclimatization during charging/discharging. CNTs, carbon-nanotubes, with distinct 1D-tubular structure, excellent electrical and thermal conductivities, mechanical flexibility and significantly large surface-area, are considered ideal additives to enrich electrodes’ chemistry. Here, we observe contemporary developments in synthesis and characterization of CNTs and CNTs-based nanostructured composite-electrodes for utilization in LIBs.

  12. Carbon nanotubes in Li-ion batteries: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehrawat, Poonam; Julien, C.; Islam, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • LIBs are gaining immense attention among rechargeable battery systems. • HEVs and portables demand higher power and life than the conventional systems. • CNTs owing to their unique 1D structure can enhance performance of LIBs. • We report contemporary advancements in CNTs technology as applicable to LIBs. • CNTs-composite systems have also been reviewed. - Abstract: Portable-electronics epitomizing technological breakthrough in history of mankind, are universal reality thanks to rechargeable batteries. LIBs, lithium-ion batteries, owing to high-reversible capacity, high-power capability, good-safety, long-life and zero-memory effects are at the heart of this revolution. Nonetheless, longer-battery-life, higher-current- and power-density, better-safety, and flexibility, crucial for portables and hybrid-electric-vehicles further fuel the research to better their electrochemistry. Electrode materials are vital for performance of batteries. Recent developments in nanoscience and nanotechnology offer potential prospects to devise novel-nanostructured electrode materials for next-generation better-performing LIBs. Nanostructured materials are pivotal to these progresses due to their manageable surface-area, stunted mass and charge-diffusion span, and volume change acclimatization during charging/discharging. CNTs, carbon-nanotubes, with distinct 1D-tubular structure, excellent electrical and thermal conductivities, mechanical flexibility and significantly large surface-area, are considered ideal additives to enrich electrodes’ chemistry. Here, we observe contemporary developments in synthesis and characterization of CNTs and CNTs-based nanostructured composite-electrodes for utilization in LIBs.

  13. Specificity of mutations induced by carbon ions in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuo, Youichirou; Nishijima, Shigehiro; Hase, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Ayako; Tanaka, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kikuo

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the nature of mutations induced by accelerated ions in eukaryotic cells, the effects of carbon-ion irradiation were compared with those of γ-ray irradiation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutational effect and specificity of carbon-ion beams were studied in the URA3 gene of the yeast. Our experiments showed that the carbon ions generated more than 10 times the number of mutations induced by γ-rays, and that the types of base changes induced by carbon ions include transversions (68.7%), transitions (13.7%) and deletions/insertions (17.6%). The transversions were mainly G:C → T:A, and all the transitions were G:C → A:T. In comparison with the surrounding sequence context of mutational base sites, the C residues in the 5'-AC(A/T)-3' sequence were found to be easily changed. Large deletions and duplications were not observed, whereas ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana were mainly short deletions and rearrangements. The remarkable feature of yeast mutations induced by carbon ions was that the mutation sites were localized near the linker regions of nucleosomes, whereas mutations induced by γ-ray irradiation were located uniformly throughout the gene

  14. Specificity of mutations induced by carbon ions in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuo, Youichirou [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishijima, Shigehiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hase, Yoshihiro [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sakamoto, Ayako [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Tanaka, Atsushi [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Shimizu, Kikuo [Radioisotope Research Center, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-4, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: shimizu@rirc.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the nature of mutations induced by accelerated ions in eukaryotic cells, the effects of carbon-ion irradiation were compared with those of {gamma}-ray irradiation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutational effect and specificity of carbon-ion beams were studied in the URA3 gene of the yeast. Our experiments showed that the carbon ions generated more than 10 times the number of mutations induced by {gamma}-rays, and that the types of base changes induced by carbon ions include transversions (68.7%), transitions (13.7%) and deletions/insertions (17.6%). The transversions were mainly G:C {sup {yields}} T:A, and all the transitions were G:C {sup {yields}} A:T. In comparison with the surrounding sequence context of mutational base sites, the C residues in the 5'-AC(A/T)-3' sequence were found to be easily changed. Large deletions and duplications were not observed, whereas ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana were mainly short deletions and rearrangements. The remarkable feature of yeast mutations induced by carbon ions was that the mutation sites were localized near the linker regions of nucleosomes, whereas mutations induced by {gamma}-ray irradiation were located uniformly throughout the gene.

  15. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallas, Raya R.; Huenemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Greilich, Steffen; Jaekel, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy ''end-to-end'' tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification.

  16. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallas, Raya R.; Huenemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Greilich, Steffen [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Jaekel, Oliver [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy ''end-to-end'' tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification.

  17. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallas, Raya R; Hünemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2015-12-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy "end-to-end" tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  18. Effects of ion beam bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto tungsten carbide and tool steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awazu, Kaoru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki [Industrial Research Inst. of Ishikawa (Japan); Watanabe, Hiroshi [Gakushuin Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Iwaki, Masaya; Guzman, L [RIKEN, Saitama (Japan)

    1992-04-15

    A study was made of the effects of argon ion bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto WC and tool steels. Carbon thin film deposition was performed at various temperatures ranging from 200degC to 350degC, using C{sub 6}H{sub 6} gas. Argon ion beam bombardment of the films was carried out at an energy of 150 keV with a dose of 1x10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2}. The hardness and adhesion of the films were measured by means of Knoop hardness and scratch tests respectively. The structure of the carbon films was estimated by laser Raman spectroscopy, and the relations were investigated between the mechanical properties and the structure of the films. The hardness of carbon thin films increases as their deposition temperature decreases; this tendency corresponds to the increase in amorphous structure estimated by Raman spectra. Argon ion bombardment results in constant hardness and fraction of amorphous structure. Argon ion beam bombardment of films prior to additional carbon deposition may cause the adhesion of the subsequently deposited films to improve. It is concluded that argon ion beam bombardment is useful for improving the properties of carbon films deposited onto WC and tool steels. (orig.).

  19. Effects of ion beam bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto tungsten carbide and tool steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awazu, Kaoru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Iwaki, Masaya; Guzman, L.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made of the effects of argon ion bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto WC and tool steels. Carbon thin film deposition was performed at various temperatures ranging from 200degC to 350degC, using C 6 H 6 gas. Argon ion beam bombardment of the films was carried out at an energy of 150 keV with a dose of 1x10 16 ions cm -2 . The hardness and adhesion of the films were measured by means of Knoop hardness and scratch tests respectively. The structure of the carbon films was estimated by laser Raman spectroscopy, and the relations were investigated between the mechanical properties and the structure of the films. The hardness of carbon thin films increases as their deposition temperature decreases; this tendency corresponds to the increase in amorphous structure estimated by Raman spectra. Argon ion bombardment results in constant hardness and fraction of amorphous structure. Argon ion beam bombardment of films prior to additional carbon deposition may cause the adhesion of the subsequently deposited films to improve. It is concluded that argon ion beam bombardment is useful for improving the properties of carbon films deposited onto WC and tool steels. (orig.)

  20. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeff, Marca M.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard

    1995-01-01

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  1. Heavy-ion radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Tobias, C.A.; Holley, W.R.; Benton, E.V.; Woodruff, K.H.; MacFarland, E.W.

    1983-01-01

    High energy, heavy-ion beams offer superior discrimination of tissue electron densities at very low radiation doses. This characteristic has potential for diagnostic medical imaging of neoplasms arising in the soft tissues and organs because it can detect smaller inhomogeneities than x rays. Heavy-ion imaging may also increase the accuracy of cancer radiotherapy planning involving use of accelerated charged particles. In the current physics research program of passive heavy-ion imaging, critical modulation transfer function tests are being carried out in heavy-ion projection radiography and heavy-ion computerized tomography. The research goal is to improve the heavy-ion imaging method until it reaches the limits of its theoretical resolution defined by range straggling, multiple scattering, and other factors involved in the beam quality characteristics. Clinical uses of the imaging method include the application of heavy-ion computerized tomography to heavy-ion radiotherapy planning, to the study of brain tumors and other structures of the head, and to low-dose heavy-ion projection mammography, particularly for women with dense breasts where other methods of diagnosis fail. The ions used are primarily 300 to 570 MeV/amu carbon and neon ions accelerated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac

  2. Influence of dose distribution homogeneity on the tumor control probability in heavy-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Xiaoqiong; Li Qiang; Zhou Guangming; Li Wenjian; Wei Zengquan

    2001-01-01

    In order to estimate the influence of the un-uniform dose distribution on the clinical treatment result, the Influence of dose distribution homogeneity on the tumor control probability was investigated. Basing on the formula deduced previously for survival fraction of cells irradiated by the un-uniform heavy-ion irradiation field and the theory of tumor control probability, the tumor control probability was calculated for a tumor mode exposed to different dose distribution homogeneity. The results show that the tumor control probability responding to the same total dose will decrease if the dose distribution homogeneity gets worse. In clinical treatment, the dose distribution homogeneity should be better than 95%

  3. Change of chemical bond and wettability of polylacticacid implanted with high-flux carbon ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jizhong; Kang Jiachen; Zhang Xiaoji; Zhou Hongyu

    2008-01-01

    Polylacticacid (PLA) was submitted to high-flux carbon ion implantation with energy of 40 keV. It was investigated to the effect of ion fluence (1 x 10 12 -1 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 ) on the properties of the polymer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), wettability, and roughness were employed to study change of structure and properties of the as-implanted PLA samples. Six carbon bonds, that is, C, C-H, C-O-C, C-O, O-C-O, and >C=O, were observed on surfaces of the as-implanted PLA samples. The intensities of various chemical bonds changed with increasing ion fluence. AFM images displayed that there was irradiation damage and that it was related closely with ion fluence. At fluence as high as 1 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 surface-restructuring phenomenum took place on the surface of the PLA. Wettability was also affected by the variation on the fluence. With increasing ion fluence, the water contact angle of the as-implanted PLA samples changed gradually reaching a maximum of 76.5 deg. with 1 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . The experimental results revealed that carbon ion fluence strongly affected surface chemical bond, morphology, wettability, and roughness of the PLA samples

  4. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  5. Electrochemical performances and capacity fading behaviors of activated carbon/hard carbon lithium ion capacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xianzhong; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Wenjie; Wang, Kai; Li, Chen; Li, Zhao; Ma, Yanwei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Three-electrode pouch cell is used to investigate the capacity fading of AC/HC LIC. • the electrode potential swing is critical for the cycleability of a LIC cell. • Different capacity fading behaviors are discussed. • A large-capacity LIC pouch cell has been assembled with a specific energy of 18.1 Wh kg −1 based on the total weight. - Abstract: Lithium ion capacitor (LIC) is one of the most promising electrochemical energy storage devices, which offers rapid charging-discharging capability and long cycle life. We have fabricated LIC pouch cells using an electrochemically-driven lithium pre-doping method through a three-electrode pouch cell structure. The active materials of cathode and anode of LIC cell are activated carbon and pre-lithiated hard carbon, respectively. The electrochemical performances and the capacity fading behaviors of LICs in the voltage range of 2.0 − 4.0 V have been studied. The specific energy and specific power reach 73.6 Wh kg −1 and 11.9 kW kg −1 based on the weight of the active materials in both cathode and anode, respectively. Since the cycling performance is actually determined by hard carbon anode, the anode potential swings are emphasized. The capacity fading of LIC upon cycling is proposed to be caused by the increases of internal resistance and the consumption of lithium stored in anode. Finally, a large-capacity LIC pouch cell has been assembled with a maximum specific energy of 18.1 Wh kg −1 and a maximum specific power of 3.7 kW kg −1 based on the weight of the whole cell.

  6. Microporous carbon derived from polyaniline base as anode material for lithium ion secondary battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Enhui; Huang, Zhengzheng; Shen, Haijie; Tian, Yingying; Xiao, Chengyi; Yang, Jingjing; Mao, Zhaohui

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Nitrogen-containing microporous carbon was prepared from polyaniline base by K 2 CO 3 activation, and used as anode material for lithium ion secondary battery. → K 2 CO 3 activation promotes the formation of amorphous and microporous structure. → High nitrogen content, and large surface area with micropores lead to strong intercalation between carbon and lithium ion, and thus improve the lithium storage capacity. -- Abstract: Microporous carbon with large surface area was prepared from polyaniline base using K 2 CO 3 as an activating agent. The physicochemical properties of the carbon were characterized by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, elemental analyses and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement. The electrochemical properties of the microporous carbon as anode material in lithium ion secondary battery were evaluated. The first discharge capacity of the microporous carbon was 1108 mAh g -1 , whose first charge capacity was 624 mAh g -1 , with a coulombic efficiency of 56.3%. After 20 cycling tests, the microporous carbon retains a reversible capacity of 603 mAh g -1 at a current density of 100 mA g -1 . These results clearly demonstrated the potential role of microporous carbon as anode for high capacity lithium ion secondary battery.

  7. Poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mingxin; Qiu, Guannan; Song, Weiping

    2010-02-01

    Utilization of poultry litter as a precursor material to manufacture activated carbon for treating heavy metal-contaminated water is a value-added strategy for recycling the organic waste. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to investigate kinetics, isotherms, and capacity of poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water. It was revealed that poultry litter-based activated carbon possessed significantly higher adsorption affinity and capacity for heavy metals than commercial activated carbons derived from bituminous coal and coconut shell. Adsorption of metal ions onto poultry litter-based carbon was rapid and followed Sigmoidal Chapman patterns as a function of contact time. Adsorption isotherms could be described by different models such as Langmuir and Freundlich equations, depending on the metal species and the coexistence of other metal ions. Potentially 404 mmol of Cu2+, 945 mmol of Pb2+, 236 mmol of Zn2+, and 250-300 mmol of Cd2+ would be adsorbed per kg of poultry litter-derived activated carbon. Releases of nutrients and metal ions from litter-derived carbon did not pose secondary water contamination risks. The study suggests that poultry litter can be utilized as a precursor material for economically manufacturing granular activated carbon that is to be used in wastewater treatment for removing heavy metals.

  8. Enhancement of SPHK1 in vitro by carbon ion irradiation in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higo, Morihiro; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Kawata, Tetsuya; Kato, Yoshikuni; Kouzu, Yukinao; Yamamoto, Nobuharu; Shibahara, Takahiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Ito, Hisao; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the gene expression changes in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells after carbon ion irradiation. Methods and Materials Three OSCC cell lines (HSC2, Ca9-22, and HSC3) were irradiated with accelerated carbon ion beams or X-rays using three different doses. The cellular sensitivities were determined by clonogenic survival assay. To identify genes the expression of which is influenced by carbon ion irradiation in a dose-dependent manner, we performed Affymetrix GeneChip analysis with HG-U133 plus 2.0 arrays containing 54,675 probe sets. The identified genes were analyzed using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool to investigate the functional network and gene ontology. Changes in mRNA expression in the genes were assessed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results We identified 98 genes with expression levels that were altered significantly at least twofold in each of the three carbon-irradiated OSCC cell lines at all dose points compared with nonirradiated control cells. Among these, SPHK1, the expression of which was significantly upregulated by carbon ion irradiation, was modulated little by X-rays. The function of SPHK1 related to cellular growth and proliferation had the highest p value (p = 9.25e-7 to 2.19e-2). Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed significantly elevated SPHK1 expression levels after carbon ion irradiation (p < 0.05), consistent with microarray data. Clonogenic survival assay indicated that carbon ion irradiation could induce cell death in Ca9-22 cells more effectively than X-rays. Conclusions Our findings suggest that SPHK1 helps to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and processes underlying the biologic response to carbon ion beams in OSCC

  9. Carbon ion irradiation induced surface modification of polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, A.; Chakraborty, V.; Dutta, R.K.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    Polypropylene was irradiated with 12 C ions of 3.6 and 5.4 MeV energies in the fluence range of 5x10 13 -5x10 14 ions/cm 2 using 3 MV tandem accelerator. Ion penetration was limited to a few microns and surface modifications were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. At the lowest ion fluence only blister formation of various sizes (1-6 μm) were observed, but at higher fluence (1x10 14 ions/cm 2 ) a three-dimensional network structure was found to form. A gradual degradation in the network structure was observed with further increase in the ion fluence. The dose dependence of the changes on surface morphology of polypropylene is discussed

  10. Carbon ion irradiation induced surface modification of polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, A. E-mail: abhijit@alpha.iuc.res.in; Chakraborty, V.; Dutta, R.K.; Chintalapudi, S.N

    2001-12-01

    Polypropylene was irradiated with {sup 12}C ions of 3.6 and 5.4 MeV energies in the fluence range of 5x10{sup 13}-5x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} using 3 MV tandem accelerator. Ion penetration was limited to a few microns and surface modifications were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. At the lowest ion fluence only blister formation of various sizes (1-6 {mu}m) were observed, but at higher fluence (1x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}) a three-dimensional network structure was found to form. A gradual degradation in the network structure was observed with further increase in the ion fluence. The dose dependence of the changes on surface morphology of polypropylene is discussed.

  11. Boron ion irradiation induced structural and surface modification of glassy carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalijadis, Ana; Jovanović, Zoran; Cvijović-Alagić, Ivana; Laušević, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of boron into glassy carbon was achieved by irradiating two different types of targets: glassy carbon polymer precursor and carbonized glassy carbon. Targets were irradiated with a 45 keV B 3+ ion beam in the fluence range of 5 × 10 15 –5 × 10 16 ions cm −2 . For both types of targets, the implanted boron was located in a narrow region under the surface. Following irradiation, the polymer was carbonized under the same condition as the glassy carbon samples (at 1273 K) and examined by Raman spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, hardness and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Structural analysis showed that during the carbonization process of the irradiated polymers, boron is substitutionally incorporated into the glassy carbon structure, while for irradiated carbonized glassy carbon samples, boron irradiation caused an increase of the sp 3 carbon fraction, which is most pronounced for the highest fluence irradiation. Further analyses showed that different nature of boron incorporation, and thus changed structural parameters, are crucial for obtaining glassy carbon samples with modified mechanical, chemical and electrochemical properties over a wide range

  12. On the mechanism of water cluster-ion formation in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warneck, P.; Rakshit, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    A drift chamber mass spectrometer has been used to study the formation of water cluster-ions in carbon dioxide containing traces of water vapour. The dominant reaction sequences were identified up to the fourth generation of daughter ions starting with CO 2 + . The subsequent reaction mechanism remains uncertain and several possibilities are discussed. The final ions are H 3 O + H 2 O and H 3 O + (H 2 O) 2 . The significance of the reaction schemes to the radiation chemistry of carbon dioxide is pointed out. (orig.)

  13. The survival effects of V79 cells irradiated with carbon ions in different let

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jufang; Zhou Guangming; He Jing; Li Wenjian; Li Qiang; Dang Bingrong; Li Xinglin; Weng Xiaoqiong; Xie Hongmei; Wei Zengquan; Gao Qingxiang

    2001-01-01

    The survival of cultured Chinese V79 hamster cells irradiated with carbon ions with different LETs were investigated. Irradiation was performed at the heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). Results were compared with those obtained from the experiments with γ rats and could be concluded as follows: The survival curves for carbon ions showed as straight lines and were fitted to the one-target one-hit model, but for γ rays the curves with shoulders were fitted to the multi-target one-hit model. As the LETs were 125, 200 and 700 keV/μm for carbon ions, the inactivation cross section 35, 12 and 8 μm 2 , respectively, which suggested that under the experimental conditions, the lower the LET of carbon ions, the more seriously the irradiation killed cells. In the case of 125 keV/μm, the RBEs of carbon ions at the 0.1 and 0.37 survival levels were 1.47 and 2.19 respectively

  14. Ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots for the detection of mercury ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yusha; Mei, Jing; Bai, Jianliang; Chen, Xu; Ren, Lili

    2018-05-01

    A novel ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots has been synthesized via bonding rhodamine B hydrazide to the carbon dots surface by an amide reaction. The ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor showed only a single blue fluorescence emission around 450 nm. While, as mercury ion was added, due to the open-ring of rhodamine moiety bonded on the CDs surface, the orange emission of the open-ring rhodamine would increase obviously according to the concentration of mercury ion, resulting in the distinguishable dual emissions at 450 nm and 575 nm under a single 360 excitation wavelength. Meanwhile, the ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots we prepared is more sensitive to qualitative and semi-quantitative detection of mercury ion in the range of 0–100 μM, because fluorescence changes gradually from blue to orange emission under 365 nm lamp with the increasing of mercury ion in the tested solution.

  15. Highly ordered three-dimensional macroporous carbon spheres for determination of heavy metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Jianming [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Yang, E-mail: yangl@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Huang, Hui [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Kang, Zhenhui, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres (MPCSs) were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPCS was covalently modified by cysteine (MPCS-CO-Cys). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPCS-CO-Cys was first time used in electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heavy metal ions such as Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} can be simultaneously determined. -- Abstract: An effective voltammetric method for detection of trace heavy metal ions using chemically modified highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres electrode surfaces is described. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were prepared by carbonization of glucose in silica crystal bead template, followed by removal of the template. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were covalently modified by cysteine, an amino acid with high affinities towards some heavy metals. The materials were characterized by physical adsorption of nitrogen, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. While the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of carbon spheres. High sensitivity was exhibited when this material was used in electrochemical detection (square wave anodic stripping voltammetry) of heavy metal ions due to the porous structure. And the potential application for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions was also investigated.

  16. Highly ordered three-dimensional macroporous carbon spheres for determination of heavy metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Jianming; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres (MPCSs) were prepared. ► MPCS was covalently modified by cysteine (MPCS–CO–Cys). ► MPCS–CO–Cys was first time used in electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. ► Heavy metal ions such as Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ can be simultaneously determined. -- Abstract: An effective voltammetric method for detection of trace heavy metal ions using chemically modified highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres electrode surfaces is described. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were prepared by carbonization of glucose in silica crystal bead template, followed by removal of the template. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were covalently modified by cysteine, an amino acid with high affinities towards some heavy metals. The materials were characterized by physical adsorption of nitrogen, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. While the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of carbon spheres. High sensitivity was exhibited when this material was used in electrochemical detection (square wave anodic stripping voltammetry) of heavy metal ions due to the porous structure. And the potential application for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions was also investigated.

  17. [Involvement of carbonate/bicarbonate ions in the superoxide-generating reaction of adrenaline autoxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, T V

    2015-01-01

    An important role of carbonate/bicarbonate ions has been recognized in the superoxide generating reaction of adrenaline autooxidation in an alkaline buffer (a model of quinoid adrenaline oxidation in the body). It is suggested that these ions are directly involved not only in formation of superoxide anion radical (О(2)(-)) but also other radicals derived from the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer. Using various buffers it was shown that the rate of accumulation of adrenochrome, the end product of adrenaline oxidation, and the rate of О(2)(-)· formation depend on concentration of carbonate/bicarbonate ions in the buffer and that these ions significantly accelerate adrenaline autooxidation thus demonstrating prooxidant properties. The detectable amount of diformazan, the product of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction, was significantly higher than the amount of adrenochrome formed; taking into consideration the literature data on О(2)(-)· detection by NBT it is suggested that adrenaline autooxidation is accompanied by one-electron reduction not only of oxygen dissolved in the buffer and responsible for superoxide formation but possible carbon dioxide also dissolved in the buffer as well as carbonate/bicarbonate buffer components leading to formation of corresponding radicals. The plots of the dependence of the inhibition of adrenochrome and diformazan formation on the superoxide dismutase concentration have shown that not only superoxide radicals are formed during adrenaline autooxidation. Since carbonate/bicarbonate ions are known to be universally present in the living nature, their involvement in free radical processes proceeding in the organism is discussed.

  18. Effect of ion concentrations on uranium absorption from sodium carbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traut, D.E.; El Hazek, N.M.T.; Palmer, G.R.; Nichols, I.L.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of various ion concentrations on uranium absorption from a sodium carbonate solution by a strong-base, anion resin was investigated in order to help assure an adequate uranium supply for future needs. The studies were conducted to improve the recovery of uranium from in situ leach solutions by ion exchange. The effects of carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride, and sulfate ions were examined. Relatively low (less than 5 g/l) concentrations of chloride, sulfate, and bicarbonate were found to be detrimental to the absorption of uranium. High (greater than 10 g/l) carbonate concentrations also adversely affected the uranium absorption. In addition, the effect of initial resin form was investigated in tests of the chloride, carbonate, and bicarbonate forms; resin form was shown to have no effect on the absorption of uranium

  19. Incidence Angle Effect of Energetic Carbon Ions on Deposition Rate, Topography, and Structure of Ultrathin Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the incidence angle of energetic carbon ions on the thickness, topography, and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) was examined in the context of numerical

  20. Successive ionization of positive ions of carbon and nitrogen by electron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donets, E.D.; Ilyushchenko, V.I.

