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Sample records for carbon ion radiation

  1. Erythrocyte stiffness during morphological remodeling induced by carbon ion radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoping Zhang

    Full Text Available The adverse effect induced by carbon ion radiation (CIR is still an unavoidable hazard to the treatment object. Thus, evaluation of its adverse effects on the body is a critical problem with respect to radiation therapy. We aimed to investigate the change between the configuration and mechanical properties of erythrocytes induced by radiation and found differences in both the configuration and the mechanical properties with involving in morphological remodeling process. Syrian hamsters were subjected to whole-body irradiation with carbon ion beams (1, 2, 4, and 6 Gy or X-rays (2, 4, 6, and 12 Gy for 3, 14 and 28 days. Erythrocytes in peripheral blood and bone marrow were collected for cytomorphological analysis. The mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were determined using atomic force microscopy, and the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was analyzed via western blotting. The results showed that dynamic changes were evident in erythrocytes exposed to different doses of carbon ion beams compared with X-rays and the control (0 Gy. The magnitude of impairment of the cell number and cellular morphology manifested the subtle variation according to the irradiation dose. In particular, the differences in the size, shape and mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were well exhibited. Furthermore, immunoblot data showed that the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was changed after irradiation, and there was a common pattern among its substantive characteristics in the irradiated group. Based on these findings, the present study concluded that CIR could induce a change in mechanical properties during morphological remodeling of erythrocytes. According to the unique characteristics of the biomechanical categories, we deduce that changes in cytomorphology and mechanical properties can be measured to evaluate the adverse effects generated by tumor radiotherapy. Additionally, for the first time, the current study

  2. Ionized carbon investigation (spectroscopic terms, radiative lifetimes) using ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchet-Poulizac, M.-C.

    1974-01-01

    The spectra of carbon in all its ionization states were studied by the beam-foil technique, from the far ultraviolet (30A) to 6000A. This excitation process gives the spectra of strongly charged ions with great intensity and favours population of the high levels of these ions. It has led to new identifications, mainly in the CIV, CV, and CVI spectra. The results of radiative lifetime measurements are given for many levels of C II, C III, C IV and C V. The chief cause of error on these measurements is the cascade phenomenon. Various methods of decay curve analysis accounting for these processes were examined and showed that lifetime values of precision better than 10% can be obtained. The transition probabilities were estimated from the lifetime measurements whenever possible. The spectra obtained in the laboratory were compared with those observed in the Wolf-Rayet stars of the carbon sequence. The similarities and dissimilarities which appear yield information on the physical conditions prevailing in the atmosphere of these stars [fr

  3. Study of carbon ion behavior by using collisional radiative model in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Kubota, Yuusuke; Saito, Masashi; Matama, Ken; Itakura, Akiyoshi; Cho, Teruji; Kato, Takako

    2006-01-01

    In a plasma experiment, collisional radiative model (CRM) is very useful model to evaluate impurity behaviors and plasma parameters with line emission from a plasma. CRMs for carbon and oxygen have been developed. However verification and application of the model for analysis of experimental results are not enough. Then we applied CRM calculation results to observed impurity spectra in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror to evaluate the impurity density profile and the particle balance of each charge state of carbon ion. We calculated the effective ionization rate for each charge state of carbon ion and obtained the density profile of each ion. Moreover, we calculated absolute emission intensities from all carbon ions. (author)

  4. Alanine Radiation Detectors in Therapeutic Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo

    of the depth dose curves. Solid state detectors, such as diamond detectors, radiochromic films, TLDs and the amino acid alanine are used due to there good spatial resolution. If used in particle beams their response often exhibits a dependence on particle energy and type, so the acquired signal is not always...... proportional to absorbed dose. A model by Hansen and Olsen, based on the Track Structure Theory is available, which can predict the relative efficiency of some detectors, when the particle spectrum is known. For alanine detectors the model was successfully validated by Hansen and Olsen for several ion species...... at energies below 20 MeV/u. We implemented this model in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. At the GSI heavy ion facility in Darmstadt, Germany, alanine has been irradiated with carbon ions at energies between 88 an 400 MeV/u, which is the energy range used for therapy. The irradiation and the detector response have...

  5. Nano mechanical properties of carbon films modified by ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, C.E.; Serbena, F.C.; Lepienski, C.M.; Odo, G.Y.; Zawislak, F.C.; Lopes, J.M.J.; Baptista, D.L.; Garcia, I.T.S.

    2000-01-01

    In present work it is measured hardness, Young modulus and friction coefficient values for different types of carbon films. These films were submitted to different ion bombardment conditions (energy and fluencies). The mechanical behavior was obtained by nano indentation technique and analyzed by the Oliver/Pharr method. For friction coefficient determination the nano scratch procedure is used. Pristine C 60 films (fullerenes) has a hardness of 0.33 GPa. After irradiation with different ions (He, N and Bi), the hardness raise to about 14 GPa and the Young modulus change from 20 to about 200 GPa. For photoresist film AZ-1350J irradiation with Ar and He change the hardness from 0.4 to about 14 GPa and the Young modulus raise from 4 to 80 GPa. In a-C-H the hardness change from 3.5 to 11 GPa when submitted to N irradiation. In PPA films the hardness value raise from 0.5 to 11 GPa after irradiation with Ar. These mechanical and tribological results were analyzed in terms of deposited energy by the ion irradiation and compared with those presented in the literature. (author)

  6. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  7. Carbon-Ion Radiation Therapy for Pelvic Recurrence of Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Shigeru, E-mail: s_yamada@nirs.go.jp [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ebner, Daniel K. [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Brown University Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Shinoto, Makoto [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Saga (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro [Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Isozaki, Yuka; Yasuda, Shigeo; Makishima, Hirokazu; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Isozaki, Tetsuro; Endo, Satoshi [Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Takahashi, Keiichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Disease Center, Komagome, Tokyo (Japan); Sekimoto, Mitsugu [National Hospital Organization Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Saito, Norio [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Matsubara, Hisahiro [Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Investigation of the treatment potential of carbon-ion radiation therapy in pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase 1/2 dose escalation study was performed. One hundred eighty patients (186 lesions) with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with carbon-ion radiation therapy (CIRT) (phase 1/2: 37 and 143 patients, respectively). The relapse locations were 71 in the presacral region, 82 in the pelvic sidewalls, 28 in the perineum, and 5 near the colorectal anastomosis. A 16-fraction in 4 weeks dose regimen was used, with total dose ranging from 67.2 to 73.6 Gy(RBE); RBE-weighted absorbed dose: 4.2 to 4.6 Gy(RBE)/fraction. Results: During phase 1, the highest total dose, 73.6 Gy(RBE), resulted in no grade >3 acute reactions in the 13 patients treated at that dose. Dose escalation was halted at this level, and this dose was used for phase 2, with no other grade >3 acute reactions observed. At 5 years, the local control and survival rates at 73.6 Gy(RBE) were 88% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80%-93%) and 59% (95% CI, 50%-68%), respectively. Conclusion: Carbon-ion radiation therapy may be a safe and effective treatment option for locally recurrent rectal cancer and may serve as an alternative to surgery.

  8. Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Gemcitabine for Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinoto, Makoto, E-mail: shinoto@saga-himat.jp [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamada, Shigeru [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yasuda, Shigeo [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Saisho, Hiromitsu [Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Kaken Hospital, Chemotherapy Research Institute, Chiba (Japan); Asano, Takehide; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Amano, Hodaka; Ishihara, Takeshi; Otsuka, Masayuki; Matsuda, Masamichi; Kainuma, Osamu; Funakoshi, Akihiro; Furuse, Junji; Nakagori, Toshio; Okusaka, Takuji; and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To determine, in the setting of locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the maximum tolerated dose of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) and gemcitabine dose delivered concurrently and to estimate local effect and survival. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of pancreatic invasive ductal carcinomas and radiographically unresectable disease without metastasis. Concurrent gemcitabine was administered on days 1, 8, and 15, and the dose levels were escalated from 400 to 1000 mg/m{sup 2} under the starting dose level (43.2 GyE) of C-ion RT. The dose levels of C-ion RT were escalated from 43.2 to 55.2 GyE at 12 fractions under the fixed recommended gemcitabine dose determined. Results: Seventy-six patients were enrolled. Among the 72 treated patients, dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 3 patients: grade 3 infection in 1 patient and grade 4 neutropenia in 2 patients. Only 1 patient experienced a late grade 3 gastric ulcer and bleeding 10 months after C-ion RT. The recommended dose of gemcitabine with C-ion RT was found to be 1000 mg/m{sup 2}. The dose of C-ion RT with the full dose of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2}) was safely increased to 55.2 GyE. The freedom from local progression rate was 83% at 2 years using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. The 2-year overall survival rates in all patients and in the high-dose group with stage III (≥45.6 GyE) were 35% and 48%, respectively. Conclusions: Carbon ion RT with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine was well tolerated and effective in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  9. Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Sacral Chordoma: An Analysis of 188 Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Reiko, E-mail: r_imai@nirs.go.jp [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Araki, Nobuhito [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Abe, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Kanehira, Chihiro; Kaya, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Chuman, Hirokazu; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuneyoshi, Masazumi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Hiraga, Hiroaki; Hiruma, Toru; Machinami, Rikuo; Matsumine, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Seiichi; Morioka, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Takehiko; and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of carbon ion radiation therapy administered to 188 patients with unresectable primary sacral chordomas. Patients and Methods: One hundred eighty-eight patients were treated with carbon ion radiation therapy at a single institute between 1996 and 2013 and retrospectively analyzed. The median age was 66 years. The highest proximal invasion reached past S2 level in 137 patients. The median clinical target volume was 345 cm{sup 3}. One hundred six patients received 67.2 gray equivalents (GyE)/16 fractions (fr), 74 patients received 70.4 GyE/16 fr, 7 patients received 73.6 GyE/16 fr, and 1 patient received 64.0 GyE/16 fr. Results: The median follow-up period was 62 months (range, 6.8-147.5 months). Seventy percent of patients were followed for 5 years or until death. The 5-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 77.2%, 81.1%, and 50.3%, respectively. Forty-one patients had a local recurrence. Sex, tumor volume, level of proximal invasion, and irradiated dose were unrelated to local control. There was grade 3 toxicity of the peripheral nerves in 6 patients and grade 4 toxicity of the skin in 2 patients. Ambulation remained in 97% of patients. Conclusions: Carbon ion radiation therapy was safe and effective for unresectable chordoma and provided good local control and survival while preserving ambulation.

  10. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  11. Carbon Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Biological effects on Oryza sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Xishan; Gong, Ning; Meng, Qingmei; Liu, Jiawei; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Large number of researches on rice after spaceflights indicated that rice was a favorable model organism to study biological effects induced by space radiation. The stimulative effect could often be found on rice seedlings after irradiation by low-dose energetic heavy-ion radiation. Spaceflight also could induce stimulative effect on kinds of seeds. To further understand the mechanism of low-dose radiation biological effects and the dose range, the germinated rice seeds which were irradiated by different doses of carbon heavy-ion (0, 0.02, 0.1, 0.2, 1, 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20Gy, LET=27.3keV/µm) were used as materials to study. By investigating the variation of rice phenotype under different doses, we found that 2Gy radiation dose was a dividing point of the phenotypic variation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the variation of mitochondria, chloroplast, endoplasmic reticulum, ribosome and nucleus in mesophyll cell of rice apical meristem at 24 hours after radiation with different doses. The cells were not apparently physiologically damaged when the dose of radiation was less than 2Gy. The number of chloroplast did not change significantly, but the number of mitochondria was significantly increased, and gathered around in the chloroplast and endoplasmic reticulum; the obvious lesion of chloroplast and mitochondria were found at the mesophyll cells when radiation dose was higher than 2Gy. The mitochondria were swelling and appearing blurred crest. The chloroplast and mitochondrial mutation rate increased significantly (pmitochondrial was an important organelle involved in the antioxidative systems, its dysfunction could result in the increase of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation. We found that the growth stimulation induced by low-dose radiation mainly occurred at three-leaf stage along with the increasing activity of antioxidase system and damages of lipid peroxidation. We also found that the relative expression of genes sdhb and aox1a

  12. Verification of Dose Distribution in Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy for Stage I Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irie, Daisuke; Saitoh, Jun-ichi, E-mail: junsaito@gunma-u.ac.jp; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Abe, Takanori; Kubota, Yoshiki; Sakai, Makoto; Noda, Shin-ei; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate robustness of dose distribution of carbon-ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to identify factors affecting the dose distribution by simulated dose distribution. Methods and Materials: Eighty irradiation fields for delivery of C-ion RT were analyzed in 20 patients with stage I NSCLC. Computed tomography images were obtained twice before treatment initiation. Simulated dose distribution was reconstructed on computed tomography for confirmation under the same settings as actual treatment with respiratory gating and bony structure matching. Dose-volume histogram parameters, such as %D95 (percentage of D95 relative to the prescribed dose), were calculated. Patients with any field for which the %D95 of gross tumor volume (GTV) was below 90% were classified as unacceptable for treatment, and the optimal target margin for such cases was examined. Results: Five patients with a total of 8 fields (10% of total number of fields analyzed) were classified as unacceptable according to %D95 of GTV, although most patients showed no remarkable change in the dose-volume histogram parameters. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that tumor displacement and change in water-equivalent pathlength were significant predictive factors of unacceptable cases (P<.001 and P=.002, respectively). The main cause of degradation of the dose distribution was tumor displacement in 7 of the 8 unacceptable fields. A 6-mm planning target volume margin ensured a GTV %D95 of >90%, except in 1 extremely unacceptable field. Conclusions: According to this simulation analysis of C-ion RT for stage I NSCLC, a few fields were reported as unacceptable and required resetting of body position and reconfirmation. In addition, tumor displacement and change in water-equivalent pathlength (bone shift and/or chest wall thickness) were identified as factors influencing the robustness of dose distribution. Such uncertainties should be regarded

  13. Dose-volume histogram analysis of hepatic toxicity related to carbon ion radiation therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Shigeo; Kato, Hirotoshi; Tsujii, Hitohiko; Mizoe, Junetsu

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the correlation of hepatic toxicity with dose-volume factors of carbon ion radiotherapy in the liver. Forty-nine patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy delivered in 4 fractions over 4 to 7 days. Six patients received a total dose of 48 GyE and 43 received 52.8 GyE. The correlation of various blood biochemistry data with dose-volume histogram (DVH) data in non-cancerous liver were evaluated. The strongest significant correlation was seen between percent volume of non-cancerous liver with radiation dose more than 11 GyE (V 11 GyE ) and elevation of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) level as early adverse response after carbon ion beam radiation therapy (p=0.0003). In addition, significant correlation between DVH data and change of several other blood biochemistry data were also revealed in early phase. In late phase after carbon ion radiotherapy, the strongest significant correlation was seen between decrease of platelet count and V 26GyE (p=0.015). There was no significant correlation between other blood biochemistry data and DVH data in the late phase. It was suggested that dose-volume factors of carbon ion radiotherapy influenced only transient aggravation of liver function, which improved in the long term after irradiation. (author)

  14. On the cost-effectiveness of Carbon ion radiation therapy for skull base chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaekel, Oliver; Land, Beate; Combs, Stephanie Elisabeth; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Debus, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The cost-effectiveness of Carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) for patients with skull base chordoma is analyzed. Materials and Methods: Primary treatment costs and costs for recurrent tumors are estimated. The costs for treatment of recurrent tumors were estimated using a sample of 10 patients presenting with recurrent chordoma at the base of skull at DKFZ. Using various scenarios for the local control rate and reimbursements of Carbon ion therapy the cost-effectiveness of ion therapy for these tumors is analyzed. Results: If local control rate for skull base chordoma achieved with carbon ion therapy exceeds 70.3%, the overall treatment costs for carbon RT are lower than for conventional RTI. The cost-effectiveness ratio for carbon RT is 2539 Euro per 1% increase in survival, or 7692 Euro per additional life year. Conclusion: Current results support the thesis that Carbon ion RT, although more expensive, is at least as cost-effective as advanced photon therapies for these patients. Ion RT, however, offers substantial benefits for the patients such as improved control rates and less severe side effects

  15. Effect of endoplasmic reticulum stress on the response of HeLa cells to carbon ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jiefang; Wang Zhuanzi; Wei Wei; Dang Bingrong; Li Wenjian

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of endoplasmic reticulum stress on HeLa cells to "1"2C"6"+ ion irradiation, HeLa cells were pretreated with 2.5 mmol/L dithiothreitol and irradiated by "1"2C"6"+ ions with different doses. The results showed that, compared with IR alone, dithiothreitol combined with carbon ion irradiation caused HeLa cell survival decreased, and the apoptosis increased. Moreover, dithiothreitol and carbon ion radiation combination treatment led to a significant increase of G_2/M phase, and autophagy was activated obviously in combination treatment group. The results imply that continuous endoplasmic reticulum stress can change the response of HeLa cells to "1"2C"6"+ irradiation, and dithiothreitol may affect HeLa cells through the autophagy cell death pathway. (authors)

  16. A custom-made mouthpiece incorporating tongue depressors and elevators to reduce radiation-induced tongue mucositis during carbon-ion radiation therapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa, Hiroaki; Koto, Masashi; Ebner, Daniel K; Takagi, Ryo; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi

    We introduce a custom-made mouthpiece for carbon-ion radiation therapy for head and neck malignancy. The mouthpiece incorporates either a tongue depressor or elevator depending on tumor location. The risk of tongue mucositis may be reduced without compromising therapeutic efficacy through mouthpiece shaping. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Multicenter Study of Carbon-Ion Radiation Therapy for Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck: Subanalysis of the Japan Carbon-Ion Radiation Oncology Study Group (J-CROS) Study (1402 HN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koto, Masashi, E-mail: koto.masashi@qst.go.jp [Hospital of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Chiba (Japan); Demizu, Yusuke [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno (Japan); Saitoh, Jun-ichi [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Suefuji, Hiroaki [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA-HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi [Hospital of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Chiba (Japan); Okimoto, Tomoaki [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA-HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Takagi, Ryo [Hospital of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Chiba (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi [Hospital of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Chiba (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of carbon-ion radiation therapy (RT) for mucosal melanoma of the head and neck (MMHN) in the Japan Carbon-Ion Radiation Oncology Study Group study. Methods and Materials: Patients with MMHN with N0-1M0 status who were treated with carbon-ion RT at 4 institutions in Japan between November 2003 and December 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Two hundred sixty patients (male, 111; female, 149; median age, 68 years) with histologically proven MMHN were enrolled. Results: Primary sites included the nasal cavity in 178 patients, paranasal sinuses in 43, oral cavity in 27, and pharynx in 12. Eighty-six patients had T3 tumors, 147 had T4a tumors, and 27 had T4b tumors. Two hundred fifty-one patients were diagnosed with N0 disease, and 9 with N1 disease. The median total dose and number of fractions were 57.6 Gy RBE (relative biological effectiveness) and 16, respectively. Chemotherapy including dimethyl traizeno imidazole carboxamide was used concurrently in 129 patients. The median follow-up duration was 22 months (range, 1-132 months). The 2-year overall survival and local control rates were 69.4% and 83.9%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that gross tumor volume and concurrent chemotherapy were significant prognostic factors for overall survival. Grade 3 and grade 4 late morbidities were observed in 27 and 7 patients (5 developed ipsilateral blindness, 1 mucosal ulcer, and 1 second malignant disease in the irradiated volume), respectively. No patients developed grade 5 late morbidities. Conclusion: Carbon-ion RT is a promising treatment option for MMHN.

  18. Radiation biophysical studies with mammalian cells and a modulated carbon ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.D.; Blakely, E.A.; Smith, K.C.; Urtasun, R.C.; Lyman, J.T.; Tobias, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    Chinese hamster (V-79) and human kidney (T-1) cells were irradiated in stirred suspensions placed at various positions in the plateau and extended Bragg peak of a 400-MeV/amu carbon ion beam. The range of the ions was modulated by a lead (translational) ridge filter and a brass (spiral) ridge filter designed to produce extended peaks of approximately 4 and 10 cm, respectively. Stationary-phase and G 1 -phase populations of Chinese hamster cells were found to have different absolute radiosensitivities which, in turn, were different from that of asynchronous human kidney cells. The increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) observed as carbon ions were slowed down and stopped in water was similar for the three cell populations at doses greater than 400 rad. At lower doses the RBE was greater for the hamster cell populations than for the human kidney cells. The gain in RBE (at the 50% survival level) between the plateaus and the middle region of the extended peaks was approximately 2.0 and 1.7 for the 4- and 10-cm extended peaks, respectively. Oxygen enhancement ratios (OER) were determined at the 10% survival levels with stationary-phase populations of hamster cells. Values of 2.8, 2.65, and 1.65 were obtained for the OER of 220-kV x rays, plateau carbon, and the middle region of the 4-cm carbon peak, respectively. Across the 10-cm carbon peak the OER was found to vary between values of 2.4 to 1.55 from the proximal to distal positions

  19. Radiative double-electron capture in collisions of fast heavy ions with solid carbon targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakhontov, V.L.; Amusia, M.Y.

    1997-01-01

    Two-electron capture with an emission of a single photon (TESP) in collisions of highly charged ions with light atoms is considered. Such a process is actually a time-reversed double photoionization but occurring at specific kinematics. In the lowest order in the interelectron interaction, the TESP probability is determined by two diagrams which are evaluated analytically by means of the Coulomb Green close-quote s function. The calculated ratio of the radiative double-electron capture and single recombination cross sections is in fair agreement with the data obtained in the recent experimental study of this phenomenon. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Carbon-ion radiation enhances migration ability and invasiveness of the pancreatic cancer cell, PANC-1, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Mayumi; Otsuka, Yoshimi; Imadome, Kaori; Endo, Satoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Imai, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease that responds poorly to conventional photon radiotherapy. Carbon-ion (C-ion) radiation has advantages compared with conventional radiotherapy, because it enables more accurate dose distribution and more efficient tumor cell killing. To elucidate the effects of local radiotherapy on the characteristics of metastatic tumors, it is necessary to understand the nature of motility in irradiated tumor cells; this will, in turn, facilitate the development of effective strategies to counter tumor cell motility, which can be used in combination with radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to examine the invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells exposed to C-ion irradiation. We found that C-ion irradiation suppressed the migration of MIAPaCa-2, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1; diminished the invasiveness of MIAPaCa-2; and tended to reduce the invasion of BxPC-3 and AsPC-1. However, C-ion irradiation increased the invasiveness of PANC-1 through the activation of plasmin and urokinase-type plasiminogen activator. Administration of serine protease inhibitor (SerPI) alone failed to reduce C-ion-induced PANC-1 invasiveness, whereas the combination of SerPI and Rho-associated coiled-coil forming protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor suppressed it. Furthermore, PANC-1 showed mesenchymal-amoeboid transition when we treated with SerPI alone. In conclusion, C-ion irradiation is effective in suppressing the invasive potential of several pancreatic tumor cell lines, but not PANC-1; this is the first study showing that C-ion irradiation induces the invasive potential of a tumor cell line. Further in vivo studies are required to examine the therapeutic effectiveness of radiotherapy combined with inhibitors of both mesenchymal and amoeboid modes of tumor cell motility. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of carbon ion radiation therapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobaraki, A.; Ohno, Tatsuya; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Nakano, Takashi; Yamada Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of carbon ion radiotherapy compared with conventional multimodality therapy in the treatment of patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Direct costs for diagnosis, recurrent treatment, follow-up, visits, supportive therapy, complications, and admission were computed for each individual using a sample of 25 patients presenting with local recurrent rectal cancer at the National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) and Gunma University Hospital (GUH). Patients received only radical surgery for primary rectal adenocarcinoma and had isolated unresectable pelvic recurrence. Fourteen and 11 patients receiving treatment for the local recurrence between 2003 and 2005 were followed retrospectively at NIRS and GUH, respectively. Treatment was carried out with carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) alone at NIRS, while multimodality therapy including three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hyperthermia was performed at GUH. The 2-year overall survival rate was 85% and 55% for CIRT and multimodality treatment, respectively. The mean cost was 4803946 yen for the CIRT group and 4611100 yen for the multimodality treatment group. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for CIRT was 6428 yen per 1% increase in survival. The median duration of total hospitalization was 37 days for CIRT and 66 days for the multimodality treatment group. In conclusion, by calculating all direct costs, CIRT was found to be a potential cost effective treatment modality as compared to multimodality treatment for locally recurrent rectal cancer. (author)

  2. Carbon Ion Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Herrmann, Rochus

    On the importance of choice of target size for selective boosting of hypoxic tumor subvolumina in carbon ion therapy Purpose: Functional imaging methods in radiotherapy are maturing and can to some extent uncover radio resistant structures found within a tumour entity. Selective boost of identified...... effect. All cell lines investigated here did not reach an OER of 1, even for the smaller structures, which may indicate that the achievable dose average LET of carbon ions is too low, and heavier ions than carbon may be considered for functional LET-painting....

  3. Radiation-induced segregation and void formation in C+ ion-irradiated vanadium-carbon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeyama, T.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Sato, Y.; Mochizuki, S.

    1982-01-01

    To clarify the effect of interstitial elements on radiation-induced segregation and void formation in V and V-C alloys irradiated by 200 keV C + ions to a dose of 48 dpa at 973 K, the microstructural observation and the measurement of C segregation to the surfaces were carried out by TEM and XPS. Voids, dislocations and precipitates were produced in all of the specimens during irradiation. The addition of C in V led to a reduction of void size and to increase in void number density, consequently the void swelling was suppressed strongly. Radiation-induced segregation of C was observed clearly on and near the irradiated surfaces of V-C alloys and as a result of the enrichment of C atoms, carbides precipitated on the surfaces. It is the first evidence of the radiation-induced segregation of interstitial elements on the surfaces. Also, quasi-carbides were observed on the (210) habit plaints near large voids and dislocations in V. The phenomena show that C atoms, which was insolved and/or implanted, interact strongly with vacancies rather than self-interstitial atoms and migrate with vacancies toward defect sinks, such as surfaces, voids, and dislocations. The segregated zones of C reduced the sink efficiency of the defects, and showed the effect of the suppression on void in V-C alloys. (author)

  4. Heavy-ion radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Masashi

    1975-01-01

    New aspect of heavy ion radiation chemistry is reviewed. Experiment has been carried out with carbon ions and nitrogen ions accelerated by a 160 cm cyclotron of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research. The results of experiments are discussed, taking into consideration the effects of core radius depending on heavy ion energy and of the branch tracks of secondary electrons outside the core on chemical reaction and the yield of products. The effect of core size on chemical reaction was not able to be observed, because the incident energy of heavy ions was only several tens of MeV. Regarding high radical density, attention must be given to the production of oxygen in the core. It is possible to produce O 2 in the core in case of high linear energy transfer (LET), while no production of O 2 in case of low LET radiation. This may be one of study problems in future. LET effects on the yield of decomposed products were examined on acetone, methyl-ethyl-ketone and diethyl ketone, using heavy ions (C and N) as well as gamma radiation and helium ions. These three ketones showed that the LET change of two gaseous products, H 2 and CO, was THF type. There are peaks at 50-70 eV/A in the yield of both products. The peaks suggest the occurrence of ''saturation'' in decomposition. Attention was drawn to acetone containing a small amount (2 wt.%) of H 2 O. H 2 O and CO produced from this system differ from those in the pure system. The hydrogen connection formed by such a small amount of H 2 O may mediate the energy transfer. Sodium acetate tri-hydrate produces CH 3 radical selectively by gamma-ray irradiation at 77 K. In this case, the production of CH 2 COO - increases with the increase of LET of radiation. This phenomenon may be an important study problem. (Iwakiri, K.)

  5. TAS-116, a novel Hsp90 inhibitor, selectively enhances radio-sensitivity of human cancer cells to X-rays and carbon ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Younghyun; Sunada, Shigeaki; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Fujimori, Akira; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Hsp90 inhibitors have been investigated as cancer therapeutics in mono-therapy and to augment radiotherapy, however serious adverse effects of early generation Hsp90 inhibitors limited their development. TAS-116 is a novel Hsp90 inhibitor with lower adverse effects than other Hsp90 inhibitors, and here we investigated the radio-sensitizing effects of TAS-116 in low LET X-ray, and high LET carbon ion irradiated human cancer cells and mouse tumor xenografts. TAS-116 decreased cell survival of both X-ray and carbon ion-irradiated human cancer cell lines (HeLa and H1299 cells), and similar to other Hsp90 inhibitors, it did not affect radiosensitivity of non-cancerous human fibroblasts. TAS-116 increased the number of radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci, and delayed the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). TAS-116 reduced the expression of proteins that mediate repair of DSBs by homologous recombination (RAD51) and non-homologous end joining (Ku, DNA-PKcs), and suppressed formation of RAD51 foci and phosphorylation/activation of DNA-PKcs. TAS-116 also decreased expression of the cdc25 cell cycle progression marker, markedly increasing G2/M arrest. Combined treatment of mouse tumor xenografts with carbon ions and TAS-116 showed promising delay in tumor growth compared to either individual treatment. These results demonstrate that TAS-116 radio-sensitizes human cancer cells to both X rays and carbon ions by inhibiting the two major DSB repair pathways, and these effects were accompanied by marked cell cycle arrest. The promising results of combination TAS-116 + carbon ion radiation therapy of tumor xenografts justify further exploration of TAS-116 as an adjunct to radiotherapy using low or high LET radiation. PMID:28062703

  6. Randomised trial of proton vs. carbon ion radiation therapy in patients with low and intermediate grade chondrosarcoma of the skull base, clinical phase III study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikoghosyan, Anna V; Rauch, Geraldine; Münter, Marc W; Jensen, Alexandra D; Combs, Stephanie E; Kieser, Meinhard; Debus, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Low and intermediate grade chondrosarcomas are relative rare bone tumours. About 5-12% of all chondrosarcomas are localized in base of skull region. Low grade chondrosarcoma has a low incidence of distant metastasis but is potentially lethal disease. Therefore, local therapy is of crucial importance in the treatment of skull base chondrosarcomas. Surgical resection is the primary treatment standard. Unfortunately the late diagnosis and diagnosis at the extensive stage are common due to the slow and asymptomatic growth of the lesions. Consequently, complete resection is hindered due to close proximity to critical and hence dose limiting organs such as optic nerves, chiasm and brainstem. Adjuvant or additional radiation therapy is very important for the improvement of local control rates in the primary treatment. Proton therapy is the gold standard in the treatment of skull base chondrosarcomas. However, high-LET (linear energy transfer) beams such as carbon ions theoretically offer advantages by enhanced biologic effectiveness in slow-growing tumours. The study is a prospective randomised active-controlled clinical phase III trial. The trial will be carried out at Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapie (HIT) centre as monocentric trial. Patients with skull base chondrosarcomas will be randomised to either proton or carbon ion radiation therapy. As a standard, patients will undergo non-invasive, rigid immobilization and target volume definition will be carried out based on CT and MRI data. The biologically isoeffective target dose to the PTV (planning target volume) in carbon ion treatment will be 60 Gy E ± 5% and 70 Gy E ± 5% (standard dose) in proton therapy respectively. The 5 year local-progression free survival (LPFS) rate will be analysed as primary end point. Overall survival, progression free and metastasis free survival, patterns of recurrence, local control rate and morbidity are the secondary end points. Up to now it was impossible to compare two different

  7. Characterization of carbon ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikazono, N.; Suzuki, C.; Kitamura, S.; Watanabe, H.; Tano, S.; Tanaka, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana by carbon ions was carried out to investigate the mutational effect of ion particles in higher plants. The averaged mutation rate of carbon ions was 2.0 X 10 -6 / Gy, which was 18-fold higher than that of electrons. PCR analysis of the carbon ion-induced mutants showed that, out of 28 mutant alleles, 14 had point-like mutations within the gene, while 14 contained large structural alterations. In the case of 12 electron-induced mutants, 9 had point-like mutations within the gene, while 3 contained large structural alterations. These results suggest that carbon ions are more likely to induce large structural alterations compared with electrons. Further sequence analysis revealed that most of the point-like mutations induced by carbon ions were short deletions. In the case of rearrangements, DNA strand breaks were found to be rejoined using, if present, short homologous sequences for both types of radiation. After carbon ion-irradiation, small deletions were frequently observed around the breakpoints, whereas duplications of terminal sequence were found after electron-irradiation. These results suggest that non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway operates after plant cells are exposed to both ion particles and electrons but that different mode of rejoining deals with the broken ends produced by each radiation. From the present results, it seems reasonable to assume that carbon ions could predominantly induce null mutations in Arabidopsis. The fact that the molecular nature of carbon ion-induced mutation was different from that of electrons and that the molecular mechanisms of cells to induce mutations appeared to be also different implicates that ion particle is not only valuable as a new mutagen but also useful as a new tool to study repair mechanisms of certain types of DNA damage

  8. Biological effects of accelerated boron, carbon, and neon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryev, Yu.G.; Ryzhov, N.I.; Popov, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    The biological effects of accelerated boron, carbon, and neon ions on various biological materials were determined. The accelerated ions included 10 B, 11 B, 12 C, 20 Ne, 22 Ne, and 40 Ar. Gamma radiation and x radiation were used as references in the experiments. Among the biological materials used were mammalian cells and tissues, yeasts, unicellular algae (chlorella), and hydrogen bacteria. The results of the investigation are given and the biophysical aspects of the problem are discussed

  9. Temporal Lobe Reactions After Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy: Comparison of Relative Biological Effectiveness–Weighted Tolerance Doses Predicted by Local Effect Models I and IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillmann, Clarissa, E-mail: clarissa.gillmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schlampp, Ingmar [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Karger, Christian P. [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted tolerance doses for temporal lobe reactions after carbon ion radiation therapy using 2 different versions of the local effect model (LEM I vs LEM IV) for the same patient collective under identical conditions. Methods and Materials: In a previous study, 59 patients were investigated, of whom 10 experienced temporal lobe reactions (TLR) after carbon ion radiation therapy for low-grade skull-base chordoma and chondrosarcoma at Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in 2002 and 2003. TLR were detected as visible contrast enhancements on T1-weighted MRI images within a median follow-up time of 2.5 years. Although the derived RBE-weighted temporal lobe doses were based on the clinically applied LEM I, we have now recalculated the RBE-weighted dose distributions using LEM IV and derived dose-response curves with Dmax,V-1 cm³ (the RBE-weighted maximum dose in the remaining temporal lobe volume, excluding the volume of 1 cm³ with the highest dose) as an independent dosimetric variable. The resulting RBE-weighted tolerance doses were compared with those of the previous study to assess the clinical impact of LEM IV relative to LEM I. Results: The dose-response curve of LEM IV is shifted toward higher values compared to that of LEM I. The RBE-weighted tolerance dose for a 5% complication probability (TD{sub 5}) increases from 68.8 ± 3.3 to 78.3 ± 4.3 Gy (RBE) for LEM IV as compared to LEM I. Conclusions: LEM IV predicts a clinically significant increase of the RBE-weighted tolerance doses for the temporal lobe as compared to the currently applied LEM I. The limited available photon data do not allow a final conclusion as to whether RBE predictions of LEM I or LEM IV better fit better clinical experience in photon therapy. The decision about a future clinical application of LEM IV therefore requires additional analysis of temporal lobe reactions in a

  10. Microdosimetry of proton and carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin [Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology, Ongkharak, Nakhon Nayok 26120 (Thailand); Hultqvist, Martha [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-10691 (Sweden); Lindborg, Lennart; Nikjoo, Hooshang, E-mail: hooshang.nikjoo@ki.se [Radiation Biophysics Group, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Box 260 SE-17176, Stockholm (Sweden); Uehara, Shuzo [School of Health Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    carbon ion beams. The results are useful for characterizing ion beams of practical importance for biophysical modeling of radiation-induced DNA damage response and repair in the depth profiles of protons and carbon ions used in radiotherapy.

  11. Single-Fraction Carbon-Ion Radiation Therapy for Patients 80 Years of Age and Older With Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karube, Masataka; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Nakajima, Mio; Yamashita, Hideomi; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Takehiko; Kamada, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In an aging society, many senior citizens want less invasive treatment because of potential medical complications. The National Institute of Radiological Sciences has started to treat stage I lung cancer with single-fraction carbon-ion radiation therapy (CIRT) as a dose escalation prospective phase 1/2 trial. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of CIRT for patients 80 years of age and older, undergoing single-fraction CIRT. Methods and Materials: Peripheral non-small cell lung cancer patients who were treated with single-fraction CIRT were prospectively followed. We analyzed the data from among these patients 80 years of age and older. Results: There were 70 patients. Median age was 83 years (range: 80-89) and median follow-up period was 42.7 months (range: 12-128 months). Three-year local control, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 88.0%, 81.6%, and 72.4%, respectively. Five-year local control, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 85.8%, 64.9%, and 39.7%, respectively. There were no adverse effects higher than grade 2 either in the acute or late phase in terms of skin and lung. Analgesic agents were necessary for only 5 patients (7.1%), to relieve muscular or rib fracture pain caused by irradiation. Conclusions: Single-fraction CIRT was low-risk and effective, even for the elderly.

  12. Single-Fraction Carbon-Ion Radiation Therapy for Patients 80 Years of Age and Older With Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karube, Masataka, E-mail: mstk117@gmail.com [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Nakajima, Mio [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yamashita, Hideomi; Nakagawa, Keiichi [Department of Radiology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Fujisawa, Takehiko [Chiba Foundation for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Chiba (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: In an aging society, many senior citizens want less invasive treatment because of potential medical complications. The National Institute of Radiological Sciences has started to treat stage I lung cancer with single-fraction carbon-ion radiation therapy (CIRT) as a dose escalation prospective phase 1/2 trial. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of CIRT for patients 80 years of age and older, undergoing single-fraction CIRT. Methods and Materials: Peripheral non-small cell lung cancer patients who were treated with single-fraction CIRT were prospectively followed. We analyzed the data from among these patients 80 years of age and older. Results: There were 70 patients. Median age was 83 years (range: 80-89) and median follow-up period was 42.7 months (range: 12-128 months). Three-year local control, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 88.0%, 81.6%, and 72.4%, respectively. Five-year local control, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 85.8%, 64.9%, and 39.7%, respectively. There were no adverse effects higher than grade 2 either in the acute or late phase in terms of skin and lung. Analgesic agents were necessary for only 5 patients (7.1%), to relieve muscular or rib fracture pain caused by irradiation. Conclusions: Single-fraction CIRT was low-risk and effective, even for the elderly.

  13. Iterative reconstruction with boundary detection for carbon ion computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Deepak; Qin, Nan; Zhang, You; Kalantari, Faraz; Niu, Shanzhou; Jia, Xun; Pompos, Arnold; Jiang, Steve; Wang, Jing

    2018-03-01

    In heavy ion radiation therapy, improving the accuracy in range prediction of the ions inside the patient’s body has become essential. Accurate localization of the Bragg peak provides greater conformity of the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. We investigated the use of carbon ions directly for computed tomography (carbon CT) to create the relative stopping power map of a patient’s body. The Geant4 toolkit was used to perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the carbon ion trajectories, to study their lateral and angular deflections and the most likely paths, using a water phantom. Geant4 was used to create carbonCT projections of a contrast and spatial resolution phantom, with a cone beam of 430 MeV/u carbon ions. The contrast phantom consisted of cranial bone, lung material, and PMMA inserts while the spatial resolution phantom contained bone and lung material inserts with line pair (lp) densities ranging from 1.67 lp cm-1 through 5 lp cm-1. First, the positions of each carbon ion on the rear and front trackers were used for an approximate reconstruction of the phantom. The phantom boundary was extracted from this approximate reconstruction, by using the position as well as angle information from the four tracking detectors, resulting in the entry and exit locations of the individual ions on the phantom surface. Subsequent reconstruction was performed by the iterative algebraic reconstruction technique coupled with total variation minimization (ART-TV) assuming straight line trajectories for the ions inside the phantom. The influence of number of projections was studied with reconstruction from five different sets of projections: 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90. Additionally, the effect of number of ions on the image quality was investigated by reducing the number of ions/projection while keeping the total number of projections at 60. An estimation of carbon ion range using the carbonCT image resulted in improved range prediction compared to the range calculated using a

  14. Carbon ion radiotherapy for sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    Principles of heavy ion therapy, its application to bone and soft tissue sarcomas and outline of its general state are described. The heavy ion therapy has advantages of its high dose distribution to the target and strong biological effect due to the Bragg peak formation and high linear energy transfer, respectively. The authors use carbon ion generated by Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) for the therapy of performance state 0-2 patients with the sarcomas unresectable, diagnosed pathologically, and of 60 y, 45% and teens, 8%) have been treated, whose tumor site has been the pelvis in 73%, volume >600 mL in 63%, tissue type of bone tumor in 70% (where cordoma has amounted to>200 cases). Five-year local control rate is found 71% and survival, 59%. In 175 therapeutically fresh cases with sacral cordoma of median age 67 y, with median clinical target volume 9 cm, treated with median dose 70.4 GyE/16 irradiations, the 8-y local control rate is found to be 69% and survival, 74%, within the median follow-up 54 months; with severe skin ulcer in 2 cases and deterioration of nervous dysfunction in 15 cases; suggesting the therapy is as effective and useful as surgical resection. At present, the therapy is not applicable to Japan health insurance. In the author's hospital, the heavy ion therapy has been conducted to total of >6,000 patients, which amounting to the largest number in the world. Now, 3 Japanese facilities can do the therapy as well and 3 countries in the world.(T.T.)

  15. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L J; Sood, D K; Manory, R R [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 {mu}m thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10{sup 17} - 8x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}. Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L.J.; Sood, D.K.; Manory, R.R. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 {mu}m thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10{sup 17} - 8x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}. Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.J.; Sood, D.K.; Manory, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 μm thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10 17 - 8x10 17 ions cm -2 . Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs

  18. Unlimited ion acceleration by radiation pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S V; Echkina, E Yu; Esirkepov, T Zh; Inovenkov, I N; Kando, M; Pegoraro, F; Korn, G

    2010-04-02

    The energy of ions accelerated by an intense electromagnetic wave in the radiation pressure dominated regime can be greatly enhanced due to a transverse expansion of a thin target. The expansion decreases the number of accelerated ions in the irradiated region resulting in an increase in the ion energy and in the ion longitudinal velocity. In the relativistic limit, the ions become phase locked with respect to the electromagnetic wave resulting in unlimited ion energy gain.

  19. SU-F-T-124: Radiation Biological Equivalent Presentations OfLEM-1 and MKM Approaches in the Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi, W; Jiang, G; Sheng, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study the correlations of the radiation biological equivalent doses (BED) along depth and lateral distance between LEM-1 and MKM approaches. Methods: In NIRS-MKM (Microdosimetric Kinetic Model) approach, the prescribed BED, referred as C-Eq, doses aims to present the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for different energies of carbon-ions on a fixed 10% survival value of HCG cell with respect to convention X-ray. Instead of a fixed 10% survival, the BED doses of LEM-1 (Local Effect Model) approach, referred as X-Eq, aims to present the RBE over the whole survival curve of chordoma-like cell with alpha/beta ratio of 2.0. The relationship of physical doses as a function of C-Eq and X-Eq doses were investigated along depth and lateral distance for various sizes of cubic targets in water irradiated by carbon-ions. Results: At the center of each cubic target, the trends between physical and C-Eq or X-Eq doses can be described by a linear and 2nd order polynomial functions, respectively. Using fit functions can then calculate a scaling factor between C-Eq and X-Eq doses to have similar physical doses. With equalized C-Eq and X-Eq doses at the depth of target center, over- and under-estimated X-Eq to C-Eq are seen for depths before and after the target center, respectively. Near the distal edge along depth, sharp rising of RBE value is observed for X-Eq, but sharp dropping of RBE value is observed for C-Eq. For lateral locations near and just outside 50% dose level, sharp raising of RBE value is also seen for X-Eq, while only minor increasing with fast dropping for C-Eq. Conclusion: An analytical function to model the differences between the CEq and X-Eq doses along depth and lateral distance need to further investigated to explain varied clinic outcome of specific cancers using two different approaches to calculated BED doses.

  20. Radiation Effects in Carbon Nanoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory D. Cress

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard dielectric hardening approaches are applicable to carbon nanoelectronics devices.

  1. Collisional-radiative models for hydrogen-like and helium-like carbon and oxygen ions and applications to experimental data from the TS Tokamak and the reversed field pinch RFX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraro, L.; Sattin, F.; Puiatty, M.E.; Scarin, P.; Valisa, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Mattioli, M.; Demichelis, C.; Mandl, W. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Hogan, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Collisional radiative models (CRM) are needed to simulate experimental line brightnesses and emissivities from fusion devices. CRM are built for H-like and He-like carbon and oxygen ions. The impurity ion radial distribution is obtained using a transport code with two radius dependent transport parameters: a diffusion coefficient D and an inward convection velocity V. Examples are given of the quantitative interpretation of experimental spectroscopic data from two fusion devices: the Tore Supra Tokamak and the Reversed Field Pinch RFX. (K.A.). 60 refs.

  2. Collisional-radiative models for hydrogen-like and helium-like carbon and oxygen ions and applications to experimental data from the TS Tokamak and the reversed field pinch RFX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carraro, L.; Sattin, F.; Puiatty, M.E.; Scarin, P.; Valisa, M.; Mattioli, M.; Demichelis, C.; Mandl, W.

    1996-07-01

    Collisional radiative models (CRM) are needed to simulate experimental line brightnesses and emissivities from fusion devices. CRM are built for H-like and He-like carbon and oxygen ions. The impurity ion radial distribution is obtained using a transport code with two radius dependent transport parameters: a diffusion coefficient D and an inward convection velocity V. Examples are given of the quantitative interpretation of experimental spectroscopic data from two fusion devices: the Tore Supra Tokamak and the Reversed Field Pinch RFX. (K.A.)

  3. Radiation effects of ion beams on polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Seiichi

    1993-01-01

    Recent progress in the radiation effects of ion beams on polymers are reviewed briefly. Our recent work on the radiation effects of ion beams on polystyrene thin films on silicon wafers and time resolved emission studies on polymers are described. (orig.)

  4. Changes of the electronic structure of the atoms of nitrogen in nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes under the influence of pulsed ion radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korusenko, P.M., E-mail: korusenko@obisp.oscsbras.ru [Omsk Scientific Centre, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Karl Marx Avenue, 15, Omsk 644024 (Russian Federation); Bolotov, V.V.; Nesov, S.N.; Povoroznyuk, S.N. [Omsk Scientific Centre, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Karl Marx Avenue, 15, Omsk 644024 (Russian Federation); Khailov, I.P. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Ave. 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    With the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) there have been investigated the changes of the chemical state of nitrogen atoms in the structure of nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CN{sub x}-MWCNTs) resulting from the impact of pulsed ion beam at various parameters of the beam (energy density, number of pulses). It has been established that irradiation with the pulsed ion beam leads to a reduction of the total amount of nitrogen in CN{sub x} nanotubes. It has been shown that a single pulse irradiation of ion beam at the energy densities of 0.5, 1, 1.5 J/cm{sup 2} leads to restructuring of the nitrogen from pyridinic and pyrrolic configuration to graphitic state. Complete removal of nitrogen (pyridinic, pyrrolic, graphitic) embedded in the structure of the walls of CN{sub x} nanotubes occurs at ten pulses and 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}.

  5. Heavy ion facility for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemann, C.; Alonso, J.; Clark, D.; Grunder, H.; Hoyer, E.; Lou, K.; Staples, J.; Voelker, F.

    1977-03-01

    The accelerator requirements of particle radiation therapy are reviewed and a preliminary design of a heavy ion synchrotron for hospital installation is presented. Beam delivery systems and multi-treatment room arrangements are outlined

  6. Carbon glass-ceramics and their radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgil'ev, Yu. S.

    1995-01-01

    Structural carbon materials (SCMs) hold great promise for use in numerous plasma-facing components of fusion reactors. One possible candidate for this use is carbon glass-ceramic. Therefore, it is not surprising that there is considerable interest in studying its properties and their variations upon exposure to different radiations, such as neutrons, high-energy electrons, and light ions (H + , D + , and He + ). Here, the authors summarize data accumulated to date on the structure and properties of commercial carbon glass-ceramics and their behavior under irradiation with neutrons, electrons, and some ions

  7. Contributions of secondary fragmentation by carbon ion beams in water phantom: Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, C K; Bolst, David; Tran, Linh T.; Guatelli, Susanna; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Kamil, W A

    2017-01-01

    Heavy-particle therapy such as carbon ion therapy is currently very popular because of its superior conformality in terms of dose distribution and higher Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE). However, carbon ion beams produce a complex mixed radiation field, which needs to be fully characterised. In this study, the fragmentation of a 290 MeV/u primary carbon ion beam was studied using the Geant4 Monte Carlo Toolkit. When the primary carbon ion beam interacts with water, secondary light charged particles (H, He, Li, Be, B) and fast neutrons are produced, contributing to the dose, especially after the distal edge of the Bragg peak. (paper)

  8. Experience with carbon ion radiotherapy at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaekel, O. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: o.jaekel@dkfz.de; Schulz-Ertner, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Karger, C.P. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heeg, P. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    At GSI, a radiotherapy facility was established using beam scanning and active energy variation. Between December 1997 and April 2004, 220 patients have been treated at this facility with carbon ions. Most patients are treated for chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the base of skull, using a dose of 60 Gye (Gray equivalent) in 20 fractions. Carbon ion therapy is also offered in a combination with conventional radiotherapy for a number of other tumors (adenoidcystic carcinoma, chordoma of the cervical spine and sacrum, atypical menningeoma). The patients treated for skull base tumors showed an overall local control rate after two years of 90%. The overall treatment toxicity was mild. This shows that carbon ion radiotherapy can safely be applied using a scanned beam and encouraged the Heidelberg university hospital to build a hospital based facility for ion therapy.

  9. Mechanical Design of Carbon Ion Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Carbon Ion Optics are expected to provide much longer thruster life due to their resistance to sputter erosion. There are a number of different forms of carbon that have been used for fabricating ion thruster optics. The mechanical behavior of carbon is much different than that of most metals, and poses unique design challenges. In order to minimize mission risk, the behavior of carbon must be well understood, and components designed within material limitations. Thermal expansion of the thruster structure must be compatible with thermal expansion of the carbon ion optics. Specially designed interfaces may be needed so that grid gap and aperture alignment are not adversely affected by dissimilar material properties within the thruster. The assembled thruster must be robust and tolerant of launch vibration. The following paper lists some of the characteristics of various carbon materials. Several past ion optics designs are discussed, identifying strengths and weaknesses. Electrostatics and material science are not emphasized so much as the mechanical behavior and integration of grid electrodes into an ion thruster.

  10. Radiation from heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kast, J.R.; Lee, Y.K.

    1975-01-01

    A study of x rays produced in heavy ion collisions has led to a search for molecular orbital x rays, concentrating on 35 Cl ions on Al, NaCl, and C targets. Preliminary analysis of the angular dependence of continuum x rays has tentatively identified quasi-molecular K x rays. Other work completed and in progress is discussed. (3 figures) (U.S.)

  11. Multiply charged carbon-ion production for medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Sasaki, N.; Takasugi, W.; Wakaisami, S.; Biri, S.; Drentje, A. G.

    2008-01-01

    Over 3000 cancer patients have already been treated by the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences since 1994. The clinical results have clearly verified the effectiveness and safety of heavy-ion radiotherapy. The most important result has been to establish that the carbon ion is one of the most effective radiations for radiotherapy. The ion source is required to realize a stable beam with the same conditions for daily operation. However, the deposition of carbon ions on the wall of the plasma chamber is normally unavoidable. This causes an ''anti-wall-coating effect,'' i.e., a decreasing of the beam, especially for the higher charge-state ions due to the surface material of the wall. The ion source must be required to produce a sufficiently intense beam under the bad condition. Other problems were solved by improvements and maintenance, and thus we obtained enough reproducibility and stability along with decreased failures. We summarize our over 13 years of experience, and show the scope for further developments

  12. Synchrotron-radiation experiments with recoil ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Studies of atoms, ions and molecules with synchrotron radiation have generally focused on measurements of properties of the electrons ejected during, or after, the photoionization process. Much can also be learned, however, about the atomic or molecular relaxation process by studies of the residual ions or molecular fragments following inner-shell photoionization. Measurements are reported of mean kinetic energies of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon recoil ions produced by vacancy cascades following inner-shell photoionization using white and monochromatic synchrotron x radiation. Energies are much lower than for the same charge-state ions produced by charged-particle impact. The results may be applicable to design of future angle-resolved ion-atom collision experiments. Photoion charge distributions are presented and compared with other measurements and calculations. Related experiments with synchrotron-radiation produced recoil ion, including photoionization of stored ions and measurement of shakeoff in near-threshold excitation, are briefly discussed. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  13. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangwer, T.E.; Goldstein, M.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1977-11-01

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references

  14. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwer, T.E.; Goldstein, M.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1977-11-01

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references.

  15. Mutagenic effects of carbon ions near the range end in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hase, Yoshihiro, E-mail: hase.yoshihiro@jaea.go.jp [Ion Beam Mutagenesis Research Group, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Nozawa, Shigeki; Narumi, Issay [Ion Beam Mutagenesis Research Group, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2012-03-01

    To gain insight into the mutagenic effects of accelerated heavy ions in plants, the mutagenic effects of carbon ions near the range end (mean linear energy transfer (LET): 425 keV/{mu}m) were compared with the effects of carbon ions penetrating the seeds (mean LET: 113 keV/{mu}m). Mutational analysis by plasmid rescue of Escherichia coli rpsL from irradiated Arabidopsis plants showed a 2.7-fold increase in mutant frequency for 113 keV/{mu}m carbon ions, whereas no enhancement of mutant frequency was observed for carbon ions near the range end. This suggested that carbon ions near the range end induced mutations that were not recovered by plasmid rescue. An Arabidopsis DNA ligase IV mutant, deficient in non-homologous end-joining repair, showed hyper-sensitivity to both types of carbon-ion irradiation. The difference in radiation sensitivity between the wild type and the repair-deficient mutant was greatly diminished for carbon ions near the range end, suggesting that these ions induce irreparable DNA damage. Mutational analysis of the Arabidopsis GL1 locus showed that while the frequency of generation of glabrous mutant sectors was not different between the two types of carbon-ion irradiation, large deletions (>{approx}30 kb) were six times more frequently induced by carbon ions near the range end. When 352 keV/{mu}m neon ions were used, these showed a 6.4 times increase in the frequency of induced large deletions compared with the 113 keV/{mu}m carbon ions. We suggest that the proportion of large deletions increases with LET in plants, as has been reported for mammalian cells. The nature of mutations induced in plants by carbon ions near the range end is discussed in relation to mutation detection by plasmid rescue and transmissibility to progeny.

  16. Ion - biomolecule interactions and radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlathoelter, T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The biological effects of ionizing radiation in living cells are not a mere result of the direct impact of high energy quanta of radiation. Secondary particles such as low energy electrons, radicals and (multiply charged) ions are formed within the track. The interaction of these secondary particles with biologically relevant molecules is responsible for a large fraction of biological radiation damage to a cell, as well. Singly and multiply charged ions can be of importance as both, primary and secondary particles, and are known to cause severe biological damage. For instance, in heavy ion therapy and proton therapy the pronounced Bragg peak of fast (typically a few 100 MeV/u) ions in biological tissue is utilized. The Bragg peak is located at a depth, where the ions (mostly C q+ or protons) are slowed down to about 100 keV/u and have their maximum linear energy transfer (LET) to the medium. This depth is reasonably well defined and depends on the initial ion kinetic energy. Since the ions are rapidly stopped in this energy range, penetration beyond the Bragg peak is weak and it is thus possible to 'scan' the Bragg peak through a malignant tumour without excessive damage of the surrounding tissue by mere variation of the ion kinetic energy (i.e. the penetration depth). Severe biological damage is almost only possible, when the track of a primary quantum of ionizing radiation crosses the nucleus of a cell. Particularly the induction of double strand breaks of DNA or clustered DNA lesions is potentially lethal or mutagenic. A primary particle interacting with individual molecules within this environment leads to molecular excitation, ionization and fragmentation. In the process, the primary particle looses energy and slow secondary electrons and ions are formed, which might induce further damage. For a deep understanding of biological radiation damage on the level of individual molecules it is thus important to quantify excitation, ionization and

  17. Neoplastic transformation induced by carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettega, Daniela; Calzolari, Paola; Hessel, Petra; Stucchi, Claudio G; Weyrather, Wilma K

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this experiment was to compare the oncogenic potential of carbon ion beams and conventional photon beams for use in radiotherapy. The HeLa X human skin fibroblast cell line CGL1 was irradiated with carbon ions of three different energies (270, 100, and 11.4 MeV/u). Inactivation and transformation data were compared with those for 15 MeV photons. Inactivation and transformation frequencies for the 270 MeV/u carbon ions were similar to those for 15-MeV photons. The maximal relative biologic effectiveness (RBE(alpha)) values for 100MeV/u and 11.4 MeV/u carbon ions, respectively, were as follows: inactivation, 1.6 +/- 0.2 and 6.7 +/- 0.7; and transformation per surviving cell, 2.5 +/- 0.6 and 12 +/- 3. The curve for dose-transformation per cell at risk exhibited a maximum that was shifted toward lower doses at lower energies. Transformation induction per cell at risk for carbon ions in the entrance channel was comparable to that for photons, whereas for the lower energies, 100 MeV/u and 11 MeV/u, which are representative of the energies delivered to the tumor margins and volume, respectively, the probability of transformation in a single cell was greater than it was for photons. In addition, at isoeffective doses with respect to cell killing, the 11.4-MeV/u beam was more oncogenic than were photons.

