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Sample records for carbon ion induced

  1. Erythrocyte stiffness during morphological remodeling induced by carbon ion radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoping Zhang

    Full Text Available The adverse effect induced by carbon ion radiation (CIR is still an unavoidable hazard to the treatment object. Thus, evaluation of its adverse effects on the body is a critical problem with respect to radiation therapy. We aimed to investigate the change between the configuration and mechanical properties of erythrocytes induced by radiation and found differences in both the configuration and the mechanical properties with involving in morphological remodeling process. Syrian hamsters were subjected to whole-body irradiation with carbon ion beams (1, 2, 4, and 6 Gy or X-rays (2, 4, 6, and 12 Gy for 3, 14 and 28 days. Erythrocytes in peripheral blood and bone marrow were collected for cytomorphological analysis. The mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were determined using atomic force microscopy, and the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was analyzed via western blotting. The results showed that dynamic changes were evident in erythrocytes exposed to different doses of carbon ion beams compared with X-rays and the control (0 Gy. The magnitude of impairment of the cell number and cellular morphology manifested the subtle variation according to the irradiation dose. In particular, the differences in the size, shape and mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were well exhibited. Furthermore, immunoblot data showed that the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was changed after irradiation, and there was a common pattern among its substantive characteristics in the irradiated group. Based on these findings, the present study concluded that CIR could induce a change in mechanical properties during morphological remodeling of erythrocytes. According to the unique characteristics of the biomechanical categories, we deduce that changes in cytomorphology and mechanical properties can be measured to evaluate the adverse effects generated by tumor radiotherapy. Additionally, for the first time, the current study

  2. Ion-irradiation-induced defects in bundles of carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Salonen, E; Nordlund, K

    2002-01-01

    We study the structure and formation yields of atomic-scale defects produced by low-dose Ar ion irradiation in bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes. For this, we employ empirical potential molecular dynamics and simulate ion impact events over an energy range of 100-1000 eV. We show that the most common defects produced at all energies are vacancies on nanotube walls, which at low temperatures are metastable but long-lived defects. We further calculate the spatial distribution of the defects, which proved to be highly non-uniform. We also show that ion irradiation gives rise to the formations of inter-tube covalent bonds mediated by carbon recoils and nanotube lattice distortions due to dangling bond saturation. The number of inter-tube links, as well as the overall damage, linearly grows with the energy of incident ions.

  3. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 1017 ions-cm− 2, 2.4 × 1017 ions-cm− 2, and 4.8 × 1017 ions-cm− 2. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation

  4. Raman Spectroscopy of Irradiation Effect in Three Carbon Allotropes Induced by Low Energy B Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yun-Chong; JIN Yun-Fan; YAO Cun-Feng; ZHANG Chong-Hong

    2009-01-01

    Irradiation effect in three carbon allotropes C6o, diamond and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) induced by 170 keV B ions, mainly including the process of the damage creation, is investigated by means of Rarnan spectroscopy technique. The differences on irradiation sensitivity and structural stability for C6o, HOPG and diamond are compared. The analysis results indicate that C6o is the most sensitive for B ions irradiation, diamond is the second one and the structure of HOPG is the most stable under B ion irradiation. The damage cross sections σ of C6o, diamond and HOPG deduced from the Raman spectra are 7.78 × 10-15, 6.38 × 10-15 and 1.31 × 10-15 cm-2, respectively.

  5. DOSE TO RADIOLOGICAL TECHNOLOGISTS FROM INDUCED RADIONUCLIDES IN CARBON ION RADIOTHERAPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonai, S; Spano, V

    2016-09-01

    Radioactive nuclides are induced in irradiation devices and patients during high-energy photon and ion beam radiotherapies. These nuclides potentially become sources of exposure to radiation workers. Radiological technologists (RTs) are often required to enter an irradiation room and approach activated devices and patients. In this study, annual doses to RTs working in a carbon ion radiotherapy facility were estimated based on measurements with the Si-semiconductor personal dosemeter. In addition, the time decay of dose around a patient couch after irradiation was obtained by phantom experiments. The annual Hp(10) values for passive and scanned beams were estimated to be 61 and 2 μSv, respectively, when assuming the number of treatments in 2013. These are much lower than the ICRP recommended dose limit for radiation workers. The time-series data of dose to RTs during their work and the time decay of the dose should be helpful for reducing their dose further. PMID:27179122

  6. Radiolysis and sputtering of carbon dioxide ice induced by swift Ti, Ni, and Xe ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, C.; Bender, M.; Severin, D.; Trautmann, C.; Boduch, Ph.; Bordalo, V.; Domaracka, A.; Lv, X. Y.; Martinez, R.; Rothard, H.

    2015-12-01

    Solid carbon dioxide (CO2) is found in several bodies of the solar system, the interstellar medium (ISM) and young stellar objects, where it is exposed to cosmic and stellar wind radiation. Here, the chemical and physical modifications induced by heavy ion irradiation of pure solid CO2 at low temperature (T = 15-30 K) are analyzed. The experiments were performed with Ti (550 MeV) and Xe (630 MeV) ions at the UNILAC of GSI/Darmstadt and with Ni ions (46 and 52 MeV) at IRRSUD of GANIL/Caen. The evolution of the thin CO2 ice films (deposited on a CsI window) was monitored by mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR). The dissociation rate of CO2, determined from the fluence dependence of the IR absorption peak intensity, is found to be proportional to the electronic stopping power Se. We also confirm that the sputtering yield shows a quadric increase with electronic stopping power. Furthermore, the production rates of daughter molecules such as CO, CO3 and O3 were found to be linear in Se.

  7. Carbon Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Biological effects on Oryza sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Xishan; Gong, Ning; Meng, Qingmei; Liu, Jiawei; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Large number of researches on rice after spaceflights indicated that rice was a favorable model organism to study biological effects induced by space radiation. The stimulative effect could often be found on rice seedlings after irradiation by low-dose energetic heavy-ion radiation. Spaceflight also could induce stimulative effect on kinds of seeds. To further understand the mechanism of low-dose radiation biological effects and the dose range, the germinated rice seeds which were irradiated by different doses of carbon heavy-ion (0, 0.02, 0.1, 0.2, 1, 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20Gy, LET=27.3keV/µm) were used as materials to study. By investigating the variation of rice phenotype under different doses, we found that 2Gy radiation dose was a dividing point of the phenotypic variation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the variation of mitochondria, chloroplast, endoplasmic reticulum, ribosome and nucleus in mesophyll cell of rice apical meristem at 24 hours after radiation with different doses. The cells were not apparently physiologically damaged when the dose of radiation was less than 2Gy. The number of chloroplast did not change significantly, but the number of mitochondria was significantly increased, and gathered around in the chloroplast and endoplasmic reticulum; the obvious lesion of chloroplast and mitochondria were found at the mesophyll cells when radiation dose was higher than 2Gy. The mitochondria were swelling and appearing blurred crest. The chloroplast and mitochondrial mutation rate increased significantly (pplant. Keywords: Heavy-ion radiation; Low dose; Stimulation effect; Inhibition effect; Rice.

  8. Carbon-ion beam irradiation kills X-ray-resistant p53-null cancer cells by inducing mitotic catastrophe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napapat Amornwichet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To understand the mechanisms involved in the strong killing effect of carbon-ion beam irradiation on cancer cells with TP53 tumor suppressor gene deficiencies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: DNA damage responses after carbon-ion beam or X-ray irradiation in isogenic HCT116 colorectal cancer cell lines with and without TP53 (p53+/+ and p53-/-, respectively were analyzed as follows: cell survival by clonogenic assay, cell death modes by morphologic observation of DAPI-stained nuclei, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs by immunostaining of phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX, and cell cycle by flow cytometry and immunostaining of Ser10-phosphorylated histone H3. RESULTS: The p53-/- cells were more resistant than the p53+/+ cells to X-ray irradiation, while the sensitivities of the p53+/+ and p53-/- cells to carbon-ion beam irradiation were comparable. X-ray and carbon-ion beam irradiations predominantly induced apoptosis of the p53+/+ cells but not the p53-/- cells. In the p53-/- cells, carbon-ion beam irradiation, but not X-ray irradiation, markedly induced mitotic catastrophe that was associated with premature mitotic entry with harboring long-retained DSBs at 24 h post-irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: Efficient induction of mitotic catastrophe in apoptosis-resistant p53-deficient cells implies a strong cancer cell-killing effect of carbon-ion beam irradiation that is independent of the p53 status, suggesting its biological advantage over X-ray treatment.

  9. Heavy-ion induced desorption yields of amorphous carbon films bombarded with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Küchler, D; Scrivens, R; Costa Pinto, P; Yin Vallgren, C; Bender, M

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade, intense experimental studies on the heavy-ion induced molecular desorption were performed in several particle accelerator laboratories worldwide in order to understand and overcome large dynamic pressure rises caused by lost beam ions. Different target materials and various coatings were studied for desorption and mitigation techniques were applied to heavy-ion accelerators. For the upgrade of the CERN injector complex, a coating of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) vacuum system with a thin film of amorphous carbon is under study to mitigate the electron cloud effect observed during SPS operation with the nominal proton beam for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since the SPS is also part of the heavy-ion injector chain for LHC, dynamic vacuum studies of amorphous carbon films are important to determine their ion induced desorption yields. At the CERN Heavy Ion Accelerator (LINAC 3), carbon-coated accelerator-type stainless steel vacuum chambers were tested for desorption using 4.2 Me...