    Experimental studies of deep ionization of heavy ions are described. The applications of such studies in atomic physics, plasma physics and space physics are discussed. Investigations using intersecting ion-electron beams, shifted beams and ion trap sources are described, and data are presented for multi-charged ions of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen. A detailed description of the development of the IEL (electron beam ionizer) source, and the KRION (cryogenic version) source is given, and further data for the multiple ionization of carbon and nitrogen are given for charge states up to C 6+ and N 7+ . The advantages and disadvantages of the KRION source are discussed, and preliminary studies of a new torroidal ion trap source (HIRAC) are presented. (11 figs, 57 refs) (U.S.)

  1. Detection of Sn(II) ions via quenching of the fluorescence of carbon nanodots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Yazid, S.N.A.; Chin, S.F.; Pang, S.C.; Ng, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report that fluorescent carbon nanodots (C-dots) can act as an optical probe for quantifying Sn(II) ions in aqueous solution. C-dots are synthesized by carbonization and surface oxidation of preformed sago starch nanoparticles. Their fluorescence is significantly quenched by Sn(II) ions, and the effect can be used to determine Sn(II) ions. The highest fluorescence intensity is obtained at a concentration of 1.75 mM of C-dots in aqueous solution. The probe is highly selective and hardly interfered by other ions. The quenching mechanism appears to be predominantly of the static (rather than dynamic) type. Under optimum conditions, there is a linear relationship between fluorescence intensity and Sn(II) ions concentration up to 4 mM, and with a detection limit of 0.36 μM. (author)

  2. Effects of ion beam irradiation on the microstructures and strengths of different carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo; Kurumada, Akira; Kawamata, Kiyohiro; Inagaki, Michio

    1998-01-01

    The high energy argon ion was irradiated to different carbon fibers with various microstructures. The cross-sectional structures and strengths properties have been evaluated before and after ion irradiation. As a result, the diameter of fibers decreased due to ion irradiation, except for the fiber with dual structure. The tensile strength also decreased due to ion irradiation, except for fibers which were not heat-treated. This suggests that it is necessary to consider not only the defects in the vertical cross-section but also changes in defect structures in the axial direction. The results of computer simulation indicated that argon ion with 175MeV/1μA produced homogeneous defects in the carbon fibers with the diameter of about 20 μm. (author)

  3. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate - sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na 2 CO 3 -0.5 N NaHCO 3 ) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/1 uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluant (5 % NaCl-0.5 % Na 2 CO 3 ). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased. (author)

  4. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate-sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na 2 CO 3 -0.5 N NaHCO 3 ) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/l uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluent (5% NaCl-0.5% Na 2 CO 3 ). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased. (author)

  5. SU-F-T-199: A New Strategy for Integrating Photon with Proton and Carbon Ion in the Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z; Wang, J; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a viable strategy to integrate photon plan and proton/carbon ion plan based on deformable registration. Methods: Two prostate cancer patients were enrolled in this study. Each patient has 2 CTs, which were input in the Raystation radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS). CT1 was deformed to the second CT2 using the Hybrid deformation method. The dice similarity coefficient (DSC) parameter was used to evaluate the difference between the actual structures (bladder, rectum and CTV) and the corresponding deformed structures on CT2. The prescription dose was 63.02GyE to CTV, which included 49.32GyE for CTV1 with carbon and boost 13.7Gy for CTV2 with photon. The carbon plan was made first in Syngo TPS (Syngo PT Planning system, version VB10. Siemens, Germany) on CT1 and transferred to Raystation TPS. Selected Isodoses (23.5Gy, 36.8Gy, 39.1Gy, 47.0Gy and 49.3Gy) of carbon plan were converted to contours and then deformed to CT2, which was used as normal tissues for photon plan optimization on CT2. The final plan was the combination of photon plan and the carbon deformation plan on the CT2. The plan from this strategy was compared with direct optimization of the photon plan on CT2 added some clinical endpoints from carbon plan on CT1. Results: The new strategy with deformable registration is tested and combined plans were successfully obtained for the 2 patients. This strategy obtained both integrated DVH and dose distribution information. For patient 1, the rectum V30, V60 and bladder V63 were 45.8, 10.3 and 9.7 for the combined plan with deformation and 48.1, 11.0 and 12.0 for the direct photon plan. Conclusion: The new strategy for combining photon and carbon/proton is feasible. However, the clinical accuracy is still need more evaluation.

  6. Status of ion sources at HIMAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, A.; Fujita, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sakuma, T.; Sasaki, N.; Sasano, T.; Takasugi, W.; Biri, S.; Drentje, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) was designed as a clinical dedicated facility. The carbon ions are utilized for the heavy-ion radiotherapy, so its production is the most important aim for ion sources at HIMAC. However HIMAC has a second essential task to operate as a facility for basic experiments. In that scope it accelerates many ions. In order to serve all HIMAC users at best, three ion sources have been installed. This report summarizes the status of the ion sources to produce carbon ions and to extend the range of ion species. It appears that the improvement of the cooling system gave good stability and reproducibility although the carbon depositions on the surface of all parts is unavoidable. An almost maintenance free ion source for carbon ion radiotherapy has been developed. It also appears that a 2 frequency heating improved the beam intensity under the conditions of enough power and precise frequency tuning for the additional microwave. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (A.C.)

  7. Upcycling of Packing-Peanuts into Carbon Microsheet Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etacheri, Vinodkumar; Hong, Chulgi Nathan; Pol, Vilas G

    2015-09-15

    Porous carbon microsheet anodes with Li-ion storage capacity exceeding the theoretical limit are for the first time derived from waste packing-peanuts. Crystallinity, surface area, and porosity of these 1 μm thick carbon sheets were tuned by varying the processing temperature. Anodes composed of the carbon sheets outperformed the electrochemical properties of commercial graphitic anode in Li-ion batteries. At a current density of 0.1 C, carbon microsheet anodes exhibited a specific capacity of 420 mAh/g, which is slightly higher than the theoretical capacity of graphite (372 mAh/g) in Li-ion half-cell configurations. At a higher rate of 1 C, carbon sheets retained 4-fold higher specific capacity (220 mAh/g) compared to those of commercial graphitic anode. After 100 charge-discharge cycles at current densities of 0.1 and 0.2 C, optimized carbon sheet anodes retained stable specific capacities of 460 and 370 mAh/g, respectively. Spectroscopic and microscopic investigations proved the structural integrity of these high-performance carbon anodes during numerous charge-discharge cycles. Considerably higher electrochemical performance of the porous carbon microsheets are endorsed to their disorderness that facilitate to store more Li-ions than the theoretical limit, and porous 2-D microstructure enabling fast solid-state Li-ion diffusion and superior interfacial kinetics. The work demonstrated here illustrates an inexpensive and environmentally benign method for the upcycling of packaging materials into functional carbon materials for electrochemical energy storage.

  8. Surface modifications of polypropylene by high energy carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, A.; Chakraborty, V.; Dutta, R.K.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    Polypropylene was irradiated with 12 C ions of 3.6 and 5.4 MeV energies using 3 MV tandem accelerator. The surface modification was investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Optical changes were monitored by UV-VIS and FTIR spectroscopy. At the lowest ion fluence, only blister formation of various sizes (1-6 μm) was observed. Polymer when irradiated at a fluence of 1x10 14 ions/cm 2 exhibited a network structure. A comparative study on dose dependence of surface and bulk modification has been described. (author)

  9. An activated microporous carbon prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin for lithium ion battery anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yinhai; Xiang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Enhui; Wu, Yuhu; Xie, Hui; Wu, Zhilian; Tian, Yingying

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Microporous carbon was prepared by chemical activation of phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin. ► Activation leads to high surface area, well-developed micropores. ► Micropores lead to strong intercalation between carbon and lithium ion. ► Large surface area promotes to improve the lithium storage capacity. -- Abstract: Microporous carbon anode materials were prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin by ZnCl 2 and KOH activation. The physicochemical properties of the obtained carbon materials were characterized by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller, and elemental analysis. The electrochemical properties of the microporous carbon as anode materials in lithium ion secondary batteries were evaluated. At a current density of 100 mA g −1 , the carbon without activation shows a first discharge capacity of 515 mAh g −1 . After activation, the capacity improved obviously. The first discharge capacity of the carbon prepared by ZnCl 2 and KOH activation was 1010 and 2085 mAh g −1 , respectively. The reversible capacity of the carbon prepared by KOH activation was still as high as 717 mAh g −1 after 20 cycles, which was much better than that activated by ZnCl 2 . These results demonstrated that it may be a promising candidate as an anode material for lithium ion secondary batteries.

  10. Modified granular activated carbon: A carrier for the recovery of nickel ions from aqueous wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satapathy, D.; Natarajan, G.S.; Sen, R. [Central Fuel Research Inst., Nagpur (India)

    2004-07-01

    Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) is widely used for the removal and recovery of toxic pollutants including metals because of its low cost and high affinity towards the scavenging of metal ions. Activated carbon derived from bituminous coal is preferred for wastewater treatment due to its considerable hardness, a characteristic needed to keep down handling losses during re-activation. Commercial grade bituminous coal based carbon, viz. Filtrasorb (F-400), was used in the present work. The scavenging of precious metals such as nickel onto GAC was studied and a possible attempt made to recover the adsorbed Ni{sup 2+} ions through the use of some suitable leaching processes. As part of the study, the role of complexing agents on the surface of the carbon was also investigated. The use of organic complexing agents such as oxine and 2-methyloxine in the recovery process was found to be promising. In addition, the surface of the carbon was modified with suitable oxidising agents that proved to be more effective than chelating agents. Several attempts were made to optimise the recovery of metal ions by carrying out experiments with oxidising agents in order to obtain maximum recovery from the minimum quantity of carbon. Experiments with nitric acid indicated that not only was the carbon surface modified but such modification also helped in carbon regeneration.

  11. Structural and optical properties of 70-keV carbon ion beam synthesized carbon nanoclusters in thermally grown silicon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poudel, P.R.; Poudel, P.P.; Paramo, J.A.; Strzhemechny, Y.M.; Rout, B.; McDaniel, F.D.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of carbon nanoclusters formed in thermally grown silicon dioxide film via the ion beam synthesis process have been investigated. A low-energy (70 keV) carbon ion beam (C - ) at a fluence of 3 x 10 17 atoms/cm 2 was used for implantation into a thermally grown silicon dioxide layer (500 nm thick) on a Si (100) wafer. Several parts of the implanted samples were subsequently annealed in a gas mixture (4 % H 2 + 96 % Ar) at 900 C for different time periods. The as-implanted and annealed samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The carbon ion implantation depth profile was simulated using a widely used Monte Carlo-based simulation code SRIM-2012. Additionally, the elemental depth profile of the implanted carbon along with host elements of silicon and oxygen were simulated using a dynamic ion-solid interaction code T-DYN, which incorporates the effects of the surface sputtering and gradual change in the elemental composition in the implanted layers due to high-fluence ion implantation. The elemental depth profile obtained from the XPS measurements matches closely to the T-DYN predictions. Raman measurements indicate the formation of graphitic phases in the annealed samples. The graphitic peak (G-peak) was found to be increased with the annealing time duration. In the sample annealed for 10 min, the sizes of the carbon nanoclusters were found to be 1-4 nm in diameter using TEM. The PL measurements at room temperature using a 325-nm laser show broad-band emissions in the ultraviolet to visible range in the as-implanted sample. Intense narrow bands along with the broad bands were observed in the annealed samples. The defects present in the as-grown samples along with carbon ion-induced defect centers in the as-implanted samples are the main contributors to the observed

  12. Structural and optical properties of 70-keV carbon ion beam synthesized carbon nanoclusters in thermally grown silicon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poudel, P.R. [University of North Texas, Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, Denton, TX (United States); Intel Corporation, Rio Rancho, NM (United States); Poudel, P.P. [University of Kentucky, Department of Chemistry, Lexington, KY (United States); Paramo, J.A.; Strzhemechny, Y.M. [Texas Christian University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Fort Worth, TX (United States); Rout, B. [University of North Texas, Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, Denton, TX (United States); University of North Texas, Center for Advanced Research and Technology, Denton, TX (United States); McDaniel, F.D. [University of North Texas, Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, Denton, TX (United States)

    2014-09-18

    The structural and optical properties of carbon nanoclusters formed in thermally grown silicon dioxide film via the ion beam synthesis process have been investigated. A low-energy (70 keV) carbon ion beam (C{sup -}) at a fluence of 3 x 10{sup 17} atoms/cm{sup 2} was used for implantation into a thermally grown silicon dioxide layer (500 nm thick) on a Si (100) wafer. Several parts of the implanted samples were subsequently annealed in a gas mixture (4 % H{sub 2} + 96 % Ar) at 900 C for different time periods. The as-implanted and annealed samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The carbon ion implantation depth profile was simulated using a widely used Monte Carlo-based simulation code SRIM-2012. Additionally, the elemental depth profile of the implanted carbon along with host elements of silicon and oxygen were simulated using a dynamic ion-solid interaction code T-DYN, which incorporates the effects of the surface sputtering and gradual change in the elemental composition in the implanted layers due to high-fluence ion implantation. The elemental depth profile obtained from the XPS measurements matches closely to the T-DYN predictions. Raman measurements indicate the formation of graphitic phases in the annealed samples. The graphitic peak (G-peak) was found to be increased with the annealing time duration. In the sample annealed for 10 min, the sizes of the carbon nanoclusters were found to be 1-4 nm in diameter using TEM. The PL measurements at room temperature using a 325-nm laser show broad-band emissions in the ultraviolet to visible range in the as-implanted sample. Intense narrow bands along with the broad bands were observed in the annealed samples. The defects present in the as-grown samples along with carbon ion-induced defect centers in the as-implanted samples are the main

  13. Advanced carbon materials/olivine LiFePO4 composites cathode for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chunli; Xue, Zhigang; Wen, Sheng; Ye, Yunsheng; Xie, Xiaolin

    2016-06-01

    In the past two decades, LiFePO4 has undoubtly become a competitive candidate for the cathode material of the next-generation LIBs due to its abundant resources, low toxicity and excellent thermal stability, etc. However, the poor electronic conductivity as well as low lithium ion diffusion rate are the two major drawbacks for the commercial applications of LiFePO4 especially in the power energy field. The introduction of highly graphitized advanced carbon materials, which also possess high electronic conductivity, superior specific surface area and excellent structural stability, into LiFePO4 offers a better way to resolve the issue of limited rate performance caused by the two obstacles when compared with traditional carbon materials. In this review, we focus on advanced carbon materials such as one-dimensional (1D) carbon (carbon nanotubes and carbon fibers), two-dimensional (2D) carbon (graphene, graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide) and three-dimensional (3D) carbon (carbon nanotubes array and 3D graphene skeleton), modified LiFePO4 for high power lithium ion batteries. The preparation strategies, structure, and electrochemical performance of advanced carbon/LiFePO4 composite are summarized and discussed in detail. The problems encountered in its application and the future development of this composite are also discussed.

  14. Effects of beer administration in mice on acute toxicities induced by X rays and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monobe, Manami

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the tissue specificity of radioprotection by beer, which was previously found for human lymphocytes. C3H/He female mice, aged 14 weeks, received an oral administration of beer, ethanol or saline at a dose of 1 ml/mouse 30 min before whole-body irradiation with 137 Cs γ rays or 50 keV/μm carbon ions. The dicentrics of chromosome aberrations in spleen cells were significantly (p 0 (slope of a dose-survival curve) for γ rays and carbon ions as well. Beer administration significantly (p 50/30 (radiation dose required to kill 50% of mice within 30 days) for γ rays and carbon ions. Ethanol-administration also significantly (p 50/30 value for γ rays, but not for carbon ions. It is concluded that beer administration reduces the radiation injury caused by photons and carbon ions, depending on the tissue type. Radioprotection by beer administration is not solely due to OH radical-scavenging action by the ethanol contained in beer. (author)

  15. Enhanced Lithium- and Sodium-Ion Storage in an Interconnected Carbon Network Comprising Electronegative Fluorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok-Min; Etacheri, Vinodkumar; Hong, Chulgi Nathan; Choi, Seung Wan; Lee, Ki Bong; Pol, Vilas G

    2017-06-07

    Fluorocarbon (C x F y ) anode materials were developed for lithium- and sodium-ion batteries through a facile one-step carbonization of a single precursor, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). Interconnected carbon network structures were produced with doped fluorine in high-temperature carbonization at 500-800 °C. The fluorocarbon anodes derived from the PVDF precursor showed higher reversible discharge capacities of 735 mAh g -1 and 269 mAh g -1 in lithium- and sodium-ion batteries, respectively, compared to the commercial graphitic carbon. After 100 charge/discharge cycles, the fluorocarbon showed retentions of 91.3% and 97.5% in lithium (at 1C) and sodium (at 200 mA g -1 ) intercalation systems, respectively. The effects of carbonization temperature on the electrochemical properties of alkali metal ion storage were thoroughly investigated and documented. The specific capacities in lithium- and sodium-ion batteries were dependent on the fluorine content, indicating that the highly electronegative fluorine facilitates the insertion/extraction of lithium and sodium ions in rechargeable batteries.

  16. Performance of Novel Randomly Oriented High Graphene Carbon in Lithium Ion Capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul S. Kadam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of carbon material comprising the anode is the key to the performance of a lithium ion capacitor. In addition to determining the capacity, the structure of the carbon material also determines the diffusion rate of the lithium ion into the anode which in turn controls power density which is vital in high rate applications. This paper covers details of systematic investigation of the performance of a structurally novel carbon, called Randomly Oriented High Graphene (ROHG carbon, and graphite in a high rate application device, that is, lithium ion capacitor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows that ROHG is less resistive and has faster lithium ion diffusion rates (393.7 × 10−3 S·s(1/2 compared to graphite (338.1 × 10−3 S·s(1/2. The impedance spectroscopy data is supported by the cell data showing that the ROHG carbon based device has energy density of 22.8 Wh/l with a power density of 4349.3 W/l, whereas baseline graphite based device has energy density of 5 Wh/l and power density of 4243.3 W/l. This data clearly shows advantage of the randomly oriented graphene platelet structure of ROHG in lithium ion capacitor performance.

  17. Mesoporous activated carbon from corn stalk core for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Li, Chun; Qi, Hui; Yu, Kaifeng; Liang, Ce

    2018-04-01

    A novel mesoporous activated carbon (AC) derived from corn stalk core is prepared via a facile and effective method which including the decomposition and carbonization of corn stalk core under an inert gas atmosphere and further activation process with KOH solution. The mesoporous activated carbon (AC) is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements. These biomass waste derived from activated carbon is proved to be promising anode materials for high specific capacity lithium ion batteries. The activated carbon anode possesses excellent reversible capacity of 504 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at 0.2C. Compared with the unactivated carbon (UAC), the electrochemical performance of activated carbon is significantly improved due to its mesoporous structure.

  18. Carbon nanotube: nanodiamond Li-ion battery cathodes with increased thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Ruben; Lee, Eungiee; Shevchenko, Elena V.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-10-01

    Prevention of excess heat accumulation within the Li-ion battery cells is a critical design consideration for electronic and photonic device applications. Many existing approaches for heat removal from batteries increase substantially the complexity and overall weight of the battery. Some of us have previously shown a possibility of effective passive thermal management of Li-ion batteries via improvement of thermal conductivity of cathode and anode material1. In this presentation, we report the results of our investigation of the thermal conductivity of various Li-ion cathodes with incorporated carbon nanotubes and nanodiamonds in different layered structures. The cathodes were synthesized using the filtration method, which can be utilized for synthesis of commercial electrode-active materials. The thermal measurements were conducted with the "laser flash" technique. It has been established that the cathode with the carbon nanotubes-LiCo2 and carbon nanotube layered structure possesses the highest in-plane thermal conductivity of 206 W/mK at room temperature. The cathode containing nanodiamonds on carbon nanotubes structure revealed one of the highest cross-plane thermal conductivity values. The in-plane thermal conductivity is up to two orders-of-magnitude greater than that in conventional cathodes based on amorphous carbon. The obtained results demonstrate a potential of carbon nanotube incorporation in cathode materials for the effective thermal management of Li-ion high-powered density batteries.

  19. Characterization of silicon- and carbon-based composite anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomenko, Volodymyr G.; Barsukov, Viacheslav Z.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years development of active materials for negative electrodes has been of great interest. Special attention has been focused on the active materials possessing higher reversible capacity than that of conventional graphite. In the present work the electrochemical performance of some carbon/silicon-based materials has been analyzed. For this purpose various silicon-based composites were prepared using such carbon materials as graphite, hard carbon and graphitized carbon black. An analysis of charging-discharging processes at electrodes based on different carbon materials has shown that graphite modified with silicon is the most promising anode material. It has also been revealed that the irreversible capacity mainly depends on the content of Si. An optimum content of Si has been determined with taking into account that high irreversible capacity is not suitable for practical application in lithium-ion batteries. This content falls within the range of 8-10 wt%. The reversible capacity of graphite modified with 8 wt% carbon-coated Si was as high as 604 mAh g -1 . The irreversible capacity loss with this material was as low as 8.1%. The small irreversible capacity of the material allowed developing full lithium-ion rechargeable cells in the 2016 coin cell configuration. Lithium-ion batteries based on graphite modified with silicon show gravimetric and volumetric specific energy densities which are higher by approximately 20% than those for a lithium-ion battery based on natural graphite

  20. Effects of ion implantation on the electrochemical characteristics of carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Katsuo; Iwaki, Masaya

    1994-01-01

    Various carbon materials are important electrode materials for electrochemical field. By ion implantation, the surface layer reforming of carbon materials (mainly galssy carbon) was carried out, and the effect that it exerts to their electrode characteristics was investigated. As the results of the ion implantation of Li, N, O, K, Ti, Zn, Cd and others performed so far, it was found that mainly by the change of the surface layer to amorphous state, there were the effects of the lowering of base current and the lowering of electrode reaction rate, and it was known that the surface layers of carbon materials doped with various kinds of ions showed high chemical stability. The use of carbon materials as electrodes in electrochemistry is roughly divided into the electrodes for electrolytic industry and fuel cells for large current and those for the measurement in electrochemical reaction for small current. The structure of carbon materials and electrode characteristics, and the reforming effect by ion implantation are reported. (K.I.)

  1. Molecular carbon nitride ion beams for enhanced corrosion resistance of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwitz, A.; Kennedy, J.

    2017-10-01

    A novel approach is presented for molecular carbon nitride beams to coat stainless surfaces steel using conventional safe feeder gases and electrically conductive sputter targets for surface engineering with ion implantation technology. GNS Science's Penning type ion sources take advantage of the breaking up of ion species in the plasma to assemble novel combinations of ion species. To test this phenomenon for carbon nitride, mixtures of gases and sputter targets were used to probe for CN+ ions for simultaneous implantation into stainless steel. Results from mass analysed ion beams show that CN+ and a variety of other ion species such as CNH+ can be produced successfully. Preliminary measurements show that the corrosion resistance of stainless steel surfaces increased sharply when implanting CN+ at 30 keV compared to reference samples, which is interesting from an application point of view in which improved corrosion resistance, surface engineering and short processing time of stainless steel is required. The results are also interesting for novel research in carbon-based mesoporous materials for energy storage applications and as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors, because of their high surface area, electrical conductivity, chemical stability and low cost.