  18. PARP-1 is a key player in controlling apoptosis induced by high LET carbon ion beam and low LET gamma radiation in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorai, Atanu; Ghosh, Utpal; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P.; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2014-01-01

    PARP-1 inhibitors have long been used as chemo-sensitizer or radio-sensitizer and specific PARP-1 inhibitors are also in clinical trial for the treatment of various cancers. PARP-1 is not only involved in DNA repair but also plays very complex role in induction of apoptosis in postirradiation condition. Our objective is to investigate role of PARP-1 in apoptosis triggered by high LET carbon ion beam (CIB) and low LET gamma. We have treated HeLa and PARP-1 knock down HeLa (Hsil) cells with various doses of CIB and gamma. We measured DNA damage by comet assay and various apoptotic parameters such as nuclear fragmentation, activation of caspase-3,8,9, AIF translocation etc. We observed higher DNA breaks and also higher apoptosis in HsiI cells compared with HeLa cells. Both CIB and gamma treatment results G2/M arrest but unlike gamma CIB makes S-phase delay, implicating that gamma and CIB triggers different pathway after DNA damage. Cell death by CIB or by gamma increased up on knocking down of PARP-1 but increase is higher for high LET CIB compared with low LET gamma. Furthermore, expression level of PARP-1 controls the intensity of overall apoptosis in cells in post-irradiation condition. So, combination of PARP-1 inhibition with high LET CIB could be a promising tool to combat cancer. (author)

  19. Radiation damage in carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Eartherly, W.P.; Nelson, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    Graphite and carbon-carbon composite materials are widely used in plasma facing applications in current Tokamak devices such as TFTR and DIIID in the USA, JET, Tore Supra and TEXTOR in Europe, and JT-60U in Japan. Carbon-carbon composites are attractive choices for Tokamak limiters and diverters because of their low atomic number, high thermal shock resistance, high melting point, and high thermal conductivity. Next generation machines such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will utilize carbon-carbon composites in their first wall and diverter. ITER will be an ignition machine and thus will produce substantial neutron fluences from the D-T fusion reaction. The resultant high energy neutrons will cause carbon atom displacements in the plasma facing materials which will markedly affect their structure and physical properties. The effect of neutron damage on graphite has been studied for over forty years. Recently the effects of neutron irradiation on the fusion relevant graphite GraphNOL N3M was reviewed. In contrast to graphite, relatively little work has been performed to elucidate the effects of neutron irradiation on carbon-carbon composites. The results of our previous irradiation experiments have been published elsewhere. Here the irradiation induced dimensional changes in 1D, 2D, and 3D carbon-carbon composites are reported for fluences up to 4.7 dpa at an irradiation temperature of 600 degree C

  20. Quartz gauge response in ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.E.; Gilbert, P.H.; Kernthaler, C.; Anderson, M.U.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes recent work to make high quality quartz gauge (temporal and spatial) shock wave measurements in a pulsed ion beam environment. Intense ion beam radiation, nominally 1 MeV protons, was deposited into material samples instrumented with shunted quartz gauges adjacent to the ion deposition zone. Fluence levels were chosen to excite three fundamentally different material response modes (1) strong vapor, (2) combined vapor and melt phase and (3) thermoelastic material response. A unique quartz gauge design was utilized that employed printed circuit board (PCB) technology to facilitate electrical shielding, ruggedness, and fabrication at sign e meeting the essential one dimensional requirements of the characterized Sandia shunted quartz gauge. Shock loading and unloading experiments were conducted to evaluate the piezoelectric response of the coupled quartz gauge/PCB transducer. High fidelity shock wave profiles were recorded at the three ion fluence levels providing dynamic material response data for vapor, melt and solid material phases

  1. Focused ion beam milling of carbon fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huson, Mickey G.; Church, Jeffrey S.; Hillbrick, Linda K.; Woodhead, Andrea L.; Sridhar, Manoj; Van De Meene, Allison M.L.

    2015-01-01

    A focused ion beam has been used to mill both individual carbon fibres as well as fibres in an epoxy composite, with a view to preparing flat surfaces for nano-indentation. The milled surfaces have been assessed for damage using scanning probe microscopy nano-indentation and Raman micro-probe analysis, revealing that FIB milling damages the carbon fibre surface and covers surrounding areas with debris of disordered carbon. The debris is detected as far as 100 μm from the milling site. The energy of milling as well as the orientation of the beam was varied and shown to have an effect when assessed by Raman spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Focused ion beam (FIB) milling was used to mill flat surfaces on carbon fibres. • Raman spectroscopy showed amorphous carbon was generated during FIB milling. • The amorphous debris is detected as far as 100 μm from the milling site. • This surface degradation was confirmed by nano-indentation experiments.

  2. Intense Ion Pulses for Radiation Effects Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    induction linear accelerator that has been developed to deliver intense, up to 50 nC/pulse/mm2, sub-ns pulses of light ions with kinetic energy up to 1.2...II induction linear accelerator for intense ion beam pulses at Berkeley Lab. Figure 3. Helium current and integrated charge versus time at the...under contracts DE-AC02-205CH11231 and DE-AC52-07NA27344. JOURNAL OF RADIATION EFFECTS, Research and Engineering Vol. 35, No. 1, April 2017 158 INTENSE

  3. Radiative electron capture by channeled ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitarke, J.M.; Ritchie, R.H.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1989-01-01

    Considerable experimental data have been accumulated relative to the emission of photons accompanying electron capture by swift, highly stripped atoms penetrating crystalline matter under channeling conditions. Recent data suggest that the photon energies may be less than that expected from simple considerations of transitions from the valence band of the solid to hydrogenic states on the moving ion. We have studied theoretically the impact parameter dependence of the radiative electron capture (REC) process, the effect of the ion's wake and the effect of capture from inner shells of the solid on the photon emission probability, using a statistical approach. Numerical comparisons of our results with experiment are made. 13 refs., 6 figs

  4. Effect of ion irradiation on the structure and the surface topography of carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligacheva, E.A.; Galyaeva, L.V.; Gavrilov, N.V.; Belykh, T.A.; Ligachev, A.E.; Sokhoreva, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of C + ion irradiation (40 keV, 10 15 - 10 19 cm -2 ) on the structure and surface topography of high-module carbon fibers is investigated. Interplanar distance and internal stress values are found to be minimal at a radiation dose of 10 17 cm -2 , the height of a layer pack being practically unchanged. The relief of ion irradiated carbon fiber surface constitutes regularly repetitive valleys and ridges spaced parallel with the fiber axis [ru

  5. Protontherapy versus carbon ion therapy advantages, disadvantages and similarities

    CERN Document Server

    d’Ávila Nunes, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comparison analysis of two cancer treatment therapies: carbon ion therapy and protontherapy. It is divided in 5 sections. The first ones gives the reader a brief history of Radiotherapy and types of radiation. In the second section, the techniques and equipments, including new ones in development such as Cyclinac , Laser and DWA, are described. The third section describes biophysical (such as stopping power and LET) and biological (such as RBE and OER) properties, the fundamental experiments and clinical area. The fourth section presents models and the fifth section compares both techniques, showing advantages and disadvantages of each, and their similarities.

  6. Long-term Results of Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced or Unfavorably Located Choroidal Melanoma: Usefulness of CT-based 2-Port Orthogonal Therapy for Reducing the Incidence of Neovascular Glaucoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Shingo; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Nomiya, Takuma; Kamada, Tadashi; Tokumaru, Sunao; Mizota, Atsushi; Ohnishi, Yoshitaka; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term results of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) in patients with choroidal melanoma, and to assess the usefulness of CT-based 2-port irradiation in reducing the risk of neovascular glaucoma (NVG). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and February 2012, a total of 116 patients with locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma received CT-based C-ion RT. Of these patients, 114 were followed up for more than 6 months and their data analyzed. The numbers of T3 and T2 patients (International Union Against Cancer [UICC], 5th edition) were 106 and 8, respectively. The total dose of C-ion RT varied from 60 to 85 GyE, with each dose given in 5 fractions. Since October 2005, 2-port therapy (51 patients) has been used in an attempt to reduce the risk of NVG. A dose-volume histogram analysis was also performed in 106 patients. Results: The median follow-up was 4.6 years (range, 0.5-10.6 years). The 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and eye retention rates were 80.4% (95% confidence interval 89.0%-71.8%), 82.2% (90.6%-73.8%), 92.8% (98.5%-87.1%), 72.1% (81.9%-62.3%), and 92.8% (98.1%-87.5%), respectively. The overall 5-year NVG incidence rate was 35.9% (25.9%-45.9%) and that of 1-port group and 2-port group were 41.6% (29.3%-54.0%) and 13.9% (3.2%-24.6%) with statistically significant difference (P<.001). The dose-volume histogram analysis showed that the average irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body was significantly lower in the non-NVG group than in the NVG group at all dose levels, and significantly lower in the 2-port group than in the 1-port group at high dose levels. Conclusions: The long-term results of C-ion RT for choroidal melanoma are satisfactory. CT-based 2-port C-ion RT can be used to reduce the high-dose irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body and the resulting risk of NVG

  7. Long-term Results of Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced or Unfavorably Located Choroidal Melanoma: Usefulness of CT-based 2-Port Orthogonal Therapy for Reducing the Incidence of Neovascular Glaucoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Shingo [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi, E-mail: h_tsuji@nirs.go.jp [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Nomiya, Takuma; Kamada, Tadashi [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tokumaru, Sunao [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Mizota, Atsushi [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohnishi, Yoshitaka [Department of Ophthalmology, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama (Japan); Tsujii, Hirohiko [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term results of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) in patients with choroidal melanoma, and to assess the usefulness of CT-based 2-port irradiation in reducing the risk of neovascular glaucoma (NVG). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and February 2012, a total of 116 patients with locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma received CT-based C-ion RT. Of these patients, 114 were followed up for more than 6 months and their data analyzed. The numbers of T3 and T2 patients (International Union Against Cancer [UICC], 5th edition) were 106 and 8, respectively. The total dose of C-ion RT varied from 60 to 85 GyE, with each dose given in 5 fractions. Since October 2005, 2-port therapy (51 patients) has been used in an attempt to reduce the risk of NVG. A dose-volume histogram analysis was also performed in 106 patients. Results: The median follow-up was 4.6 years (range, 0.5-10.6 years). The 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and eye retention rates were 80.4% (95% confidence interval 89.0%-71.8%), 82.2% (90.6%-73.8%), 92.8% (98.5%-87.1%), 72.1% (81.9%-62.3%), and 92.8% (98.1%-87.5%), respectively. The overall 5-year NVG incidence rate was 35.9% (25.9%-45.9%) and that of 1-port group and 2-port group were 41.6% (29.3%-54.0%) and 13.9% (3.2%-24.6%) with statistically significant difference (P<.001). The dose-volume histogram analysis showed that the average irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body was significantly lower in the non-NVG group than in the NVG group at all dose levels, and significantly lower in the 2-port group than in the 1-port group at high dose levels. Conclusions: The long-term results of C-ion RT for choroidal melanoma are satisfactory. CT-based 2-port C-ion RT can be used to reduce the high-dose irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body and the resulting risk of NVG.

  8. Ion exchange fiber by radiation grafting, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kunio

    1990-01-01

    Radiation grafting is gaining attention as a method for producing high performance materials. This method can be applied to add functions to existing polymer plastics. The author participated in the research program on the production of ion exchange fiber by radiation grafting and its applicability at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment. Consequently, it was clarified that it was possible to introduce the cation exchange group, represented by sulfonic and carboxyl groups, and the anion exchange group, represented by the quarternary ammonium group, to polypropylene fiber available on the market. The ion exchange capacity was able to be controlled by the degree of grafting, i.e. approximately up to 3 meq/g in both strong acid and strong base and approximately up to 5 meq/g in weak acid were obtained. The adsorption performance of ammonia, a representative malodorous substance, was also studied using test cation exchange fiber. The adsorption rate of H type strong acid cation exchange fiber was great, due to the H type having neutral reaction, and the adsorption capacity matched the ion exchange capacity. Although the Cu and Ni types features coordinated adsorption and their adsorption rates were from 1/2 to 1/3 of that of the H type, their adsorption capacities showed increase along with the metal adsorbed. (author)

  9. COSMIC: A Regimen of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Plus Dose-Escalated, Raster-Scanned Carbon Ion Boost for Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors: Results of the Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Alexandra D., E-mail: alexdjensen@gmx.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Nikoghosyan, Anna V.; Lossner, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas; Jäkel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Centre, Heidelberg (Germany); Münter, Marc W.; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dose-escalated carbon ion (C12) therapy in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) and other malignant salivary gland tumors (MSGTs) of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: COSMIC (combined treatment of malignant salivary gland tumors with intensity modulated radiation therapy and carbon ions) is a prospective phase 2 trial of 24 Gy(RBE) C12 followed by 50 Gy IMRT in patients with pathologically confirmed MSGT. The primary endpoint is mucositis Common Terminology Criteria grade 3; the secondary endpoints are locoregional control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3; treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Results: Between July 2010 and August 2011, 54 patients were accrued, and 53 were available for evaluation. The median follow-up time was 42 months; patients with microscopically incomplete resections (R1, n=20), gross residual disease (R2, n=17), and inoperable disease (n=16) were included. Eighty-nine percent of patients had ACC, and 57% had T4 tumors. The most common primary sites were paranasal sinus (34%), submandibular gland, and palate. At the completion of radiation therapy, 26% of patients experienced grade 3 mucositis, and 20 patients reported adverse events of the ear (38%). The most common observed late effects were grade 1 xerostomia (49%), hearing impairment (25%, 2% ipsilateral hearing loss), and adverse events of the eye (20%), but no visual impairment or loss of vision. Grade 1 central nervous system necrosis occurred in 6%, and 1 grade 4 ICA hemorrhage without neurologic sequelae. The best response was 54% (complete response/partial remission). At 3 years, the LC, PFS, and OS were 81.9%, 57.9%, and 78.4%, respectively. No difference was found regarding resection status. The

  10. Carbon nano tubes -Buckypaper- radiation studies for medical physics application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alanazi, A.; Alkhorayef, M.; Dalton, A.; Bradley, D. A. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, College for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Guildford, Surrey GR2 7XH (United Kingdom); Alzimami, K. [King Saud University, Department of Radiological Sciences, P. O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433 (Saudi Arabia); Abuhadi, N., E-mail: a.alanazi@surrey.ac.uk [Jazan University, Faculty of Medical Applied Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology Department, P. O. Box 114, Jazan (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-10-15

    Radiation dosimetry underpins safe and effective clinical applications of radiation. Many materials have been used to measure the radiation dose deposited in human tissue, their radiation response requiring the application of correction factors to account for various influencing factors, including sensitivity to dose and energy dependence. In regard to the latter, account needs to be taken of difference from the effective atomic number of human tissue, soft or calcified. Graphite ion chambers and semiconductor diode detectors have been used to make measurements in phantoms but these active devices represent a clear disadvantage when considered for in vivo dosimetry. In both circumstances, dosimeters with atomic number similar to human tissue are needed. Carbon nano tubes have properties that potentially meet the demand, requiring low voltage in active devices and an atomic number similar to adipose tissue. In this study, single-wall carbon nano tubes buckypaper has been used to measure the beta particle dose deposited from a strontium-90 source, the medium displaying thermoluminescence at potentially useful sensitivity. As an example, the samples show a clear response for a dose of 2 Gy. This finding suggests that carbon nano tubes can be used as a passive dosimeter specifically for the high levels of radiation exposures used in radiation therapy. Furthermore, the finding points towards further potential applications such as for space radiation measurements, not least because the medium satisfies a demand for light but strong materials of minimal capacitance. (Author)

  11. Carbon nano tubes -Buckypaper- radiation studies for medical physics application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanazi, A.; Alkhorayef, M.; Dalton, A.; Bradley, D. A.; Alzimami, K.; Abuhadi, N.

    2015-10-01

    Radiation dosimetry underpins safe and effective clinical applications of radiation. Many materials have been used to measure the radiation dose deposited in human tissue, their radiation response requiring the application of correction factors to account for various influencing factors, including sensitivity to dose and energy dependence. In regard to the latter, account needs to be taken of difference from the effective atomic number of human tissue, soft or calcified. Graphite ion chambers and semiconductor diode detectors have been used to make measurements in phantoms but these active devices represent a clear disadvantage when considered for in vivo dosimetry. In both circumstances, dosimeters with atomic number similar to human tissue are needed. Carbon nano tubes have properties that potentially meet the demand, requiring low voltage in active devices and an atomic number similar to adipose tissue. In this study, single-wall carbon nano tubes buckypaper has been used to measure the beta particle dose deposited from a strontium-90 source, the medium displaying thermoluminescence at potentially useful sensitivity. As an example, the samples show a clear response for a dose of 2 Gy. This finding suggests that carbon nano tubes can be used as a passive dosimeter specifically for the high levels of radiation exposures used in radiation therapy. Furthermore, the finding points towards further potential applications such as for space radiation measurements, not least because the medium satisfies a demand for light but strong materials of minimal capacitance. (Author)

  12. Research with stored ions produced using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, D.A.; Kravis, S.D.; Meron, M.; Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Sellin, I.A.; O, C.S.; Levin, J.C.; Short, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    A distribution of argon ion charge states has been produced by inner shell photoionization of argon atoms using x-ray synchrotron radiation. These ions were stored in a Penning ion trap at moderate to very low well depths, and analog-detected yielding narrow charge-to-mass spectrum linewidths. Estimates of ion densities indicated that ion-ion collisional energy transfer should be rapid, leading to thermalization. Measurements using variants of this novel stored, multi-charged ion gas are considered

  13. Adsorption of palladium ions by modified carbons from rice husks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafa, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    Steam activated carbon of high surface area does not show palladium ions adsorption. Treatment of this carbon with HF acid increases to a great extent the gas adsorption capacity expressed as nitrogen surface area as well as the adsorption capacity of palladium ions from aqueous solution. HHB was loaded in different amounts on to these carbons. The acid sites represent the active fraction of the surface on which the adsorption palladium ions proceed. The uptake of palladium ions by HHB treated carbons is related to the total number of HHB molecules loaded on the carbon surface. (author)

  14. Amorphous molecular junctions produced by ion irradiation on carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhenxia; Yu Liping; Zhang Wei; Ding Yinfeng; Li Yulan; Han Jiaguang; Zhu Zhiyuan; Xu Hongjie; He Guowei; Chen Yi; Hu Gang

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and molecular dynamics have demonstrated that electron irradiation could create molecular junctions between crossed single-wall carbon nanotubes. Recently molecular dynamics computation predicted that ion irradiation could also join single-walled carbon nanotubes. Employing carbon ion irradiation on multi-walled carbon nanotubes, we find that these nanotubes evolve into amorphous carbon nanowires, more importantly, during the process of which various molecular junctions of amorphous nanowires are formed by welding from crossed carbon nanotubes. It demonstrates that ion-beam irradiation could be an effective way not only for the welding of nanotubes but also for the formation of nanowire junctions

  15. Comparative transcriptome analysis of rice seedlings induced by different doses of heavy ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Sun, Yeqing; Wang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as a main factor causing biological effects on plant seeds. To investigate the different effects on genome-wide gene expression of low-dose and high-dose ion radiation, we carried out ground-base carbon particle HZE experiments with different cumulative doses (0Gy, 0.2Gy, 2Gy) to rice seeds and then performed comparative transcriptome analysis of the rice seedlings. We identified a total of 2551 and 1464 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in low-dose and high-dose radiation groups, respectively. Gene ontology analyses indicated that low-dose and high-dose ion radiation both led to multiple physiological and biochemical activities changes in rice. By Gene Ontology analyses, the results showed that only one process-oxidation reduction process was enriched in the biological process category after high-dose ion radiation, while more processes such as response to biotic stimulus, heme binding, tetrapyrrole binding, oxidoreductase activity, catalytic activity and oxidoreductase activity were significantly enriched after low-dose ion radiation. The results indicated that the rice plants only focused on the process of oxidation reduction to response to high-dose ion radiation, whereas it was a coordination of multiple biological processes to response to low-dose ion radiation. To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of radiation stress-responsive genes, we identified several DEGs-encoding TFs. AP2/EREBP, bHLH, C2H2, MYB and WRKY TF families were altered significantly in response to ion radiation. Mapman analysis speculated that the biological effects on rice seedlings caused by the radiation stress might share similar mechanisms with the biotic stress. Our findings highlight important alterations in the expression of radiation response genes, metabolic pathways, and TF-encoding genes in rice seedlings exposed to low-dose and high-dose ion radiation.

  16. Development of Radiation Processing to Functionalize Carbon Nanofiber to Use in Nanocomposites for Industrial Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondim de Andrade e Silva, Leonardo; Evora, Maria Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on carbon materials have been thoroughly investigated because of its importance in the fields of nuclear, medical, and materials science. Basically, the effect of ionizing radiation on carbon materials takes place as a displacement of carbon atoms from their amorphous or graphitic structures. For nanocarbon materials, only destructive effects were observed in early experiments involving bombardment of carbon nanotubes and fullerenes with ions. However, recent work reveals that radiation can exploit defect creation for novel materials development especially in electronic nanotechnology (Krasheninnikov et al., 2007)

  17. Development of Radiation Processing to Functionalize Carbon Nanofiber to Use in Nanocomposites for Industrial Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim de Andrade e Silva, Leonardo, E-mail: lgasilva@ipen.br [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Research – IPEN, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242 Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 São Paulo – SP (Brazil); Evora, Maria Cecilia, E-mail: cecilia@ieav.cta.br [Institute of Advanced Studies – IEAv, Av. Cel Av José Alberto Albano do Amarante, 1 Putim, 12228-001 São José dos Campos – SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on carbon materials have been thoroughly investigated because of its importance in the fields of nuclear, medical, and materials science. Basically, the effect of ionizing radiation on carbon materials takes place as a displacement of carbon atoms from their amorphous or graphitic structures. For nanocarbon materials, only destructive effects were observed in early experiments involving bombardment of carbon nanotubes and fullerenes with ions. However, recent work reveals that radiation can exploit defect creation for novel materials development especially in electronic nanotechnology (Krasheninnikov et al., 2007)

  18. On the mechanism of water cluster-ion formation in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warneck, P.; Rakshit, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    A drift chamber mass spectrometer has been used to study the formation of water cluster-ions in carbon dioxide containing traces of water vapour. The dominant reaction sequences were identified up to the fourth generation of daughter ions starting with CO 2 + . The subsequent reaction mechanism remains uncertain and several possibilities are discussed. The final ions are H 3 O + H 2 O and H 3 O + (H 2 O) 2 . The significance of the reaction schemes to the radiation chemistry of carbon dioxide is pointed out. (orig.)

  19. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-08-19

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  20. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  1. Electronic structure of incident carbon ions on a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Takeuchi, Takae; Yamamoto, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure of an incident carbon ion on a graphite surface is discussed on the basis of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. A carbon cation forms a covalent bond with the graphite, and a carbon nonion is attracted to the graphite surface through van der Waals interaction. A carbon anion has no stable state on a graphite surface. The charge effects of incident ions become clear upon detailed examination of the electronic structure. (author)

  2. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y. [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm{sup 2} at the peak of the pulse.

  3. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse.

  4. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Unresectable Retroperitoneal Sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, Itsuko; Kagei, Kenji; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Sugahara, Shinji; Okada, Tohru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ito, Hisao; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the applicability of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for unresectable retroperitoneal sarcomas with regard to normal tissue morbidity and local tumor control. Methods and Materials: From May 1997 to February 2006, 24 patients (17 male and 7 female) with unresectable retroperitoneal sarcoma received CIRT. Age ranged from 16 to 77 years (median, 48.6 years). Of the patients, 16 had primary disease and 8 recurrent disease. Histologic diagnoses were as follows: malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 6, liposarcoma in 3, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 3, Ewing/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) in 2, and miscellaneous in 10 patients. The histologic grades were as follows: Grade 3 in 15, Grade 2-3 in 2, Grade 2 in 3, and unknown in 4. Clinical target volumes ranged between 57 cm 3 and 1,194 cm 3 (median 525 cm 3 ). The delivered carbon ion dose ranged from 52.8 to 73.6 GyE in 16 fixed fractions over 4 weeks. Results: The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 6-143 months). The overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 75% and 50%, respectively. The local control rates at 2 and 5 years were 77% and 69%. No complications of the gastrointestinal tract were encountered. No other toxicity greater than Grade 2 was observed. Conclusions: Use of CIRT is suggested to be effective and safe for retroperitoneal sarcomas. The results obtained with CIRT were a good overall survival rate and local control, notwithstanding the fact that most patients were not eligible for surgical resection and had high-grade sarcomas.

  5. Radiation therapy using high-energy heavy-ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki

    1995-01-01

    The clinical trial of the heavy-ion radiotherapy was started at June 1994 after pre-clinical experiments using 290 MeV/u carbon beam. In this paper, an irradiation system for the heavy-ion radiotherapy installed at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) and the physical characteristics of the therapeutic beam were discussed. (author)

  6. Spontaneous radiation emission during penetration of ions in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miraglia, J.E.; Pacher, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, the principal continuum radiative emission processes, which occur during the penetration of ions in solids or gases, are resumed. The characteristics of the following processes are discussed: secondary electron bremsstrahlung (SEB), atomic bremsstrahlung (AB), and internuclear bremsstrahlung (INB). Recent advances of the ion channeling effects in crystal solids on the spontaneous radiative spectra are exposed. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  7. Use of heavy ions to model radiation damage of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirokov, S.V.; Vyshemirskij, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    The methods for modeling radiation damage of metals using heavy ions are reviewed and the results obtained are analyzed. It is shown that irradiation of metals with heavy ion can simulate neutron exposure with the equivalent dose with adequate accuracy and permits a detailed analysis of radiation damage of metals

  8. Effects of beer administration in mice on acute toxicities induced by X rays and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monobe, Manami

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the tissue specificity of radioprotection by beer, which was previously found for human lymphocytes. C3H/He female mice, aged 14 weeks, received an oral administration of beer, ethanol or saline at a dose of 1 ml/mouse 30 min before whole-body irradiation with 137 Cs γ rays or 50 keV/μm carbon ions. The dicentrics of chromosome aberrations in spleen cells were significantly (p 0 (slope of a dose-survival curve) for γ rays and carbon ions as well. Beer administration significantly (p 50/30 (radiation dose required to kill 50% of mice within 30 days) for γ rays and carbon ions. Ethanol-administration also significantly (p 50/30 value for γ rays, but not for carbon ions. It is concluded that beer administration reduces the radiation injury caused by photons and carbon ions, depending on the tissue type. Radioprotection by beer administration is not solely due to OH radical-scavenging action by the ethanol contained in beer. (author)

  9. Chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of prostate cancer patients treated with IMRT and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartel, Carola; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Durante, Marco; Sommer, Sylwester; Nasonova, Elena; Fournier, Claudia; Lee, Ryonfa; Debus, Juergen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Ritter, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the cytogenetic damage in blood lymphocytes of patients treated for prostate cancer with different radiation qualities and target volumes. Materials and methods: Twenty patients receiving carbon-ion boost irradiation followed by IMRT or IMRT alone for the treatment of prostate cancer entered the study. Cytogenetic damage induced in peripheral blood lymphocytes of these patients was investigated at different times during the radiotherapy course using Giemsa staining and mFISH. A blood sample from each patient was taken before initiation of radiation therapy and irradiated in vitro to test for individual radiosensitivity. In addition, in vitro dose-effect curves for the induction of chromosomal exchanges by X-rays and carbon ions of different energies were measured. Results: The yield of chromosome aberrations increased during the therapy course, and the frequency was lower in patients irradiated with carbon ions as compared to patients treated with IMRT with similar target volumes. A higher frequency of aberrations was measured by increasing the target volume. In vitro, high-LET carbon ions were more effective than X-rays in inducing aberrations and yielded a higher fraction of complex exchanges. The yield of complex aberrations observed in vivo was very low. Conclusion: The investigation showed no higher aberration yield induced by treatment with a carbon-ion boost. In contrast, the reduced integral dose to the normal tissue is reflected in a lower chromosomal aberration yield when a carbon-ion boost is used instead of IMRT alone. No cytogenetic 'signature' of exposure to densely ionizing carbon ions could be detected in vivo.

  10. Coherent electromagnetic radiation of a combined electron-ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankratov, S G; Samoshenkov, Yu K [Vsesoyuznyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Optiko-Fizicheskikh Izmerenij, Moscow (USSR)

    1977-07-01

    The intensity of coherent electromagnetic radiation due to interaction of a modulated electron beam with a modulated ion beam is calculated. It is shown that the radiation intensity has a sharp maximum at the frequency equal to the difference of the modulation frequency of the electron and ion beams. The results obtained are compared with those corresponding to the scattering of a modulated electron beam on randomly distributed gas ions.

  11. Fate of D3 mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to X-rays or carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, S; Pignalosa, D; Nasonova, E; Arrizabalaga, O; Helm, A; Durante, M; Ritter, S

    2014-01-15

    The risk of radiation exposure during embryonic development is still a major problem in radiotoxicology. In this study we investigated the response of the murine embryonic stem cell (mESC) line D3 to two radiation qualities: sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions. We analyzed clonogenic cell survival, proliferation, induction of chromosome aberrations as well as the capability of cells to differentiate to beating cardiomyocytes up to 3 days after exposure. Our results show that, for all endpoints investigated, carbon ions are more effective than X-rays at the same radiation dose. Additionally, in long term studies (≥8 days post-irradiation) chromosomal damage and the pluripotency state were investigated. These studies reveal that pluripotency markers are present in the progeny of cells surviving the exposure to both radiation types. However, only in the progeny of X-ray exposed cells the aberration frequency was comparable to that of the control population, while the progeny of carbon ion irradiated cells harbored significantly more aberrations than the control, generally translocations. We conclude that cells surviving the radiation exposure maintain pluripotency but may carry stable chromosomal rearrangements after densely ionizing radiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Carbon contaminant in the ion processing of aluminum oxide film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaug, Y.; Roy, N.

    1989-01-01

    Ion processing can induce contamination on the bombarded surface. However, this process is essential for the microelectronics device fabrication. Auger electron spectroscopy has been used to study the simultaneous deposition of carbon impurity during ion bombardment of magnetron rf-sputtering deposited aluminum oxide film. Ion bombardment on aluminum oxide results in a preferential removal of surface oxygen and a formation of a metastable state of aluminum suboxide. Cosputtered implanted carbon contaminant appears to have formed a new state of stoichiometry on the surface of the ion bombarded aluminum oxide and existed as an aluminum carbide. This phase has formed due to the interaction of the implanted carbon and the aluminum suboxide. The Ar + ion sputter etching rate is reduced for the carbon contaminated oxide. The electrical resistance of the aluminum oxide between two gold strips has been measured. It is found that the electrical resistance is also reduced due to the formation of the new stoichiometry on the surface

  13. Corrosion resistance of uranium with carbon ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Hongwei; Yan Dongxu; Bai Bin; Lang Dingmu; Xiao Hong; Wang Xiaohong

    2008-01-01

    The carbon modified layers prepared on uranium surface by carbon ion implantation, gradient implantation, recoil implantation and ion beam assisted deposition process techniques were studied. Depth profile elements of the samples based on Auger electron spectroscopy, phase composition identified by X-ray diffraction as well as corrosion resistance of the surface modified layers by electrochemistry tester and humid-thermal oxidation test were carried out. The carbon modified layers can be obtained by above techniques. The samples deposited with 45 keV ion bombardment, implanted by 50 keV ions and implanted with gradient energies are of better corrosion resistance properties. The samples deposited carbon before C + implantation and C + assisted deposition exhibit worse corrosion resistance properties. The modified layers are dominantly dot-corraded, which grows from the dots into substructure, however, the assisted deposition samples have comparatively high carbon composition and are corraded weakly. (authors)

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Damage to Coiled Carbon Nanotubes under C Ion Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Bin; Zhang Wei; Gong Wen-Bin; Wang Song; Ren Cui-Lan; Wang Cheng-Bin; Zhu Zhi-Yuan; Huai Ping

    2013-01-01

    The stability of coiled carbon nanotubes under C ion irradiation is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The defect statistics shows that small curvature coiled carbon nanotubes have better radiation tolerance than normal straight carbon nanotubes. To understand the effect of the curvature on defect production, the threshold displacement energies for the upper and lower walls, as well as those for the side parts, are calculated. The results show that the lower wall has better radiation tolerance than the upper wall. For the upper wall, a small increase in the curvature of nanotube axis gives rise to an increase in the radiation tolerance and then a decrease with the curvature becomes larger. However, for the lower wall, as the curvature of the nanotube axis increases, the radiation tolerance increases as the bonds compressed slightly in our simulation

  15. EUD-based biological optimization for carbon ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brüningk, Sarah C.; Kamp, Florian; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment planning for carbon ion therapy requires an accurate modeling of the biological response of each tissue to estimate the clinical outcome of a treatment. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) accounts for this biological response on a cellular level but does not refer to the actual impact on the organ as a whole. For photon therapy, the concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) represents a simple model to take the organ response into account, yet so far no formulation of EUD has been reported that is suitable to carbon ion therapy. The authors introduce the concept of an equivalent uniform effect (EUE) that is directly applicable to both ion and photon therapies and exemplarily implemented it as a basis for biological treatment plan optimization for carbon ion therapy. Methods: In addition to a classical EUD concept, which calculates a generalized mean over the RBE-weighted dose distribution, the authors propose the EUE to simplify the optimization process of carbon ion therapy plans. The EUE is defined as the biologically equivalent uniform effect that yields the same probability of injury as the inhomogeneous effect distribution in an organ. Its mathematical formulation is based on the generalized mean effect using an effect-volume parameter to account for different organ architectures and is thus independent of a reference radiation. For both EUD concepts, quadratic and logistic objective functions are implemented into a research treatment planning system. A flexible implementation allows choosing for each structure between biological effect constraints per voxel and EUD constraints per structure. Exemplary treatment plans are calculated for a head-and-neck patient for multiple combinations of objective functions and optimization parameters. Results: Treatment plans optimized using an EUE-based objective function were comparable to those optimized with an RBE-weighted EUD-based approach. In agreement with previous results from photon

  16. High Energy Ion Acceleration by Extreme Laser Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-14

    published in the internationally leading journal Physical Review Letters. We continued to progress this pionee 15.  SUBJECT TERMS ion therapy, heavy ion ...Thomson parabola spectrometer: To separate and provide a measurement of the charge -to-mass ratio and energy spectrum of the different ion species...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0015 High energy ion acceleration by extreme laser radiation pressure Paul McKenna UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE VIZ ROYAL COLLEGE

  17. Ions in carbon dioxide at an atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezoe, Yasumasa; Onuki, Kaoru; Shimizu, Saburo; Nakajima, Hayato; Sato, Shoichi; Matsuoka, Shingo; Nakamura, Hirone; Tamura, Takaaki

    1985-01-01

    The formation and the subsequent reactions of positive and negative ions were observed by a time resolved atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer (TRAPI) in an atmospheric pressure carbon dioxide added with small amounts of carbon monoxide and oxygen. A relatively stable ion of (44 x n) + (n >= 2) having a different reactivity from that of (CO 2 ) + sub(n) was found to be one of major ionic species in this gas system. This species was tentatively assigned as [O 2 (CO) 2 ] + (CO 2 )sub(n-2). A new reaction sequence of positive ions is proposed which can be operative in the radiolysis of carbon dioxide at 1 atm. (author)

  18. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Katagiri, K.; Noda, K.; Ponkin, D. O.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Salnikov, V. V.; Shutov, V. B.

    2015-08-01

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 1010 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5 × 109 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 1011 C6+ ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the 11C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C4+ ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of 11C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated 11C4+ beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the 11C4+ beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons.

  19. Modified carbon black materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostecki, Robert; Richardson, Thomas; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Pollak, Elad; Lux, Simon

    2016-06-14

    A lithium (Li) ion battery comprising a cathode, a separator, an organic electrolyte, an anode, and a carbon black conductive additive, wherein the carbon black has been heated treated in a CO.sub.2 gas environment at a temperature range of between 875-925 degrees Celsius for a time range of between 50 to 70 minutes to oxidize the carbon black and reduce an electrochemical reactivity of the carbon black towards the organic electrolyte.

  20. 3.5 Radiation stability of ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marhol, M.

    1976-01-01

    The main knowledge is summed up of the radiation stability of ion exchangers. No basic changes occur in inorganic ion exchangers with the exception of the exchange capacity at doses of up to 10 9 rad. This also applies to coal-based ion exchangers. Tables are given showing the changes in specific volume, exchange capacity and weight of different types of organic ion exchangers in dependence on the radiation dose. The effects are discussed of the structure of organic cation and anion exchangers, polymeric strong basic anion exchangers, polycondensate anion exchangers and ion exchange membranes on their radiation stability. General experimental procedures are given for laboratory tests of the radiation stability of exchangers. (L.K.)

  1. Radiative decay rates in Si crystallites with a donor ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbenyova, Natalia V.; Burdov, Vladimir A.

    2018-04-01

    Within the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory, the radiative recombination rates have been calculated for small, ˜1 nm in diameter, hydrogen-passivated silicon crystallites with a single lithium or phosphorus ion. Sharp increase of the radiative recombination rates with increasing temperature was revealed for the crystallites with the lithium ion. No temperature effect was found for the crystallites with the ion of P. It was also shown that the presence of ionized donors in Si crystallites can substantially accelerate the radiative decay compared to the case of pure crystallites.

  2. A review of the radiation stability of ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive literature survey on the radiation stability of synthetic organic ion exchangers was published in this journal (Vol. 97, No. 1.). This paper is a brief review of the major findings of this survey along with similar information on synthetic inorganic ion exchangers. The primary goal of this literature survey is to review present knowledge on the effects of ionizing radiations on synthetic ion exchange materials used in radiochemical processing. The information available in the literature shows some general trends in observed qualitative effects by different types of organic and inorganic ion exchange materials. (author)

  3. Heavy metal ion adsorption onto polypyrrole-impregnated porous carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Moonjung; Jang, Jyongsik

    2008-09-01

    Polypyrrole-impregnated porous carbon was readily synthesized using vapor infiltration polymerization of pyrrole monomers. The results show that the functionalized polymer layer was successfully coated onto the pore surface of carbon without collapse of mesoporous structure. The modified porous carbon exhibited an improved complexation affinity for heavy metal ions such as mercury, lead, and silver ions due to the amine group of polypyrrole. The introduced polypyrrole layer could provide the surface modification to be applied for heavy metal ion adsorbents. Especially, polymer-impregnated porous carbon has an enhanced heavy metal ion uptake, which is 20 times higher than that of adsorbents with amine functional groups. Furthermore, the relationship between the coated polymer amount and surface area was also investigated in regard to adsorption capacity.

  4. Sorption studies of nickel ions onto activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Parth; Vyas, Meet; Patel, Chirag

    2018-05-01

    Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. The use of low-cost activated carbon derived from azadirachta indica, an agricultural waste material, has been investigated as a replacement for the current expensive methods of removing nickel ions from wastewater. The temperature variation study showed that the nickel ions adsorption is endothermic and spontaneous with increased randomness at the solid solution interface. Significant effect on adsorption was observed on varying the pH of the nickel ion solutions. Therefore, this study revealed that azadirachta indica can serve as a good source of activated carbon with multiple and simultaneous metal ions removing potentials and may serve as a better replacement for commercial activated carbons in applications that warrant their use.

  5. Atmospheric ions and pollution. Ions of the cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachon, A.

    1977-01-01

    The principal historical steps before the so-called 'cosmic radiation' was known as an extra-terrestrial radiation are described. The origin, nature and energy of the radiation are discussed together with its evolution all along its path through atmosphere, in view of the interaction that occurs between the radiation and the atmosphere. The mechanism of the ionization induced by cosmic radiation is analyzed, the corresponding energy balance is established and the possible singularities in air ionization induced by cosmic rays are discussed [fr

  6. Equivalence of displacement radiation damage in superluminescent diodes induced by protons and heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xingji, E-mail: lxj0218@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Chaoming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lan, Mujie; Xiao, Liyi [Center of Micro-electronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Jianchun; Ding, Dongfa [Beijing Aerospace Times Optical-electronic Technology Co.Ltd, Beijing 100854 (China); Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2013-07-11

    The degradation of optical power for superluminescent diodes is in situ measured under exposures of protons with various energies (170 keV, 3 MeV and 5 MeV), and 25 MeV carbon ions for several irradiation fluences. Experimental results show that the optical power of the SLDs decreases with increasing fluence. The protons with lower energies cause more degradation in the optical power of SLDs than those with higher energies at a given fluence. Compared to the proton irradiation with various energies, the 25 MeV carbon ions induce more severe degradation to the optical power. To characterize the radiation damage of the SLDs, the displacement doses as a function of chip depth in the SLDs are calculated by SRIM code for the protons and carbon ions. Based on the irradiation testing and calculation results, an approach is given to normalize the equivalence of displacement damage induced by various charged particles in SLDs.

  7. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Ponkin, D. O.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Salnikov, V. V.; Shutov, V. B. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Katagiri, K.; Noda, K. [National Institute of Radiological Science, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C{sup 4+} and C{sup 6+} ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 10{sup 10} C{sup 4+} ions per pulse and about 5 × 10{sup 9} C{sup 6+} ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 10{sup 11} C{sup 6+} ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the {sup 11}C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C{sup 4+} ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of {sup 11}C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated {sup 11}C{sup 4+} beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the {sup 11}C{sup 4+} beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons.

  8. Relative clinical effectiveness of carbon ion radiotherapy. Theoretical modelling for H and N tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonovic, Laura; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Dasu, Alexandru; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of the efficiency of photon and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) administered with the same number of fractions might be of limited clinical interest, since a wide range of fractionation patterns are used clinically today. Due to advanced photon treatment techniques, hypofractionation is becoming increasingly accepted for prostate and lung tumours, whereas patients with head and neck tumours still benefit from hyperfractionated treatments. In general, the number of fractions is considerably lower in carbon ion RT. A clinically relevant comparison would be between fractionation schedules that are optimal within each treatment modality category. In this in silico study, the relative clinical effectiveness (RCE) of carbon ions was investigated for human salivary gland tumours, assuming various radiation sensitivities related to their oxygenation. The results indicate that, for hypoxic tumours in the absence of reoxygenation, the RCE (defined as the ratio of D 50 for photons to carbon ions) ranges from 3.5 to 5.7, corresponding to carbon ion treatments given in 36 and 3 fractions, respectively, and 30 fractions for photons. Assuming that interfraction local oxygenation changes take place, results for RCE are lower than that for an oxic tumour if only a few fractions of carbon ions are used. If the carbon ion treatment is given in more than 12 fractions, the RCE is larger for the hypoxic than for the well-oxygenated tumour. In conclusion, this study showed that in silico modelling enables the study of a wide range of factors in the clinical considerations and could be an important step towards individualisation of RT treatments. (author)

  9. Radiation-induced radical ions in calcium sulfite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogushevich, S. E.

    2006-07-01

    We have used EPR to study the effect of γ radiation on calcium sulfite. We have observed and identified the radiation-induced radical ions SO 2 - (iso) with g = 2.0055 and SO 2 - (orth-1) with g1 = 2.0093, g2 = 2.0051, g3 = 2.0020, identical to the initial and thermally induced SO 2 - respectively, SO 3 - (iso) with g = 2.0031 and SO 3 - (axial) with g⊥ = 2.0040, g∥ = 2.0023, identical to mechanically induced SO 3 - . We have established the participation of radiation-induced radical ions SO 3 - in formation of post-radiation SO 2 - .

  10. Carbon Contamination During Ion Irradiation - Accurate Detection and Characterization of its Effect on Microstructure of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Kruska, Karen; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Edwards, Danny J.; Zhu, Zihua; Zhang, Jiandong

    2017-11-17

    Accelerator-based ion beam techniques have been used to study radiation effects in materials for decades. Although carbon contamination induced by ion beam in target materials is a well-known issue, it has not been fully characterized nor quantified for studies in ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels that are candidate materials for applications such as core structural components in advanced nuclear reactors. It is an especially important issue for this class of material because of the effect of carbon level on precipitate formation. In this paper, the ability to quantify carbon contamination using three common techniques, namely time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS), atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is compared. Their effectiveness and short-comings in determining carbon contamination will be presented and discussed. The corresponding microstructural changes related to carbon contamination in ion irradiated F/M steels are also presented and briefly discussed.

  11. Proteomics analysis of ram sperm by heavy ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yuxuan; Li Hongyan; Zhang Hong

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the proteome changes induced by heavy ion radiation using irradiated ram sperm by a two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis. The 2D gels were stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue. Differentially expressed proteins were detected by PDQuest 8.0 software and subjected to ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with a surveyor HPLC system, and differential protein spots were identified. Results showed there are five differential protein spots in irradiated sperm gels, four up-regulated protein spots and one spot missed. The differentially expressed protein spots were identified to be two up-regulated proteins including enolase, and enolase 1. It was concluded there was proteome changes induced by heavy ion radiation in ram sperm, which may be useful to clarify the physiology state of ram sperm in heavy ion radiation and provide a theoretical basis for radiation ram breeding. (authors)

  12. Radiation hardening of metals irradiated by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didyk, A.Yu.; Skuratov, V.A.; Mikhajlova, N.Yu.; Regel', V.R.

    1988-01-01

    The damage dose dependence in the 10 -4 -10 -2 dpa region of radiation hardening of Al, V, Ni, Cu irradiated by xenon ions with 124 MeV energy is investigated using the microhardness technique and transmission electron microscope. It is shown that the pure metals radiation hardening is stimulated for defects clusters with the typical size less than 5 nm, as in the case of neutron and the light charge ion irradiation

  13. Ion-molecule reactions: their role in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lias, S.G.; Ausloos, P.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive review of ion--molecule reactions is presented, including information from mass spectrometric, organic chemistry, and NMR studies, from theoretical calculations, and from gas and liquid phase radiation chemistry. Special emphasis is placed on interpreting the role of ion--molecule reactions in systems under high energy irradiation. The discussion is presented under the following chapter headings: ion--molecule reactions and their role in radiation chemistry; unimolecular processes: the nature and structure of ionic intermediates in radiolysis; ion lifetimes and the fate of unreactive ions; kinetics and mechanisms of ion--molecule reactions; proton transfer reactions; negative atom and two-atom transfer reactions; condensation reactions; and, association or clustering reactions

  14. Radiative Recombination and Photoionization Data for Tungsten Ions. Electron Structure of Ions in Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malvina B. Trzhaskovskaya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical studies of tungsten ions in plasmas are presented. New calculations of the radiative recombination and photoionization cross-sections, as well as radiative recombination and radiated power loss rate coefficients have been performed for 54 tungsten ions for the range W6+–W71+. The data are of importance for fusion investigations at the reactor ITER, as well as devices ASDEX Upgrade and EBIT. Calculations are fully relativistic. Electron wave functions are found by the Dirac–Fock method with proper consideration of the electron exchange. All significant multipoles of the radiative field are taken into account. The radiative recombination rates and the radiated power loss rates are determined provided the continuum electron velocity is described by the relativistic Maxwell–Jüttner distribution. The impact of the core electron polarization on the radiative recombination cross-section is estimated for the Ne-like iron ion and for highly-charged tungsten ions within an analytical approximation using the Dirac–Fock electron wave functions. The effect is shown to enhance the radiative recombination cross-sections by ≲20%. The enhancement depends on the photon energy, the principal quantum number of polarized shells and the ion charge. The influence of plasma temperature and density on the electron structure of ions in local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas is investigated. Results for the iron and uranium ions in dense plasmas are in good agreement with previous calculations. New calculations were performed for the tungsten ion in dense plasmas on the basis of the average-atom model, as well as for the impurity tungsten ion in fusion plasmas using the non-linear self-consistent field screening model. The temperature and density dependence of the ion charge, level energies and populations are considered.

  15. ADSORPTION OF STRONTIUM IONS FROM WATER ON MODIFIED ACTIVATED CARBONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Ciobanu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of strontium ions from aqueous solutions on active carbons CAN-7 and oxidized CAN-8 has been studied. It has been found that allure of the adsorption isotherms for both studied active carbons are practically identical. Studies have shown that the adsorption isotherms for strontium ions from aqueous solutions are well described by the Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations, respectively. The surface heterogeneity of activated carbons CAN-7 and oxidized CAN-8 has been assessed by using Freundlich equation.

  16. Comparison of the effects of photon versus carbon ion irradiation when combined with chemotherapy in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaich, Fabian; Brons, Stephan; Haberer, Thomas; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of combination effects of chemotherapy drugs with carbon ions in comparison to photons in vitro. The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line WiDr was tested for combinations with camptothecin, cisplatin, gemcitabine and paclitaxel. In addition three other human tumour cell lines (A549: lung, LN-229: glioblastoma, PANC-1: pancreas) were tested for the combination with camptothecin. Cells were irradiated with photon doses of 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy or carbon ion doses of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 Gy. Cell survival was assessed using the clonogenic growth assay. Treatment dependent changes in cell cycle distribution (up to 12 hours post-treatment) were measured by FACS analysis after propidium-iodide staining. Apoptosis was monitored for up to 36 hours post-treatment by Nicoletti-assay (with qualitative verification using DAPI staining). All cell lines exhibited the well-known increase of killing efficacy per unit dose of carbon ion exposure, with relative biological efficiencies at 10% survival (RBE 10 ) ranging from 2.3 to 3.7 for the different cell lines. In combination with chemotherapy additive toxicity was the prevailing effect. Only in combination with gemcitabine or cisplatin (WiDr) or camptothecin (all cell lines) the photon sensitivity was slightly enhanced, whereas purely independent toxicities were found with the carbon ion irradiation, in all cases. Radiation-induced cell cycle changes displayed the generally observed dose-dependent G2-arrest with little effect on S-phase fraction for all cell lines for photons and for carbon ions. Only paclitaxel showed a significant induction of apoptosis in WiDr cell line but independent of the used radiation quality. Combined effects of different chemotherapeutics with photons or with carbon ions do neither display qualitative nor substantial quantitative differences. Small radiosensitizing effects, when observed with photons are decreased with carbon ions. The data support the idea that a radiochemotherapy with common

  17. Extraction of Co ions from ion-exchange resin by supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Min Su; Koh, Moon Sung; Yang, Sung Woo; Park, Kwang Heon; Kim, Hak Won; Kim, Hong Doo

    2005-01-01

    There are a number of liquid treatment processes for eliminating radioactive ionic contaminants in nuclear facilities. One of the most common treatment methods for aqueous streams is the use of ion exchange, which is a well-developed technique that has been employed for many years in the nuclear industry. More specifically speaking, systems that ion exchange method is applied to in nuclear power plants are liquid radioactive waste treatment system, chemical and volume control system, steam generator blowdown treatment system, and service water supply system. During the operation of nuclear power plants, radioactive contaminants such as Co-60, Mn-54, Fe-59 and Cs-137 are contained in liquid radioactive wastes. And the wastes containing small amount of uranium are generated in nuclear fuel cycle facilities. To treat the liquid radioactive waste, we usually install ion exchangers rather than evaporators due to their simplicity and effectiveness, and this trend is increasing. However, the ion exchange process produces large volume of spent organic resin, and has some problems of radiation damage and thermal instability. And the reuse of the resin is limited due to the degradation of ion-exchanging ability. For this reason, were should consider a better method to expand the lifetime of the resin or to reduce the volume of radioactive resin wastes by extracting radioactive contaminants located in the resin. Supercritical fluid CO 2 has many good points as a process solvent that include low viscosity, negligible surface tension, and variable selectivity. And supercritical fluids have physical properties of both liquid and gas such as good penetration with a high dissolution capability. Supercritical fluids have been widely used in extraction, purification, and recovery processes. A number of workers applied supercritical CO 2 solvent for cleaning of precision devices and waste treatments. Since supercritical CO 2 has its mild critical point at 31 and 73.8bar as .deg. C

  18. Carbon ion radiotherapy in bone and soft tissue sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Kagei, Kenji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Heavy ions have superior depth-dose distribution and greater cell-killing capability. In June 1996, clinical research for the treatment of bone and soft tissue sarcomas was begun using carbon ions generated by the HIMAC. As of February 2006, a total of the 278 patients with bone and soft tissue sarcoma had been enrolled into the clinical trial. Most of the patients had locally advanced and/or medically inoperable tumors. The clinical trial revealed that carbon ion radiotherapy provided definite local control and offered a survival advantage without unacceptable morbidity in bone and soft tissue sarcomas that were hard to cure with other modalities. (author)

  19. Modeling of Jupiter's electron an ion radiation belts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicard, Angelica

    2004-01-01

    In the Fifties, James Van Allen showed the existence of regions of the terrestrial magnetosphere consisted of energetic particles, trapped by the magnetic field: the radiation belts. The radiation belts of the Earth were the subject of many modeling works and are studied since several years at the Departement Environnement Spatial (DESP) of ONERA. In 1998, the DESP decided to adapt the radiation belts model of the Earth, Salammbo, to radiation environment of Jupiter. A first thesis was thus carried out on the subject and a first radiation belts model of electrons of Jupiter was developed [Santos-Costa, 2001]. The aim of this second thesis is to develop a radiation belts model for protons and heavy ions. In order to validate the developed model, the comparisons between Salammbo results and observations are essential. However, the validation is difficult in the case of protons and heavy ions because in-situ measurements of the probes are very few and most of the time contaminated by very energetic electrons. To solve this problem, a very good model of electrons radiation belts is essential to confirm or cancel the contamination of protons and heavy ions measurements. Thus, in parallel to the development of the protons and heavy ions radiation belts model, the electrons models, already existing, has been improved. Then Salammbo results have been compared to the different observations available (in-situ measurements, radio-astronomical observations). The different comparisons show a very good agreement between Salammbo results and observations. (author) [fr

  20. Radiative losses and electron cooling rates for carbon and oxygen plasma impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, R.; Bonnin, X.

    1992-01-01

    Radiative losses and electron cooling rates are calculated for carbon and oxygen ions under conditions relevant to fusion plasmas. Both rates are calculated with the most recent recommended atomic data. A modified coronal model which includes the effects of metastable states is described and used to calculate the rates. Comparisons with other approaches are also discussed. (author). 36 ref, figs

  1. SU-F-T-144: Analytical Closed Form Approximation for Carbon Ion Bragg Curves in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomanen, S; Moskvin, V; Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Semi-empirical modeling is a powerful computational method in radiation dosimetry. A set of approximations exist for proton ion depth dose distribution (DDD) in water. However, the modeling is more complicated for carbon ions due to fragmentation. This study addresses this by providing and evaluating a new methodology for DDD modeling of carbon ions in water. Methods: The FLUKA, Monte Carlo (MC) general-purpose transport code was used for simulation of carbon DDDs for energies of 100–400 MeV in water as reference data model benchmarking. Based on Thomas Bortfeld’s closed form equation approximating proton Bragg Curves as a basis, we derived the critical constants for a beam of Carbon ions by applying models of radiation transport by Lee et. al. and Geiger to our simulated Carbon curves. We hypothesized that including a new exponential (κ) residual distance parameter to Bortfeld’s fluence reduction relation would improve DDD modeling for carbon ions. We are introducing an additional term to be added to Bortfeld’s equation to describe fragmentation tail. This term accounts for the pre-peak dose from nuclear fragments (NF). In the post peak region, the NF transport will be treated as new beams utilizing the Glauber model for interaction cross sections and the Abrasion- Ablation fragmentation model. Results: The carbon beam specific constants in the developed model were determined to be : p= 1.75, β=0.008 cm-1, γ=0.6, α=0.0007 cm MeV, σmono=0.08, and the new exponential parameter κ=0.55. This produced a close match for the plateau part of the curve (max deviation 6.37%). Conclusion: The derived semi-empirical model provides an accurate approximation of the MC simulated clinical carbon DDDs. This is the first direct semi-empirical simulation for the dosimetry of therapeutic carbon ions. The accurate modeling of the NF tail in the carbon DDD will provide key insight into distal edge dose deposition formation.