  10. Bystander effects induced by medium from carbon-ion irradiated human cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ju-Fang; LI Wen-Jian; ZHOU Guang-Ming; DANG Bing-Rong; MA Qiu-Feng; FENG Yan

    2005-01-01

    The bystander effects induced by medium from human hepatoma SMMC-7721 and adenocarcinoma F56 cells irradiated with carbon ions were investigated. It was found that the survival fraction (SF) of the irradiated cells decreased exponentially along with the increased dose. SMMC-7721 cells were more radiosensitive than F56 cells.The plating efficiency (PE) of the non-irradiated cells treated with irradiated conditioned medium (ICM) was obviously lower than the PE of control cells for SMMC-7721 cells but not for F56 cells. Moreover, the reduced PE and SF by ICM treatment were more significant for 1Gy irradiation than for 6Gy irradiation on SMMC-7721 cells. These results suggest that the irradiated cells can secrete factor(s) into medium that is cytotoxic to bystander non-irradiated cells. The bystander effects are dependent on cell genotype presented at the time of irradiation and radiation dose.This makes impact on the precise estimation of the effects of radiation and tumor radiotherapy.

  11. Carbon Ion Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Herrmann, Rochus;

    On the importance of choice of target size for selective boosting of hypoxic tumor subvolumina in carbon ion therapy Purpose: Functional imaging methods in radiotherapy are maturing and can to some extent uncover radio resistant structures found within a tumour entity. Selective boost of identified...... effect. All cell lines investigated here did not reach an OER of 1, even for the smaller structures, which may indicate that the achievable dose average LET of carbon ions is too low, and heavier ions than carbon may be considered for functional LET-painting....

  12. Bystander effects induced by the low-fluence irradiation of carbon and iron ions (6 MeV/n)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many reports are available regarding bystander effects after exposure to low fluences of alpha particles and helium ions. However, few studies have examined bystander cellular effects after exposure to low fluences of ion species heavier than helium. We has been investigating bystander effects using both human normal fibroblasts and tumor cell lines irradiated with low energy (6 MeV/n) carbon or iron ions generated with the Medium Energy Beam Course. This year we focused on the bystander cellular effects as follows; Bystander cell-killing effect in human tumor cell lines irradiated with carbon ions. Relationship of bystander lethal effect between p53-wild and p53-mutated cells. Bystander cell-killing effect was observed in human normal and tumor cells harboring wild-type p53, but not in p53-mutated tumor cells. Moreover, observed bystander effect was suppressed by treating with a specific inhibitor of gap-junction mediated cell-cell communication. There is evidence that p53- and gap-junction-related bystander effect is an important role of carbon-ion induced lethal effect. (author)

  13. Carbon ion induced DNA double-strand breaks in melanophore B16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in melanophore B16 induced by plateau and extended Bragg peak of 75 MeV/u 12C6+ ions were studied by using a technique of inverse pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PIGE). DNA fragment lengths were distributed in two ranges: the larger in 1.4 Mbp-3.2 Mbp and the smaller in less than 1.2 Mbp. It indicates that distribution of DNA fragments induced by heavy ion irradiation is not stochastic and there probably are sensitive sites to heavy ions in DNA molecules of B16. Percentage of DNA released from plug (PR) increased and trended towards a quasi-plateau ∝85% as dose increased. Content of the larger fragments decreased and flattened with increasing dose while content of the smaller ones increased and trended towards saturation. (orig.)

  14. Carbon ion induced DNA double-strand breaks in melanophore B{sub 16}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Zengquan; Zhou Guangming; Wang Jufang; He Jing; Li Qiang; Li Wenjian; Xie Hongmei; Cai Xichen; Tao Huang; Dang Bingrong; Han Guangwu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China). Inst. of Modern Physics; Gao Qingxiang [Lanzhou Univ. (China)

    1997-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in melanophore B{sub 16} induced by plateau and extended Bragg peak of 75 MeV/u {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions were studied by using a technique of inverse pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PIGE). DNA fragment lengths were distributed in two ranges: the larger in 1.4 Mbp-3.2 Mbp and the smaller in less than 1.2 Mbp. It indicates that distribution of DNA fragments induced by heavy ion irradiation is not stochastic and there probably are sensitive sites to heavy ions in DNA molecules of B{sub 16}. Percentage of DNA released from plug (PR) increased and trended towards a quasi-plateau {proportional_to}85% as dose increased. Content of the larger fragments decreased and flattened with increasing dose while content of the smaller ones increased and trended towards saturation. (orig.)

  15. Ion beam induced charge collection (IBICC) from integrated circuit test structures using a 10 MeV carbon microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, B.N.; Bouanani, M.E.; Duggan, J.L.; McDaniel, F.D. [Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Doyle, B.L.; Walsh, D.S. [Ion Beam Materials Research Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, MS 1056, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] Aton, T.J. [Silicon Technology Development, Texas Instruments Inc., PO Box 650311, MS 3704, Dallas, Texas 75265 (United States)

    1999-06-01

    As feature sizes of Integrated Circuits (ICs) continue to shrink, the sensitivity of these devices, particularly SRAMs and DRAMs, to natural radiation is increasing. In this paper, the Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) technique is utilized to simulate neutron-induced Si recoil effects in ICs. The IBICC measurements, conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories, employed a 10 MeV carbon microbeam with 1{mu}m diameter spot to scan test structures on specifically designed ICs. With the aid of IC layout information, an analysis of the charge collection efficiency from different test areas is presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) from Integrated Circuit Test Structures Using a 10 MeV Carbon Microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aton, T.J.; Doyle, B.L.; Duggan, J.L.; El Bouanani, M.; Guo, B.N.; McDaniel, F.D.; Renfrow, S.N.; Walsh, D.S.

    1998-11-18

    As future sizes of Integrated Circuits (ICs) continue to shrink the sensitivity of these devices, particularly SRAMs and DRAMs, to natural radiation is increasing. In this paper, the Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) technique is utilized to simulate neutron-induced Si recoil effects in ICS. The IBICC measurements, conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories employed a 10 MeV carbon microbeam with 1pm diameter spot to scan test structures on specifically designed ICS. With the aid of layout information, an analysis of the charge collection efficiency from different test areas is presented. In the present work a 10 MeV Carbon high-resolution microbeam was used to demonstrate the differential charge collection efficiency in ICS with the aid of the IC design Information. When ions strike outside the FET, the charge was only measured on the outer ring, and decreased with strike distance from this diode. When ions directly strike the inner and ring diodes, the collected charge was localized to these diodes. The charge for ions striking the gate region was shared between the inner and ring diodes. I The IBICC measurements directly confirmed the interpretations made in the earlier work.

  17. Risk of simulated microgravity on testicular injury induced by high-LET carbon-ion beams in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the impact of simulated microgravity on acute injury induced by low doses of carbon ions in male reproductive organs of mice, and determined alterations in spermatogenic function and expression levels of apoptotic factors in mice following exposure to acute irradiation after 7 days of simulated microgravity. The results demonstrated that significant reductions in spermatozoa, primary spermatocytes and spermatogonia, and increased globular cells in seminiferous tubule and pro-apoptotic proteins were observed in the group exposed to over 0.4 Gy irradiation. Collectively, the data suggest that lesions inflicted by simulated microgravity are not markedly modified by lower doses of irradiation (0.2 Gy) in mouse testis compared to the control group. However, testicular impairments were markedly evident in the group exposed to higher doses of carbon ions plus simulated microgravity, which may be due at least in part to elevated apoptosis initiated by the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway in germ cells. (authors)

  18. Targeting of Carbon Ion-Induced G2 Checkpoint Activation in Lung Cancer Cells Using Wee-1 Inhibitor MK-1775.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongyu; Takahashi, Akihisa; Sejimo, Yukihiko; Adachi, Akiko; Kubo, Nobuteru; Isono, Mayu; Yoshida, Yukari; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    The potent inhibitor of the cell cycle checkpoint regulatory factor Wee-1, MK-1775, has been reported to enhance non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell sensitivity to photon radiation by abrogating radiation-induced G2 arrest. However, little is known about the effects of this sensitizer after exposure to carbon (C)-ion radiation. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the effects of C ions in combination with MK-1775 on the killing of NSCLC cells. Human NSCLC H1299 cells were exposed to X rays or C ions (290 MeV/n, 50 keV/μm at the center of a 6 cm spread-out Bragg peak) in the presence of MK-1775. The cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometry and Western blotting. Radiosensitivity was determined using clonogenic survival assays. The mechanisms underlying MK-1775 radiosensitization were studied by observing H2AX phosphorylation and mitotic catastrophe. G2 checkpoint arrest was enhanced 2.3-fold by C-ion exposure compared with X-ray exposure. Radiation-induced G2 checkpoint arrest was abrogated by MK-1775. Exposure to radiation resulted in a significant reduction in the mitotic ratio and increased phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), the primary downstream mediator of Wee-1-induced G2 arrest. The Wee-1 inhibitor, MK-1775 restored the mitotic ratio and suppressed Cdk1 phosphorylation. In addition, MK-1775 increased H1299 cell sensitivity to C ions and X rays independent of TP53 status. MK-1775 also significantly increased H2AX phosphorylation and mitotic catastrophe in irradiated cells. These results suggest that the G2 checkpoint inhibitor MK-1775 can enhance the sensitivity of human NSCLC cells to C ions as well as X rays. PMID:26645158

  19. Isolated and clustered DNA lesions induced by high-energy iron and carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, H.; Tanaka, R.; Nakaarai, Y.; Terato, H.; Furusawa, Y.