  2. Influence of surface oxidation on ion dynamics and capacitance in porous and nonporous carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyatkin, Boris [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zhang, Yu [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Mamontov, Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kolesnikov, Alexander I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cheng, Yongqiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Meyer, III, Harry M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cummings, Peter T. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Gogotsi, Yury G. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-04-07

    Here, we investigate the influence of surface chemistry and ion confinement on capacitance and electrosorption dynamics of room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in supercapacitors. Using air oxidation and vacuum annealing, we produced defunctionalized and oxygen-rich surfaces of carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) and graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs). While oxidized surfaces of porous CDCs improve capacitance and rate handling abilities of ions, defunctionalized nonporous GNPs improve charge storage densities on planar electrodes. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) probed the structure, dynamics, and orientation of RTIL ions confined in divergently functionalized pores. Oxidized, ionophilic surfaces draw ions closer to pore surfaces and enhance potential-driven ion transport during electrosorption. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations corroborated experimental data and demonstrated the significance of surface functional groups on ion orientations, accumulation densities, and capacitance.

  3. Chemical modification of polypropylene induced by high energy carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, A.; Chakraborty, V.; Chintalapudi, S.N. E-mail: snc@gamma.iuc.res.in

    2000-06-01

    Polypropylene was irradiated with {sup 12}C{sup +} ions of 3.6 and 5.4 MeV energy using 3 MV Pelletron. The spectral changes owing to ion bombardment were investigated by UV-VIS and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. A gradual increase in absorbance was observed around visible and near visible region with increase in fluence of bombarding ions. The difference absorption spectra show formation of chromophoric groups with wavelength maximum near 380 nm at lower fluence, but at high fluence a shift in peak is observed. The chromophoric groups are likely to be the extended conjugated polyene system and the red shift in peak position at high fluence may be attributed to the greater degree of conjugation. The formation of unsaturated linkage is confirmed by the FTIR spectra with observed stretching band around 1650 cm{sup -1} and its intensity was found to increase with increase in ion fluence studied. The gases (in the range 2-80 amu) which were evolved due to interaction of polypropylene with {sup 12}C{sup +} ions were measured with Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA). A large number of gaseous components were detected. This shows that polymer chains break into some smaller fragments which concomitantly leads to extended conjugation.

  4. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, A. E.; Nikolaev, P.; Amama, P. B.; Zakharov, D.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Stach, E. A.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. With the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  5. Benchmarking nuclear models of FLUKA and GEANT4 for carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bohlen, TT; Quesada, J M; Bohlen, T T; Cerutti, F; Gudowska, I; Ferrari, A; Mairani, A

    2010-01-01

    As carbon ions, at therapeutic energies, penetrate tissue, they undergo inelastic nuclear reactions and give rise to significant yields of secondary fragment fluences. Therefore, an accurate prediction of these fluences resulting from the primary carbon interactions is necessary in the patient's body in order to precisely simulate the spatial dose distribution and the resulting biological effect. In this paper, the performance of nuclear fragmentation models of the Monte Carlo transport codes, FLUKA and GEANT4, in tissue-like media and for an energy regime relevant for therapeutic carbon ions is investigated. The ability of these Monte Carlo codes to reproduce experimental data of charge-changing cross sections and integral and differential yields of secondary charged fragments is evaluated. For the fragment yields, the main focus is on the consideration of experimental approximations and uncertainties such as the energy measurement by time-of-flight. For GEANT4, the hadronic models G4BinaryLightIonReaction a...

  6. Electrochemically Controlled Ion-exchange Property of Carbon Nanotubes/Polypyrrole Nanocomposite in Various Electrolyte Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Daiwon [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Zhu, Chengzhou [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920 United States; Fu, Shaofang [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920 United States; Du, Dan [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920 United States; Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Lin, Yuehe [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920 United States

    2016-09-15

    The electrochemically controlled ion-exchange properties of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT)/electronically conductive polypyrrole (PPy) polymer composite in the various electrolyte solutions have been investigated. The ion-exchange behavior, rate and capacity of the electrochemically deposited polypyrrole with and without carbon nanotube (CNT) were compared and characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It has been found that the presence of carbon nanotube backbone resulted in improvement in ion-exchange rate, stability of polypyrrole, and higher anion loading capacity per PPy due to higher surface area, electronic conductivity, porous structure of thin film, and thinner film thickness providing shorter diffusion path. Chronoamperometric studies show that electrically switched anion exchange could be completed more than 10 times faster than pure PPy thin film. The anion selectivity of CNT/PPy film is demonstrated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  7. Determination of low-energy ion-induced electron yields from thin carbon foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allegrini, Frederic; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Wurz, Peter; Bochsler, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Ion beams crossing thin carbon foils can cause electron emission from the entrance and exit surface. Thin carbon foils are used in various types of time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers to produce start pulses for TOF measurements. The yield of emitted electrons depends, among other parameters, on the energy of the incoming ion and its mass, and it has been experimentally determined for a few projectile elements. The electron emission yield is of great importance for deriving abundance ratios of elements and isotopes in space plasmas using TOF mass spectrometers. We have developed a detector for measuring ion-induced electron yields, and we have extended the electron yield measurements for oxygen to energies relevant for solar wind research. We also present first measurements of the carbon foil electron emission yield for argon and iron in the solar wind energy range

  8. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-15

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  9. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  10. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  11. Carbon dioxide ion implantation in Titanium Nitride (Ti N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torabi, Sh.; Sari, A. H.; Hojabri, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation on titanium samples performed at 3x10 18 , 8x10 17 , 3x10 18 doses. In addition CO 2 ions were also implanted at doses in the range of 1x10 17 ,4 x10 17 ,8x10 17 . Atomic Force Microscopy, used to investigate the topographical changes of implanted samples. The structure of samples and phase composition were characterized using x-ray diffraction. The results show that by increasing of nitrogen ions, the roughness, grain sizes and hardness will increase. But by further increasing of dose, hardness will be decreased. The CO 2 implantation also enhance the roughness, grain size and hardness which could be caused by phase composition.

  12. Investigation of different-ligand complexes of holmium and erbium with NTA and carbonate ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, N.A.; Bel'tyukova, S.V.; Poluehktov, N.S.

    1979-01-01

    Found out have been the optimum conditions for the formation of the lantanides (Ln) multiligand complexes with the nitriletriacetic acid (NTA) and the carbonate-ion. It has been established that the components correlation in complex compounds is equal to 1:1:1. Computed have been the values of the oscillator forces of the absorption bands, that conform to the ''supersensitive'' migration of the multiligand complexes, It is shown that the increment in the oscillator forces, the induced entering of one carbonate-ion into the Ln-NTA complex molecule conforms to about 1/4 of the oscillator forces increment during the migration from the aquo ion to the [Ln(CO 3 ) 4 ] 5- complex carbonaceous ion

  13. Carbonate and Bicarbonate Ion Transport in Alkaline Anion Exchange Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    comparable assumptions, a similar equation can be derived starting with the Nernst -Planck equation . σ = ∑ σi = ∑ F2z2i RT (ε− ε0)q D0i 1 + δi Ci [1] Using Eq...an appropriate ion-membrane diffusion coefficient. Finally, an equation derived from the dusty fluid model can be used to calculate the ionic...Finally, an equation derived from the dusty fluid model can be used to calculate the ionic conductivity of the membrane in different counter ion forms

  14. Manipulating Adsorption-Insertion Mechanisms in Nanostructured Carbon Materials for High-Efficiency Sodium Ion Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Shen [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Hubei Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 China; Xiao, Lifen [College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 China; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Sushko, Maria L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Han, Kee Sung [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Shao, Yuyan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Yan, Mengyu [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 China; Liang, Xinmiao [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Science, Wuhan 430071 China; Mai, Liqiang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 China; Feng, Jiwen [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Science, Wuhan 430071 China; Cao, Yuliang [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Hubei Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 China; Ai, Xinping [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Hubei Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 China; Yang, Hanxi [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Hubei Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 China; Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2017-05-12

    Hard carbon is one of the most promising anode materials for sodium-ion batteries, but the low coulombic efficiency is still a key barrier. In this paper we synthesized a series of nanostructured hard carbon materials with controlled architectures. Using a combination of in-situ XRD mapping, ex-situ NMR, EPR, electrochemical techniques and simulations, an “adsorption-intercalation” (A-I) mechanism is established for Na ion storage. During the initial stages of Na insertion, Na ions adsorb on the defect sites of hard carbon with a wide adsorption energy distribution, producing a sloping voltage profile. In the second stage, Na ions intercalate into graphitic layers with suitable spacing to form NaCx compounds similar to the Li ion intercalation process in graphite, producing a flat low voltage plateau. The cation intercalation with a flat voltage plateau should be enhanced and the sloping region should be avoided. Guided by this knowledge, non-porous hard carbon material has been developed which has achieved high reversible capacity and coulombic efficiency to fulfill practical application.

  15. Comparison of the effects of photon versus carbon ion irradiation when combined with chemotherapy in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaich, Fabian; Brons, Stephan; Haberer, Thomas; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of combination effects of chemotherapy drugs with carbon ions in comparison to photons in vitro. The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line WiDr was tested for combinations with camptothecin, cisplatin, gemcitabine and paclitaxel. In addition three other human tumour cell lines (A549: lung, LN-229: glioblastoma, PANC-1: pancreas) were tested for the combination with camptothecin. Cells were irradiated with photon doses of 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy or carbon ion doses of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 Gy. Cell survival was assessed using the clonogenic growth assay. Treatment dependent changes in cell cycle distribution (up to 12 hours post-treatment) were measured by FACS analysis after propidium-iodide staining. Apoptosis was monitored for up to 36 hours post-treatment by Nicoletti-assay (with qualitative verification using DAPI staining). All cell lines exhibited the well-known increase of killing efficacy per unit dose of carbon ion exposure, with relative biological efficiencies at 10% survival (RBE 10 ) ranging from 2.3 to 3.7 for the different cell lines. In combination with chemotherapy additive toxicity was the prevailing effect. Only in combination with gemcitabine or cisplatin (WiDr) or camptothecin (all cell lines) the photon sensitivity was slightly enhanced, whereas purely independent toxicities were found with the carbon ion irradiation, in all cases. Radiation-induced cell cycle changes displayed the generally observed dose-dependent G2-arrest with little effect on S-phase fraction for all cell lines for photons and for carbon ions. Only paclitaxel showed a significant induction of apoptosis in WiDr cell line but independent of the used radiation quality. Combined effects of different chemotherapeutics with photons or with carbon ions do neither display qualitative nor substantial quantitative differences. Small radiosensitizing effects, when observed with photons are decreased with carbon ions. The data support the idea that a radiochemotherapy with common

  16. Negative ion emission at field electron emission from amorphous (alpha-C:H) carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Bernatskij, D P; Ivanov-Omskij, V I; Pavlov, V G; Zvonareva, T K

    2001-01-01

    The study on the electrons field emission from the plane cathode surface on the basis of the amorphous carbon film (alpha-C:H) is carried out. The methodology, making it possible to accomplish simultaneously the registration of the emission currents and visually observe the distribution of the emission centers on the plane emitter surface is developed. The analysis of the oscillograms indicated that apart from the proper electron constituent the negative ions of hydrogen (H sup - and H sub 2 sup -), carbon (C sup -) and hydrocarbon (CH sub n sup -) are observed. The ions emission is connected with the processes of formation and degradation of the local emission centers

  17. Study of the influence of surface carbon on the tribological properties of ion-treated steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyagoub, Abdenacer; Faussemagne, Arielle

    1999-01-01

    Samples of 100Cr6 steel were treated by different ion beams in order to study the evolution of their tribological properties. A strong correlation was found between the amount of surface carbon, whatever its origin (contamination, direct C implantation or ion-beam mixing of a deposited carbon layer), and the reduction of the friction coefficient as well as the improvement of the wear resistance. These results are discussed in the framework of a recent statistical model founded on the asperity concept and describing the tribological behaviour of bilayer systems

  18. Additional transport channel of carbon ions for biological research at the Nuclotron of JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yudin, I.P.; Panasik, V.A.; Tyutyunnikov, S.I.

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with the construction of the 12 C +6 beam transport line for biomedical research at the Nuclotron accelerator complex, JINR. We have studied the scheme and modes of magneto-optical elements of the channel. The results of calculations of the investigated beam transport of carbon ions are presented. The algorithms to control the carbon ion beam in the transportation system are discussed. The choice of the magneto-optical system is motivated. The graphs of the beam envelopes in the channel are given. The scanning control beam functions are considered

  19. Additional transport channel of carbon ions for biological research at the Nuclotron of JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yudin, I.P.; Panasik, V.A.; Tyutyunnikov, S.I.

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with the construction of the beam 12 C +6 transport line for biomedical research at the Nuclotron accelerator complex, JINR. We have studied the scheme and modes of magneto-optical elements of the channel. The results of calculations of the investigated beam transport of carbon ions are presented. The algorithms to control the carbon ion beam in the transportation system are discussed. The choice of the magneto-optical system is motivated. The graphs of the beam envelopes in the channel are given. The scanning control beam functions are considered

  20. MnO-carbon hybrid nanofiber composites as superior anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jian-Gan; Yang, Ying; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Kang, Feiyu

    2015-01-01

    MnO-carbon hybrid nanofiber composites are fabricated by electrospinning polyimide/manganese acetylacetonate precursor and a subsequent carbonization process. The composition, phase structure and morphology of the composites are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The results indicate that the composites exhibit good nanofibrous morphology with MnO nanoparticles uniformly encapsulated by carbon nanofibers. The hybrid nanofiber composites are used directly as freestanding anodes for lithium-ion batteries to evaluate their electrochemical properties. It is found that the optimized MnO-carbon nanofiber composite can deliver a high reversible capacity of 663 mAh g −1 , along with excellent cycling stability and good rate capability. The superior performance enables the composites to be promising candidates as an anode alternative for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

  1. Rubber-based carbon electrode materials derived from dumped tires for efficient sodium-ion storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-Yue; Ma, Chao; Bai, Yu-Lin; Liu, Yu-Si; Wang, Shi-Feng; Wei, Xiao; Wang, Kai-Xue; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2018-04-03

    The development of sustainable and low cost electrode materials for sodium-ion batteries has attracted considerable attention. In this work, a carbon composite material decorated with in situ generated ZnS nanoparticles has been prepared via a simple pyrolysis of the rubber powder from dumped tires. Upon being used as an anode material for sodium-ion batteries, the carbon composite shows a high reversible capacity and rate capability. A capacity as high as 267 mA h g-1 is still retained after 100 cycles at a current density of 50 mA g-1. The well dispersed ZnS nanoparticles in carbon significantly enhance the electrochemical performance. The carbon composites derived from the rubber powder are proposed as promising electrode materials for low-cost, large-scale energy storage devices. This work provides a new and effective method for the reuse of dumped tires, contributing to the recycling of valuable waste resources.

  2. Ion from Aqueous Solution using Magnetite, Activated Carbon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Thermodynamic studies on Adsorption of lead (II) Ion from Aqueous Solution using. Magnetite ... process industries and agricultural activities, which tends to ... osmosis. These processes are however, not economically feasible for small scale industries .... Freundlich coefficient. ..... from binary component system, Beni-suef.

  3. Lead ions removal from aqueous solution using modified carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-02

    Feb 2, 2018 ... Recently, in Vietnam and many other countries, the pollution of water by ... ions in water, including copper (Cu2+), lead (Pb2+), cadmium. (Cd2+), zinc (Zn2+) and chromium (Cr3+), may be a potential hazard to human health ...

  4. Role of carbon impurities on the surface morphology evolution of tungsten under high dose helium ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of carbon impurities on the surface evolution (e.g., fuzz formation) of tungsten (W) surface during 300 eV He ions irradiation was studied. Several tungsten samples were irradiated by He ion beam with a various carbon ions percentage. The presence of minute carbon contamination within the He ion beam was found to be effective in preventing the fuzz formation. At higher carbon concentration, the W surface was found to be fully covered with a thick graphitic layer on the top of tungsten carbide (WC) layer that cover the sample surface. Lowering the ion beam carbon percentage was effective in a significant reduction in the thickness of the surface graphite layer. Under these conditions the W surface was also found to be immune for the fuzz formation. The effect of W fuzz prevention by the WC formation on the sample surface was more noticeable when the He ion beam had much lower carbon (C) ions content (0.01% C). In this case, the fuzz formation was prevented on the vast majority of the W sample surface, while W fuzz was found in limited and isolated areas. The W surface also shows good resistance to morphology evolution when bombarded by high flux of pure H ions at 900 °C. - Highlights: • Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low energy He ion beam irradiation. • The effect of adding various percentage of carbon impurity to the He ion beam on the trend of W fuzz formation was studied. • Mitigation of W fuzz formation due to addition of small percentage of carbon to the He ion beam is reported. • The formation of long W nanowires due to He ion beam irradiation mixed with 0.01% carbon ions is reported.

  5. Oxidation processes on conducting carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    La Mantia, Fabio

    2012-11-21

    The oxidation processes at the interface between different types of typical carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries and carbonates electrolyte above 5 V versus Li/Li+ were investigated. Depending on the nature and surface area of the carbon additive, the irreversible capacity during galvanostatic cycling between 2.75 and 5.25 V versus Li/Li+ could be as high as 700 mAh g-1 (of carbon). In the potential region below 5 V versus Li/Li+, high surface carbon additives also showed irreversible plateaus at about 4.1-4.2 and 4.6 V versus Li/Li+. These plateaus disappeared after thermal treatments at or above 150 °C in inert gas. The influence of the irreversible capacity of carbon additives on the overall performances of positive electrodes was discussed. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  6. Radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Innovative techniques and current controversies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geinitz, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Examines in detail the role of innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer, including IMRT, IGRT, BART, and modern brachytherapy. Explores a range of current controversies in patient treatment. Intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists. Radiation treatment is rapidly evolving owing to the coordinated research of physicists, engineers, computer and imaging specialists, and physicians. Today, the arsenal of ''high-precision'' or ''targeted'' radiotherapy includes multimodal imaging, in vivo dosimetry, Monte Carlo techniques for dose planning, patient immobilization techniques, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), biologically adapted radiotherapy (BART), quality assurance methods, novel methods of brachytherapy, and, at the far end of the scale, particle beam radiotherapy using protons and carbon ions. These approaches are like pieces of a puzzle that need to be put together to provide the prostate cancer patient with high-level optimized radiation treatment. This book examines in detail the role of the above-mentioned innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer. In addition, a variety of current controversies regarding treatment are carefully explored, including whether prophylactic treatment of the pelvic lymphatics is essential, the magnitude of the effect of dose escalation, whether a benefit accrues from hypofractionation, and what evidence exists for the superiority of protons or heavy ions. Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer: Innovative Techniques and Current Controversies is intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists with an interest in the up-to-date capabilities of modern radiation oncology for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  7. Stability and kinetics of uranyl ion complexation by macrocycles in propylene carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fux, P.

    1984-06-01

    A thermodynamic study of uranyl ion complexes formation with different macrocyclic ligands was realized in propylene carbonate as solvent using spectrophotometric and potentiometric techniques. Formation kinetics of two UO 2 complexes: a crown ether (18C6) and a coronand (22) was studied by spectrophotometry in propylene carbonate with addition of tetraethylammonium chlorate 0.1M at 25 0 C. Possible structures of complexes in solution are discussed [fr

  8. Ion beam trajectory simulation of carbon isotopes in cyclotron DECY-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pramudita Anggraita

    2014-01-01

    A simulation on the ion beam trajectories of various carbon isotopes "1"2C, "1"3C, and "1"4C in DECY-13 cyclotron has been carried out using Scilab 5.4.1 software. Calculations in the simulation were carried out in 3 dimensions. The simulation shows trajectory separations, which provide possibility for "1"4C measurement such as in carbon dating at accelerating voltage frequency of about 72 MHz. (author)

  9. SU-F-T-144: Analytical Closed Form Approximation for Carbon Ion Bragg Curves in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomanen, S; Moskvin, V; Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Semi-empirical modeling is a powerful computational method in radiation dosimetry. A set of approximations exist for proton ion depth dose distribution (DDD) in water. However, the modeling is more complicated for carbon ions due to fragmentation. This study addresses this by providing and evaluating a new methodology for DDD modeling of carbon ions in water. Methods: The FLUKA, Monte Carlo (MC) general-purpose transport code was used for simulation of carbon DDDs for energies of 100–400 MeV in water as reference data model benchmarking. Based on Thomas Bortfeld’s closed form equation approximating proton Bragg Curves as a basis, we derived the critical constants for a beam of Carbon ions by applying models of radiation transport by Lee et. al. and Geiger to our simulated Carbon curves. We hypothesized that including a new exponential (κ) residual distance parameter to Bortfeld’s fluence reduction relation would improve DDD modeling for carbon ions. We are introducing an additional term to be added to Bortfeld’s equation to describe fragmentation tail. This term accounts for the pre-peak dose from nuclear fragments (NF). In the post peak region, the NF transport will be treated as new beams utilizing the Glauber model for interaction cross sections and the Abrasion- Ablation fragmentation model. Results: The carbon beam specific constants in the developed model were determined to be : p= 1.75, β=0.008 cm-1, γ=0.6, α=0.0007 cm MeV, σmono=0.08, and the new exponential parameter κ=0.55. This produced a close match for the plateau part of the curve (max deviation 6.37%). Conclusion: The derived semi-empirical model provides an accurate approximation of the MC simulated clinical carbon DDDs. This is the first direct semi-empirical simulation for the dosimetry of therapeutic carbon ions. The accurate modeling of the NF tail in the carbon DDD will provide key insight into distal edge dose deposition formation.

  10. Computational Evaluation of Amorphous Carbon Coating for Durable Silicon Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jeongwoon; Ihm, Jisoon; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Kim, Seungchul

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of graphite-like amorphous carbon coating on bulky silicon to examine whether it can improve the durability of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries using molecular dynamics simulations and ab-initio electronic structure calculations. Structural models of carbon coating are constructed using molecular dynamics simulations of atomic carbon deposition with low incident energies (1–16 eV). As the incident energy decreases, the ratio of sp2 carbons increases, that of sp3 decreases, and the carbon films become more porous. The films prepared with very low incident energy contain lithium-ion conducting channels. Also, those films are electrically conductive to supplement the poor conductivity of silicon and can restore their structure after large deformation to accommodate the volume change during the operations. As a result of this study, we suggest that graphite-like porous carbon coating on silicon will extend the lifetime of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries. PMID:28347087

  11. Computational Evaluation of Amorphous Carbon Coating for Durable Silicon Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwoon Hwang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of graphite-like amorphous carbon coating on bulky silicon to examine whether it can improve the durability of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries using molecular dynamics simulations and ab-initio electronic structure calculations. Structural models of carbon coating are constructed using molecular dynamics simulations of atomic carbon deposition with low incident energies (1–16 eV. As the incident energy decreases, the ratio of sp2 carbons increases, that of sp3 decreases, and the carbon films become more porous. The films prepared with very low incident energy contain lithium-ion conducting channels. Also, those films are electrically conductive to supplement the poor conductivity of silicon and can restore their structure after large deformation to accommodate the volume change during the operations. As a result of this study, we suggest that graphite-like porous carbon coating on silicon will extend the lifetime of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries.