  2. Ion exchange fiber prepared by radiation grafting, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Kunio; Fujii, Toshiaki; Takai, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Atsushi

    1991-01-01

    Ion exchange fiber prepared by radiation grafting has the capabilities for wide application as high performance materials. Extensive studies were made to evaluate the ion exchange fiber prepared by radiation grafting for removing some toxic or malodorous gases, continuing from the previous work (presented in Ebara Engng. Review, No. 146), in which the ability of removing ammonia with cation exchange fiber was investigated. The results of this study can be summarized by the following conclusions: (1) Methods of evaluating the ability of removing ammonia, acetaldehyde, and some lower fatty acids in low concentration were established, (2) Besides being effective for the removal of acidic or basic gases, neutral gas such as acetaldehyde can also be removed by adding some functional compounds to the ion exchange fiber, and (3) Ion exchange fiber prepared by radiation grafting is effective as a deodorizing filter. (author)

  3. Radiation Protection Using Carbon Nanotube Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyers, Jodie L., Jr.; Moore, Valerie C.; Casscells, S. Ward

    2010-01-01

    BHA and BHT are well-known food preservatives that are excellent radical scavengers. These compounds, attached to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), could serve as excellent radical traps. The amino-BHT groups can be associated with SWNTs that have carbolyxic acid groups via acid-base association or via covalent association. The material can be used as a means of radiation protection or cellular stress mitigation via a sequence of quenching radical species using nano-engineered scaffolds of SWNTs and their derivatives. It works by reducing the number of free radicals within or nearby a cell, tissue, organ, or living organism. This reduces the risk of damage to DNA and other cellular components that can lead to chronic and/or acute pathologies, including (but not limited to) cancer, cardiovascular disease, immuno-suppression, and disorders of the central nervous system. These derivatives can show an unusually high scavenging ability, which could prove efficacious in protecting living systems from radical-induced decay. This technique could be used to protect healthy cells in a living biological system from the effects of radiation therapy. It could also be used as a prophylactic or antidote for radiation exposure due to accidental, terrorist, or wartime use of radiation- containing weapons; high-altitude or space travel (where radiation exposure is generally higher than desired); or in any scenario where exposure to radiation is expected or anticipated. This invention s ultimate use will be dependent on the utility in an overall biological system where many levels of toxicity have to be evaluated. This can only be assessed at a later stage. In vitro toxicity will first be assessed, followed by in vivo non-mammalian screening in zebra fish for toxicity and therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-15

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  5. Intense heavy ion beam-induced effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupka, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    Amorphous carbon or carbon-based stripper foils are commonly applied in accelerator technology for electron stripping of ions. At the planned facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, thin carbon stripper foils provide an option for directly delivering ions of intermediate charge states to the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS 18, in order to mitigate space charge limitations during high-intensity operation. In case of desired high end-energies in the synchrotron, a second stripping process by a thicker carbon foil provides ions of higher charge states for injection into the SIS18. High beam intensities and a pulsed beam structure as foreseen at FAIR pose new challenges to the stripper foils which experience enhanced degradation by radiation damage, thermal effects, and stress waves. In order to ensure reliable accelerator operation, radiation-hard stripper foils are required. This thesis aims to a better understanding of processes leading to degradation of carbon-based thin foils. Special focus is placed on ion-beam induced structure and physical property changes and on the influence of different beam parameters. Irradiation experiments were performed at the M3-beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) at GSI, using swift heavy ion beams with different pulse lengths and repetition rates. Tested carbon foils were standard amorphous carbon stripper foils produced by the GSI target laboratory, as well as commercial amorphous and diamond-like carbon foils and buckypaper foils. Microstructural changes were investigated with various methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), profilometry and chromatic aberration measurements. For the investigation of structural changes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), in-situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and small angle X

  6. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  7. Blackbody Radiation and the Carbon Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the days of Kirchhoff, blackbody radiation has been considered to be a uni- versal process, independent of the nature and shape of the emitter. Nonetheless, in promoting this concept, Kirchhoff did require, at the minimum, thermal equilibrium with an enclosure. Recently, the author stated (P.-M. Robitaille, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. , 2003, v. 31(6, 1263–1267; P.-M. Robitaille, Progr. in Phys. , 2006, v. 2, 22–23, that blackbody radiation is not universal and has called for a return to Stewart’s law (P.-M. Robitaille, Progr. in Phys. , 2008, v. 3, 30–35. In this work, a historical analysis of thermal radiation is presented. It is demonstrated that soot, or lampblack, was the standard for blackbody experiments throughout the 1800s. Furthermore, graphite and carbon black continue to play a central role in the construction of blackbody cavities. The advent of universality is reviewed through the writings of Pierre Prevost, Pierre Louis Dulong, Alexis Therese Petit, Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier, Simeon Denis Pois- son, Frederick Herve de la Provostaye, Paul Quentin Desain, Balfour Stewart, Gustav Robert Kirchhoff, and Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Planck. These writings illustrate that blackbody radiation, as experimentally produced in cavities and as discussed theoreti- cally, has remained dependent on thermal equilibrium with at least the smallest carbon particle. Finally, Planck’s treatment of Kirchhoff’s law is examined in detail and the shortcomings of his derivation are outlined. It is shown once again, that universality does not exist. Only Stewart’s law of thermal emission, not Kirchhoff’s, is fully valid.

  8. Blackbody Radiation and the Carbon Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Marie Robitaille

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the days of Kirchhoff, blackbody radiation has been considered to be a universal process, independent of the nature and shape of the emitter. Nonetheless, in promoting this concept, Kirchhoff did require, at the minimum, thermal equilibrium with an enclosure. Recently, the author stated (P.-M. Robitaille, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., 2003, v.31(6, 1263-1267; P.-M. Robitaille, Progr. in Phys., 2006, v.2, 22-23, that blackbody radiation is not universal and has called for a return to Stewart's law (P.-M. Robitaille, Progr. in Phys., 2008, v.3, 30-35. In this work, a historical analysis of thermal radiation is presented. It is demonstrated that soot, or lampblack, was the standard for blackbody experiments throughout the 1800s. Furthermore, graphite and carbon black continue to play a central role in the construction of blackbody cavities. The advent of universality is reviewed through the writings of Pierre Prevost, Pierre Louis Dulong, Alexis Therese Petit, Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier, Simeon Denis Poisson, Frederick Herve de la Provostaye, Paul Quentin Desain, Balfour Stewart, Gustav Robert Kirchhoff, and Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Planck. These writings illustrate that blackbody radiation, as experimentally produced in cavities and as discussed theoretically, has remained dependent on thermal equilibrium with at least the smallest carbon particle. Finally, Planck's treatment of Kirchhoff's law is examined in detail and the shortcomings of his derivation are outlined. It is shown once again, that universality does not exist. Only Stewart's law of thermal emission, not Kirchhoff's, is fully valid.

  9. Ion conducting fluoropolymer carbonates for alkali metal ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSimone, Joseph M.; Pandya, Ashish; Wong, Dominica; Balsara, Nitash P.; Thelen, Jacob; Devaux, Didier

    2017-09-05

    Liquid or solid electrolyte compositions are described that comprise a homogeneous solvent system and an alkali metal salt dissolved in said solvent system. The solvent system may comprise a fluoropolymer, having one or two terminal carbonate groups covalently coupled thereto. Batteries containing such electrolyte compositions are also described.

  10. The biological effectiveness of heavy ion radiations in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craven, P.A.

    1996-03-01

    Although heavy ions are rarely encountered in the majority of terrestrial environments, the exposure of humans to this fascinating class of ionizing radiation is becoming more frequent. Long-duration spaceflight, new radiotherapeutic procedures and enhanced levels of radon, and other naturally-occurring alpha particle emitters, have all increased concern and stimulated interest recently within the radiological protection and radiobiological communities. Significant data concerning the long-term effects of low levels of heavy ions on mammalian systems are correspondingly scarce, leading to increased emphasis on modelling all aspects of the radiation-organism interaction. Contemporary radiation protection procedures reflect the need for a more fundamental understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the biological actions of such radiations. Major deficiencies exist in the current recommendations for assessment of relative effectiveness, the enhanced severity of the biological consequences instigated by heavy ions, over conventional sparsely ionizing radiations. In an attempt to remedy some of the inadequate concepts and assumptions presently employed and, simultaneously, to gain insight into the fundamental mechanisms behind the notion of radiation quality, a series of algorithms have been developed and executed as computer code, to evaluate the biological effectiveness of heavy ion radiation ''tracks'' according to a number of criteria. These include consideration of the spatial characteristics of physical energy deposition in idealised cellular structures (finite particle range, radial extension of tracks via δ-ray emission) and the likelihood of induction and mis-repair of severe molecular lesions (double-strand breaks, multiply-damaged sites). (author)

  11. An automated single ion hit at JAERI heavy ion microbeam to observe individual radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Tomihiro; Sakai, Takuro; Naitoh, Yutaka; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Hirao, Toshio

    1999-01-01

    Microbeam scanning and a single ion hit technique have been combined to establish an automated beam positioning and single ion hit system at the JAERI Takasaki heavy ion microbeam system. Single ion irradiation on preset points of a sample in various patterns can be performed automatically in a short period. The reliability of the system was demonstrated using CR-39 nuclear track detectors. Single ion hit patterns were achieved with a positioning accuracy of 2 μm or less. In measurement of single event transient current using this system, the reduction of the pulse height by accumulation of radiation damages was observed by single ion injection to the same local areas. This technique showed a possibility to get some quantitative information about the lateral displacement of an individual radiation effect in silicon PIN photodiodes. This paper will give details of the irradiation system and present results from several experiments

  12. Axial ion-electron emission microscopy of IC radiation hardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, B. L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Walsh, D. S.; Swenson, D.

    2002-05-01

    A new system for performing radiation effects microscopy (REM) has been developed at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque. This system combines two entirely new concepts in accelerator physics and nuclear microscopy. A radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac is used to boost the energy of ions accelerated by a conventional Tandem Van de Graaff-Pelletron to velocities of 1.9 MeV/amu. The electronic stopping power for heavy ions is near a maximum at this velocity, and their range is ˜20 μm in Si. These ions therefore represent the most ionizing form of radiation in nature, and are nearly ideal for performing single event effects testing of integrated circuits. Unfortunately, the energy definition of the RFQ-boosted ions is rather poor (˜ a few %), which makes problematic the focussing of such ions to the submicron spots required for REM. To circumvent this problem, we have invented ion electron emission microscopy (IEEM). One can perform REM with the IEEM system without focussing or scanning the ion beam. This is because the position on the sample where each ion strikes is determined by projecting ion-induced secondary electrons at high magnification onto a single electron position sensitive detector. This position signal is then correlated with each REM event. The IEEM system is now mounted along the beam line in an axial geometry so that the ions pass right through the electron detector (which is annular), and all of the electrostatic lenses used for projection. The beam then strikes the sample at normal incidence which results in maximum ion penetration and removes a parallax problem experienced in an earlier system. Details of both the RFQ-booster and the new axial IEEM system are given together with some of the initial results of performing REM on Sandia-manufactured radiation hardened integrated circuits.

  13. The influence of ion bombardment on emission properties of carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chepusov, Alexander; Komarskiy, Alexander; Kuznetsov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    When electric-vacuum device works its cathode surface experiences bombardment with ions of residual gases. Effects of ion bombardment impact on surface of field emission cathodes made of carbon materials may essentially change emission properties of such cathodes. It changes emission start electric field strength, voltage vs. current characteristic of material, its relief and electron structure of the surface layer. Field emission cathode operating mode, variation of radiation doses allow to obtain both good effects: maximal electric current, surface recovery – and negative ones: the worst emission properties and surface destruction, amorphization.

  14. The influence of ion bombardment on emission properties of carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chepusov, Alexander, E-mail: chepusov@iep.uran.ru [The Institute of Electrophysics of the Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IEP UD RAS), 620016, 106 Amundsen Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 620002, 19 Mira Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Komarskiy, Alexander, E-mail: aakomarskiy@gmail.com [The Institute of Electrophysics of the Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IEP UD RAS), 620016, 106 Amundsen Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 620002, 19 Mira Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Vadim, E-mail: kuznetsov@iep.uran.ru [The Institute of Electrophysics of the Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IEP UD RAS), 620016, 106 Amundsen Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    When electric-vacuum device works its cathode surface experiences bombardment with ions of residual gases. Effects of ion bombardment impact on surface of field emission cathodes made of carbon materials may essentially change emission properties of such cathodes. It changes emission start electric field strength, voltage vs. current characteristic of material, its relief and electron structure of the surface layer. Field emission cathode operating mode, variation of radiation doses allow to obtain both good effects: maximal electric current, surface recovery – and negative ones: the worst emission properties and surface destruction, amorphization.

  15. Fluoro-Carbonate Solvents for Li-Ion Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NAGASUBRAMANIAN, GANESAN

    1999-01-01

    A number of fluoro-carbonate solvents were evaluated as electrolytes for Li-ion cells. These solvents are fluorine analogs of the conventional electrolyte solvents such as dimethyl carbonate, ethylene carbonate, diethyl carbonate in Li-ion cells. Conductivity of single and mixed fluoro carbonate electrolytes containing 1 M LiPF(sub 6) was measured at different temperatures. These electrolytes did not freeze at -40 C. We are evaluating currently, the irreversible 1st cycle capacity loss in carbon anode in these electrolytes and the capacity loss will be compared to that in the conventional electrolytes. Voltage stability windows of the electrolytes were measured at room temperature and compared with that of the conventional electrolytes. The fluoro-carbon electrolytes appear to be more stable than the conventional electrolytes near Li voltage. Few preliminary electrochemical data of the fluoro-carbonate solvents in full cells are reported in the literature. For example, some of the fluorocarbonate solvents appear to have a wider voltage window than the conventional electrolyte solvents. For example, methyl 2,2,2 trifluoro ethyl carbonate containing 1 M LiPF(sub 6) electrolyte has a decomposition voltage exceeding 6 V vs. Li compared to and lt;5 V for conventional electrolytes. The solvent also appears to be stable in contact with lithium at room temperature

  16. Ion irradiation effects on tensile properties of carbon fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurumada, A.; Ishihara, M.; Baba, S.; Aihara, J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composite materials have high thermal conductivity and excellent mechanical properties at high temperatures. They have been used as structural materials at high temperatures in fission and experimental fusion reactors. The changes in the microstructures and the mechanical properties due to irradiation damage must be measured for the safety design and the life assessment of the materials. The purpose of this study is to obtain a basic knowledge of the development of new carbon composite materials having high thermal conductivity and excellent resistance to irradiation damage. Five kinds of carbon fibres were selected, including a vapour growth carbon fibre (VGCF; K1100X), a polyacrylonitrile-based fibre (PAN; M55JB by Toray Corp.), two meso-phase pitch-based fibres (YS-15-60S and YS-70-60S by Nippon Graphite Fiber Corp.) and a pitch-based fibre (K13C2U by Mitsubishi Chemical Co.). They were irradiated by high-energy carbon, nickel and argon ions. Irradiation damages in the carbon fibres are expected to be uniform across the cross-section, as the diameters of the carbon fibres are about 20 μm and are sufficiently smaller than the ranges of ions. The cross-sectional areas increased due to ion irradiation, with the exception of the K1100X of VGCF. One of the reasons for the increases is the swelling of carbon basal planes due to lattice defects in the graphite interlayer. The tensile strengths and the Young's moduli decreased due to ion irradiation except for the K1100X of VGCF and the YS-15-60S of meso-phase pitch-based fibres. One of the reasons for the decreases is thought to be that the microstructures of carbon fibres are damaged in the axial direction, as ions were irradiated vertically with respect to the longitudinal direction of carbon fibres. The results of this study indicate that the VGCF and the meso-phase pitch-based carbon fibres could be useful as reinforcement fibres of new carbon composite materials having high thermal conductivity and

  17. Ion-irradiation-induced defects in bundles of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salonen, E.; Krasheninnikov, A.V.; Nordlund, K.

    2002-01-01

    We study the structure and formation yields of atomic-scale defects produced by low-dose Ar ion irradiation in bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes. For this, we employ empirical potential molecular dynamics and simulate ion impact events over an energy range of 100-1000 eV. We show that the most common defects produced at all energies are vacancies on nanotube walls, which at low temperatures are metastable but long-lived defects. We further calculate the spatial distribution of the defects, which proved to be highly non-uniform. We also show that ion irradiation gives rise to the formations of inter-tube covalent bonds mediated by carbon recoils and nanotube lattice distortions due to dangling bond saturation. The number of inter-tube links, as well as the overall damage, linearly grows with the energy of incident ions

  18. Development of an animal model for heavy ion radiation-induced nausea and vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamatodani, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kouichi; Nohara, Kyoko

    2003-01-01

    Emesis is one of the most characteristic side effects of radiation therapy. Clinical and pharmacological findings indicate that the peripheral serotonergic pathway is predominantly involved in the development of radiation-induced emesis, but the precise etiology is still unknown. We previously demonstrated that the activation of the histaminergic neuron system in the brain is essential for the development of motion-induced emesis (motion sickness). In this study, we studied the effects of heavy-ion irradiation on the hypothalamic histamine release measured in vivo with a microdialysis method in mice. Total body irradiation at dose of 8 Gy (carbon ion: 290 MeV/u, 6 cm spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP)) did not cause any significant changes in the histamine release in mice. These findings indicate that the central histaminergic activation is not involved in the development of radiation-induced emesis in mice. (author)

  19. Stoichiometric carbon nitride synthesized by ion beam sputtering and post nitrogen ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valizadeh, R.; Colligon, J.S.; Katardiev, I.V.; Faunce, C.A.; Donnelly, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Carbon nitride films have been deposited on Si (100) by ion beam sputtering a vitreous graphite target with nitrogen and argon ions with and without concurrent N2 ion bombardment at room temperature. The sputtering beam energy was 1000 eV and the assisted beam energy was 300 eV with ion / atom arrival ratio ranging from 0.5 to 5. The carbon nitride films were deposited both as single layer directly on silicon substrate and as multilayer between two layers of stoichiometric amorphous silicon nitride and polycrystalline titanium nitride. The deposited films were implanted ex-situ with 30 keV nitrogen ions with various doses ranging from 1E17 to 4E17 ions.cm -2 and 2 GeV xenon ion with a dose of 1E12 ions.cm -2 . The nitrogen concentration of the films was measured with Rutherford Backscattering (RBS), Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS) and Parallel Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (PEELS). The nitrogen concentration for as deposited sample was 34 at% and stoichiometric carbon nitride C 3 N 4 was achieved by post nitrogen implantation of the multi-layered films. Post bombardment of single layer carbon nitride films lead to reduction in the total nitrogen concentration. Carbon K edge structure obtained from PEELS analysis suggested that the amorphous C 3 N 4 matrix was predominantly sp 2 bonded. This was confirmed by Fourier Transforrn Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the single CN layer which showed the nitrogen was mostly bonded with carbon in nitrile (C≡N) and imine (C=N) groups. The microstructure of the film was determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) which indicated that the films were amorphous

  20. Genomic mutation study for long-term cells induced by carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Furusawa, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Hirayama, R.; Matsumoto, Y.; Qin, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: Densely ionizing (high LET) radiation can increase the relative biological effectiveness of cell and tissue. Astronauts in the space exploration have the potential exposure of chronic low-dose radiations in the field of low-flux galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and the subsequent biological effects have become one of the major concerns of space science. Furthermore, Heavy ions also are used new radiation therapy owing increased lethal effectiveness of high LET radiation. During radiation therapy, normal tissues also are exposed to ionizing radiation. Radiation can induce genomic mutation and instability in descendants of irradiated cells. Induction of genomic instability can represent one of the initiating steps leading to malignant transformation. Higher frequencies of mutation can be expected to provide higher rates of carcinogenicity with human exposure. Therefore, the study of radiation induced genomic mutation and instability is relevant to the estimates of the risk of secondary malignancies associated with radiation therapy and the carcinogenic effects of space environmental radiation. The hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) locus has been the most commonly used as a target gene for mutation detection studies. In this study, we investigated the generation expression dependence of mutation induction on HPRT locus in CHO cells irradiated with carbon ions. Methods: Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were irradiated with graded doses of carbon ions (290MeV/u, LET:13kev/um) accelerated with Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at National Institute of Radiological Sciences(NIRS). The survival effect of cells plated immediately after irradiation was measured with cell colony formation assay. After irradiation, cells were continues reseeding and cultures for lone-term proliferation. Cell samples were collected at 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 37 and 44 days post irradiation. Mutation induction of cell

  1. Validation of recent Geant4 physics models for application in carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lechner, A; Ivanchenko, V N

    2010-01-01

    Cancer treatment with energetic carbon ions has distinct advantages over proton or photon irradiation. In this paper we present a simulation model integrated into the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit (version 9.3) which enables the use of ICRU 73 stopping powers for ion transport calculations. For a few materials, revised ICRU 73 stopping power tables recently published by ICRU (P. Sigmund, A. Schinner, H. Paul, Errata and Addenda: ICRU Report 73 (Stopping of Ions Heavier than Helium), International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, 2009) were incorporated into Geant4, also covering media like water which are of importance in radiotherapeutical applications. We examine, with particular attention paid to the recent developments, the accuracy of current Geant4 models for simulating Bragg peak profiles of C-12 ions incident on water and polyethylene targets. Simulated dose distributions are validated against experimental data available in the literature, where the focus is on beam energies relevant to io...

  2. Microstructure evolution in carbon-ion implanted sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orwa, J. O.; McCallum, J. C.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Peng, J. L.; Rubanov, S.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon ions of MeV energy were implanted into sapphire to fluences of 1x10 17 or 2x10 17 cm -2 and thermally annealed in forming gas (4% H in Ar) for 1 h. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy results obtained from the lower dose implant showed retention of implanted carbon and accumulation of H near the end of range in the C implanted and annealed sample. Three distinct regions were identified by transmission electron microscopy of the implanted region in the higher dose implant. First, in the near surface region, was a low damage region (L 1 ) composed of crystalline sapphire and a high density of plateletlike defects. Underneath this was a thin, highly damaged and amorphized region (L 2 ) near the end of range in which a mixture of i-carbon and nanodiamond phases are present. Finally, there was a pristine, undamaged sapphire region (L 3 ) beyond the end of range. In the annealed sample some evidence of the presence of diamond nanoclusters was found deep within the implanted layer near the projected range of the C ions. These results are compared with our previous work on carbon implanted quartz in which nanodiamond phases were formed only a few tens of nanometers from the surface, a considerable distance from the projected range of the ions, suggesting that significant out diffusion of the implanted carbon had occurred.

  3. Application of ion beams for polymeric carbon based biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evelyn, A.L.

    2001-01-01

    Ion beams have been shown to be quite suitable for the modification and analysis of carbon based biomaterials. Glassy polymeric carbon (GPC), made from cured phenolic resins, has a high chemical inertness that makes it useful as a biomaterial in medicine for drug delivery systems and for the manufacture of heart valves and other prosthetic devices. Low and high-energy ion beams have been used, with both partially and fully cured phenolic resins, to enhance biological cell/tissue growth on, and to increase tissue adhesion to GPC surfaces. Samples bombarded with energetic ion beams in the keV to MeV range exhibited increased surface roughness, measured using optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Ion beams were also used to perform nuclear reaction analyses of GPC encapsulated drugs for use in internal drug delivery systems. The results from the high energy bombardment were more dramatic and are shown in this paper. The interaction of energetic ions has demonstrated the useful application of ion beams to enhance the properties of carbon-based biomaterials

  4. Ion bombardment simulation: a review related to fusion radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brimhall, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    Prime emphasis is given to reviewing the ion bombardment data on the refractory metals molybdenum, niobium and vanadium which have been proposed for use in advanced fusion devices. The temperature and dose dependence of the void parameters are correlated among these metals. The effect of helium and hydrogen gas on the void parameters is also included. The similarities and differences of the response of these materials to high dose, high temperature radiation damage are evaluated. Comparisons are made with results obtained from stainless steel and nickel base alloys. The ion bombardment data is then compared and correlated, as far as possible, with existing neutron data on the refractory metals. The theoretically calculated damage state produced by neutrons and ions is also briefly discussed and compared to experimental data wherever possible. The advantages and limitations of ion simulation in relation to fusion radiation damage are finally summarized

  5. The influence of fractionation on cell survival and premature differentiation after carbon ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jufang; Li Renming; Guo Chuanling; Fournier, C.; K-Weyrather, W.

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the influence of fractionation on cell survival and radiation induced premature differentiation as markers for early and late effects after X-rays and carbon irradiation. Normal human fibroblasts NHDF, AG1522B and WI-38 were irradiated with 250 kV X-rays, or 266 MeV/u, 195 MeV/u and 11 MeV/u carbon ions. Cytotoxicity was measured by a clonogenic survival assay or by determination of the differentiation pattern. Experiments with high-energy carbon ions show that fractionation induced repair effects are similar to photon irradiation. The relative biological effective (RBE) 10 values for clonogenic survival are 1.3 and 1.6 for irradiation in one or two fractions for NHDF cells and around 1.2 for AG1522B cells regardless of the fractionation scheme. The RBE for a doubling of post mitotic fibroblasts (PMF) in the population is 1 for both single and two fractionated irradiation of NHDF cells. Using 11 MeV/u carbon ions, no repair effect can be seen in WI-38 cells. The RBE 10 for clonogenic survival is 3.2 for single irradiation and 4.9 for two fractionated irradiations. The RBE for a doubling of PMF is 3.1 and 5.0 for single and two fractionated irradiations, respectively. For both cell lines the effects of high-energy carbon ions representing the irradiation of the skin and the normal tissue in the entrance channel are similar to the effects of X-rays. The fractionation effects are maintained. For the lower energy, which is representative for the irradiation of the tumor region, RBE is enhanced for clonogenic survival as well as for premature terminal differentiation. Fractionation effects are not detectable. Consequently, the therapeutic ratio is significantly enhanced by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions. (author)

  6. Laser radiation effect on radiation-induced defects in heavy ion tracks in dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, A.N.; Zhiryakov, B.M.; Kushin, V.V.; Lyapidevskij, V.K.; Khokhlov, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    Possibility of laser radiation resonance effect on radiation-induced defects in heavy ion tracks in dielectric materials is investigated. Absorption spectra in infrared, visible and ultraviolet ranges for cellulose nitrate samples irradiated by 6 MeV/nucleon 58 Ni ions and reactor gamma radiation are measured. Absorption spectra for irradiated and reference samples are presented. Two absorption bands λ 1 =0.33 μm (E 1 =3.9 eV) and λ 2 =0.72 μm (E 2 =1.7 eV) are detected. Etching rate decrease in a track under laser radiation effect is noticed. 3 refs.; 1 fig

  7. What's next in carbon ion radiotherapy at NIRS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    Since its launch by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in 1994, cancer therapy using heavy ion beams (carbon ion beams) has been used in approximately 5,500 patients. Accumulated clinical experience has identified certain types of malignant tumors that respond exclusively to this treatment. It has also been made clear that this therapy is capable of treating several other types of cancers safely in a relatively short period of time, effecting remission and/or cure without pain or discomfort in a few days or weeks. We can reasonably state that heavy ion radiotherapy has been established as a safe and effective treatment method. NIRS researchers are continuing to make every effort to develop more effective, efficient, and patient-friendly heavy ion irradiation systems. The result of this research and development is also expected to slash the attendant costs of heavy ion radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Mutagenic effects of nitrogen and carbon ions on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Shen Mei; Lu Ting; Shu Shizhen

    1998-06-01

    Dry seeds of stevia were implanted by 60∼100 keV nitrogen ion and 75 keV carbon ion with various doses. The biological effects in M 1 and mutation in M 2 were studied. The results showed that ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure and inhibited mitosis action in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with the increase of ion beam energy and dose. Energy effects of mitosis were presented between 75 keV and 60, 100 keV. As compared with γ-rays, the effects of ion beam were lower on chromosomal aberration but were higher on frequency of the mutation. The rate of cell with chromosome aberration and M 2 useful mutation induced by implantation of carbon ion was higher than those induced by implantation of nitrogen ion. Mutagenic effects of Feng 1 x Ri Yuan and of Ri Yuan x Feng 2 are higher than that of Ji Ning and Feng 2

  9. Trapping behaviour of deuterium ions implanted into tungsten simultaneously with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Suzuki, Sachiko; Wang, Wanjing; Kurata, Rie; Kida, Katsuya; Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji; Ashikawa, Naoko; Sagara, Akio; Yoshida, Naoaki

    2009-01-01

    The trapping behaviour of deuterium ions implanted into tungsten simultaneously with carbon ions was investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The D 2 TDS spectrum consisted of three desorption stages, namely desorption of deuterium trapped by intrinsic defects, ion-induced defects and carbon with the formation of the C-D bond. Although the deuterium retention trapped by intrinsic defects was almost constant, that by ion-induced defects increased as the ion fluence increased. The retention of deuterium with the formation of the C-D bond was saturated at an ion fluence of 0.5x10 22 D + m -2 , where the major process was changed from the sputtering of tungsten with the formation of a W-C mixture to the formation of a C-C layer, and deuterium retention as the C-D bond decreased. It was concluded that the C-C layer would enhance the chemical sputtering of carbon with deuterium with the formation of CD x and the chemical state of carbon would control the deuterium retention in tungsten under C + -D 2 + implantation.

  10. Modelling radiation fields of ion beams in tissue-like materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burigo, Lucas Norberto

    2014-01-01

    Fast nuclei are ionizing radiation which can cause deleterious effects to irradiated cells. The modelling of the interactions of such ions with matter and the related effects are very important to physics, radiobiology, medicine and space science and technology. A powerful method to study the interactions of ionizing radiation with biological systems was developed in the field of microdosimetry. Microdosimetry spectra characterize the energy deposition to objects of cellular size, i.e., a few micrometers. In the present thesis the interaction of ions with tissue-like media was investigated using the Monte Carlo model for Heavy-Ion Therapy (MCHIT) developed at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies. MCHIT is a Geant4-based application intended to benchmark the physical models of Geant4 and investigate the physical properties of therapeutic ion beams. We have implemented new features in MCHIT in order to calculate microdosimetric quantities characterizing the radiation fields of accelerated nucleons and nuclei. The results of our Monte Carlo simulations were compared with recent experimental microdosimetry data. In addition to microdosimetry calculations with MCHIT, we also investigated the biological properties of ion beams, e.g. their relative biological effectiveness (RBE), by means of the modified Microdosimetric-Kinetic model (MKM). The MKM uses microdosimetry spectra in describing cell response to radiation. MCHIT+MKM allowed us to study the physical and biological properties of ion beams. The main results of the thesis are as follows: MCHIT is able to describe the spatial distribution of the physical dose in tissue-like media and microdosimetry spectra for ions with energies relevant to space research and ion-beam cancer therapy; MCHIT+MKM predicts a reduction of the biological effectiveness of ions propagating in extended medium due to nuclear fragmentation reactions; We predicted favourable biological dose-depth profiles for monoenergetic helium and

  11. Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-10-01

    We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included

  12. Characterization of radiation damage induced by swift heavy ions in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Christian

    2016-05-15

    Graphite is a classical material in neutron radiation environments, being widely used in nuclear reactors and power plants as a moderator. For high energy particle accelerators, graphite provides ideal material properties because of the low Z of carbon and its corresponding low stopping power, thus when ion projectiles interact with graphite is the energy deposition rather low. This work aims to improve the understanding of how the irradiation with swift heavy ions (SHI) of kinetic energies in the range of MeV to GeV affects the structure of graphite and other carbon-based materials. Special focus of this project is given to beam induced changes of thermo-mechanical properties. For this purpose the Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and glassy carbon (GC) (both serving as model materials), isotropic high density polycrystalline graphite (PG) and other carbon based materials like carbon fiber carbon composites (CFC), chemically expanded graphite (FG) and molybdenum carbide enhanced graphite composites (MoC) were exposed to different ions ranging from {sup 131}Xe to {sup 238}U provided by the UNILAC accelerator at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. To investigate structural changes, various in-situ and off-line measurements were performed including Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. Thermo-mechanical properties were investigated using the laser-flash-analysis method, differential scanning calorimetry, micro/nano-indentation and 4-point electrical resistivity measurements. Beam induced stresses were investigated using profilometry. Obtained results provided clear evidence that ion beam-induced radiation damage leads to structural changes and degradation of thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of graphite. PG transforms towards a disordered sp2 structure, comparable to GC at high fluences. Irradiation-induced embrittlement is strongly reducing the lifetime of most high-dose exposed accelerator components. For

  13. Robotic-based carbon ion therapy and patient positioning in 6 degrees of freedom: setup accuracy of two standard immobilization devices used in carbon ion therapy and IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Alexandra D; Winter, Marcus; Kuhn, Sabine P; Debus, Jürgen; Nairz, Olaf; Münter, Marc W

    2012-03-29

    To investigate repositioning accuracy in particle radiotherapy in 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, 3 DOF) for two immobilization devices (Scotchcast masks vs thermoplastic head masks) currently in use at our institution for fractionated radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients. Position verifications in patients treated with carbon ion therapy and IMRT for head and neck malignancies were evaluated. Most patients received combined treatment regimen (IMRT plus carbon ion boost), immobilization was achieved with either Scotchcast or thermoplastic head masks. Position corrections in robotic-based carbon ion therapy allowing 6 DOF were compared to IMRT allowing corrections in 3 DOF for two standard immobilization devices. In total, 838 set-up controls of 38 patients were analyzed. Robotic-based position correction including correction of rotations was well tolerated and without discomfort. Standard deviations of translational components were between 0.5 and 0.8 mm for Scotchcast and 0.7 and 1.3 mm for thermoplastic masks in 6 DOF and 1.2-1.4 mm and 1.0-1.1 mm in 3 DOF respectively. Mean overall displacement vectors were between 2.1 mm (Scotchcast) and 2.9 mm (thermoplastic masks) in 6 DOF and 3.9-3.0 mm in 3 DOF respectively. Displacement vectors were lower when correction in 6 DOF was allowed as opposed to 3 DOF only, which was maintained at the traditional action level of >3 mm for position correction in the pre-on-board imaging era. Setup accuracy for both systems was within the expected range. Smaller shifts were required when 6 DOF were available for correction as opposed to 3 DOF. Where highest possible positioning accuracy is required, frequent image guidance is mandatory to achieve best possible plan delivery and maintenance of sharp gradients and optimal normal tissue sparing inherent in carbon ion therapy.

  14. Ion irradiation and biomolecular radiation damage II. Indirect effect

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei; Yu, Zengliang; Su, Wenhui

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that damage of genome in a living cell by ionizing radiation is about one-third direct and two-thirds indirect. The former which has been introduced in our last paper, concerns direct energy deposition and ionizing reactions in the biomolecules; the latter results from radiation induced reactive species (mainly radicals) in the medium (mainly water) surrounding the biomolecules. In this review, a short description of ion implantation induced radical formation in water is ...

  15. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  16. Treatment planning for carbon ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Scholz, D.; Weber, U.; Jaekel, O.

    2001-01-01

    The GSI facility realizes for the first time a combination of an active field shaping, using a scanned beam, with an active energy variation of the beam, thus making full use of the advantages of heavy charged particles for therapy. This novel irradiation technique requires a method for dose calculation and optimization which is radically different from conventional approaches used for example in photon and even proton therapy, due to the strong dependence of the RBE on particle charge, energy and absorbed dose. A prerequisite is the development of a physical beam model as well as a radiobiological model to describe the interactions of ion beams with biological material. (orig.)

  17. Impairments of DNA synthesization and normal tissue after irradiation with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Nobuhiko; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ando, Koichi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uzawa, Akiko; Koike, Sachiko; Fukawa, Takeshi; Monobe, Manami; Hirayama, Ryoichi

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate [2- 14 C]thymidine as a tracer, to detect radiation damages in gut. We examined the radiolabeled thymidine accumulation in gut after irradiated with carbon-ion. Mice were given whole body irradiation with carbon-ion (290 MeV/u, 6 cm-spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), 20 keV/μm). Gut [2- 14 C]thymidine accumulation significantly decreased 4 hr after irradiated with 9 Gy, and did not recover until 24 hr after irradiation. Furthermore, we investigated the dose dependency of [2- 14 C]thymidine accumulation in gut. At 12 hr after irradiation, accumulation of thymidine decreased with an increase of carbon-ion doses (1-9 Gy), whereas that of [6- 3 H]thymidine was independent of radiation dose. These results suggest that the difference of isotope-labeled position causes change of thymidine kinetics. At 84 hr after irradiation, [2- 14 C]thymidine accumulation showed no dose dependence. However, a clear dose dependence was obtained when [2- 14 C]thymidine accumulation was corrected by blood flow. Uptake of a regional blood flow marker 14 C-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) in gut increased after 9-18 Gy irradiation. These findings demonstrated that the [2- 14 C]thymidine uptake in vivo could be an appropriate marker for investigating gut responses and blood flow should be taken account for the evaluation by [2- 14 C]thymidine. (author)

  18. The regeneration of polluted active carbon by radiation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Borong; Wu Minghong; Hu Longxin; Zhou Riumin; Zhu Jinliang

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the regeneration of polluted active carbon from monosodium glutamate factory by combination of radiation and acid-alkali chemical techniques. The experimental results show that the polluted active carbon will be highly regenerated on the conditions of process concentration 3%, process time 0.5 hour and the adjustment process concentration 2%, time 0.5 hour, radiation dose 5kGy. As regeneration times increase, the regenerated active carbon behaves with good repetition and stable property

  19. Quantitative analysis of carbon radiation in edge plasmas of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, C.F.; Morita, S.; Oishi, T.; Goto, M.; Murakami, I.; Wang, E.R.; Huang, X.L.

    2013-01-01

    It is of interest to compare the carbon radiation loss between LHD and tokamaks. Since the radiation from C"3"+ is much smaller than that from C"5"+, it is also interesting to examine the difference in the detached plasma. In addition, it is important to study quantitatively the radiation from each ionization stage of carbon which is uniquely the dominant impurity in most tokamaks and LHD. (J.P.N.)

  20. Feasibility of carbon-ion radiotherapy for re-irradiation of locoregionally recurrent, metastatic, or secondary lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Karube, Masataka; Nakajima, Mio; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Kamada, Tadashi

    2018-03-02

    Intrathoracic recurrence after carbon-ion radiotherapy for primary or metastatic lung tumors remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths. However, treatment options are limited. Herein, we report on the toxicity and efficacy of re-irradiation with carbon-ion radiotherapy for locoregionally recurrent, metastatic, or secondary lung tumors. Data of 95 patients with prior intrathoracic carbon-ion radiotherapy who were treated with re-irradiation with carbon-ion radiotherapy at our institution between 2006 and 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. Seventy-three patients (76.8%) had primary lung tumors and 22 patients (23.2%) had metastatic lung tumors. The median dose of initial carbon-ion radiotherapy was 52.8 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) and the median dose of re-irradiation was 66.0 Gy (relative biological effectiveness). None of the patients received concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up period after re-irradiation was 18 months. In terms of grade ≥3 toxicities, one patient experienced each of the following: grade 5 bronchopleural fistula, grade 4 radiation pneumonitis, grade 3 chest pain, and grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. The 2-year local control and overall survival rates were 54.0% and 61.9%, respectively. In conclusion, re-irradiation with carbon-ion radiotherapy was associated with relatively low toxicity and moderate efficacy. Re-irradiation with carbon-ion radiotherapy might be an effective treatment option for patients with locoregionally recurrent, metastatic, or secondary lung tumors. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  1. Health-related quality of life after carbon-ion radiotherapy for prostate cancer. A 3-year prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    To assess 3-year health-related quality of life of patients treated with carbon ion radiotherapy for prostate cancer. A total of 213 patients received carbon-ion radiotherapy at a total dose of 66 Gy equivalent in 20 fractions over 5 weeks, and neoadjuvant and adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy were administered for high-risk patients for at least 12 months. A health-related quality of life assessment was carried out at four time-points (immediately before the initiation of carbon-ion radiotherapy, immediately after, 12 and 36 months after completion of carbon-ion radiotherapy) using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy General and for Prostate Cancer Patients. The evaluable response rates among all responses were more than 94%. Overall, a significant decrease in the scores of the health-related quality of life 12 months after carbon-ion radiotherapy returned to their baseline levels at 36 months. Additionally, no significant decrease was observed in the scores at any of the assessment time-points compared with their baseline scores in the group of carbon-ion radiotherapy without androgen deprivation therapy; however, the presence of morbidity and biochemical failure significantly worsened the scores, and the decreases in the scores did not improve even at 36 months after carbon-ion radiotherapy. An assessment based on a subjective scoring system shows a significant decrease in health-related quality of life at 12 months after carbon-ion radiation therapy, which tends to return to baseline levels at 36 months. The presence of morbidity and bio-chemical failure significantly worsen health-related quality of life scores. Further controlled studies focusing on health-related quality of life assessment in patients with prostate cancer are warranted. (author)

  2. Radiative Auger effect in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, P.; Oltjen, J.; Jamison, K.A.; Kauffman, R.L.; Woods, C.W.; Hall, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The radiative Auger effect, RAE, is observed for Al and Si bombarded by 1-2MeV H + . This is the first observation of the RAE X-ray edge using ion excitation. The K-L 23 L 23 RAE edge energy and the relative intensity are in agreement with the previously reported electron and photon induced spectra. (Auth.)

  3. Raman spectroscopic investigations of swift heavy ion irradiation effects in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olejniczak, A.; Skuratov, V.A.; Lukaszewicz, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we report the results on swift heavy ion irradiation effects in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Buckypapers, prepared of CVD grown, SWNTs were irradiated at room temperature with 167 MeV Xe ions to fluences in the range of 6×10 11 - 6.5×10 13 cm -2 and investigated using Raman spectroscopy. We observed a rich set of features in the intermediate frequency mode region. Some of them, being defect-induced, resembled fairly well the phonon density of states (DOS) of nanocrystalline glassy carbon. Analysis of the RBM modes has shown that the broader metallic tubes are characterized by higher radiation stability than thinner semiconducting ones. (authors)

  4. RBE of cells irradiated by carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjian; Zhou Guangming; Wei Zengquan; Wang Jufang; Dang Bingrong; Li Qiang; Xie Hongmei

    2002-01-01

    The mouse melanoma cells (B16), human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (HeLa), Chinese hamster pulmonary cells V79, and human hepatoma cells (SMMC-7721) were collected for studying. The cells of 5 x 10 5 /ml were seeded in 35 mm diameter petri dish and allowed to grow one day, and then the medium in petri dishes was removed away, the cells were washed once with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), petri dishes was covered with 4μm thickness Mylar film. The cells were irradiated by 12 C ion beam with LETs of 125.5, 200, 700 keV/μm in water generated from HIRFL (Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou). For 60 Co γ-ray experiment, the cells of 5 x 10 4 /ml were grown in 20 ml culture flasks including 1.5 ml cell suspension and directly used for irradiation. Following irradiation, the cells were trypsinized, counted, plated at appropriate densities in growth medium and then seeded in 60 mm diameter culture dishes. Each dish was filled 4 ml standard medium, and incubated for 8-12 days at 37 degree C incubator containing 5% CO 2 . The cultures were then rinsed with PBS buffer at pH 6.8, fixed with Carnoy's fluid, stained for 8 min with Giemsa (1:20, pH 6.8), and colonies containing more than 50 cells were scored. Their relative biological effectivenesses (RBE) were investigated. The results show that RBE depends on cellular types and increases with increasing of cellular survival level when LET is at 125.5 keV/μm, and decreases with increasing LET when LET ≥ 125.5 keV/μm

  5. Customized mouthpieces designed to reduce tongue mucositis in carbon-ion radiotherapy for tumors of the nasal and paranasal sinuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Musha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mouthpieces are used to fix the positions of the lower jaw and teeth during carbon-ion radiotherapy for head and neck tumors. We used a customized mouthpiece to reduce radiation mucositis by displacing the tongue. Acute radiation mucositis gradually increased for the palate and tongue after approximately six irradiation fractions (maximal mean grade: palate, 2.5 during radiation fractions 15; tongue, 0.8 during radiation fractions 12 and 13. The mean grade of mucositis was significantly lower for the tongue than for the palate from irradiation fraction six until two weeks after irradiation.

  6. Radiation safety of Takasaki ion accelerators for advanced radiation in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Susumu; Anazawa, Yutaka

    1991-01-01

    Building layout of Takasaki ion accelerator facility has been started since 1987, with the propulsion of research development of (1) cosmetic environment materials, (2) nuclear fusion reactors, (3) biotechnology, and (4) new functional materials. This paper deals with an AVF cyclotron and a tandem type accelerator, focusing on safety design, radiation safety management, and radioactive waste management. Safety design is discussed in view of radiation shielding and activation countermeasures. Radiation safety management covers radiation monitoring in the workplace, exhaust radioactivity, environment outside the facility, and the other equipments; personal monitoring; and protective management of exposure. For radiation waste management, basic concept and management methods are commented on. (N.K.)

  7. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials used in waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation damage to process materials used in radioactive waste management has been a topic of little interest in the past. In recent years, as a result of the increasing number of accidents reported in the open literature, there has been some desire to examine the radiation decomposition of ion exchange materials and its consequences to the interim and long-term management of radioactive wastes. Extensive literature surveys and some confirmatory laboratory investigations conducted conclusively demonstrate that radiation damage to ion exchangers has the potential to cause problems of corrosion, elution of adsorbed ionic species, generation of flammable and explosive gaseous products and agglomeration of particulates to form rigid monoliths. This paper is an overview of present knowledge and a presentation of the results of our investigations of this phenomenon. The distinct lack of systematic studies to evaluate the problems of radiation damage to process materials used in the consolidation and isolation of high specific activity radionuclides still leaves considerable gaps in our knowledge of the processes and consequences of radiation effects on ion exchangers used in radioactive waste management

  8. Development of C{sup 6+} laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, T., E-mail: takayuki1.sako@toshiba.co.jp; Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama 235-8522 (Japan); Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T. [Cancer Research Center, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Takeuchi, T. [Accelerator Engineering Corporation, Chiba 263-0043 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A prototype C{sup 6+} injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  9. Development of C6+ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K.; Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T.; Takeuchi, T.

    2016-02-01

    A prototype C6+ injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  10. Development of C⁶⁺ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, T; Yamaguchi, A; Sato, K; Goto, A; Iwai, T; Nayuki, T; Nemoto, K; Kayama, T; Takeuchi, T

    2016-02-01

    A prototype C(6+) injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  11. Development of C6+ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K.; Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T.; Takeuchi, T.

    2016-01-01

    A prototype C 6+ injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4

  12. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Cavoto, G.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-06-24

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (~ 10 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with ...

  13. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavoto, G.; Cirillo, E.N.M.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (∼ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency. (orig.)

  14. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavoto, G. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Cirillo, E.N.M. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento SBAI, Rome (Italy); Cocina, F. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Ferretti, J. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Polosa, A.D. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); CERN, Theory Division, Geneva (Switzerland); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (∼ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency. (orig.)

  15. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoto, G; Cirillo, E N M; Cocina, F; Ferretti, J; Polosa, A D

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs ([Formula: see text] GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency.

  16. Optical emission spectroscopy of carbon laser plasma ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balki, Oguzhan; Rahman, Md. Mahmudur; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2018-04-01

    Carbon laser plasma generated by an Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse width 7 ns, fluence 4-52 J cm-2) is studied by optical emission spectroscopy and ion time-of-flight. Up to C4+ ions are detected with the ion flux strongly dependent on the laser fluence. The increase in ion charge with the laser fluence is accompanied by observation of multicharged ion lines in the optical spectra. The time-integrated electron temperature Te is calculated from the Boltzmann plot using the C II lines at 392.0, 426.7, and 588.9 nm. Te is found to increase from ∼0.83 eV for a laser fluence of 22 J cm-2 to ∼0.90 eV for 40 J cm-2. The electron density ne is obtained from the Stark broadened profiles of the C II line at 392 nm and is found to increase from ∼ 2 . 1 × 1017cm-3 for 4 J cm-2 to ∼ 3 . 5 × 1017cm-3 for 40 J cm-2. Applying an external electric field parallel to the expanding plume shows no effect on the line emission intensities. Deconvolution of ion time-of-flight signal with a shifted Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for each charge state results in an ion temperature Ti ∼4.7 and ∼6.0 eV for 20 and 36 J cm-2, respectively.

  17. Coprecipitation of alkali metal ions with calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Minoru; Kitano, Yasushi

    1986-01-01

    The coprecipitation of alkali metal ions Li + , Na + , K + and Rb + with calcium carbonate has been studied experimentally and the following results have been obtained: (1) Alkali metal ions are more easily coprecipitated with aragonite than with calcite. (2) The relationship between the amounts of alkali metal ions coprecipitated with aragonite and their ionic radii shows a parabolic curve with a peak located at Na + which has approximately the same ionic radius as Ca 2+ . (3) However, the amounts of alkali metal ions coprecipitated with calcite decrease with increasing ionic radius of alkali metals. (4) Our results support the hypothesis that (a) alkali metals are in interstitial positions in the crystal structure of calcite and do not substitute for Ca 2+ in the lattice, but (b) in aragonite, alkali metals substitute for Ca 2+ in the crystal structure. (5) Magnesium ions in the parent solution increase the amounts of alkali metal ions (Li + , Na + , K + and Rb + ) coprecipitated with calcite but decrease those with aragonite. (6) Sodium-bearing aragonite decreases the incorporation of other alkali metal ions (Li + , K + and Rb + ) into the aragonite. (author)

  18. Neuron attachment properties of carbon negative-ion implanted bioabsorbable polymer of poly-lactic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2002-01-01

    Modification of a bioabsorbable polymer of poly-lactic acid (PLA) by negative carbon ion implantation was investigated with resect to radiation effects on surface physical properties and nerve-cell attachment properties. Carbon negative ions were implanted to PLA at energy of 5-30 keV with a dose of 10 14 -10 16 ions/cm 2 . Most C-implanted PLA samples showed contact angles near 80 deg. and almost same as that of unimplanted PLA, although a few samples at 5 keV and less 3x10 14 ions/cm 2 had contact angles larger than 90 deg. The attachment properties of nerve cells of PC-12h (rat adrenal phechromocytoma) in vitro were studied. PC-12h cells attached on the unimplanted region in C-implanted PLA samples at 5 and 10 keV. On the contrary, the nerve cells attached on only implanted region for the C-implanted PLA sample at 30 keV and 1x10 15 ions/cm 2

  19. Energy dependent track structure parametrizations for protons and carbon ions based on nano-metric simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauke, A.; Wilkens, J.J.; Villagrasa, C.; Rabus, H.

    2015-01-01

    The BioQuaRT project within the European Metrology Research Programme aims at correlating ion track structure characteristics with the biological effects of radiation and develops measurement and simulation techniques for determining ion track structure on different length scales from about 2 nm to about 10 μm. Within this framework, we investigate methods to translate track-structure quantities derived on a nanometer scale to macroscopic dimensions. Input data sets were generated by simulations of ion tracks of protons and carbon ions in liquid water using the Geant-4 Monte Carlo tool-kit with the Geant-4-DNA processes. Based on the energy transfer points - recorded with nanometer resolution - we investigated parametrizations of overall properties of ion track structure. Three different track structure parametrizations have been developed using the distances to the 10 next neighbouring ionizations, the radial energy distribution and ionisation cluster size distributions. These parametrizations of nanometer-scale track structure build a basis for deriving biologically relevant mean values which are essential in the clinical situation where each voxel is exposed to a mixed radiation field. (authors)

  20. Radiation lifetimes and failure mechanisms of carbon stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auble, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of lifetimes of thin carbon foils under heavy-ion irradiation are compiled and recent advances in stripper foil technology are reviewed. The impact of recent foil lifetime improvements, many by more than an order of magnitude, on heavy-ion electrostatic accelerators is discussed. Foil inhomogeneities, particularly those caused by sputtering are suggested to be a prime factor in usable foil lifetimes

  1. Fast heavy-ion radiation damage of glycine in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Shinji [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Tsuchida, Hidetsugu, E-mail: tsuchida@nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Furuya, Ryosuke [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Majima, Takuya; Itoh, Akio [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Fast heavy-ion radiolysis of biomolecules in aqueous solution is investigated for an atomistic understanding of radiation damage to normal cells during heavy-particle beam therapy. The smallest amino acid glycine was used as a model biomaterial. Microjets of aqueous glycine solutions under vacuum were irradiated with 4.0-MeV carbon ions corresponding to energies in the Bragg peak region. To understand the effects of the water environment on molecular damage, the yield of glycine dissociation was measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The yield was significantly reduced relative to gas-phase glycine targets. This implies that the numerous water molecules surrounding a single glycine molecule act as a buffer that suppresses dissociation. This is an environmental effect similar to that observed for other biomolecular cluster targets.

  2. Solvation of lithium ion in dimethoxyethane and propylene carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2015-07-01

    Solvation of the lithium ion (Li+) in dimethoxyethane (DME) and propylene carbonate (PC) is of scientific significance and urgency in the context of lithium-ion batteries. I report PM7-MD simulations on the composition of Li+ solvation shells (SH) in a few DME/PC mixtures. The equimolar mixture features preferential solvation by PC, in agreement with classical MD studies. However, one DME molecule is always present in the first SH, supplementing the cage formed by five PC molecules. As PC molecules get removed, DME gradually substitutes vacant places. In the PC-poor mixtures, an entire SH is populated by five DME molecules.

  3. Dose Response of Alanine Detectors Irradiated with Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type, when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behaviour of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results with model predictions......-dose curves deviate from predictions in the peak region, most pronounced at the distal edge of the peak. Conclusions: The used model and its implementation show a good overall agreement for quasi mono energetic measurements. Deviations in depth-dose measurements are mainly attributed to uncertainties...

  4. Annealing effects on the migration of ion-implanted cadmium in glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlatshwayo, T.T., E-mail: thulani.hlatshwayo@up.ac.za [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Sebitla, L.D. [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Physics Department, University of Botswana, Gaborone (Botswana); Njoroge, E.G.; Mlambo, M.; Malherbe, J.B. [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2017-03-15

    The migration behaviour of cadmium (Cd) implanted into glassy carbon and the effects of annealing on radiation damage introduced by ion implantation were investigated. The glassy carbon substrates were implanted with Cd at a dose of 2 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} and energy of 360 keV. The implantation was performed at room temperature (RT), 430 °C and 600 °C. The RT implanted samples were isochronally annealed in vacuum at 350, 500 and 600 °C for 1 h and isothermally annealed at 350 °C up to 4 h. The as-implanted and annealed samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Raman results revealed that implantation at room temperature amorphized the glassy carbon structure while high temperature implantations resulted in slightly less radiation damage. Isochronal annealing of the RT implanted samples resulted in some recrystallization as a function of increasing temperature. The original glassy carbon structure was not achieved at the highest annealing temperature of 600 °C. Diffusion of Cd in glassy carbon was already taking place during implantation at 430 °C. This diffusion of Cd was accompanied by significant loss from the surface during implantation at 600 °C. Isochronal annealing of the room temperature implanted samples at 350 °C for 1 h caused Cd to diffuse towards the bulk while isothermal annealing at 500 and 600 °C resulted in the migration of implanted Cd toward the surface accompanied by a loss of Cd from the surface. Isothermal annealing at 350 °C for 1 h caused Cd to diffuse towards the bulk while for annealing time >1 h Cd diffused towards the surface. These results were interpreted in terms of trapping and de-trapping of implanted Cd by radiation damage.

  5. Ion exchange resins as high-dose radiation dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alian, A.; Dessouki, A.; El-Assay, N.B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports on the possibility of using various types of ion exchange resins as high-dose radiation dosimeters, by analysis of the decrease in exchange capacity with absorbed dose. The resins studied are Sojuzchim-export-Moscow Cation Exchanger KU-2 and Anion Exchanger AV-17 and Merck Cation Exchanger I, and Merck Anion Exchangers II and III. Over the dose range 1 to 100 kGy, the systems show linearity between log absorbed dose and decrease in resin ion exchange capacity. The slope of this response function differs for the different resins, depending on their ionic form and degree of cross-linking. The radiation sensitivity increases in the order KU-2; Exchanger I; AV-17; Exchanger II; Exchanger III. Merck resins with moisture content of 21% showed considerably higher radiation sensitivity than those with 2 to 3% moisture content. The mechanism of radiation-induced denaturing of the ion exchanger resins involves cleavage and decomposition of functional substituents, with crosslinking playing a stabilizing role, with water and its radiolytic products serving to inhibit radical recombination and interfering with the protection cage effect of crosslinking. (author)

  6. Trapped-Ion Quantum Logic with Global Radiation Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidt, S; Randall, J; Webster, S C; Lake, K; Webb, A E; Cohen, I; Navickas, T; Lekitsch, B; Retzker, A; Hensinger, W K

    2016-11-25

    Trapped ions are a promising tool for building a large-scale quantum computer. However, the number of required radiation fields for the realization of quantum gates in any proposed ion-based architecture scales with the number of ions within the quantum computer, posing a major obstacle when imagining a device with millions of ions. Here, we present a fundamentally different approach for trapped-ion quantum computing where this detrimental scaling vanishes. The method is based on individually controlled voltages applied to each logic gate location to facilitate the actual gate operation analogous to a traditional transistor architecture within a classical computer processor. To demonstrate the key principle of this approach we implement a versatile quantum gate method based on long-wavelength radiation and use this method to generate a maximally entangled state of two quantum engineered clock qubits with fidelity 0.985(12). This quantum gate also constitutes a simple-to-implement tool for quantum metrology, sensing, and simulation.

  7. Radiation defects in lithium fluoride induced by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautmann, C.; Schwartz, K.; Steckenreiter, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Costantini, J.M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France). DPTA/SPMC; Toulemonde, M. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherches avec les Ions Lourds (CIRIL), 14 - Caen (France)

    1998-07-01

    Single crystals of lithium fluoride were irradiated with various species of heavy ions in the energy regime between 1 and 30 MeV/u. The induced radiation damage was studied with techniques such as optical absorption spectroscopy, small-angle x-ray scattering, chemical etching and profilometry, complemented by annealing experiments. Clear evidence is given for a complex track structure and defect morphology. Single defects such as F-centers are produced in a large halo of several tens of nanometers around the ion trajectory. The defect creation in this zone is similar to that under conventional radiation. For heavy ions above a critical energy loss of 10 keV/nm, new effects occur within a very small core region of 2-4 nm in diameter. The damage in this zone is responsible for chemical etching and for a characteristic anisotropic x-ray scattering. It is assumed that in this core, complex defect aggregates (e.g., cluster of color centers, molecular anions and vacancies) are created. Their formation is only slightly influenced by the irradiation temperature and takes place even at 15 K where diffusion processes of primary defects are frozen. Furthermore, irradiation with heavy ions leads to pronounced swelling effects which can be related to an intermediate zone of around 10 nm around the ion path. (orig.) 40 refs.