    During space flight astronauts are exposed to various types of radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays, the latter of which contain high-energy charged particles such as Fe and C ions. The radiation risk to astronauts toward such high-energy charged particles has been assessed by ground-based experiments. When irradiated by ionizing radiation, DNA molecules suffer from oxidation of bases and strand breaks. The distribution of these lesions along the DNA strand may differ significantly between densely ionizing high-energy Fe and C ions and sparsely ionizing radiation like 60Co gamma-rays. Among various types of DNA damage, bistranded clustered lesions comprised of multiple oxidized bases or strand breaks on opposite strands within a few helical turns are of particular interest since they are assumed to be resistant to repair or induce faulty repair, hence resulting in cell killing and mutations. In the present study, we have analyzed isolated and clustered DNA lesions generated by high-energy Fe and C ions to elucidate the nature of DNA lesions. Plasmid DNA (pDEL19) was irradiated in 10 mM Tris buffer (pH 7.5) by Fe (500 MeV/amu) and C (290 MeV/amu) ions and 60Co gamma-rays. Single-strand breaks (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DSB) were quantified by analysis of conformational changes using agarose gel electrophoresis. For quantification of isolated and bistranded clustered base lesions, irradiated plasmid was exhaustively digested prior to agarose gel analysis by Endo III and Fpg that preferentially incise DNA at oxidative pyrimidine and purine lesions, respectively. The yield (site/Gy/nucleotide) of isolated damages (SSB and bases lesions) tended to decrease with increasing LET [gamma (0.2 keV/μ m) 0.77 (C) > 0.69 (Fe)]. This result is in contrast to the higher biological effectiveness (e.g. cell killing) of high-energy Fe and C ions than gamma-rays, suggesting a role of more complex damage clusters that cannot be distinguished by simple analysis of direct

  20. Radiation effects on bipolar junction transistors induced by 25 MeV carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoming; Li, Xingji; Geng, Hongbin; Zhao, Zhiming; Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu

    2010-12-01

    The characteristic degradation in silicon NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) of 3DG112 type is examined under the irradiation with 25 MeV carbon (C) ions and various bias conditions. Different electrical parameters were measured in-situ during the exposure under each bias condition. From the experimental data, larger variation of base current ( IB) is observed after irradiation at a given value of base-emitter voltage ( VBE), while the collector current is only slightly affected by irradiation at a given VBE. The gain degradation is mostly affected by the behavior of the base current. The change in the reciprocal of current gain (Δ(1/ β)) increases linearly with increasing the C ions fluence. The degradation of the NPN BJTs under various bias conditions during irradiation was studied. Compared to the case where the terminals are grounded, at a given fluence, the change in the reciprocal of current gain varies slightly less when the base-emitter junction is forward biased. On the other hand, there is no distinction for the change in the reciprocal of current gain between the case of reverse-biased base-emitter junction and that of all terminals grounded for the NPN BJTs at a given fluence.

  1. Mobile ions on carbonate surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Treavor A.; Martin, Scot T.

    2005-07-01

    Surface ions move during the dissolution and growth of minerals. The present study investigates the density and the mobility of surface ions and the structure of the adsorbed water layer with changes in relative humidity (RH). The time evolution of the polarization force, which is induced by an electrically biased tip of an atomic force microscope, shows that the density and the mobility of surface ions increase with rising humidity, a finding which is consistent with increasing surface hydration. A marked change in the observations above 55% RH indicates a transition from a water layer formed by heteroepitaxial two-dimensional growth at low RH to one formed by multilayer three-dimensional growth at high RH. A comparison of the results of several rhombohedral carbonates ( viz. CaCO 3, FeCO 3, ZnCO 3, MgCO 3, and MnCO 3) shows that a long relaxation time of the polarization force at high RH is predictive of a rapid dissolution rate. This finding is rationalized by long lifetimes in terrace positions and hence greater opportunities for detachment of the ion to aqueous solution (i.e., dissolution). Our findings on the density and the mobility of surface ions therefore help to better constrain mechanistic models of hydration, ion exchange, and dissolution/growth.

  2. Biological features of an early-maturity mutant of sweet sorghum induced by carbon ions irradiation and its genetic polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xicun; Li, Wenjian

    2012-08-01

    It is well known that heavy ions irradiation is characterized by a high linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE). These characters are believed to increase mutation frequency and mutation spectrum of plants or mammalian cells irradiated by heavy ions. Here we describe an early-maturity mutant of sweet sorghum induced by carbon ion irradiation. The growth period of this mutant was shortened by about 20 days compared to the wild type. The proline content of the mutant was increased by 11.05% while the malondialdehyde content was significantly lower than that of wild type. In addition, the RAPD analysis indicated that the percentage of polymorphism between the mutant KFJT-1 and the control KFJT-CK reached 5.26%. The gain of early-maturity might solve the problem in the northwest region of China where seeds of sweet sorghum cannot be mature because of early frost. The early-maturity mutant may be important for future space cultivation.

  3. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  4. Polarization-induced distortion of ions in the pores of carbon electrodes for electrochemical capacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Ovín Ania, María Concepción; Pernak, J.; Stefaniak, F.; Raymundo-Piñero, Encarnación; Béguin, F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the effect of confining ionic species of the electrolyte inside the porosity of carbon electrodes during the performance of electrochemical capacitors. Solvent-free ionic liquids and a conventional organic medium were used as electrolytes, while two series of carbons with controlled pore sizes – one of them obtained from nanocasting procedure – were used as electrode materials. Our results demonstrate that under the effect of the electric field applied during the polarizati...

  5. Intense heavy ion beam-induced temperature effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the future FAIR facility, reliably working solid carbon stripper foils are desired for providing intermediate charge states to SIS18. With the expected high beam intensities, the foils experience enhanced degradation and limited lifetime due to severe radiation damage, stress waves, and thermal effects. This work presents systematic measurements of the temperature of different carbon-based stripper foils (amorphous, diamond-like, and carbon-nanotube based) exposed to 4.8 MeV/u U, Bi, and Au beams of different pulse intensities. Thermal and spectroscopic analyses were performed by means of infrared thermography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The resulting temperature depends on the foil thickness and strongly increases with increasing pulse intensity and repetition rate. (author)

  6. Carbon-ion beams induce production of an immune mediator protein, high mobility group box 1, at levels comparable with X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray radiotherapy activates tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses, and increases in the serum levels of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) induced by X-ray irradiation play a pivotal role in activating anti-tumor immunity. Here, we examined whether carbon-ion beams, as well as X-rays, can induce HMGB1 release from human cancer cell lines. The study examined five human cancer cell lines: TE2, KYSE70, A549, NCI-H460 and WiDr. The proportion of cells surviving X- or carbon-ion beam irradiation was assessed in a clonogenic assay. The D10, the dose at which 10% of cells survive, was calculated using a linear–quadratic model. HMGB1 levels in the culture supernatants were assessed by an ELISA. The D10 dose for X-rays in TE2, KYSE70, A549, NCI-H460 and WiDr cells was 2.1, 6.7, 8.0, 4.8 and 7.1 Gy, respectively, whereas that for carbon-ion beams was 0.9, 2.5, 2.7, 1.8 and 3.5 Gy, respectively. X-rays and carbon-ion beams significantly increased HMGB1 levels in the culture supernatants of A549, NCI-H460 and WiDr cells at 72 h post-irradiation with a D10 dose. Furthermore, irradiation with X-rays or carbon-ion beams significantly increased HMGB1 levels in the culture supernatants of all five cell lines at 96 h post-irradiation. There was no significant difference in the amount of HMGB1 induced by X-rays and carbon-ion beams at any time-point (except at 96 h for NCI-H460 cells); thus we conclude that comparable levels of HMGB1 were detected after irradiation with iso-survival doses of X-rays and carbon-ion beams. (author)

  7. Carbon-ion beams effectively induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in human neural stem cells compared with glioblastoma A172 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT) holds promise in the treatment of glioblastoma, an aggressive X-ray–resistant brain tumor. However, since glioblastoma cells show a highly invasive nature, carbon-ion (C-ion) irradiation of normal tissues surrounding the tumor is inevitable. Recent studies have revealed the existence of neural stem cells in the adult brain. Therefore, the damaging effect of C-ion beams on the neural stem cells has to be carefully considered in the treatment planning of CIRT. Here, we investigated the growth and death mode of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) and glioblastoma A172 cells after X-ray or C-ion beam irradiation. The X-ray dose resulting in a 50% growth rate (D50) was 0.8 Gy in hNSCs and 3.0 Gy in A172 cells, while the D50 for C-ion beams was 0.4 Gy in hNSCs and 1.6 Gy in A172 cells; the relative biological effectiveness value of C-ion beams was 2.0 in hNSCs and 1.9 in A172 cells. Importantly, both X-rays and C-ion beams preferentially induced apoptosis, not necrosis, in hNSCs; however, radiation-induced apoptosis was less evident in A172 cells. The apoptosis-susceptible nature of the irradiated hNSCs was associated with prolonged upregulation of phosphorylated p53, whereas the apoptosis-resistant nature of A172 cells was associated with a high basal level of nuclear factor kappa B expression. Taken together, these data indicate that apoptosis is the major cell death pathway in hNSCs after irradiation. The high sensitivity of hNSCs to C-ion beams underscores the importance of careful target volume delineation in the treatment planning of CIRT for glioblastoma. (author)

  8. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  9. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-08-19