  12. Low-cost carbon-silicon nanocomposite anodes for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badi, Nacer; Erra, Abhinay Reddy; Hernandez, Francisco C Robles; Okonkwo, Anderson O; Hobosyan, Mkhitar; Martirosyan, Karen S

    2014-01-01

    The specific energy of the existing lithium ion battery cells is limited because intercalation electrodes made of activated carbon (AC) materials have limited lithium ion storage capacities. Carbon nanotubes, graphene, and carbon nanofibers are the most sought alternatives to replace AC materials but their synthesis cost makes them highly prohibitive. Silicon has recently emerged as a strong candidate to replace existing graphite anodes due to its inherently large specific capacity and low working potential. However, pure silicon electrodes have shown poor mechanical integrity due to the dramatic expansion of the material during battery operation. This results in high irreversible capacity and short cycle life. We report on the synthesis and use of carbon and hybrid carbon-silicon nanostructures made by a simplified thermo-mechanical milling process to produce low-cost high-energy lithium ion battery anodes. Our work is based on an abundant, cost-effective, and easy-to-launch source of carbon soot having amorphous nature in combination with scrap silicon with crystalline nature. The carbon soot is transformed in situ into graphene and graphitic carbon during mechanical milling leading to superior elastic properties. Micro-Raman mapping shows a well-dispersed microstructure for both carbon and silicon. The fabricated composites are used for battery anodes, and the results are compared with commercial anodes from MTI Corporation. The anodes are integrated in batteries and tested; the results are compared to those seen in commercial batteries. For quick laboratory assessment, all electrochemical cells were fabricated under available environment conditions and they were tested at room temperature. Initial electrochemical analysis results on specific capacity, efficiency, and cyclability in comparison to currently available AC counterpart are promising to advance cost-effective commercial lithium ion battery technology. The electrochemical performance observed for

  13. Ion dynamics in porous carbon electrodes in supercapacitors using in situ infrared spectroelectrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Francis W; Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Yury; Elabd, Yossef A

    2013-08-28

    Electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs), or supercapacitors, rely on electrosorption of ions by porous carbon electrodes and offer a higher power and a longer cyclic lifetime compared to batteries. Ionic liquid (IL) electrolytes can broaden the operating voltage window and increase the energy density of EDLCs. Herein, we present direct measurements of the ion dynamics of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)imide in an operating EDLC with electrodes composed of porous nanosized carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) and nonporous onion-like carbons (OLCs) with the use of in situ infrared spectroelectrochemistry. For CDC electrodes, IL ions (both cations and anions) were directly observed entering and exiting CDC nanopores during charging and discharging of the EDLC. Conversely, for OLC electrodes, IL ions were observed in close proximity to the OLC surface without any change in the bulk electrolyte concentration during charging and discharging of the EDLC. This provides experimental evidence that charge is stored on the surface of OLCs in OLC EDLCs without long-range ion transport through the bulk electrode. In addition, for CDC EDLCs with mixed electrolytes of IL and propylene carbonate (PC), the IL ions were observed entering and exiting CDC nanopores, while PC entrance into the nanopores was IL concentration dependent. This work provides direct experimental confirmation of EDLC charging mechanisms that previously were restricted to computational simulations and theories. The experimental measurements presented here also provide deep insights into the molecular level transport of IL ions in EDLC electrodes that will impact the design of the electrode materials' structure for electrical energy storage.

  14. Investigations on carbon cluster formation in heavy ion irradiated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathy, S.P.; Mishra, R.; Mawar, A.K.; Dwivedi, K.K.; Khathing, D.T.; Srivastava, A.; Avasthi, D.K.; Ghosh, S.; Fink, D.

    2000-01-01

    In polymers, the carbonaceous clusters are supposed to be responsible for the electrical conductivity. So, the irradiation of organic polymers namely polypropylene (8μ) and polyimide (50μ) by energetic heavy ions 28 Si and 58 Ni produce significant changes in the size of these clusters leading to the corresponding change in the band gap and other electrical properties as revealed by the UV-VIS spectroscopic examinations. (author)

  15. The influence of fractionation on cell survival and premature differentiation after carbon ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jufang; Li Renming; Guo Chuanling; Fournier, C.; K-Weyrather, W.

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the influence of fractionation on cell survival and radiation induced premature differentiation as markers for early and late effects after X-rays and carbon irradiation. Normal human fibroblasts NHDF, AG1522B and WI-38 were irradiated with 250 kV X-rays, or 266 MeV/u, 195 MeV/u and 11 MeV/u carbon ions. Cytotoxicity was measured by a clonogenic survival assay or by determination of the differentiation pattern. Experiments with high-energy carbon ions show that fractionation induced repair effects are similar to photon irradiation. The relative biological effective (RBE) 10 values for clonogenic survival are 1.3 and 1.6 for irradiation in one or two fractions for NHDF cells and around 1.2 for AG1522B cells regardless of the fractionation scheme. The RBE for a doubling of post mitotic fibroblasts (PMF) in the population is 1 for both single and two fractionated irradiation of NHDF cells. Using 11 MeV/u carbon ions, no repair effect can be seen in WI-38 cells. The RBE 10 for clonogenic survival is 3.2 for single irradiation and 4.9 for two fractionated irradiations. The RBE for a doubling of PMF is 3.1 and 5.0 for single and two fractionated irradiations, respectively. For both cell lines the effects of high-energy carbon ions representing the irradiation of the skin and the normal tissue in the entrance channel are similar to the effects of X-rays. The fractionation effects are maintained. For the lower energy, which is representative for the irradiation of the tumor region, RBE is enhanced for clonogenic survival as well as for premature terminal differentiation. Fractionation effects are not detectable. Consequently, the therapeutic ratio is significantly enhanced by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions. (author)

  16. Technical Note: Experimental carbon ion range verification in inhomogeneous phantoms using prompt gammas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Dedes, G.; Krimmer, J.; Ray, C.; Testa, E., E-mail: e.testa@ipnl.in2p3.fr; Testa, M. [IPNL, Université de Lyon, Lyon F-69003 |(France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); De Rydt, M. [IPNL, Université de Lyon, Lyon F-69003 (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Leuven B-3001 (Belgium); Freud, N.; Létang, J. M. [CREATIS, Université de Lyon, Lyon F-69003 (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, INSA-Lyon, Centre Léon Bérard, 69008 Lyon (France)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to experimentally assess the possibility to monitor carbon ion range variations—due to tumor shift and/or elongation or shrinking—using prompt-gamma (PG) emission with inhomogeneous phantoms. Such a study is related to the development of PG monitoring techniques to be used in a carbon ion therapy context. Methods: A 95 MeV/u carbon ion beam was used to irradiate phantoms with a variable density along the ion path to mimic the presence of bone and lung in homogeneous humanlike tissue. PG profiles were obtained after a longitudinal scan of the phantoms. A setup comprising a narrow single-slit collimator and two detectors placed at 90° with respect to the beam axis was used. The time of flight technique was applied to allow the selection between PG and background events. Results: Using the positions at 50% entrance and 50% falloff of the PG profiles, a quantity called prompt-gamma profile length (PGPL) is defined. It is possible to observe shifts in the PGPL when there are absolute ion range shifts as small as 1–2 mm. Quantitatively, for an ion range shift of −1.33 ± 0.46 mm (insertion of a Teflon slab), a PGPL difference of −1.93 ± 0.58 mm and −1.84 ± 1.27 mm is obtained using a BaF{sub 2} and a NaI(Tl) detector, respectively. In turn, when an ion range shift of 4.59 ± 0.42 mm (insertion of a lung-equivalent material slab) is considered, the difference is of 4.10 ± 0.54 and 4.39 ± 0.80 mm for the same detectors. Conclusions: Herein, experimental evidence of the usefulness of employing PG to monitor carbon ion range using inhomogeneous phantoms is presented. Considering the homogeneous phantom as reference, the results show that the information provided by the PG emission allows for detecting ion range shifts as small as 1–2 mm. When considering the expected PG emission from an energy slice in a carbon ion therapy scenario, the experimental setup would allow to retrieve the same PGPL as the high statistics of

  17. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide enhances the antitumor effect of radiotherapy on oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Eiji; Hasegawa, Takumi; Ueha, Takeshi; Takeda, Daisuke; Saito, Izumi; Kawamoto, Teruya; Akisue, Toshihiro; Sakai, Yoshitada; Sasaki, Ryohei; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Komori, Takahide

    2018-05-16

    Radiotherapy (RT) is one of the main treatment modalities for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), however, radioresistance is a major impediment to its clinical success and poses as a concern that needs to be addressed. Tumor hypoxia is known to be significantly associated with radioresistance in various malignancies, hence, resolving the hypoxic state of a tumor may improve the antitumor effect of RT on OSCC. We have previously revealed that transcutaneous CO2 induced mitochondrial apoptosis and suppressed tumor growth in OSCC by resolving hypoxia. Considering the previous study, we hypothesized that transcutaneous CO2 may enhance the antitumor effect of RT on OSCC by improving intratumoral hypoxia, thereby overcoming radioresistance. In the present study, the combination of transcutaneous CO2 and RT significantly inhibited tumor growth compared with other treatments. This combination therapy also led to decreased expression of HIF-1α in parallel with increased expression of the cleaved forms of caspase-3-8-9 and PARP, which play essential roles in mitochondrial apoptosis. Additionally, the combination therapy increased the expression of ROS modulator 1 and subsequent mitochondrial ROS production, compared to RT alone. These results indicated that transcutaneous CO2 could potentially improve the antitumor effect of RT by decreasing the intratumoral hypoxia and increasing the mitochondrial apoptosis. Our findings indicated that CO2 therapy may be a novel adjuvant therapy in combination with RT for OSCC.

  18. Carbonation of wollastonite(001) competing hydration: microscopic insights from ion spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Roberto C; Cho, Kyeongjae; Brüner, Philipp; Welle, Alexander; Gerdes, Andreas; Thissen, Peter

    2015-03-04

    In this paper, we report about the influence of the chemical potential of water on the carbonation reaction of wollastonite (CaSiO3) as a model surface of cement and concrete. Total energy calculations based on density functional theory combined with kinetic barrier predictions based on nudge elastic band method show that the exposure of the water-free wollastonite surface to CO2 results in a barrier-less carbonation. CO2 reacts with the surface oxygen and forms carbonate (CO3(2-)) complexes together with a major reconstruction of the surface. The reaction comes to a standstill after one carbonate monolayer has been formed. In case one water monolayer is covering the wollastonite surface, the carbonation is no more barrier-less, yet ending in a localized monolayer. Covered with multilayers of water, the thermodynamic ground state of the wollastonite completely changes due to a metal-proton exchange reaction (also called early stage hydration) and Ca(2+) ions are partially removed from solid phase into the H2O/wollastonite interface. Mobile Ca(2+) reacts again with CO2 and forms carbonate complexes, ending in a delocalized layer. By means of high-resolution time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry images, we confirm that hydration can lead to a partially delocalization of Ca(2+) ions on wollastonite surfaces. Finally, we evaluate the impact of our model surface results by the meaning of low-energy ion-scattering spectroscopy combined with careful discussion about the competing reactions of carbonation vs hydration.

  19. Does carbonate ion control planktonic foraminifera shell calcification in upwelling regions?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Godad, S.P.; Naidu, P.D.

    are still debated and to utilize shell weights of a particular species as a surface water carbonate ion proxy, it is important to understand whether [CO = 3 ] controls shell calcification in that species over a period of time. We therefore utilize...

  20. Radioprotective effects of melatonin on carbon-ion and X ray irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masayoshi; Kawata, Tetsuya; Liu, C.; Sakurai, Akiko; Ito, Hisao; Ando, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    The radioprotective ability of melatonin was investigated in C3H mice irradiated to a whole-body X-ray (150 Kv, 20 mA) and carbon-ion (290 MeV/u). Mice exposed to X-ray, 13 KeV/μm and 50 KeV/μm carbon-ion dose of 7.0-7.5 Gy, 6.5-7.25 Gy and 6.0-6.5 Gy, respectively. One hour before the irradiation, mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of 0.2 ml of either solvent (soybean oil) or melatonin (250 mg/kg, uniform suspension in soybean oil). Mice were observed for mortality over a period of 30 days following irradiation. Results obtained the first year are as follows. The toxicity of melatonin (at a dose 250 mg/kg) intraperitoneal administered to mice could not be observed. A pretreatment of melatonin is effective in protecting mice from lethal damage of low-linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation (X-ray and 13 KeV/μm carbon-ion). In the high-LET irradiated mice with 50 KeV/μm carbon-ion, melatonin exhibited a slight increase in their survival. (author)

  1. Pyrolytic Carbon Nanosheets for Ultrafast and Ultrastable Sodium-Ion Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Se Youn; Kang, Minjee; Choi, Jaewon; Lee, Min Eui; Yoon, Hyeon Ji; Kim, Hae Jin; Leal, Cecilia; Lee, Sungho; Jin, Hyoung-Joon; Yun, Young Soo

    2018-04-01

    Na-ion cointercalation in the graphite host structure in a glyme-based electrolyte represents a new possibility for using carbon-based materials (CMs) as anodes for Na-ion storage. However, local microstructures and nanoscale morphological features in CMs affect their electrochemical performances; they require intensive studies to achieve high levels of Na-ion storage performances. Here, pyrolytic carbon nanosheets (PCNs) composed of multitudinous graphitic nanocrystals are prepared from renewable bioresources by heating. In particular, PCN-2800 prepared by heating at 2800 °C has a distinctive sp 2 carbon bonding nature, crystalline domain size of ≈44.2 Å, and high electrical conductivity of ≈320 S cm -1 , presenting significantly high rate capability at 600 C (60 A g -1 ) and stable cycling behaviors over 40 000 cycles as an anode for Na-ion storage. The results of this study show the unusual graphitization behaviors of a char-type carbon precursor and exceptionally high rate and cycling performances of the resulting graphitic material, PCN-2800, even surpassing those of supercapacitors. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiwon Kang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructural materials have gained the spotlight as promising anode materials for energy storage; they exhibit unique physico-chemical properties such as large surface area, short Li+ ion diffusion length, and high electrical conductivity, in addition to their long-term stability. However, carbon-nanostructured materials have issues with low areal and volumetric densities for the practical applications in electric vehicles, portable electronics, and power grid systems, which demand higher energy and power densities. One approach to overcoming these issues is to design and apply a three-dimensional (3D electrode accommodating a larger loading amount of active anode materials while facilitating Li+ ion diffusion. Furthermore, 3D nanocarbon frameworks can impart a conducting pathway and structural buffer to high-capacity non-carbon nanomaterials, which results in enhanced Li+ ion storage capacity. In this paper, we review our recent progress on the design and fabrication of 3D carbon nanostructures, their performance in Li-ion batteries (LIBs, and their implementation into large-scale, lightweight, and flexible LIBs.

  3. Enhanced wear resistance of production tools and steel samples by implantation of nitrogen and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, N.J.; Straede, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years ion implantation has become a feasible technique for obtaining improved wear resistance of production tools. However, basic knowledge of how and in which cases ion implantation is working at its best is still needed. The present paper discusses structural and tribological investigations of carbon and nitrogen implanted steels. The nitrogen data were obtained mainly from field tests and the investigation of carbon implantations took place mainly in the laboratory. A study was made of how the tribological behaviour of implanted steels changes with different implantation parameters. The tribological laboratory investigations were carried out using pin-on-disc equipment under controlled test conditions, and deal with high dose carbon implantation (approximately (1-2)x10 18 ions cm -2 ). The wear resistance of steels was enhanced dramatically, by up to several orders of magnitude. The field test results cover a broad range of ion implanted production tools, which showed a marked improvement in wear resistance. Nitrogen implanted tools are also compared with carbon and titanium implanted tools. (orig.)

  4. Rigid versus Flexible Ligands on Carbon Nanotubes for the Enhanced Sensitivity of Cobalt Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Pingping; Kraut, Nadine D.; Feigel, Ian Matthew; Star, Alexander

    2013-02-26

    Carbon nanotubes have shown great promise in the fabrication of ultra-compact and highly sensitive chemical and biological sensors. Additional chemical functionalization schemes can controllably improve selectivity of the carbon nanotube-based sensors; however the exact transduction mechanism is still under debate. In this article we detail the synthesis and selective response of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with polyazomethine (PAM) polymer towards the application of a specific trace metal ion detector. The response of the polymer system was compared to shape persistent macrocycle (MAC) comprised of identical ion coordination ligands. While ion detection with rigid MAC/SWNT chemiresistor was comparable to bare SWNT, flexible PAM offers significant SWNT signal amplification, allowing for picomolar detection of Co{sup 2+} ions with both selectivity and a fast response. We hypothesized that rearrangement of the flexible PAM on the SWNT network is a sensing mechanism which allows for ultrasensitive detection of metal ions. The electron transfer and polymer rearrangement on the SWNT was studied by a combination of optical spectroscopy and electrical measurements - ultimately allowing for a better understanding of fundamental mechanisms that prompt device response.

  5. Removal of heavy metal ions from wastewaters using dendrimer-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannazzo, Daniela; Pistone, Alessandro; Ziccarelli, Ida; Espro, Claudia; Galvagno, Signorino; Giofré, Salvatore V; Romeo, Roberto; Cicero, Nicola; Bua, Giuseppe D; Lanza, Giuseppe; Legnani, Laura; Chiacchio, Maria A

    2017-06-01

    Dendrimer-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for heavy metal ion removal from wastewaters were developed. Triazole dendrimers (TD) were built directly onto the carbon nanotube surface by successive click chemistry reactions affording the zero- and first-generation dendrimer-functionalized MWCNT (MWCNT-TD1 and MWCNT-TD2). The Moedritzer-Irani reaction carried out on the amino groups present on the MWCNT-TD2 sample gave the corresponding α-aminophosphonate nanosystem MWCNT-TD2P. Both MWCNT-TD2 and MWCNT-TD2P nanosystems have been characterized by physical, chemical, and morphological analyses. Their chelating abilities towards the toxic metal ions Pb 2+ , Hg 2+ , and Ni 2+ and the harmless Ca 2+ ion have been experimentally evaluated in the two different sets of experiments and at the salt concentrations of 1 mg/mL or 1 μg/mL by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results of these studies pointed out the interesting chelating behavior for the phosphonated nanosystem towards the Hg 2+ ion. The complexation mode of the best chelating system MWCNT-TD2P with mercury was investigated through density functional theory (DFT) calculations, suggesting a chelation mechanism involving the two oxygen atoms of the phosphate group. The synthesized dendrimers, supported on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes, have shown the potential to be used for the selective toxic metal ion removal and recovery.

  6. Effects of main traits of sweet sorghum irradiated by carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjian; He Jingyu; Liu Qingfang; Yu Lixia; Dong Xicun

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the influence of carbon ion irradiation on important agronomic characters of sweet sorghum, dry seeds of Sweet Sorghum BJ0601 and BJ0602 were irradiated by 100 MeV/u 12 C +6 ion beam to different doses at Heavy Ion Accelerator National Laboratory in Lanzhou (HIANLL). When matured, the main traits of sweet sorghum were measured. The correlation coefficient of five main agronomic characters, i.e. number of node, plant height, stalk diameter, sugar content and stem weight per plant, were analyzed using the SPSS 13.0 software. The results indicated that the obvious influence of sweet sorghum irradiated by carbon ion beam was observed. In addition, the correlation of main traits was studied. This study may provide rudimental data to select novel variety of sweet sorghum suited for fuel ethanol production. In addition, the average of sugar content of early mutant BJ0601-1 is higher than BJ0601 in M2, and the sugar content of sweet sorghum may be improved by carbon ion beam irradiation. (authors)

  7. Alternate dipping preparation of biomimetic apatite layers in the presence of carbonate ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelain, Grégory; Bourgeois, Damien; Meyer, Daniel; Ravaux, Johann; Averseng, Olivier; Vidaud, Claude

    2014-01-01

    The classical simulated body fluids method cannot be employed to prepare biomimetic apatites encompassing metallic ions that lead to very stable phosphates. This is the case for heavy metals such as uranium, whose presence in bone mineral after contamination deserves toxicological study. We have demonstrated that existing methods, based on alternate dipping into calcium and phosphate ions solutions, can be adapted to achieve this aim. We have also especially studied the impact of the presence of carbonate ions in the medium as these are necessary to avoid hydrolysis of the contaminating metallic cations. Both the apatite–collagen complex method and a standard chemical (STD) method employing only mineral solutions lead to biomimetic apatites when calcium and carbonate ions are introduced simultaneously. The obtained materials were fully characterized and we established that the STD method tolerates the presence of carbonate ions much better, and this leads to homogeneous samples. Emphasis was set on the repeatability of the method to ensure the relevancy of further work performed on series of samples. Finally, osteoblasts cultured on these samples also proved a similar yield and standard-deviation in their adenosine triphosphate content when compared to commercially available substrates designed to study of such cell cultures. (paper)

  8. Systematic investigations on acyclic organic carbonate solvents for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, J.; Peter, S.; Novak, P.

    2003-03-01

    Electrochemical cycling tests on cells with graphite electrodes and several alkyl methyl carbonates were performed. Experiments with mixed binary solvent electrolytes with ethylene carbonate (EC) showed that the alkyl methyl carbonates H{sub 3}CO(CO)O(CH{sub 2}){sub n}H (n = 3-5) are suitable as co-solvents in lithium-ion batteries. Ternary mixtures of EC, BMC, and propylene carbonate (PC) showed better overall performances than EC/PC electrolytes. The branched isobutyl methyl carbonate (i-BMC) outperforms its linear isomer (BMC) in terms of electrochemical performance. LiPF{sub 6} is superior to LiClO{sub 4} as conducting salt in both EC/BMC and EC/i-BMC mixtures in terms of electrolyte conductivity, rate capability, and cycling stability. (author)

  9. Calibration of BAS-TR image plate response to high energy (3-300 MeV) carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, D.; Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Fernandez, J.; Cerchez, M.; Gray, R. J.; Hanton, F.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Neely, D.; Romagnani, L.; Ruiz, J. A.; Sarri, G.; Scullion, C.; Streeter, M.; Swantusch, M.; Willi, O.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the calibration of Fuji BAS-TR image plate (IP) response to high energy carbon ions of different charge states by employing an intense laser-driven ion source, which allowed access to carbon energies up to 270 MeV. The calibration method consists of employing a Thomson parabola spectrometer to separate and spectrally resolve different ion species, and a slotted CR-39 solid state detector overlayed onto an image plate for an absolute calibration of the IP signal. An empirical response function was obtained which can be reasonably extrapolated to higher ion energies. The experimental data also show that the IP response is independent of ion charge states.

  10. Adsorption of manganese(II) ions by EDTA-treated activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, A.Y.; Mazyck, D.W. [Jones Edmunds & Associates, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The adsorption of manganese(II) ions from aqueous solution onto three different granular activated carbons treated with ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and its sodium salt was investigated. Characterization of the chelate-treated carbons showed that EDTA altered the physical and chemical properties of the sorbents relative to their untreated counterparts. Furthermore, the modified sorbents exhibited a heightened capacity towards the adsorption of Mn(II) ions from aqueous media. Manganese(II) ion removal increased from 0 to 6.5 mg/g for the lignite coal-based sorbent, from 3.5 to 14.7 mg/g for the wood-based sorbent and from 1.3 to 7.9 mg/g for the bituminous coal-based sorbent. The increased removal is attributed, in part, to the creation of Lewis base sites that participate in covalent interactions and hydrolysis reactions.

  11. Efficient adsorption of Hg (II) ions in water by activated carbon modified with melamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hangdao; Meng, Jingling; Chen, Jing

    2018-04-01

    Removal of Hg (II) ions from industrial wastewater is important for the water treatment, and adsorption is an efficient treatment process. Activated carbon (AC) was modified with melamine, which introduced nitrogen-containing functional groups onto AC surface. Original AC and melamine modified activated carbon (ACM) were characterized by elemental analysis, N2 adsorption-desorption, determination of the pH of the point of zero charge (pHpzc) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and their performance in the adsorption of Hg(II) ions was investigated. Langmuir model fitted the experimental data of equilibrium isotherms well. ACM showed the higher Hg (II) ions adsorption capacity, increasing more than more than 1.8 times compared to the original one. Moreover, ACM showed a wider pH range for the maximum adsorption than the parent AC.

  12. Deposition of carbon nitride films by vacuum ion diode with explosive emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenev, S.A.; Perry, A.J. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark (United States); Elkind, A.; Kalmukov, A.

    1997-10-31

    Carbon nitride films were synthesized using a novel technique based on the pulsed high voltage ion/electron diode with explosive emission (pulsed voltage 200-700 kV pulsed current 100-500 Acm{sup -2} (ions) 150-2000 Acm{sup -2} (electrons)). The method and its novel features are discussed as well as its application to the formation of the crystalline {beta}-phase in C{sub 3}N{sub 4} films. Mixed elemental nitrogen and carbon films are formed by sequential deposition then subjected to ion and/or electron beam mixing to synthesize the C{sub 3}N{sub 4} structure. The experimental conditions used for this pulsed process are described and the efficiency of the method for nitrogen incorporation is demonstrated. The results presented indicate that {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} crystallites are formed in an amorphous matrix. (orig.) 20 refs.