  8. Oxidation processes on conducting carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    La Mantia, Fabio; Huggins, Robert A.; Cui, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The oxidation processes at the interface between different types of typical carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries and carbonates electrolyte above 5 V versus Li/Li+ were investigated. Depending on the nature and surface area of the carbon

  9. EPR characterization of carbonate ion effect on TCE and PCE decomposition by gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, J.H.; Chung, H.H.; Lee, M.J.; Jung, J.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonate ions significantly inhibit the decomposition of TCE (trichloroethylene) and PCE (perchloroethylene) by gamma-rays. The inhibition effect is larger in the case of TCE than PCE due to a greater dependence of TCE decomposition on hydroxyl radicals. The inhibition effect of carbonate ions was characterized by an EPR/spin-trapping technique. The intensity of DMPO-OH adduct signal decreased as the carbonate ion concentration increased and the percent of signal reduction was linearly proportional to the logarithm of carbonate ion concentration. This directly proves that the carbonate ions inhibit the decomposition of TCE and PCE by scavenging hydroxyl radicals. (author)

  10. Bystander effects on mammalian cells induced by carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jufang; Zhao Jing; Ma Qiufeng; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Li Weijian; Zhou Guangming; Dang Bingrong; Mao Limin; Feng Yan

    2004-01-01

    Bystander effects on unirradiated V79 cells were observed by irradiated conditioned medium (ICM) method and co-cultured with carbon-ion-irradiated V79 cells. The results showed that the colony formation efficiency of unirradiated cells is obviously decreased by ICM. After co-culture with carbon-ion-irradiated cells for some time, the colony formation efficiency of co-cultured cells was lower than expected results assuming no bystander effects. The micronucleus frequency and hprt gene mutation rate was almost the same as expected results. Cytotoxic factor(s), which was effective for cell growth but not for micronucleus and mutation on unirradiated cells, might be released by irradiated cells. (authors)

  11. Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

    2009-02-21

    An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

  12. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    OpenAIRE

    N. S. Lovenduski; M. C. Long; K. Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−]) on the basis of a long control simulation with a fully-coupled Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical...

  13. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Lovenduski, N. S.; Long, M. C.; Lindsay, K.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−]) on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and ...

  14. Constructing carbon nanotube junctions by Ar ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishaq, Ahmad; Ni Zhichun; Yan Long; Gong Jinlong; Zhu Dezhang

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) irradiated by Ar ion beams at elevated temperature were studied. The irradiation-induced defects in CNTs are greatly reduced by elevated temperature. Moreover, the two types of CNT junctions, the crossing junction and the parallel junction, were formed. And the CNT networks may be fabricated by the two types of CNT junctions. The formation process and the corresponding mechanism of CNT networks are discussed.

  15. Heavy ion linear accelerator for radiation damage studies of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsaev, Sergey V.; Mustapha, Brahim; Ostroumov, Peter N.; Nolen, Jerry; Barcikowski, Albert; Pellin, Michael; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2017-03-01

    A new eXtreme MATerial (XMAT) research facility is being proposed at Argonne National Laboratory to enable rapid in situ mesoscale bulk analysis of ion radiation damage in advanced materials and nuclear fuels. This facility combines a new heavy-ion accelerator with the existing high-energy X-ray analysis capability of the Argonne Advanced Photon Source. The heavy-ion accelerator and target complex will enable experimenters to emulate the environment of a nuclear reactor making possible the study of fission fragment damage in materials. Material scientists will be able to use the measured material parameters to validate computer simulation codes and extrapolate the response of the material in a nuclear reactor environment. Utilizing a new heavy-ion accelerator will provide the appropriate energies and intensities to study these effects with beam intensities which allow experiments to run over hours or days instead of years. The XMAT facility will use a CW heavy-ion accelerator capable of providing beams of any stable isotope with adjustable energy up to 1.2 MeV/u for U-238(50+) and 1.7 MeV for protons. This energy is crucial to the design since it well mimics fission fragments that provide the major portion of the damage in nuclear fuels. The energy also allows damage to be created far from the surface of the material allowing bulk radiation damage effects to be investigated. The XMAT ion linac includes an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, a normal-conducting radio-frequency quadrupole and four normal-conducting multi-gap quarter-wave resonators operating at 60.625 MHz. This paper presents the 3D multi-physics design and analysis of the accelerating structures and beam dynamics studies of the linac.

  16. Heavy ion linear accelerator for radiation damage studies of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsaev, Sergey V; Mustapha, Brahim; Ostroumov, Peter N; Nolen, Jerry; Barcikowski, Albert; Pellin, Michael; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2017-03-01

    A new eXtreme MATerial (XMAT) research facility is being proposed at Argonne National Laboratory to enable rapid in situ mesoscale bulk analysis of ion radiation damage in advanced materials and nuclear fuels. This facility combines a new heavy-ion accelerator with the existing high-energy X-ray analysis capability of the Argonne Advanced Photon Source. The heavy-ion accelerator and target complex will enable experimenters to emulate the environment of a nuclear reactor making possible the study of fission fragment damage in materials. Material scientists will be able to use the measured material parameters to validate computer simulation codes and extrapolate the response of the material in a nuclear reactor environment. Utilizing a new heavy-ion accelerator will provide the appropriate energies and intensities to study these effects with beam intensities which allow experiments to run over hours or days instead of years. The XMAT facility will use a CW heavy-ion accelerator capable of providing beams of any stable isotope with adjustable energy up to 1.2 MeV/u for 238 U 50+ and 1.7 MeV for protons. This energy is crucial to the design since it well mimics fission fragments that provide the major portion of the damage in nuclear fuels. The energy also allows damage to be created far from the surface of the material allowing bulk radiation damage effects to be investigated. The XMAT ion linac includes an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, a normal-conducting radio-frequency quadrupole and four normal-conducting multi-gap quarter-wave resonators operating at 60.625 MHz. This paper presents the 3D multi-physics design and analysis of the accelerating structures and beam dynamics studies of the linac.

  17. Carbon Nanotube-Based Ion Selective Sensors for Wearable Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Soumyendu; David-Pur, Moshe; Hanein, Yael

    2017-10-11

    Wearable electronics offer new opportunities in a wide range of applications, especially sweat analysis using skin sensors. A fundamental challenge in these applications is the formation of sensitive and stable electrodes. In this article we report the development of a wearable sensor based on carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode arrays for sweat sensing. Solid-state ion selective electrodes (ISEs), sensitive to Na + ions, were prepared by drop coating plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) doped with ionophore and ion exchanger on CNT electrodes. The ion selective membrane (ISM) filled the intertubular spaces of the highly porous CNT film and formed an attachment that was stronger than that achieved with flat Au, Pt, or carbon electrodes. Concentration of the ISM solution used influenced the attachment to the CNT film, the ISM surface morphology, and the overall performance of the sensor. Sensitivity of 56 ± 3 mV/decade to Na + ions was achieved. Optimized solid-state reference electrodes (REs), suitable for wearable applications, were prepared by coating CNT electrodes with colloidal dispersion of Ag/AgCl, agarose hydrogel with 0.5 M NaCl, and a passivation layer of PVC doped with NaCl. The CNT-based REs had low sensitivity (-1.7 ± 1.2 mV/decade) toward the NaCl solution and high repeatability and were superior to bare Ag/AgCl, metals, carbon, and CNT films, reported previously as REs. CNT-based ISEs were calibrated against CNT-based REs, and the short-term stability of the system was tested. We demonstrate that CNT-based devices implemented on a flexible support are a very attractive platform for future wearable technology devices.

  18. Similarity between the effects of carbon-ion irradiation and X-irradiation on the development of rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inouye, Minoru; Hayasaka, Shizu; Murata, Yoshiharu; Takahashi, Sentaro; Kubota, Yoshihisa

    2000-01-01

    The effects of carbon-ion irradiation and X-irradiation on the development of rat brain were compared. Twenty pregnant rats were injected with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) at 9 pm on day 18 pregnancy and divided into five groups. Three hours after injection (day 19.0) one group was exposed to 290 MeV/u carbon-ion radiation by a single dose of 1.5 Gy. Other groups were exposed to X-radiation by 1.5, 2.0 or 2.5 Gy, or sham-treated, respectively. Fetuses were removed from one dam in each group 8 h after exposure and examined histologically. Extensive cell death was observed in the brain mantle from the irradiated groups. The cell death after 1.5 Gy carbon-ion irradiation was remarkably more extensive than that after 1.5 Gy X-irradiation, but comparable to that after 2.0 Gy or 2.5 Gy X-irradiation. The remaining rats were allowed to give birth and the offspring were sacrificed at 6 weeks of age. All of the irradiated offspring manifested microcephaly. The size of the brain mantle exposed to 1.5 Gy carbon-ion radiation was significantly smaller than that exposed to 1.5 Gy X-radiation and larger than that exposed to 2.5 Gy X-radiation. A histological examination of the cerebral cortex revealed that cortical layers II-IV were malformed. The defect by 1.5 Gy carbon-ion irradiation was more severe than that by the same dose of X-irradiation. Although the BrdU-incorporated neurons were greatly reduced in number in all irradiated groups, these cells reached the superficial area of the cortex. These findings indicated that the effects of both carbon-ion irradiation and X-irradiation on the development of rat brain are similar in character, and the effect of 1.5 Gy carbon-ion irradiation compares to that of 2.0-2.5 Gy X-irradiation. (author)

  19. Study of Radiation Hardness of Gd2SiO5 scintillator for Heavy Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kawade, K; Itow, Y; Masuda, K; Murakami, T; Sako,T; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, T; Taki, K

    2011-01-01

    Gd2SiO5 (GSO) scintillator has very excellent radiation resistance, a fast decay time and a large light yield. Because of these features, GSO scintillator is a suitable material for high radiation environment experiments such as those encountered at high energy accelerators. The radiation hardness of GSO has been measured with Carbon ion beams at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). During two nights of irradiation the GSO received a total radiation dose of 7 × 10$^5$ Gy and no decrease of light yield was observed. On the other hand an increase of light yield by 25% was observed. The increase is proportional to the total dose, increasing at a rate of 0.025%/Gy and saturating at around 1 kGy. Recovery to the initial light yield was also observed during the day between two nights of radiation exposure. The recovery was observed to have a slow exponential time constant of approximately 1.5 × 10$^4$ seconds together with a faster component. In case of the LHCf experiment, a very forward region ex...

  20. Carbon ion irradiation of the human prostate cancer cell line PC3: A whole genome microarray study

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUETENS, ANNELIES; MOREELS, MARJAN; QUINTENS, ROEL; CHIRIOTTI, SABINA; TABURY, KEVIN; MICHAUX, ARLETTE; GRÉGOIRE, VINCENT; BAATOUT, SARAH

    2014-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is a form of external radiation therapy, which uses beams of charged particles such as carbon ions. Compared to conventional radiotherapy with photons, the main advantage of carbon ion therapy is the precise dose localization along with an increased biological effectiveness. The first results obtained from prostate cancer patients treated with carbon ion therapy showed good local tumor control and survival rates. In view of this advanced treatment modality we investigated the effects of irradiation with different beam qualities on gene expression changes in the PC3 prostate adenocarcinoma cell line. For this purpose, PC3 cells were irradiated with various doses (0.0, 0.5 and 2.0 Gy) of carbon ions (LET=33.7 keV/μm) at the beam of the Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds (Caen, France). Comparative experiments with X-rays were performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre. Genome-wide gene expression was analyzed using microarrays. Our results show a downregulation in many genes involved in cell cycle and cell organization processes after 2.0 Gy irradiation. This effect was more pronounced after carbon ion irradiation compared with X-rays. Furthermore, we found a significant downregulation of many genes related to cell motility. Several of these changes were confirmed using qPCR. In addition, recurrence-free survival analysis of prostate cancer patients based on one of these motility genes (FN1) revealed that patients with low expression levels had a prolonged recurrence-free survival time, indicating that this gene may be a potential prognostic biomarker for prostate cancer. Understanding how different radiation qualities affect the cellular behavior of prostate cancer cells is important to improve the clinical outcome of cancer radiation therapy. PMID:24504141

  1. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-Joon Jin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have displayed great potential as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs due to their unique structural, mechanical, and electrical properties. The measured reversible lithium ion capacities of CNT-based anodes are considerably improved compared to the conventional graphite-based anodes. Additionally, the opened structure and enriched chirality of CNTs can help to improve the capacity and electrical transport in CNT-based LIBs. Therefore, the modification of CNTs and design of CNT structure provide strategies for improving the performance of CNT-based anodes. CNTs could also be assembled into free-standing electrodes without any binder or current collector, which will lead to increased specific energy density for the overall battery design. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of lithium ion intercalation and diffusion in CNTs, and the influence of different structures and morphologies on their performance as anode materials for LIBs.

  2. Adsorption of heavy metal ions on activated carbon, (5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hisayoshi; Kamegawa, Katsumi; Arita, Seiji

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption effect of heavy metal ions Cd 2+ , Zn 2+ and Hg 2+ on activated carbon by adding EDTA is reported, utilizing the experimental data. The activated carbons used for the experiment are mostly D, and B, C and F partly. As for the experimental procedure, the solutions of 100 ml which are composed of activated carbon, pH adjusting liquid, EDTA solution and solutions of heavy metals Cd, Zn and Hg, are shaken for 24 hours at 20 deg C, and after the activated carbon is centrifuged and separated for 15 minutes at 3000 rpm, the remaining heavy metal concentrations and pH in the supernatant are measured. The experimental results showed the useful effect on the adsorption of heavy metal ions of Cd, Zn and Hg by adding about 1 mol ratio of (EDTA/heavy metals). The individual experimental results are presented in detail. Concerning the adsorption quantity, 83% of Cd ions remained in the supernatant without addition of EDTA, but less than 1% with addition of about 1 to 5 mol ratio of (EDTA/Cd), and this adsorption effect was almost similar to Zn and Hg, i.e. 100% to 1% in Zn and 70% to 2 or 3% in Hg, under the condition written above. As for the influence of pH on Cd adsorption, the remaining Cd ratio is less than 10%, when pH is 7 to 10.5 at the mol ratio of 1 and 5.5 to 9 at the mol ratio of 10. The adsorption effect was different according to the kinds of activated carbon. The influencing factors for adsorption effect are the concentration of coexisting cations in the solution and the mixing time, etc. The effects of pH on Zn and Hg adsorption were almost similar to Cd. (Nakai, Y.)

  3. Multiscale approach to the physics of radiation damage with ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surdutovich, Eugene [Physics Department, Oakland University, 2200 N. Squirrel Rd., Rochester MI 48309 (United States); Solov' yov, Andrey V. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe University, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, Frankfurt am Main 60438 (Germany)

    2013-04-19

    We review a multiscale approach to the physics of ion-beam cancer therapy, an approach suggested in order to understand the interplay of a large number of phenomena involved in radiation damage scenario occurring on a range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. We briefly overview its history and present the current stage of its development. The differences of the multiscale approach from other methods of understanding and assessment of radiation damage are discussed as well as its relationship to other branches of physics, chemistry and biology.

  4. Differential Bystander Signaling Between Radioresistant Chondrosarcoma Cells and Fibroblasts After X-Ray, Proton, Iron Ion and Carbon Ion Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakatsuki, Masaru, E-mail: wa@mbe.nifty.com [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Magpayo, Nicole; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Chondrosarcoma is well known as a radioresistant tumor, but the mechanisms underlying that resistance are still unclear. The bystander effect is well documented in the field of radiation biology. We investigated the bystander response induced by X-rays, protons, carbon ions, and iron ions in chondrosarcoma cells using a transwell insert co-culture system that precludes physical contact between targeted and bystander cells. Methods and Materials: Human chondrosarcoma cells were irradiated with 0.1-, 0.5-, 1-, and 2-Gy X-rays, protons, carbon ions or iron ions using a transwell insert co-culture system. Formation of micronuclei and p53 binding protein 1 staining in bystander and irradiated cells were analyzed and bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells, and normal human skin fibroblasts was investigated. Results: In this study, we show that the fraction of cells with DNA damages in irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed dose-dependent increases with all beams. However, the fraction of cells with DNA damages in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells did not show any change from the levels in control cells. In the bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells and fibroblasts, the amount of micronucleus formation in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells co-cultured with irradiated fibroblasts were the same as the levels for control cells. However, all bystander fibroblasts co-cultured with irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed significant increases in the fraction of micronucleated cells compared to the rate of control cells. Conclusions: We conclude that chondrosarcoma cells in the transwell insert co-culture system could release bystander stimulations but could not develop bystander responses.

  5. Differential Bystander Signaling Between Radioresistant Chondrosarcoma Cells and Fibroblasts After X-Ray, Proton, Iron Ion and Carbon Ion Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatsuki, Masaru; Magpayo, Nicole; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Chondrosarcoma is well known as a radioresistant tumor, but the mechanisms underlying that resistance are still unclear. The bystander effect is well documented in the field of radiation biology. We investigated the bystander response induced by X-rays, protons, carbon ions, and iron ions in chondrosarcoma cells using a transwell insert co-culture system that precludes physical contact between targeted and bystander cells. Methods and Materials: Human chondrosarcoma cells were irradiated with 0.1-, 0.5-, 1-, and 2-Gy X-rays, protons, carbon ions or iron ions using a transwell insert co-culture system. Formation of micronuclei and p53 binding protein 1 staining in bystander and irradiated cells were analyzed and bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells, and normal human skin fibroblasts was investigated. Results: In this study, we show that the fraction of cells with DNA damages in irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed dose-dependent increases with all beams. However, the fraction of cells with DNA damages in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells did not show any change from the levels in control cells. In the bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells and fibroblasts, the amount of micronucleus formation in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells co-cultured with irradiated fibroblasts were the same as the levels for control cells. However, all bystander fibroblasts co-cultured with irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed significant increases in the fraction of micronucleated cells compared to the rate of control cells. Conclusions: We conclude that chondrosarcoma cells in the transwell insert co-culture system could release bystander stimulations but could not develop bystander responses.

  6. Radiation processing for PTFE composite reinforced with carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akihiro Oshima; Akira Udagawa; Yousuke Morita

    1999-01-01

    The present work is an attempt to evaluate the performance of crosslinked PTFE as a polymer matrix for carbon fiber-reinforced composite materials. The carbon fiber-reinforced PTFE pre-composite, which is laminated with PTFE fine powder, is crosslinked by electron beam irradiation. Mechanical and frictional properties of the crosslinked PTFE composite obtained are higher than those of PTFE resin. The crosslinked PTFE composite with high mechanical and radiation resistant performance is obtained by radiation crosslinking process

  7. Tumor induction in mice after local irradiation with single doses of either carbon-ion beams or gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Ando, Yutaka; Kobashi, Gen

    2014-12-01

    To determine the dose-dependent relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for tumor prevalence in mice receiving single localized doses to their right leg of either carbon ions (15, 45 or 75 keV/μm) or 137Cs gamma rays. A total of 1647 female C3H mice were irradiated to their hind legs with a localized dose of either reference gamma rays or 15, 45 or 75 keV/μm carbon-ion beams. Irradiated mice were evaluated for tumors twice a month during their three-year life span, and the dimensions of any tumors found were measured with a caliper. The tumor induction frequency was calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The incidence of tumors from 50 Gy of 45 keV/μm carbon ions was marginally higher than those from 50 Gy of gamma rays. However, 60 Gy of 15 keV/μm carbon ions induced significantly fewer tumors than did gamma rays. RBE values of 0.87 + 0.12, 1.29 + 0.08 or 2.06 + 0.39 for lifetime tumorigenesis were calculated for 15, 45 or 75 keV/μm carbon-ion beams, respectively. Fibrosarcoma predominated, with no Linear Energy Transfer (LET)-dependent differences in the tumor histology. Experiments measuring the late effect of leg skin shrinkage suggested that the carcinogenic damage of 15 keV/μm carbon ions would be less than that of gamma rays. We conclude that patients receiving radiation doses to their normal tissues would face less risk of secondary tumor induction by carbon ions of intermediate LET values compared to equivalent doses of photons.

  8. Black carbon radiative forcing at TOA decreased during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Cheng, Tianhai; Zheng, Lijuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-12-05

    During aging processing, black carbon (also called soot) particles may tend to be mixed with other aerosols, and highly influence their radiative forcing. In this study, freshly emitted soot particles were simulated as fractal aggregates composed of small spherical primary monomers. After aging in the atmosphere, soot monomers were coated by a thinly layer of sulfate as thinly coated soot particles. These soot particles were entirely embedded into large sulfate particle by further aging, and becoming heavily coated soot particles. In clear-sky conditions, black carbon radiative forcing with different aging states were investigated for the bottom and top of atmosphere (BOA and TOA). The simulations showed that black carbon radiative forcing increased at BOA and decreased at TOA after their aging processes. Thinly and heavily coated states increased up to ~12% and ~35% black carbon radiative forcing at BOA, and black carbon radiative forcing at TOA can reach to ~20% and ~100% smaller for thinly and heavily coated states than those of freshly emitted states, respectively. The effect of aging states of black carbon radiative forcing was varied with surface albedo, aerosol optical depth and solar zenith angles. These findings would be helpful for the assessments of climate change.

  9. Chromosome inversions in lymphocytes of prostate cancer patients treated with X-rays and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignalosa, Diana; Lee, Ryonfa; Hartel, Carola; Sommer, Sylvester; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Debus, Jürgen; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the cytogenetic damage of the intrachange type in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients treated for prostate cancer with different radiation qualities. Material and methods: Prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a clinical trial based at the Heidelberg University Hospital and at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in 2006. Patients were treated either with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) alone or with a carbon-ion boost followed by IMRT. Blood samples were collected at the end of the therapy and the mBAND technique was used to investigate the cytogenetic damage of the inter and intrachange types. Moreover, the mBAND analysis was performed on healthy donor cells irradiated in vitro with X-rays or C-ions. Results: Our results show no statistically significant differences in the yield and the spectrum of chromosome aberrations among patients treated only with IMRT and patients receiving the combined treatment when similar target volumes and doses to the target are compared. Conclusion: The study suggests that the risks of normal tissue late effects and second malignancies in prostate cancer patients are comparable when heavy ions or IMRT radiotherapy are applied

  10. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post box-10502, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2013-07-18

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/{mu}m) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows {approx} 28% reduction of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  11. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2013-01-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET – 290keV/μm) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows ∼ 28% reduction of 12 C 6+ ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells

  12. Multiscale approach to the physics of radiation damage with ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdutovich, E.; Solov'yov, A.

    2014-01-01

    The multiscale approach to the assessment of bio-damage resulting upon irradiation of biological media with ions is reviewed, explained and compared to other approaches. The processes of ion propagation in the medium concurrent with ionization and excitation of molecules, transport of secondary products, dynamics of the medium, and biological damage take place on a number of different temporal, spatial and energy scales. The multiscale approach, a physical phenomenon-based analysis of the scenario that leads to radiation damage, has been designed to consider all relevant effects on a variety of scales and develop an approach to the quantitative assessment of biological damage as a result of irradiation with ions. Presently, physical and chemical effects are included in the scenario while the biological effects such as DNA repair are only mentioned. This paper explains the scenario of radiation damage with ions, overviews its major parts, and applies the multiscale approach to different experimental conditions. On the basis of this experience, the recipe for application of the multiscale approach is formulated. The recipe leads to the calculation of relative biological effectiveness. (authors)

  13. Radiation pressure acceleration: The factors limiting maximum attainable ion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bulanov, S. V. [KPSI, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); A. M. Prokhorov Institute of General Physics RAS, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M. [KPSI, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Pegoraro, F. [Physics Department, University of Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, CNR, Pisa 56127 (Italy); Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is a highly efficient mechanism of laser-driven ion acceleration, with near complete transfer of the laser energy to the ions in the relativistic regime. However, there is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. The tightly focused laser pulses have group velocities smaller than the vacuum light speed, and, since they offer the high intensity needed for the RPA regime, it is plausible that group velocity effects would manifest themselves in the experiments involving tightly focused pulses and thin foils. However, in this case, finite spot size effects are important, and another limiting factor, the transverse expansion of the target, may dominate over the group velocity effect. As the laser pulse diffracts after passing the focus, the target expands accordingly due to the transverse intensity profile of the laser. Due to this expansion, the areal density of the target decreases, making it transparent for radiation and effectively terminating the acceleration. The off-normal incidence of the laser on the target, due either to the experimental setup, or to the deformation of the target, will also lead to establishing a limit on maximum ion energy.

  14. Measurement of secondary radiation during ion beam therapy with the pixel detector Timepix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martišíková, Mária; Jakubek, Jan; Granja, Carlos; Hartmann, Bernadette; Opálka, Lukáš; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Jäkel, Oliver

    2011-11-01

    In ion beam therapy the finite range of the ion beams in tissue and the presence of the Bragg-peak are exploited. Unpredictable changes in the patient`s condition can alter the range of the ion beam in the body. Therefore it is desired to verify the actual ion range during the treatment, preferably in a non-invasive way. Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used successfully to monitor the applied dose distributions. This method however suffers from limited applicability and low detection efficiency. In order to increase the detection efficiency and to decrease the uncertainties, in this study we investigate the possibility to measure secondary charged particles emerging from the patient during irradiation. An initial experimental study to register the particle radiation coming out of a patient phantom during the therapy was performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) in Germany. A static narrowly-focused beam of carbon ions was directed into a head phantom. The emerging secondary radiation was measured with the position-sensitive Timepix detector outside of the phantom. The detector, developed by the Medipix Collaboration, consists of a silicon sensor bump bonded to a pixelated readout chip (256 × 256 pixels with 55 μm pitch). Together with the USB-based readout interface, Timepix can operate as an active nuclear emulsion registering single particles online with 2D-track visualization. In this contribution we measured the signal behind the head phantom and investigated its dependence on the beam energy (corresponding to beam range in water 2-30 cm). Furthermore, the response was measured at four angles between 0 and 90 degrees. At all investigated energies some signal was registered. Its pattern corresponds to ions. Differences in the total amount of signal for different beam energies were observed. The time-structure of the signal is correlated with that of the incoming beam, showing that we register products of prompt processes. Such

  15. Measurement of secondary radiation during ion beam therapy with the pixel detector Timepix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martišíková, Mária; Hartmann, Bernadette; Jäkel, Oliver; Jakubek, Jan; Granja, Carlos; Opálka, Lukáš; Pospíšil, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    In ion beam therapy the finite range of the ion beams in tissue and the presence of the Bragg-peak are exploited. Unpredictable changes in the patient's condition can alter the range of the ion beam in the body. Therefore it is desired to verify the actual ion range during the treatment, preferably in a non-invasive way. Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used successfully to monitor the applied dose distributions. This method however suffers from limited applicability and low detection efficiency. In order to increase the detection efficiency and to decrease the uncertainties, in this study we investigate the possibility to measure secondary charged particles emerging from the patient during irradiation. An initial experimental study to register the particle radiation coming out of a patient phantom during the therapy was performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) in Germany. A static narrowly-focused beam of carbon ions was directed into a head phantom. The emerging secondary radiation was measured with the position-sensitive Timepix detector outside of the phantom. The detector, developed by the Medipix Collaboration, consists of a silicon sensor bump bonded to a pixelated readout chip (256 × 256 pixels with 55 μm pitch). Together with the USB-based readout interface, Timepix can operate as an active nuclear emulsion registering single particles online with 2D-track visualization. In this contribution we measured the signal behind the head phantom and investigated its dependence on the beam energy (corresponding to beam range in water 2–30 cm). Furthermore, the response was measured at four angles between 0 and 90 degrees. At all investigated energies some signal was registered. Its pattern corresponds to ions. Differences in the total amount of signal for different beam energies were observed. The time-structure of the signal is correlated with that of the incoming beam, showing that we register products of prompt processes. Such

  16. Late quaternary fluctuations in carbonate and carbonate ion content in the northern Indian ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.

    -normalized carbonate ion (CO3=*) range from 90 to 125µmol kg-1 in the tropical region of the world oceans with a weight los of 0.3 ± 0.05µg mol -1kg-1 (Broecker and Clark, 201d). Botm water CO3=* concentration bathing the core tops are in the range of 88 to 13 μmolkg-1...

  17. Radiation stability of sodium titanate ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenna, B.T.

    1980-02-01

    Sodium titanate and sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin are being considered as ion exchangers to remove 90 Sr and actinides from the large volume of defense waste stored at Hanford Site in Washington. Preliminary studies to determine the radiation effect on Sr +2 and I - capacity of these ion-exchange materials were conducted. Samples of sodium titanate powder, sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin, as well as the nitrate form of macroreticular anion resin were irradiated with up to 2 x 10 9 Rads of 60 Co gamma rays. Sodium titanate cation capacity decreased about 50% while the sodium titanate loaded macroeticular resin displayed a dramatic decrease in cation capacity when irradiated with 10 8 -10 9 Rad. The latter decrease is tentatively ascribed to radiation damage to the organic portion which subsequently inhibits interaction with the contained sodium titanate. The anion capacity of both macroreticular resin and sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin exhibited significant decreases with increasing radiation exposure. These results suggest that consideration should be given to the potential effects of radiation degradation if column regeneration is to be used. 5 figures, 2 tables

  18. Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries Based on Carbon Cryogels and Carbon Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nanofoams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  19. Carbon Cryogel and Carbon Paper-Based Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 6 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-5 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  20. Carbon nanotube/carbon nanotube composite AFM probes prepared using ion flux molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesmore, Grace; Roque, Carrollyn; Barber, Richard

    The performance of carbon nanotube-carbon nanotube composite (CNT/CNT composite) atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes is compared to that of conventional Si probes in AFM tapping mode. The ion flux molding (IFM) process, aiming an ion beam at the CNT probe, aligns the tip to a desired angle. The result is a relatively rigid tip that is oriented to offset the cantilever angle. Scans using these probes reveal an improvement in image accuracy over conventional tips, while allowing higher aspect ratio imaging of 3D surface features. Furthermore, the lifetimes of CNT-CNT composite tips are observed to be longer than both conventional tips and those claimed for other CNT technologies. Novel applications include the imaging of embiid silk. Supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholars Award and Carbon Design Innovations.

  1. The use of ionizing radiation and ion exchange resins in the removal of heavy metals from waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Arnaouty, M.B.; Taher, N.H.; El-Toony, M.M.; Dessouki, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    The removal of heavy metal ions from waste water using gamma-radiation and a polymeric membrane prepared by radiation graft copolymerization of vinyl acetate (VAc) onto low density polyethylene films was investigated for the cases of zinc and iron ions. These metal ions were reduced by the hydrated electrons and hydrogen atoms to lower or zero valence state and eventually precipitate out of solution. parameter analysis includes the effect metal ion concentration, Ph, degree of grafting and irradiation dose. The maximum precipitation of the unirradiated metal ions was achieved at Ph 10, while the least precipitation occurred at Ph 3. Irradiation at Ph 5.5 resulted in more precipitation of iron than zinc. Both elements were adsorbed by different adsorbents granular activated carbon (GAC), powdered activated carbon (PAC), amberlite IR-120 plus, dowex-1- exchangers and grafted membranes). The combined treatment by irradiation plus adsorption showed more removal percent, especially for powdered activated carbon (PAC). Also, the grafted membranes showed a removal percent of 98% at high degree of grafting

  2. Shielding data for hadron-therapy ion accelerators: Attenuation of secondary radiation in concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; Sagia, E; Silari, M

    2014-01-01

    The secondary radiation field produced by seven different ion species (from hydrogen to nitrogen), impinging onto thick targets made of either iron or ICRU tissue, was simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, and transported through thick concrete shields: the ambient dose equivalent was estimated and shielding parameters evaluated. The energy for each ion beam was set in order to reach a maximum penetration in ICRU tissue of 290 mm (equivalent to the therapeutic range of 430 MeV/amu carbon ions). Source terms and attenuation lengths are given as a function of emission angle and ion species, along with fits to the Monte Carlo data, for shallow depth and deep penetration in the shield. Trends of source terms and attenuation lengths as a function of neutron emission angle and ion species impinging on tar- get are discussed. A comparison of double differential distributions of neutrons with results from similar simulation works reported in the literature is also included. The aim of this work is to provide shi...

  3. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Kai; Wang, Yibo [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Zhuguo, E-mail: lizg@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, 2.4 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, and 4.8 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation.

  4. Ion confinement and radiation losses in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isler, R.C.; Colchin, R.J.; Wade, M.R.; Lyon, J.F.; Fowler, R.H.; Rome, J.A.; Hiroe, S.; Baylor, L.R.; England, A.; Ma, C.H.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Ochando, M.; Paul, S.

    1991-01-01

    Collapses of stored energy are typically observed in low-density (anti n e ∼ 10 13 cm -3 ) extensively gettered ATF plasmas when the electron density rises to the ECH cutoff point, and the central heating is supplied only by neutral- beam-injection (NBI). However, the decline of stored energy can be avoided if the density is raised rapidly to about 5 x 10 13 cm -3 . Three mechanisms have been proposed to explain the collapses: (1) impurity radiation, (2) excitation of an electron instability driven by the neutral beams, or (3) poor coupling of the beam ions to the thermal plasmas. Detailed spectroscopic studies of plasma cleanliness as a function of the gettering procedure have shown that radiation is an unlikely candidate for initiating collapses, although it may become an important loss mechanism once the electron temperature has fallen to a low level. No specific electron instability has yet been identified with injection, but recent experimental and computational work indicates that losses by shinethrough and charge exchange strongly influence the evolution of low-density plasmas. This report discusses the beam particle losses, thermal ions, and the evolution of radiation profiles

  5. Mini-TEPC Microdosimetric Study of Carbon Ion Therapeutic Beams at CNAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, V.; Colautti, P.; Chiriotti, S.; Moros, D.; Ciocca, M.; Mairani, A.

    2017-09-01

    Mono-energetic carbon ion scanning beams of 195.2 MeV/u at the Italian National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) have been used to study the microdosimetric features of an "active" carbon ion beam used in hadrontherapy. A 30x30 mm2 area has been scanned by a 6 mm beam with scanning steps of 2 mm. A mini TEPC of 0.57 mm3 has been used to perform measurements in a water phantom at different depths on the beam axis. The detector small size allowed for measuring, with good spatial resolution, also inside the relatively small Bragg peak region and inside the distal edge, where the radiation quality varies quickly. In spite of the high event rate (up to 105 s-1), no pile-up effects were observed. Results showed that the frequency-mean lineal energy scaled well with the absorbed dose. Moreover, the dose-mean lineal energy itself seemed to be a good descriptor of the radiation quality.

  6. Focused Ion Beam Nanopatterning for Carbon Nanotube Ropes Based Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera LA FERRARA

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Focused Ion Beam (FIB technology has been used to realize electrode patterns for contacting Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs ropes for chemical gas sensor applications. Two types of transducers, based on a single rope and on bundles, have been realized starting from silicon/Si3N4 substrate. Electrical behaviour, at room temperature, in toxic gas environments, has been investigated and compared to evaluate contribution of a single rope based sensor respect to bundles one. For all the devices, upon exposure to NO2 and NH3, the conductance has been found to increase or decrease respectively. Conductance signal is stronger for sensor based on bundles, but it also evident that response time in NO2 is faster for device based on a single rope. FIB technology offers, then, the possibility to contact easily a single sensitive nanowire, as carbon nanotube rope.

  7. Ion beam analysis of hydrogen retained in carbon nanotubes and carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, F.D.; Holland, O.W.; Naab, F.U.; Mitchell, L.J.; Dhoubhadel, M.; Duggan, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are studied as a possible hydrogen storage medium for future energy needs. Typically, hydrogen is stored in the CNTs by exposure of the material to a high-pressure H 2 atmosphere at different temperatures. The maximum hydrogen concentrations stored following this method and measured using ion beam analysis do not exceed 1 wt.%. Introduction of defects by ion irradiation (i.e. implantation) prior to high-pressure H 2 treatment, offers an alternative method to activate H adsorption and enhance the chemisorption of hydrogen. This is a preliminary work where hydrogen was introduced into single-wall nanotubes and carbon films by low-energy (13.6 keV) hydrogen ion implantation. Elastic recoil detection was used to measure the quantity and depth distribution of hydrogen retained in the carbonaceous materials. Results show that there are substantial differences in the measured profiles between the CNT samples and the vitreous carbon. On another hand, only ∼43% of the implanted hydrogen in the CNTs is retained in the region where it should be located according to the SRIM simulations for a solid carbon sample

  8. KX radiation of quasi-molecules in heavy ion interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaun, K.G.

    1976-01-01

    The object of investigation is the KX radiation of quasimolecules produced at collision of heavy ions with atoms. In collision, electron may change their states adiabatically and form, at sufficiently small distances R between nuclei, quasimolecular states, which transform, in the limiting case of R → 0, to the states of a quasiatom with an atomic number of Z = Z 1 + Z 2 , where Z 1 and Z 2 are the atomic numbers of the heavy ion and atom. The discussion is restricted to collision experiments of Z = Z 1 + Z 2 > 50. The obtained and published data on the systems Ni+Ni, Nb+Nb, Zr+Nb, La+La, La+Xe, Pb+Pb, and Bi+Bi are analyzed. At a sufficiently high ion energy, one observes an asymmetry of a quasimolecular spectrum, the asymmetry having maximum in the range of the characteristic KX energy of a quasiatom. Data on the absolute yield Y(Ksub(α)) of individual high-energy components of X-rays excited on collision of heavy ions are presented. A considerable drop in yield Y(Ksub(α)) with increasing Z is noted

  9. Particulate inverse opal carbon electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Da-Young; Kim, Sang-Ok; Chae, Yu Jin; Lee, Joong Kee; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2013-01-29

    Inverse opal carbon materials were used as anodes for lithium ion batteries. We applied particulate inverse opal structures and their dispersion in the formation of anode electrodes via solution casting. We prepared aminophenyl-grafted inverse opal carbons (a-IOC), inverse opal carbons with mesopores (mIOC), and bare inverse opal carbons (IOC) and investigated the electrochemical behavior of these samples as anode materials. Surface modification by aminophenyl groups was confirmed by XPS measurements. TEM images showed mesopores, and the specific area of mIOC was compared with that of IOC using BET analysis. A half-cell test was performed to compare a-IOC with IOC and mIOC with IOC. In the case of the a-IOC structure, the cell test revealed no improvement in the reversible specific capacity or the cycle performance. The mIOC cell showed a reversible specific capacity of 432 mAh/g, and the capacity was maintained at 88%-approximately 380 mAh/g-over 20 cycles.

  10. Radiation Environment Model of Protons and Heavier Ions at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Luz Maria Martinez; Garrett, Henry B.; Jun, Insoo

    2015-01-01

    We performed an in depth study of the methods used to review the geometric factors (GF) and sensitivity to charge particles of the Energetic Particle Detector instrument on board the Galileo Spacecraft. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the interactions of electrons and ions (i. e., protons and alphas) with the sensitive regions of the instrument. The DC0 and B0 channels were studied with the intention of using them to update the jovian proton radiation model. The results proved that the B0 is a clean proton chanel without any concerns for contamination by heavier ions and electrons. In contrast, DC0 was found to be contaminated by electrons. Furthermore, we also found out that the B2 channel is a clean alpha particle channel (in other words, no contamination by electrons and/or protons).

  11. Radiation dose estimates for carbon-11-labelled PET tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aart, Jasper van der; Hallett, William A.; Rabiner, Eugenii A.; Passchier, Jan; Comley, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Carbon-11-labelled positron emission tomography (PET) tracers commonly used in biomedical research expose subjects to ionising radiation. Dosimetry is the measurement of radiation dose, but also commonly refers to the estimation of health risk associated with ionising radiation. This review describes radiation dosimetry of carbon-11-labelled molecules in the context of current PET research and the most widely used regulatory guidelines. Methods: A MEDLINE literature search returned 42 articles; 32 of these were based on human PET data dealing with radiation dosimetry of carbon-11 molecules. Radiation burden expressed as effective dose and maximum absorbed organ dose was compared between tracers. Results: All but one of the carbon-11-labelled PET tracers have an effective dose under 9 μSv/MBq, with a mean of 5.9 μSv/MBq. Data show that serial PET scans in a single subject are feasible for the majority of radiotracers. Conclusion: Although differing in approach, the two most widely used regulatory frameworks (those in the USA and the EU) do not differ substantially with regard to the maximum allowable injected activity per PET study. The predictive validity of animal dosimetry models is critically discussed in relation to human dosimetry. Finally, empirical PET data are related to human dose estimates based on homogenous distribution, generic models and maximum cumulated activities. Despite the contribution of these models to general risk estimation, human dosimetry studies are recommended where continued use of a new PET tracer is foreseen.

  12. Ion acceleration by radiation pressure in thin and thick targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macchi, Andrea, E-mail: macchi@df.unipi.i [CNR/INFM/polyLAB, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' Enrico Fermi' , Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Benedetti, Carlo, E-mail: Carlo.Benedetti@bo.infn.i [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-08-01

    Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) by circularly polarized laser pulses is emerging as a promising way to obtain efficient acceleration of ions. We briefly review theoretical work on the topic, aiming at characterizing suitable experimental scenarios. We discuss the two reference cases of RPA, namely the thick target ('Hole Boring') and the (ultra)thin target ('Light Sail') regimes. The different scaling laws of the two regimes, the related experimental challenges and their suitability for foreseen applications are discussed.

  13. Track structure based modelling of light ion radiation effects on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Elke; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Dingfelder, Michael; Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Baiocco, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation risk assessment is of great importance for manned spaceflights in order to estimate risks and to develop counter-measures to reduce them. Biophysical simulations with PARTRAC can help greatly to improve the understanding of initial biological response to ionizing radiation. Results from modelling radiation quality dependent DNA damage and repair mechanisms up to chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) can be used to predict radiation effects depending on the kind of mixed radiation field exposure. Especially dicentric yields can serve as a biomarker for an increased risk due to radiation and hence as an indicator for the effectiveness of the used shielding. PARTRAC [1] is a multi-scale biophysical research MC code for track structure based initial DNA damage and damage response modelling. It integrates physics, radiochemistry, detailed nuclear DNA structure and molecular biology of DNA repair by NHEJ-pathway to assess radiation effects on cellular level [2]. Ongoing experiments with quasi-homogeneously distributed compared to sub-micrometre focused bunches of protons, lithium and carbon ions allow a separation of effects due to DNA damage complexity on nanometre scale from damage clustering on (sub-) micrometre scale [3, 4]. These data provide an unprecedented benchmark for the DNA damage response model in PARTRAC and help understand the mechanisms leading to cell killing and chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) induction. A large part of space radiation is due to a mixed ion field of high energy protons and few heavier ions that can be only partly absorbed by the shielding. Radiation damage induced by low-energy ions significantly contributes to the high relative biological efficiency (RBE) of ion beams around Bragg peak regions. For slow light ions the physical cross section data basis in PARTRAC has been extended to investigate radiation quality effects in the Bragg peak region [5]. The resulting range and LET values agree with ICRU data

  14. Use of spectra from foil-excited heavy-ion beams to interpret radiation from plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.

    1978-01-01

    Spectra from foil-excited heavy ion beams can be used to investigate the relative abundance and charge state composition of heavy metal contaminants which cause severe radiative energy losses in tokamak-produced plasmas. The degree of ionization of these metals in the tokamak plasma is not well known because of uncertainties in ionization and recombination rates and particle confinement times. Only a few stages of ionization are typically prominent in foil-excited spectra, however, and both the most probable charge state and distribution width are well known. Highly ionized heavy ions (e.g., Ti, Mo, W and Au) which span the range of charge states found in present tokamaks were produced by passing beams from the Brookhaven MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerator facility through 20 μg/cm 2 carbon stripping foils. EUV radiation was recorded with a grazing incidence spectrometer. Comparisons of the beam-foil spectra with radiation from plasmas, and recent direct determinations of atomic oscillator strengths for principal resonance lines of such highly ionized species as Li-like iron (Fe 23+ ), Na-like bromine (Br 24+ ), and Cu-like iodine (I 24+ ) are discussed

  15. Large area diamond-like carbon coatings by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, A.R.; Proctor, G.; Jones, A.M.; Bull, S.J.; Chivers, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) coatings have been deposited onto large geometry components in the Harwell Blue Tank ion implantation facility. To modify the substrate surface and to crack the low vapour pressure oil which is evaporated and condensed onto the surface, a 40 Kev nitrogen ion bucket ion source is used. The coating of areas up to 1 metre in diameter is common and with component manipulation larger areas may be coated. Since the component temperature never exceeds 80 o C during the process, a wide range of materials may be coated including specialist tool steels and even certain high density polymers. In order to produce hard wear resistant coatings with extremely low coefficients of friction (0.02-0.15) and a range of mechanical and electrical properties, various oil precursors have been investigated. The production and assessment of such coatings, including measurements of their tribiological performance, is presented. Applications for wear resistance, corrosion protection and electrically conducting coatings are discussed with examples drawn from engineering, electronics and biomedicine. (7 figures, 13 references). (UK)

  16. Comparative studies on PADC polymeric detector treated by gamma radiation and Ar ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Saftawy, A.A.; Abdel Reheem, A.M.; Kandil, S.A.; Abd El Aal, S.A.; Salama, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The induced defects on PADC polymer by low energy Ar ions bombardments have been investigated and evaluated with respect to gamma rays. • Low energy ions in the range of 3 keV is not examined elsewhere. And offers a competitive irradiation tool to gamma. • The structure, hardness and wear resistance enhanced after irradiation. • The optical properties changed, the optical band gap decreased and the refractive index enhanced. • The used ion source proves efficiency in improving surface properties of PADC polymer in comparison to the obtained results by the powerful energy source, gamma rays. - Abstract: In the present study, a comparative analysis and evaluation of the induced defects in polyallyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) polymeric detector exposed to Ar+ and gamma radiation were made. To get insight into the structure defects due to irradiation, X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique was employed. The PADC surface structure changed after irradiation due to the reduction in the surface crystalline structure and the formation of disordered systems. Also, surface morphology changes were traced using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and showed minor surface irregularities after gamma irradiation and large changes upon Ar+ irradiation. Additionally, micro-hardness and friction coefficient of the irradiated samples were investigated and found to increase after irradiation. UV–vis spectroscopy was used to estimate the optical band gap energy which considered as the basis for calculating the number of conjugated carbon atoms responsible for the blackening effect and color changes took place over the PADC surface. It was found that as the applied dose increased, the band gap decreased and the number of carbon clusters get larger. The refractive index and the dispersion parameters for the studied polymer were calculated and discussed. Also, the induced defects on the polymer surface which serve as a non-radiative centers resulting in reduced

  17. Comparative studies on PADC polymeric detector treated by gamma radiation and Ar ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Saftawy, A.A., E-mail: aama1978@yahoo.com [Accelerators & Ion Sources Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, P.O. 13759, Cairo (Egypt); Abdel Reheem, A.M. [Accelerators & Ion Sources Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, P.O. 13759, Cairo (Egypt); Kandil, S.A. [Cyclotron project, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, P.O. 13759, Cairo (Egypt); Abd El Aal, S.A. [Central Lab. for Elemental & Isotopic Analysis, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, P.O. 13759, Cairo (Egypt); Salama, S. [Radiation Protection & Civil Defense Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, P.O. 13759, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The induced defects on PADC polymer by low energy Ar ions bombardments have been investigated and evaluated with respect to gamma rays. • Low energy ions in the range of 3 keV is not examined elsewhere. And offers a competitive irradiation tool to gamma. • The structure, hardness and wear resistance enhanced after irradiation. • The optical properties changed, the optical band gap decreased and the refractive index enhanced. • The used ion source proves efficiency in improving surface properties of PADC polymer in comparison to the obtained results by the powerful energy source, gamma rays. - Abstract: In the present study, a comparative analysis and evaluation of the induced defects in polyallyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) polymeric detector exposed to Ar+ and gamma radiation were made. To get insight into the structure defects due to irradiation, X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique was employed. The PADC surface structure changed after irradiation due to the reduction in the surface crystalline structure and the formation of disordered systems. Also, surface morphology changes were traced using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and showed minor surface irregularities after gamma irradiation and large changes upon Ar+ irradiation. Additionally, micro-hardness and friction coefficient of the irradiated samples were investigated and found to increase after irradiation. UV–vis spectroscopy was used to estimate the optical band gap energy which considered as the basis for calculating the number of conjugated carbon atoms responsible for the blackening effect and color changes took place over the PADC surface. It was found that as the applied dose increased, the band gap decreased and the number of carbon clusters get larger. The refractive index and the dispersion parameters for the studied polymer were calculated and discussed. Also, the induced defects on the polymer surface which serve as a non-radiative centers resulting in reduced

  18. Radiation processing for carbon fiber-reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Udagawa, Akira; Morita, Yousuke

    2001-01-01

    The present work is an attempt to evaluate the performance of the fiber composites with crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as a polymer matrix by radiation. The uni-directional carbon fiber-reinforced composites were fabricated with PTFE fine powder impregnation method and then crosslinked by electron beams irradiation under selective conditions. The carbon fiber-reinforced crosslinked PTFE composites show good mechanical properties compared with crosslinked PTFE. The radiation resistance of crosslinked PTFE composites is improved more than that of crosslinked resin without fiber. (author)

  19. Theoretical Study of Radiation from a Broad Range of Impurity Ions for Magnetic Fusion Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, Alla [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities plays an important role in the study of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The measurements of these impurities are crucial for the control of the general machine conditions, for the monitoring of the impurity levels, and for the detection of various possible fault conditions. Low-Z impurities, typically present in concentrations of 1%, are lithium, beryllium, boron, carbon, and oxygen. Some of the common medium-Z impurities are metals such as iron, nickel, and copper, and high-Z impurities, such as tungsten, are present in smaller concentrations of 0.1% or less. Despite the relatively small concentration numbers, the aforementioned impurities might make a substantial contribution to radiated power, and also influence both plasma conditions and instruments. A detailed theoretical study of line radiation from impurities that covers a very broad spectral range from less than 1 Å to more than 1000 Å has been accomplished and the results were applied to the LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) and the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) and to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton. Though low- and medium-Z impurities were also studied, the main emphasis was made on the comprehensive theoretical study of radiation from tungsten using different state-of-the-art atomic structure codes such as Relativistic Many-Body Perturbation Theory (RMBPT). The important component of this research was a comparison of the results from the RMBPT code with other codes such as the Multiconfigurational Hartree–Fock developed by Cowan (COWAN code) and the Multiconfiguration Relativistic Hebrew University Lawrence Atomic Code (HULLAC code), and estimation of accuracy of calculations. We also have studied dielectronic recombination, an important recombination process for fusion plasma, for variety of highly and low charged tungsten ions using COWAN and HULLAC codes. Accurate DR rate coefficients are needed for

  20. Continuum radiation emitted from transition metals under ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Boujlaidi, A.; Kaddouri, A.; Ait El Fqih, M.; Hammoum, K.; Aouchiche, H.

    2012-01-01

    Optical emission of transition metals has been studied during 5 keV Kr + ions bombardment within and without oxygen atmosphere in the colliding chamber. The observed spectra consist of a series of discrete lines superimposed on a broad continuum. Generally, the emission intensity was influenced by the presence of oxygen giving rise to transient effects as well as to an increase in the line intensity. The behaviours of spectral lines were successfully explained in term of electron-transfer process between the excited sputtered atom and the solid surface. In this work, we have focused our study on the continuous radiation emitted during ion bombardment. The experimental results suggest that the continuum emission depends on the nature of metal and very probably related to its electronic structure. The collective deactivation of 3d-shell electrons appears to play a role in the emission of this radiation. The observed enhancement in the presence of oxygen is probably due to a significant contribution of the oxide molecules. (authors)

  1. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for marginal lymph node recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Tomoaki; Nakano, Takashi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Noda, Shin-ei; Ohkubo, Yu; Ando, Ken; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Kato, Shingo; Kamada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Recurrences of cervical cancer after definitive radiotherapy often occur at common iliac or para-aortic lymph nodes as marginal lymph node recurrences. Patients with these recurrences have a chance of long-term survival by optimal re-treatment with radiotherapy. However, the re-irradiation often overlaps the initial and the secondary radiotherapy fields and can result in increased normal tissue toxicities in the bowels or the stomach. Carbon-ion radiotherapy, a form of particle beam radiotherapy using accelerated carbon ions, offers more conformal and sharp dose distribution than X-ray radiotherapy. Therefore, this approach enables the delivery of high radiation doses to the target while sparing its surrounding normal tissues. Marginal lymph node recurrences in common iliac lymph nodes after radiotherapy were treated successfully by carbon-ion radiotherapy in two patients. These two patients were initially treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy and intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy. However, the diseases recurred in the lymph nodes near the border of the initial radiotherapy fields after 22 months and 23 months. Because re-irradiation with X-ray radiotherapy may deliver high doses to a section of the bowels, carbon-ion radiotherapy was selected to treat the lymph node recurrences. A total dose of 48 Gy (RBE) in 12 fractions over 3 weeks was given to the lymph node recurrences, and the tumors disappeared completely with no severe acute toxicities. The two patients showed no evidence of disease for 75 months and 63 months after the initial radiotherapy and for 50 months and 37 months after the carbon-ion radiotherapy, respectively. No severe late adverse effects are observed in these patients. The two presented cases suggest that the highly conformal dose distribution of carbon-ion radiotherapy may be beneficial in the treatment of marginal lymph node recurrences after radiotherapy. In addition, the higher biological effect of carbon-ion

  2. Clinical Outcome of Sacral Chordoma With Carbon Ion Radiotherapy Compared With Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Yoshihiro; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Yamada, Yoshihisa; Sugiura, Hideshi; Shido, Yoji; Wasa, Junji; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy, post-treatment function, toxicity, and complications of carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) for sacral chordoma compared with surgery. Methods and Materials: The records of 17 primary sacral chordoma patients treated since 1990 with surgery (n = 10) or carbon ion RT (n = 7) were retrospectively analyzed for disease-specific survival, local recurrence-free survival, complications, and functional outcome. The applied carbon ion dose ranged from 54.0 Gray equivalent (GyE) to 73.6 GyE (median 70.4). Results: The mean age at treatment was 55 years for the surgery group and 65 years for the carbon ion RT group. The median duration of follow-up was 76 months for the surgery group and 49 months for the carbon ion RT group. The local recurrence-free survival rate at 5 years was 62.5% for the surgery and 100% for the carbon ion RT group, and the disease-specific survival rate at 5 years was 85.7% and 53.3%, respectively. Urinary-anorectal function worsened in 6 patients (60%) in the surgery group, but it was unchanged in all the patients who had undergone carbon ion RT. Postoperative wound complications requiring reoperation occurred in 3 patients (30%) after surgery and in 1 patient (14%) after carbon ion RT. The functional outcome evaluated using the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society scoring system revealed 55% in the surgery group and 75% in the carbon ion RT group. Of the six factors in this scoring system, the carbon ion RT group had significantly greater scores in emotional acceptance than did the surgery group. Conclusion: Carbon ion RT results in a high local control rate and preservation of urinary-anorectal function compared with surgery.

  3. Dosimetric evaluation of lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) as a dosemeter for gamma-radiation dose measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoca, R; Ureña-Núñez, F

    2009-06-01

    This work reports the possibility of using lithium carbonate as a dosimetric material for gamma-radiation measurements. Carboxi-radical ions, CO(2)(-) and CO(3)(-), arise from the gamma irradiation of Li(2)CO(3), and these radical ions can be quantified by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. The EPR-signal response of gamma-irradiated lithium carbonate has been investigated to determine some dosimetric characteristics such as: peak-to-peak signal intensity versus gamma dose received, zero-dose response, signal fading, signal repeatability, batch homogeneity, dose rate effect and stability at different environmental conditions. Using the conventional peak-to-peak method of stable ion radicals, it is concluded that lithium carbonate could be used as a gamma dosemeter in the range of 3-100 Gy.

  4. A preliminary Monte Carlo study for the treatment head of a carbon-ion radiotherapy facility using TOPAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongdong; Zhang, Lian; Chen, Zhi; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Li, Qiang; Xu, Xie George

    2017-09-01

    In medical physics it is desirable to have a Monte Carlo code that is less complex, reliable yet flexible for dose verification, optimization, and component design. TOPAS is a newly developed Monte Carlo simulation tool which combines extensive radiation physics libraries available in Geant4 code, easyto-use geometry and support for visualization. Although TOPAS has been widely tested and verified in simulations of proton therapy, there has been no reported application for carbon ion therapy. To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of TOPAS simulations for carbon ion therapy, a licensed TOPAS code (version 3_0_p1) was used to carry out a dosimetric study of therapeutic carbon ions. Results of depth dose profile based on different physics models have been obtained and compared with the measurements. It is found that the G4QMD model is at least as accurate as the TOPAS default BIC physics model for carbon ions, but when the energy is increased to relatively high levels such as 400 MeV/u, the G4QMD model shows preferable performance. Also, simulations of special components used in the treatment head at the Institute of Modern Physics facility was conducted to investigate the Spread-Out dose distribution in water. The physical dose in water of SOBP was found to be consistent with the aim of the 6 cm ridge filter.