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  10. Molecular nature of mutations induced by high-LET irradiation with argon and carbon ions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Tomonari; Kazama, Yusuke [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Innovation Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ohbu, Sumie; Shirakawa, Yuki; Liu Yang; Kambara, Tadashi; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tomoko, E-mail: tomoabe@riken.jp [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Innovation Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Linear energy transfer (LET) is an important parameter to be considered in heavy-ion mutagenesis. However, in plants, no quantitative data are available on the molecular nature of the mutations induced with high-LET radiation above 101-124 keV {mu}m{sup -1}. In this study, we irradiated dry seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana with Ar and C ions with an LET of 290 keV {mu}m{sup -1}. We analyzed the DNA alterations caused by the higher-LET radiation. Mutants were identified from the M{sub 2} pools. In total, 14 and 13 mutated genes, including bin2, egy1, gl1, gl2, hy1, hy3-5, ttg1, and var2, were identified in the plants derived from Ar- and C-ions irradiation, respectively. In the mutants from both irradiations, deletion was the most frequent type of mutation; 13 of the 14 mutated genes from the Ar ion-irradiated plants and 11 of the 13 mutated genes from the C ion-irradiated plants harbored deletions. Analysis of junction regions generated by the 2 types of irradiation suggested that alternative non-homologous end-joining was the predominant pathway of repair of break points. Among the deletions, the proportion of large deletions (>100 bp) was about 54% for Ar-ion irradiation and about 64% for C-ion irradiation. Both current results and previously reported data revealed that the proportions of the large deletions induced by 290-keV {mu}m{sup -1} radiations were higher than those of the large deletions induced by lower-LET radiations (6% for 22.5-30.0 keV {mu}m{sup -1} and 27% for 101-124 keV {mu}m{sup -1}). Therefore, the 290 keV {mu}m{sup -1} heavy-ion beams can effectively induce large deletions and will prove useful as novel mutagens for plant breeding and analysis of gene functions, particularly tandemly arrayed genes.

  11. Measurement of large angle fragments induced by 400 MeV n-1 carbon ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, Andrey; Consiglio, Lucia; De Lellis, Giovanni; Di Crescenzo, Antonia; Lauria, Adele; Montesi, Maria Cristina; Patera, Vincenzo; Sirignano, Chiara; Tioukov, Valeri

    2015-09-01

    The use of carbon ion beams in radiotherapy presents significant advantages when compared to traditional x-ray. In fact, carbon ions deposit their energy inside the human body at the end of their range, the Bragg peak. Unlike x-ray beams, where the energy deposition decreases exponentially inside the irradiated volume, the shape of carbon beams is sharp and focused. Advantages are an increased energy released in the cancer volume while minimizing the irradiation to healthy tissues. Currently, the use of carbon beams is limited by the poor knowledge we have about the effects of the secondary fragments on the irradiated tissues. The secondary particles produced and their angular distribution is crucial to determine the global dose deposition. The knowledge of the flux of secondary particles plays a key role in the real time monitoring of the dose profile in hadron therapy. We present a detector based on nuclear emulsions for fragmentation measurements that performs a sub-micrometric tridimensional spatial resolution, excellent multi-particle separation and large angle track recognition. Nuclear emulsions are assembled in order to realize a hybrid detector (emulsion cloud chamber (ECC)) made of 300 μm nuclear emulsion films alternated with lead as passive material. Data reported here have been obtained by exposing two ECC detectors to the fragments produced by a 400 MeV n-1 12C beam on a composite target at the GSI laboratory in Germany. The ECC was exposed inside a more complex detector, named FIRST, in order to collect fragments with a continuous angular distribution in the range 47°-81° with respect to the beam axis. Results on the angular distribution of fragments as well as their momentum estimations are reported here.

  12. Measurement of large angle fragments induced by 400 MeV n−1 carbon ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of carbon ion beams in radiotherapy presents significant advantages when compared to traditional x-ray. In fact, carbon ions deposit their energy inside the human body at the end of their range, the Bragg peak. Unlike x-ray beams, where the energy deposition decreases exponentially inside the irradiated volume, the shape of carbon beams is sharp and focused. Advantages are an increased energy released in the cancer volume while minimizing the irradiation to healthy tissues. Currently, the use of carbon beams is limited by the poor knowledge we have about the effects of the secondary fragments on the irradiated tissues. The secondary particles produced and their angular distribution is crucial to determine the global dose deposition. The knowledge of the flux of secondary particles plays a key role in the real time monitoring of the dose profile in hadron therapy.We present a detector based on nuclear emulsions for fragmentation measurements that performs a sub-micrometric tridimensional spatial resolution, excellent multi-particle separation and large angle track recognition. Nuclear emulsions are assembled in order to realize a hybrid detector (emulsion cloud chamber (ECC)) made of 300 μm nuclear emulsion films alternated with lead as passive material.Data reported here have been obtained by exposing two ECC detectors to the fragments produced by a 400 MeV n−1 12C beam on a composite target at the GSI laboratory in Germany. The ECC was exposed inside a more complex detector, named FIRST, in order to collect fragments with a continuous angular distribution in the range 47°–81° with respect to the beam axis. Results on the angular distribution of fragments as well as their momentum estimations are reported here. (paper)

  13. Comparative proteomic profiling and possible toxicological mechanism of acute injury induced by carbon ion radiation in pubertal mice testes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong

    2016-07-01

    We investigated potential mechanisms of acute injury in pubertal mice testes after exposure to carbon ion radiation (CIR). Serum testosterone was measured following whole-body irradiation with a 2Gy carbon ion beam. Comparative proteomic profiling and Western blotting were applied to identify potential biomarkers and measure protein expression, and terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) was performed to detect apoptotic cells. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were used to investigate protein localization. Serum testosterone was lowest at 24h after CIR, and 10 differentially expressed proteins were identified at this time point that included eIF4E, an important regulator of initiation that combines with mTOR and 4EBP1 to control protein synthesis via the mTOR signalling pathway during proliferation and apoptosis. Protein expression and localization studies confirmed their association with acute injury following exposure to CIR. These three proteins may be useful molecular markers for detecting abnormal spermatogenesis following exposure to environmental and cosmic radiation

  14. Evaluation of neutron radiation field in carbon ion therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun-Kui; Su, You-Wu; Li, Wu-Yuan; Yan, Wei-Wei; Chen, Xi-Meng; Mao, Wang; Pang, Cheng-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ions have significant advantages in tumor therapy because of their physical and biological properties. In view of the radiation protection, the safety of patients is the most important issue in therapy processes. Therefore, the effects of the secondary particles produced by the carbon ions in the tumor therapy should be carefully considered, especially for the neutrons. In the present work, the neutron radiation field induced by carbon ions was evaluated by using the FLUKA code. The simulated results of neutron energy spectra and neutron dose was found to be in good agreement with the experiment data. In addition, energy deposition of carbon ions and neutrons in tissue-like media was studied, it is found that the secondary neutron energy deposition is not expected to exceed 1% of the carbon ion energy deposition in a typical treatment.

  15. Carbon ion radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Carbon ion therapy offers the potential advantages of improved dose localization and enhanced biological effects. It has been suggested that carbon ion therapy is effective against radioresistant pancreatic cancer. In April 2000, clinical studies examining the treatment of pancreatic cancer with carbon ions were begun at the HIMAC. As of February 2010, 48 patients treated with preoperative carbon ion radiotherapy and 89 patients treated for locally advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled into the clinical trials. Both protocols are still ongoing. The interim results of these clinical trials suggest that carbon ion radiotherapy provides good local control and offers a survival advantage for patients with otherwise hard to cure pancreatic cancer, without unacceptable morbidity. (author)

  16. Carbon ion radiotherapy for sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principles of heavy ion therapy, its application to bone and soft tissue sarcomas and outline of its general state are described. The heavy ion therapy has advantages of its high dose distribution to the target and strong biological effect due to the Bragg peak formation and high linear energy transfer, respectively. The authors use carbon ion generated by Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) for the therapy of performance state 0-2 patients with the sarcomas unresectable, diagnosed pathologically, and of 60 y, 45% and teens, 8%) have been treated, whose tumor site has been the pelvis in 73%, volume >600 mL in 63%, tissue type of bone tumor in 70% (where cordoma has amounted to>200 cases). Five-year local control rate is found 71% and survival, 59%. In 175 therapeutically fresh cases with sacral cordoma of median age 67 y, with median clinical target volume 9 cm, treated with median dose 70.4 GyE/16 irradiations, the 8-y local control rate is found to be 69% and survival, 74%, within the median follow-up 54 months; with severe skin ulcer in 2 cases and deterioration of nervous dysfunction in 15 cases; suggesting the therapy is as effective and useful as surgical resection. At present, the therapy is not applicable to Japan health insurance. In the author's hospital, the heavy ion therapy has been conducted to total of >6,000 patients, which amounting to the largest number in the world. Now, 3 Japanese facilities can do the therapy as well and 3 countries in the world.(T.T.)

  17. SPS Ion Induced Desorption Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    This experiment will give a study about the induced desorption from heavy ion (Indium ion run from week 45 in SPS T4-H8 area) impacting LHC type graphite collimator. 4 different samples are located in the 4 chambers 90° one to each other: pure graphite, graphite with copper coating, graphite with NEG coating, 316LN stainless steal (reference).

  18. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L.J.; Sood, D.K.; Manory, R.R. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 {mu}m thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10{sup 17} - 8x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}. Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Carbon nanostructures produced through ion irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Several nanostructures we produced by ion irradiation have been reviewed in this paper. By using ions to irradiate two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene targets respectively, it was found that small fullerenes C20 and C26 were grown, adding two members to the fullerene family. Meanwhile, crystalline diamonds also have been produced by Ar+ ions irradiation of graphite. In the experiment of double ions Ni+ and Ar+ irradiation, nanoscale argon bubbles formed. On the other side, when multi-wall carbon nanotubes were irradiated by C+, many MWCNTs evolved to amorphous carbon nanowires and amorphous carbon nanotubes. And there are possible welding in the crossed nanotubes.