  13. Sputtering of carbon using hydrogen ion beams with energies of 60–800 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorov, Dmitry S., E-mail: dmitrisidoroff@rambler.ru [Nizhny Novgorod State University, 23 Gagarina Avenue, Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod Region 603950 (Russian Federation); Chkhalo, Nikolay I., E-mail: chkhalo@ipm.sci-nnov.ru [Institute for Physics of Microstructures RAS, Academicheskaya Str. 7, Afonino, Nizhny Novgorod Region, Kstovsky District, Kstovo Region 603087 (Russian Federation); Mikhailenko, Mikhail S.; Pestov, Alexey E.; Polkovnikov, Vladimir N. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures RAS, Academicheskaya Str. 7, Afonino, Nizhny Novgorod Region, Kstovsky District, Kstovo Region 603087 (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    This article presents the result of a study on the sputtering of carbon films by low-energy hydrogen ions. In particular, the etching rate and surface roughness were measured. The range of energies where the sputtering switches from pure chemical to a combination of chemical and physical mechanisms was determined. It is shown that Sigmund’s theory for ion etching does not work well for fields of energy less than 150 eV and that it accurately describes the dependence of a sputtering coefficient on ion energy for energies greater than 300 eV. A strong smoothing effect for the surface of carbon film was also found. This result is interesting in itself and for its significance for the manufacture of super-smooth surfaces for X-ray applications.

  14. In-treatment tests for the monitoring of proton and carbon-ion therapy with a large area PET system at CNAO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosso, V., E-mail: valeria.rosso@pi.infn.it [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Battistoni, G. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Ciocca, M. [Fondazione CNAO, Pavia (Italy); Collini, F. [Department of Physical Sciences, Earth and Environment, University of Siena and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Ferretti, S.; Kraan, A.C.; Lucenò, S. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Molinelli, S.; Pullia, M. [Fondazione CNAO, Pavia (Italy); Sportelli, G.; Zaccaro, E.; Del Guerra, A. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    One of the most promising new radiotherapy techniques makes use of charged particles like protons and carbon ions, rather than photons. At present, there are more than 50 particle therapy centers operating worldwide, and many new centers are being constructed. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is considered a well-established non-invasive technique to monitor range and delivered dose in patients treated with particle therapy. Nuclear interactions of the charged hadrons with the patient tissue lead to the production of β+ emitting isotopes (mainly {sup 15}O and {sup 11}C), that decay with a short lifetime producing a positron. The two 511 keV annihilation photons can be detected with a PET detector. In-beam PET is particularly interesting because it could allow monitoring the ions range also during dose delivery. A large area dual head PET prototype was built and tested. The system is based on an upgraded version of the previously developed DoPET prototype. Each head covers now 15×15 cm{sup 2} and is composed by 9 (3×3) independent modules. Each module consists of a 23×23 LYSO crystal matrix (2 mm pitch) coupled to H8500 PMT and is readout by custom front-end and a FPGA based data acquisition electronics. Data taken at the CNAO treatment facility in Pavia with proton and carbon beams impinging on heterogeneous phantoms demonstrate the DoPET capability to detect the presence of a small air cavity in the phantom.

  15. Integrated carbon nanospheres arrays as anode materials for boosted sodium ion storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangjia Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing cost-effective advanced carbon anode is critical for innovation of sodium ion batteries. Herein, we develop a powerful combined method for rational synthesis of free-standing binder-free carbon nanospheres arrays via chemical bath plus hydrothermal process. Impressively, carbon spheres with diameters of 150–250 nm are randomly interconnected with each other forming highly porous arrays. Positive advantages including large porosity, high surface and strong mechanical stability are combined in the carbon nanospheres arrays. The obtained carbon nanospheres arrays are tested as anode material for sodium ion batteries (SIBs and deliver a high reversible capacity of 102 mAh g−1 and keep a capacity retention of 95% after 100 cycles at a current density of 0.25 A g−1 and good rate performance (65 mAh g−1 at a high current density of 2 A g−1. The good electrochemical performance is attributed to the stable porous nanosphere structure with fast ion/electron transfer characteristics.

  16. Adsorption Efficiency of Iron Modified Carbons for Removal of Pb(II Ions from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Salmani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The Lead causes severe damage to several systems of the body, especially to bony tissues. Until now, several low-cost biosorbents have been studied for removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. In the present study, carbonized pomegranate peels modified with Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions and then it was investigated for removal of Pb(II ions from aqueous solution. Materials and methods: the washed granola of pomegranate peel was separately socked with FeCl3 and FeCl2 solutions for 24 h. Then, the granules were carbonized at 400 ºC for 3 h in a programmable furnace in the atmosphere of nitrogen. The adsorption experiments were carried out for two types of iron-modified carbons by batch adsorption using one variable at a time procedures. Results: The optimum conditions were found as contact time 90 min, initial concentration 50 mg/l, and adsorbent dose, 1.00 g/100 ml solution. Maximum removal efficiency was calculated as 84% and 89% for Fe3+ and Fe2+ impregnated pomegranate peel carbons respectively. Conclusion: The iron treatment pomegranate peel carbons modified their surfaces for adsorption of heavy metals. The results showed that chemical modification of the low-cost adsorbents originating from agricultural waste has stood out for metal removal capabilities.

  17. Self-organized formation of metal-carbon nanostructures by hyperthermal ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, I.K.

    2006-04-26

    The quasi-simultaneous deposition of mass-selected hyperthermal carbon and metal ions results in a variety of interesting film morphologies, depending on the metal used and the deposition conditions. The observed features are of the order of a few nanometres and are therefore interesting for future potential applications in the various fields of nanotechnology. The present study focuses on the structural analysis of amorphous carbon films containing either copper, silver, gold, or iron using amongst others Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The film morphologies found are as follows: copper-containing films consist of copper nanoclusters with sizes ranging from about 3 to 9 nm uniformly distributed throughout the amorphous carbon matrix. The cluster size hereby rises with the copper content of the films. The silver containing films decompose into a pure amorphous carbon film with silver agglomerates at the surface. Both, the gold- and the iron-containing films show a multilayer structure of metal-rich layers with higher cluster density separated by metal-depleted amorphous carbon layers. The layer distances are of the order of up to 15 nm in the case of gold-carbon films and 7 nm in the case of iron-carbon films. The formation of theses different structures cannot be treated in the context of conventional self-organization mechanisms basing upon thermal diffusion and equilibrium thermodynamics. Instead, an ion-induced atomic transport, sputtering effects, and the stability of small metal clusters were taken into account in order to model the structure formation processes. A similar multilayer morphology was recently also reported in the literature for metal-carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering techniques. In order to investigate, whether the mechanisms are the same as in the case of the ion beam deposited films described above, first experiments were conducted

  18. An ion-optical design study of a carbon-ion rotating gantry with a superconducting final bending magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokor, J.; Pavlovič, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ion-optical designs of an isocentric ion gantry with a compact curved superconducting final bending magnet are presented. The gantry is designed for transporting carbon-therapy beams with nominal kinetic energy of 400 MeV/u, which corresponds to the penetration range of C"6"+ beam in water of about 28 cm. In contrast to other existing designs, we present a “hybrid” beam transport system containing a single superconducting element – the last bending magnet. All other elements are based on conventional warm technology. Ion-optical properties of such a hybrid system are investigated in case of transporting non-symmetric (i.e. different emittance patterns in the horizontal and vertical plane) beams. Different conditions for transporting the non-symmetric beams are analyzed aiming at finding the optimal, i.e. the most compact, gantry version. The final gantry layout is presented including a 2D parallel scanning. The ion-optical and scanning properties of the final gantry design are described, discussed and illustrated by computer simulations performed by WinAGILE.

  19. Electronic excitation induced modifications in elongated iron nanoparticle encapsulated multiwalled carbon nanotubes under ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikiran, V.; Bazylewski, P.; Sameera, I.; Bhatia, Ravi; Pathak, A. P.; Prasad, V.; Chang, G. S.

    2018-05-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) filled with Fe nanorods were shown to have contracted and deformed under heavy ion irradiation. In this study, 120 MeV Ag and 80 MeV Ni ion irradiation was performed to study the deformation and defects induced in iron filled MWCNT under heavy ion irradiation. The structural modifications induced due to electronic excitation by ion irradiation were investigated employing high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman scattering experiments, and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. We understand that the ion irradiation causes modifications in the Fe nanorods which result in compressions and expansions of the nanotubes, and in turn leads to the buckling of MWCNT. The G band of the Raman spectra shifts slightly towards higher wavenumber and the shoulder G‧ band enhances with the increase of ion irradiation fluence, where the buckling wavelength depends on the radius 'r' of the nanotubes as exp[(r)0.5]. The intensity ratio of the D to G Raman modes initially decreases at the lowest fluence, and then it increases with the increase in ion fluence. The electron diffraction pattern and the high resolution images clearly show the presence of ion induced defects on the walls of the tube and encapsulated iron nanorods.

  20. Microdosimetry for a carbon ion beam using track-etched detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrozova, I.; Ploc, O.; Davidkova, M.; Vondracek, V.; Sefl, M.; Stepan, V.; Pachnerova Brabcova, K.; Incerti, S.

    2015-01-01

    Track-etched detectors (TED) have been used as linear energy transfer (LET) spectrometers in heavy ion beams for many years. LET spectra and depth -dose distribution of a carbon ion beam were measured behind polymethylmethacrylate degraders at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan. The measurements were performed along monoenergetic beam with energy 290 MeV u -1 in different positions: (1) at beam extraction area, (2) at beginning, (3) maximum and (4) behind the Bragg peak region (0, 117, 147 and 151 mm of water-equivalent depth, respectively). The LET spectra inside and outside of the primary ion beam have been evaluated. TED record only heavy charged particles with LET above 8 -10 keV μm -1 , while electrons and ions with lower LET are not detected. The Geant4 simulation toolkit version 4.9.6.P01 has been used to estimate the contribution of non-detected particles to absorbed dose. Presented results demonstrate the applicability of TED for microdosimetry measurements in therapeutic carbon ion beams. (authors)

  1. Biological intercomparison using gut crypt survivals for proton and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzawa, Akiko; Ando, Koichi; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2006-01-01

    Charged particle therapy depends on biological information for the dose prescription. Relative biological effectiveness or relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for this requirement could basically be provided by experimental data. As RBE values of protons and carbon ions depend on several factors such as cell/tissue type, endpoint, dose and fractionation schedule, a single RBE value could not function as a master key to open all rooms filled with guests of different radiosensitivities. However, any biological model with accurate reproducibility is useful for comparing biological effectiveness between different facilities. We used mouse gut crypt survivals as endpoint, and compared the cell killing efficiency of proton beams at three Japanese facilities. Three Linac X-ray machines with 4 and 6 MeV were used as reference beams, and there was only a small variation (coefficient of variance <2%) in biological effectiveness among them. The RBE values of protons relative to Linac X-rays ranged from 1.0 to 1.11 at the middle of a 6-cm SOBP (spread-out Bragg peak) and from 0.96 to 1.01 at the entrance plateau. The coefficient of variance for protons ranged between 4.0 and 5.1%. The biological comparison of carbon ions showed fairly good agreement in that the difference in biological effectiveness between National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS)/Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) and Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI)/Heavy Ion Synchrotron (SIS) was 1% for three positions within the 6-cm SOBP. The coefficient of variance was <1.7, <0.6 and <1.6% for proximal, middle and distal SOBP, respectively. We conclude that the inter-institutional variation of biological effectiveness is smaller for carbon ions than protons, and that beam-spreading methods of carbon ions do not critically influence gut crypt survival. (author)

  2. Biological intercomparison using gut crypt survivals for proton and carbon-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzawa, Akiko; Ando, Koichi; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2007-01-01

    Charged particle therapy depends on biological information for the dose prescription. Relative biological effectiveness or RBE for this requirement could basically be provided by experimental data. As RBE values of protons and carbon ions depend on several factors such as cell/tissue type, biological endpoint, dose and fractionation schedule, a single RBE value could not deal with all different radiosensitivities. However, any biological model with accurate reproducibility is useful for comparing biological effectiveness between different facilities. We used mouse gut crypt survivals as endpoint, and compared the cell killing efficiency of proton beams at three Japanese facilities. Three Linac X-ray machines with 4 and 6 MeV were used as reference beams, and there was only a small variation (coefficient of variance<2%) in biological effectiveness among them. The RBE values of protons relative to Linac X-rays ranged from 1.0 to 1.11 at the middle of a 6-cm SOBP (spread-out Bragg peak) and from 0.96 to 1.01 at the entrance plateau. The coefficient of variance for protons ranged between 4.0 and 5.1%. The biological comparison of carbon ions showed fairly good agreement in that the difference in biological effectiveness between National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS)/ Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) and Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI)/Heavy Ion Synchrotron (SIS) was 1% for three positions within the 6-cm SOBP. The coefficient of variance was <1.7, <0.6 and <1.6% for proximal, middle and distal SOBP, respectively. We conclude that the inter-institutional variation of biological effectiveness is smaller for carbon ions than protons, and that beam-spreading methods of carbon ions do not critically influence gut crypt survival. (author)

  3. Hierarchical mesoporous/microporous carbon with graphitized frameworks for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Lv

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A hierarchical meso-/micro-porous graphitized carbon with uniform mesopores and ordered micropores, graphitized frameworks, and extra-high surface area of ∼2200 m2/g, was successfully synthesized through a simple one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The commercial mesoporous zeolite Y was utilized as a meso-/ micro-porous template, and the small-molecule methane was employed as a carbon precursor. The as-prepared hierarchical meso-/micro-porous carbons have homogeneously distributed mesopores as a host for electrolyte, which facilitate Li+ ions transport to the large-area micropores, resulting a high reversible lithium ion storage of 1000 mA h/g and a high columbic efficiency of 65% at the first cycle.

  4. Influence of carbonate ions on the micellization behavior in triblock copolymer solution

    CERN Document Server

    Thiyagarajan, P

    2002-01-01

    SANS was used to investigate the micellization behavior of triblock copolymers (F68, F88 and F108) as functions of carbonate ion concentration and temperature. SANS data were fitted to determine the sizes of the core and corona, inter-micelle distance, association number and the volume fraction of the micelles. As the polymer molecular weight increases, the core radius and the radius of gyration (R sub g) of the corona and the inter-micelle distance increase. The carbonate ion concentration and polymer molecular weight have dramatic influence on the temperatures at which the micellization and spherical-to-cylindrical micelle transformation occur. The mechanism by which this phenomenon occurs in these solutions is through a gradual dehydration of polymers with increasing carbonate concentration and/or temperature. (orig.)

  5. BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES FOR A COMPACT CARBON ION LINAC FOR THERAPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plastun, A.; Mustapha, B.; Nassiri, A.; Ostroumov, P.

    2016-05-01

    Feasibility of an Advanced Compact Carbon Ion Linac (ACCIL) for hadron therapy is being studied at Argonne National Laboratory in collaboration with RadiaBeam Technologies. The 45-meter long linac is designed to deliver 109 carbon ions per second with variable energy from 45 MeV/u to 450 MeV/u. S-band structure provides the acceleration in this range. The carbon beam energy can be adjusted from pulse to pulse, making 3D tumor scanning straightforward and fast. Front end accelerating structures such as RFQ, DTL and coupled DTL are designed to operate at lower frequencies. The design of the linac was accompanied with extensive end-to-end beam dynamics studies which are presented in this paper.

  6. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions with Acid Activated Carbons Derived from Oil Palm and Coconut Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mokhlesur M.; Adil, Mohd; Yusof, Alias M.; Kamaruzzaman, Yunus B.; Ansary, Rezaul H.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, batch adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate the suitability of prepared acid activated carbons in removing heavy metal ions such as nickel(II), lead(II) and chromium(VI). Acid activated carbons were obtained from oil palm and coconut shells using phosphoric acid under similar activation process while the differences lie either in impregnation condition or in both pretreatment and impregnation conditions. Prepared activated carbons were modified by dispersing hydrated iron oxide. The adsorption equilibrium data for nickel(II) and lead(II) were obtained from adsorption by the prepared and commercial activated carbons. Langmuir and Freundlich models fit the data well. Prepared activated carbons showed higher adsorption capacity for nickel(II) and lead(II). The removal of chromium(VI) was studied by the prepared acid activated, modified and commercial activated carbons at different pH. The isotherms studies reveal that the prepared activated carbon performs better in low concentration region while the commercial ones in the high concentration region. Thus, a complete adsorption is expected in low concentration by the prepared activated carbon. The kinetics data for Ni(II), Pb(II) and Cr(VI) by the best selected activated carbon fitted very well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. PMID:28788640

  7. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions with Acid Activated Carbons Derived from Oil Palm and Coconut Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhlesur M. Rahman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, batch adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate the suitability of prepared acid activated carbons in removing heavy metal ions such as nickel(II, lead(II and chromium(VI. Acid activated carbons were obtained from oil palm and coconut shells using phosphoric acid under similar activation process while the differences lie either in impregnation condition or in both pretreatment and impregnation conditions. Prepared activated carbons were modified by dispersing hydrated iron oxide. The adsorption equilibrium data for nickel(II and lead(II were obtained from adsorption by the prepared and commercial activated carbons. Langmuir and Freundlich models fit the data well. Prepared activated carbons showed higher adsorption capacity for nickel(II and lead(II. The removal of chromium(VI was studied by the prepared acid activated, modified and commercial activated carbons at different pH. The isotherms studies reveal that the prepared activated carbon performs better in low concentration region while the commercial ones in the high concentration region. Thus, a complete adsorption is expected in low concentration by the prepared activated carbon. The kinetics data for Ni(II, Pb(II and Cr(VI by the best selected activated carbon fitted very well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  8. Differential Bystander Signaling Between Radioresistant Chondrosarcoma Cells and Fibroblasts After X-Ray, Proton, Iron Ion and Carbon Ion Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakatsuki, Masaru, E-mail: wa@mbe.nifty.com [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Magpayo, Nicole; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Chondrosarcoma is well known as a radioresistant tumor, but the mechanisms underlying that resistance are still unclear. The bystander effect is well documented in the field of radiation biology. We investigated the bystander response induced by X-rays, protons, carbon ions, and iron ions in chondrosarcoma cells using a transwell insert co-culture system that precludes physical contact between targeted and bystander cells. Methods and Materials: Human chondrosarcoma cells were irradiated with 0.1-, 0.5-, 1-, and 2-Gy X-rays, protons, carbon ions or iron ions using a transwell insert co-culture system. Formation of micronuclei and p53 binding protein 1 staining in bystander and irradiated cells were analyzed and bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells, and normal human skin fibroblasts was investigated. Results: In this study, we show that the fraction of cells with DNA damages in irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed dose-dependent increases with all beams. However, the fraction of cells with DNA damages in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells did not show any change from the levels in control cells. In the bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells and fibroblasts, the amount of micronucleus formation in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells co-cultured with irradiated fibroblasts were the same as the levels for control cells. However, all bystander fibroblasts co-cultured with irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed significant increases in the fraction of micronucleated cells compared to the rate of control cells. Conclusions: We conclude that chondrosarcoma cells in the transwell insert co-culture system could release bystander stimulations but could not develop bystander responses.

  9. Differential Bystander Signaling Between Radioresistant Chondrosarcoma Cells and Fibroblasts After X-Ray, Proton, Iron Ion and Carbon Ion Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatsuki, Masaru; Magpayo, Nicole; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Chondrosarcoma is well known as a radioresistant tumor, but the mechanisms underlying that resistance are still unclear. The bystander effect is well documented in the field of radiation biology. We investigated the bystander response induced by X-rays, protons, carbon ions, and iron ions in chondrosarcoma cells using a transwell insert co-culture system that precludes physical contact between targeted and bystander cells. Methods and Materials: Human chondrosarcoma cells were irradiated with 0.1-, 0.5-, 1-, and 2-Gy X-rays, protons, carbon ions or iron ions using a transwell insert co-culture system. Formation of micronuclei and p53 binding protein 1 staining in bystander and irradiated cells were analyzed and bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells, and normal human skin fibroblasts was investigated. Results: In this study, we show that the fraction of cells with DNA damages in irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed dose-dependent increases with all beams. However, the fraction of cells with DNA damages in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells did not show any change from the levels in control cells. In the bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells and fibroblasts, the amount of micronucleus formation in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells co-cultured with irradiated fibroblasts were the same as the levels for control cells. However, all bystander fibroblasts co-cultured with irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed significant increases in the fraction of micronucleated cells compared to the rate of control cells. Conclusions: We conclude that chondrosarcoma cells in the transwell insert co-culture system could release bystander stimulations but could not develop bystander responses.

  10. Double-ion imprinted polymer @magnetic nanoparticles modified screen printed carbon electrode for simultaneous analysis of cerium and gadolinium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Bhim Bali; Jauhari, Darshika

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Synthesis of a double-ion imprinted polymer for analysis of Ce(IV) and Gd(III). • Imprinted nano-beads were grown on MNPs-modified SPCE surface. • Voltammetric determination of both templates was carried out simultaneously. • Ultra-trace analysis with LOD (ng mL −1 ) 0.07 for Ce(IV) and 0.19 for Gd(III) is achieved. - Abstract: A typical, reproducible, and rugged screen printed carbon electrode, modified with dual-ion imprinted beads, was fabricated employing the “surface grafting from” approach. For this, the acyl chloride functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were first immobilized and chemically attached with a typical functional monomer (but-2-enedioic acid bis-[(2-amino-ethyl)-amide]) on the electrode surface. This was subsequently subjected to the thermal polymerization in the presence of template ions (Ce(IV) and Gd(III)), cross-linker (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate), initiator (AIBN), and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The modified sensor was used for the simultaneous analysis of both template ions in aqueous, blood serum, and waste-water samples, using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry which revealed two oxidation peaks for respective templates with resolution as much as 950 mV, without any cross reactivity, interferences and false-positives. The detection limits realized by the proposed sensor, under optimized conditions, were found to be as low as 0.07 ng mL −1 for Ce(IV) and 0.19 ng mL −1 for Gd(III) (S/N = 3) that could eventually be helpful for lanthanide estimation at stringent levels

  11. Double-ion imprinted polymer @magnetic nanoparticles modified screen printed carbon electrode for simultaneous analysis of cerium and gadolinium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Bhim Bali, E-mail: prof.bbpd@yahoo.com; Jauhari, Darshika

    2015-05-22

    Highlights: • Synthesis of a double-ion imprinted polymer for analysis of Ce(IV) and Gd(III). • Imprinted nano-beads were grown on MNPs-modified SPCE surface. • Voltammetric determination of both templates was carried out simultaneously. • Ultra-trace analysis with LOD (ng mL{sup −1}) 0.07 for Ce(IV) and 0.19 for Gd(III) is achieved. - Abstract: A typical, reproducible, and rugged screen printed carbon electrode, modified with dual-ion imprinted beads, was fabricated employing the “surface grafting from” approach. For this, the acyl chloride functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were first immobilized and chemically attached with a typical functional monomer (but-2-enedioic acid bis-[(2-amino-ethyl)-amide]) on the electrode surface. This was subsequently subjected to the thermal polymerization in the presence of template ions (Ce(IV) and Gd(III)), cross-linker (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate), initiator (AIBN), and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The modified sensor was used for the simultaneous analysis of both template ions in aqueous, blood serum, and waste-water samples, using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry which revealed two oxidation peaks for respective templates with resolution as much as 950 mV, without any cross reactivity, interferences and false-positives. The detection limits realized by the proposed sensor, under optimized conditions, were found to be as low as 0.07 ng mL{sup −1} for Ce(IV) and 0.19 ng mL{sup −1} for Gd(III) (S/N = 3) that could eventually be helpful for lanthanide estimation at stringent levels.