  5. The co-effect of collagen and magnesium ions on calcium carbonate biomineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Yunfeng; Feng Qingling; Li Xiaoming

    2006-01-01

    The process of calcium carbonate biomineralization in the solution containing collagen and magnesium ions was studied in this paper. The results were characterized by using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect rules were obtained by the cooperation of collagen and magnesium ions in different concentration. The experiment results showed that in the presence of both collagen and magnesium ions, aragonite and vaterite were precipitated at low Mg/Ca ion concentration ratio, while only aragonite with regular spherical morphology was precipitated at high Mg/Ca ion concentration ratio. It indicated that collagen has a promotional effect on magnesium ions in controlling the polymorph of calcium carbonate crystal. A much wider range of calcium carbonate morphologies was observed in the presence of both collagen and magnesium ions. The experiments suggested that collagen acts in combination with magnesium ions to inhibit calcite crystal growth, while favoring the formation of aragonite crystals

  6. Comparison of Individual Radiosensitivity to γ-Rays and Carbon Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Grace; Normil, Marie Delna; Testard, Isabelle; Hempel, William M; Ricoul, Michelle; Sabatier, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ions are an up-and-coming ion species, currently being used in charged particle radiotherapy. As it is well established that there are considerable interindividual differences in radiosensitivity in the general population that can significantly influence clinical outcomes of radiotherapy, we evaluate the degree of these differences in the context of carbon ion therapy compared with conventional radiotherapy. In this study, we evaluate individual radiosensitivity following exposure to carbon-13 ions or γ-rays in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy individuals based on the frequency of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that was either misrepaired or left unrepaired to form chromosomal aberrations (CAs) (simply referred to here as DSBs for brevity). Levels of DSBs were estimated from the scoring of CAs visualized with telomere/centromere-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TC-FISH). We examine radiosensitivity at the dose of 2 Gy, a routinely administered dose during fractionated radiotherapy, and we determined that a wide range of DSBs were induced by the given dose among healthy individuals, with highly radiosensitive individuals harboring more IR-induced breaks in the genome than radioresistant individuals following exposure to the same dose. Furthermore, we determined the relative effectiveness of carbon irradiation in comparison to γ-irradiation in the induction of DSBs at each studied dose (isodose effect), a quality we term "relative dose effect" (RDE). This ratio is advantageous, as it allows for simple comparison of dose-response curves. At 2 Gy, carbon irradiation was three times more effective in inducing DSBs compared with γ-irradiation (RDE of 3); these results were confirmed using a second cytogenetic technique, multicolor-FISH. We also analyze radiosensitivity at other doses (0.2-15 Gy), to represent hypo- and hyperfractionation doses and determined that RDE is dose dependent: high ratios at low doses

  7. TL response of Eu activated LiF nanocubes irradiated by 85 MeV carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salah, Numan, E-mail: nsalah@kau.edu.sa [Center of Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Alharbi, Najlaa D. [Sciences Faculty for Girls, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Habib, Sami S. [Center of Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Lochab, S.P. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2015-09-01

    Carbon ions were found to be effective for cancer treatment. These heavy ions have a high relative biological effectiveness compared to those of photons. They have higher linear energy transfer and sharper Bragg peak with a very excellent local tumor control. However, the dose of these swift heavy ions needs to be measured with great accuracy. Lithium fluoride (LiF) is a highly sensitive phosphor widely used for radiation dosimetry. In this work Eu activated LiF nanocubes were exposed to 85 MeV C{sup 6+} ion beam and evaluated for their thermoluminescence (TL) response. Pellet forms of this nanomaterial were exposed to these ions in the fluence range 10{sup 9}–10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The obtained result shows a prominent TL glow peak at around 320 °C, which is different than that induced by gamma rays. This glow peak exhibits a linear response in the range 10{sup 9}–10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}, corresponding to the equivalent absorbed doses 0.273–273 kGy. The absorbed doses, penetration depths and main energy loss were calculated using TRIM code based on the Monte Carlo simulation. The supralinearity function and stopping power in this nanomaterial were also studied. The modification induced in the glow curve structure as a result of changing irradiation type might be utilized to use LiF:Eu nanocubes as a dosimeter for mixed filed radiations. Moreover, the wide linear response of LiF:Eu nanocubes along with the low fading are another imperative results suggesting that this nanomaterial might be a good candidate for carbon ions dosimetry.

  8. TL response of Eu activated LiF nanocubes irradiated by 85 MeV carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salah, Numan; Alharbi, Najlaa D.; Habib, Sami S.; Lochab, S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon ions were found to be effective for cancer treatment. These heavy ions have a high relative biological effectiveness compared to those of photons. They have higher linear energy transfer and sharper Bragg peak with a very excellent local tumor control. However, the dose of these swift heavy ions needs to be measured with great accuracy. Lithium fluoride (LiF) is a highly sensitive phosphor widely used for radiation dosimetry. In this work Eu activated LiF nanocubes were exposed to 85 MeV C 6+ ion beam and evaluated for their thermoluminescence (TL) response. Pellet forms of this nanomaterial were exposed to these ions in the fluence range 10 9 –10 13 ions/cm 2 . The obtained result shows a prominent TL glow peak at around 320 °C, which is different than that induced by gamma rays. This glow peak exhibits a linear response in the range 10 9 –10 12 ions/cm 2 , corresponding to the equivalent absorbed doses 0.273–273 kGy. The absorbed doses, penetration depths and main energy loss were calculated using TRIM code based on the Monte Carlo simulation. The supralinearity function and stopping power in this nanomaterial were also studied. The modification induced in the glow curve structure as a result of changing irradiation type might be utilized to use LiF:Eu nanocubes as a dosimeter for mixed filed radiations. Moreover, the wide linear response of LiF:Eu nanocubes along with the low fading are another imperative results suggesting that this nanomaterial might be a good candidate for carbon ions dosimetry

  9. Three-dimensional Invasion of Human Glioblastoma Cells Remains Unchanged by X-ray and Carbon Ion Irradiation In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eke, Iris; Storch, Katja; Kaestner, Ina; Vehlow, Anne [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Faethe, Christina; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang [Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Taucher-Scholz, Gisela [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt (Germany); Temme, Achim; Schackert, Gabriele [Section of Experimental Neurosurgery/Tumor Immunology, Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Cordes, Nils, E-mail: Nils.Cordes@Oncoray.de [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Cell invasion represents one of the major determinants that treatment has failed for patients suffering from glioblastoma. Contrary findings have been reported for cell migration upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, the migration and invasion capability of glioblastoma cells on and in collagen type I were evaluated upon irradiation with X-rays or carbon ions. Methods and Materials: Migration on and invasion in collagen type I were evaluated in four established human glioblastoma cell lines exposed to either X-rays or carbon ions. Furthermore, clonogenic radiation survival, proliferation (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine positivity), DNA double-strand breaks ({gamma}H2AX/53BP1-positive foci), and expression of invasion-relevant proteins (eg, {beta}1 integrin, FAK, MMP2, and MMP9) were explored. Migration and invasion assays for primary glioblastoma cells also were carried out with X-ray irradiation. Results: Neither X-ray nor carbon ion irradiation affected glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, a finding similarly observed in primary glioblastoma cells. Intriguingly, irradiated cells migrated unhampered, despite DNA double-strand breaks and reduced proliferation. Clonogenic radiation survival was increased when cells had contact with extracellular matrix. Specific inhibition of the {beta}1 integrin or proliferation-associated signaling molecules revealed a critical function of JNK, PI3K, and p38 MAPK in glioblastoma cell invasion. Conclusions: These findings indicate that X-rays and carbon ion irradiation effectively reduce proliferation and clonogenic survival without modifying the migration and invasion ability of glioblastoma cells in a collagen type I environment. Addition of targeted agents against members of the MAPK and PI3K signaling axis to conventional chemoradiation therapy seems potentially useful to optimize glioblastoma therapy.

  10. Blackbody Radiation and the Carbon Particle

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre-Marie Robitaille

    2008-01-01

    Since the days of Kirchhoff, blackbody radiation has been considered to be a uni- versal process, independent of the nature and shape of the emitter. Nonetheless, in promoting this concept, Kirchhoff did require, at the minimum, thermal equilibrium with an enclosure. Recently, the author stated (P.-M. Robitaille, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. , 2003, v. 31(6), 1263–1267; P.-M. Robitaille, Progr. in Phys. , 2006, v. 2, 22–23), that blackbod...

  11. Radiation Protection Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M.; Lu, Meng; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Doyle, Condell Dewayne; Kosynkin, Dimitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine

    2011-01-01

    This invention is a means of radiation protection, or cellular oxidative stress mitigation, via a sequence of quenching radical species using nano-engineered scaffolds, specifically single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and their derivatives. The material can be used as a means of radiation protection by reducing the number of free radicals within, or nearby, organelles, cells, tissue, organs, or living organisms, thereby reducing the risk of damage to DNA and other cellular components (i.e., RNA, mitochondria, membranes, etc.) that can lead to chronic and/or acute pathologies, including but not limited to cancer, cardiovascular disease, immuno-suppression, and disorders of the central nervous system. In addition, this innovation could be used as a prophylactic or antidote for accidental radiation exposure, during high-altitude or space travel where exposure to radiation is anticipated, or to protect from exposure from deliberate terrorist or wartime use of radiation- containing weapons.

  12. Radial dose distribution from carbon ion incident on liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scifoni, E.; Surdutovich, E.; Solov'yov, A.V.; Surdutovich, E.

    2010-01-01

    We report calculations of the radial dose deposited along carbon-ion tracks in liquid water using different techniques depending on the energy range of secondary electrons. The models are developed in relation with the experimental data on electron penetration lengths. For electrons with energies higher than 45 eV, we use the Katz model. However, the main focus is on the low-energy electrons, which are largely responsible for DNA damage within 10 nm from the tracks. For these electrons, the dose calculation is based on their random walk behaviour. The results of this combined approach are compared to experimental measurements. Contributions to the deposited energy by electrons of different ranges of energy are discussed. (authors)

  13. Innershell ionization by fast protons, alpha particles and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, J.H. van.

    1984-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the study of inner-shell excitations of atoms induced by fast charged particle collisions. A new method is described for measuring the spectrum of delta-electrons emitted by 208 Pb after excitation by 15 MeV protons or 50 MeV alpha particles. Experimental equipment is described. Results of both experiments are presented and compared with PWBA models and with calculations based on a semi-classical approximation. The small-impact-parameter ionization probabilities obtained are then compared with literature. Also small-impact-parameter measurements done with 100 MeV carbon ions are described. Besides K-shell measurements, the author also presents L-subshell ionization probability results for Pb. An appendix is added in which energy straggling problems in solid targets are treated. (Auth./G.J.P.)

  14. Transport of Carbonate Ions by Novel Cellulose Fiber Supported Solid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Gaikwad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Transport of carbonate ions was explored through fiber supported solid membrane. A novel fiber supported solid membrane was prepared by chemical modification of cellulose fiber with citric acid, 2′2-bipyridine and magnesium carbonate. The factors affecting the permeability of carbonate ions such as immobilization of citric acid-magnesium metal ion -2′2-bipyridine complex (0 to 2.5 mmol/g range over cellulose fiber, carbon-ate ion concentration in source phase and NaOH concentration in receiving phase were investigated. Ki-netic of carbonate, sulfate, and nitrate ions was investigated through fiber supported solid membrane. Transport of carbonate ions with/without bubbling of CO2 (0 to 10 ml/min in source phase was explored from source to receiving phase. The novel idea is to explore the adsorptive transport of CO2 from source to receiving phase through cellulose fiber containing magnesium metal ion organic framework. Copyright © 2012 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.Received: 25th November 2011; Revised: 17th December 2011; Accepted: 19th December 2011[How to Cite: A.G. Gaikwad. (2012. Transport of Carbonate Ions by Novel Cellulose Fiber Supported Solid Membrane. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (1: 49– 57.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1225.49-57][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1225.49-57 ] | View in 

  15. Unlimited Energy Gain in the Laser-Driven Radiation Pressure Dominant Acceleration of Ions

    OpenAIRE

    Bulanov, S. V.; Echkina, E. Yu.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Inovenkov, I. N.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Korn, G.

    2009-01-01

    The energy of the ions accelerated by an intense electromagnetic wave in the radiation pressure dominated regime can be greatly enhanced due to a transverse expansion of a thin target. The expansion decreases the number of accelerated ions in the irradiated region increasing the energy and the longitudinal velocity of remaining ions. In the relativistic limit, the ions become phase-locked with respect to the electromagnetic wave resulting in the unlimited ion energy gain. This effect and the ...

  16. Precipitation characteristics of uranyl ions at different pHs depending on the presence of carbonate ions and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Wook; Kim, Yeon-Hwa; Lee, Se-yoon; Lee, Jae-Won; Joe, Kih-Soo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Jong-Seung; Song, Kyuseok; Song, Kee-Chan

    2009-04-01

    This work studied the dissolution of uranium dioxide and precipitation characteristics of uranyl ions in alkaline and acidic solutions depending on the presence of carbonate ions and H2O2 in the solutions at different pHs controlled by adding HNO3 or NaOH in the solution. The chemical structures of the precipitates generated in different conditions were evaluated and compared by using XRD, SEM, TG-DT, and IR analyses together. The sizes and forms of the precipitates in the solutions were evaluated, as well. The uranyl ions were precipitated in the various forms, depending on the solution pH and the presences of hydrogen peroxide and carbonate ions in the solution. In a 0.5 M Na2CO3 solution with H2O2, where the uranyl ions formed mixed uranyl peroxy-carbonato complexes, the uranyl ions were precipitated as a uranium peroxide of UO4(H20)4 at pH 3-4, and precipitated as a clarkeite of Na2U2Ox(OH)y(H2O)z above pH 13. In the same carbonate solution without H2O2, where the uranyl ions formed uranyl tris-carbonato complex, the uranyl ions were observed to be precipitated as a different form of clarkeite above pH 13. The precipitate of uranyl ions in a nitrate solution without carbonate ions and H2O2 at a high pH were studied together to compare the precipitate forms in the carbonate solutions.

  17. Experimental Studies of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Space Radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, MIchael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Craven, Paul D.; Hyers, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Game ]changing propulsion systems are often enabled by novel designs using advanced materials. Radiator performance dictates power output for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon fiber materials have the potential to offer significant improvements in thermal conductivity and mass properties. A test apparatus was developed to test advanced radiator designs. This test apparatus uses a resistance heater inside a graphite tube. Metallic tubes can be slipped over the graphite tube to simulate a heat pipe. Several sub ]scale test articles were fabricated using CNT cloth and pitch ]based carbon fibers, which were bonded to a metallic tube using an active braze material. The test articles were heated up to 600 C and an infrared (IR) camera captured the results. The test apparatus and experimental results are presented here.

  18. Particles that fight cancer: the use of protons and carbon ions in cancer therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Particles that fight cancer: the use of protons and carbon ions in cancer therapy Cancer is a major societal issue. A key challenge for cancer therapy is the complex and multifaceted nature of the disease, which calls for personalised treatment. Radiotherapy has been used to treat tumours for more than a century, and is still a staple in oncology: today, 50 % of cancer patients receive radiotherapy, half of them with curative intent. Hadrontherapy is one of the most technologically advanced methods of delivering radiation dose to the tumour while protecting surrounding healthy tissues. In addition, hadrontherapy can reach otherwise difficult to access deep-seated tumours and can be used for radio resistant tumours as in hypoxia. This year marks 60 years since the first patient was treated with protons in the US and 20 years since the use of carbon ions in Japan. Join us in learning about the journey of particle therapy in Japan and Europe, its challenges, clinical results and future prospects. Thursday 2...

  19. Water equivalent thickness values of materials used in beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Taddei, Phillip J; Fitzek, Markus M; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-05-07

    Heavy charged particle beam radiotherapy for cancer is of increasing interest because it delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume. Accurate knowledge of the range of a heavy charged particle beam after it penetrates a patient's body or other materials in the beam line is very important and is usually stated in terms of the water equivalent thickness (WET). However, methods of calculating WET for heavy charged particle beams are lacking. Our objective was to test several simple analytical formulas previously developed for proton beams for their ability to calculate WET values for materials exposed to beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions. Experimentally measured heavy charged particle beam ranges and WET values from an iterative numerical method were compared with the WET values calculated by the analytical formulas. In most cases, the deviations were within 1 mm. We conclude that the analytical formulas originally developed for proton beams can also be used to calculate WET values for helium, carbon and iron ion beams with good accuracy.

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of prompt-gamma emission during carbon ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Foulher, F.; Bajard, M.; Chevallier, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Henriquet, P.; Ray, C.; Testa, E.; Testa, M. [Universite de Lyon 1, F-69003 Lyon (France); IN2P3/CNRS, UMR 5822, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Freud, N.; Letang, J. M. [Laboratoire de Controles Non Destructifs Par Rayonnements Ionisants, INSA-Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Karkar, S. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Plescak, R.; Schardt, D. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulations based on the Geant4 tool-kit (version 9.1) were performed to study the emission of secondary prompt gamma-rays produced by nuclear reactions during carbon ion-beam therapy. These simulations were performed along with an experimental program and instrumentation developments which aim at designing a prompt gamma-ray device for real-time control of hadron therapy. The objective of the present study is twofold: first, to present the features of the prompt gamma radiation in the case of carbon ion irradiation; secondly, to simulate the experimental setup and to compare measured and simulated counting rates corresponding to various experiments. For each experiment, we found that simulations overestimate prompt gamma-ray detection yields by a factor of 12. Uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections and binary cascade model cannot explain such discrepancies. The so-called 'photon evaporation' model is therefore questionable and its modification is currently in progress. (authors)

  1. Study on carbon dioxide conversion by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Hyun; Park, Geun Il; Cho, Il Hoon; Choi, Sang Do; Hong, Kwang Hee; Lee, Chang Woo

    1999-09-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the synergistic effects on the CO 2 conversion by the application of semiconductor in the field of gamma-ray. Gamma-ray irradiation was performed to examine the effects of semiconductor application on CO 2 conversion in water and the formation of organic material from carbonate solution. From experimental results it is clear that the supplication of semiconductor in the field of gamma-ray increases the efficiency for CO 2 conversion to organic matter. Based on the obtained experimental results it is obvious that the synergistic effects of semiconductor materials in the gamma-ray field leads to increase of the CO 2 conversion yield to organic matter up to 50 percent compared to the gamma-ray irradiation. The way of achieving higher activity is due to the catalytic action of semiconductor by gamma-ray irradiation. Zr-doped TiO 2 catalyst prepared by sol-gel method exhibits the higher efficiency for CO 2 conversion in aqueous solution and carbonate containing solution. This effect of Zr-doping can be explained by the formation of additional defects in surface of TiO 2 film. (author)

  2. Collision and radiative processes in emission of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2018-05-01

    The peculiarities of the spectroscopic properties of CO2 molecules in air due to vibration-rotation radiative transitions are analyzed. The absorption coefficient due to atmospheric carbon dioxide and other atmospheric components is constructed within the framework of the standard atmosphere model, on the basis of classical molecular spectroscopy and the regular model for the spectroscopy absorption band. The radiative flux from the atmosphere toward the Earth is represented as that of a blackbody, and the radiative temperature for emission at a given frequency is determined with accounting for the local thermodynamic equilibrium, a small gradient of the tropospheric temperature and a high optical thickness of the troposphere for infrared radiation. The absorption band model with an absorption coefficient averaged over the frequency and line-by-line model are used for evaluating the radiative flux from the atmosphere to the Earth which values are nearby for these models and are equal W m‑2 for the contemporary concentration of atmospheric CO2 molecules and W m‑2 at its doubled value. The absorption band model is not suitable to calculate the radiative flux change at doubling of carbon dioxide concentration because averaging over oscillations decreases the range where the atmospheric optical thickness is of the order of one, and just this range determines this change. The line-by-line method gives the change of the global temperature K as a result of doubling the carbon dioxide concentration. The contribution to the global temperature change due to anthropogenic injection of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, i.e. resulted from combustion of fossil fuels, is approximately 0.02 K now.

  3. Structure carbon materials: clusters, nanotubes, ion-implant polymers and diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapchuk, N.M.; Odzhaev, V.B.; Poklonskij, N.A.; Sviridov, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes the series of research works dealing with the physics of nanostructured carbon materials, which were awarded a Sevchenko Prize in 2008. The paper considers the mechanism of synthesis of 3D carbon nanospecies and their nanomechanics, magnetic properties of ion-implanted diamonds, as well as the regularities of formation of novel forms of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and metal-carbon nanocomposites via ion bombardment of polymers, as well as electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of ion-implanted polymers an their possible applications in micro- and nanoelectronics. (authors)

  4. Silver-coated ion exchange membrane electrode applied to electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Y.; Ito, H.; Okano, K.; Nagasu, K.; Sato, S.

    2003-01-01

    Silver-coated ion exchange membrane electrodes (solid polymer electrolyte, SPE) were prepared by electroless deposition of silver onto ion exchange membranes. The SPE electrodes were used for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) reduction with 0.2 M K 2 SO 4 as the electrolyte with a platinum plate (Pt) for the counterelectrode. In an SPE electrode system prepared from a cation exchange membrane (CEM), the surface of the SPE was partly ruptured during CO 2 reduction, and the reaction was rapidly suppressed. SPE electrodes made of an anion exchange membrane (SPE/AEM) sustained reduction of CO 2 to CO for more than 2 h, whereas, the electrode potential shifted negatively during the electrolysis. The reaction is controlled by the diffusion of CO 2 through the metal layer of the SPE electrode at high current density. Ultrasonic radiation, applied to the preparation of SPE/AEM, was effective to improve the electrode properties, enhancing the electrolysis current of CO 2 reduction. Observation by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that the electrode metal layer became more porous by the ultrasonic radiation treatment. The partial current density of CO 2 reduction by SPE/AEM amounted to 60 mA cm -2 , i.e. three times the upper limit of the conventional electrolysis by a plate electrode. Application of SPE device may contribute to an advancement of CO 2 fixation at ambient temperature and pressure

  5. Carbon nanotori as traps for atoms and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Yue; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotori surely represent an ideal location to trap both charged and uncharged atoms, since they are open, accessible and possess strong attractive energy. In this paper, we investigate the plausibility of carbon nanotori as atomic traps and we use the continuum approximation together with the Lennard-Jones potential to model the encapsulation of an atom or ion by a nanotorus. The critical geometric factors such as the minor and major radii, i.e. r and R of the nanotorus, for which the maximum interaction between the atom and the nanotorus occurs, are determined. For various atoms, assumed situated along the axis of the torus, the minimum potential energy between the atom and the nanotorus is calculated and compared, and shown to be approximately kηεσ 2 , where η is the uniform atomic density, ε and σ are the Lennard-Jones well depth and the van der Waals radius, respectively, and k is a universal non-dimensional constant with the approximate value -12.42. The results given in this paper might be used for future drug delivery and biosensing design.

  6. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean time series sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30-year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these results

  7. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovenduski, N. S.; Long, M. C.; Lindsay, K.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]) on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32-] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32-] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32-] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite) are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean time series sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32-] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in association with El Niño-Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32-] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20-30-year periods. North Atlantic [CO32-] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these results will aid the interpretation of trends

  8. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, K; Chen, Y J; Ohira, C; Nojima, K; Ando, S; Kobayashi, N; Ohbuchi, T; Shimizu, W [Space and Particle Radiation Science Research Group, Chiba (Japan); Koike, S; Kanai, T [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Accelerator Physics

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/{mu}m also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/{mu}m in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/{mu}m were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/{mu} steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  9. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, K.; Chen, Y.J.; Ohira, C.; Nojima, K.; Ando, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Ohbuchi, T.; Shimizu, W.; Koike, S.; Kanai, T.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/μm also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/μm in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/μm were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/μ steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  10. Radiolysis and sputtering of carbon dioxide ice induced by swift Ti, Ni, and Xe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejía, C. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique CIMAP (CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCN), CIMAP-Ganil, BP 5133, Boulevard Henri Becquerel, 14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marquês de São Vicente 225, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bender, M.; Severin, D. [Materials Research Department, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Trautmann, C. [Materials Research Department, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Boduch, Ph. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique CIMAP (CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCN), CIMAP-Ganil, BP 5133, Boulevard Henri Becquerel, 14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Bordalo, V. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique CIMAP (CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCN), CIMAP-Ganil, BP 5133, Boulevard Henri Becquerel, 14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Observatório Nacional-MCTI, Rua General José Cristino 77, 20921-400 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Domaracka, A.; Lv, X.Y. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique CIMAP (CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCN), CIMAP-Ganil, BP 5133, Boulevard Henri Becquerel, 14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); and others

    2015-12-15

    Solid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is found in several bodies of the solar system, the interstellar medium (ISM) and young stellar objects, where it is exposed to cosmic and stellar wind radiation. Here, the chemical and physical modifications induced by heavy ion irradiation of pure solid CO{sub 2} at low temperature (T = 15–30 K) are analyzed. The experiments were performed with Ti (550 MeV) and Xe (630 MeV) ions at the UNILAC of GSI/Darmstadt and with Ni ions (46 and 52 MeV) at IRRSUD of GANIL/Caen. The evolution of the thin CO{sub 2} ice films (deposited on a CsI window) was monitored by mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR). The dissociation rate of CO{sub 2}, determined from the fluence dependence of the IR absorption peak intensity, is found to be proportional to the electronic stopping power S{sub e}. We also confirm that the sputtering yield shows a quadric increase with electronic stopping power. Furthermore, the production rates of daughter molecules such as CO, CO{sub 3} and O{sub 3} were found to be linear in S{sub e}.

  11. The complex ion structure of warm dense carbon measured by spectrally resolved x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Vorberger, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik komplexer Systeme, Nöthnitzer Straße 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Helfrich, J.; Frydrych, S.; Ortner, A.; Otten, A.; Roth, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Siegenthaler, K.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Gericke, D. O.; Wünsch, K. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Bachmann, B.; Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bagnoud, V.; Blažević, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2015-05-15

    We present measurements of the complex ion structure of warm dense carbon close to the melting line at pressures around 100 GPa. High-pressure samples were created by laser-driven shock compression of graphite and probed by intense laser-generated x-ray sources with photon energies of 4.75 keV and 4.95 keV. High-efficiency crystal spectrometers allow for spectrally resolving the scattered radiation. Comparing the ratio of elastically and inelastically scattered radiation, we find evidence for a complex bonded liquid that is predicted by ab-initio quantum simulations showing the influence of chemical bonds under these conditions. Using graphite samples of different initial densities we demonstrate the capability of spectrally resolved x-ray scattering to monitor the carbon solid-liquid transition at relatively constant pressure of 150 GPa. Showing first single-pulse scattering spectra from cold graphite of unprecedented quality recorded at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we demonstrate the outstanding possibilities for future high-precision measurements at 4th Generation Light Sources.

  12. Application of accelerated argon ion radiation in rice breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Hong; Mei Mantong; Lu Yonggen; Yang, T.C.

    1994-01-01

    Dry seeds of rice 'Xiangzhou', a hsien (indica) variety, which has pleasant aroma but poor yield and originated in Guangdong Province, were irradiated by argon ion beam with the energy of 400 MeV/u to improve its agronomic traits. Three mutant lines, Ar-X-1-1, Ar-X-1-2 and Ar-X-2 were selected from M 1 or M 2 generation plants developed from seeds exposed to the dose of 100 Gy, and their economic potential in the M 5 generation was tested. The results showed that several traits of these lines were evidently improved when compared with the original variety. Plant height was reduced by 25% ∼ 39%, and growth period shortened by 8 ∼ 25 days. The effective panicle per plant was increased, and the resistance to bacterial leaf blight was improved. The grain yield per plot was increased by 14.34% ∼ 121.51%, which reached significant level in variance analysis, and the pleasant aroma was also retained. In addition, two mutants with traits of early maturity or semidwarf were found from the progenies of seeds exposured to the 150 Gy. The results suggest the potential application of heavy ion radiation in rice breeding

  13. Adsorption efficiencies of calcium (II ion and iron (II ion on activated carbon obtained from pericarp of rubber fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orawan Sirichote

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of adsorption efficiencies of activated carbon from pericarp of rubber fruit for calcium (II ion and iron (II ion has been performed by flowing the solutions of these ions through a column of activated carbon. The weights of activated carbon in 500 mL buret column (diameter 3.2 cm for flowing calcium (II ion and iron (II ion solutions were 15 g and 10 g, respectively. The initial concentration of calcium ion was prepared to be about eight times more diluted than the true concentration found in the groundwater from the lower part of southern Thailand. Calcium (II ion concentrations were analysed by EDTA titration and its initial concentration was found to be 23.55 ppm. With a flow rate of 26 mL/min, the adsorption efficiency was 11.4 % with passed through volume 4.75 L. Iron (II ion concentrations were analysed by spectrophotometric method; its initial concentration was found to be 1.5565 ppm. At a flow rate of 22 mL/min, the adsorption efficiency was 0.42 % with passed through volume of 34.0 L.

  14. Measuring main-ion temperatures in ASDEX upgrade using scattering of ECRH radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Stejner; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that collective Thomson scattering of millimeter wave electron cyclotron resonance heating radiation can be used for measurements of the main-ion temperature in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak.......We demonstrate that collective Thomson scattering of millimeter wave electron cyclotron resonance heating radiation can be used for measurements of the main-ion temperature in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak....

  15. Characterization of electrode materials for lithium ion and sodium ion batteries using synchrotron radiation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeff, Marca M; Chen, Guoying; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas J; Mehta, Apurva; Shirpour, Mona; Duncan, Hugues; Kim, Chunjoong; Kam, Kinson C; Conry, Thomas

    2013-11-11

    Intercalation compounds such as transition metal oxides or phosphates are the most commonly used electrode materials in Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. During insertion or removal of alkali metal ions, the redox states of transition metals in the compounds change and structural transformations such as phase transitions and/or lattice parameter increases or decreases occur. These behaviors in turn determine important characteristics of the batteries such as the potential profiles, rate capabilities, and cycle lives. The extremely bright and tunable x-rays produced by synchrotron radiation allow rapid acquisition of high-resolution data that provide information about these processes. Transformations in the bulk materials, such as phase transitions, can be directly observed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), while X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) gives information about the local electronic and geometric structures (e.g. changes in redox states and bond lengths). In situ experiments carried out on operating cells are particularly useful because they allow direct correlation between the electrochemical and structural properties of the materials. These experiments are time-consuming and can be challenging to design due to the reactivity and air-sensitivity of the alkali metal anodes used in the half-cell configurations, and/or the possibility of signal interference from other cell components and hardware. For these reasons, it is appropriate to carry out ex situ experiments (e.g. on electrodes harvested from partially charged or cycled cells) in some cases. Here, we present detailed protocols for the preparation of both ex situ and in situ samples for experiments involving synchrotron radiation and demonstrate how these experiments are done.

  16. Na-ion capacitor using sodium pre-doped hard carbon and activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuratani, Kentaro; Yao, Masaru; Senoh, Hiroshi; Takeichi, Nobuhiko; Sakai, Tetsuo; Kiyobayashi, Tetsu

    2012-01-01

    We assembled a sodium-ion capacitor (Na-IC) by combining sodium pre-doped hard carbon (HC) as the negative- and activated carbon (AC) as the positive-electrode. The electrochemical properties were compared with two lithium-ion capacitors (Li-ICs) in which the negative electrodes were prepared with Li pre-doped HC and mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB). The positive and negative electrodes were prepared using the established doctor blade method. The negative electrodes were galvanostatically pre-doped with Na or Li to 80% of the full capacity of carbons. The potential of the negative electrodes after pre-doping was around 0.0 V vs. Na/Na + or Li/Li + , which resulted in the higher output potential difference of the Na-IC and Li-ICs than that of the conventional electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) because AC positive electrode works in the same principle both in the ion capacitors and in the EDLC. The state-of-charge of the negative electrode varied 80 ± 10% during the electrochemical charging and discharging. The capacity of the cell was evaluated using galvanostatic charge–discharge measurement. At the discharge current density of 10 mA cm −2 , the Na-IC maintained 70% of the capacity that obtained at the current density of 0.5 mA cm −2 , which was comparable to the Li-ICs. At 50 mA cm −2 , the capacities of the Li-IC(MCMB) and the Na-IC dropped to 20% whereas the Li-IC(HC) retained 30% of the capacity observed at 0.5 mA cm −2 . The capacities of the Na-IC and Li-ICs decreased by 9% and 3%, respectively, after 1000 cycles of charging and discharging.

  17. Direct Comparison of Biologically Optimized Spread-out Bragg Peaks for Protons and Carbon Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkens, Jan J.; Oelfke, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy with hadrons, it is anticipated that carbon ions are superior to protons, mainly because of their biological properties: the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for carbon ions is supposedly higher in the target than in the surrounding normal tissue, leading to a therapeutic advantage over protons. The purpose of this report is to investigate this effect by using biological model calculations. Methods and Materials: We compared spread-out Bragg peaks for protons and carbon ions by using physical and biological optimization. The RBE for protons and carbon ions was calculated according to published biological models. These models predict increased RBE values in regions of high linear energy transfer (LET) and an inverse dependency of the RBE on dose. Results: For pure physical optimization, protons yield a better dose distribution along the central axis. In biologically optimized plans, RBE variations for protons were relatively small. For carbon ions, high RBE values were found in the high-LET target region, as well as in the low-dose region outside the target. This means that the LET dependency and dose dependency of the RBE can cancel each other. We show this for radioresistant tissues treated with two opposing beams, for which the predicted carbon RBE within the target volume was lower than outside. Conclusions: For tissue parameters used in this study, the model used does not predict a biologic advantage of carbon ions. More reliable model parameters and clinical trials are necessary to explore the true potential of radiotherapy with carbon ions

  18. Method for fabricating carbon/lithium-ion electrode for rechargeable lithium cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Attia, Alan I. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The method includes steps for forming a carbon electrode composed of graphitic carbon particles adhered by an ethylene propylene diene monomer binder. An effective binder composition is disclosed for achieving a carbon electrode capable of subsequent intercalation by lithium ions. The method also includes steps for reacting the carbon electrode with lithium ions to incorporate lithium ions into graphitic carbon particles of the electrode. An electrical current is repeatedly applied to the carbon electrode to initially cause a surface reaction between the lithium ions and to the carbon and subsequently cause intercalation of the lithium ions into crystalline layers of the graphitic carbon particles. With repeated application of the electrical current, intercalation is achieved to near a theoretical maximum. Two differing multi-stage intercalation processes are disclosed. In the first, a fixed current is reapplied. In the second, a high current is initially applied, followed by a single subsequent lower current stage. Resulting carbon/lithium-ion electrodes are well suited for use as an anode in a reversible, ambient temperature, lithium cell.

  19. Uranium targets sandwiched between carbon layers for use on target wheels and on a Wobbler in heavy-ion bombardments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folger, H.; Hartmann, W.; Klemm, J.; Thalheimer, W.

    1989-01-01

    Uranium layers of ≅ 0.4 mg/cm 2 are evaporated by means of a 6 kW electron-beam gun onto 0.04 mg/cm 2 thick carbon films in a high-vacuum process; a protecting layer of ≅ 0.01 mg/cm 2 of carbon is added in the same vacuum cycle. The evaporation- and deposition yields are discussed and measurements of target characteristics are described. C/U/C sandwich targets in the shape of a sector of an annulus are prepared for use on rotating target wheels of 155 mm radius to be bombarded with a pulsed beam of heavy ions. One type of circular targets of 20 mm in diameter is mounted to a target wobbler. Both, wheel and wobbler, distribute the intensity of the heavy-ion beam to a larger area to reduce radiation damages. Examples of target applications will be mentioned. (orig.)

  20. A Benchmarking Study of High Energy Carbon Ion Induced Neutron Using Several Monte Carlo Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Oh, J. H.; Jung, N. S.; Lee, H. S. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Y. S.; Kwon, D. Y.; Kim, Y. M. [Catholic Univ., Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Oranj, L. Mokhtari [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this study, the benchmarking study was done for the representative particle interaction of the heavy ion accelerator, especially carbon-induced reaction. The secondary neutron is an important particle in the shielding analysis to define the source term and penetration ability of radiation fields. The performance of each Monte Carlo codes were verified for selected codes: MCNPX 2.7, PHITS 2.64 and FLUKA 2011.2b.6. For this benchmarking study, the experimental data of Kurosawa et al. in the SINBAD database of NEA was applied. The calculated results of the differential neutron yield produced from several materials irradiated by high energy carbon beam reproduced the experimental data well in small uncertainty. But the MCNPX results showed large discrepancy with experimental data, especially at the forward angle. The calculated results were lower a little than the experimental and it was clear in the cases of lower incident carbon energy, thinner target and forward angle. As expected, the influence of different model was found clearly at forward direction. In the shielding analysis, these characteristics of each Monte Carlo codes should be considered and utilized to determine the safety margin of a shield thickness.

  1. A Benchmarking Study of High Energy Carbon Ion Induced Neutron Using Several Monte Carlo Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. H.; Oh, J. H.; Jung, N. S.; Lee, H. S.; Shin, Y. S.; Kwon, D. Y.; Kim, Y. M.; Oranj, L. Mokhtari

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the benchmarking study was done for the representative particle interaction of the heavy ion accelerator, especially carbon-induced reaction. The secondary neutron is an important particle in the shielding analysis to define the source term and penetration ability of radiation fields. The performance of each Monte Carlo codes were verified for selected codes: MCNPX 2.7, PHITS 2.64 and FLUKA 2011.2b.6. For this benchmarking study, the experimental data of Kurosawa et al. in the SINBAD database of NEA was applied. The calculated results of the differential neutron yield produced from several materials irradiated by high energy carbon beam reproduced the experimental data well in small uncertainty. But the MCNPX results showed large discrepancy with experimental data, especially at the forward angle. The calculated results were lower a little than the experimental and it was clear in the cases of lower incident carbon energy, thinner target and forward angle. As expected, the influence of different model was found clearly at forward direction. In the shielding analysis, these characteristics of each Monte Carlo codes should be considered and utilized to determine the safety margin of a shield thickness

  2. Induction of DNA double-strand breaks in hepatoma cell SMMC-7721 by accelerated carbon ion 12C6+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Suwen; Su Xu; Wang Jufang; Zhao Jing; Li Wenjian

    2004-01-01

    DNA lesions, especially DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs), are looked upon as the dominant molecular effect of radiation action. Dsbs mark the beginning of a cascade of cellular processes that either results in complete repair of the DNA damage or lead to deleterious stages such as mutation, transformation or even cell death. Changing the radiation quality can influence the radiosensitivity of cells in culture. Accelerated particles provide an excellent means of varying the ionization density of the test radiation. With ion beams, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological consequences of high linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation can be studied and describing radiation action with biophysical models can be tested. In this paper, radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) were measured in hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells by means of an experimental approach involving pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and densitometric scanning of ethidium bromide stained gels. With this set-up, the induction of dsbs was investigated in SMMC-7721 cells after irradiation with accelerated carbon ions with specific LET 70 keV/μm. The fraction of DNA retained was taken as quantitative measure to calculate absolute yields of induced DNA dsbs. Experimental data shows that the induction of DNA dsbs increasing with the dose of irradiation. Data are compared with published results on dsbs induction in mammalian cells by radiations of comparable LET

  3. Binding of nickel and zinc ions with activated carbon prepared from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Activated carbon was prepared from sugar cane fibre by carbonizing at 500 oC for 30 minutes. This was followed by activation with ammonium chloride. The activated carbon was characterised in terms of pH, bulk density, ash content, surface area and surface charge. Equilibrium sorption of nickel and zinc ions by the ...

  4. PARP-1 depletion in combination with carbon ion exposure significantly reduces MMPs activity and overall increases TIMPs expression in cultured HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorai, Atanu; Sarma, Asitikantha; Chowdhury, Priyanka; Ghosh, Utpal

    2016-01-01

    Hadron therapy is an innovative technique where cancer cells are precisely killed leaving surrounding healthy cells least affected by high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation like carbon ion beam. Anti-metastatic effect of carbon ion exposure attracts investigators into the field of hadron biology, although details remain poor. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibitors are well-known radiosensitizer and several PARP-1 inhibitors are in clinical trial. Our previous studies showed that PARP-1 depletion makes the cells more radiosensitive towards carbon ion than gamma. The purpose of the present study was to investigate combining effects of PARP-1 inhibition with carbon ion exposure to control metastatic properties in HeLa cells. Activities of matrix metalloproteinases-2, 9 (MMP-2, MMP-9) were measured using the gelatin zymography after 85 MeV carbon ion exposure or gamma irradiation (0- 4 Gy) to compare metastatic potential between PARP-1 knock down (HsiI) and control cells (H-vector - HeLa transfected with vector without shRNA construct). Expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of MMPs such as TIMP-1, TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 were checked by immunofluorescence and western blot. Cell death by trypan blue, apoptosis and autophagy induction were studied after carbon ion exposure in each cell-type. The data was analyzed using one way ANOVA and 2-tailed paired-samples T-test. PARP-1 silencing significantly reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities and carbon ion exposure further diminished their activities to less than 3 % of control H-vector. On the contrary, gamma radiation enhanced both MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in H-vector but not in HsiI cells. The expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in H-vector and HsiI showed different pattern after carbon ion exposure. All three TIMPs were increased in HsiI, whereas only TIMP-1 was up-regulated in H-vector after irradiation. Notably, the expressions of all TIMPs were significantly higher in HsiI than H-vector at 4 Gy. Apoptosis was

  5. SU-D-BRB-02: Investigations of Secondary Ion Distributions in Carbon Ion Therapy Using the Timepix Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwosch, K; Hartmann, B; Jakubek, J; Granja, C; Soukup, P; Jaekel, O; Martisikova, M

    2012-06-01

    Due to the high conformity of carbon ion therapy, unpredictable changes in the patient's geometry or deviations from the planned beam properties can result in changes of the dose distribution. PET has been used successfully to monitor the actual dose distribution in the patient. However, it suffers from biological washout processes and low detection efficiency. The purpose of this contribution is to investigate the potential of beam monitoring by detection of prompt secondary ions emerging from a homogeneous phantom, simulating a patient's head. Measurements were performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (Germany) using a carbon ion pencil beam irradiated on a cylindrical PMMA phantom (16cm diameter). For registration of the secondary ions, the Timepix detector was used. This pixelated silicon detector allows position-resolved measurements of individual ions (256×256 pixels, 55μm pitch). To track the secondary ions we used several parallel detectors (3D voxel detector). For monitoring of the beam in the phantom, we analyzed the directional distribution of the registered ions. This distribution shows a clear dependence on the initial beam energy, width and position. Detectable were range differences of 1.7mm, as well as vertical and horizontal shifts of the beam position by 1mm. To estimate the clinical potential of this method, we measured the yield of secondary ions emerging from the phantom for a beam energy of 226MeV/u. The differential distribution of secondary ions as a function of the angle from the beam axis for angles between 0 and 90° will be presented. In this setup the total yield in the forward hemisphere was found to be in the order of 10 -1 secondary ions per primary carbon ion. The presented measurements show that tracking of secondary ions provides a promising method for non-invasive monitoring of ion beam parameters for clinical relevant carbon ion fluences. Research with the pixel detectors was carried out in frame of the Medipix

  6. Effects of ionizing radiation on the light sensing elements of the retina. [Structural and physiological effects of carbon, helium, and neon ions on rods and cones of salamanders and mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malachowski, M.J.

    1978-07-01

    This investigation was undertaken to quantitate possible morphological and physiological effects of particles of high linear energy transfer on the retina, in comparison with x-ray effects. The particles used were accelerated atomic nuclei of helium, carbon, and neon at kinetic energies of several hundred MeV/nucleon. For morphological studies, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and light microscopy were used. Physiological studies consisted of autoradiographic data of the rate of incorporation of labeled protein in the structures (opsin) of the outer segment of visual cells. Structural changes were found in the nuclei, as well as the inner and outer segments of visual cells, rods and cones. At a low dose of 10 rad, x rays and helium had no statistically significant morphological effects, but carbon and neon beams did cause significant degeneration of individual cells, pointing to the existence of a linear dose--effect relationship. At high doses of several hundred rads, a Pathologic Index determined the relative biological effectiveness of neon against alpha particles to have a value of greater than 6. The severity of effects per particle increased with atomic number. Labeling studies demonstrated a decreased rate of incorporation of labeled proteins in the structural organization of the outer segments of visual rods. The rate of self-renewal of visual rod discs was punctuated by irradiation and the structures themselves were depleted of amino acids. A model of rod discs (metabolic and catabolic) was postulated for correlated early and late effects to high and low doses.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF DOSIMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF GAFCHROMIC EBT3 AND EBT-XD FILMS FOR CLINICAL CARBON ION BEAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonai, Shunsuke; Arai, Chinatsu; Shimoyama, Kaoru; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie

    2018-02-03

    Radiochromic film is a very useful tool for 2D dosimetric measurements in radiotherapy because it is self-developing and has very high-spatial resolution. However, considerable care has to be taken in ion beam radiotherapy owing to the quenching effect of high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. In this study, the dose responses of GAFchromic EBT3 and EBT-XD films were experimentally investigated using the clinical carbon ion beam at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba. Results showed that the relations between absorbed dose and net optical density could be expressed well using an equation proposed by Reinhardt (2015). The quenching effect was evaluated by determining their relative efficiencies for photon irradiation as a function of LET. A correction equation derived in this study allowed the absorbed dose to be determined in the small irradiation field used for carbon ion radiotherapy eye treatments. This study contributes to establishing an absolute dosimetry procedure for heavy ion beams using radiochromic film. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Anodic stripping voltammetric determination of silver ion at a carbon paste electrode modified with carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashkhourian, J.; Javadi, S.; Ana, F.N.

    2011-01-01

    A carbon paste electrode (CPE) was modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes and successfully applied to the determination of silver ion by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. Compared to a conventional CPE, a remarkably improved peak current response and sensitivity is observed. The analytical procedure consisted of an open circuit accumulation step for 2 min in -0.4 V, this followed by an anodic potential scan between +0.2 and + 0.6 V to obtain the voltammetric peak. The oxidation peak current is proportional to the concentration of silver ion in the range from 1.0 x 10 -8 to 1.0 x 10 -5 mol L -1 , with a detection limit of 1.8 x 10 -9 mol L -1 after an accumulation time of 120 s. The relative standard deviation for 7 successive determinations of Ag(I) at 0.1 μM concentration is 1.99%. The procedure was validated by determining Ag(I) in natural waters. (author)

  9. Integration and evaluation of automated Monte Carlo simulations in the clinical practice of scanned proton and carbon ion beam therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J; Sommerer, F; Mairani, A; Unholtz, D; Farook, R; Handrack, J; Frey, K; Marcelos, T; Tessonnier, T; Ecker, S; Ackermann, B; Ellerbrock, M; Debus, J; Parodi, K

    2014-08-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of beam interaction and transport in matter are increasingly considered as essential tools to support several aspects of radiation therapy. Despite the vast application of MC to photon therapy and scattered proton therapy, clinical experience in scanned ion beam therapy is still scarce. This is especially the case for ions heavier than protons, which pose additional issues like nuclear fragmentation and varying biological effectiveness. In this work, we present the evaluation of a dedicated framework which has been developed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center to provide automated FLUKA MC simulations of clinical patient treatments with scanned proton and carbon ion beams. Investigations on the number of transported primaries and the dimension of the geometry and scoring grids have been performed for a representative class of patient cases in order to provide recommendations on the simulation settings, showing that recommendations derived from the experience in proton therapy cannot be directly translated to the case of carbon ion beams. The MC results with the optimized settings have been compared to the calculations of the analytical treatment planning system (TPS), showing that regardless of the consistency of the two systems (in terms of beam model in water and range calculation in different materials) relevant differences can be found in dosimetric quantities and range, especially in the case of heterogeneous and deep seated treatment sites depending on the ion beam species and energies, homogeneity of the traversed tissue and size of the treated volume. The analysis of typical TPS speed-up approximations highlighted effects which deserve accurate treatment, in contrast to adequate beam model simplifications for scanned ion beam therapy. In terms of biological dose calculations, the investigation of the mixed field components in realistic anatomical situations confirmed the findings of previous groups so far reported only in

  10. Effect of carbon on ion beam mixing of Fe-Ti bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, J.P.; Nastasi, M.; Lappalainen, R.; Sickafus, K. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The influence of implanted carbon on ion beam mixing of a Fe-Ti system was investigated. Carbon was introduced into bilayer samples by implanting {sup 13}C isotopes. The implantation energies were selected to set the mean range of carbon ions in either the iron or titanium layer. The effect of implanted carbon on 400 keV Ar ion mixing in the temperature range from 0 to 300{degree}C was studied using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy at the energy of 5 MeV. Changes in carbon concentration profiles were probed utilizing the resonance of the nuclear reaction {sup 13}C(p,{gamma}){sup 14}N at the proton energy of 1.748 MeV. The measurements revealed that mixing was not affected by carbon implanted into the titanium layer. However, carbon in the iron layer remarkably retarded mixing at all temperatures investigated. Significant changes in carbon depth distributions were observed only when the sample with implanted carbon in the iron layer was mixed at 300{degree}C. These results are explained in terms of the enhanced mobility of carbon in an evaporated iron film which allows segregation to the interface. At low temperatures, however, vacancy-carbon interaction in iron may have a contribution to the retarded ion beam mixing. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Comparison of Biological Effectiveness of Carbon-Ion Beams in Japan and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzawa, Akiko; Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Takai, Nobuhiko; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Scholz, Michael; Elsaesser, Thilo; Peschke, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the biological effectiveness of 290 MeV/amu carbon-ion beams in Chiba, Japan and in Darmstadt, Germany, given that different methods for beam delivery are used for each. Methods and Materials: Murine small intestine and human salivary gland tumor (HSG) cells exponentially growing in vitro were irradiated with 6-cm width of spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) adjusted to achieve nearly identical beam depth-dose profiles at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, and the SchwerIonen Synchrotron in Darmstadt. Cell kill efficiencies of carbon ions were measured by colony formation for HSG cells and jejunum crypts survival in mice. Cobalt-60 γ rays were used as the reference radiation. Isoeffective doses at given survivals were used for relative biological effectiveness (RBE) calculations and interinstitutional comparisons. Results: Isoeffective D 10 doses (mean ± standard deviation) of HSG cells ranged from 2.37 ± 0.14 Gy to 3.47 ± 0.19 Gy for Chiba and from 2.31 ± 0.11 Gy to 3.66 ± 0.17 Gy for Darmstadt. Isoeffective D 10 doses of gut crypts after single doses ranged from 8.25 ± 0.17 Gy to 10.32 ± 0.14 Gy for Chiba and from 8.27 ± 0.10 Gy to 10.27 ± 0.27 Gy for Darmstadt, whereas isoeffective D 30 doses after three fractionated doses were 9.89 ± 0.17 Gy through 13.70 ± 0.54 Gy and 10.14 ± 0.20 Gy through 13.30 ± 0.41 Gy for Chiba and Darmstadt, respectively. Overall difference of RBE between the two facilities was 0-5% or 3-7% for gut crypt survival or HSG cell kill, respectively. Conclusion: The carbon-ion beams at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany are biologically identical after single and daily fractionated irradiation.

  12. Gamma radiation effects in vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Lubkowski, Grzegorz; Kuhnhenn, Jochen; Suhrke, Michael; Weinand, Udo; Endler, Ingolf; Meißner, Frank; Richter, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study of gamma radiation effects in low-density arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. These arrays are characterized by excellent anti-reflective and absorbing properties for wavelengths from UV to IR, which makes them an interesting option for stray light control in optical space applications. Gamma irradiation equivalent to an estimated surface lifetime exposition in geostationary orbit does not affect the reflectivity of the structures. First h...

  13. A rechargeable iodine-carbon battery that exploits ion intercalation and iodine redox chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ke; Hu, Ziyu; Ma, Jizhen; Ma, Houyi; Dai, Liming; Zhang, Jintao

    2017-09-13

    Graphitic carbons have been used as conductive supports for developing rechargeable batteries. However, the classic ion intercalation in graphitic carbon has yet to be coupled with extrinsic redox reactions to develop rechargeable batteries. Herein, we demonstrate the preparation of a free-standing, flexible nitrogen and phosphorus co-doped hierarchically porous graphitic carbon for iodine loading by pyrolysis of polyaniline coated cellulose wiper. We find that heteroatoms could provide additional defect sites for encapsulating iodine while the porous carbon skeleton facilitates redox reactions of iodine and ion intercalation. The combination of ion intercalation with redox reactions of iodine allows for developing rechargeable iodine-carbon batteries free from the unsafe lithium/sodium metals, and hence eliminates the long-standing safety issue. The unique architecture of the hierarchically porous graphitic carbon with heteroatom doping not only provides suitable spaces for both iodine encapsulation and cation intercalation but also generates efficient electronic and ionic transport pathways, thus leading to enhanced performance.Carbon-based electrodes able to intercalate Li + and Na + ions have been exploited for high performing energy storage devices. Here, the authors combine the ion intercalation properties of porous graphitic carbons with the redox chemistry of iodine to produce iodine-carbon batteries with high reversible capacities.

  14. Quality of life (QOL) assessment in patients received carbon ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Miyamoto, Tada-aki; Kato, Hirotoshi; Oono, Tatsuya; Yamada, Shigeru; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2003-01-01

    Until February 2003, a total of 1,463 patients were enrolled in clinical trials of carbon ion radiotherapy. Most of the patients had locally advanced and/or medically inoperable tumors. The clinical trials revealed that carbon ion radiotherapy provided definite local control and offered a survival advantage without unacceptable morbidity in a variety of tumors that were hard to cure by other modalities. In this study, quality of life (QOL) outcomes of patients with unresectable bone and soft tissue sarcoma after carbon ion radiotherapy are investigated. (author)

  15. Evolution of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Osama; Makishima, Hirokazu; Kamada, Tadashi

    2018-03-06

    Charged particles can achieve better dose distribution and higher biological effectiveness compared to photon radiotherapy. Carbon ions are considered an optimal candidate for cancer treatment using particles. The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Chiba, Japan was the first radiotherapy hospital dedicated for carbon ion treatments in the world. Since its establishment in 1994, the NIRS has pioneered this therapy with more than 69 clinical trials so far, and hundreds of ancillary projects in physics and radiobiology. In this review, we will discuss the evolution of carbon ion radiotherapy at the NIRS and some of the current and future projects in the field.

  16. Composites with carbon nanotube for radiation shielding application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontainha, Críssia C.P.; Nunes, Modesto; Rosas, Víctor A.

    2017-01-01

    Polymeric composites filled with attenuating metals and functionalized with carbon nanotubes (NTC) are being largely developed. New attenuators materials have been widely investigated for radiation shielding to apply in procedures as interventional radiology, Computed Tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine. In this work composites for radiation attenuation in radiodiagnostic imaging procedures made of inorganic material as filler, by a sol-gel method, in poly(vinylidene fluoride-tryfluorethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE] copolymers that are used as the polymeric matrix. Two different metal attenuators were used as fillers: zirconia stabilized by yttria (8% wt.) and bismuth oxide. Carbon nanotubes were added with different concentrations at the solution of attenuator metal under controlled magnetic stirring. Characterization of composites by FTIR, UV-Vis, DSC and SEM-EDS were carried out. In a previous analysis of radiation attenuation, was used an incident monochromatic X-ray beam from the RIGAKU diffractometer. In this setup, one reference measure is directly exposed to the x-rays being diffracted by single crystal of Si (111). Another measure the attenuated beam is performed with the composite sample under detector. The functionalization of the carbon nanotube of multiple walls (MWNCT) in the in the P(VDF-TrFE) was evaluated. The samples present a good dispersion of the attenuator metal into presence at methacrylic acid. The cheap tube presented better dispersion in the polymer matrix than the 3100 nanotubes. Bismuth oxidation composites showed a better attenuation factor compared to Zirconia stabilized by yttria composites. (author)

  17. Composites with carbon nanotube for radiation shielding application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontainha, Críssia C.P.; Nunes, Modesto; Rosas, Víctor A., E-mail: crissia@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (IMA/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Anatomia e Imagem; Santos, Adelina P.; Furtado, Clascídia A.; Faria, Luiz O., E-mail: farialo@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Polymeric composites filled with attenuating metals and functionalized with carbon nanotubes (NTC) are being largely developed. New attenuators materials have been widely investigated for radiation shielding to apply in procedures as interventional radiology, Computed Tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine. In this work composites for radiation attenuation in radiodiagnostic imaging procedures made of inorganic material as filler, by a sol-gel method, in poly(vinylidene fluoride-tryfluorethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE] copolymers that are used as the polymeric matrix. Two different metal attenuators were used as fillers: zirconia stabilized by yttria (8% wt.) and bismuth oxide. Carbon nanotubes were added with different concentrations at the solution of attenuator metal under controlled magnetic stirring. Characterization of composites by FTIR, UV-Vis, DSC and SEM-EDS were carried out. In a previous analysis of radiation attenuation, was used an incident monochromatic X-ray beam from the RIGAKU diffractometer. In this setup, one reference measure is directly exposed to the x-rays being diffracted by single crystal of Si (111). Another measure the attenuated beam is performed with the composite sample under detector. The functionalization of the carbon nanotube of multiple walls (MWNCT) in the in the P(VDF-TrFE) was evaluated. The samples present a good dispersion of the attenuator metal into presence at methacrylic acid. The cheap tube presented better dispersion in the polymer matrix than the 3100 nanotubes. Bismuth oxidation composites showed a better attenuation factor compared to Zirconia stabilized by yttria composites. (author)

  18. Indirect radiative forcing by ion-mediated nucleation of aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A clear understanding of particle formation mechanisms is critical for assessing aerosol indirect radiative forcing and associated climate feedback processes. Recent studies reveal the importance of ion-mediated nucleation (IMN in generating new particles and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN in the atmosphere. Here we implement the IMN scheme into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5. Our simulations show that, compared to globally averaged results based on H2SO4-H2O binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN, the presence of ionization (i.e., IMN halves H2SO4 column burden, but increases the column integrated nucleation rate by around one order of magnitude, total particle number burden by a factor of ~3, CCN burden by ~10% (at 0.2% supersaturation to 65% (at 1.0% supersaturation, and cloud droplet number burden by ~18%. Compared to BHN, IMN increases cloud liquid water path by 7.5%, decreases precipitation by 1.1%, and increases total cloud cover by 1.9%. This leads to an increase of total shortwave cloud radiative forcing (SWCF by 3.67 W m−2 (more negative and longwave cloud forcing by 1.78 W m−2 (more positive, with large spatial variations. The effect of ionization on SWCF derived from this study (3.67 W m−2 is a factor of ~3 higher that of a previous study (1.15 W m−2 based on a different ion nucleation scheme and climate model. Based on the present CAM5 simulation, the 5-yr mean impacts of solar cycle induced changes in ionization rates on CCN and cloud forcing are small (~−0.02 W m−2 but have larger inter-annual (from −0.18 to 0.17 W m−2 and spatial variations.