  20. Ion-Induced Surface Diffusion in Ion Sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Makeev, Maxim A.; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    1997-01-01

    Ion bombardment is known to enhance surface diffusion and affect the surface morphology. To quantify this phenomenon we calculate the ion-induced diffusion constant and its dependence on the ion energy, flux and angle of incidence. We find that ion bombardment can both enhance and suppress diffusion and that the sign of the diffusion constant depends on the experimental parameters. The effect of ion-induced diffusion on ripple formation and roughening of ion-sputtered surfaces is discussed an...

  1. Graphene crystal growth by thermal precipitation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon precursor via patterned-iron thin layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rius Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, relevant advances on graphene as a building block of integrated circuits (ICs have been demonstrated. Graphene growth and device fabrication related processing has been steadily and intensively powered due to commercial interest; however, there are many challenges associated with the incorporation of graphene into commercial applications which includes challenges associated with the synthesis of this material. Specifically, the controlled deposition of single layer large single crystal graphene on arbitrary supports, is particularly challenging. Previously, we have reported the first demonstration of the transformation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon (FIBID-C into patterned graphitic layers by metal-assisted thermal treatment (Ni foils. In this present work, we continue exploiting the FIBID-C approach as a route for graphene deposition. Here, thin patterned Fe layers are used for the catalysis of graphenization and graphitization. We demonstrate the formation of high quality single and few layer graphene, which evidences, the possibility of using Fe as a catalyst for graphene deposition. The mechanism is understood as the minute precipitation of atomic carbon after supersaturation of some iron carbides formed under a high temperature treatment. As a consequence of the complete wetting of FIBID-C and patterned Fe layers, which enable graphene growth, the as-deposited patterns do not preserve their original shape after the thermal treatment

  2. Enhanced lithium ion storage in TiO2 nanoparticles, induced by sulphur and carbon co-doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Svetlozar; Barylyak, Adriana; Besaha, Khrystyna; Dimitrova, Anna; Krischok, Stefan; Bund, Andreas; Bobitski, Jaroslav

    2016-09-01

    Sulphur and carbon codoped anatase nanoparticles are synthesized by one-step approach based on interaction between thiourea and metatitanic acid. Electron microscopy shows micrometer-sized randomly distributed crystal aggregates, consisting of many 25-40 nm TiO2 nanoparticles. The obtained phase composition and chemical states of the elements in the structure are analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD shows that after doping the tetragonal anatase structure is preserved. Further data assessment by Rietveld refinement allows detection of a slight increase of the c lattice parameter and volume related to incorporation of the doping elements. XPS confirms the coexistence of both elemental and oxide carbon forms, which are predominantly located on the TiO2 particle surface. According to XPS analysis sulphur occupies titanium sites and the element is present in S6+ sulfate environment. Analysis based on cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic intermittent titration (GITT) suggests an accelerated Li+ transport in the doped TiO2 structure. The synthesized S and C co-doped anatase has an excellent electrochemical performance in terms of capacity and very fast lithiation kinetics, superior to the non-doped TiO2. The material displays 83% capacity retention for 500 galvanostatic cycles and nearly 100% current efficiency.

  3. Relative biological effectiveness of carbon ions for tumor control, acute skin damage and late radiation-induced fibrosis in a mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Horsman, Michael Robert; Alsner, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of the present study was to compare the biological effectiveness of carbon ions relative to x-rays between tumor control, acute skin reaction and late RIF of CDF1 mice. Material and methods. CDF1 mice with a C3H mouse mammary carcinoma implanted subcutaneously on the foot of t...

  4. Single-ion adsorption and switching in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushmaker, Adam W.; Oklejas, Vanessa; Walker, Don; Hopkins, Alan R.; Chen, Jihan; Cronin, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Single-ion detection has, for many years, been the domain of large devices such as the Geiger counter, and studies on interactions of ionized gasses with materials have been limited to large systems. To date, there have been no reports on single gaseous ion interaction with microelectronic devices, and single neutral atom detection techniques have shown only small, barely detectable responses. Here we report the observation of single gaseous ion adsorption on individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which, because of the severely restricted one-dimensional current path, experience discrete, quantized resistance increases of over two orders of magnitude. Only positive ions cause changes, by the mechanism of ion potential-induced carrier depletion, which is supported by density functional and Landauer transport theory. Our observations reveal a new single-ion/CNT heterostructure with novel electronic properties, and demonstrate that as electronics are ultimately scaled towards the one-dimensional limit, atomic-scale effects become increasingly important.

  5. Mechanical Design of Carbon Ion Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Carbon Ion Optics are expected to provide much longer thruster life due to their resistance to sputter erosion. There are a number of different forms of carbon that have been used for fabricating ion thruster optics. The mechanical behavior of carbon is much different than that of most metals, and poses unique design challenges. In order to minimize mission risk, the behavior of carbon must be well understood, and components designed within material limitations. Thermal expansion of the thruster structure must be compatible with thermal expansion of the carbon ion optics. Specially designed interfaces may be needed so that grid gap and aperture alignment are not adversely affected by dissimilar material properties within the thruster. The assembled thruster must be robust and tolerant of launch vibration. The following paper lists some of the characteristics of various carbon materials. Several past ion optics designs are discussed, identifying strengths and weaknesses. Electrostatics and material science are not emphasized so much as the mechanical behavior and integration of grid electrodes into an ion thruster.

  6. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references

  7. Translational Research to Improve the Efficacy of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy: Experience of Gunma University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Noda, Shin-Ei; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy holds great promise for cancer therapy. Clinical data show that carbon ion radiotherapy is an effective treatment for tumors that are resistant to X-ray radiotherapy. Since 1994 in Japan, the National Institute of Radiological Sciences has been heading the development of carbon ion radiotherapy using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba. The Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC) was established in the year 2006 as a proof-of-principle institute for carbon ion radiotherapy with a view to facilitating the worldwide spread of compact accelerator systems. Along with the management of more than 1900 cancer patients to date, GHMC engages in translational research to improve the treatment efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy. Research aimed at guiding patient selection is of utmost importance for making the most of carbon ion radiotherapy, which is an extremely limited medical resource. Intratumoral oxygen levels, radiation-induced cellular apoptosis, the capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks, and the mutational status of tumor protein p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor genes are all associated with X-ray sensitivity. Assays for these factors are useful in the identification of X-ray-resistant tumors for which carbon ion radiotherapy would be beneficial. Research aimed at optimizing treatments based on carbon ion radiotherapy is also important. This includes assessment of dose fractionation, normal tissue toxicity, tumor cell motility, and bystander effects. Furthermore, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy will likely be enhanced by research into combined treatment with other modalities such as chemotherapy. Several clinically available chemotherapeutic drugs (carboplatin, paclitaxel, and etoposide) and drugs at the developmental stage (Wee-1 and heat shock protein 90 inhibitors) show a sensitizing effect on tumor cells treated with carbon ions. Additionally, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy can be improved by

  8. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected

  9. Indications of Carbon Ion Therapy at CNAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orecchia, Roberto; Rossi, Sandro; Fossati, Piero

    2009-03-01

    CNAO will be a dual center capable of providing therapeutic beams of protons and carbon ions with maximum energy of 400 MeV/u. At the beginning, it will be equipped with three treatment rooms with fixed horizontal and vertical beam lines. In a subsequent phase, two more rooms with a rotating gantry are foreseen. An active spot scanning dose delivery system will be employed. Initially, 80% of the treatments will be carried out with carbon ions. All patients will be treated within clinical trials to assess carbon ion indications with an evidence-based methodology. Seven disease-specific working groups have been developed: lung tumors, liver tumors, sarcomas, head and neck tumors, central nervous system lesions, eye tumors and pediatric tumors. The last two groups will be treated mainly with protons. In the first phase, CNAO will focus on head and neck cancers, treating inoperable, residual or recurrent malignant salivary gland tumors, mucosal melanoma, adenocarcinoma and unfavorably located SCC (nasal and paranasal sinuses). Carbon ions will be employed as a boost in the treatment of locally advanced, poor prognosis, SCC of the hypopharynx and tongue base. Bone and soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity will be treated with a limb-sparing approach, and trunk sarcomas will be treated with exclusive or post-operative irradiation. Skull base tumors (chordoma and chondrosarcoma), recurrent or malignant meningioma and glial tumors will be treated with carbon ions. After sufficient expertise has been gained in coping with organ motion, CNAO will start treating thoracic and abdominal targets. HCC will be treated in inoperable patients with one or more lesions that can be included in a single CTV. Early stage NSCLC will be treated. In the second phase, two more groups on gynecological malignancies and digestive tumors (esophageal cancer, rectal cancer, pancreatic cancer) will be created.

  10. Ion induced transformation of polymer films into diamond-like carbon incorporating silver nano particles; Ioneninduzierte Umwandlung von Polymerschichten zu diamantaehnlichem Kohlenstoff mit darin enthaltenen Silber-Nanopartikeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Florian P.

    2010-03-26

    Silver containing diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an interesting material for medical engineering from several points of view. On the one hand DLC provides high mechanical robustness. It can be used as biocompatible and wear resistant coating for joint replacing implants. On the other hand silver has antimicrobial properties, which could reduce post-operative inflammations. However conventional production of Ag-DLC by co-deposition of silver and carbon in a plasma process is problematic since it does not allow for a separate control of nano particle morphology and matrix properties. In this work an alternative production method has been developed to circumvent this problem. In metall-DLC-production by ion implantation into a nano composite, silver nano particles are initially formed in solution and then incorporated within a polymer matrix. Finally the polymer is transformed into DLC by ion implantation. The aspects and single steps of this method were investigated with regard to the resulting material's properties. The goal was to design an economically relevant deposition method. Based on experimental results a model of the transformation process has been established, which has also been implemented in a computer simulation. Finally the antibacterial properties of the material have been checked in a biomedical test. Here a bacterial killing rate of 90% could be achieved. (orig.)