  12. Particle therapy for mucosal melanoma of the head and neck. A single-institution retrospective comparison of proton and carbon ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demizu, Y.; Fujii, O.; Terashima, K.; Mima, M.; Hashimoto, N.; Fuwa, N. [Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan); Niwa, Y. [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nishinomiya, Hyogo (Japan); Akagi, T. [Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Department of Radiation Physics, Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan); Daimon, T. [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Nishinomiya, Hyogo (Japan); Murakami, M. [Dokkyo Medical University, Center for Radiation Oncology, Shimotsuga-gun, Tochigi (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    To retrospectively analyze treatment outcomes after particle therapy using protons or carbon ions for mucosal melanoma of the head and neck (HNMM) at the Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, as well as to compare proton therapy (PT) and carbon ion therapy (CIT). Data from 62 HNMM patients without metastasis, treated with PT or CIT between October 2003 and April 2011 were analyzed. Median patient age was 70.5 years (range 33-89 years). Of the total patients, 33 (53 %) had received PT and 29 (47 %) had undergone CIT. Protocols for 65 or 70.2 GyE in 26 fractions were used for both ion types. Median follow-up was 18.0 months (range 5.2-82.7 months). The 1-/2-year overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) rates were 93 %/61 % and 93 %/78 % for all patients, 91 %/44 % and 92 %/71 % for the PT patients and 96 %/62 % and 95 %/59 % for the CIT patients, respectively. No significant differences were observed between PT and CIT. Local recurrence was observed in 8 patients (PT: 5, CIT: 3) and 29 (PT: 18, CIT: 11) experienced distant metastases. Acute reactions were acceptable and all patients completed the planned radiotherapy. Regarding late toxicity, grade 3 or greater events were observed in 5 patients (PT: 3, CIT: 2), but no significant difference was observed between PT and CIT. Our single-institution retrospective analysis demonstrated that particle therapy for HNMM achieved good LC, but OS was unsatisfactory. There were no significant differences between PT and CIT in terms of either efficacy or toxicity. (orig.)

  13. Biomass carbon micro/nano-structures derived from ramie fibers and corncobs as anode materials for lithium-ion and sodium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhenghao; Yin, Shengyu; Guo, Zaiping; Wang, Shiquan; Feng, Chuanqi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ramie fibers and corncobs are used as precursors to prepare the biomass carbons. • The ramie fiber carbon (RFC) took on morphology of 3D micro-rods. • The corncob carbon (CC) possessed a 2D nanosheets structure. • Both RFC and CC exhibited outstanding electrochemical performances in LIBs and SIBs systems. - Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D) rod-like carbon micro-structures derived from natural ramie fibers and two-dimensional (2D) carbon nanosheets derived from corncobs have been fabricated by heat treatment at 700 °C under argon atomsphere. The structure and morphology of the as-obtained ramie fiber carbon (RFC) and corncob carbon (CC) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique. The electrochemical performances of the biomass carbon-based anode in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) were investigated. When tested as anode material for lithium ion batteries, both the RFC microrods and CC nanosheets exhibited high capacity, excellent rate capability, and stable cyclability. The specific capacity were still as high as 489 and 606 mAhg −1 after 180 cycles when cycled at room temperature in a 3.0–0.01 V potential (vs. Li/Li + ) window at current density of 100 mAg −1 , respectively, which are much higher than that of graphite (375 mAhg −1 ) under the same current density. Although the anodes in sodium ion batteries showed poorer specific capability than that in lithium-ion batteries, they still achieve a reversible sodium intercalation capacity of 122 and 139 mAhg −1 with similar cycling stability. The feature of stable cycling performance makes the biomass carbon derived from natural ramie fibers and corncobs to be promising candidates as electrodes in rechargeable sodium-ion batteries and lithium-ion batteries.

  14. Biomass carbon micro/nano-structures derived from ramie fibers and corncobs as anode materials for lithium-ion and sodium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhenghao [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Yin, Shengyu [College of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Wuhan Technology and Business University, Wuhan 430065 (China); Guo, Zaiping [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Institute for Superconducting & Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Wang, Shiquan [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Feng, Chuanqi, E-mail: cfeng@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Ramie fibers and corncobs are used as precursors to prepare the biomass carbons. • The ramie fiber carbon (RFC) took on morphology of 3D micro-rods. • The corncob carbon (CC) possessed a 2D nanosheets structure. • Both RFC and CC exhibited outstanding electrochemical performances in LIBs and SIBs systems. - Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D) rod-like carbon micro-structures derived from natural ramie fibers and two-dimensional (2D) carbon nanosheets derived from corncobs have been fabricated by heat treatment at 700 °C under argon atomsphere. The structure and morphology of the as-obtained ramie fiber carbon (RFC) and corncob carbon (CC) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique. The electrochemical performances of the biomass carbon-based anode in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) were investigated. When tested as anode material for lithium ion batteries, both the RFC microrods and CC nanosheets exhibited high capacity, excellent rate capability, and stable cyclability. The specific capacity were still as high as 489 and 606 mAhg{sup −1} after 180 cycles when cycled at room temperature in a 3.0–0.01 V potential (vs. Li/Li{sup +}) window at current density of 100 mAg{sup −1}, respectively, which are much higher than that of graphite (375 mAhg{sup −1}) under the same current density. Although the anodes in sodium ion batteries showed poorer specific capability than that in lithium-ion batteries, they still achieve a reversible sodium intercalation capacity of 122 and 139 mAhg{sup −1} with similar cycling stability. The feature of stable cycling performance makes the biomass carbon derived from natural ramie fibers and corncobs to be promising candidates as electrodes in rechargeable sodium-ion batteries and lithium-ion batteries.

  15. SU-G-IeP2-13: Toward Heavy Ion Computed Tomography with Carbon Ions: A Monte Carlo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, D; Qin, N; Zhang, Y; Jia, X; Wang, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the present Monte Carlo study, we investigated the use of Carbon ions for computed tomography (CT) with a relatively low imaging dose. This will enable us to avoid any conversion of X-ray CT numbers to the relative stopping power (or relative electron density) values and the associated uncertainties in Carbon dose calculation. Methods: In the first stage, we studied the propagation of Carbon nuclei through a water phantom using the Geant4 specially to understand their lateral displacement inside the phantom. In the second stage, we used our GPU-based Monte Carlo code, which has been cross validated against Geant4, to create the 2D map of the water equivalent path length (WEPL) inside a human head size phantom by acquiring 240 projections each 1.5° apart. Subsequently the 3D relative electron density map of the phantom was reconstructed from the 2D WEPL map using the Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) coupled with total variation (TV) minimization Results: A high quality image of the relative electron density inside the phantom was reconstructed by ARTTV. The mean relative error between the reconstructed image for low contrast object (PMMA) was about 1.74%. The delivered dose per scan at the center of the phantom was about 0.1 Gy. Conclusion: We have been able to obtain a 3D map of the electron density using a human head size phantom while keeping the delivered dose to relatively low value. Using the GPU capabilities of our simulation engine, we believe that a real time CT with Carbon ions could be a reality in future.

  16. Optical waveguides in fluoride lead silicate glasses fabricated by carbon ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-liang; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Qi-feng; Lü, Peng; Li, Wei-nan; Liu, Chun-xiao

    2018-03-01

    The carbon ion implantation with energy of 4.0 MeV and a dose of 4.0×1014 ions/cm2 is employed for fabricating the optical waveguide in fluoride lead silicate glasses. The optical modes as well as the effective refractive indices are measured by the prism coupling method. The refractive index distribution in the fluoride lead silicate glass waveguide is simulated by the reflectivity calculation method (RCM). The light intensity profile and the energy losses are calculated by the finite-difference beam propagation method (FD-BPM) and the program of stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM), respectively. The propagation properties indicate that the C2+ ion-implanted fluoride lead silicate glass waveguide is a candidate for fabricating optical devices.

  17. Validation of recent Geant4 physics models for application in carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lechner, A; Ivanchenko, V N

    2010-01-01

    Cancer treatment with energetic carbon ions has distinct advantages over proton or photon irradiation. In this paper we present a simulation model integrated into the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit (version 9.3) which enables the use of ICRU 73 stopping powers for ion transport calculations. For a few materials, revised ICRU 73 stopping power tables recently published by ICRU (P. Sigmund, A. Schinner, H. Paul, Errata and Addenda: ICRU Report 73 (Stopping of Ions Heavier than Helium), International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, 2009) were incorporated into Geant4, also covering media like water which are of importance in radiotherapeutical applications. We examine, with particular attention paid to the recent developments, the accuracy of current Geant4 models for simulating Bragg peak profiles of C-12 ions incident on water and polyethylene targets. Simulated dose distributions are validated against experimental data available in the literature, where the focus is on beam energies relevant to io...

  18. Limitations of disordered carbons obtained from biomass as anodes for real lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Alvaro; Hernán, Lourdes; Morales, Julián

    2011-05-23

    Two disordered microporous carbons were obtained from two different types of biomass residues: olive and cherry stones. The former (OS) was activated physically under steam while the latter (CS) chemically with an aqueous solution of ZnCl(2). Their structural and textural properties were studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and N(2) adsorption/desorption. Although the samples possess similar textural properties (BET surface areas, micropore surfaces and volumes), the CS carbon is more disordered than the OS carbon. Their electrochemical response in half-cells (CS[OS]/Li) is good; the values are comparable to those obtained from mesocarbon microbeads commonly used in commercial lithium-ion batteries, which consist of highly graphitized carbon. However, cells featuring the OS or CS carbon as anode and LiMn(2)O(4) as cathode perform poorly. Electrochemical activation of the electrodes against lithium metal, a recommended procedure for boosting the electrochemical properties of real lithium-ion batteries, improves cell performance (particularly with OS) but is ultimately ineffective: the delivered average capacity of the activated cell made from OS was less than half its theoretical value. The high irreversible capacity, high polarization between the charge and discharge curves, combined with the presence of various functional groups and the high disorder of the studied carbons which may facilitate side reactions such as electrolyte decomposition, results in a degraded cell performance. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Gemcitabine for Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinoto, Makoto, E-mail: shinoto@saga-himat.jp [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamada, Shigeru [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yasuda, Shigeo [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Saisho, Hiromitsu [Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Kaken Hospital, Chemotherapy Research Institute, Chiba (Japan); Asano, Takehide; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Amano, Hodaka; Ishihara, Takeshi; Otsuka, Masayuki; Matsuda, Masamichi; Kainuma, Osamu; Funakoshi, Akihiro; Furuse, Junji; Nakagori, Toshio; Okusaka, Takuji; and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To determine, in the setting of locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the maximum tolerated dose of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) and gemcitabine dose delivered concurrently and to estimate local effect and survival. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of pancreatic invasive ductal carcinomas and radiographically unresectable disease without metastasis. Concurrent gemcitabine was administered on days 1, 8, and 15, and the dose levels were escalated from 400 to 1000 mg/m{sup 2} under the starting dose level (43.2 GyE) of C-ion RT. The dose levels of C-ion RT were escalated from 43.2 to 55.2 GyE at 12 fractions under the fixed recommended gemcitabine dose determined. Results: Seventy-six patients were enrolled. Among the 72 treated patients, dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 3 patients: grade 3 infection in 1 patient and grade 4 neutropenia in 2 patients. Only 1 patient experienced a late grade 3 gastric ulcer and bleeding 10 months after C-ion RT. The recommended dose of gemcitabine with C-ion RT was found to be 1000 mg/m{sup 2}. The dose of C-ion RT with the full dose of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2}) was safely increased to 55.2 GyE. The freedom from local progression rate was 83% at 2 years using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. The 2-year overall survival rates in all patients and in the high-dose group with stage III (≥45.6 GyE) were 35% and 48%, respectively. Conclusions: Carbon ion RT with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine was well tolerated and effective in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  20. Charge state distributions for heavy ions in carbon stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahan, M.A.; Lebed, R.F.; Feinberg, B.

    1989-03-01

    We have extended the database of measured charge state distributions available in the literature through measurements at the SuperHILAC using carbon stripper foils in the energy range 1.2--8.5 MeV/u. Modifying a semi-empirical model to include the effect of electronic shells, we are able to correctly predict the mean charge state to within 1/2 a charge state for 6≤Z≤92 and energies from 30 keV/u to 16 MeV/u. We have determined parameters for the widths of the distributions for each electronic shell. For distributions lying across a shell boundary, we join the two Gaussians of different widths to get an asymmetric distribution. 18 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Three-dimensional core-shell Fe_2O_3 @ carbon/carbon cloth as binder-free anode for the high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Enzuo; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Li, Jiajun; Zhao, Naiqin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The 3D core-shell Fe_2O_3@C/CC structure is fabricated by simple hydrothermal route. • The composite connected 3D carbon networks consist of carbon cloth, Fe_2O_3 nanorods and outer carbon layer. • The Fe_2O_3@C/CC used as binder-free anode in LIBs, demonstrates excellent performances. - Abstract: A facile and scalable strategy is developed to fabricate three dimensional core-shell Fe_2O_3 @ carbon/carbon cloth structure by simple hydrothermal route as binder-free lithium-ion battery anode. In the unique structure, carbon coated Fe_2O_3 nanorods uniformly disperse on carbon cloth which forms the conductive carbon network. The hierarchical porous Fe_2O_3 nanorods in situ grown on the carbon cloth can effectively shorten the transfer paths of lithium ions and reduce the contact resistance. The carbon coating significantly inhibits pulverization of active materials during the repeated Li-ion insertion/extraction, as well as the direct exposure of Fe_2O_3 to the electrolyte. Benefiting from the structural integrity and flexibility, the nanocomposites used as binder-free anode for lithium-ion batteries, demonstrate high reversible capacity and excellent cyclability. Moreover, this kind of material represents an alternative promising candidate for flexible, cost-effective, and binder-free energy storage devices.

  2. Comparative Risk Predictions of Second Cancers After Carbon-Ion Therapy Versus Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, John G., E-mail: jeley@som.umaryland.edu [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Friedrich, Thomas [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Homann, Kenneth L.; Howell, Rebecca M. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Scholz, Michael; Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Newhauser, Wayne D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: This work proposes a theoretical framework that enables comparative risk predictions for second cancer incidence after particle beam therapy for different ion species for individual patients, accounting for differences in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the competing processes of tumor initiation and cell inactivation. Our working hypothesis was that use of carbon-ion therapy instead of proton therapy would show a difference in the predicted risk of second cancer incidence in the breast for a sample of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients. Methods and Materials: We generated biologic treatment plans and calculated relative predicted risks of second cancer in the breast by using two proposed methods: a full model derived from the linear quadratic model and a simpler linear-no-threshold model. Results: For our reference calculation, we found the predicted risk of breast cancer incidence for carbon-ion plans-to-proton plan ratio, , to be 0.75 ± 0.07 but not significantly smaller than 1 (P=.180). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that second cancer risks are, on average, comparable between proton therapy and carbon-ion therapy.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of three-dimensional carbon electrodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixidor, Genis Turon; Zaouk, Rabih B.; Park, Benjamin Y.; Madou, Marc J.

    This paper presents fabrication and testing results of three-dimensional carbon anodes for lithium-ion batteries, which are fabricated through the pyrolysis of lithographically patterned epoxy resins. This technique, known as Carbon-MEMS, provides great flexibility and an unprecedented dimensional control in shaping carbon microstructures. Variations in the pattern density and in the pyrolysis conditions result in anodes with different specific and gravimetric capacities, with a three to six times increase in specific capacity with respect to the current thin-film battery technology. Newly designed cross-shaped Carbon-MEMS arrays have a much higher mechanical robustness (as given by their moment of inertia) than the traditionally used cylindrical posts, but the gravimetric analysis suggests that new designs with thinner features are required for better carbon utilization. Pyrolysis at higher temperatures and slower ramping up schedules reduces the irreversible capacity of the carbon electrodes. We also analyze the addition of Meso-Carbon Micro-Beads (MCMB) particles on the reversible and irreversible capacities of new three-dimensional, hybrid electrodes. This combination results in a slight increase in reversible capacity and a big increase in the irreversible capacity of the carbon electrodes, mostly due to the non-complete attachment of the MCMB particles.

  4. Effect of oxide ion concentration on the electrochemical oxidation of carbon in molten LiCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, J. W.; Choi, I. K.; Park, Y. S.; Kim, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The continuous measurement of lithium oxide concentration was required in DOR (Direct Oxide Reduction) process, which converts spent nuclear fuel to metal form, for the reactivity monitor and effective control of the process. The concentration of lithium oxide was measured by the electrochemical method, which was based on the phenomenon that carbon atoms of glassy carbon electrode electrochemically react with oxygen ions of lithium oxide in molten LiCl medium. From the results of electrode polarization experiments, the trend of oxidation rate of carbon atoms was classified into two different regions, which were proportional and non-proportional ones, dependent on the amount of lithium oxide. Below about 2.5 wt % Li 2 O, as the carbon atom ionization rate was fast enough for reacting with diffusing lithium oxide to the surface of carbon electrode. In this concentration range, the oxidation rate of carbon atoms was controlled by the diffusion of lithium oxide, and the concentration of lithium oxide could be measured by electrochemical method. But, above 2.5 wt % Li 2 O, the oxidation rate of carbon atoms was controlled by the applied electrochemical potential, because the carbon atom ionization rate was suppressed by the huge amounts of diffusing Li 2 O. Above this concentration, the electrochemical method was not applicable to determine the concentration of lithium oxide

  5. Hydrogen substituted graphdiyne as carbon-rich flexible electrode for lithium and sodium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianjiang; Wang, Ning; Cui, Zili; Du, Huiping; Fu, Lin; Huang, Changshui; Yang, Ze; Shen, Xiangyan; Yi, Yuanping; Tu, Zeyi; Li, Yuliang

    2017-10-27

    Organic electrodes are potential alternatives to current inorganic electrode materials for lithium ion and sodium ion batteries powering portable and wearable electronics, in terms of their mechanical flexibility, function tunability and low cost. However, the low capacity, poor rate performance and rapid capacity degradation impede their practical application. Here, we concentrate on the molecular design for improved conductivity and capacity, and favorable bulk ion transport. Through an in situ cross-coupling reaction of triethynylbenzene on copper foil, the carbon-rich frame hydrogen substituted graphdiyne film is fabricated. The organic film can act as free-standing flexible electrode for both lithium ion and sodium ion batteries, and large reversible capacities of 1050 mAh g -1 for lithium ion batteries and 650 mAh g -1 for sodium ion batteries are achieved. The electrode also shows a superior rate and cycle performances owing to the extended π-conjugated system, and the hierarchical pore bulk with large surface area.

  6. Formation of a highly doped ultra-thin amorphous carbon layer by ion bombardment of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotr Michałowski, Paweł; Pasternak, Iwona; Ciepielewski, Paweł; Guinea, Francisco; Strupiński, Włodek

    2018-07-01

    Ion bombardment of graphene leads to the formation of defects which may be used to tune properties of the graphene based devices. In this work, however, we present that the presence of the graphene layer on a surface of a sample has a significant impact on the ion bombardment process: broken sp2 bonds react with the incoming ions and trap them close to the surface of the sample, preventing a standard ion implantation. For an ion bombardment with a low impact energy and significant dose (in the range of 1014 atoms cm‑2) an amorphization of the graphene layer is observed but at the same time, most of the incoming ions do not penetrate the sample but stop at the surface, thus forming a highly doped ultra-thin amorphous carbon layer. The effect may be used to create thin layers containing desired atoms if no other technique is available. This approach is particularly useful for secondary ion mass spectrometry where a high concentration of Cs at the surface of a sample significantly enhances the negative ionization probability, allowing it to reach better detection limits.

  7. Binding of nickel and zinc ions with activated carbon prepared from sugar cane fibre (Saccharum officinarum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.U. Ikhuoria

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon was prepared from sugar cane fibre by carbonizing at 500 oC for 30 minutes. This was followed by activation with ammonium chloride. The activated carbon was characterised in terms of pH, bulk density, ash content, surface area and surface charge. Equilibrium sorption of nickel and zinc ions by the activated carbon was studied using a range of metal ion concentrations. The sorption data was observed to have an adequate fit for the Langmuir isotherm equation. The level of metal ion uptake was found to be of the order: Ni2+ > Zn2+. The difference in the removal efficiency could be explained in terms of the hydration energy of the metal ions. The distribution coefficient for a range of concentration of the metal ions at the sorbent water interface is found to be higher than the concentration in the continuous phase.

  8. Effect of Carbon Concentration on the Sputtering of Carbon-Rich SiC Bombarded by Helium Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghao Liang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC is considered as an important material for nuclear engineering due to its excellent properties. Changing the carbon content in SiC can regulate and control its elastic and thermodynamic properties, but a simulation study of the effect of carbon content on the sputtering (caused by the helium ions of SiC is still lacking. In this work, we used the Monte-Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation methods to study the effects of carbon concentration, incidence energy, incident angle, and target temperature on the sputtering yield of SiC. The results show that the incident ions’ energy and angle have a significant effect on sputtering yield of SiC when the carbon concentration in SiC is around 62 at %, while the target temperature has a little effect on the sputtering yield of SiC. Our work might provide theoretical support for the experimental research and engineering application of carbon fiber-reinforced SiC that be used as the plasma-facing material in tokamak fusion reactors.

  9. Influence of electrolyte ion-solvent interactions on the performances of supercapacitors porous carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaux, C.; Matei Ghimbeu, C.; Dahbi, M.; Anouti, M.; Lemordant, D.; Béguin, F.; Vix-Guterl, C.; Raymundo-Piñero, E.

    2014-10-01

    The development of advanced and safe electrochemical supercapacitors or hybrid supercapacitors combining a battery electrode material such as graphite and a porous carbon electrode implies the use of new electrolytes containing a tetra-alkylammonium or lithium salt dissolved preferentially in a safe and environmentally friendly solvent such as alkylcarbonates. In those systems, the carbon porosity of the activated carbon electrode controls the electrochemical behavior of the whole device. In this work, it is demonstrated that electrolytes containing highly polarizing ions such as Li+ dissolved in polar solvents such as alkylcarbonates do not completely loss their solvation shell at the opposite of what is observed for poorly solvated cations like TEABF4. As a consequence, the optimal carbon pore size for obtaining the largest energy density, while keeping a high power density, is wider when strongly solvated cations, like Li+ are used than for conventional organic electrolytes using acetonitrile as solvent and TEA+ as salt cations. TEA+ cations are easily desolvated and hence are able to penetrate in small pores matching the dimensions of bare ions. The dissimilarity of behavior of alkylcarbonates and acetonitrile based electrolytes highlights the importance of ion-solvent interactions when searching the optimal porous texture for the electrode material.

  10. Lithium iron phosphate/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes for high energy lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanyi; Liu, Dawei; Zhang, Qifeng; Yu, Danmei; Liu, Jun; Cao, Guozhong

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports sol-gel derived nanostructured LiFePO4/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes exhibiting enhanced electrochemical properties and cyclic stabilities. LiFePO4/carbon films were obtained by spreading sol on Pt coated Si wafer followed by ambient drying overnight and annealing/pyrolysis at elevated temperature in nitrogen. Uniform and crack-free LiFePO4/carbon nanocomposite films were readily obtained and showed olivine phase as determined by means of X-Ray Diffractometry. The electrochemical characterization revealed that, at a current density of 200 mA/g (1.2 C), the nanocomposite film cathodes demonstrated an initial lithium-ion intercalation capacity of 312 mAh/g, and 218 mAh/g after 20 cycles, exceeding the theoretical storage capacity of conventional LiFePO4 electrode. Such enhanced Li-ion intercalation performance could be attributed to the nanocomposite structure with fine crystallite size below 20 nm as well as the poor crystallinity which provides a partially open structure allowing easy mass transport and volume change associated with Li-ion intercalation. Moreover the surface defect introduced by carbon nanocoating could also effectively facilitate the charge transfer and phase transitions.

  11. Response of the skin of hamsters to fractionated irradiation with X rays or accelerated carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leith, J.T.; Powers-Risius, P.; Woodruff, K.H.; McDonald, M.; Howard, J.