  19. MgO-templated carbon as a negative electrode material for Na-ion capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kado, Yuya; Soneda, Yasushi

    2016-12-01

    In this study, MgO-templated carbon with different pore structures was investigated as a negative electrode material for Na-ion capacitors. With increasing the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, the irreversible capacity increased, and the coulombic efficiency of the 1st cycle decreased because of the formation of solid electrolyte interface layers. MgO-templated carbon annealed at 1000 °C exhibited the highest capacity and best rate performance, suggesting that an appropriate balance between surface area and crystallinity is imperative for fast Na-ion storage, attributed to the storage mechanism: combination of non-faradaic electric double-layer capacitance and faradaic Na intercalation in the carbon layers. Finally, a Na-ion capacitor cell using MgO-templated carbon and activated carbon as the negative and positive electrodes, respectively, exhibited an energy density at high power density significantly greater than that exhibited by the cell using a commercial hard carbon negative electrode.

  20. Study on the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes controlled by ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Biben; Zhang Bing; Zheng Kun; Hao Wei; Wang Wanlu; Liao Kejun

    2004-01-01

    Aligned carbon nanotubes were prepared by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition using CH 4 , H 2 and NH 3 as reaction gases. It was investigated how different negative bias affects the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes. The results indicate that the average diameter of the aligned carbon nanotubes is reduced and the average length of the aligned carbon nanotubes is increased with increasing negative bias. Because of the occurrence of glow discharge, a cathode sheath forms near the substrate surface, and a number of ions are produced in it, and a very strong electrical field builds up near the substrate surface. Under the effect of the field, the strong bombardment of ions on the substrate surface will influence the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes. Combined with related theories, authors have analyzed and discussed the ion bombardment effects on the growth of the aligned carbon nanotudes

  1. Molecular analysis of carbon ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikazono, Naoya; Tanaka, Atsushi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Tano, Shigemitsu; Yokota, Yukihiko

    1998-01-01

    In order to elucidate the characteristics of the mutations induced by ion particles at the molecular level in plants, mutated loci in carbon ion-induced mutants of Arabidopsis were investigated by PCR and Southern blot analyses. In the present study, two lines of gl1 mutant and two lines of tt4 mutant were isolated after carbon ion-irradiation. Out of four mutants, one had a deletion, other two contained rearrangements, and one had a point-like mutation. From the present result, it was suggested that ion particles induced different kinds of alterations of the DNA and therefore they could produce various types of mutant alleles in plants. (author)

  2. Behavior of the extraction of metallic ions in carbonate medium, using N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine (BPHA) - benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipriani, M.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility of separating quantitatively trace impurities like Cu, Fe, In and Pb, present in uranium base materials of nuclear grade, is demonstrated. A solvent extraction is employed which makes use of -benzoylphenylhydroxylamine(BPHA)-benzene solution and separation is effected in a medium containing 252 moles per liter of sodium-uranyl tricarbonate at pH of 9,0. Carbonate ions under such conditions inhibit uranium extraction by masking uranyl ion-BPHA reaction. The uranyl ions show a demasking action, releasing, thereby, Pb(II) ions which are being extracted from carbonate medium. The Atomic Absorption Spectrophometry technique is used to obtain the experimental data [pt

  3. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  4. Assessment of Early Toxicity and Response in Patients Treated With Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center Using the Raster Scanning Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Jensen, Alexandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Muenter, Marc W.; Welzel, Thomas; Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E., E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-hedielberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-12-01

    Puropose: To asses early toxicity and response in 118 patients treated with scanned ion beams to validate the safety of intensity-controlled raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. Patients and Methods: Between November 2009 and June 2010, we treated 118 patients with proton and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) using active beam delivery. The main indications included skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, salivary gland tumors, and gliomas. We evaluated early toxicity within 6 weeks after RT and the initial clinical and radiologic response for quality assurance in our new facility. Results: In all 118 patients, few side effects were observed, in particular, no high numbers of severe acute toxicity were found. In general, the patients treated with particle therapy alone showed only a few single side effects, mainly Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/Common Terminology Criteria grade 1. The most frequent side effects and cumulative incidence of single side effects were observed in the head-and-neck patients treated with particle therapy as a boost and photon intensity-modulated RT. The toxicities included common radiation-attributed reactions known from photon RT, including mucositis, dysphagia, and skin erythema. The most predominant imaging responses were observed in patients with high-grade gliomas and those with salivary gland tumors. For skull base tumors, imaging showed a stable tumor outline in most patients. Thirteen patients showed improvement of pre-existing clinical symptoms. Conclusions: Side effects related to particle treatment were rare, and the overall tolerability of the treatment was shown. The initial response was promising. The data have confirmed the safe delivery of carbon ions and protons at the newly opened Heidelberg facility.

  5. Solvation behavior of carbonate-based electrolytes in sodium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresce, Arthur V; Russell, Selena M; Borodin, Oleg; Allen, Joshua A; Schroeder, Marshall A; Dai, Michael; Peng, Jing; Gobet, Mallory P; Greenbaum, Steven G; Rogers, Reginald E; Xu, Kang

    2016-12-21

    Sodium ion batteries are on the cusp of being a commercially available technology. Compared to lithium ion batteries, sodium ion batteries can potentially offer an attractive dollar-per-kilowatt-hour value, though at the penalty of reduced energy density. As a materials system, sodium ion batteries present a unique opportunity to apply lessons learned in the study of electrolytes for lithium ion batteries; specifically, the behavior of the sodium ion in an organic carbonate solution and the relationship of ion solvation with electrode surface passivation. In this work the Li + and Na + -based solvates were characterized using electrospray mass spectrometry, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, 17 O, 23 Na and pulse field gradient double-stimulated-echo pulse sequence nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and conductivity measurements. Spectroscopic evidence demonstrate that the Li + and Na + cations share a number of similar ion-solvent interaction trends, such as a preference in the gas and liquid phase for a solvation shell rich in cyclic carbonates over linear carbonates and fluorinated carbonates. However, quite different IR spectra due to the PF 6 - anion interactions with the Na + and Li + cations were observed and were rationalized with the help of density functional theory (DFT) calculations that were also used to examine the relative free energies of solvates using cluster - continuum models. Ion-solvent distances for Na + were longer than Li + , and Na + had a greater tendency towards forming contact pairs compared to Li + in linear carbonate solvents. In tests of hard carbon Na-ion batteries, performance was not well correlated to Na + solvent preference, leading to the possibility that Na + solvent preference may play a reduced role in the passivation of anode surfaces and overall Na-ion battery performance.

  6. Apparatus for the measurement of ion activety caused by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroem, S.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a linear amplifier for the monitoring of very small currents from a high pressure ionization chamber. In the traditional design of an ionization chamber current amplifier, selected semiconductors and resistors are chosen to measure the very small currents in question. As the leakage currents in these semiconductors are larger than the smallest currents to be measured, very sophisticated electronics must be employed to succeed with the design. In order to overcome this disadvantage, the invention is based on the following basic features: A capacitor is charged by the chamber ion current during a fixed time period, without loading the amplifier input. The use of a peak detector makes bouncing of the time-lag relay contacts unimportant, and allows an anlog-to-digital converter to store the voltage build-up in the capacitor as a digital value. The measuring range of the amplifier, 0.001 pA to 1000 pA, makes it suitable for measuring gamma radiation in the air, both under normal and abnormal conditions. 1 fig

  7. Thermal electromagnetic radiation in heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, R. [Texas A and M University, Cyclotron Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, College Station, TX (United States); Hees, H. van [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Frankfurt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute of Advanced Studies (FIAS), Frankfurt (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    We review the potential of precise measurements of electromagnetic probes in relativistic heavy-ion collisions for the theoretical understanding of strongly interacting matter. The penetrating nature of photons and dileptons implies that they can carry undistorted information about the hot and dense regions of the fireballs formed in these reactions and thus provide a unique opportunity to measure the electromagnetic spectral function of QCD matter as a function of both invariant mass and momentum. In particular we report on recent progress on how the medium modifications of the (dominant) isovector part of the vector current correlator (ρ channel) can shed light on the mechanism of chiral symmetry restoration in the hot and/or dense environment. In addition, thermal dilepton radiation enables novel access to (a) the fireball lifetime through the dilepton yield in the low invariant-mass window 0.3 GeV ≤ M ≤ 0.7 GeV, and (b) the early temperatures of the fireball through the slope of the invariant-mass spectrum in the intermediate-mass region (1.5 GeV < M < 2.5 GeV). The investigation of the pertinent excitation function suggests that the beam energies provided by the NICA and FAIR projects are in a promising range for a potential discovery of the onset of a first-order phase transition, as signaled by a non-monotonous behavior of both low-mass yields and temperature slopes. (orig.)

  8. Highly porous carbon with large electrochemical ion absorption capability for high-performance supercapacitors and ion capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijie; Wang, Rutao; Zhang, Yabin; Zhang, Li

    2017-11-01

    Carbon-based supercapacitors have attracted extensive attention as the complement to batteries, owing to their durable lifespan and superiority in high-power-demand fields. However, their widespread use is limited by the low energy storage density; thus, a high-surface-area porous carbon is urgently needed. Herein, a highly porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area up to 3643 m2 g-1 has been synthesized by chemical activation of papayas for the first time. This sp2-bonded porous carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form narrow mesopores of 2 ˜ 5 nm in width, which can be systematically tailored with varied activation levels. Two-electrode symmetric supercapacitors constructed by this porous carbon achieve energy density of 8.1 Wh kg-1 in aqueous electrolyte and 65.5 Wh kg-1 in ionic-liquid electrolyte. Furthermore, half-cells (versus Li or Na metal) using this porous carbon as ion sorption cathodes yield high specific capacity, e.g., 51.0 and 39.3 mAh g-1 in Li+ and Na+ based organic electrolyte. These results underline the possibility of obtaining the porous carbon for high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors and ion capacitors in a readily scalable and economical way.

  9. Highly porous carbon with large electrochemical ion absorption capability for high-performance supercapacitors and ion capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijie; Wang, Rutao; Zhang, Yabin; Zhang, Li

    2017-11-03

    Carbon-based supercapacitors have attracted extensive attention as the complement to batteries, owing to their durable lifespan and superiority in high-power-demand fields. However, their widespread use is limited by the low energy storage density; thus, a high-surface-area porous carbon is urgently needed. Herein, a highly porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area up to 3643 m 2 g -1 has been synthesized by chemical activation of papayas for the first time. This sp 2 -bonded porous carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form narrow mesopores of 2 ∼ 5 nm in width, which can be systematically tailored with varied activation levels. Two-electrode symmetric supercapacitors constructed by this porous carbon achieve energy density of 8.1 Wh kg -1 in aqueous electrolyte and 65.5 Wh kg -1 in ionic-liquid electrolyte. Furthermore, half-cells (versus Li or Na metal) using this porous carbon as ion sorption cathodes yield high specific capacity, e.g., 51.0 and 39.3 mAh g -1 in Li + and Na + based organic electrolyte. These results underline the possibility of obtaining the porous carbon for high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors and ion capacitors in a readily scalable and economical way.

  10. Active raster scanning with carbon ions. Reirradiation in patients with recurrent skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, Matthias; Welzel, Thomas; Oelmann, Jan; Habl, Gregor; Hauswald, Henrik; Jensen, Alexandra; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Ellerbrock, Malte [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of reirradiation with carbon ions in patients with relapse of skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma. Reirradiation with carbon ions was performed on 25 patients with locally recurrent skull base chordoma (n = 20) or chondrosarcoma (n = 5). The median time between the last radiation exposure and the reirradiation with carbon ions was 7 years. In the past, 23 patients had been irradiated once, two patients twice. Reirradiation was delivered using the active raster scanning method. The total median dose was 51.0 GyE carbon ions in a weekly regimen of five to six fractions of 3 GyE. Local progression-free survival (LPFS) was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method; toxicity was evaluated using the NCI Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE v.4.03). The treatment could be finished in all patients without interruption. In 80 % of patients, symptom control was achieved after therapy. The 2-year-LPFS probability was 79.3 %. A PTV volume of < 100 ml or a total dose of > 51 GyE was associated with a superior local control rate. The therapy was associated with low acute toxicity. One patient developed grade 2 mucositis during therapy. Furthermore, 12 % of patients had tympanic effusion with mild hypacusis (grade 2), while 20 % developed an asymptomatic temporal lobe reaction after treatment (grade 1). Only one patient showed a grade 3 osteoradionecrosis. Reirradiation with carbon ions is a safe and effective method in patients with relapsed chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the skull base. (orig.) [German] Evaluierung der Sicherheit und Wirksamkeit einer Re-Bestrahlung mittels Kohlenstoffionen bei Patienten mit Lokalrezidiv eines Chordoms und Chondrosarkoms der Schaedelbasis. Bei 25 Patienten mit einem Lokalrezidiv eines Chordoms (n = 20) oder Chondrosarkoms (n = 5) der Schaedelbasis erfolgte eine Re-Bestrahlung mittels Kohlenstoffionen. Die mediane Zeit zwischen letzter Bestrahlung und Re-Bestrahlung mit Kohlenstoffionen

  11. Polarization mechanism for Bremsstrahlung and radiative recombination in a plasma with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astapenko, V.A.; Bureeva, L.A.; Lisitsa, V.S.

    2002-01-01

    Contribution of polarization channel into radiation and recombination of electrons in plasma with heavy ions is investigated. Cases of hot plasma with temperature T e = 0.5 keV and Fe, Mo, W, U ions and relatively cold plasma with temperature 0.1-10 eV are considered. Calculations of spectral characteristics, full cross sections and recombination rates in plasma are made, bearing in mind its real ionization equilibrium. The calculations are made on the basis of quasiclassical approximation for electron scattering and statistical model of ions. It is shown that contribution of polarization channel is essential both for effective radiation and full rate of radiative recombination [ru

  12. Operation of low-energy ion implanters for Si, N, C ion implantation into silicon and glassy carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carder, D.A.; Markwitz, A.

    2009-01-01

    This report details the operation of the low-energy ion implanters at GNS Science for C, N and Si implantations. Two implanters are presented, from a description of the components through to instructions for operation. Historically the implanters have been identified with the labels 'industrial' and 'experimental'. However, the machines only differ significantly in the species of ions available for implantation and sample temperature during implantation. Both machines have been custom designed for research purposes, with a wide range of ion species available for ion implantation and the ability to implant two ions into the same sample at the same time from two different ion sources. A fast sample transfer capability and homogenous scanning profiles are featured in both cases. Samples up to 13 mm 2 can be implanted, with the ability to implant at temperatures down to liquid nitrogen temperatures. The implanters have been used to implant 28 Si + , 14 N + and 12 C + into silicon and glassy carbon substrates. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy has been used to analyse the implanted material. From the data a Si 30 C 61 N 9 layer was measured extending from the surface to a depth of about 77 ± 2 nm for (100) silicon implanted with 12 C + and 14 N + at multiple energies. Silicon and nitrogen ion implantation into glassy carbon produced a Si (40.5 %), C (38 %), N (19.5 %) and O (2%) layer centred around a depth of 50 ± 2 nm from the surface. (author). 8 refs., 20 figs

  13. Tuning the Solid Electrolyte Interphase for Selective Li- and Na-Ion Storage in Hard Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Fernando A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3122 USA; Yan, Pengfei [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Marzouk, Asma [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, P.O. Box 5825 Doha Qatar; Wang, Chongmin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Xu, Guiliang [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Chen, Zonghai [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA; Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Sprenkle, Vincent L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, P.O. Box 5825 Doha Qatar; Balbuena, Perla B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3122 USA; Li, Xiaolin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-03-07

    Solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) with controllable properties are highly desirable to improve battery performance. In this paper, we use a combined experimental and simulation approach to study the SEI formation on hard carbon in Li and Na-ion batteries. We show that with proper additives, stable SEI can be formed on hard carbon by pre-cycling the electrode materials in Li or Na-ion electrolyte. Detailed mechanistic studies suggest that the ion transport in the SEI layer is kinetically controlled and can be tuned by the applied voltage. Selective Na and Li-ion SEI membranes are produced using the Na or Li-ion based electrolytes respectively. The large Na ion SEI allows easy transport of Li ions, while the small Li ion SEI shuts off the Na-ion transport. Na-ion storage can be manipulated by tuning the SEI with film-forming electrolyte additives or preforming a SEI on the electrodes’ surface. The Na specific capacity can be controlled to <25 mAh/g, ~1/10 of the normal capacity (250 mAh/g). Unusual selective/preferential transport of Li-ion is demonstrated by preforming a SEI on the electrode’s surface and corroborated with a mixed electrolyte. This work may provide new guidance for preparing good ion selective conductors using electrochemical approaches in the future.

  14. Phase I study evaluating the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer with carbon ion radiotherapy: the PHOENIX-01 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Debus, Jürgen; Habermehl, Daniel; Kieser, Meinhard; Dreher, Constantin; Werner, Jens; Haselmann, Renate; Jäkel, Oliver; Jäger, Dirk; Büchler, Markus W

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer include surgery, chemotherapy as well as radiotherapy. In many cases, surgical resection is not possible, and therefore treatment alternatives have to be performed. Chemoradiation has been established as a convincing treatment alternative for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Carbon ions offer physical and biological characteristics. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 1.16 and 2.46 depending on the pancreatic cancer cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Japanese Data on the evaluation of carbon ion radiation therapy showed promising results for patients with pancreatic cancer. The present PHOENIX-01 trial evaluates carbon ion radiotherapy using the active rasterscanning technique in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in combination with weekly gemcitabine and adjuvant gemcitabine. Primary endpoint is toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall survival, progression-free survival and response. The physical and biological properties of the carbon ion beam promise to improve the therapeutic ratio in patients with pancreatic cancer: Due to the inverted dose profile dose deposition in the entry channel of the beam leads to sparing of normal tissue; the Bragg peak can be directed into the defined target volume, and the sharp dose fall-off thereafter again spares normal tissue behind the target volume. The higher RBE of carbon ions, which has been shown also for pancreatic cancer cell lines in the preclinical setting, is likely to contribute to an increase in local control, and perhaps in OS. Early data from Japanese centers have shown promising results. In conclusion, this is the first trial to evaluate actively delivered carbon

  15. Luminescence imaging of water during carbon-ion irradiation for range estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Morishita, Yuki; Sekihara, Eri [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Akagi, Takashi; Yamashita, Tomohiro [Hygo Ion Beam Medical Center, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The authors previously reported successful luminescence imaging of water during proton irradiation and its application to range estimation. However, since the feasibility of this approach for carbon-ion irradiation remained unclear, the authors conducted luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation and estimated the ranges. Methods: The authors placed a pure-water phantom on the patient couch of a carbon-ion therapy system and measured the luminescence images with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device camera during carbon-ion irradiation. The authors also carried out imaging of three types of phantoms (tap-water, an acrylic block, and a plastic scintillator) and compared their intensities and distributions with those of a phantom containing pure-water. Results: The luminescence images of pure-water phantoms during carbon-ion irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured carbon-ion ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained by simulation. The image of the tap-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as that of the pure-water phantom. The acrylic block phantom’s luminescence image produced seven times higher luminescence and had a 13% shorter range than that of the water phantoms; the range with the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The plastic scintillator showed ∼15 000 times higher light than that of water. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation of water is not only possible but also a promising method for range estimation in carbon-ion therapy.

  16. Luminescence imaging of water during carbon-ion irradiation for range estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Morishita, Yuki; Sekihara, Eri; Akagi, Takashi; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously reported successful luminescence imaging of water during proton irradiation and its application to range estimation. However, since the feasibility of this approach for carbon-ion irradiation remained unclear, the authors conducted luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation and estimated the ranges. Methods: The authors placed a pure-water phantom on the patient couch of a carbon-ion therapy system and measured the luminescence images with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device camera during carbon-ion irradiation. The authors also carried out imaging of three types of phantoms (tap-water, an acrylic block, and a plastic scintillator) and compared their intensities and distributions with those of a phantom containing pure-water. Results: The luminescence images of pure-water phantoms during carbon-ion irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured carbon-ion ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained by simulation. The image of the tap-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as that of the pure-water phantom. The acrylic block phantom’s luminescence image produced seven times higher luminescence and had a 13% shorter range than that of the water phantoms; the range with the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The plastic scintillator showed ∼15 000 times higher light than that of water. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation of water is not only possible but also a promising method for range estimation in carbon-ion therapy.

  17. Reprint of: Negative carbon cluster ion beams: New evidence for the special nature of C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; O'brien, S. C.; Zhang, Q.; Heath, J. R.; Tittel, F. K.; Curl, R. F.; Kroto, H. W.; Smalley, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Cold carbon cluster negative ions are formed by supersonic expansion of a plasma created at the nozzle of a supersonic cluster beam source by an excimer laser pulse. The observed distribution of mass peaks for the Cn- ions for n > 40 demonstrates that the evidence previously given for the special stability of neutral C60 and the existence of spheroidal carbon shells cannot be an artifact of the ionization conditions.

  18. Mutational effects of γ-rays and carbon ion beams on Arabidopsis seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshihara, Ryohei; Nozawa, Shigeki; Hase, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Ayako N.; Narumi, Issay; Hidema, Jun

    2013-01-01

    To assess the mutational effects of radiation on vigorously proliferating plant tissue, the mutation spectrum was analyzed with Arabidopsis seedlings using the plasmid-rescue method. Transgenic plants containing the Escherichia coli rpsL gene were irradiated with γ-rays and carbon ion beams (320-MeV 12 C 6+ ), and mutations in the rpsL gene were analyzed. Mutant frequency increased significantly following irradiation by γ-rays, but not by 320-MeV 12 C 6+ . Mutation spectra showed that both radiations increased the frequency of frameshifts and other mutations, including deletions and insertions, but only γ-rays increased the frequency of total base substitutions. These results suggest that the type of DNA lesions which cause base substitutions were less often induced by 320-MeV 12 C 6+ than by γ-rays in Arabidopsis seedlings. Furthermore, γ-rays never increased the frequencies of G:C to T:A or A:T to C:G transversions, which are caused by oxidized guanine; 320-MeV 12 C 6+ , however, produced a slight increase in both transversions. Instead, γ-rays produced a significant increase in the frequency of G:C to A:T transitions. These results suggest that 8-oxoguanine has little effect on mutagenesis in Arabidopsis cells. (author)

  19. Carbon nanotubes in Li-ion batteries: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehrawat, Poonam [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), Jamia Nagar, New Delhi 110025 (India); Julien, C. [Sorbonne Universities, University Pierre and Marie CURIE – Paris-6, Paris (France); Islam, S.S., E-mail: sislam@jmi.ac.in [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), Jamia Nagar, New Delhi 110025 (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • LIBs are gaining immense attention among rechargeable battery systems. • HEVs and portables demand higher power and life than the conventional systems. • CNTs owing to their unique 1D structure can enhance performance of LIBs. • We report contemporary advancements in CNTs technology as applicable to LIBs. • CNTs-composite systems have also been reviewed. - Abstract: Portable-electronics epitomizing technological breakthrough in history of mankind, are universal reality thanks to rechargeable batteries. LIBs, lithium-ion batteries, owing to high-reversible capacity, high-power capability, good-safety, long-life and zero-memory effects are at the heart of this revolution. Nonetheless, longer-battery-life, higher-current- and power-density, better-safety, and flexibility, crucial for portables and hybrid-electric-vehicles further fuel the research to better their electrochemistry. Electrode materials are vital for performance of batteries. Recent developments in nanoscience and nanotechnology offer potential prospects to devise novel-nanostructured electrode materials for next-generation better-performing LIBs. Nanostructured materials are pivotal to these progresses due to their manageable surface-area, stunted mass and charge-diffusion span, and volume change acclimatization during charging/discharging. CNTs, carbon-nanotubes, with distinct 1D-tubular structure, excellent electrical and thermal conductivities, mechanical flexibility and significantly large surface-area, are considered ideal additives to enrich electrodes’ chemistry. Here, we observe contemporary developments in synthesis and characterization of CNTs and CNTs-based nanostructured composite-electrodes for utilization in LIBs.

  20. Carbon nanotubes in Li-ion batteries: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehrawat, Poonam; Julien, C.; Islam, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • LIBs are gaining immense attention among rechargeable battery systems. • HEVs and portables demand higher power and life than the conventional systems. • CNTs owing to their unique 1D structure can enhance performance of LIBs. • We report contemporary advancements in CNTs technology as applicable to LIBs. • CNTs-composite systems have also been reviewed. - Abstract: Portable-electronics epitomizing technological breakthrough in history of mankind, are universal reality thanks to rechargeable batteries. LIBs, lithium-ion batteries, owing to high-reversible capacity, high-power capability, good-safety, long-life and zero-memory effects are at the heart of this revolution. Nonetheless, longer-battery-life, higher-current- and power-density, better-safety, and flexibility, crucial for portables and hybrid-electric-vehicles further fuel the research to better their electrochemistry. Electrode materials are vital for performance of batteries. Recent developments in nanoscience and nanotechnology offer potential prospects to devise novel-nanostructured electrode materials for next-generation better-performing LIBs. Nanostructured materials are pivotal to these progresses due to their manageable surface-area, stunted mass and charge-diffusion span, and volume change acclimatization during charging/discharging. CNTs, carbon-nanotubes, with distinct 1D-tubular structure, excellent electrical and thermal conductivities, mechanical flexibility and significantly large surface-area, are considered ideal additives to enrich electrodes’ chemistry. Here, we observe contemporary developments in synthesis and characterization of CNTs and CNTs-based nanostructured composite-electrodes for utilization in LIBs.

  1. Specificity of mutations induced by carbon ions in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuo, Youichirou; Nishijima, Shigehiro; Hase, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Ayako; Tanaka, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kikuo

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the nature of mutations induced by accelerated ions in eukaryotic cells, the effects of carbon-ion irradiation were compared with those of γ-ray irradiation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutational effect and specificity of carbon-ion beams were studied in the URA3 gene of the yeast. Our experiments showed that the carbon ions generated more than 10 times the number of mutations induced by γ-rays, and that the types of base changes induced by carbon ions include transversions (68.7%), transitions (13.7%) and deletions/insertions (17.6%). The transversions were mainly G:C → T:A, and all the transitions were G:C → A:T. In comparison with the surrounding sequence context of mutational base sites, the C residues in the 5'-AC(A/T)-3' sequence were found to be easily changed. Large deletions and duplications were not observed, whereas ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana were mainly short deletions and rearrangements. The remarkable feature of yeast mutations induced by carbon ions was that the mutation sites were localized near the linker regions of nucleosomes, whereas mutations induced by γ-ray irradiation were located uniformly throughout the gene

  2. Specificity of mutations induced by carbon ions in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuo, Youichirou [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishijima, Shigehiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hase, Yoshihiro [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sakamoto, Ayako [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Tanaka, Atsushi [Radiation-Applied Biology Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Watanuki-machi 1233, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Shimizu, Kikuo [Radioisotope Research Center, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-4, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: shimizu@rirc.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the nature of mutations induced by accelerated ions in eukaryotic cells, the effects of carbon-ion irradiation were compared with those of {gamma}-ray irradiation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutational effect and specificity of carbon-ion beams were studied in the URA3 gene of the yeast. Our experiments showed that the carbon ions generated more than 10 times the number of mutations induced by {gamma}-rays, and that the types of base changes induced by carbon ions include transversions (68.7%), transitions (13.7%) and deletions/insertions (17.6%). The transversions were mainly G:C {sup {yields}} T:A, and all the transitions were G:C {sup {yields}} A:T. In comparison with the surrounding sequence context of mutational base sites, the C residues in the 5'-AC(A/T)-3' sequence were found to be easily changed. Large deletions and duplications were not observed, whereas ion-induced mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana were mainly short deletions and rearrangements. The remarkable feature of yeast mutations induced by carbon ions was that the mutation sites were localized near the linker regions of nucleosomes, whereas mutations induced by {gamma}-ray irradiation were located uniformly throughout the gene.

  3. Comparison of the Raman spectra of ion irradiated soot and collected extraterrestrial carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetto, R.; Pino, T.; Dartois, E.; Cao, A.-T.; d'Hendecourt, L.; Strazzulla, G.; Bréchignac, Ph.

    2009-03-01

    We use a low pressure flame to produce soot by-products as possible analogues of the carbonaceous dust present in diverse astrophysical environments, such as circumstellar shells, diffuse interstellar medium, planetary disks, as well as in our own Solar System. Several soot samples, displaying an initial chemical diversity from aromatic to aliphatic dominated material, are irradiated with 200-400 keV H +, He +, and Ar ++ ions, with fluences comprised between 10 14 and 10 16 ions/cm 2, to simulate expected radiation induced modification on extraterrestrial carbon. The evolution of the samples is monitored using Raman spectroscopy, before, during, and after irradiation. A detailed analysis of the first- and second-order Raman spectra is performed, using a fitting combination of Lorentzian and/or Gaussian-shaped bands. Upon irradiation, the samples evolve toward an amorphous carbon phase. The results suggest that the observed variations are more related to vacancy formation than ionization processes. A comparison with Raman spectra of extraterrestrial organic matter and other irradiation experiments of astrophysically relevant carbonaceous materials is presented. The results are consistent with previous experiments showing mostly amorphization of various carbonaceous materials. Irradiated soots have Raman spectra similar to those of some meteorites, IDPs, and Comet Wild 2 grains collected by the Stardust mission. Since the early-Sun expected irradiation fluxes sufficient for amorphization are compatible with accretion timescales, our results support the idea that insoluble organic matter (IOM) observed in primitive meteorites has experienced irradiation-induced amorphization prior to the accretion of the parent bodies, emphasizing the important role played by early solar nebula processing.

  4. Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granja, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz; Opalka, Lukas [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Martisikova, Maria; Gwosch, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jakubek, Jan [Advacam, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-07-07

    Imaging in ion beam therapy is an essential and increasingly significant tool for treatment planning and radiation and dose deposition verification. Efforts aim at providing precise radiation field characterization and online monitoring of radiation dose distribution. A review is given of the research and methodology of quantum-imaging, composition, spectral and directional characterization of the mixed-radiation fields in proton and light ion beam therapy developed by the IEAP CTU Prague and HIT Heidelberg group. Results include non-invasive imaging of dose deposition and primary beam online monitoring.

  5. Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granja, Carlos; Opalka, Lukas; Martisikova, Maria; Gwosch, Klaus; Jakubek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Imaging in ion beam therapy is an essential and increasingly significant tool for treatment planning and radiation and dose deposition verification. Efforts aim at providing precise radiation field characterization and online monitoring of radiation dose distribution. A review is given of the research and methodology of quantum-imaging, composition, spectral and directional characterization of the mixed-radiation fields in proton and light ion beam therapy developed by the IEAP CTU Prague and HIT Heidelberg group. Results include non-invasive imaging of dose deposition and primary beam online monitoring.

  6. Effects of ion beam bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto tungsten carbide and tool steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awazu, Kaoru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki [Industrial Research Inst. of Ishikawa (Japan); Watanabe, Hiroshi [Gakushuin Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Iwaki, Masaya; Guzman, L [RIKEN, Saitama (Japan)

    1992-04-15

    A study was made of the effects of argon ion bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto WC and tool steels. Carbon thin film deposition was performed at various temperatures ranging from 200degC to 350degC, using C{sub 6}H{sub 6} gas. Argon ion beam bombardment of the films was carried out at an energy of 150 keV with a dose of 1x10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2}. The hardness and adhesion of the films were measured by means of Knoop hardness and scratch tests respectively. The structure of the carbon films was estimated by laser Raman spectroscopy, and the relations were investigated between the mechanical properties and the structure of the films. The hardness of carbon thin films increases as their deposition temperature decreases; this tendency corresponds to the increase in amorphous structure estimated by Raman spectra. Argon ion bombardment results in constant hardness and fraction of amorphous structure. Argon ion beam bombardment of films prior to additional carbon deposition may cause the adhesion of the subsequently deposited films to improve. It is concluded that argon ion beam bombardment is useful for improving the properties of carbon films deposited onto WC and tool steels. (orig.).

  7. Effects of ion beam bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto tungsten carbide and tool steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awazu, Kaoru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Iwaki, Masaya; Guzman, L.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made of the effects of argon ion bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto WC and tool steels. Carbon thin film deposition was performed at various temperatures ranging from 200degC to 350degC, using C 6 H 6 gas. Argon ion beam bombardment of the films was carried out at an energy of 150 keV with a dose of 1x10 16 ions cm -2 . The hardness and adhesion of the films were measured by means of Knoop hardness and scratch tests respectively. The structure of the carbon films was estimated by laser Raman spectroscopy, and the relations were investigated between the mechanical properties and the structure of the films. The hardness of carbon thin films increases as their deposition temperature decreases; this tendency corresponds to the increase in amorphous structure estimated by Raman spectra. Argon ion bombardment results in constant hardness and fraction of amorphous structure. Argon ion beam bombardment of films prior to additional carbon deposition may cause the adhesion of the subsequently deposited films to improve. It is concluded that argon ion beam bombardment is useful for improving the properties of carbon films deposited onto WC and tool steels. (orig.)

  8. Dependence of the bystander effect for micronucleus formation on dose of heavy-ion radiation in normal human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Aoki-Nakano, Mizuho; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Wada, Seiichi; Kakizaki, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    Ionising radiation-induced bystander effects are well recognised, but its dependence on dose or linear energy transfer (LET) is still a matter of debate. To test this, 49 sites in confluent cultures of AG01522D normal human fibroblasts were targeted with microbeams of carbon (103 keV μm -1 ), neon (375 keV μm -1 ) and argon ions (1260 keV μm -1 ) and evaluated for the bystander-induced formation of micronucleus that is a kind of a chromosome aberration. Targeted exposure to neon and argon ions significantly increased the micronucleus frequency in bystander cells to the similar extent irrespective of the particle numbers per site of 1- 6. In contrast, the bystander micronucleus frequency increased with increasing the number of carbon-ion particles in a range between 1 and 3 particles per site and was similar in a range between 3 and 8 particles per site. These results suggest that the bystander effect of heavy ions for micronucleus formation depends on dose. (authors)

  9. Geant4 simulation of clinical proton and carbon ion beams for the treatment of ocular melanomas with the full 3-D pencil beam scanning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, Edoardo; Riccardi, Cristina; Rimoldi, Adele; Tamborini, Aurora [University of Pavia and the INFN section of Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Piersimoni, Pierluigi [Division of Radiation Research, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Ciocca, Mario [Medical Physics Unit, CNAO Foundation, Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates the possibility to use carbon ion beams delivered with active scanning modality, for the treatment of ocular melanomas at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) in Pavia. The radiotherapy with carbon ions offers many advantages with respect to the radiotherapy with protons or photons, such as a higher relative radio-biological effectiveness (RBE) and a dose release better localized to the tumor. The Monte Carlo (MC) Geant4 10.00 patch-03 toolkit is used to reproduce the complete CNAO extraction beam line, including all the active and passive components characterizing it. The simulation of proton and carbon ion beams and radiation scanned field is validated against CNAO experimental data. For the irradiation study of the ocular melanoma an eye-detector, representing a model of a human eye, is implemented in the simulation. Each element of the eye is reproduced with its chemical and physical properties. Inside the eye-detector a realistic tumor volume is placed and used as the irradiation target. A comparison between protons and carbon ions eye irradiations allows to study possible treatment benefits if carbon ions are used instead of protons. (authors)

  10. Study on regeneration of activated carbon by means of electron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Guanghua; Arai, H.; Hosono, M.

    1991-01-01

    The results of regeneration of activated carbon adsorbing sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) by 2 MeV electron radiation, and the dependence of the regeneration rate of activated carbon on the electron current intensity, the temperature of sample and the atmosphere were reported. It is shown that regeneration of activated carbon by electron radiation is full of promise

  11. Gamma radiation damage in pixelated detector based on carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva, A.; Pinnera, I.; Leyva, D.; Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the possible gamma radiation damage in high pixelated based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes detectors, grown on two different substrata, when it is operating in aggressive radiational environments. The radiation damage in displacements per atom (dpa) terms were calculated using the MCCM algorithm, which takes into account the McKinley-Feshbach approach with the Kinchin-Pease approximation for the damage function. Was observed that with increasing of the gamma energy the displacement total number grows monotonically reaching values of 0.39 displacements for a 10 MeV incident photon. The profiles of point defects distributions inside the carbon nanotube pixel linearly rise with depth, increasing its slope with photon energy. In the 0.1 MeV - 10 MeV studied energy interval the electron contribution to the total displacement number become higher than the positron ones, reaching this last one a maximum value of 12% for the 10 MeV incident photons. Differences between the calculation results for the two used different substrata were not observed. (Author)

  12. Reduction in life span on normal human fibroblasts exposed to low-dose radiation in heavy-ion radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masao; Yamaguchi, Chizuru; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Uchihori, Yukio; Fujitaka, Kazunobu

    2003-01-01

    We studied the effect of in vitro life span in normal human fibroblasts exposed to chronically low-dose radiation in heavy-ion radiation field. Cells were cultured in a CO 2 incubator, which was set in the irradiation room for biological study of heavy ions in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), and exposed to scattered radiations produced with heavy-ion beams throughout the life span of the cell population. Absorbed dose, which was measured using a thermoluminescence dosimeter(TLD) and a Si-semiconductor detector, was to be 1.4 mGy per day when operating the HIMAC machine for biological experiments. The total population doubling number of the exposed cells reduced to 79-93% of non-exposed control cells in the three independent experiments. There is evidence that the exposure of chronically low-dose radiation in heavy-ion radiation field promotes the life-span reduction in cellular level. (author)

  13. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.B., E-mail: ahmad.rabilal@gmail.com [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McNeill, F.E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Byun, S.H., E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Prestwich, W.V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Seymour, C., E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Mothersill, C.E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced 'bystander effects' studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} H{sup +}/cm{sup 2} s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}, and 35 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps for wavelengths of 280 {+-} 5 nm, 320 {+-} 5 nm and 340 {+-} 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a 'damage cross section' of the order of 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  14. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeff, Marca M.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard

    1995-01-01

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  15. Change of chemical bond and wettability of polylacticacid implanted with high-flux carbon ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jizhong; Kang Jiachen; Zhang Xiaoji; Zhou Hongyu

    2008-01-01

    Polylacticacid (PLA) was submitted to high-flux carbon ion implantation with energy of 40 keV. It was investigated to the effect of ion fluence (1 x 10 12 -1 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 ) on the properties of the polymer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), wettability, and roughness were employed to study change of structure and properties of the as-implanted PLA samples. Six carbon bonds, that is, C, C-H, C-O-C, C-O, O-C-O, and >C=O, were observed on surfaces of the as-implanted PLA samples. The intensities of various chemical bonds changed with increasing ion fluence. AFM images displayed that there was irradiation damage and that it was related closely with ion fluence. At fluence as high as 1 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 surface-restructuring phenomenum took place on the surface of the PLA. Wettability was also affected by the variation on the fluence. With increasing ion fluence, the water contact angle of the as-implanted PLA samples changed gradually reaching a maximum of 76.5 deg. with 1 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . The experimental results revealed that carbon ion fluence strongly affected surface chemical bond, morphology, wettability, and roughness of the PLA samples

  16. Electrochemical performances and capacity fading behaviors of activated carbon/hard carbon lithium ion capacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xianzhong; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Wenjie; Wang, Kai; Li, Chen; Li, Zhao; Ma, Yanwei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Three-electrode pouch cell is used to investigate the capacity fading of AC/HC LIC. • the electrode potential swing is critical for the cycleability of a LIC cell. • Different capacity fading behaviors are discussed. • A large-capacity LIC pouch cell has been assembled with a specific energy of 18.1 Wh kg −1 based on the total weight. - Abstract: Lithium ion capacitor (LIC) is one of the most promising electrochemical energy storage devices, which offers rapid charging-discharging capability and long cycle life. We have fabricated LIC pouch cells using an electrochemically-driven lithium pre-doping method through a three-electrode pouch cell structure. The active materials of cathode and anode of LIC cell are activated carbon and pre-lithiated hard carbon, respectively. The electrochemical performances and the capacity fading behaviors of LICs in the voltage range of 2.0 − 4.0 V have been studied. The specific energy and specific power reach 73.6 Wh kg −1 and 11.9 kW kg −1 based on the weight of the active materials in both cathode and anode, respectively. Since the cycling performance is actually determined by hard carbon anode, the anode potential swings are emphasized. The capacity fading of LIC upon cycling is proposed to be caused by the increases of internal resistance and the consumption of lithium stored in anode. Finally, a large-capacity LIC pouch cell has been assembled with a maximum specific energy of 18.1 Wh kg −1 and a maximum specific power of 3.7 kW kg −1 based on the weight of the whole cell.

  17. Radiation grafting of methacrylate onto carbon nanofiber surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evora, M.C.; Klosterman, D.; Lafdi, K.; Li, L.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation can be used to modify and improve the properties of materials. Electron beam irradiation has potential application in modifying the structure of carbon fibers in order to produce useful defects in the graphite structure and create reactive sites. In this study, vapor grown carbon nano fibers (VGCF) were irradiated with a high energy (3 MeV) electron beam in air to dose of 1000 kGy to create active sites and added to methyl methacrylate (MMA) dissolved in water/methanol (50% V). The irradiated samples were analyzed by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy to assess the impact on surface and bulk properties. Oxygen was readily incorporated enhancing the dispersion of VGCF. Raman spectroscopy analyses indicated that the sample irradiated and preirradiated grafted sample with MMA had the intensity ratio increased. (author)

  18. Microporous carbon derived from polyaniline base as anode material for lithium ion secondary battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Enhui; Huang, Zhengzheng; Shen, Haijie; Tian, Yingying; Xiao, Chengyi; Yang, Jingjing; Mao, Zhaohui

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Nitrogen-containing microporous carbon was prepared from polyaniline base by K 2 CO 3 activation, and used as anode material for lithium ion secondary battery. → K 2 CO 3 activation promotes the formation of amorphous and microporous structure. → High nitrogen content, and large surface area with micropores lead to strong intercalation between carbon and lithium ion, and thus improve the lithium storage capacity. -- Abstract: Microporous carbon with large surface area was prepared from polyaniline base using K 2 CO 3 as an activating agent. The physicochemical properties of the carbon were characterized by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, elemental analyses and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement. The electrochemical properties of the microporous carbon as anode material in lithium ion secondary battery were evaluated. The first discharge capacity of the microporous carbon was 1108 mAh g -1 , whose first charge capacity was 624 mAh g -1 , with a coulombic efficiency of 56.3%. After 20 cycling tests, the microporous carbon retains a reversible capacity of 603 mAh g -1 at a current density of 100 mA g -1 . These results clearly demonstrated the potential role of microporous carbon as anode for high capacity lithium ion secondary battery.

  19. Poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mingxin; Qiu, Guannan; Song, Weiping

    2010-02-01

    Utilization of poultry litter as a precursor material to manufacture activated carbon for treating heavy metal-contaminated water is a value-added strategy for recycling the organic waste. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to investigate kinetics, isotherms, and capacity of poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water. It was revealed that poultry litter-based activated carbon possessed significantly higher adsorption affinity and capacity for heavy metals than commercial activated carbons derived from bituminous coal and coconut shell. Adsorption of metal ions onto poultry litter-based carbon was rapid and followed Sigmoidal Chapman patterns as a function of contact time. Adsorption isotherms could be described by different models such as Langmuir and Freundlich equations, depending on the metal species and the coexistence of other metal ions. Potentially 404 mmol of Cu2+, 945 mmol of Pb2+, 236 mmol of Zn2+, and 250-300 mmol of Cd2+ would be adsorbed per kg of poultry litter-derived activated carbon. Releases of nutrients and metal ions from litter-derived carbon did not pose secondary water contamination risks. The study suggests that poultry litter can be utilized as a precursor material for economically manufacturing granular activated carbon that is to be used in wastewater treatment for removing heavy metals.

  20. Enhancement of SPHK1 in vitro by carbon ion irradiation in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higo, Morihiro; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Kawata, Tetsuya; Kato, Yoshikuni; Kouzu, Yukinao; Yamamoto, Nobuharu; Shibahara, Takahiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Ito, Hisao; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the gene expression changes in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells after carbon ion irradiation. Methods and Materials Three OSCC cell lines (HSC2, Ca9-22, and HSC3) were irradiated with accelerated carbon ion beams or X-rays using three different doses. The cellular sensitivities were determined by clonogenic survival assay. To identify genes the expression of which is influenced by carbon ion irradiation in a dose-dependent manner, we performed Affymetrix GeneChip analysis with HG-U133 plus 2.0 arrays containing 54,675 probe sets. The identified genes were analyzed using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool to investigate the functional network and gene ontology. Changes in mRNA expression in the genes were assessed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results We identified 98 genes with expression levels that were altered significantly at least twofold in each of the three carbon-irradiated OSCC cell lines at all dose points compared with nonirradiated control cells. Among these, SPHK1, the expression of which was significantly upregulated by carbon ion irradiation, was modulated little by X-rays. The function of SPHK1 related to cellular growth and proliferation had the highest p value (p = 9.25e-7 to 2.19e-2). Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed significantly elevated SPHK1 expression levels after carbon ion irradiation (p < 0.05), consistent with microarray data. Clonogenic survival assay indicated that carbon ion irradiation could induce cell death in Ca9-22 cells more effectively than X-rays. Conclusions Our findings suggest that SPHK1 helps to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and processes underlying the biologic response to carbon ion beams in OSCC

  1. Carbon ion irradiation induced surface modification of polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, A.; Chakraborty, V.; Dutta, R.K.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    Polypropylene was irradiated with 12 C ions of 3.6 and 5.4 MeV energies in the fluence range of 5x10 13 -5x10 14 ions/cm 2 using 3 MV tandem accelerator. Ion penetration was limited to a few microns and surface modifications were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. At the lowest ion fluence only blister formation of various sizes (1-6 μm) were observed, but at higher fluence (1x10 14 ions/cm 2 ) a three-dimensional network structure was found to form. A gradual degradation in the network structure was observed with further increase in the ion fluence. The dose dependence of the changes on surface morphology of polypropylene is discussed

  2. Carbon ion irradiation induced surface modification of polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, A. E-mail: abhijit@alpha.iuc.res.in; Chakraborty, V.; Dutta, R.K.; Chintalapudi, S.N

    2001-12-01

    Polypropylene was irradiated with {sup 12}C ions of 3.6 and 5.4 MeV energies in the fluence range of 5x10{sup 13}-5x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} using 3 MV tandem accelerator. Ion penetration was limited to a few microns and surface modifications were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. At the lowest ion fluence only blister formation of various sizes (1-6 {mu}m) were observed, but at higher fluence (1x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}) a three-dimensional network structure was found to form. A gradual degradation in the network structure was observed with further increase in the ion fluence. The dose dependence of the changes on surface morphology of polypropylene is discussed.

  3. Boron ion irradiation induced structural and surface modification of glassy carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalijadis, Ana; Jovanović, Zoran; Cvijović-Alagić, Ivana; Laušević, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of boron into glassy carbon was achieved by irradiating two different types of targets: glassy carbon polymer precursor and carbonized glassy carbon. Targets were irradiated with a 45 keV B 3+ ion beam in the fluence range of 5 × 10 15 –5 × 10 16 ions cm −2 . For both types of targets, the implanted boron was located in a narrow region under the surface. Following irradiation, the polymer was carbonized under the same condition as the glassy carbon samples (at 1273 K) and examined by Raman spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, hardness and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Structural analysis showed that during the carbonization process of the irradiated polymers, boron is substitutionally incorporated into the glassy carbon structure, while for irradiated carbonized glassy carbon samples, boron irradiation caused an increase of the sp 3 carbon fraction, which is most pronounced for the highest fluence irradiation. Further analyses showed that different nature of boron incorporation, and thus changed structural parameters, are crucial for obtaining glassy carbon samples with modified mechanical, chemical and electrochemical properties over a wide range

  4. Quantitative comparisons between experimentally measured 2-D carbon radiation and Monte Carlo impurity (MCI) code simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.E.; Leonard, A.W.; West, W.P.; Finkenthal, D.F.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Porter, G.D.

    1998-08-01

    Experimentally measured carbon line emissions and total radiated power distributions from the DIII-D divertor and Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) are compared to those calculated with the Monte Carlo Impurity (MCI) model. A UEDGE background plasma is used in MCI with the Roth and Garcia-Rosales (RG-R) chemical sputtering model and/or one of six physical sputtering models. While results from these simulations do not reproduce all of the features seen in the experimentally measured radiation patterns, the total radiated power calculated in MCI is in relatively good agreement with that measured by the DIII-D bolometric system when the Smith78 physical sputtering model is coupled to RG-R chemical sputtering in an unaltered UEDGE plasma. Alternatively, MCI simulations done with UEDGE background ion temperatures along the divertor target plates adjusted to better match those measured in the experiment resulted in three physical sputtering models which when coupled to the RG-R model gave a total radiated power that was within 10% of measured value

  5. Exposure to carbon ions triggers pro-inflammatory signals, changes in homeostasis and epidermal tissue organization to a similar extent as photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palma eSimoniello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing application of charged particles in radiotherapy requires a deeper understanding of early and late side effects occurring in skin, which is exposed in all radiation treatments. We measured cellular and molecular changes related to the early inflammatory response of human skin irradiated with carbon ions, in particular cell death induction and changes in differentiation and proliferation of epidermal cells during the first days after exposure.Model systems for human skin from healthy donors of different complexity, i.e. keratinocytes, co-culture of skin cells, 3D skin equivalent and skin explants, were used to investigate the alterations induced by carbon ions (spread-out Bragg-peak, dose averaged LET 100 keV/µm in comparison to X-ray and UV-B exposure. After exposure to ionizing radiation, in none of the model systems apoptosis/necrosis was observed. Carbon ions triggered inflammatory signalling and accelerated differentiation of keratinocytes to a similar extent as X-rays at the same doses. High doses of carbon ions were more effective than X-rays in reducing proliferation and inducing abnormal differentiation. In contrast, changes identified following low dose exposure (≤ 0.5 Gy were induced more effectively after X-ray exposure, i.e. enhanced proliferation and change in the polarity of basal cells.

  6. Energy and carbon balances in cheatgrass, an essay in autecology. [Shortwave radiation, radiowave radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinds, W.T.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment to determine the fates of energy and carbon in cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) was carried out on steep (40/sup 0/) north- and south-facing slopes on a small earth mound, using many small lysimeters to emulate swards of cheatgrass. Meteorological conditions and energy fluxes that were measured included air and soil temperatures, relative humidity, wind speed, incoming shortwave radiation, net all-wave radiation, heat flux to the soil, and evaporation and transpiration separately. The fate of photosynthetically fixed carbon during spring growth was determined by analysis of the plant tissues into mineral nutrients, crude protein, crude fat, crude fiber, and nitrogen-free extract (NFE) for roots, shoots, and seeds separately. (auth)

  7. Ion beam modification of solids ion-solid interaction and radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Wesch, Werner

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the method of ion beam modification of solids in realization, theory and applications in a comprehensive way. It provides a review of the physical basics of ion-solid interaction and on ion-beam induced structural modifications of solids. Ion beams are widely used to modify the physical properties of materials. A complete theory of ion stopping in matter and the calculation of the energy loss due to nuclear and electronic interactions are presented including the effect of ion channeling. To explain structural modifications due to high electronic excitations, different concepts are presented with special emphasis on the thermal spike model. Furthermore, general concepts of damage evolution as a function of ion mass, ion fluence, ion flux and temperature are described in detail and their limits and applicability are discussed. The effect of nuclear and electronic energy loss on structural modifications of solids such as damage formation, phase transitions and amorphization is reviewed for ins...

  8. Atmospheric ions and probable indirect biological effect of low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, Z.

    1984-01-01

    The problem is discussed of the health consequences of low radiation doses (of less than 0.01 Gy). Owing to natural radioactivity and cosmic radiation, ions are formed in the atmosphere which may thus indirectly mediate the effects of ionizing radiation on the organism. The rate of ion formation is approximately 6.1 ion pairs/cm 3 .s and their number will not exceed 10 3 ions/cm 3 . In an environment where artificial radioactive sources are used, the ion concentration may reach up to 10 5 ions/cm 3 . The effect of ions on man may be divided into several types: 1. effect on mental state (behaviour, fatigue, headaches); 2. effect on the cardiovascular system; 3. effect on the bronchial system;and 4. effect on physiological processes, e.g., secretion by endocrine glands. It is not yet known whether the biological effect of small (fast) ions is a function of their electric charge only or of their kinetic energy as well. The view is discussed that low radiation doses through indirect effects have favourable and beneficial influence on the human organism. (M.D.)

  9. Real-Time Online Monitoring of the Ion Range by Means of Prompt Secondary Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krimmer, J.; Balleyguier, L.; Caponetto, L.; Chen, X.; Dahoumane, M.; Dauvergne, D.; De Rydt, M.; Dedes, G.; Della Negra, R.; Deng, S.M.; Ley, J.L.; Mathez, H.; Pinto, M.; Ray, C.; Richard, M.H.; Reithinger, V.; Roellinghoff, F.; Testa, E.; Zoccarato, Y.; Baudot, J.; Winter, M.; Brons, S.; Chabot, M.; Force, P.; Joly, B.; Insa, C.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L.; Magne, M.; Montarou, G.; Freud, N.; Letang, J.M.; Lojacono, X.; Maxim, V.; Prostk, R.; Herault, J.; La Tessa, C.; Pleskac, R.; Vanstalle, M.; Parodi, K.; Prieels, D.; Smeets, J.; Rinaldi, I.

    2013-06-01

    Prompt secondary radiations such as gamma rays and protons can be used for ion-range monitoring during ion therapy either on an energy-slice basis or on a pencil-beam basis. We present a review of the ongoing activities in terms of detector developments, imaging, experimental and theoretical physics issues concerning the correlation between the physical dose and hadronic processes. (authors)

  10. To the problem on a charge state of energetic ions of radiation belts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panasyuk, M.I.

    1980-01-01

    Estimation of the effect of recharging processes upon formation of intensity maxima of radiation belt ions of different types is obtained as well as the ion charge states in the area of intensity maxima. Comparison of spatial position of intensity maxima of the H, He, C, O ions with the energies more than 1 MeV with the calculation results is presented. It provides the particle radial drift under the effect of sudden impulses and death at the expence of ionization losses. Application of adiabaticity criterion of the particle movement to the analysis of position of outer edge of radiation belt of heavy ions permitted to carry out estimation of the He, C, O ion charge state. He ions with the energy more than 1 MeV possess mainly the charge state of +2, C and O ions with the energy of several MeV over L=5-6 are in the ionized state almost completely, and during the drift into the depth of the belts the ion charge decreases to 3-4 over L approximately 3.5 with the energy increase. At the energies higher than several MeV the recharge processes are significant for the C and.O ions. For He ions with the energy higher 1 MeV and for H ions with more than 0.1 MeV the recharge role is not considerable

  11. The survival effects of V79 cells irradiated with carbon ions in different let

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jufang; Zhou Guangming; He Jing; Li Wenjian; Li Qiang; Dang Bingrong; Li Xinglin; Weng Xiaoqiong; Xie Hongmei; Wei Zengquan; Gao Qingxiang

    2001-01-01

    The survival of cultured Chinese V79 hamster cells irradiated with carbon ions with different LETs were investigated. Irradiation was performed at the heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). Results were compared with those obtained from the experiments with γ rats and could be concluded as follows: The survival curves for carbon ions showed as straight lines and were fitted to the one-target one-hit model, but for γ rays the curves with shoulders were fitted to the multi-target one-hit model. As the LETs were 125, 200 and 700 keV/μm for carbon ions, the inactivation cross section 35, 12 and 8 μm 2 , respectively, which suggested that under the experimental conditions, the lower the LET of carbon ions, the more seriously the irradiation killed cells. In the case of 125 keV/μm, the RBEs of carbon ions at the 0.1 and 0.37 survival levels were 1.47 and 2.19 respectively

  12. Ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots for the detection of mercury ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yusha; Mei, Jing; Bai, Jianliang; Chen, Xu; Ren, Lili

    2018-05-01

    A novel ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots has been synthesized via bonding rhodamine B hydrazide to the carbon dots surface by an amide reaction. The ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor showed only a single blue fluorescence emission around 450 nm. While, as mercury ion was added, due to the open-ring of rhodamine moiety bonded on the CDs surface, the orange emission of the open-ring rhodamine would increase obviously according to the concentration of mercury ion, resulting in the distinguishable dual emissions at 450 nm and 575 nm under a single 360 excitation wavelength. Meanwhile, the ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon dots we prepared is more sensitive to qualitative and semi-quantitative detection of mercury ion in the range of 0–100 μM, because fluorescence changes gradually from blue to orange emission under 365 nm lamp with the increasing of mercury ion in the tested solution.