  11. Carbon-based ion and molecular channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sint, Kyaw; Wang, Boyang; Kral, Petr

    2008-03-01

    We design ion and molecular channels based on layered carboneous materials, with chemically-functionalized pore entrances. Our molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that these ultra-narrow pores, with diameters around 1 nm, are highly selective to the charges and sizes of the passing (Na^+ and Cl^-) ions and short alkanes. We demonstrate that the molecular flows through these pores can be easily controlled by electrical and mechanical means. These artificial pores could be integrated in fluidic nanodevices and lab-on-a-chip techniques with numerous potential applications. [1] Kyaw Sint, Boyang Wang and Petr Kral, submitted. [2] Boyang Wang and Petr Kral, JACS 128, 15984 (2006).

  12. Reactions of carbon cluster ions stored in an RF trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactions of carbon cluster ions with O2 were studied by using an RF ion trap in which cluster ions of specific size produced by laser ablation could be stored selectively. Reaction rate constants for positive and negative carbon cluster ions were estimated. In the case of the positive cluster ions, these were consistent with the previous experimental results using FTMS. Negative carbon cluster ions C-n (n=4-8) were much less reactive than positive cluster ions. The CnO- products were seen only in n=4 and 6. (orig.)

  13. Treatment planning system for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama-Ito, Hiroko [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the treatment planning (TP) and its peripheral system for carbon ion therapy that has been developed and in clinical use in recent two years at our institution. A new treatment planning system which is FOCUS customized to our irradiation system will be launched in clinical use soon. A new DICOM based PACS has been developed and in use. Now MRI, PET images are ready to be utilized for patient definition with image fusion functionality of radiotherapy TP. We implemented the exchange functionality of TP data specified by RTOG 3D QA Center in FOCUS, Pinnacle3 and heavy ion TP. Target volume and normal structure contours and dose distributions are exchangeable. A database system of carbon ion therapy dedicated to analysis of therapy data has been designed and implemented. All accessible planning data and treatment records of more than 1000 patients treated for seven and half years have been archived. The system has a DICOM RT sever and a database for miscellaneous text data. Limited numbers of private attributes were introduced for ion therapy specific objects. On-line as well as manual registration along with edit functionalities is prepared. Standard web browser is used to search and retrieve information. A DICOM RT viewer has been developed to view and retrieve RT images, dose distributions and structure set. These system described above are all designed to conform to the up-to-date standards of radiation therapy so as to be bases of the future development of the therapy at our institution. (author)

  14. Clinical advantages of carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Baba, Masayuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotoshi; Kato, Shingo; Yamada, Shigeru; Yasuda, Shigeo; Yanagi, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Hara, Ryusuke; Yamamoto, Naotaka; Mizoe, Junetsu

    2008-07-01

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) possesses physical and biological advantages. It was started at NIRS in 1994 using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC); since then more than 50 protocol studies have been conducted on almost 4000 patients with a variety of tumors. Clinical experiences have demonstrated that C-ion RT is effective in such regions as the head and neck, skull base, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissues, and pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer, as well as for histological types including adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, malignant melanoma and various types of sarcomas, against which photon therapy could be less effective. Furthermore, when compared with photon and proton RT, a significant reduction of overall treatment time and fractions has been accomplished without enhancing toxicities. Currently, the number of irradiation sessions per patient averages 13 fractions spread over approximately three weeks. This means that in a carbon therapy facility a larger number of patients than is possible with other modalities can be treated over the same period of time.

  15. Precise measurement of prompt photon emission for carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Agodi, C; Cirrone, G A P; Collamati, F; Cuttone, G; De Lucia, E; De Napoli, M; Di Domenico, A; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Gauzzi, P; Iarocci, E; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Paoloni, A; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Romano, F; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Voena, C

    2011-01-01

    Proton and carbon ion therapy is an emerging technique used for the treatment of solid cancers. The monitoring of the dose delivered during such treatments is still a matter of research. A possible technique exploits the information provided by single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. This paper reports the measurements of the spectrum and rate of such photons produced from the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of INFN, Catania, with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. The differential production rate for photons with energy E > 2 MeV and emitted at 90 degree is found to be $dN_{\\gamma}/(dN_C d\\Omega)=(2.92\\pm 0.19)\\times 10^{-2}$sr$^{-1}$.

  16. Simulation of induced radioactivity for Heavy Ion Medical Machine

    CERN Document Server

    Jun-Kui, Xu; Wu-Yuan, Li; Wang, Mao; Jia-Wen, Xia; Xi-Meng, Chen; Wei-Wei, Yan; Chong, Xu

    2013-01-01

    For radiation protection and environmental impact assessment purpose, the radioactivity induced by carbon ion of Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) was studied. Radionuclides in accelerator component, cooling water and air at target area which are induced from primary beam and secondary particles are simulated by FLUKA Monte Carlo code. It is found that radioactivity in cooling water and air is not very important at the required beam intensity and energy which is needed for treatment, radionuclides in accelerator component may cause some problem for maintenance work, suitable cooling time is needed after the machine are shut down.

  17. Diallyl disulfide enhances carbon ion beams-induced apoptotic cell death in cervical cancer cells through regulating Tap73 /ΔNp73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Cuixia; Sun, Chao; Li, Hongyan; Si, Jing; Zhang, Hong; Han, Lu; Zhao, Qiuyue; Liu, Yang; Liu, Bin; Miao, Guoying; Gan, Lu; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS), extracted from crushed garlic by steam-distillation, has been reported to provide the anticancer activity in several cancer types. However, the effect of DADS on high-LET carbon beams - induced cell death remains unknown. Therefore, we used human cervical cancer cells to elucidate the molecular effects of this diallyl sulfide. Radiotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment, especially in advanced cervical cancer and there is still space to improve the radiosensitivity to reduce radiation dosage. In this study, we found that radiation effects evoked by high-LET carbon beam was marked by inhibition of cell viability, cell cycle arrest, significant rise of apoptotic cells, regulation of transcription factor, such as p73, as well as alterations of crucial mediator of the apoptosis pathway. We further demonstrated that pretreatment of 10 µM DADS in HeLa cells exposed to radiation resulted in decrease in cell viability and increased radiosensitivity. Additionally, cells pretreated with DADS obviously inhibited the radiation-induced G2/M phase arrest, but promoted radiation-induced apoptosis. Moreover, combination DADS and the radiation exacerbated the activation of apoptosis pathways through up-regulated ration of pro-apoptotic Tap73 to anti-apoptotic ΔNp73, and its downstream proteins, such as FASLG, and APAF1. Taken together, these results suggest that DADS is a potential candidate as radio sensitive agent for cervical cancer. PMID:26505313

  18. Kinetics of ion beam deposition of carbon at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growth rates of carbon films grown by ion beam deposition using methane gas were measured in situ as a function of deposition conditions. The methane pressure dependence of the growth rate was used to measure the cross-section for charge exchange. Variations in deposition rate per incident energetic particle found for each ion energy were related to ion current density. It was found that rates of growth per incident energetic specie were (i) largest for the smallest current densities, (ii) decreased monotonically with increasing current density, and (iii) were consistently larger than can be explained by deposition directly from the energetic flux alone. These observations were interpreted in terms of irradiation-induced surface interactions which promote chemisorption of methane physisorbed from the ambient atmosphere. (orig.)

  19. Differential effects of irradiation with carbon ions and x-rays on macrophage function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Sandro; Ritter, Sylvia; Fournier, Claudia; Nixdorff, Kathryn

    2009-05-01

    Macrophages are potent elicitors of inflammatory reactions that can play both positive and negative roles in radiotherapy. While several studies have investigated the effects of X-rays or gamma-rays on macrophages, virtually no work has been done on the responses of these cells to irradiation with carbon ions. Investigations into the effects of carbon ion irradiation are of particular interest in light of the fact that this type of radiation is being used increasingly for cancer therapy. In the present investigation we compared the effects of 250 kV X-rays with those of 9.8 MeV/u carbon ions on RAW 264.7 macrophages over a wide range of radiation doses. Macrophage functions including vitality, phagocytic activity, production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and TNFalpha and production of nitric oxide (NO) were measured. In comparison to lymphocytes and fibroblasts, macrophages showed only a small decrease in vitality after irradiation with either X-rays or carbon ions. Proinflammatory cytokines and NO were induced in macrophages by LPS but not by irradiation alone. X-rays or carbon ions had little modulating effect on LPS-induced TNFalpha production. However, LPS-induced NO increased in a dose dependent manner up to 6-fold after carbon ion irradiation, while X-ray irradiation did not have this effect. Carbon ion irradiation mediated a concomitant decrease in IL-1beta production. Carbon ions also had a greater effect than X-rays in enhancing the phagocytic activity of macrophages. These results underscore the greater potential of carbon ion irradiation with regard to radiobiological effectiveness.

  20. Carbonate Ion Effects on Coccolith Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziveri, P.; Probert, I.; Stoll, H. M.

    2006-12-01

    conclusively distinguished whether C is taken up only as CO2 by passive diffusion or also by active transport of CO2 or HCO^{3-} . In reality, the patterns of stable isotopic variations in coccoliths may provide more constraints for unraveling the cellular C transport and the calcification mechanisms. We will present latest findings on these issues, both from culture experiments and sediment traps located in the Bay of Bengal. Coccolith species separated from these sediment traps also show evidence of carbonate ion effects.