    1981-01-01

    The ventral thoracic skin of hamsters was irradiated with either single, split (two fractions given in 24 hr), or multiple (five fractions given daily) exposures of X rays or accelerated carbon ions using a 4-cm spread Bragg peak. Animals were positioned in the heavy-ion beam so that the ventral thoracic skin surface was 1 cm distal to the proximal peak of the modified beam. Early skin reactions from 6 to 30 days postirradiation were assessed. Using the average skin reactions produced in this period, it was found that the relative biological effect (RBE) for single doses of carbon ions was about 1.6 (5-17 Gy per fraction), for two fractions about 1.8 (5-17 Gy perfraction), and for five fractions about 1.9 (2.4-7.2 Gy per fraction). The fractional amount of sublethal damage repaired after carbon ion irradiation was about 0.3 (at dose levels of 2.4-8.0 Gy per fraction) compared to a value of about 0.45 (at dose levels of 60-13.0 Gy per fraction) found for the fractionated X irradiations, indicting about a 33% decrease in the relative amount of sublethal damage repaired after carbon ion irradiation in this position in the spread Bragg curve. Also, data were interpreted using plots of the reciprocal total dose needed to produce a given level of skin damage versus the dose per fraction used in the multifraction experiments, and of the RBE versus dose per fraction obtained from a nonparametric analysis of the responses. These approaches allow estimation of RBE at dose levels relevant to the clinical situation. Also, estimation may be made of the maximum permissible RBE by using the zero dose intercept value from the linear reciprocal dose plot. With this approach, the RBE at a dose level of 2 Gy is about 2.5 and the maximum RBE value is about 2.7

  12. Synthesis and application of ion imprinting polymer coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes for selective adsorption of nickel ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junnan; Shang, Hongzhou; Zhang, Xing; Sun, Xiaoran

    2018-01-01

    A novel nickel ion imprinted polymers (IIPs) based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized inverse emulsion system, using chitosan(CS) and acrylic acid as the functional monomers, Ni (II) as the template, and N' N-methylene bis-acrylamide as the cross-linker. The chemical structure and morphological feature of the IIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Thermogravimetry (TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR). The studies indicated that the gel layer was well grafted on the surface of MWCNTs. Studies on the adsorption ability of the IIPs, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, demonstrated that IIPs possessed excellent adsorption and selective ability towards Ni (II), fitting to pseudo second-order kinetic isotherms and with a maximum capacity of 19.86 mg/g, and selectivity factor of 13.09 and 4.42. The electrochemical performance of ion imprinting carbon paste electrode (CPE/IIPs) was characterized by Cyclic voltammetry (CV). Studies have shown that CPE/IIPs showed excellent electrochemical performance.

  13. Carbon Contamination During Ion Irradiation - Accurate Detection and Characterization of its Effect on Microstructure of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Kruska, Karen; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Edwards, Danny J.; Zhu, Zihua; Zhang, Jiandong

    2017-11-17

    Accelerator-based ion beam techniques have been used to study radiation effects in materials for decades. Although carbon contamination induced by ion beam in target materials is a well-known issue, it has not been fully characterized nor quantified for studies in ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels that are candidate materials for applications such as core structural components in advanced nuclear reactors. It is an especially important issue for this class of material because of the effect of carbon level on precipitate formation. In this paper, the ability to quantify carbon contamination using three common techniques, namely time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS), atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is compared. Their effectiveness and short-comings in determining carbon contamination will be presented and discussed. The corresponding microstructural changes related to carbon contamination in ion irradiated F/M steels are also presented and briefly discussed.

  14. Water flow in carbon-based nanoporous membranes impacted by interactions between hydrated ions and aromatic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Shi, Guosheng; Fang, Haiping

    2017-02-24

    Carbon-based nanoporous membranes, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene/graphene oxide and graphyne, have shown great potential in water desalination and purification, gas and ion separation, biosensors, and lithium-based batteries, etc. A deep understanding of the interaction between hydrated ions in an aqueous solution and the graphitic surface in systems composed of water, ions and a graphitic surface is essential for applications with carbon-based nanoporous membrane platforms. In this review, we describe the recent progress of the interaction between hydrated ions and aromatic ring structures on the carbon-based surface and its applications in the water flow in a carbon nanotube. We expect that these works can be extended to the understanding of water flow in other nanoporous membranes, such as nanoporous graphene, graphyne and stacked sheets of graphene oxide.

  15. Electronic sputtering by swift highly charged ions of nitrogen on amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, M.; Haranger, F.; Rothard, H.; Ban d'Etat, B.; Boduch, P.; Clouvas, A.; Potiriadis, C.; Neugebauer, R.; Jalowy, T.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic sputtering with heavy ions as a function of both electronic energy loss dE/dx and projectile charge state q was studied at the French heavy ion accelerator GANIL. Amorphous carbon (untreated, and sputter-cleaned and subsequently exposed to nitrogen) was irradiated with swift highly charged ions (Z=6-73, q=6-54, energy 6-13 MeV/u) in an ultrahigh vacuum scattering chamber. The fluence dependence of ion-induced electron yields allows to deduce a desorption cross-section σ which varies approximately as σ∼(dE/dx) 1.65 or σ∼q 3.3 for sputter-cleaned amorphous carbon exposed to nitrogen. This q dependence is close to the cubic charge dependence observed for the emission of H + secondary ions which are believed to be emitted from the very surface. However, the power law σ∼(dE/dx) 1.65 , related to the electronic energy loss gives the best empirical description. The dependence on dE/dx is close to a quadratic one thus rather pointing towards a thermal evaporation-like effect

  16. Room temperature diamond-like carbon coatings produced by low energy ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwitz, A., E-mail: a.markwitz@gns.cri.nz [Department for Ion Beam Technologies, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Mohr, B.; Leveneur, J. [Department for Ion Beam Technologies, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2014-07-15

    Nanometre-smooth diamond-like carbon coatings (DLC) were produced at room temperature with ion implantation using 6 kV C{sub 3}H{sub y}{sup +} ion beams. Ion beam analysis measurements showed that the coatings contain no heavy Z impurities at the level of 100 ppm, have a homogeneous stoichiometry in depth and a hydrogen concentration of typically 25 at.%. High resolution TEM analysis showed high quality and atomically flat amorphous coatings on wafer silicon. Combined TEM and RBS analysis gave a coating density of 3.25 g cm{sup −3}. Raman spectroscopy was performed to probe for sp{sup 2}/sp{sup 3} bonds in the coatings. The results indicate that low energy ion implantation with 6 kV produces hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings with a sp{sup 3} content of about 20%. Results highlight the opportunity of developing room temperature DLC coatings with ion beam technology for industrial applications.

  17. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwitz, Andreas; Gupta, Prasanth; Mohr, Berit; Hübner, René; Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert; Becker, Hans-Werner

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction 1H(15N, αγ)12C (Eres = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0-10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp2 hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  18. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwitz, Andreas, E-mail: A.Markwitz@gns.cri.nz [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Gupta, Prasanth [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Mohr, Berit [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Hübner, René [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Becker, Hans-Werner [RUBION, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, αγ){sup 12}C (E{sub res} = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0–10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp{sup 2} hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  19. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate - sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko (Government Industrial Research Inst., Shikoku, Takamatsu (Japan))

    1982-09-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-0.5 N NaHCO/sub 3/) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/1 uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluant (5 % NaCl-0.5 % Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased.

  20. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate-sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakane, K.; Hirotsu, T.; Fujii, A.; Katoh, S.; Sugasaka, K. (Government Industrial Research. Inst., Shikoku, Takamatsu (Japan))

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-0.5 N NaHCO/sub 3/) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/l uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluent (5% NaCl-0.5% Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased.

  1. Neuron attachment properties of carbon negative-ion implanted bioabsorbable polymer of poly-lactic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2002-01-01

    Modification of a bioabsorbable polymer of poly-lactic acid (PLA) by negative carbon ion implantation was investigated with resect to radiation effects on surface physical properties and nerve-cell attachment properties. Carbon negative ions were implanted to PLA at energy of 5-30 keV with a dose of 10 14 -10 16 ions/cm 2 . Most C-implanted PLA samples showed contact angles near 80 deg. and almost same as that of unimplanted PLA, although a few samples at 5 keV and less 3x10 14 ions/cm 2 had contact angles larger than 90 deg. The attachment properties of nerve cells of PC-12h (rat adrenal phechromocytoma) in vitro were studied. PC-12h cells attached on the unimplanted region in C-implanted PLA samples at 5 and 10 keV. On the contrary, the nerve cells attached on only implanted region for the C-implanted PLA sample at 30 keV and 1x10 15 ions/cm 2

  2. Carbon protrusions on PTFE surface prepared by ion irradiation and chemical defluorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T.; Iwaki, M.

    2006-01-01

    A surface of PTFE was covered with small protrusions by ion-beam irradiation. In this study, we converted PTFE protrusions into carbon protrusions by a defluorination (carbonization) process using sodium vapor. The morphology, composition and structure were analyzed by SEM-EDX, Raman spectroscopy and TEM. The irradiated PTFE sheets were packed in evacuated glass tubes with a sodium block and kept at 473 K for 2-48 h. The samples were then rinsed in HCl and distilled water to remove NaF precipitates. The EDX measurement showed that the NaF precipitates were completely removed by washing, and the percentage of carbon atoms was controlled from 60% to 99% by the treatment. Raman spectra showed that graphite structures grow during the defluorination process. TEM micrographs showed that the protrusions have a bubble structure and are covered with a thin wall. The carbonized protrusions were conductive and grew perpendicular to the substrate.

  3. Eelectrochemical properties and corrosion resistance of carbon-ion-implanted magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ruizhen; Yang, Xiongbo; Li, Penghui; Suen, Kai Wong; Wu, Guosong; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon, as a biocompatible benign element, was implanted into Mg. • A protective amorphous carbon layer was formed after implantation. • Treated sample exhibits good corrosion resistance in two solutions. - Abstract: The corrosion resistance of magnesium-based biomaterials is critical to clinical applications. In this work, carbon as a biocompatible and benign nonmetallic element with high chemical inertness is implanted into pure magnesium to improve the corrosion behavior. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and Raman scattering reveal the formation of an amorphous carbon layer after ion implantation. Electrochemical studies demonstrate remarkable improvement in the corrosion resistance of magnesium in simulated body fluids (SBF) and Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM)

  4. Highly stable carbon coated Mg2Si intermetallic nanoparticles for lithium-ion battery anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamirat, Andebet Gedamu; Hou, Mengyan; Liu, Yao; Bin, Duan; Sun, Yunhe; Fan, Long; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2018-04-01

    Silicon is an ideal candidate anode material for Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, it suffers from rapid capacity fading due to large volume expansion upon lithium insertion. Herein, we design and fabricate highly stable carbon coated porous Mg2Si intermetallic anode material using facile mechano-thermal technique followed by carbon coating using thermal vapour deposition (TVD), toluene as carbon source. The electrode exhibits an excellent first reversible capacity of 726 mAh g-1 at a rate of 100 mA g-1. More importantly, the electrode demonstrates high rate capability (380 mAh g-1 at high rate of 2 A g-1) as well as high cycle stability, with capacity retentions of 65% over 500 cycles. These improvements are attributable to both Mg supporting medium and the uniform carbon coating, which can effectively increase the conductivity and electronic contact of the active material and protects large volume alterations during the electrochemical cycling process.

  5. Transport of carbon ion test particles and hydrogen recycling in the plasma of the Columbia tokamak ''HBT'' [High Beta Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jian-Hua.

    1990-01-01

    Carbon impurity ion transport is studied in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak (HBT), using a carbon tipped probe which is inserted into the plasma (n e ∼ 1 - 5 x 10 14 (cm -3 ), T e ∼ 4 - 10 (eV), B t ∼ 0.2 - 0.4(T)). Carbon impurity light, mainly the strong lines of C II (4267A, emitted by the C + ions) and C III (4647A, emitted by the C ++ ions), is formed by the ablation or sputtering of plasma ions and by the discharge of the carbon probe itself. The diffusion transport of the carbon ions is modeled by measuring the space-and-time dependent spectral light emission of the carbon ions with a collimated optical beam and photomultiplier. The point of emission can be observed in such a way as to sample regions along and transverse to the toroidal magnetic field. The carbon ion diffusion coefficients are obtained by fitting the data to a diffusion transport model. It is found that the diffusion of the carbon ions is ''classical'' and is controlled by the high collisionality of the HBT plasma; the diffusion is a two-dimensional problem and the expected dependence on the charge of the impurity ion is observed. The measurement of the spatial distribution of the H α emissivity was obtained by inverting the light signals from a 4-channel polychromator, the data were used to calculate the minor-radial influx, the density, and the recycling time of neutral hydrogen atoms or molecules. The calculation shows that the particle recycling time τ p is comparable with the plasma energy confinement time τ E ; therefore, the recycling of the hot plasma ions with the cold neutrals from the walls is one of the main mechanisms for loss of plasma energy

  6. The influence of ion bombardment on emission properties of carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chepusov, Alexander; Komarskiy, Alexander; Kuznetsov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    When electric-vacuum device works its cathode surface experiences bombardment with ions of residual gases. Effects of ion bombardment impact on surface of field emission cathodes made of carbon materials may essentially change emission properties of such cathodes. It changes emission start electric field strength, voltage vs. current characteristic of material, its relief and electron structure of the surface layer. Field emission cathode operating mode, variation of radiation doses allow to obtain both good effects: maximal electric current, surface recovery – and negative ones: the worst emission properties and surface destruction, amorphization.

  7. The influence of ion bombardment on emission properties of carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chepusov, Alexander, E-mail: chepusov@iep.uran.ru [The Institute of Electrophysics of the Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IEP UD RAS), 620016, 106 Amundsen Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 620002, 19 Mira Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Komarskiy, Alexander, E-mail: aakomarskiy@gmail.com [The Institute of Electrophysics of the Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IEP UD RAS), 620016, 106 Amundsen Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 620002, 19 Mira Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Vadim, E-mail: kuznetsov@iep.uran.ru [The Institute of Electrophysics of the Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IEP UD RAS), 620016, 106 Amundsen Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    When electric-vacuum device works its cathode surface experiences bombardment with ions of residual gases. Effects of ion bombardment impact on surface of field emission cathodes made of carbon materials may essentially change emission properties of such cathodes. It changes emission start electric field strength, voltage vs. current characteristic of material, its relief and electron structure of the surface layer. Field emission cathode operating mode, variation of radiation doses allow to obtain both good effects: maximal electric current, surface recovery – and negative ones: the worst emission properties and surface destruction, amorphization.

  8. High energy (MeV) ion-irradiated π-conjugated polyaniline: Transition from insulating state to carbonized conducting state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.K.; Lee, S.Y.; Lee, C.S.; Kim, H.M.; Joo, J.; Beag, Y.W.; Koh, S.K.

    2004-01-01

    High energy (MeV) C 2+ , F 2+ , and Cl 2+ ions were irradiated onto π-conjugated polyaniline emeraldine base (PAN-EB) samples. The energy of an ion beam was controlled to a range of 3-4.5 MeV, with the ion dosage varying from 1x10 12 to 1x10 16 ions/cm 2 . The highest dc conductivity (σ dc ) at room temperature was measured to be ∼60 S/cm for 4.5 MeV Cl 2+ ion-irradiated PAN-EB samples with a dose of 1x10 16 ions/cm 2 . We observed the transition of high energy ion-irradiated PAN-EB samples from insulating state to conducting state as a function of ion dosage based on σ dc and its temperature dependence. The characteristic peaks of the Raman spectrum of the PAN-EB samples were reduced, while the D-peak (disordered peak) and the G peak (graphitic peak) appeared as the ion dose increased. From the analysis of the D and G peaks of the Raman spectra of the systems compared to multiwalled carbon nanotubes, ion-irradiated graphites, and annealed carbon films, the number of the clusters of hexagon rings with conducting sp 2 -bonded carbons increased with ion dosage. We also observed the increase in the size of the nanocrystalline graphitic domain of the systems with increasing ion dosage. The intensity of normalized electron paramagnelic resonance signal also increased in correlation with ion dose. The results of this study demonstrate that π-conjugated pristine PAN-EB systems changed from insulating state to carbonized conducting state through high energy ion irradiation with high ion dosage

  9. Behavior of carbon readsorbed on tungsten during low energy Ar ion irradiation at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pranevicius, L.; Pranevicius, L.L.; Milcius, D.; Templier, C.; Bobrovaite, B.

    2008-01-01

    A study of the behavior of carbon sputtered and readsorbed after scattering collisions with particles of surrounding gas on the tungsten surface affected by Ar ion irradiation with the flux equal to 2 x 10 16 cm -2 s -1 extracted from plasma under 300 V negative bias voltage in the temperature range 370-870 K was performed. The dependence of the W sample weight change on the working gas pressure in the range 0.1-10 Pa was registered and the information was deduced about prevailing sputtering-redeposition processes. The depth profiles of carbon at the tungsten surface were measured. We found that carbon distribution profiles in tungsten depend on the C redeposition rate for fixed ion irradiation parameters. Three regimes have been distinguished: (i) at working gas pressure equal to 5 Pa and more, the C redeposition rate prevails the sample surface erosion rate and the W surface is covered by continuous amorphous carbon film (the C film growth regime), (ii) at working gas pressure equal to about 1 Pa, the C redepostion rate is approximately equal to the erosion rate and the W surface is partially covered by redeposited carbon, and (iii) at working gas pressure less than 0.2 Pa, the erosion rate prevails the C redeposition rate (the W surface erosion regime). In the regime of balanced redeposition and erosion deep C penetration depth into nanocrystalline W was registered. It is suggested that under simultaneous C adsorption and ion irradiation at elevated temperature C adatoms are driven from the W surface into grain boundaries and into the bulk by the difference in chemical potentials between the activated W surface and grain boundaries. As the W surface is covered by amorphous C film, the grain boundaries are blocked and the efficiency of carbon transport decreases

  10. Tetrapropylammonium ion influence on the synthesis of Pt Ru/carbon hybrids by hydrothermal carbonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tusi, M.M.; Polanco, N.S.O.; Brandalise, M.; Correa, O.V.; Silva, A.C.; Oliveira Neto, A.; Linardi, M.; Spinace, E.V.

    2010-01-01

    PtRu/Carbon hybrid materials were prepared by hydrothermal carbonization using starch as carbon source and reducing agent and H 2 PtCl 6 .6H 2 O e RuCl 3 .xH 2 O as metals source and catalyst of the carbonization process. The materials were prepared in the following conditions: without pH adjustment, in the absence and in the presence of tetrapropylammonium chloride (TPACl), and adjusting the pH using potassium hydroxide (KOH) or tetrapropylammonium hydroxide (TPAOH). The obtained materials were treated under argon atmosphere at 900 deg C and characterized by SEM/EDX, BET isotherm, XRD and TEM. The electro-oxidation of methanol was studied by chronoamperometry. The material prepared using TPAOH showed the best performance for methanol electro-oxidation. (author)

  11. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon for Red Phosphorous Based Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoyang Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Serving as conductive matrix and stress buffer, the carbon matrix plays a pivotal role in enabling red phosphorus to be a promising anode material for high capacity lithium ion batteries and sodium ion batteries. In this paper, nitrogen-doping is proved to effective enhance the interface interaction between carbon and red phosphorus. In detail, the adsorption energy between phosphorus atoms and oxygen-containing functional groups on the carbon is significantly reduced by nitrogen doping, as verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption mechanisms are further revealed on the basis of DFT (the first density functional theory calculations. The RPNC (red phosphorus/nitrogen-doped carbon composite material shows higher cycling stability and higher capacity than that of RPC (red phosphorus/carbon composite anode. After 100 cycles, the RPNC still keeps discharge capacity of 1453 mAh g−1 at the current density of 300 mA g−1 (the discharge capacity of RPC after 100 cycles is 1348 mAh g−1. Even at 1200 mA g−1, the RPNC composite still delivers a capacity of 1178 mAh g−1. This work provides insight information about the interface interactions between composite materials, as well as new technology develops high performance phosphorus based anode materials.

  12. Boron erosion and carbon deposition due to simultaneous bombardment with deuterium and carbon ions in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohya, K.; Kawata, J.; Wienhold, P.; Karduck, P.; Rubel, M.; Seggern, J. von

    1999-01-01

    Erosion of boron out of a thin film exposed to deuterium edge plasmas and the simultaneous carbon deposition have been investigated in the tokamak TEXTOR-94 and simulated by means of a dynamic Monte Carlo code. The calculated results are compared with some observations (colorimetry, spectroscopy and AES) during and after the exposures. The implantation of carbon impurities strongly changes the effective boron sputtering yield of the film, which results into a lowering of the film erosion and a formation of thick carbon deposits. A strong decrease in the observed BII line emission around a surface location far from the plasma edge can be explained by a carbon deposition on the film. The calculated carbon depth profiles in the film, depending on the distance of the exposed surface from the plasma edge, are in reasonable agreement with measurements by AES after the exposures. Although simultaneous surface erosion and carbon deposition can be simulated, the calculated erosion rate is larger, by a factor of 2, than the observations by colorimetry at the early stage of the exposure

  13. Bi-Directional Ion Emission from Massive Gold Cluster Impacts on Nanometric Carbon Foils

    OpenAIRE

    DeBord, J. Daniel; Della-Negra, Serge; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A.; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Schweikert, Emile A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon cluster emission from thin carbon foils (5–40 nm) impacted by individual Aun+q cluster projectiles (95–125 qkeV, n/q = 3–200) reveals features regarding the energy deposition, projectile range, and projectile fate in matter as a function of the projectile characteristics. For the first time, the secondary ion emission from thin foils has been monitored simultaneously in both forward and backward emission directions. The projectile range and depth of emission were examined as a function...

  14. Carbon-Coated SnO2 Nanorod Array for Lithium-Ion Battery Anode Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Xiaoxu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon-coated SnO2 nanorod array directly grown on the substrate has been prepared by a two-step hydrothermal method for anode material of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs. The structural, morphological and electrochemical properties were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and electrochemical measurement. When used as anodes for LIBs with high current density, as-obtained array reveals excellent cycling stability and rate capability. This straightforward approach can be extended to the synthesis of other carbon-coated metal oxides for application of LIBs.

  15. PAN-based carbon fiber negative electrodes for structural lithium-ion batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Hellqvist Kjell, Maria; Jacques, Eric; Zenkert, Dan; Behm, Mårten; Lindbergh, Göran

    2011-01-01

    Several grades of commercially-available polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers have been studied for structural lithium-ion batteries to understand how the sizing, different lithiation rates and number of fibers per tow affect the available reversible capacity, when used as both current collector and electrode, for use in structural batteries. The study shows that at moderate lithiation rates, 100 mA g-1, most of the carbon fibers display a reversible capacity close to or above 100 mAh ...

  16. Investigation of uranium sorption from carbonate solutions by different ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekrasova, N.A.; Kudryavtseva, S.P.; Milyutin, V.V.; Chuveleva, Eh.A.; Firsova, L.A.; Gelis, V.M.

    2008-01-01

    One studied the uranium sorption from the reference carbonate solutions based on the ion-exchange resins varying in the rank. The PFA-300, the A-560, the AB-17x8 highly basic anionites and the ampholytes (S-930, S-922, S-957, ANKB-35) were shown to manifest the best sorption characteristics as to U. One determined the dependences of the static exchange capacity of the PFA-300, the A-560 and the S-922 resins as to the uranium on the carbonate solution pH, as well as the absorbed uranium desorption conditions [ru

  17. Carbon nitride films synthesized by NH3-ion-beam-assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H.W.; Cui, F.Z.; He, X.M.; Li, W.Z.; Li, H.D.