  13. Development of electronic clinical path for patients with H and N cancer treated with carbon ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisutani, Asuka; Okabe, Satsuki; Murakami, Masao; Kagawa, Kazufumi; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an electronic clinical path for patients with head and neck (H and N) tumor treated with carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) focusing on acute reactions of the oral mucosa and the skin. Between January and July, 2002, fifteen patients with H and N tumor had been treated with carbon ion radiotherapy including oral cavity in the RT fields. Acute reactions of the oral mucosa and the skin were analyzed together with face scales (FS) that is an indicator of quality of life obtained daily from patients during RT courses. Medical interventions including prescription for mucositis or dermatitis, nursing care, and changes of meal were also analyzed. Average period of being in hospital was 42.6±3.6 days and that of radiation was 27.0±1.9 days. Radiation mucositis appeared 5 days (10.8 GyE) after start of carbon ion RT, reached a maximum reaction at 20 days (Grade 1: 7%, Grade 2: 33%, Grade 3: 60%), and recovered less than Grade 1 at 44 days on average. Radiation dermatitis also appeared 8 days (18 GyE), reached a maximum at 33 days (Grade 1: 47%, Grade 2: 40%, Grade 3: 13%), and recovered less than Grade 1 at 51 days on average. Changes of FS showed deterioration 23 days after start of therapy. At the latter half of RT courses, mucositis, FS, and dermatitis reached a maximum in that order. Through analyses of the time-score plots, the change of FS seemed corresponding to that of dermatitis. The required medical interventions were change of meal in 10, analgesics in 8, and gargles in 15 patients. Based on these results, we established a clinical path as a trial piece. We confirmed that there was a specific pattern in ups and downs of acute reactions of the oral mucosa and the skin during a RT course. We concluded that a clinical path is useful for patients with H and N cancer treated with carbon ion RT. (author)

  14. Highly ordered three-dimensional macroporous carbon spheres for determination of heavy metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Jianming [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Yang, E-mail: yangl@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Huang, Hui [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Kang, Zhenhui, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres (MPCSs) were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPCS was covalently modified by cysteine (MPCS-CO-Cys). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPCS-CO-Cys was first time used in electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heavy metal ions such as Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} can be simultaneously determined. -- Abstract: An effective voltammetric method for detection of trace heavy metal ions using chemically modified highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres electrode surfaces is described. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were prepared by carbonization of glucose in silica crystal bead template, followed by removal of the template. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were covalently modified by cysteine, an amino acid with high affinities towards some heavy metals. The materials were characterized by physical adsorption of nitrogen, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. While the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of carbon spheres. High sensitivity was exhibited when this material was used in electrochemical detection (square wave anodic stripping voltammetry) of heavy metal ions due to the porous structure. And the potential application for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions was also investigated.

  15. Highly ordered three-dimensional macroporous carbon spheres for determination of heavy metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Jianming; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres (MPCSs) were prepared. ► MPCS was covalently modified by cysteine (MPCS–CO–Cys). ► MPCS–CO–Cys was first time used in electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. ► Heavy metal ions such as Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ can be simultaneously determined. -- Abstract: An effective voltammetric method for detection of trace heavy metal ions using chemically modified highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres electrode surfaces is described. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were prepared by carbonization of glucose in silica crystal bead template, followed by removal of the template. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were covalently modified by cysteine, an amino acid with high affinities towards some heavy metals. The materials were characterized by physical adsorption of nitrogen, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. While the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of carbon spheres. High sensitivity was exhibited when this material was used in electrochemical detection (square wave anodic stripping voltammetry) of heavy metal ions due to the porous structure. And the potential application for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions was also investigated.

  16. [Involvement of carbonate/bicarbonate ions in the superoxide-generating reaction of adrenaline autoxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, T V

    2015-01-01

    An important role of carbonate/bicarbonate ions has been recognized in the superoxide generating reaction of adrenaline autooxidation in an alkaline buffer (a model of quinoid adrenaline oxidation in the body). It is suggested that these ions are directly involved not only in formation of superoxide anion radical (О(2)(-)) but also other radicals derived from the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer. Using various buffers it was shown that the rate of accumulation of adrenochrome, the end product of adrenaline oxidation, and the rate of О(2)(-)· formation depend on concentration of carbonate/bicarbonate ions in the buffer and that these ions significantly accelerate adrenaline autooxidation thus demonstrating prooxidant properties. The detectable amount of diformazan, the product of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction, was significantly higher than the amount of adrenochrome formed; taking into consideration the literature data on О(2)(-)· detection by NBT it is suggested that adrenaline autooxidation is accompanied by one-electron reduction not only of oxygen dissolved in the buffer and responsible for superoxide formation but possible carbon dioxide also dissolved in the buffer as well as carbonate/bicarbonate buffer components leading to formation of corresponding radicals. The plots of the dependence of the inhibition of adrenochrome and diformazan formation on the superoxide dismutase concentration have shown that not only superoxide radicals are formed during adrenaline autooxidation. Since carbonate/bicarbonate ions are known to be universally present in the living nature, their involvement in free radical processes proceeding in the organism is discussed.

  17. Effect of ion concentrations on uranium absorption from sodium carbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traut, D.E.; El Hazek, N.M.T.; Palmer, G.R.; Nichols, I.L.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of various ion concentrations on uranium absorption from a sodium carbonate solution by a strong-base, anion resin was investigated in order to help assure an adequate uranium supply for future needs. The studies were conducted to improve the recovery of uranium from in situ leach solutions by ion exchange. The effects of carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride, and sulfate ions were examined. Relatively low (less than 5 g/l) concentrations of chloride, sulfate, and bicarbonate were found to be detrimental to the absorption of uranium. High (greater than 10 g/l) carbonate concentrations also adversely affected the uranium absorption. In addition, the effect of initial resin form was investigated in tests of the chloride, carbonate, and bicarbonate forms; resin form was shown to have no effect on the absorption of uranium

  18. Incidence Angle Effect of Energetic Carbon Ions on Deposition Rate, Topography, and Structure of Ultrathin Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the incidence angle of energetic carbon ions on the thickness, topography, and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) was examined in the context of numerical

  19. Correlation of radiative properties of rare earth ions (Pr and Nd ) in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    E3, ξ4f and α), spectral intensities (fexpt), Judd–Ofelt intensity parameters (Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6) and radiative life- times (τR) ... minimize self-focusing effects of laser radiation (Weber. 1990 ..... for Pr3+ ion there is much variation in both Ω2 and Ω6.

  20. ''Atomic'' Bremsstrahlung or polarizational radiation in collision of many-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Solov'yov, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    In this work the so-called ''Atomic'' bremsstrahlung (AB) or polarizational radiation, created in collisions of atoms or ions, is discussed. This kind of radiation arises due to the polarization of the electron shell of colliding particles. It is created by the structured projectiles and targets if the constituents are electrically charged. 6 refs, 2 figs

  1. Suppression of X-radiation from 2 MeV ion electrostatic accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignat'ev, I.G.; Miroshnichenko, V.I.; Sirenko, A.M.; Storizhko, V.E.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents results concerning studies of X-radiation from 2 MeV ion electrostatic accelerator 'Sokol' used for nuclear microprobe analysis. The radiation protection system of the accelerator was developed and tested. Tests of the system of the accelerator show that it reduces doses rate by two orders of magnitude

  2. Successive ionization of positive ions of carbon and nitrogen by electron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donets, E.D.; Ilyushchenko, V.I.

    Experimental studies of deep ionization of heavy ions are described. The applications of such studies in atomic physics, plasma physics and space physics are discussed. Investigations using intersecting ion-electron beams, shifted beams and ion trap sources are described, and data are presented for multi-charged ions of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen. A detailed description of the development of the IEL (electron beam ionizer) source, and the KRION (cryogenic version) source is given, and further data for the multiple ionization of carbon and nitrogen are given for charge states up to C 6+ and N 7+ . The advantages and disadvantages of the KRION source are discussed, and preliminary studies of a new torroidal ion trap source (HIRAC) are presented. (11 figs, 57 refs) (U.S.)

  3. Detection of Sn(II) ions via quenching of the fluorescence of carbon nanodots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Yazid, S.N.A.; Chin, S.F.; Pang, S.C.; Ng, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report that fluorescent carbon nanodots (C-dots) can act as an optical probe for quantifying Sn(II) ions in aqueous solution. C-dots are synthesized by carbonization and surface oxidation of preformed sago starch nanoparticles. Their fluorescence is significantly quenched by Sn(II) ions, and the effect can be used to determine Sn(II) ions. The highest fluorescence intensity is obtained at a concentration of 1.75 mM of C-dots in aqueous solution. The probe is highly selective and hardly interfered by other ions. The quenching mechanism appears to be predominantly of the static (rather than dynamic) type. Under optimum conditions, there is a linear relationship between fluorescence intensity and Sn(II) ions concentration up to 4 mM, and with a detection limit of 0.36 μM. (author)

  4. Effects of ion beam irradiation on the microstructures and strengths of different carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo; Kurumada, Akira; Kawamata, Kiyohiro; Inagaki, Michio

    1998-01-01

    The high energy argon ion was irradiated to different carbon fibers with various microstructures. The cross-sectional structures and strengths properties have been evaluated before and after ion irradiation. As a result, the diameter of fibers decreased due to ion irradiation, except for the fiber with dual structure. The tensile strength also decreased due to ion irradiation, except for fibers which were not heat-treated. This suggests that it is necessary to consider not only the defects in the vertical cross-section but also changes in defect structures in the axial direction. The results of computer simulation indicated that argon ion with 175MeV/1μA produced homogeneous defects in the carbon fibers with the diameter of about 20 μm. (author)

  5. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate - sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na 2 CO 3 -0.5 N NaHCO 3 ) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/1 uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluant (5 % NaCl-0.5 % Na 2 CO 3 ). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased. (author)

  6. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate-sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na 2 CO 3 -0.5 N NaHCO 3 ) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/l uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluent (5% NaCl-0.5% Na 2 CO 3 ). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased. (author)

  7. Object kinetic Monte Carlo model for neutron and ion irradiation in tungsten: Impact of transmutation and carbon impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castin, N.; Bonny, G.; Bakaev, A.; Ortiz, C. J.; Sand, A. E.; Terentyev, D.

    2018-03-01

    We upgrade our object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model, aimed at describing the microstructural evolution in tungsten (W) under neutron and ion irradiation. Two main improvements are proposed based on recently published atomistic data: (a) interstitial carbon impurities, and their interaction with radiation-induced defects (point defect clusters and loops), are more accurately parameterized thanks to ab initio findings; (b) W transmutation to rhenium (Re) upon neutron irradiation, impacting the diffusivity of radiation defects, is included, also relying on recent atomistic data. These essential amendments highly improve the portability of our OKMC model, providing a description for the formation of SIA-type loops under different irradiation conditions. The model is applied to simulate neutron and ion irradiation in pure W samples, in a wide range of fluxes and temperatures. We demonstrate that it performs a realistic prediction of the population of TEM-visible voids and loops, as compared to experimental evidence. The impact of the transmutation of W to Re, and of carbon trapping, is assessed.

  8. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Shornikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  9. Upcycling of Packing-Peanuts into Carbon Microsheet Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etacheri, Vinodkumar; Hong, Chulgi Nathan; Pol, Vilas G

    2015-09-15

    Porous carbon microsheet anodes with Li-ion storage capacity exceeding the theoretical limit are for the first time derived from waste packing-peanuts. Crystallinity, surface area, and porosity of these 1 μm thick carbon sheets were tuned by varying the processing temperature. Anodes composed of the carbon sheets outperformed the electrochemical properties of commercial graphitic anode in Li-ion batteries. At a current density of 0.1 C, carbon microsheet anodes exhibited a specific capacity of 420 mAh/g, which is slightly higher than the theoretical capacity of graphite (372 mAh/g) in Li-ion half-cell configurations. At a higher rate of 1 C, carbon sheets retained 4-fold higher specific capacity (220 mAh/g) compared to those of commercial graphitic anode. After 100 charge-discharge cycles at current densities of 0.1 and 0.2 C, optimized carbon sheet anodes retained stable specific capacities of 460 and 370 mAh/g, respectively. Spectroscopic and microscopic investigations proved the structural integrity of these high-performance carbon anodes during numerous charge-discharge cycles. Considerably higher electrochemical performance of the porous carbon microsheets are endorsed to their disorderness that facilitate to store more Li-ions than the theoretical limit, and porous 2-D microstructure enabling fast solid-state Li-ion diffusion and superior interfacial kinetics. The work demonstrated here illustrates an inexpensive and environmentally benign method for the upcycling of packaging materials into functional carbon materials for electrochemical energy storage.

  10. Modelling of radiation losses for ion acceleration at ultra-high laser intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capdessus Remi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation losses of charged particles can become important in ultra high intensity laser plasma interaction. This process is described by the radiation back reaction term in the electron equation of motion. This term is implemented in the relativistic particle-in-cell code by using a renormalized Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model. In the hole boring regime case of laser ion acceleration it is shown that radiation losses results in a decrease of the piston velocity.

  11. Surface modifications of polypropylene by high energy carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, A.; Chakraborty, V.; Dutta, R.K.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    Polypropylene was irradiated with 12 C ions of 3.6 and 5.4 MeV energies using 3 MV tandem accelerator. The surface modification was investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Optical changes were monitored by UV-VIS and FTIR spectroscopy. At the lowest ion fluence, only blister formation of various sizes (1-6 μm) was observed. Polymer when irradiated at a fluence of 1x10 14 ions/cm 2 exhibited a network structure. A comparative study on dose dependence of surface and bulk modification has been described. (author)

  12. Influence of ions on relativistic double layers radiation in astrophysical plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM Ahadi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As double layers (DLs are one of the most important acceleration mechanisms in space as well as in laboratory plasmas, they are studied from different points of view. In this paper, the emitted power and energy radiated from charged particles, accelerated in relativistic cosmic DLs are investigated. The effect of the presence of additional ions in a multi-species plasma, as a real example of astrophysical plasma, is also investigated. Considering the acceleration role of DLs, radiations from accelerated charged particles could be seen as a loss mechanism. These radiations are influenced directly by the additional ion species as well as their relative densities.

  13. Non-invasive monitoring of therapeutic carbon ion beams in a homogeneous phantom by tracking of secondary ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwosch, K.; Hartmann, B.; Jakubek, J.; Granja, C.; Soukup, P.; Jäkel, O.; Martišíková, M.

    2013-06-01

    Radiotherapy with narrow scanned carbon ion beams enables a highly accurate treatment of tumours while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. Changes in the patient’s geometry can alter the actual ion range in tissue and result in unfavourable changes in the dose distribution. Consequently, it is desired to verify the actual beam delivery within the patient. Real-time and non-invasive measurement methods are preferable. Currently, the only technically feasible method to monitor the delivered dose distribution within the patient is based on tissue activation measurements by means of positron emission tomography (PET). An alternative monitoring method based on tracking of prompt secondary ions leaving a patient irradiated with carbon ion beams has been previously suggested. It is expected to help in overcoming the limitations of the PET-based technique like physiological washout of the beam induced activity, low signal and to allow for real-time measurements. In this paper, measurements of secondary charged particle tracks around a head-sized homogeneous PMMA phantom irradiated with pencil-like carbon ion beams are presented. The investigated energies and beam widths are within the therapeutically used range. The aim of the study is to deduce properties of the primary beam from the distribution of the secondary charged particles. Experiments were performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center, Germany. The directions of secondary charged particles emerging from the PMMA phantom were measured using an arrangement of two parallel pixelated silicon detectors (Timepix). The distribution of the registered particle tracks was analysed to deduce its dependence on clinically important beam parameters: beam range, width and position. Distinct dependencies of the secondary particle tracks on the properties of the primary carbon ion beam were observed. In the particular experimental set-up used, beam range differences of 1.3 mm were detectable. In addition, variations

  14. Rapid and controllable perforation of carbon nanotubes by microwave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojaghi, Neda; Mokhtarifar, Maryam; Sabaghian, Zahra; Arab, Hamed; Maghrebi, Morteza; Baniadam, Majid

    2018-05-01

    This study presents a new controlled approach to deep perforation of millimeter-long carbon nanotube arrays (CNTAs) by fast oxidative cutting. The approach is based on decorating CNTAs with silver (Ag) nanoparticles, followed by heating Ag-decorated CNTAs with microwave radiation (2.48 GHz, 300 W). The perforation was evaluated using different techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method. The results of the oxidation of carbonaceous materials indicated that the relative amount of oxygen functional groups increased without total oxidation of carbon up to 60 s. After 60 s, the amount of functional groups decreased as the total oxidation started suddenly. Afterwards, at around 120 and 420 s, the oxidation of Ag-decorated CNTAs reached the point of total perforation and total cutting, respectively. Though carbon decomposition terminated at around 420 s, the total pore volume and surface area increased continuously. This was attributed to the steady growth of Ag nanoparticles located between CNTAs.

  15. Brain Injury After Proton Therapy or Carbon Ion Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer and Skull Base Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyawaki, Daisuke; Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Sasaki, Ryohei; Niwa, Yasue; Terashima, Kazuki; Nishimura, Hideki; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of early delayed or late morbidity of Brain after particle therapy for skull base tumors and head-and-neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Between May 2001 and December 2005, 59 patients with cancerous invasion of the skull base were treated with proton or carbon ion therapy at the Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center. Adverse events were assessed according to the magnetic resonance imaging findings (late effects of normal tissue-subjective, objective, management, analytic [LENT-SOMA]) and symptoms (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [CTCAE], version 3.0). Dose-volume histograms were used to analyze the relationship between the dose and volume of the irradiated brain and the occurrence of brain injury. The median follow-up time was 33 months. Results: Of the 48 patients treated with proton therapy and 11 patients treated with carbon ion radiotherapy, 8 (17%) and 7 (64%), respectively, developed radiation-induced brain changes (RIBCs) on magnetic resonance imaging (LENT-SOMA Grade 1-3). Four patients (7%) had some clinical symptoms, such as vertigo and headache (CTCAE Grade 2) or epilepsy (CTCAE Grade 3). The actuarial occurrence rate of RIBCs at 2 and 3 years was 20% and 39%, respectively, with a significant difference in the incidence between the proton and carbon ion radiotherapy groups. The dose-volume histogram analyses revealed significant differences between Brain lobes with and without RIBCs in the actuarial volume of brain lobes receiving high doses. Conclusion: Particle therapies produced minimal symptomatic brain toxicities, but sequential evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging detected a greater incidence of RIBCs. Significant differences were observed in the irradiated brain volume between Brain lobes with and without RIBCs.

  16. Laboratory Spectroscopy of Large Carbon Molecules and Ions in Support of Space Missions. A New Generation of Laboratory & Space Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Tan, Xiaofeng; Cami, Jan; Biennier, Ludovic; Remy, Jerome

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important and ubiquitous component of carbon-bearing materials in space. A long-standing and major challenge for laboratory astrophysics has been to measure the spectra of large carbon molecules in laboratory environments that mimic (in a realistic way) the physical conditions that are associated with the interstellar emission and absorption regions [1]. This objective has been identified as one of the critical Laboratory Astrophysics objectives to optimize the data return from space missions [2]. An extensive laboratory program has been developed to assess the properties of PAHs in such environments and to describe how they influence the radiation and energy balance in space. We present and discuss the gas-phase electronic absorption spectra of neutral and ionized PAHs measured in the UV-Visible-NIR range in astrophysically relevant environments and discuss the implications for astrophysics [1]. The harsh physical conditions of the interstellar medium characterized by a low temperature, an absence of collisions and strong VUV radiation fields - have been simulated in the laboratory by associating a pulsed cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS) with a supersonic slit jet seeded with PAHs and an ionizing, penning-type, electronic discharge. We have measured for the {\\it first time} the spectra of a series of neutral [3,4] and ionized [5,6] interstellar PAHs analogs in the laboratory. An effort has also been attempted to quantify the mechanisms of ion and carbon nanoparticles production in the free jet expansion and to model our simulation of the diffuse interstellar medium in the laboratory [7]. These experiments provide {\\it unique} information on the spectra of free, large carbon-containing molecules and ions in the gas phase. We are now, for the first time, in the position to directly compare laboratory spectral data on free, cold, PAH ions and carbon nano-sized carbon particles with astronomical observations in the

  17. An activated microporous carbon prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin for lithium ion battery anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yinhai; Xiang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Enhui; Wu, Yuhu; Xie, Hui; Wu, Zhilian; Tian, Yingying

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Microporous carbon was prepared by chemical activation of phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin. ► Activation leads to high surface area, well-developed micropores. ► Micropores lead to strong intercalation between carbon and lithium ion. ► Large surface area promotes to improve the lithium storage capacity. -- Abstract: Microporous carbon anode materials were prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin by ZnCl 2 and KOH activation. The physicochemical properties of the obtained carbon materials were characterized by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller, and elemental analysis. The electrochemical properties of the microporous carbon as anode materials in lithium ion secondary batteries were evaluated. At a current density of 100 mA g −1 , the carbon without activation shows a first discharge capacity of 515 mAh g −1 . After activation, the capacity improved obviously. The first discharge capacity of the carbon prepared by ZnCl 2 and KOH activation was 1010 and 2085 mAh g −1 , respectively. The reversible capacity of the carbon prepared by KOH activation was still as high as 717 mAh g −1 after 20 cycles, which was much better than that activated by ZnCl 2 . These results demonstrated that it may be a promising candidate as an anode material for lithium ion secondary batteries.

  18. Modified granular activated carbon: A carrier for the recovery of nickel ions from aqueous wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satapathy, D.; Natarajan, G.S.; Sen, R. [Central Fuel Research Inst., Nagpur (India)

    2004-07-01

    Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) is widely used for the removal and recovery of toxic pollutants including metals because of its low cost and high affinity towards the scavenging of metal ions. Activated carbon derived from bituminous coal is preferred for wastewater treatment due to its considerable hardness, a characteristic needed to keep down handling losses during re-activation. Commercial grade bituminous coal based carbon, viz. Filtrasorb (F-400), was used in the present work. The scavenging of precious metals such as nickel onto GAC was studied and a possible attempt made to recover the adsorbed Ni{sup 2+} ions through the use of some suitable leaching processes. As part of the study, the role of complexing agents on the surface of the carbon was also investigated. The use of organic complexing agents such as oxine and 2-methyloxine in the recovery process was found to be promising. In addition, the surface of the carbon was modified with suitable oxidising agents that proved to be more effective than chelating agents. Several attempts were made to optimise the recovery of metal ions by carrying out experiments with oxidising agents in order to obtain maximum recovery from the minimum quantity of carbon. Experiments with nitric acid indicated that not only was the carbon surface modified but such modification also helped in carbon regeneration.

  19. Structural and optical properties of 70-keV carbon ion beam synthesized carbon nanoclusters in thermally grown silicon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poudel, P.R.; Poudel, P.P.; Paramo, J.A.; Strzhemechny, Y.M.; Rout, B.; McDaniel, F.D.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of carbon nanoclusters formed in thermally grown silicon dioxide film via the ion beam synthesis process have been investigated. A low-energy (70 keV) carbon ion beam (C - ) at a fluence of 3 x 10 17 atoms/cm 2 was used for implantation into a thermally grown silicon dioxide layer (500 nm thick) on a Si (100) wafer. Several parts of the implanted samples were subsequently annealed in a gas mixture (4 % H 2 + 96 % Ar) at 900 C for different time periods. The as-implanted and annealed samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The carbon ion implantation depth profile was simulated using a widely used Monte Carlo-based simulation code SRIM-2012. Additionally, the elemental depth profile of the implanted carbon along with host elements of silicon and oxygen were simulated using a dynamic ion-solid interaction code T-DYN, which incorporates the effects of the surface sputtering and gradual change in the elemental composition in the implanted layers due to high-fluence ion implantation. The elemental depth profile obtained from the XPS measurements matches closely to the T-DYN predictions. Raman measurements indicate the formation of graphitic phases in the annealed samples. The graphitic peak (G-peak) was found to be increased with the annealing time duration. In the sample annealed for 10 min, the sizes of the carbon nanoclusters were found to be 1-4 nm in diameter using TEM. The PL measurements at room temperature using a 325-nm laser show broad-band emissions in the ultraviolet to visible range in the as-implanted sample. Intense narrow bands along with the broad bands were observed in the annealed samples. The defects present in the as-grown samples along with carbon ion-induced defect centers in the as-implanted samples are the main contributors to the observed

  20. Structural and optical properties of 70-keV carbon ion beam synthesized carbon nanoclusters in thermally grown silicon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poudel, P.R. [University of North Texas, Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, Denton, TX (United States); Intel Corporation, Rio Rancho, NM (United States); Poudel, P.P. [University of Kentucky, Department of Chemistry, Lexington, KY (United States); Paramo, J.A.; Strzhemechny, Y.M. [Texas Christian University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Fort Worth, TX (United States); Rout, B. [University of North Texas, Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, Denton, TX (United States); University of North Texas, Center for Advanced Research and Technology, Denton, TX (United States); McDaniel, F.D. [University of North Texas, Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, Denton, TX (United States)

    2014-09-18

    The structural and optical properties of carbon nanoclusters formed in thermally grown silicon dioxide film via the ion beam synthesis process have been investigated. A low-energy (70 keV) carbon ion beam (C{sup -}) at a fluence of 3 x 10{sup 17} atoms/cm{sup 2} was used for implantation into a thermally grown silicon dioxide layer (500 nm thick) on a Si (100) wafer. Several parts of the implanted samples were subsequently annealed in a gas mixture (4 % H{sub 2} + 96 % Ar) at 900 C for different time periods. The as-implanted and annealed samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The carbon ion implantation depth profile was simulated using a widely used Monte Carlo-based simulation code SRIM-2012. Additionally, the elemental depth profile of the implanted carbon along with host elements of silicon and oxygen were simulated using a dynamic ion-solid interaction code T-DYN, which incorporates the effects of the surface sputtering and gradual change in the elemental composition in the implanted layers due to high-fluence ion implantation. The elemental depth profile obtained from the XPS measurements matches closely to the T-DYN predictions. Raman measurements indicate the formation of graphitic phases in the annealed samples. The graphitic peak (G-peak) was found to be increased with the annealing time duration. In the sample annealed for 10 min, the sizes of the carbon nanoclusters were found to be 1-4 nm in diameter using TEM. The PL measurements at room temperature using a 325-nm laser show broad-band emissions in the ultraviolet to visible range in the as-implanted sample. Intense narrow bands along with the broad bands were observed in the annealed samples. The defects present in the as-grown samples along with carbon ion-induced defect centers in the as-implanted samples are the main

  1. Advanced carbon materials/olivine LiFePO4 composites cathode for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chunli; Xue, Zhigang; Wen, Sheng; Ye, Yunsheng; Xie, Xiaolin

    2016-06-01

    In the past two decades, LiFePO4 has undoubtly become a competitive candidate for the cathode material of the next-generation LIBs due to its abundant resources, low toxicity and excellent thermal stability, etc. However, the poor electronic conductivity as well as low lithium ion diffusion rate are the two major drawbacks for the commercial applications of LiFePO4 especially in the power energy field. The introduction of highly graphitized advanced carbon materials, which also possess high electronic conductivity, superior specific surface area and excellent structural stability, into LiFePO4 offers a better way to resolve the issue of limited rate performance caused by the two obstacles when compared with traditional carbon materials. In this review, we focus on advanced carbon materials such as one-dimensional (1D) carbon (carbon nanotubes and carbon fibers), two-dimensional (2D) carbon (graphene, graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide) and three-dimensional (3D) carbon (carbon nanotubes array and 3D graphene skeleton), modified LiFePO4 for high power lithium ion batteries. The preparation strategies, structure, and electrochemical performance of advanced carbon/LiFePO4 composite are summarized and discussed in detail. The problems encountered in its application and the future development of this composite are also discussed.

  2. Enhanced Lithium- and Sodium-Ion Storage in an Interconnected Carbon Network Comprising Electronegative Fluorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok-Min; Etacheri, Vinodkumar; Hong, Chulgi Nathan; Choi, Seung Wan; Lee, Ki Bong; Pol, Vilas G

    2017-06-07

    Fluorocarbon (C x F y ) anode materials were developed for lithium- and sodium-ion batteries through a facile one-step carbonization of a single precursor, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). Interconnected carbon network structures were produced with doped fluorine in high-temperature carbonization at 500-800 °C. The fluorocarbon anodes derived from the PVDF precursor showed higher reversible discharge capacities of 735 mAh g -1 and 269 mAh g -1 in lithium- and sodium-ion batteries, respectively, compared to the commercial graphitic carbon. After 100 charge/discharge cycles, the fluorocarbon showed retentions of 91.3% and 97.5% in lithium (at 1C) and sodium (at 200 mA g -1 ) intercalation systems, respectively. The effects of carbonization temperature on the electrochemical properties of alkali metal ion storage were thoroughly investigated and documented. The specific capacities in lithium- and sodium-ion batteries were dependent on the fluorine content, indicating that the highly electronegative fluorine facilitates the insertion/extraction of lithium and sodium ions in rechargeable batteries.

  3. Performance of Novel Randomly Oriented High Graphene Carbon in Lithium Ion Capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul S. Kadam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of carbon material comprising the anode is the key to the performance of a lithium ion capacitor. In addition to determining the capacity, the structure of the carbon material also determines the diffusion rate of the lithium ion into the anode which in turn controls power density which is vital in high rate applications. This paper covers details of systematic investigation of the performance of a structurally novel carbon, called Randomly Oriented High Graphene (ROHG carbon, and graphite in a high rate application device, that is, lithium ion capacitor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows that ROHG is less resistive and has faster lithium ion diffusion rates (393.7 × 10−3 S·s(1/2 compared to graphite (338.1 × 10−3 S·s(1/2. The impedance spectroscopy data is supported by the cell data showing that the ROHG carbon based device has energy density of 22.8 Wh/l with a power density of 4349.3 W/l, whereas baseline graphite based device has energy density of 5 Wh/l and power density of 4243.3 W/l. This data clearly shows advantage of the randomly oriented graphene platelet structure of ROHG in lithium ion capacitor performance.

  4. Semiconductors Under Ion Radiation: Ultrafast Electron-Ion Dynamics in Perfect Crystals and the Effect of Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Wei; Schleife, André

    Stability and safety issues have been challenging difficulties for materials and devices under radiation such as solar panels in outer space. On the other hand, radiation can be utilized to modify materials and increase their performance via focused-ion beam patterning at nano-scale. In order to grasp the underlying processes, further understanding of the radiation-material and radiation-defect interactions is required and inevitably involves the electron-ion dynamics that was traditionally hard to capture. By applying Ehrenfest dynamics based on time-dependent density functional theory, we have been able to perform real-time simulation of electron-ion dynamics in MgO and InP/GaP. By simulating a high-energy proton penetrating the material, the energy gain of electronic system can be interpreted as electronic stopping power and the result is compared to existing data. We also study electronic stopping in the vicinity of defects: for both oxygen vacancy in MgO and interface of InP/GaP superlattice, electronic stopping shows strong dependence on the velocity of the proton. To study the energy transfer from electronic system to lattice, simulations of about 100 femto-seconds are performed and we analyze the difference between Ehrenfest and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

  5. Mesoporous activated carbon from corn stalk core for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Li, Chun; Qi, Hui; Yu, Kaifeng; Liang, Ce

    2018-04-01

    A novel mesoporous activated carbon (AC) derived from corn stalk core is prepared via a facile and effective method which including the decomposition and carbonization of corn stalk core under an inert gas atmosphere and further activation process with KOH solution. The mesoporous activated carbon (AC) is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements. These biomass waste derived from activated carbon is proved to be promising anode materials for high specific capacity lithium ion batteries. The activated carbon anode possesses excellent reversible capacity of 504 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at 0.2C. Compared with the unactivated carbon (UAC), the electrochemical performance of activated carbon is significantly improved due to its mesoporous structure.

  6. Carbon nanotube: nanodiamond Li-ion battery cathodes with increased thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Ruben; Lee, Eungiee; Shevchenko, Elena V.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-10-01

    Prevention of excess heat accumulation within the Li-ion battery cells is a critical design consideration for electronic and photonic device applications. Many existing approaches for heat removal from batteries increase substantially the complexity and overall weight of the battery. Some of us have previously shown a possibility of effective passive thermal management of Li-ion batteries via improvement of thermal conductivity of cathode and anode material1. In this presentation, we report the results of our investigation of the thermal conductivity of various Li-ion cathodes with incorporated carbon nanotubes and nanodiamonds in different layered structures. The cathodes were synthesized using the filtration method, which can be utilized for synthesis of commercial electrode-active materials. The thermal measurements were conducted with the "laser flash" technique. It has been established that the cathode with the carbon nanotubes-LiCo2 and carbon nanotube layered structure possesses the highest in-plane thermal conductivity of 206 W/mK at room temperature. The cathode containing nanodiamonds on carbon nanotubes structure revealed one of the highest cross-plane thermal conductivity values. The in-plane thermal conductivity is up to two orders-of-magnitude greater than that in conventional cathodes based on amorphous carbon. The obtained results demonstrate a potential of carbon nanotube incorporation in cathode materials for the effective thermal management of Li-ion high-powered density batteries.

  7. Characterization of silicon- and carbon-based composite anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomenko, Volodymyr G.; Barsukov, Viacheslav Z.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years development of active materials for negative electrodes has been of great interest. Special attention has been focused on the active materials possessing higher reversible capacity than that of conventional graphite. In the present work the electrochemical performance of some carbon/silicon-based materials has been analyzed. For this purpose various silicon-based composites were prepared using such carbon materials as graphite, hard carbon and graphitized carbon black. An analysis of charging-discharging processes at electrodes based on different carbon materials has shown that graphite modified with silicon is the most promising anode material. It has also been revealed that the irreversible capacity mainly depends on the content of Si. An optimum content of Si has been determined with taking into account that high irreversible capacity is not suitable for practical application in lithium-ion batteries. This content falls within the range of 8-10 wt%. The reversible capacity of graphite modified with 8 wt% carbon-coated Si was as high as 604 mAh g -1 . The irreversible capacity loss with this material was as low as 8.1%. The small irreversible capacity of the material allowed developing full lithium-ion rechargeable cells in the 2016 coin cell configuration. Lithium-ion batteries based on graphite modified with silicon show gravimetric and volumetric specific energy densities which are higher by approximately 20% than those for a lithium-ion battery based on natural graphite

  8. Effects of ion implantation on the electrochemical characteristics of carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Katsuo; Iwaki, Masaya

    1994-01-01

    Various carbon materials are important electrode materials for electrochemical field. By ion implantation, the surface layer reforming of carbon materials (mainly galssy carbon) was carried out, and the effect that it exerts to their electrode characteristics was investigated. As the results of the ion implantation of Li, N, O, K, Ti, Zn, Cd and others performed so far, it was found that mainly by the change of the surface layer to amorphous state, there were the effects of the lowering of base current and the lowering of electrode reaction rate, and it was known that the surface layers of carbon materials doped with various kinds of ions showed high chemical stability. The use of carbon materials as electrodes in electrochemistry is roughly divided into the electrodes for electrolytic industry and fuel cells for large current and those for the measurement in electrochemical reaction for small current. The structure of carbon materials and electrode characteristics, and the reforming effect by ion implantation are reported. (K.I.)

  9. Epigenetic Analysis of Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Bystander Effects in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Cui, Changna; Xue, Bei

    Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect was defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic and proteomics plays significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were exposed head-only to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of (12) C heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. Directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that heavy-ion irradiated mouse head could induce genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate was highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. The results illustrated that genomic methylation changes of heavy ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of

  10. Molecular carbon nitride ion beams for enhanced corrosion resistance of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwitz, A.; Kennedy, J.

    2017-10-01

    A novel approach is presented for molecular carbon nitride beams to coat stainless surfaces steel using conventional safe feeder gases and electrically conductive sputter targets for surface engineering with ion implantation technology. GNS Science's Penning type ion sources take advantage of the breaking up of ion species in the plasma to assemble novel combinations of ion species. To test this phenomenon for carbon nitride, mixtures of gases and sputter targets were used to probe for CN+ ions for simultaneous implantation into stainless steel. Results from mass analysed ion beams show that CN+ and a variety of other ion species such as CNH+ can be produced successfully. Preliminary measurements show that the corrosion resistance of stainless steel surfaces increased sharply when implanting CN+ at 30 keV compared to reference samples, which is interesting from an application point of view in which improved corrosion resistance, surface engineering and short processing time of stainless steel is required. The results are also interesting for novel research in carbon-based mesoporous materials for energy storage applications and as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors, because of their high surface area, electrical conductivity, chemical stability and low cost.

  11. Role of activated carbon on micropollutans degradation by different radiation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Velo Gala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyse the influence of the presence of activated carbon on radiation processes. The triiodinated contrast medium diatrizoate was chosen as the contaminant model. We selected four commercial activated carbons and sixteen gamma radiation-modified carbons derived from these. The different advanced oxidation/reduction processes that have been studied were improved through the addition of activated carbon in the UV light and gamma radiating processes. In the UV/activated carbon process, the synergic activity of the activated carbon is enhanced in the samples with higher percentages of surface oxygen, ester/anhydride groups and carbon atoms with sp2 hybridization. Band gap determination of activated carbons revealed that they behave as semiconductor materials and, therefore, as photoactive materials in the presence of UV radiation, given that all band gap values are <4 eV. We also observed that the gamma radiation treatment reduces the band gap values of the activated carbons and that, in a single series of commercial carbons, lower band gap values correspond to higher contaminant removal rate values. We observed that the activity of the reutilized activated carbons is similar to that of the original carbons. Based on these results, we proposed that the activated carbon acts as a photocatalyst, promoting electrons of the valence band to the conduction band and increasing the generation of HO• radicals in the medium. Similarly, there was a synergic effect made by the presence of activated carbon in gamma radiation system, which favours pollutant removal. This synergic effect is independent of the textural but not the chemical characteristics of the activated carbon, observing a higher synergic activity for carbons with a higher surface content of oxygen, specifically quinone groups. We highlight that the synergic effect of the activated carbon requires adsorbent–adsorbate electrostatic interaction and is absent

  12. Influence of surface oxidation on ion dynamics and capacitance in porous and nonporous carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyatkin, Boris [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zhang, Yu [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Mamontov, Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kolesnikov, Alexander I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cheng, Yongqiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Meyer, III, Harry M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cummings, Peter T. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Gogotsi, Yury G. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-04-07

    Here, we investigate the influence of surface chemistry and ion confinement on capacitance and electrosorption dynamics of room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in supercapacitors. Using air oxidation and vacuum annealing, we produced defunctionalized and oxygen-rich surfaces of carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) and graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs). While oxidized surfaces of porous CDCs improve capacitance and rate handling abilities of ions, defunctionalized nonporous GNPs improve charge storage densities on planar electrodes. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) probed the structure, dynamics, and orientation of RTIL ions confined in divergently functionalized pores. Oxidized, ionophilic surfaces draw ions closer to pore surfaces and enhance potential-driven ion transport during electrosorption. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations corroborated experimental data and demonstrated the significance of surface functional groups on ion orientations, accumulation densities, and capacitance.

  13. Retention and radiative forcing of black carbon in eastern Sierra Nevada snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Sterle

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available When contaminated by absorbing particles, such as refractory black carbon (rBC and continental dust, snow's albedo decreases and thus its absorption of solar radiation increases, thereby hastening snowmelt. For this reason, an understanding of rBC's affect on snow albedo, melt processes, and radiation balance is critical for water management, especially in a changing climate. Measurements of rBC in a sequence of snow pits and surface snow samples in the eastern Sierra Nevada of California during the snow accumulation and ablation seasons of 2009 show that concentrations of rBC were enhanced sevenfold in surface snow (~25 ng g–1 compared to bulk values in the snowpack (~3 ng g–1. Unlike major ions, which were preferentially released during the initial melt, rBC and continental dust were retained in the snow, enhancing concentrations well into late spring, until a final flush occurred during the ablation period. We estimate a combined rBC and continental dust surface radiative forcing of 20 to 40 W m−2 during April and May, with dust likely contributing a greater share of the forcing.

  14. Expression profiles are different in carbon ion-irradiated normal human fibroblasts and their bystander cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwakawa, Mayumi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Imadome, Kaori; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Testuya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Imai, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated that ionizing radiation induces biological effects in non-irradiated bystander cells having received signals from directly irradiated cells; however, energetic heavy ion-induced bystander response is incompletely characterized. Here we performed microarray analysis of irradiated and bystander fibroblasts in confluent cultures. To see the effects in bystander cells, each of 1, 5 and 25 sites was targeted with 10 particles of carbon ions (18.3 MeV/u, 103 keV/μm) using microbeams, where particles traversed 0.00026, 0.0013 and 0.0066% of cells, respectively. diated cells, cultures were exposed to 10% survival dose (D), 0.1D and 0.01D of corresponding broadbeams (108 keV/μm). Irrespective of the target numbers (1, 5 or 25 sites) and the time (2 or 6 h postirradiation), similar expression changes were observed in bystander cells. Among 874 probes that showed more than 1.5-fold changes in bystander cells, 25% were upregulated and the remainder downregulated. These included genes related to cell communication (PIK3C2A, GNA13, FN1, ANXA1 and IL1RAP), stress response (RAD23B, ATF4 and EIF2AK4) and cell cycle (MYCN, RBBP4 and NEUROG1). Pathway analysis revealed serial bystander activation of G protein/PI-3 kinase pathways. Instead, genes related to cell cycle or death (CDKN1A, GADD45A, NOTCH1 and BCL2L1), and cell communication (IL1B, TCF7 and ID1) were upregulated in irradiated cells, but not in bystander cells. Our results indicate different expression profiles in irradiated and bystander cells, and imply that intercellular signaling between irradiated and bystander cells activate intracellular signaling, leading to the transcriptional stress response in bystander cells

  15. Dose- and time-dependent gene expression alterations in prostate and colon cancer cells after in vitro exposure to carbon ion and X-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetens, Annelies; Moreels, Marjan; Quintens, Roel; Soors, Els; Buset, Jasmine; Chiriotti, Sabina; Tabury, Kevin; Gregoire, Vincent; Baatout, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is an advanced form of radiotherapy that uses beams of charged particles (such as protons and carbon ions). Compared with conventional radiotherapy, the main advantages of carbon ion therapy are the precise absorbed dose localization, along with an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE). This high ballistic accuracy of particle beams deposits the maximal dose to the tumor, while damage to the surrounding healthy tissue is limited. Currently, hadrontherapy is being used for the treatment of specific types of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have shown that, under certain circumstances, exposure to charged particles may inhibit cell motility and migration. In the present study, we investigated the expression of four motility-related genes in prostate (PC3) and colon (Caco-2) cancer cell lines after exposure to different radiation types. Cells were irradiated with various absorbed doses (0, 0.5 and 2 Gy) of accelerated 13C-ions at the GANIL facility (Caen, France) or with X-rays. Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the RBE. RT-qPCR analysis showed dose- and time-dependent changes in the expression of CCDC88A, FN1, MYH9 and ROCK1 in both cell lines. However, whereas in PC3 cells the response to carbon ion irradiation was enhanced compared with X-irradiation, the effect was the opposite in Caco-2 cells, indicating cell-type–specific responses to the different radiation types. PMID:25190155

  16. Top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing affected by brown carbon in the upper troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhong; Forrister, Haviland; Liu, Jiumeng; Dibb, Jack; Anderson, Bruce; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Perring, Anne E.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Wang, Yuhang; Nenes, Athanasios; Weber, Rodney J.

    2017-07-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols affect the global radiative balance by absorbing and scattering radiation, which leads to warming or cooling of the atmosphere, respectively. Black carbon is the main light-absorbing component. A portion of the organic aerosol known as brown carbon also absorbs light. The climate sensitivity to absorbing aerosols rapidly increases with altitude, but brown carbon measurements are limited in the upper troposphere. Here we present aircraft observations of vertical aerosol distributions over the continental United States in May and June 2012 to show that light-absorbing brown carbon is prevalent in the troposphere, and absorbs more short-wavelength radiation than black carbon at altitudes between 5 and 12 km. We find that brown carbon is transported to these altitudes by deep convection, and that in-cloud heterogeneous processing may produce brown carbon. Radiative transfer calculations suggest that brown carbon accounts for about 24% of combined black and brown carbon warming effect at the tropopause. Roughly two-thirds of the estimated brown carbon forcing occurs above 5 km, although most brown carbon is found below 5 km. The highest radiative absorption occurred during an event that ingested a wildfire plume. We conclude that high-altitude brown carbon from biomass burning is an unappreciated component of climate forcing.

  17. Radiation effects on semiconductor devices in high energy heavy ion accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belousov, Anton

    2014-10-20

    Radiation effects on semiconductor devices in GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research are becoming more and more significant with the increase of beam intensity due to upgrades. Moreover a new accelerator is being constructed on the basis of GSI within the project of facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR). Beam intensities will be increased by factor of 100 and energies by factor of 10. Radiation fields in the vicinity of beam lines will increase more than 2 orders of magnitude and so will the effects on semiconductor devices. It is necessary to carry out a study of radiation effects on semiconductor devices considering specific properties of radiation typical for high energy heavy ion accelerators. Radiation effects on electronics in accelerator environment may be divided into two categories: short-term temporary effects and long-term permanent degradation. Both may become critical for proper operation of some electronic devices. This study is focused on radiation damage to CCD cameras in radiation environment of heavy ion accelerator. Series of experiments with irradiation of devices under test (DUTs) by secondary particles produced during ion beam losses were done for this study. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to simulate the experiment conditions and conditions expected in future accelerator. Corresponding comparisons and conclusions were done. Another device typical for accelerator facilities - industrial Ethernet switch was tested in similar conditions during this study. Series of direct irradiations of CCD and MOS transistors with heavy ion beams were done as well. Typical energies of the primary ion beams were 0.5-1 GeV/u. Ion species: from Na to U. Intensities of the beam up to 10{sup 9} ions/spill with spill length of 200-300 ns. Criteria of reliability and lifetime of DUTs in specific radiation conditions were formulated, basing on experimental results of the study. Predictions of electronic device reliability and lifetime were

  18. Ion Prostate Irradiation (IPI) – a pilot study to establish the safety and feasibility of primary hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in a raster scan technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habl, Gregor; Herfarth, Klaus; Hatiboglu, Gencay; Edler, Lutz; Uhl, Matthias; Krause, Sonja; Roethke, Matthias; Schlemmer, Heinz P; Hadaschik, Boris; Debus, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Due to physical characteristics, ions like protons or carbon ions can administer the dose to the target volume more efficiently than photons since the dose can be lowered at the surrounding normal tissue. Radiation biological considerations are based on the assumption that the α/β value for prostate cancer cells is 1.5 Gy, so that a biologically more effective dose could be administered due to hypofractionation without increasing risks of late effects of bladder (α/β = 4.0) and rectum (α/β = 3.9). The IPI study is a prospective randomized phase II study exploring the safety and feasibility of primary hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in a raster scan technique. The study is designed to enroll 92 patients with localized prostate cancer. Primary aim is the assessment of the safety and feasibility of the study treatment on the basis of incidence grade III and IV NCI-CTC-AE (v. 4.02) toxicity and/or the dropout of the patient from the planned therapy due to any reason. Secondary endpoints are PSA-progression free survival (PSA-PFS), overall survival (OS) and quality-of-life (QoL). This pilot study aims at the evaluation of the safety and feasibility of hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in prostate cancer patients in an active beam technique. Additionally, the safety results will be compared with Japanese results recently published for carbon ion irradiation. Due to the missing data of protons in this hypofractionated scheme, an in depth evaluation of the toxicity will be created to gain basic data for a following comparison study with carbon ion irradiation. Clinical Trial Identifier: http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01641185 (clinicaltrials.gov)

  19. Chemical modification of polypropylene induced by high energy carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, A.; Chakraborty, V.; Chintalapudi, S.N. E-mail: snc@gamma.iuc.res.in

    2000-06-01

    Polypropylene was irradiated with {sup 12}C{sup +} ions of 3.6 and 5.4 MeV energy using 3 MV Pelletron. The spectral changes owing to ion bombardment were investigated by UV-VIS and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. A gradual increase in absorbance was observed around visible and near visible region with increase in fluence of bombarding ions. The difference absorption spectra show formation of chromophoric groups with wavelength maximum near 380 nm at lower fluence, but at high fluence a shift in peak is observed. The chromophoric groups are likely to be the extended conjugated polyene system and the red shift in peak position at high fluence may be attributed to the greater degree of conjugation. The formation of unsaturated linkage is confirmed by the FTIR spectra with observed stretching band around 1650 cm{sup -1} and its intensity was found to increase with increase in ion fluence studied. The gases (in the range 2-80 amu) which were evolved due to interaction of polypropylene with {sup 12}C{sup +} ions were measured with Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA). A large number of gaseous components were detected. This shows that polymer chains break into some smaller fragments which concomitantly leads to extended conjugation.

  20. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, A. E.; Nikolaev, P.; Amama, P. B.; Zakharov, D.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Stach, E. A.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. With the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  1. Benchmarking nuclear models of FLUKA and GEANT4 for carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bohlen, TT; Quesada, J M; Bohlen, T T; Cerutti, F; Gudowska, I; Ferrari, A; Mairani, A

    2010-01-01

    As carbon ions, at therapeutic energies, penetrate tissue, they undergo inelastic nuclear reactions and give rise to significant yields of secondary fragment fluences. Therefore, an accurate prediction of these fluences resulting from the primary carbon interactions is necessary in the patient's body in order to precisely simulate the spatial dose distribution and the resulting biological effect. In this paper, the performance of nuclear fragmentation models of the Monte Carlo transport codes, FLUKA and GEANT4, in tissue-like media and for an energy regime relevant for therapeutic carbon ions is investigated. The ability of these Monte Carlo codes to reproduce experimental data of charge-changing cross sections and integral and differential yields of secondary charged fragments is evaluated. For the fragment yields, the main focus is on the consideration of experimental approximations and uncertainties such as the energy measurement by time-of-flight. For GEANT4, the hadronic models G4BinaryLightIonReaction a...

  2. Electrochemically Controlled Ion-exchange Property of Carbon Nanotubes/Polypyrrole Nanocomposite in Various Electrolyte Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Daiwon [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Zhu, Chengzhou [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920 United States; Fu, Shaofang [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920 United States; Du, Dan [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920 United States; Engelhard, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Lin, Yuehe [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920 United States

    2016-09-15

    The electrochemically controlled ion-exchange properties of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT)/electronically conductive polypyrrole (PPy) polymer composite in the various electrolyte solutions have been investigated. The ion-exchange behavior, rate and capacity of the electrochemically deposited polypyrrole with and without carbon nanotube (CNT) were compared and characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It has been found that the presence of carbon nanotube backbone resulted in improvement in ion-exchange rate, stability of polypyrrole, and higher anion loading capacity per PPy due to higher surface area, electronic conductivity, porous structure of thin film, and thinner film thickness providing shorter diffusion path. Chronoamperometric studies show that electrically switched anion exchange could be completed more than 10 times faster than pure PPy thin film. The anion selectivity of CNT/PPy film is demonstrated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  3. Determination of low-energy ion-induced electron yields from thin carbon foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allegrini, Frederic; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Wurz, Peter; Bochsler, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Ion beams crossing thin carbon foils can cause electron emission from the entrance and exit surface. Thin carbon foils are used in various types of time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers to produce start pulses for TOF measurements. The yield of emitted electrons depends, among other parameters, on the energy of the incoming ion and its mass, and it has been experimentally determined for a few projectile elements. The electron emission yield is of great importance for deriving abundance ratios of elements and isotopes in space plasmas using TOF mass spectrometers. We have developed a detector for measuring ion-induced electron yields, and we have extended the electron yield measurements for oxygen to energies relevant for solar wind research. We also present first measurements of the carbon foil electron emission yield for argon and iron in the solar wind energy range

  4. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  5. Carbon dioxide ion implantation in Titanium Nitride (Ti N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torabi, Sh.; Sari, A. H.; Hojabri, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation on titanium samples performed at 3x10 18 , 8x10 17 , 3x10 18 doses. In addition CO 2 ions were also implanted at doses in the range of 1x10 17 ,4 x10 17 ,8x10 17 . Atomic Force Microscopy, used to investigate the topographical changes of implanted samples. The structure of samples and phase composition were characterized using x-ray diffraction. The results show that by increasing of nitrogen ions, the roughness, grain sizes and hardness will increase. But by further increasing of dose, hardness will be decreased. The CO 2 implantation also enhance the roughness, grain size and hardness which could be caused by phase composition.

  6. Investigation of different-ligand complexes of holmium and erbium with NTA and carbonate ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, N.A.; Bel'tyukova, S.V.; Poluehktov, N.S.

    1979-01-01

    Found out have been the optimum conditions for the formation of the lantanides (Ln) multiligand complexes with the nitriletriacetic acid (NTA) and the carbonate-ion. It has been established that the components correlation in complex compounds is equal to 1:1:1. Computed have been the values of the oscillator forces of the absorption bands, that conform to the ''supersensitive'' migration of the multiligand complexes, It is shown that the increment in the oscillator forces, the induced entering of one carbonate-ion into the Ln-NTA complex molecule conforms to about 1/4 of the oscillator forces increment during the migration from the aquo ion to the [Ln(CO 3 ) 4 ] 5- complex carbonaceous ion

  7. Line radiation of multicharged ions with the Fermi-Dirac level distribution of electrons at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garanin, S.F.

    2003-01-01

    Line radiation of multicharged ions with the Fermi-Dirac electron distribution by levels in the range of plasma temperatures, when electron movement may be considered quasiclassical, while potential, in which they move, is the Coulomb one, is considered. The spectrum and intensity of ion radiation are calculated. Within high plasma densities the radiation intensity per one ion proved to be independent of density and proportional to T 2 [ru

  8. Carbonate and Bicarbonate Ion Transport in Alkaline Anion Exchange Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    comparable assumptions, a similar equation can be derived starting with the Nernst -Planck equation . σ = ∑ σi = ∑ F2z2i RT (ε− ε0)q D0i 1 + δi Ci [1] Using Eq...an appropriate ion-membrane diffusion coefficient. Finally, an equation derived from the dusty fluid model can be used to calculate the ionic...Finally, an equation derived from the dusty fluid model can be used to calculate the ionic conductivity of the membrane in different counter ion forms

  9. A study of V79 cell survival after for proton and carbon ion beams as represented by the parameters of Katz' track structure model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzanka, Leszek; Waligórski, M. P. R.; Bassler, Niels

    different sets of data obtained for the same cell line and different ions, measured at different laboratories, we have fitted model parameters to a set of carbon-irradiated V79 cells, published by Furusawa et al. (2), and to a set of proton-irradiated V79 cells, published by Wouters et al. (3), separately....... We found that values of model parameters best fitted to the carbon data of Furusawa et al. yielded predictions of V79 survival after proton irradiation which did not match the V79 proton data of Wouters et al. Fitting parameters to both sets combined did not improve the accuracy of model predictions...... carbon irradiation. 1. Katz, R., Track structure in radiobiology and in radiation detection. Nuclear Track Detection 2: 1-28 (1978). 2. Furusawa Y. et al. Inactivation of aerobic and hypoxic cells from three different cell lines by accelerated 3He-, 12C- and 20Ne beams. Radiat Res. 2012 Jan; 177...

  10. Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Apurva; Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource; Doeff, Marca M.; Chen, Guoying; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas J.; Mehta, Apurva; Shirpour, Mona; Duncan, Hugues; Kim, Chunjoong; Kam, Kinson C.; Conry, Thomas

    2013-04-30

    We describe the use of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques to probe details of intercalation/deintercalation processes in electrode materials for Li ion and Na ion batteries. Both in situ and ex situ experiments are used to understand structural behavior relevant to the operation of devices.

  11. Toxic effects of {sup 56}Fe ion radiation on the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryonic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Jing; Zhou, Rong [Department of Radiation Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Basic Research on Heavy Ion Radiation Application in Medicine, Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Song, Jing’e [Hospital of Stomatology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Gan, Lu; Zhou, Xin; Di, Cuixia; Liu, Yang; Mao, Aihong; Zhao, Qiuyue; Wang, Yupei [Department of Radiation Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Basic Research on Heavy Ion Radiation Application in Medicine, Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, Hong, E-mail: zhangh@impcas.ac.cn [Department of Radiation Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Basic Research on Heavy Ion Radiation Application in Medicine, Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Gansu Wuwei Institute of Medical Sciences, Wuwei 733000 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Iron ion radiation induced developmental toxicity and apoptosis in zebrafish embryos. • The mRNA expression levels of apoptosis-related genes displayed more sensitivity than the developmental toxicity. • Iron ion radiation induced apoptosis in zebrafish embryos potentially due to DNA damage and mitochondrial dysfunction. - Abstract: All living organisms and ecosystems are permanently exposed to ionizing radiation. Of all the types of ionizing radiation, heavy ions such as {sup 56}Fe have the potential to cause the most severe biological effects. We therefore examined the effects and potential mechanisms of iron ion irradiation on the induction of developmental toxicity and apoptosis in zebrafish embryos. Zebrafish embryos at 4 h post-fertilization (hpf) were divided into five groups: a control group; and four groups irradiated with 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 Gy radiation, respectively. Mortality and teratogenesis were significantly increased, and spontaneous movement, heart rate, and swimming distance were decreased in the irradiated groups, accompanied by increased apoptosis. mRNA levels of genes involved in the apoptotic pathway, including p53, bax, bcl-2, and caspase-3, were significantly affected by radiation exposure. Moreover, protein expression levels of P53 and Bcl-2 changed in accordance with the corresponding mRNA expression levels. In addition, we detected the protein expression levels of γ-H2AX, which is a biomarker for radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, and found that γ-H2AX protein levels were significantly increased in the irradiated groups. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of the mechanisms of iron ion radiation-induced developmental toxicity and apoptosis, potentially involving the induction of DNA damage and mitochondrial dysfunction. The findings of this study may aid future impact assessment of environmental radioactivity in fish.