  1. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Skull Base Chordoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mizoe, Jun–etsu; Hasegawa, Azusa; Takagi, Ryo; Bessho, Hiroki; Onda, Takeshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To present the results of the clinical study of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for skull base and paracervical spine tumors at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan. Methods: The study is comprised of three protocols: a pilot study, a phase I/II dose escalation study, and a phase II study. All the patients were treated by 16 fractions for 4 weeks with total doses of 48.0, 52.8, 57.6, and 60.8 Gy equivalents (GyE). Results: As a result of the dose escalatio...

  2. Effect of carbon ions on life span shortening and tumorigenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinuma, Shizuko; Kubo, Ayumi; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Nohima, Kumie; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2004-11-01

    One of the important concerns for astronauts in space is cancer risk associated with cosmic radiation, including heavy particle ions. But little information on cancer risk is available. We investigated the effect of carbon ions on life span shortening and tumor induction in B6C3F1 mice. The mice were exposed weekly to 0.4 and 2.0 Gy whole-body carbon-ion- or X-ray-irradiation for 4 consecutive weeks. The spectrum of induced tumors varied depending on the dose. The cause of death was thymic lymphomas and liver tumors at high and low dose, respectively. The life span shortening by X-rays was proportional to dose, while carbon ions produced a convex upward relationship. The relative biological effectiveness for the 50% life span shortening was about 1.4. The large effect of carbon ions encourages the study on tumor induction at low doses in the space. PMID:15900637

  3. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y. [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm{sup 2} at the peak of the pulse.

  4. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beama)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y.

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm2 at the peak of the pulse.

  5. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse.

  6. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse. PMID:22380206

  7. Intensive irradiation of carbon nanotubes by Si ion beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Zhichun; LI Qintao; YAN Long; GONG Jinlong; ZHU Dezhang; ZHU Zhiyuan

    2007-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were irradiated with 40 keV Si ion beam to a dose of 1×1017 cm-2. The multiple-way carbon nanowire junctions and the Si doping in carbon nanowires were realized. Moreover, the formation processes of carbon nanowire junctions and the corresponding mechanism were studied.

  8. Ion irradiation induced direct damage to DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei; Su, Wenhui

    2008-01-01

    Ion beams have been widely applied in a few biological research fields such as radioactive breeding, health protection, and tumor therapy. Up to now many interesting and impressive achievements in biology and agriculture have been made. Over the past several decades, scientists in biology, physics, and chemistry have pursued investigations focused on understanding the mechanisms of these radiobiological effects of ion beams. From the chemical point of view, these effects are due to the ion irradiation induced biomolecular damage, direct or indirect. In this review, we will present a chemical overview of the direct effects of ion irradiation upon DNA and its components, based on a review of literature combined with recent experimental results. It is suggested that, under ion bombardment, a DNA molecule undergoes a variety of processes, including radical formation, atomic displacement, intramolecular bond-scissions, emission of fragments, fragment recombination and molecular crosslink, which may lead to genetic...

  9. Heavy ion induced mutation in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tano, Shigemitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Heavy ions, He, C, Ar and Ne were irradiated to the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana for inducing the new mutants. In the irradiated generation (M{sub 1}), germination and survival rate were observed to estimate the relative biological effectiveness in relation to the LET including the inactivation cross section. Mutation frequencies were compared by using three kinds of genetic loci after irradiation with C ions and electrons. Several interesting new mutants were selected in the selfed progenies of heavy ion irradiated seeds. (author)

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of carbon ion radiotherapy for Human Eye

    CERN Document Server

    Pang, Chengguo; Yao, Zeen; Xu, Junkui; Li, Wuyuan; Yuan, Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Carbon ion is the mostly common used particle in heavy ion radiotherapy. In this paper, carbon ion dose in tumor treatment for human eye was simulated with FLUKA code, 80 MeV/u carbon beam was irradiated into the human eye from two directions, The first is from the lateral-forward direction which was a typical therapeutic condition, maximum dose was deposited in the tumor volume. The second one was that beam irradiated into eyes from the forward direction which may cause certain medical accident. The calculated results are compared with other reports. The agreement indicates that this method can be used for treatment plan in heavy ion radiotherapy.

  11. Nuclear fission induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because the accelerators of the 50's and 60's mostly provided beams of light ions, well suited for studying individual quantum states of low angular momentum or reactions involving the transfer of one or two nucleons, the study of fission, being an example of large-scale collective motion, has until recently been outside of the mainstream of nuclear research. This situation has changed in recent years, due to the new generation of accelerators capable of producing beams of heavy ions with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of all stable nuclei. These have made possible the study of new examples of large-scale collective motions, involving major rearrangements of nuclear matter, such as deep-inelastic collisions and heavy-ion fusion. Perhaps the most exciting development in the past few years is the discovery that dissipative effects (nuclear viscosity) play an important role in fission induced by heavy ions, contrary to earlier assumptions that the viscosity involved in fission was very weak and played only a minor role. This review will be mainly concerned with developments in heavy-ion induced fission during the last few years and have an emphasis on the very recent results on dissipative effects. Since heavy-ion bombardment usually results in compound systems with high excitation energies and angular momenta, shell effects might be expected to be small, and the subject of low energy fission, where they are important, will not be addressed. 285 refs., 58 figs

  12. Specific gene mutations induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes our heavy-ion research rationale, progress, and plans for the near future. The major project involves selecting a group of maize Adh1 mutants induced by heavy ions and correlating their altered behavior with altered DNA nucleotide sequences and sequence arrangements. This research requires merging the techniques of classical genetics and recombinant DNA technology. Our secondary projects involve (1) the use of the Adh gene in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, as a second system with which to quantify the sort of specific gene mutants induced by heavy ions as compared to x rays, and (2) the development of a maize Adh1 pollen in situ monitor for environmental mutagens

  13. Heavy ion induced damage to plasmid DNA : plateau region vs. spread out Bragg-peak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dang, H.M.; van Goethem, M.J.; van der Graaf, E.R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.A.; Schlathölter, T.A.

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the damage of synthetic plasmid pBR322 DNA in dilute aqueous solutions induced by fast carbon ions. The relative contribution of indirect damage and direct damage to the DNA itself is expected to vary with linear energy transfer along the ion track, with the direct damage contri

  14. Making junctions between carbon nanotubes using an ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Krasheninnikov, A V; Keinonen, J; Banhart, F

    2003-01-01

    Making use of empirical potential molecular dynamics, we study ion bombardment of crossed single-walled carbon nanotubes as a tool to join the nanotubes. We demonstrate that ion irradiation should result in welding of crossed nanotubes, both suspended and deposited on substrates. We further predict optimum ion doses and energies for ion-mediated nanotube welding which may potentially be used for developing complicated networks of joined nanotubes.

  15. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

    2015-01-01

    The Electron String type of Ion Sources (ESIS) was developed, constructed and tested first in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These ion sources can be the appropriate sources for production of pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams which can be used for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact the test ESIS Krion-6T already now at the solenoid magnetic field only 4.6 T provides more than 10^10 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5*10^9 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable for application at synchrotrons. It was also found, that Krion-6T can provide more than 10^11 C6+ ions per second at 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. As for production of 11C radioactive ion beams ESIS can be the most economic kind of ion source. To proof that the special cryogenic cell for pulse injection of gaseous species into electron string was successfully tested using the ESIS Krion-2M.

  16. Ion implantation inhibits cell attachment to glassy polymeric carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implantation of MeV gold, oxygen, carbon ions into GPC alters the surface topography of GPC and enhances the already strong tendency for cells to attach to GPC. We have shown that implantation of silver ions near the surface strongly inhibits cell growth on GPC. Both enhanced adhesion of and inhibition of cell growth are desirable improvements on cardiac implants that have long been successfully fabricated from biocompatible glassy polymeric carbon (GPC). In vitro biocompatibility tests have been carried out with model cell lines to demonstrate that ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) of silver, as well as silver ion bombardment, can favorably influence the surface of GPC for biomedical applications

  17. Modified carbon black materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostecki, Robert; Richardson, Thomas; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Pollak, Elad; Lux, Simon

    2016-06-14

    A lithium (Li) ion battery comprising a cathode, a separator, an organic electrolyte, an anode, and a carbon black conductive additive, wherein the carbon black has been heated treated in a CO.sub.2 gas environment at a temperature range of between 875-925 degrees Celsius for a time range of between 50 to 70 minutes to oxidize the carbon black and reduce an electrochemical reactivity of the carbon black towards the organic electrolyte.