    1994-01-01

    Carbon nitride thin film films have been prepared by NH 3 -ion-beam-assisted deposition with bombardment energies of 200-800 eV at room temperature. These films have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. It was found that the structure of the films varied with the bombardment energy. In the case of 400 eV bombardment, the tiny crystallites immersed on an amorphous matrix were identified to be β-C 3 N 4 . X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that some carbon atoms and nitrogen atoms form unpolarized covalent bonds in these films. (Author)

  18. New anode material for lithium-ion cells produced by catalytic graphitization of glassy carbon at 1000 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skowronski, J.M. [Poznan Univ. of Technology, Poznan (Poland). Inst. of Chemistry and Technical Electrochemistry; Central Lab. of Batteries and Cells, Poznan (Poland); Knofczynski, K. [Central Lab. of Batteries and Cells, Poznan (Poland)

    2006-10-15

    This study investigated the conversion of glassy carbon into graphite at relatively low temperature of 1000 degrees C under ambient pressure using iron powder as the catalyst. The composite product of reaction was a graphite and turbostratic carbon whose use was then examined in terms of application in lithium-ion cells. Glassy, hard carbon spheres of 10 to 15 {iota}m were prepared from phenolic resin in a nitrogen atmosphere and then subjected to heat treatment with an iron powder mixture. After cooling down to ambient temperature, the carbon/iron mixture was treated with diluted HCl solution to remove metallic additives. The modified carbon was then washed with distilled water until chloride ions disappeared in a filtrate. All samples were characterized using XRD analysis. Working electrodes for electrochemical measurements were made by mixing carbons with PVDF. Cyclic voltammograms recorded for unmodified and modified carbons were consistent with XRD measurements. SEM analysis revealed that the process of graphitization begins at the external regions of glassy carbon spheres where erosion occurs when the carbon reacts with iron particles. The surface destruction of carbon spheres progresses into the interior of the spheres, resulting in their collapse followed by the transformation into pallets resembling a stack of graphite sheets. It was noted that not all unorganized carbon was conversed to graphite. Rather, only 50 per cent of turbostratic carbon existed in the product of heat treatment. The product of graphitization appeared to be a promising material for the preparation of anodes for lithium-ion cells. The discharge capacity for carbon produced by catalytic treatment was found to be approximately 5 times higher, while the discharge/charge reversibility was 23 per cent higher than values obtained for untreated carbon. The study showed that the uptake of lithium ions by the original carbon depends on the insertion/deinsertion mechanism of hard carbon as well

  19. Transformation from hollow carbon octahedra to compressed octahedra and their use in lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Tao; Li, Na; Li, Qianwen; Xing, Zheng; Tang, Kaibin; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai; Shen, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the transformation process from hollow carbon octahedra into deflated balloon-like compressed hollow carbon octahedra ▪. Highlights: ► We demonstrate the in situ template synthesis of hollow carbon octahedra. ► The shell thickness of hollow carbon octahedra is only 2.5 nm. ► Morphology transformation could be realized by extending of reaction time. ► The hollow structures show reversible capacity as 353 mAh g −1 after 100 cycles. -- Abstract: Hollow carbon octahedra with an average size of 300 nm and a shell thickness of 2.5 nm were prepared by a reaction starting from ferrocene and Mg(CH 3 COO) 2 ·4H 2 O at 700 °C for 10 h. They became compressed and turned into deflated balloon-like octahedra when the reaction time was increased to 16 h. It was proposed that the gas pressure generated during the reaction process induced the transformation from broken carbon hollow octahedra into deflated balloon-like compressed octahedra. X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy indicate that the as-obtained carbon products possess a graphitic structure and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images indicate that they have low crystallinity. Their application as an electrode shows reversible capacity of 353 mAh g −1 after 100 cycles in the charge/discharge experiments of secondary lithium ion batteries.

  20. Spectroscopic and redox properties of curium and californium ions in concentrated aqueous carbonate-bicarbonate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobart, D.E.; Varlashkin, P.G.; Samhoun, K.; Haire, R.G.; Peterson, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Multimilligram quantities of trivalent curium-248 and californium-249 were investigated by absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and bulk solution electrolysis in concentrated aqueous carbonate-bicarbonate solution. Actinide concentrations between 10 -4 and 10 -2 M were studied in 2 M sodium carbonate and 5.5 M potassium carbonate solutions at pH values from 8 to 14. The solution absorption spectra of Cm(III) and Cf(III) in carbonate media are presented for the first time and compared to literature spectra of these species in noncomplexing aqueous solution. It was anticipated that carbonate complexation of the actinide ions could provide a sufficient negative shift in the formal potentials of the M(IV)/M(III) couples of Cm and Cf to permit the generation and stabilization of their tetravalent states in aqueous carbonate-bicarbonate medium. No conclusive evidence was found in the present work to indicate the existence of any higher oxidation states of curium or californium in carbonate solution. Some possible reasons for our inability to generate and detect oxidized species of curium and californium in this medium are discussed

  1. Lithium storage performance of carbon nanotubes prepared from polyaniline for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Xiaoxia; Huang Zhengzheng; Liu Enhui; Shen Haijie; Tian Yingying; Xie Hui; Wu Yuhu; Wu Zhilian

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Polyaniline nanotube is synthesized by the self-assembly method in aqueous media. → Carbon nanotubes were prepared from polyaniline nanotube by physical activation. → Activation leads to large surface area, and surface nitrogen and oxygen functional groups. → Such physical and chemical properties lead to the good electrochemical properties. → After 20 cycles, a reversible capacity of 728 mAh g -1 was obtained. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes with large surface area and surface nitrogen and oxygen functional groups are prepared by carbonizing and activating of polyaniline nanotubes, which is synthesized by polymerization of aniline with the self-assembly method in aqueous media. The physicochemical properties of the carbon nanotubes are characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, elemental analyses and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The surface area and pore diameter are 618.9 m 2 g -1 and 3.10 nm. The electrochemical properties of the carbon nanotubes as anode materials in lithium ion batteries are evaluated. At a current density of 100 mA g -1 , the activated carbon nanotube shows an enormously first discharge capacity of about 1370 mAh g -1 and a charge capacity of 907 mAh g -1 . After 20 cycling tests, the activated carbon nanotube retains a reversible capacity of 728 mAh g -1 . These indicate it may be a promising candidate for an anode material for lithium secondary batteries.

  2. Graphene on silicon dioxide via carbon ion implantation in copper with PMMA-free transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Jan; Spemann, Daniel; Hamza Hatahet, M.; Mändl, Stephan; Mensing, Michael; Finzel, Annemarie; Varga, Aron; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a synthesis method for the growth of low-defect large-area graphene using carbon ion beam implantation into metallic Cu foils is presented. The Cu foils (1 cm2 in size) were pre-annealed in a vacuum at 950 °C for 2 h, implanted with 35 keV carbon ions at room temperature, and subsequently annealed at 850 °C for 2 h to form graphene layers with the layer number controlled by the implantation fluence. The graphene was then transferred to SiO2/Si substrates by a PMMA-free wet chemical etching process. The obtained regions of monolayer graphene are of ˜900 μm size. Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy performed at room temperature demonstrated a good quality and homogeneity of the graphene layers, especially for monolayer graphene.

  3. Detection and Investigation of Carbon Ions Induced by Nd:YAG laser using SSNTDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qindeel, Rabia; Ali, Jalil Bin; Chaudhary, K. T.; Hussain, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    A Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser pulse of pulsed width of 9∼14 ns, wavelength of 1064 nm, repetition rate of 0.5 Hz, power of 1.1 MW and energy of 10 mJ has been used to ablate the 4N pure graphite target through IR lens. Solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) CR-39 has been used to calculate the energy of carbon ions produced as a result of laser ablation and the whole experiment has been performed under pressure ∼10 -3 Torr in stainless steel vacuum chamber. The minimum and maximum energy of carbon ions observed are 0.2 KeV to 250 KeV respectively.

  4. Morphology- and ion size-induced actuation of carbon nanotube architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier; Mahrholz; Wierach; Sinapius

    2018-04-01

    Future adaptive applications require lightweight and stiff materials with high active strain but low energy consumption. A suitable combination of these properties is offered by carbon nanotube-based actuators. Papers made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are charged within an electrolyte, which results in an electrical field forming a double-layer of ions at their surfaces and a deflection of the papers can be detected. Until now, there is no generally accepted theory for the actuation mechanism. This study focuses on the actuation mechanism of CNT papers, which represent architectures of randomly oriented CNTs. The samples are tested electrochemically in an in-plane set-up to detect the free strain. The elastic modulus of the CNT papers is analyzed in a tensile test facility. The influence of various ion sizes of water-based electrolytes is investigated.

  5. Electrochemical properties of carbon nanocoils and hollow graphite fibers as anodes for rechargeable lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liyong; Liu, Zhanjun; Guo, Quangui; Wang, Guizhen; Yang, Jinhua; Li, Peng; Wang, Xianglei; Liu, Lang

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanocoils (CNCs) have been used as anode materials for preparation of lithium ion batteries. As pure carbon material without any chemical modification, the graphitized CNCs anode exhibited larger capacities with good Coulombic efficiency, a higher rate capability, and better reversibility than the hollow graphite fibers (HGFs) anode. The excellent performance of the CNCs was possibly ascribed to the special structure and the high degree of graphitization. As a result, the CNCs anode exhibited high reversible capacity of 385.5 mA h g"−"1 at 50 mA g"−"1, 104.7% reversible capacity retention after 105 cycles, and superior reversible capability of 177.4 mA h g"−"1 at 1 A g"−"1 after 100 cycles. This result indicated that CNCs could be an attractive choice as anode material for high-energy density and high-power lithium-ion batteries.

  6. Raman spectroscopic investigations of swift heavy ion irradiation effects in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olejniczak, A.; Skuratov, V.A.; Lukaszewicz, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we report the results on swift heavy ion irradiation effects in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Buckypapers, prepared of CVD grown, SWNTs were irradiated at room temperature with 167 MeV Xe ions to fluences in the range of 6×10 11 - 6.5×10 13 cm -2 and investigated using Raman spectroscopy. We observed a rich set of features in the intermediate frequency mode region. Some of them, being defect-induced, resembled fairly well the phonon density of states (DOS) of nanocrystalline glassy carbon. Analysis of the RBM modes has shown that the broader metallic tubes are characterized by higher radiation stability than thinner semiconducting ones. (authors)

  7. Deposition of diamond-like carbon films by plasma source ion implantation with superposed pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, K.; Hatada, R.

    2003-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were prepared on silicon wafer substrate by plasma source ion implantation with superposed negative pulse. Methane and acetylene gases were used as working gases for plasma. A negative DC voltage and a negative pulse voltage were superposed and applied to the substrate holder. The DC voltage was changed in the range from 0 to -4 kV and the pulse voltage was changed from 0 to -18 kV. The surface of DLC films was very smooth. The deposition rate of DLC films increased with increasing in superposed DC bias voltage. Carbon ion implantation was confirmed for the DLC film deposited from methane plasma with high pulse voltage. I D /I G ratios of Raman spectroscopy were around 1.5 independent on pulse voltage. The maximum hardness of 20.3 GPa was observed for the film prepared with high DC and high pulse voltage

  8. Tribological studies of nitrogen ion implantation induced overlayer coatings of amorphous carbon and carbonitride phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Srivastava, S.K.; Pandian, R.; Bahuguna, Ashok; Dhara, S.; Nair, K.G.M.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Composite phase of amorphous carbon and carbonitride phase is observed on the N + ion implanted surface of steel. ► Advanced properties of implanted surface shows low friction coefficient of ∼0.05. ► High wear resistance 4.3 × 10 −8 mm 3 /Nm of N + implanted surface is obtained. -- Abstract: Morphology and microstructure of N + ion implanted 316 LN steel are found to modify with irradiated substrate temperature. At low temperature of 100 °C, self-similar micro-ripples are formed but at high temperature of 200 and 300 °C, micro-pores and blisters are observed on the implanted surface. Chemically modified surface is found to consist of amorphous carbon and carbonitride phase. Such composite characteristic of implanted steel surface at irradiated substrate temperature of 300 °C shows improved tribological properties with low friction coefficient and high wear resistance

  9. Carbon-Based Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, and Their Hybrid Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fei; Pham, Duy Tho; Lee, Young Hee

    2015-07-20

    A rapidly developing market for portable electronic devices and hybrid electrical vehicles requires an urgent supply of mature energy-storage systems. As a result, lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors have lately attracted broad attention. Nevertheless, it is well known that both devices have their own drawbacks. With the fast development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, various structures and materials have been proposed to overcome the deficiencies of both devices to improve their electrochemical performance further. In this Review, electrochemical storage mechanisms based on carbon materials for both lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors are introduced. Non-faradic processes (electric double-layer capacitance) and faradic reactions (pseudocapacitance and intercalation) are generally explained. Electrochemical performance based on different types of electrolytes is briefly reviewed. Furthermore, impedance behavior based on Nyquist plots is discussed. We demonstrate the influence of cell conductivity, electrode/electrolyte interface, and ion diffusion on impedance performance. We illustrate that relaxation time, which is closely related to ion diffusion, can be extracted from Nyquist plots and compared between lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors. Finally, recent progress in the design of anodes for lithium-ion batteries, electrochemical capacitors, and their hybrid devices based on carbonaceous materials are reviewed. Challenges and future perspectives are further discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Tuning the Solid Electrolyte Interphase for Selective Li- and Na-Ion Storage in Hard Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Fernando A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3122 USA; Yan, Pengfei [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Marzouk, Asma [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, P.O. Box 5825 Doha Qatar; Wang, Chongmin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Xu, Guiliang [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Chen, Zonghai [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Sprenkle, Vincent L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, P.O. Box 5825 Doha Qatar; Balbuena, Perla B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3122 USA; Li, Xiaolin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-03-07

    Solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) films with controllable properties are highly desirable for improving battery performance. In this paper, a combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study SEI films formed on hard carbon in Li- and Na-ion batteries. It is shown that a stable SEI layer can be designed by precycling an electrode in a desired Li- or Na-based electrolyte, and that ionic transport can be kinetically controlled. Selective Li- and Na-based SEI membranes are produced using Li- or Na-based electrolytes, respectively. The Na-based SEI allows easy transport of Li ions, while the Li-based SEI shuts off Na-ion transport. Na-ion storage can be manipulated by tuning the SEI layer with film-forming electrolyte additives, or by preforming an SEI layer on the electrode surface. The Na specific capacity can be controlled to < 25 mAh g(-1); approximate to 1/10 of the normal capacity (250 mAh g(-1)). Unusual selective/ preferential transport of Li ions is demonstrated by preforming an SEI layer on the electrode surface and corroborated with a mixed electrolyte. This work may provide new guidance for preparing good ion-selective conductors using electrochemical approaches.

  11. Collisions of carbon and oxygen ions with electrons, H, H2 and He: Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phaneuf, R.A.; Janev, R.K.; Pindzola, M.S.

    1987-02-01

    This report provides a handbook for fusion research of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for collisions of carbon and oxygen ions with electrons, hydrogen atoms and molecules, and helium atoms. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical, and parametrized form. Processes considered include exciation, ionization, and charge exchange at collision energies appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research

  12. Naked eye and smartphone applicable detection of toxic mercury ions using fluorescent carbon nanodots

    OpenAIRE

    BAÇ, BURCU; GENÇ, RÜKAN

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan passivated carbon nanodots (C-Dots$_{CHIT})$ were synthesized from expired molasses via a simple and green thermal synthesis procedure. As-synthesized C-Dots were nitrogen-doped (NC-Dots$_{CHIT})$ by posttreatment with liquid ammonia and used as nanoprobes for fluorometric detection of mercury ions (Hg(II)$_{aq.})$. Fluorescence response of NC-Dots$_{CHIT}$ in the presence of mercury was evaluated and compared with that of the polyethylene glycol passivated C-Dots$_{PEG}$. This sensi...

  13. Does Aerobic Respiration Produce Carbon Dioxide or Hydrogen Ion and Bicarbonate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Erik R

    2018-05-01

    Maintenance of intracellular pH is critical for clinical homeostasis. The metabolism of glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids yielding the generation of adenosine triphosphate in the mitochondria is accompanied by the production of acid in the Krebs cycle. Both the nature of this acidosis and the mechanism of its disposal have been argued by two investigators with a long-abiding interest in acid-base physiology. They offer different interpretations and views of the molecular mechanism of this intracellular pH regulation during normal metabolism. Dr. John Severinghaus has posited that hydrogen ion and bicarbonate are the direct end products in the Krebs cycle. In the late 1960s, he showed in brain and brain homogenate experiments that acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, reduces intracellular pH. This led him to conclude that hydrogen ion and bicarbonate are the end products, and the role of intracellular carbonic anhydrase is to rapidly generate diffusible carbon dioxide to minimize acidosis. Dr. Erik Swenson posits that carbon dioxide is a direct end product in the Krebs cycle, a more widely accepted view, and that acetazolamide prevents rapid intracellular bicarbonate formation, which can then codiffuse with carbon dioxide to the cell surface and there be reconverted for exit from the cell. Loss of this "facilitated diffusion of carbon dioxide" leads to intracellular acidosis as the still appreciable uncatalyzed rate of carbon dioxide hydration generates more protons. This review summarizes the available evidence and determines that resolution of this question will require more sophisticated measurements of intracellular pH with faster temporal resolution.

  14. Electrocatalytic Activity of Carbonized Nanostructured Polyanilines for Oxidation Reactions: Sensing of Nitrite Ions and Ascorbic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micić, Darko; Šljukić, Biljana; Zujovic, Zoran; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbonized PANIs prepared from various nanostructured PANI precursors • Electroanalytical performances of carbonized PANIs evaluated using voltammetry • Study of carbonized PANIs physico-chemical properties related to electroactivity • The lowest over-potential for NO 2 − oxidation at c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE) • The lowest over-potential for ascorbic acid oxidation at both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA - Abstract: A comparative study of the electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-containing carbon nanomaterials, prepared by the carbonization of nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) salts, for the electrooxidation reactions is presented. Nanostructured PANI salts were synthesized by the oxidative polymerization of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate in an aqueous solution in the presence of 5-sulfosalicylic acid (PANI-SSA), 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (PANI-DNSA) as well as without added acid (PANI), and subsequently carbonized to c-PANI-SSA, c-PANI-DNSA and c-PANI, respectively. Glassy carbon tip was modified with nanostructured c-PANIs and used for the investigation of sensing of nitrite and ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions as model analytes by linear sweep voltammetry. All three types of the investigated c-PANIs gave excellent response to the nitrite ions and ascorbic acid electrooxidation. The lowest peak potential for nitrite ion oxidation exhibited c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE), and for ascorbic acid oxidation both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA (ca. + 0.13 V vs. SCE). Electrochemical data were correlated with structural and textural data obtained by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elemental and nitrogen sorption analysis

  15. Recent Progress in Design of Biomass-Derived Hard Carbons for Sodium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Górka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sodium ion batteries (SIBs have attracted lots of attention over last few years due to the abundance and wide availability of sodium resources, making SIBs the most cost-effective alternative to the currently used lithium ion batteries (LIBs. Many efforts are underway to find effective anodes for SIBs since the commercial anode for LIBs, graphite, has shown very limited capacity for SIBs. Among many different types of carbons, hard carbons—especially these derived from biomass—hold a great deal of promise for SIB technology thanks to their constantly improving performance and low cost. The main scope of this mini-review is to present current progress in preparation of negative electrodes from biomass including aspects related to precursor types used and their impact on the final carbon characteristics (structure, texture and composition. Another aspect discussed is how certain macro- and microstructure characteristics of the materials translate to their performance as anode for Na-ion batteries. In the last part, current understanding of factors governing sodium insertion into hard carbons is summarized, specifically those that could help solve existing performance bottlenecks such as irreversible capacity, initial low Coulombic efficiency and poor rate performance.

  16. Carbon-Ion Radiation Therapy for Pelvic Recurrence of Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Shigeru, E-mail: s_yamada@nirs.go.jp [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ebner, Daniel K. [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Brown University Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Shinoto, Makoto [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Saga (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro [Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Isozaki, Yuka; Yasuda, Shigeo; Makishima, Hirokazu; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Isozaki, Tetsuro; Endo, Satoshi [Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Takahashi, Keiichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Disease Center, Komagome, Tokyo (Japan); Sekimoto, Mitsugu [National Hospital Organization Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Saito, Norio [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Matsubara, Hisahiro [Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Investigation of the treatment potential of carbon-ion radiation therapy in pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase 1/2 dose escalation study was performed. One hundred eighty patients (186 lesions) with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with carbon-ion radiation therapy (CIRT) (phase 1/2: 37 and 143 patients, respectively). The relapse locations were 71 in the presacral region, 82 in the pelvic sidewalls, 28 in the perineum, and 5 near the colorectal anastomosis. A 16-fraction in 4 weeks dose regimen was used, with total dose ranging from 67.2 to 73.6 Gy(RBE); RBE-weighted absorbed dose: 4.2 to 4.6 Gy(RBE)/fraction. Results: During phase 1, the highest total dose, 73.6 Gy(RBE), resulted in no grade >3 acute reactions in the 13 patients treated at that dose. Dose escalation was halted at this level, and this dose was used for phase 2, with no other grade >3 acute reactions observed. At 5 years, the local control and survival rates at 73.6 Gy(RBE) were 88% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80%-93%) and 59% (95% CI, 50%-68%), respectively. Conclusion: Carbon-ion radiation therapy may be a safe and effective treatment option for locally recurrent rectal cancer and may serve as an alternative to surgery.

  17. Mutagenic effects of carbon ion beam irradiations on dry Lotus japonicus seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shanwei [Biophysics Group, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, Libin, E-mail: libinzhou@impcas.ac.cn [Biophysics Group, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Wenjian; Du, Yan [Biophysics Group, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yu, Lixia; Feng, Hui; Mu, Jinhu [Biophysics Group, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Yuze [College of Life Science and Technology, Gansu Agricultural University, No. 1 Yingmen Village, Anning District, Lanzhou, Gansu Province 730070 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Carbon ion beam irradiation is a powerful method for creating mutants and has been used in crop breeding more and more. To investigate the effects of carbon ion beams on Lotus japonicus, dry seeds were irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam at dosages of 0, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 Gy. The germination rate, survival rate and root length of M{sub 1} populations were explored and the dose of 400 Gy was selected as the median lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) for a large-scale mutant screening. Among 2472 M{sub 2} plants, 127 morphological mutants including leaf, stem, flower and fruit phenotypic variation were found, and the mutation frequency was approximately 5.14%. Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) assays were utilized to investigate the DNA polymorphism between seven mutants and eight plants without phenotypic variation from M{sub 2} populations. No remarkable differences were detected between these two groups, and the total polymorphic rate was 0.567%.

  18. Carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water promotes skin wound healing in nude rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyan Liang

    Full Text Available Hot spring or hot spa bathing (Onsen is a traditional therapy for the treatment of certain ailments. There is a common belief that hot spring bathing has therapeutic effects for wound healing, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To examine this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of Nagano hot spring water (rich in carbonate ion, 42°C on the healing process of the skin using a nude rat skin wound model. We found that hot spring bathing led to an enhanced healing speed compared to both the unbathed and hot-water (42°C control groups. Histologically, the hot spring water group showed increased vessel density and reduced inflammatory cells in the granulation tissue of the wound area. Real-time RT-PCR analysis along with zymography revealed that the wound area of the hot spring water group exhibited a higher expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 compared to the two other control groups. Furthermore, we found that the enhanced wound healing process induced by the carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water was mediated by thermal insulation and moisture maintenance. Our results provide the evidence that carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water is beneficial for the treatment of skin wounds.

  19. Improvement on corrosion resistance of NiTi orthopedic materials by carbon plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, Ray W.Y.; Ho, Joan P.Y.; Luk, Camille M.Y.; Liu Xuanyong; Chung, Jonathan C.Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Yeung, Kelvin W.K.; Lu, William W.; Cheung, Kenneth M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) have potential applications as orthopedic implants because of their unique super-elastic properties and shape memory effects. However, the problem of out-diffusion of harmful Ni ions from the alloys during prolonged use inside a human body must be overcome before they can be widely used in orthopedic implants. In this work, we enhance the corrosion resistance of NiTi using carbon plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D). Our corrosion and simulated body fluid tests indicate that either an ion-mixed amorphous carbon coating fabricated by PIII and D or direct carbon PIII can drastically improve the corrosion resistance and block the out-diffusion of Ni from the materials. Results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicate that both C 2 H 2 -PIII and D and C 2 H 2 -PIII do not roughen the original flat surface to an extent that can lead to degradation in corrosion resistance

  20. Fate of D3 mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to X-rays or carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, S; Pignalosa, D; Nasonova, E; Arrizabalaga, O; Helm, A; Durante, M; Ritter, S

    2014-01-15

    The risk of radiation exposure during embryonic development is still a major problem in radiotoxicology. In this study we investigated the response of the murine embryonic stem cell (mESC) line D3 to two radiation qualities: sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions. We analyzed clonogenic cell survival, proliferation, induction of chromosome aberrations as well as the capability of cells to differentiate to beating cardiomyocytes up to 3 days after exposure. Our results show that, for all endpoints investigated, carbon ions are more effective than X-rays at the same radiation dose. Additionally, in long term studies (≥8 days post-irradiation) chromosomal damage and the pluripotency state were investigated. These studies reveal that pluripotency markers are present in the progeny of cells surviving the exposure to both radiation types. However, only in the progeny of X-ray exposed cells the aberration frequency was comparable to that of the control population, while the progeny of carbon ion irradiated cells harbored significantly more aberrations than the control, generally translocations. We conclude that cells surviving the radiation exposure maintain pluripotency but may carry stable chromosomal rearrangements after densely ionizing radiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.