  12. Radiotherapy for chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Haberer, Thomas; Jaekel, Oliver; Thilmann, Christoph; Kraemer, Michael; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Kraft, Gerhard; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Compared to photon irradiation, carbon ions provide physical and biologic advantages that may be exploited in chordomas and chondrosarcomas. Methods and Materials: Between August 1998 and December 2000, 37 patients with chordomas (n=24) and chondrosarcomas (n=13) were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy within a Phase I/II trial. Tumor conformal application of carbon ion beams was realized by intensity-controlled raster scanning with pulse-to-pulse energy variation. Three-dimensional treatment planning included biologic plan optimization. The median tumor dose was 60 GyE (GyE Gy x relative biologic effectiveness). Results: The mean follow-up was 13 months. The local control rate after 1 and 2 years was 96% and 90%, respectively. We observed 2 recurrences outside the gross tumor volume in patients with chordomas. Progression-free survival was 100% for chondrosarcomas and 83% for chordomas at 2 years. Partial remission after carbon ion radiotherapy was observed in 6 patients. Treatment toxicity was mild. Conclusion: These are the first data demonstrating the clinical feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of scanning beam delivery of ion beams in patients with skull base tumors. The preliminary results in patients with skull base chordomas and low-grade chondrosarcomas are encouraging, although the follow-up was too short to draw definite conclusions concerning outcome. In the absence of major toxicity, dose escalation might be considered

  13. Manipulating Adsorption-Insertion Mechanisms in Nanostructured Carbon Materials for High-Efficiency Sodium Ion Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Shen [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Hubei Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 China; Xiao, Lifen [College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 China; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Sushko, Maria L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Han, Kee Sung [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Shao, Yuyan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Yan, Mengyu [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 China; Liang, Xinmiao [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Science, Wuhan 430071 China; Mai, Liqiang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 China; Feng, Jiwen [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Science, Wuhan 430071 China; Cao, Yuliang [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Hubei Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 China; Ai, Xinping [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Hubei Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 China; Yang, Hanxi [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Hubei Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 China; Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2017-05-12

    Hard carbon is one of the most promising anode materials for sodium-ion batteries, but the low coulombic efficiency is still a key barrier. In this paper we synthesized a series of nanostructured hard carbon materials with controlled architectures. Using a combination of in-situ XRD mapping, ex-situ NMR, EPR, electrochemical techniques and simulations, an “adsorption-intercalation” (A-I) mechanism is established for Na ion storage. During the initial stages of Na insertion, Na ions adsorb on the defect sites of hard carbon with a wide adsorption energy distribution, producing a sloping voltage profile. In the second stage, Na ions intercalate into graphitic layers with suitable spacing to form NaCx compounds similar to the Li ion intercalation process in graphite, producing a flat low voltage plateau. The cation intercalation with a flat voltage plateau should be enhanced and the sloping region should be avoided. Guided by this knowledge, non-porous hard carbon material has been developed which has achieved high reversible capacity and coulombic efficiency to fulfill practical application.

  14. Negative ion emission at field electron emission from amorphous (alpha-C:H) carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Bernatskij, D P; Ivanov-Omskij, V I; Pavlov, V G; Zvonareva, T K

    2001-01-01

    The study on the electrons field emission from the plane cathode surface on the basis of the amorphous carbon film (alpha-C:H) is carried out. The methodology, making it possible to accomplish simultaneously the registration of the emission currents and visually observe the distribution of the emission centers on the plane emitter surface is developed. The analysis of the oscillograms indicated that apart from the proper electron constituent the negative ions of hydrogen (H sup - and H sub 2 sup -), carbon (C sup -) and hydrocarbon (CH sub n sup -) are observed. The ions emission is connected with the processes of formation and degradation of the local emission centers

  15. Study of the influence of surface carbon on the tribological properties of ion-treated steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyagoub, Abdenacer; Faussemagne, Arielle

    1999-01-01

    Samples of 100Cr6 steel were treated by different ion beams in order to study the evolution of their tribological properties. A strong correlation was found between the amount of surface carbon, whatever its origin (contamination, direct C implantation or ion-beam mixing of a deposited carbon layer), and the reduction of the friction coefficient as well as the improvement of the wear resistance. These results are discussed in the framework of a recent statistical model founded on the asperity concept and describing the tribological behaviour of bilayer systems

  16. Additional transport channel of carbon ions for biological research at the Nuclotron of JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yudin, I.P.; Panasik, V.A.; Tyutyunnikov, S.I.

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with the construction of the 12 C +6 beam transport line for biomedical research at the Nuclotron accelerator complex, JINR. We have studied the scheme and modes of magneto-optical elements of the channel. The results of calculations of the investigated beam transport of carbon ions are presented. The algorithms to control the carbon ion beam in the transportation system are discussed. The choice of the magneto-optical system is motivated. The graphs of the beam envelopes in the channel are given. The scanning control beam functions are considered

  17. Additional transport channel of carbon ions for biological research at the Nuclotron of JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yudin, I.P.; Panasik, V.A.; Tyutyunnikov, S.I.

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with the construction of the beam 12 C +6 transport line for biomedical research at the Nuclotron accelerator complex, JINR. We have studied the scheme and modes of magneto-optical elements of the channel. The results of calculations of the investigated beam transport of carbon ions are presented. The algorithms to control the carbon ion beam in the transportation system are discussed. The choice of the magneto-optical system is motivated. The graphs of the beam envelopes in the channel are given. The scanning control beam functions are considered

  18. MnO-carbon hybrid nanofiber composites as superior anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jian-Gan; Yang, Ying; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Kang, Feiyu

    2015-01-01

    MnO-carbon hybrid nanofiber composites are fabricated by electrospinning polyimide/manganese acetylacetonate precursor and a subsequent carbonization process. The composition, phase structure and morphology of the composites are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The results indicate that the composites exhibit good nanofibrous morphology with MnO nanoparticles uniformly encapsulated by carbon nanofibers. The hybrid nanofiber composites are used directly as freestanding anodes for lithium-ion batteries to evaluate their electrochemical properties. It is found that the optimized MnO-carbon nanofiber composite can deliver a high reversible capacity of 663 mAh g −1 , along with excellent cycling stability and good rate capability. The superior performance enables the composites to be promising candidates as an anode alternative for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

  19. Rubber-based carbon electrode materials derived from dumped tires for efficient sodium-ion storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-Yue; Ma, Chao; Bai, Yu-Lin; Liu, Yu-Si; Wang, Shi-Feng; Wei, Xiao; Wang, Kai-Xue; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2018-04-03

    The development of sustainable and low cost electrode materials for sodium-ion batteries has attracted considerable attention. In this work, a carbon composite material decorated with in situ generated ZnS nanoparticles has been prepared via a simple pyrolysis of the rubber powder from dumped tires. Upon being used as an anode material for sodium-ion batteries, the carbon composite shows a high reversible capacity and rate capability. A capacity as high as 267 mA h g-1 is still retained after 100 cycles at a current density of 50 mA g-1. The well dispersed ZnS nanoparticles in carbon significantly enhance the electrochemical performance. The carbon composites derived from the rubber powder are proposed as promising electrode materials for low-cost, large-scale energy storage devices. This work provides a new and effective method for the reuse of dumped tires, contributing to the recycling of valuable waste resources.

  20. Thermal and radiation induced polymerisation of carbon sub-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Michel

    1964-03-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of the polymerisation of carbon sub-oxide (C 3 O 2 ) in gaseous phase. As this work is related to other researches dealing with the reactions of the graphite-CO 2 system which occur in graphite-moderated nuclear reactors, a first intention was to study the behaviour of C 3 O 2 when submitted to radiations. Preliminary tests showed that the most remarkable result of this action was the formation of a polymer. It was also noticed that the polymerisation of this gas was spontaneous however slower at room temperature. The research thus focused on this polymerisation, and on the formula of the obtained polymer. After some generalities, the author reports the preparation, purification and storage and conservation of the carbon sub-oxide. The next parts report the kinetic study of thermal polymerisation, the study of polymerisation under γ rays, the study of the obtained polymer by using visible, UV and infrared spectroscopy, electronic paramagnetic resonance, and semi-conductivity measurements [fr

  1. Ion from Aqueous Solution using Magnetite, Activated Carbon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Thermodynamic studies on Adsorption of lead (II) Ion from Aqueous Solution using. Magnetite ... process industries and agricultural activities, which tends to ... osmosis. These processes are however, not economically feasible for small scale industries .... Freundlich coefficient. ..... from binary component system, Beni-suef.

  2. Lead ions removal from aqueous solution using modified carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-02

    Feb 2, 2018 ... Recently, in Vietnam and many other countries, the pollution of water by ... ions in water, including copper (Cu2+), lead (Pb2+), cadmium. (Cd2+), zinc (Zn2+) and chromium (Cr3+), may be a potential hazard to human health ...

  3. Role of carbon impurities on the surface morphology evolution of tungsten under high dose helium ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of carbon impurities on the surface evolution (e.g., fuzz formation) of tungsten (W) surface during 300 eV He ions irradiation was studied. Several tungsten samples were irradiated by He ion beam with a various carbon ions percentage. The presence of minute carbon contamination within the He ion beam was found to be effective in preventing the fuzz formation. At higher carbon concentration, the W surface was found to be fully covered with a thick graphitic layer on the top of tungsten carbide (WC) layer that cover the sample surface. Lowering the ion beam carbon percentage was effective in a significant reduction in the thickness of the surface graphite layer. Under these conditions the W surface was also found to be immune for the fuzz formation. The effect of W fuzz prevention by the WC formation on the sample surface was more noticeable when the He ion beam had much lower carbon (C) ions content (0.01% C). In this case, the fuzz formation was prevented on the vast majority of the W sample surface, while W fuzz was found in limited and isolated areas. The W surface also shows good resistance to morphology evolution when bombarded by high flux of pure H ions at 900 °C. - Highlights: • Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low energy He ion beam irradiation. • The effect of adding various percentage of carbon impurity to the He ion beam on the trend of W fuzz formation was studied. • Mitigation of W fuzz formation due to addition of small percentage of carbon to the He ion beam is reported. • The formation of long W nanowires due to He ion beam irradiation mixed with 0.01% carbon ions is reported.

  4. Oxidation processes on conducting carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    La Mantia, Fabio

    2012-11-21

    The oxidation processes at the interface between different types of typical carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries and carbonates electrolyte above 5 V versus Li/Li+ were investigated. Depending on the nature and surface area of the carbon additive, the irreversible capacity during galvanostatic cycling between 2.75 and 5.25 V versus Li/Li+ could be as high as 700 mAh g-1 (of carbon). In the potential region below 5 V versus Li/Li+, high surface carbon additives also showed irreversible plateaus at about 4.1-4.2 and 4.6 V versus Li/Li+. These plateaus disappeared after thermal treatments at or above 150 °C in inert gas. The influence of the irreversible capacity of carbon additives on the overall performances of positive electrodes was discussed. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  5. Black Carbon Radiative Forcing over the Tibetan Plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Cenlin; Li, Qinbin; Liou, K. N.; Takano, Y.; Gu, Yu; Qi, L.; Mao, Yuhao; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-11-28

    We estimate the snow albedo forcing and direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) in the Tibetan Plateau using a global chemical transport model in conjunction with a stochastic snow model and a radiative transfer model. Our best estimate of the annual BC snow albedo forcing in the Plateau is 2.9 W m-2 (uncertainty: 1.5–5.0 W m-226 ). We find that BC-snow internal mixing increases the albedo forcing by 40-60% compared with external mixing and coated BC increases the forcing by 30-50% compared with uncoated BC, whereas Koch snowflakes reduce the forcing by 20-40% relative to spherical snow grains. Our best estimate of the annual BC DRF at the top of the atmosphere is 2.3 W m-2 (uncertainty: 0.7–4.3 W m-230 ) in the Plateau after scaling the modeled BC absorption optical depth to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations. The BC forcings are attributed to emissions from different regions.

  6. Expression profiles of mRNA after exposure yeast and rice to heavy-ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Mizukami, Satomi; Nojima, Kumie

    2005-01-01

    We have studied expression profiles of mRNA after exposure yeast cells to heavy-ion radiation. Yeast cells was exposed by heavy-ion radiation with the levels of 6, 12, 25, 50, and 100 Gy. We could confirm the reproducibility of physiological state of yeast cells under the experimental conditions by DNA microarray. We could also confirm the reproducibility of viability of yeast cells after exposure to heavy-ion radiation. We thus applied yeast cells exposed with 25 Gy was applied to DNA microarray analysis. The strongly induced genes were HUG1 RAR4 RNR2 for DNA repairing genes and GLC3 GSY1 for energy metabolism genes. (author)

  7. Stability and kinetics of uranyl ion complexation by macrocycles in propylene carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fux, P.

    1984-06-01

    A thermodynamic study of uranyl ion complexes formation with different macrocyclic ligands was realized in propylene carbonate as solvent using spectrophotometric and potentiometric techniques. Formation kinetics of two UO 2 complexes: a crown ether (18C6) and a coronand (22) was studied by spectrophotometry in propylene carbonate with addition of tetraethylammonium chlorate 0.1M at 25 0 C. Possible structures of complexes in solution are discussed [fr

  8. Ion beam trajectory simulation of carbon isotopes in cyclotron DECY-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pramudita Anggraita

    2014-01-01

    A simulation on the ion beam trajectories of various carbon isotopes "1"2C, "1"3C, and "1"4C in DECY-13 cyclotron has been carried out using Scilab 5.4.1 software. Calculations in the simulation were carried out in 3 dimensions. The simulation shows trajectory separations, which provide possibility for "1"4C measurement such as in carbon dating at accelerating voltage frequency of about 72 MHz. (author)

  9. Resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization of ions by Lyman alpha radiation in gaseous nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, S; Letokhov, V

    2001-01-26

    One of the mysteries of nebulae in the vicinity of bright stars is the appearance of bright emission spectral lines of ions, which imply fairly high excitation temperatures. We suggest that an ion formation mechanism, based on resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization (RETPI) by intense H Lyman alpha radiation (wavelength of 1215 angstroms) trapped inside optically thick nebulae, can produce these spectral lines. The rate of such an ionization process is high enough for rarefied gaseous media where the recombination rate of the ions formed can be 10(-6) to 10(-8) per second for an electron density of 10(3) to 10(5) per cubic centimeter in the nebula. Under such conditions, the photo-ions formed may subsequently undergo further RETPI, catalyzed by intense He i and He ii radiation, which also gets enhanced in optically thick nebulae that contain enough helium.

  10. Fine features of parametric X-ray radiation by relativistic electrons and ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.B. Korotchenko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In present work within the frame of dynamic theory for parametric X-ray radiation in two-beam approximation we have presented detailed studies on parametric radiation emitted by relativistic both electrons and ions at channeling in crystals that is highly requested at planned experiments. The analysis done has shown that the intensity of radiation at relativistic electron channeling in Si (110 with respect to the conventional parametric radiation intensity has up to 5% uncertainty, while the error of approximate formulas for calculating parametric X-ray radiation maxima does not exceed 1.2%. We have demonstrated that simple expressions for the Fourier components of Si crystal susceptibility χ0 and χgσ could be reduced, as well as the temperature dependence for radiation maxima in Si crystal (diffraction plane (110 within Debye model. Moreover, for any types of channeled ions it is shown that the parametric X-ray radiation intensity is proportional to z2−b(Z,z/z with the function b(Z,z depending on the screening parameter and the ion charge number z=Z−Ze.

  11. Computational Evaluation of Amorphous Carbon Coating for Durable Silicon Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jeongwoon; Ihm, Jisoon; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Kim, Seungchul

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of graphite-like amorphous carbon coating on bulky silicon to examine whether it can improve the durability of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries using molecular dynamics simulations and ab-initio electronic structure calculations. Structural models of carbon coating are constructed using molecular dynamics simulations of atomic carbon deposition with low incident energies (1–16 eV). As the incident energy decreases, the ratio of sp2 carbons increases, that of sp3 decreases, and the carbon films become more porous. The films prepared with very low incident energy contain lithium-ion conducting channels. Also, those films are electrically conductive to supplement the poor conductivity of silicon and can restore their structure after large deformation to accommodate the volume change during the operations. As a result of this study, we suggest that graphite-like porous carbon coating on silicon will extend the lifetime of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries. PMID:28347087

  12. Computational Evaluation of Amorphous Carbon Coating for Durable Silicon Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwoon Hwang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of graphite-like amorphous carbon coating on bulky silicon to examine whether it can improve the durability of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries using molecular dynamics simulations and ab-initio electronic structure calculations. Structural models of carbon coating are constructed using molecular dynamics simulations of atomic carbon deposition with low incident energies (1–16 eV. As the incident energy decreases, the ratio of sp2 carbons increases, that of sp3 decreases, and the carbon films become more porous. The films prepared with very low incident energy contain lithium-ion conducting channels. Also, those films are electrically conductive to supplement the poor conductivity of silicon and can restore their structure after large deformation to accommodate the volume change during the operations. As a result of this study, we suggest that graphite-like porous carbon coating on silicon will extend the lifetime of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries.

  13. Low-cost carbon-silicon nanocomposite anodes for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badi, Nacer; Erra, Abhinay Reddy; Hernandez, Francisco C Robles; Okonkwo, Anderson O; Hobosyan, Mkhitar; Martirosyan, Karen S

    2014-01-01

    The specific energy of the existing lithium ion battery cells is limited because intercalation electrodes made of activated carbon (AC) materials have limited lithium ion storage capacities. Carbon nanotubes, graphene, and carbon nanofibers are the most sought alternatives to replace AC materials but their synthesis cost makes them highly prohibitive. Silicon has recently emerged as a strong candidate to replace existing graphite anodes due to its inherently large specific capacity and low working potential. However, pure silicon electrodes have shown poor mechanical integrity due to the dramatic expansion of the material during battery operation. This results in high irreversible capacity and short cycle life. We report on the synthesis and use of carbon and hybrid carbon-silicon nanostructures made by a simplified thermo-mechanical milling process to produce low-cost high-energy lithium ion battery anodes. Our work is based on an abundant, cost-effective, and easy-to-launch source of carbon soot having amorphous nature in combination with scrap silicon with crystalline nature. The carbon soot is transformed in situ into graphene and graphitic carbon during mechanical milling leading to superior elastic properties. Micro-Raman mapping shows a well-dispersed microstructure for both carbon and silicon. The fabricated composites are used for battery anodes, and the results are compared with commercial anodes from MTI Corporation. The anodes are integrated in batteries and tested; the results are compared to those seen in commercial batteries. For quick laboratory assessment, all electrochemical cells were fabricated under available environment conditions and they were tested at room temperature. Initial electrochemical analysis results on specific capacity, efficiency, and cyclability in comparison to currently available AC counterpart are promising to advance cost-effective commercial lithium ion battery technology. The electrochemical performance observed for

  14. A facility for liquid-phase radiation experiments on heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuglik, Z; Zvara, I; Yakushev, A B; Timokhin, S N [Flerov Lab. of Nuclear Reactions, Dubna (Russian Federation). Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research

    1994-05-01

    The facility for liquid-phase radiation experiments installed on the beam line of the U-400 cyclotron in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, is described. The accelerator provides intermediate energy (some 10 MeV/nucleon) beams of ions ranging from Li to Xe. Preliminary results on the radiolysis of the Fricke solution and malachite green in ethanol by {sup 11}B, {sup 24}Mg and {sup 40}Ca ions are presented. (author).

  15. Experimental control of the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Munib

    2008-12-01

    The laser generation of energetic high quality beams of protons and heavier ions has opened up the door to a plethora of applications. These beams are usually generated by the interaction of a short pulse high power laser with a thin metal foil target. They could already be applied to probe transient phenomena in plasmas and to produce warm dense matter by isochoric heating. Other applications such as the production of radioisotopes and tumour radiotherapy need further research to be put into practice. To meet the requirements of each application, the properties of the laser-accelerated particle beams have to be controlled precisely. In this thesis, experimental means to control the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions are investigated. The production and control of proton and carbon ion beams is studied using advanced ion source designs: Experiments concerning mass-limited (i.e. small and isolated) targets are conducted. These targets have the potential to increase both the number and the energy of laser-accelerated protons. Therefore, the influence of the size of a plane foil target on proton beam properties is measured. Furthermore, carbon ion sources are investigated. Carbon ions are of particular interest in the production of warm dense matter and in cancer radiotherapy. The possibility to focus carbon ion beams is investigated and a simple method for the production of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion beams is presented. This thesis also provides an insight into the physical processes connected to the production and the control of laser-accelerated ions. For this purpose, laser-accelerated protons are employed to probe plasma phenomena on laser-irradiated targets. Electric fields evolving on the surface of laser-irradiated metal foils and hollow metal foil cylinders are investigated. Since these fields can be used to displace, collimate or focus proton beams, understanding their temporal and spatial evolution is crucial for the design of

  16. Experimental control of the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Munib

    2008-12-15

    The laser generation of energetic high quality beams of protons and heavier ions has opened up the door to a plethora of applications. These beams are usually generated by the interaction of a short pulse high power laser with a thin metal foil target. They could already be applied to probe transient phenomena in plasmas and to produce warm dense matter by isochoric heating. Other applications such as the production of radioisotopes and tumour radiotherapy need further research to be put into practice. To meet the requirements of each application, the properties of the laser-accelerated particle beams have to be controlled precisely. In this thesis, experimental means to control the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions are investigated. The production and control of proton and carbon ion beams is studied using advanced ion source designs: Experiments concerning mass-limited (i.e. small and isolated) targets are conducted. These targets have the potential to increase both the number and the energy of laser-accelerated protons. Therefore, the influence of the size of a plane foil target on proton beam properties is measured. Furthermore, carbon ion sources are investigated. Carbon ions are of particular interest in the production of warm dense matter and in cancer radiotherapy. The possibility to focus carbon ion beams is investigated and a simple method for the production of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion beams is presented. This thesis also provides an insight into the physical processes connected to the production and the control of laser-accelerated ions. For this purpose, laser-accelerated protons are employed to probe plasma phenomena on laser-irradiated targets. Electric fields evolving on the surface of laser-irradiated metal foils and hollow metal foil cylinders are investigated. Since these fields can be used to displace, collimate or focus proton beams, understanding their temporal and spatial evolution is crucial for the design of

  17. Effects of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion radiation and ferulic acid on the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryonic oxidative stress response and gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Jing [Department of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, Hong, E-mail: zhangh@impcas.ac.cn [Department of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Zhenhua; Wu, Zhenhua [Department of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Lu, Jiang [Key Laboratory of Xinjiang Phytomedicine Resources, College of Pharmacy, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832002 (China); Di, Cuixia; Zhou, Xin [Department of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Xiaowei [Key Laboratory of Xinjiang Phytomedicine Resources, College of Pharmacy, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832002 (China)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: • Carbon ion radiation increased the oxidative stress in zebrafish embryos. • Carbon ion radiation induced transcriptional level effects. • The transcriptional level displayed more sensitivity to low dose radiation than the antioxidant enzyme activities. • FA induced radioprotective effects by the inhibition of oxidative stress. - Abstract: The effects of carbon ion irradiation and ferulic acid (FA) on the induction of oxidative stress and alteration of gene expression were studied in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Zebrafish embryos at 8 hpf were divided into seven groups: the control group; the 1 Gy, 3 Gy and 7 Gy irradiation groups; and three FA-pre-treated irradiation groups. In the irradiated groups, a significant increase in the teratogenesis of the zebrafish embryos and oxidative stress was accompanied by increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content, decreased glutathione (GSH) content and alterations in antioxidant enzyme activities (such as catalase [CAT] and superoxide dismutase [SOD]). Moreover, the mRNA levels for Cu/Zn–sod, Mn–sod, cat and gpx, the genes encoding these antioxidant proteins, were altered significantly. However, the mRNA expression patterns were not in accordance with those of the antioxidant enzymes and were more sensitive under low-dose irradiation. In addition, we detected the mRNA expression of ucp-2 and bcl-2, which are located at the mitochondrial inner membrane and related to reactive oxidative species (ROS) production. In the irradiated groups, the mRNA level of ucp-2 was significantly increased, whereas the mRNA level of bcl-2 was significantly decreased. Supplementation with FA, an antioxidant, was better able to reduce the irradiation-induced oxidative damage marked by changes in mortality, morphology, antioxidant enzyme activities and the MDA and GSH content, as well as in the mRNA expression levels. Overall, this study provided helpful information about the transcriptional effects of irradiation to better

  18. Investigations on the question of radiation-induced intracellular ion translocations in the liver of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenning, J

    1975-01-01

    Radiation-induced ion translocations in cellular and/or subcellular units can be detected in the course of the examination of whole organs. The present paper attempts to study this problem in the liver of rats. The size and ion composition of the extracellular space and its subunits (interstice, intravascular space, biliary discharge system) must therefore be known in order to obtain purely cellular electrolyte values. They can be determined with the aid of dilution methods and by applying Donnan's law. For measuring radiation-induced ion translocations in nuclei and mitochondria, they must be isolated in an aqueous phase. Processing in 0.25 mol l/sup -1/ saccharose yields the best results with regard to ion losses, since the vitality of the membranes is largely preserved when using this method. During suspension, some of the nuclei and mitochondria obtained in sacharose solution show considerable ion translocations, depending on the composition of the medium. Irradiation up to 10 kR showed that relatively low doses (100 R) already cause further changes of the electrolyte concentrations of nuclei and mitochondria. In-vivo irradiation of the liver also caused definite potassium-sodium translocations in the nucleus and the mitochondria at doses as low as 100 R. These intracellular electrolyte translocations cannot be detected in examinations of the whole organ. All in all, it is shown that intracellular ion translocations can be found at relatively low radiation doses already. The present paper discusses the possible methods by which they can be detected.

  19. Ion dynamics in porous carbon electrodes in supercapacitors using in situ infrared spectroelectrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Francis W; Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Yury; Elabd, Yossef A

    2013-08-28

    Electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs), or supercapacitors, rely on electrosorption of ions by porous carbon electrodes and offer a higher power and a longer cyclic lifetime compared to batteries. Ionic liquid (IL) electrolytes can broaden the operating voltage window and increase the energy density of EDLCs. Herein, we present direct measurements of the ion dynamics of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)imide in an operating EDLC with electrodes composed of porous nanosized carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) and nonporous onion-like carbons (OLCs) with the use of in situ infrared spectroelectrochemistry. For CDC electrodes, IL ions (both cations and anions) were directly observed entering and exiting CDC nanopores during charging and discharging of the EDLC. Conversely, for OLC electrodes, IL ions were observed in close proximity to the OLC surface without any change in the bulk electrolyte concentration during charging and discharging of the EDLC. This provides experimental evidence that charge is stored on the surface of OLCs in OLC EDLCs without long-range ion transport through the bulk electrode. In addition, for CDC EDLCs with mixed electrolytes of IL and propylene carbonate (PC), the IL ions were observed entering and exiting CDC nanopores, while PC entrance into the nanopores was IL concentration dependent. This work provides direct experimental confirmation of EDLC charging mechanisms that previously were restricted to computational simulations and theories. The experimental measurements presented here also provide deep insights into the molecular level transport of IL ions in EDLC electrodes that will impact the design of the electrode materials' structure for electrical energy storage.

  20. Identification of stable endogenous control genes for transcriptional profiling of photon, proton and carbon-ion irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharungbam, Geeta D; Schwager, Christian; Chiblak, Sara; Brons, Stephan; Hlatky, Lynn; Haberer, Thomas; Debus, Jürgen; Abdollahi, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of transcriptional regulation of genes is a prerequisite for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of action of different radiation qualities such as photon, proton or carbon ion irradiation. Microarrays and real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) are considered the two cornerstones of gene expression analysis. In interpreting these results it is critical to normalize the expression levels of the target genes by that of appropriately selected endogenous control genes (ECGs) or housekeeping genes. We sought to systematically investigate common ECG candidates for their stability after different radiation modalities in different human cell lines by qRT-PCR. We aimed to identify the most robust set of ECGs or housekeeping genes for transcriptional analysis in irradiation studies. We tested the expression stability of 32 ECGs in three human cancer cell lines. The epidermoid carcinoma cells (A431), the non small cell lung carcinoma cells (A549) and the pancreatic adenocarincoma cells (BxPC3) were irradiated with photon, proton and carbon ions. Expression Heat maps, clustering and statistic algorithms were employed using SUMO software package. The expression stability was evaluated by computing: mean, standard deviation, ANOVA, coefficient of variation and the stability measure (M) given by the geNorm algorithm. Expression analysis revealed significant cell type specific regulation of 18 out of 32 ECGs (p < 0.05). A549 and A431 cells shared a similar pattern of ECG expression as the function of different radiation qualities as compared to BxPC3. Of note, the ribosomal protein 18S, one of the most frequently used ECG, was differentially regulated as the function of different radiation qualities (p ≤ 0.01). A comprehensive search for the most stable ECGs using the geNorm algorithm identified 3 ECGs for A431 and BxPC3 to be sufficient for normalization. In contrast, 6 ECGs were required to properly normalize expression data in the more

  1. Investigations on carbon cluster formation in heavy ion irradiated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathy, S.P.; Mishra, R.; Mawar, A.K.; Dwivedi, K.K.; Khathing, D.T.; Srivastava, A.; Avasthi, D.K.; Ghosh, S.; Fink, D.

    2000-01-01

    In polymers, the carbonaceous clusters are supposed to be responsible for the electrical conductivity. So, the irradiation of organic polymers namely polypropylene (8μ) and polyimide (50μ) by energetic heavy ions 28 Si and 58 Ni produce significant changes in the size of these clusters leading to the corresponding change in the band gap and other electrical properties as revealed by the UV-VIS spectroscopic examinations. (author)

  2. Technical Note: Experimental carbon ion range verification in inhomogeneous phantoms using prompt gammas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Dedes, G.; Krimmer, J.; Ray, C.; Testa, E., E-mail: e.testa@ipnl.in2p3.fr; Testa, M. [IPNL, Université de Lyon, Lyon F-69003 |(France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); De Rydt, M. [IPNL, Université de Lyon, Lyon F-69003 (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Leuven B-3001 (Belgium); Freud, N.; Létang, J. M. [CREATIS, Université de Lyon, Lyon F-69003 (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, INSA-Lyon, Centre Léon Bérard, 69008 Lyon (France)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to experimentally assess the possibility to monitor carbon ion range variations—due to tumor shift and/or elongation or shrinking—using prompt-gamma (PG) emission with inhomogeneous phantoms. Such a study is related to the development of PG monitoring techniques to be used in a carbon ion therapy context. Methods: A 95 MeV/u carbon ion beam was used to irradiate phantoms with a variable density along the ion path to mimic the presence of bone and lung in homogeneous humanlike tissue. PG profiles were obtained after a longitudinal scan of the phantoms. A setup comprising a narrow single-slit collimator and two detectors placed at 90° with respect to the beam axis was used. The time of flight technique was applied to allow the selection between PG and background events. Results: Using the positions at 50% entrance and 50% falloff of the PG profiles, a quantity called prompt-gamma profile length (PGPL) is defined. It is possible to observe shifts in the PGPL when there are absolute ion range shifts as small as 1–2 mm. Quantitatively, for an ion range shift of −1.33 ± 0.46 mm (insertion of a Teflon slab), a PGPL difference of −1.93 ± 0.58 mm and −1.84 ± 1.27 mm is obtained using a BaF{sub 2} and a NaI(Tl) detector, respectively. In turn, when an ion range shift of 4.59 ± 0.42 mm (insertion of a lung-equivalent material slab) is considered, the difference is of 4.10 ± 0.54 and 4.39 ± 0.80 mm for the same detectors. Conclusions: Herein, experimental evidence of the usefulness of employing PG to monitor carbon ion range using inhomogeneous phantoms is presented. Considering the homogeneous phantom as reference, the results show that the information provided by the PG emission allows for detecting ion range shifts as small as 1–2 mm. When considering the expected PG emission from an energy slice in a carbon ion therapy scenario, the experimental setup would allow to retrieve the same PGPL as the high statistics of

  3. A Deterministic Electron, Photon, Proton and Heavy Ion Radiation Transport Suite for the Study of the Jovian System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Badavi, Francis F.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    A deterministic suite of radiation transport codes, developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), which describe the transport of electrons, photons, protons, and heavy ions in condensed media is used to simulate exposures from spectral distributions typical of electrons, protons and carbon-oxygen-sulfur (C-O-S) trapped heavy ions in the Jovian radiation environment. The particle transport suite consists of a coupled electron and photon deterministic transport algorithm (CEPTRN) and a coupled light particle and heavy ion deterministic transport algorithm (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means for the spacecraft design community to rapidly perform numerous repetitive calculations essential for electron, proton and heavy ion radiation exposure assessments in complex space structures. In this paper, the radiation environment of the Galilean satellite Europa is used as a representative boundary condition to show the capabilities of the transport suite. While the transport suite can directly access the output electron spectra of the Jovian environment as generated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Galileo Interim Radiation Electron (GIRE) model of 2003; for the sake of relevance to the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), the 105 days at Europa mission fluence energy spectra provided by JPL is used to produce the corresponding dose-depth curve in silicon behind an aluminum shield of 100 mils ( 0.7 g/sq cm). The transport suite can also accept ray-traced thickness files from a computer-aided design (CAD) package and calculate the total ionizing dose (TID) at a specific target point. In that regard, using a low-fidelity CAD model of the Galileo probe, the transport suite was verified by comparing with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for orbits JOI--J35 of the Galileo extended mission (1996-2001). For the upcoming EJSM mission with a potential launch date of 2020, the transport suite is used to compute

  4. Radiation deterioration of ion-exchange Nafion N117CS membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Yasunori; Hiroki, Akihiro; Tamada, Masao; Isobe, Kanetsugu; Yamanishi, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    The cation-exchange Nafion N117 membranes swelling in electrolyte solution were irradiated with γ-rays or electron beams at various doses up to 1500 kGy in the temperature range from room temperature to 343 K to obtain detailed information on the effect of ion-exchange on the radiation deterioration in mechanical properties and ion-exchange capacity. Considerable deterioration in mechanical properties was observed when the Nafion membranes swelling in electrolyte solution were irradiated. A reason is the promotion of degradation with oxygen molecules produced by the irradiation of electrolyte solution. The concentration of electrolyte solution influenced strongly the radiation deterioration in mechanical properties. Keeping the concentration of metal ions to be negligible is important when electrolyzed highly radioactive solution in the light of the durability of polyperfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membrane. A sort of cation in electrolyte solution negligibly influenced radiation deterioration in mechanical properties. A sort of anion in electrolyte solution had negligible effect on radiation deterioration in mechanical properties and ion-exchange capacity. The discrepancy in the radiation deterioration in mechanical properties of Nafion membranes swelling in NaCl solution was observed between the specimens irradiated with γ-rays and electron beams. This discrepancy can be explained from the low diffusivity of oxygen from bulk into the membrane.

  5. Features of destruction of solids by laser radiation in process of formation of multiply charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedilov, R.M.; Bedilov, M.R.; Sabitov, M.M.; Matnazarov, A.; Niyozov, B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: It is known, under interaction of laser radiation with solid surface a power density q > 0.01 W/cm 2 are observed destruction of a solid and issue of electrons, ions, neutrals, neutrons, plasmas, and also radiation in a wide ranges of a spectra. Despite of a plenty of works, devoted to study of processes of interaction, the studies of feature of destruction of solids by laser beam in process of formation multiply charged ions are insufficiently investigated. The results of study feature of destruction of solids by laser radiation in process of formation multiply charged ions are given in this work. In our experiments, we used the mass spectrometer with single-channel laser radiation. The laser installation had the following parameters: a power density of laser radiation q=(0.1-50) GW/cm 2 ; the angle of incidence a=18 deg. to the target surface Al, (W). It was obtained experimentally dynamics of morphology of destruction and also mass - charge and energy spectra of multiply charged ions formed under interaction of laser radiation with Al (W) in the intensity range q=(0.1-50) GW/cm 2 . These studies showed features of destruction Al(W) by laser radiation, i.e. invariable of value evaporation mass from a surface of a solid increase as the laser intensity q. But thus temperature a pair increases in accordance with increase of flow density of a laser radiation. Increase of temperature the pair gives in formation of multiply charged plasma. It is typical that, as q of the laser increases the maximum charge number of ions in laser plasma considerably increase and their energy spectra extend toward higher energies. For example, under q=0.1 GW/cm 2 and 50 GW/cm 2 the maximum charge number of ions Al (W) are equal to Z max = 1 and 7, respectively. From the experimental data obtained, we can conclude that, the formed multiply charged plasma practically completely absorption laser radiation and 'shielding' a target surface for various metals at power densities

  6. Observation of a shift of multicharged silicon ion recombination radiation jumps in a laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, N.G.; Kalashnikov, M.P.; Mikhajlov, Yu.A.; Rode, A.V.; Sklizkov, G.V.; Fedotov, S.I.

    1984-01-01

    In experiments on heating and compression of shell targets for the case of three-fold magnification of the laser radiation flux density on a target a shift in the recombination Si +13 ion radiation jump of 46+-8 eV has been observed, which corresponds to ionic density (1.3+-1)x10 20 cm -3 . To explain the mechanism of the jump shift, a scheme of potential energy and energy levels of two hydrogen-like ions are presented. It is shown that recording of the recombination radiation intensity jump enables one to determine the electron temperature of a plasma Tsub(e)sub(e). T value determined from the ratio of the intensity of continuous radiation before and after the recombination jump is 0.95+-0.1 keV

  7. Cooling of ions trapped in potential wells produced by electromagnetic radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobehart, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The probability distributions for the ground state and the excited state of a two-level ion trapped in an harmonic potential well are studied. The ion is excited by electromagnetic radiation and relaxes back due to either spontaneous or stimulated emission. The photon statistics is considered Poissonian and the momentum transfer between the electromagnetic field and the ion is assumed discrete. The present results are closely related to the quantum treatment in the heavy particle limit as well as to those derived from previous semiclassical models. (Author) [es

  8. Carbonation of wollastonite(001) competing hydration: microscopic insights from ion spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Roberto C; Cho, Kyeongjae; Brüner, Philipp; Welle, Alexander; Gerdes, Andreas; Thissen, Peter

    2015-03-04

    In this paper, we report about the influence of the chemical potential of water on the carbonation reaction of wollastonite (CaSiO3) as a model surface of cement and concrete. Total energy calculations based on density functional theory combined with kinetic barrier predictions based on nudge elastic band method show that the exposure of the water-free wollastonite surface to CO2 results in a barrier-less carbonation. CO2 reacts with the surface oxygen and forms carbonate (CO3(2-)) complexes together with a major reconstruction of the surface. The reaction comes to a standstill after one carbonate monolayer has been formed. In case one water monolayer is covering the wollastonite surface, the carbonation is no more barrier-less, yet ending in a localized monolayer. Covered with multilayers of water, the thermodynamic ground state of the wollastonite completely changes due to a metal-proton exchange reaction (also called early stage hydration) and Ca(2+) ions are partially removed from solid phase into the H2O/wollastonite interface. Mobile Ca(2+) reacts again with CO2 and forms carbonate complexes, ending in a delocalized layer. By means of high-resolution time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry images, we confirm that hydration can lead to a partially delocalization of Ca(2+) ions on wollastonite surfaces. Finally, we evaluate the impact of our model surface results by the meaning of low-energy ion-scattering spectroscopy combined with careful discussion about the competing reactions of carbonation vs hydration.

  9. High dose radiation damage in nuclear energy structural materials investigated by heavy ion irradiation simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongnan; Xu Yongjun; Yuan Daqing

    2014-01-01

    Structural materials in ITER, ADS and fast reactor suffer high dose irradiations of neutrons and/or protons, that leads to severe displacement damage up to lOO dpa per year. Investigation of radiation damage induced by such a high dose irradiation has attracted great attention along with the development of nuclear energy facilities of new generation. However, it is deeply hampered for the lacking of high dose neutron and proton sources. Irradiation simulation of heavy ions produced by accelerators opens up an effective way for laboratory investigation of high dose irradiation induced radiation damage encountered in the ITER, ADS, etc. Radiation damage is caused mainly by atomic displacement in materials. The displacement rate of heavy ions is about lO 3 ∼10 7 orders higher than those of neutrons and protons. High displacement rate of heavy ions significantly reduces the irradiation time. The heavy ion irradiation simulation technique (HIIS) technique has been developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy and a series of the HIIS experiments have been performed to investigate radiation damage in stainless steels, tungsten and tantalum at irradiation temperatures from room temperature to 800 ℃ and in the irradiation dose region up to 100 dpa. The experimental results show that he radiation swelling peak for the modified stainless steel appears in the temperature region around 580 ℃ and the radiation damage is more sensitive to the temperature, the size of the radiation induced vacancy cluster or void increase with the increasing of the irradiation dose, and among the three materials the home-made modified stainless steel has the best radiation resistant property. (authors)

  10. Investigation of radiative charging of dielectrics irradiated by ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dergobuzov, K.A.; Yalovets, A.P.

    1994-01-01

    Within the framework of the Gusel'nikov mathematical model are fulflled numerical investigations of charging dielectrics irradiated with ions and atoms. The model accounts for dynamics of quasi-free charge carriers of each sign with account of processes of dielectrics ionization with a beam, charge recombination and charge drift in an electric fields. The effective mobility of charge carriers is determined with account for its dependence on the dose rate

  11. Characterization of the interaction between therapeutical carbon ions and bone-like materials and related impact on treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichhorn, Anna; Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwereionen, Darmstadt (Germany); TU Darmstadt (Germany); Carlino, Antonio [University of Palermo (Italy); Kaderka, Robert; Kraemer, Michael; La Tessa, Chiara; Scifoni, Emanuele [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwereionen, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most common and effective therapies for cancer. The treatment planning system for ions TRiP98 was developed at GSI, Darmstadt. In TRiP98, the interaction between primary radiation and tissue is modeled from experimental data measured in water and rescaled to other tissue. This approximation is not accurate enough for biological materials whose elemental composition besides density deviates significantly from water. The nuclear attenuation of carbon beams in bone-like materials was measured and an estimation of the fragmentation cross section was done. In parallel, the dose profile inhomogeneity predicted by TRiP98 at the interface between water and bones was investigated and measured at HIT (Heidelberg). A 3D treatment plan was delivered in a water phantom equipped with bone targets. Pin-point ionization chambers and X-ray dosimetric films were used for measuring the dose at different positions. As a further step, the measured cross sections of carbon ions in bone have been implemented in TRiP98. The comparison of the dose profiles calculated with the standard and benchmarked versions of the treatment planning will give an estimate of the improvement.

  12. Randomised phase I/II study to evaluate carbon ion radiotherapy versus fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with recurrent or progressive gliomas: The CINDERELLA trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Wick, Wolfgang; Debus, Jürgen; Burkholder, Iris; Edler, Lutz; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Jäkel, Oliver; Haberer, Thomas; Haselmann, Renate; Unterberg, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of patients with recurrent glioma includes neurosurgical resection, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. In most cases, a full course of radiotherapy has been applied after primary diagnosis, therefore application of re-irradiation has to be applied cauteously. With modern precision photon techniques such as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), a second course of radiotherapy is safe and effective and leads to survival times of 22, 16 and 8 months for recurrent WHO grade II, III and IV gliomas. Carbon ions offer physical and biological characteristics. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 2 and 5 depending on the GBM cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Protons, however, offer an RBE which is comparable to photons. First Japanese Data on the evaluation of carbon ion radiation therapy for the treatment of primary high-grade gliomas showed promising results in a small and heterogeneous patient collective. In the current Phase I/II-CINDERELLA-trial re-irradiation using carbon ions will be compared to FSRT applied to the area of contrast enhancement representing high-grade tumor areas in patients with recurrent gliomas. Within the Phase I Part of the trial, the Recommended Dose (RD) of carbon ion radiotherapy will be determined in a dose escalation scheme. In the subsequent randomized Phase II part, the RD will be evaluated in the experimental arm, compared to the standard arm, FSRT with a total dose of 36 Gy in single doses of 2 Gy. Primary endpoint of the Phase I part is toxicity. Primary endpoint of the randomized part II is survival after re-irradiation at 12 months, secondary endpoint is progression-free survival. The Cinderella trial is the first study to evaluate carbon ion

  13. Effect of radiation quality on radical formation in ion-irradiated solid alanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Yoshida, Hiroshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Namba, Hideki; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Kojima, Takuji

    1997-03-01

    Radical formation in solid alanine irradiated with H{sup +} and He{sup +} ions of 0.5-3.0 MeV and with heavy ions of hundreds of MeV was examined by the ESR method. Radical yield is constant below a critical fluence, and the yield decreases above the fluence. The critical fluence for the H{sup +} and He{sup +} ions is about 10{sup 12} ions cm{sup -2}, while the critical fluence for the heavy ions is 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} ions cm{sup -2}. G-value of the radical formation (radicals per 100 eV absorbed dose) is obtained from the constant yield at the low fluences. The G-value depends on the radiation quality. This dependence is ascribed to the difference of local dose in the ion tracks. The fluence-yield curves were simulated with a model assuming cylindrical shape of ion tracks and dose-yield relationship for {gamma}-irradiation. This model well explains the fluence-yield curves for the ion irradiations. (author)

  14. Does carbonate ion control planktonic foraminifera shell calcification in upwelling regions?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Godad, S.P.; Naidu, P.D.

    are still debated and to utilize shell weights of a particular species as a surface water carbonate ion proxy, it is important to understand whether [CO = 3 ] controls shell calcification in that species over a period of time. We therefore utilize...

  15. Radioprotective effects of melatonin on carbon-ion and X ray irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masayoshi; Kawata, Tetsuya; Liu, C.; Sakurai, Akiko; Ito, Hisao; Ando, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    The radioprotective ability of melatonin was investigated in C3H mice irradiated to a whole-body X-ray (150 Kv, 20 mA) and carbon-ion (290 MeV/u). Mice exposed to X-ray, 13 KeV/μm and 50 KeV/μm carbon-ion dose of 7.0-7.5 Gy, 6.5-7.25 Gy and 6.0-6.5 Gy, respectively. One hour before the irradiation, mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of 0.2 ml of either solvent (soybean oil) or melatonin (250 mg/kg, uniform suspension in soybean oil). Mice were observed for mortality over a period of 30 days following irradiation. Results obtained the first year are as follows. The toxicity of melatonin (at a dose 250 mg/kg) intraperitoneal administered to mice could not be observed. A pretreatment of melatonin is effective in protecting mice from lethal damage of low-linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation (X-ray and 13 KeV/μm carbon-ion). In the high-LET irradiated mice with 50 KeV/μm carbon-ion, melatonin exhibited a slight increase in their survival. (author)

  16. Pyrolytic Carbon Nanosheets for Ultrafast and Ultrastable Sodium-Ion Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Se Youn; Kang, Minjee; Choi, Jaewon; Lee, Min Eui; Yoon, Hyeon Ji; Kim, Hae Jin; Leal, Cecilia; Lee, Sungho; Jin, Hyoung-Joon; Yun, Young Soo

    2018-04-01

    Na-ion cointercalation in the graphite host structure in a glyme-based electrolyte represents a new possibility for using carbon-based materials (CMs) as anodes for Na-ion storage. However, local microstructures and nanoscale morphological features in CMs affect their electrochemical performances; they require intensive studies to achieve high levels of Na-ion storage performances. Here, pyrolytic carbon nanosheets (PCNs) composed of multitudinous graphitic nanocrystals are prepared from renewable bioresources by heating. In particular, PCN-2800 prepared by heating at 2800 °C has a distinctive sp 2 carbon bonding nature, crystalline domain size of ≈44.2 Å, and high electrical conductivity of ≈320 S cm -1 , presenting significantly high rate capability at 600 C (60 A g -1 ) and stable cycling behaviors over 40 000 cycles as an anode for Na-ion storage. The results of this study show the unusual graphitization behaviors of a char-type carbon precursor and exceptionally high rate and cycling performances of the resulting graphitic material, PCN-2800, even surpassing those of supercapacitors. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiwon Kang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructural materials have gained the spotlight as promising anode materials for energy storage; they exhibit unique physico-chemical properties such as large surface area, short Li+ ion diffusion length, and high electrical conductivity, in addition to their long-term stability. However, carbon-nanostructured materials have issues with low areal and volumetric densities for the practical applications in electric vehicles, portable electronics, and power grid systems, which demand higher energy and power densities. One approach to overcoming these issues is to design and apply a three-dimensional (3D electrode accommodating a larger loading amount of active anode materials while facilitating Li+ ion diffusion. Furthermore, 3D nanocarbon frameworks can impart a conducting pathway and structural buffer to high-capacity non-carbon nanomaterials, which results in enhanced Li+ ion storage capacity. In this paper, we review our recent progress on the design and fabrication of 3D carbon nanostructures, their performance in Li-ion batteries (LIBs, and their implementation into large-scale, lightweight, and flexible LIBs.

  18. Enhanced wear resistance of production tools and steel samples by implantation of nitrogen and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, N.J.; Straede, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years ion implantation has become a feasible technique for obtaining improved wear resistance of production tools. However, basic knowledge of how and in which cases ion implantation is working at its best is still needed. The present paper discusses structural and tribological investigations of carbon and nitrogen implanted steels. The nitrogen data were obtained mainly from field tests and the investigation of carbon implantations took place mainly in the laboratory. A study was made of how the tribological behaviour of implanted steels changes with different implantation parameters. The tribological laboratory investigations were carried out using pin-on-disc equipment under controlled test conditions, and deal with high dose carbon implantation (approximately (1-2)x10 18 ions cm -2 ). The wear resistance of steels was enhanced dramatically, by up to several orders of magnitude. The field test results cover a broad range of ion implanted production tools, which showed a marked improvement in wear resistance. Nitrogen implanted tools are also compared with carbon and titanium implanted tools. (orig.)

  19. Rigid versus Flexible Ligands on Carbon Nanotubes for the Enhanced Sensitivity of Cobalt Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Pingping; Kraut, Nadine D.; Feigel, Ian Matthew; Star, Alexander

    2013-02-26

    Carbon nanotubes have shown great promise in the fabrication of ultra-compact and highly sensitive chemical and biological sensors. Additional chemical functionalization schemes can controllably improve selectivity of the carbon nanotube-based sensors; however the exact transduction mechanism is still under debate. In this article we detail the synthesis and selective response of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with polyazomethine (PAM) polymer towards the application of a specific trace metal ion detector. The response of the polymer system was compared to shape persistent macrocycle (MAC) comprised of identical ion coordination ligands. While ion detection with rigid MAC/SWNT chemiresistor was comparable to bare SWNT, flexible PAM offers significant SWNT signal amplification, allowing for picomolar detection of Co{sup 2+} ions with both selectivity and a fast response. We hypothesized that rearrangement of the flexible PAM on the SWNT network is a sensing mechanism which allows for ultrasensitive detection of metal ions. The electron transfer and polymer rearrangement on the SWNT was studied by a combination of optical spectroscopy and electrical measurements - ultimately allowing for a better understanding of fundamental mechanisms that prompt device response.

  20. Removal of heavy metal ions from wastewaters using dendrimer-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannazzo, Daniela; Pistone, Alessandro; Ziccarelli, Ida; Espro, Claudia; Galvagno, Signorino; Giofré, Salvatore V; Romeo, Roberto; Cicero, Nicola; Bua, Giuseppe D; Lanza, Giuseppe; Legnani, Laura; Chiacchio, Maria A

    2017-06-01

    Dendrimer-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for heavy metal ion removal from wastewaters were developed. Triazole dendrimers (TD) were built directly onto the carbon nanotube surface by successive click chemistry reactions affording the zero- and first-generation dendrimer-functionalized MWCNT (MWCNT-TD1 and MWCNT-TD2). The Moedritzer-Irani reaction carried out on the amino groups present on the MWCNT-TD2 sample gave the corresponding α-aminophosphonate nanosystem MWCNT-TD2P. Both MWCNT-TD2 and MWCNT-TD2P nanosystems have been characterized by physical, chemical, and morphological analyses. Their chelating abilities towards the toxic metal ions Pb 2+ , Hg 2+ , and Ni 2+ and the harmless Ca 2+ ion have been experimentally evaluated in the two different sets of experiments and at the salt concentrations of 1 mg/mL or 1 μg/mL by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results of these studies pointed out the interesting chelating behavior for the phosphonated nanosystem towards the Hg 2+ ion. The complexation mode of the best chelating system MWCNT-TD2P with mercury was investigated through density functional theory (DFT) calculations, suggesting a chelation mechanism involving the two oxygen atoms of the phosphate group. The synthesized dendrimers, supported on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes, have shown the potential to be used for the selective toxic metal ion removal and recovery.

  1. Effects of main traits of sweet sorghum irradiated by carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjian; He Jingyu; Liu Qingfang; Yu Lixia; Dong Xicun

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the influence of carbon ion irradiation on important agronomic characters of sweet sorghum, dry seeds of Sweet Sorghum BJ0601 and BJ0602 were irradiated by 100 MeV/u 12 C +6 ion beam to different doses at Heavy Ion Accelerator National Laboratory in Lanzhou (HIANLL). When matured, the main traits of sweet sorghum were measured. The correlation coefficient of five main agronomic characters, i.e. number of node, plant height, stalk diameter, sugar content and stem weight per plant, were analyzed using the SPSS 13.0 software. The results indicated that the obvious influence of sweet sorghum irradiated by carbon ion beam was observed. In addition, the correlation of main traits was studied. This study may provide rudimental data to select novel variety of sweet sorghum suited for fuel ethanol production. In addition, the average of sugar content of early mutant BJ0601-1 is higher than BJ0601 in M2, and the sugar content of sweet sorghum may be improved by carbon ion beam irradiation. (authors)

  2. Alternate dipping preparation of biomimetic apatite layers in the presence of carbonate ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelain, Grégory; Bourgeois, Damien; Meyer, Daniel; Ravaux, Johann; Averseng, Olivier; Vidaud, Claude

    2014-01-01

    The classical simulated body fluids method cannot be employed to prepare biomimetic apatites encompassing metallic ions that lead to very stable phosphates. This is the case for heavy metals such as uranium, whose presence in bone mineral after contamination deserves toxicological study. We have demonstrated that existing methods, based on alternate dipping into calcium and phosphate ions solutions, can be adapted to achieve this aim. We have also especially studied the impact of the presence of carbonate ions in the medium as these are necessary to avoid hydrolysis of the contaminating metallic cations. Both the apatite–collagen complex method and a standard chemical (STD) method employing only mineral solutions lead to biomimetic apatites when calcium and carbonate ions are introduced simultaneously. The obtained materials were fully characterized and we established that the STD method tolerates the presence of carbonate ions much better, and this leads to homogeneous samples. Emphasis was set on the repeatability of the method to ensure the relevancy of further work performed on series of samples. Finally, osteoblasts cultured on these samples also proved a similar yield and standard-deviation in their adenosine triphosphate content when compared to commercially available substrates designed to study of such cell cultures. (paper)

  3. Evolution of Xe spectrum and ion charge under sudden incoming radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapisch, Marcel; Busquet, Michel

    2012-06-01

    Experiments [1] and simulations of Xe at high temperature were recently reported, due to the possible scaling of astrophysical radiative shocks [2]. We used the newest version of HULLAC [3] to compute energy levels, radiative and collisional transition rates and level populations in a Coronal Radiative Model for the ions Xe9+ to Xe44+ (36263 configurations), at electron temperature of 100 eV and electron density of 10^19 -- 10^21 e/cm^3, in the presence of an external Planckian radiation field. Static and time dependent influence of the radiation on ion charge and spectrum is described. We show an effect of shell structure on relaxation of ion charge when the radiation field is suddenly turn on.[4pt] [1] Busquet, M., Thais, F., Gonzalez, M., et al., J. App. Phys. 107, 083302 (2010).[0pt] [2] Ryutov, D., Drake, R. P., Kane, J., et al., Astrophys. J. 518, 821 (1999).[0pt] [3] Klapisch, M. and Busquet, M., High Ener. Dens. Phys. 7, 98 (2011).

  4. Recommended atomic data for collisional-radiative model of Li-like ions and gain calculation for Li-like Al ions in the recombining plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, T.; Kawachi, T.; Nishihara, K.; Fujimoto, T.

    1995-09-01

    We have assessed atomic data for lithium-like ions for the purpose of constructing a reliable collisional-radiative model. We show several examples of the atomic data for aluminum and oxygen ions, and comparison of data from several sources is done in detail. For ions with nuclear charge z, the scaling formulas and fitting parameters, which are based on the data of oxygen ions, are presented. By use of these data, we have constructed two collisional-radiative models: the one for aluminum ions and the one for ions according to the scaling for z. The population inversion and the amplification gain of the soft x-ray laser lines in the recombining aluminum plasma are calculated for several electron temperatures. We also examine the effects of ion collisions for Δn=0 transitions on the excited level populations

  5. Systematic investigations on acyclic organic carbonate solvents for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, J.; Peter, S.; Novak, P.

    2003-03-01

    Electrochemical cycling tests on cells with graphite electrodes and several alkyl methyl carbonates were performed. Experiments with mixed binary solvent electrolytes with ethylene carbonate (EC) showed that the alkyl methyl carbonates H{sub 3}CO(CO)O(CH{sub 2}){sub n}H (n = 3-5) are suitable as co-solvents in lithium-ion batteries. Ternary mixtures of EC, BMC, and propylene carbonate (PC) showed better overall performan