  18. Role of Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and its target genes in human lung adenocarcinoma cells after photon- versus carbon ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposed to hypoxia tumor cells are notably resistant to photon irradiation. The hypoxiainducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α) seems to play a fundamental role in this resistance, while its role after heavy-ion beam remains unknown. The intention of this study was to determine how A549-cells (non-small-cell lung carcinoma) react in different oxygenation states after irradiation with photons or heavy ions, particularly in regards to their expression of HIF-1 target genes. Resistance of hypoxic A549 cells after photon irradiation was documented by cellular and clonogenic survival. In contrast, cellular survival after heavy-ion irradiation in hypoxic cells was not elevated to normoxic cells. Among the oxygen dependent regulation of HIF-1 target genes, gene expression analyses showed an increased expression of GLUT-1, LDH-A, PDK-1 and VEGF after photon irradiation but not after heavy-ion irradiation after 48 hours in normoxic cells. As expected, CDKN1A as inhibitor of cell cycle progression showed higher expression after both radiation forms; interestingly CDKN1A was also in an oxygen dependent manner lightly upregulated. In western blot analyses we demonstrated a significant increase of HIF-1 and GLUT-1 caused by hypoxia, but only a tendency of increased protein level in hypoxia after photon irradiation and no changes after heavy-ion irradiation. Significantly higher protein level of secreted VEGF-A could be measured 72 hours after photon irradiation in normoxic cells by ELISA analyses. Controversially discussed, I could not detect an association between HIF-1 and SCF or Trx-1 in A549-cells in this study. Whereas Trx-1-expression was neither influenced by changed oxygen partial pressure nor irradiation, I could show increased SCF mRNA by quantitative Real Time-PCR and secreted protein level by ELISA after photon irradiation independent of oxygen state. In summary, this study showed that HIF-1 and its target genes (GLUT-1, LDHA; PDK, VEGF) and also SCF was

  19. Innershell ionization by fast protons, alpha particles and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this thesis is the study of inner-shell excitations of atoms induced by fast charged particle collisions. A new method is described for measuring the spectrum of delta-electrons emitted by 208Pb after excitation by 15 MeV protons or 50 MeV alpha particles. Experimental equipment is described. Results of both experiments are presented and compared with PWBA models and with calculations based on a semi-classical approximation. The small-impact-parameter ionization probabilities obtained are then compared with literature. Also small-impact-parameter measurements done with 100 MeV carbon ions are described. Besides K-shell measurements, the author also presents L-subshell ionization probability results for Pb. An appendix is added in which energy straggling problems in solid targets are treated. (Auth./G.J.P.)

  20. Study on neutron radiation field of carbon ions therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jun-Kui; Li, Wu-Yuan; Yan, Wei-Wei; Chen, Xi-Meng; Mao, Wang; Pang, Cheng-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon ions offer significant advantages for deep-seated local tumors therapy due to their physical and biological properties. Secondary particles, especially neutrons caused by heavy ion reactions should be carefully considered in treatment process and radiation protection. For radiation protection purposes, the FLUKA Code was used in order to evaluate the radiation field at deep tumor therapy room of HIRFL in this paper. The neutron energy spectra, neutron dose and energy deposition of carbon ion and neutron in tissue-like media was studied for bombardment of solid water target by 430MeV/u C ions. It is found that the calculated neutron dose have a good agreement with the experimental date, and the secondary neutron dose may not exceed one in a thousand of the carbon ions dose at Bragg peak area in tissue-like media.

  1. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Cavoto, G.; Cirillo, E. N. M.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy lo...

  2. The fragment ion distribution of C60 in close collision with fast carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the mass distribution of fragment ions of C60 produced by collisions with 15.6 MeV carbon ions in different charge states. Close collisions were selectively measured using the coincidence method with the change of the projectile charge state. For the electron capture and loss by C5+.6+ projectile ions, which are the K-electron processes, the multifragmentation was observed evidently. In L-electron loss channels of the C2+ projectile, the peaks of the multiply ionized C60 ions and the multiply ionized fullerene-like fragment ions are more intense or as intense as the small fragment ions. (author)

  3. High temperature annealing studies of strontium ion implanted glassy carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odutemowo, O. S.; Malherbe, J. B.; Prinsloo, L.; Langa, D. F.; Wendler, E.

    2016-03-01

    Glassy carbon samples were implanted with 200 keV strontium ions to a fluence of 2 × 1016 ions/cm2 at room temperature. Analysis with Raman spectroscopy showed that ion bombardment amorphises the glassy carbon structure. Partial recovery of the glassy carbon structure was achieved after the implanted sample was vacuum annealed at 900 °C for 1 h. Annealing the strontium ion bombarded sample at 2000 °C for 5 h resulted in recovery of the glassy carbon substrate with the intensity of the D peak becoming lower than that of the pristine glassy carbon. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) showed that the implanted strontium diffused towards the surface of the glassy carbon after annealing the sample at 900 °C. This diffusion was also accompanied by loss of the implanted strontium. Comparison between the as-implanted and 900 °C depth profiles showed that less than 30% of the strontium was retained in the glassy carbon after heat treatment at 900 °C. The RBS profile after annealing at 2000 °C indicated that no strontium ions were retained after heat treatment at this temperature.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  5. Dose Response of Alanine Detectors Irradiated with Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo;

    2011-01-01

    . Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated with carbon ions with an energy range of 89-400 MeV/u. The relative effectiveness of alanine has been measured in this regime. Pristine and spread out Bragg peak depth-dose curves have been measured with alanine dosimeters. The track-structure based alanine......Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type, when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behaviour of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results with model predictions...... of the detector geometry implemented in the Monte Carlo simulations....

  6. Ion-implanted Mechanism of the Deposition Process for Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue-Min; WU Wei-Dong; WANG Yu-Ying; WANG Hai-Ping; GE Fang-Fang; TANG Yong-Jian; JU Xin

    2011-01-01

    Due to the local densification, high-energy C and doped ions can greatly affect the bonding configurations of diamond-like carbon films. We investigate the corresponding affection of different incident ions with energy from WeV to 600eV by Monte Carlo methods. The ion-implanted mechanism called the subplantation (for C, N, O, W, Y, etc.) is confirmed. Obvious thermal effect could be induced by the subplantation of the incident ions. Further, the subplantation of C ions is proved by in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The observation from an atomic force microscope (AFM) indicates that the initial implantation of C ions might result in the final primitive-cell-like morphology of the smooth film (in an area of 1.2 mm × 0.9 mm, rms roughness smaller than 20 nm by Wyko).

  7. Imaging of carbon nanomembranes with helium ion microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Beyer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomembranes (CNMs prepared from aromatic self-assembled monolayers constitute a recently developed class of 2D materials. They are made by a combination of self-assembly, radiation-induced cross-linking and the detachment of the cross-linked SAM from its substrate. CNMs can be deposited on arbitrary substrates, including holey and perforated ones, as well as on metallic (transmission electron microscopy grids. Therewith, freestanding membranes with a thickness of 1 nm and macroscopic lateral dimensions can be prepared. Although free-standing CNMs cannot be imaged by light microscopy, charged particle techniques can visualize them. However, CNMs are electrically insulating, which makes them sensitive to charging. We demonstrate that the helium ion microscope (HIM is a good candidate for imaging freestanding CNMs due to its efficient charge compensation tool. Scanning with a beam of helium ions while recording the emitted secondary electrons generates the HIM images. The advantages of HIM are high resolution, high surface sensitivity and large depth of field. The effects of sample charging, imaging of multilayer CNMs as well as imaging artefacts are discussed.

  8. Ion-induced surface modification of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the accumulation of the implanted species, a considerable number of processes can affect the composition of an alloy in the surface region during ion bombardment. Collisions of energetic ions with atoms of the alloy induce local rearrangement of atoms by displacements, replacement sequences and by spontaneous migration and recombination of defects within cascades. Point defects form clusters, voids, dislocation loops and networks. Preferential sputtering of elements changes the composition of the surface. At temperatures sufficient for thermal migration of point defects, radiation-enhanced diffusion promotes alloy component redistribution within and beyond the damage layer. Fluxes of interstitials and vacancies toward the surface and into the interior of the target induce fluxes of alloying elements leading to depth-dependent compositional changes. Moreover, Gibbsian surface segregation may affect the preferential loss of alloy components by sputtering when the kinetics of equilibration of the surface composition becomes competitive with the sputtering rate. Temperature, time, current density and ion energy can be used to influence the individual processes contributing to compositional changes and, thus, produce a rich variety of composition profiles near surfaces. 42 references

  9. Study on organosilicon plasma polymers implanted by carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radeva, E; Yourukova, L; Kolentsov, K; Balabanov, S; Zhechev, D; Steflekova, V [Georgi Nadjakov Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Amov, B [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)], E-mail: eradeva@issp.bas.bg

    2008-05-01

    In the present work plasma polymer films obtained from hexamethyldisiloxane have been implanted by carbon ions at three different doses. The photoluminescent properties of the implanted polymers were investigated. The optical transmission of these polymer layers was investigated in the visible spectral region. Their electrical parameters were also measured. It was found that the resulting changes do not worsen the protective properties of the implanted polymer layer. The variations in the properties studied might be ascribed to the nanostructured carbon clusters formed on the polymer surface. The results obtained could form the basis for further optimization of the polymer structure by carbon ion implantation in view of applications in electroluminescent display structures.

  10. Ion-exchange behavior of alkali metals on treated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion-exchange behavior of trace quantities of the alkali-metal ions sodium and cesium, on activated carbon impregnated with zirconium phosphate (referred to here as ZrP), was studied. Impregnated carbon had twice as much ion-exchange activity as unimpregnated, oxidized carbon, and 10 times as much as commercial activated carbons. The distribution coefficient of sodium increased with increasing pH; the distribution coefficient of cesium decreased with increasing pH. Sodium and cesium were separated with an electrolytic solution of 0.1 M HCl. Preliminary studies indicated that 0.2 M potassium and cesium can also be separated. Distribution coefficients of the supported ZrP were determined by the elution technique and agreed within 20% of the values for pure ZrP calculated from the literature

  11. Swift heavy ion irradiation of metal containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaseov, P. A.; Protopopova, V. S.; Karabeshkin, K. V.; Shubina, E. N.; Mishin, M. V.; Koskinen, J.; Mohapatra, S.; Tripathi, A.; Avasthi, D. K.; Titov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    Thin carbon films were grown at room temperature on (0 0 1) n-Si substrate using dual cathode filtered vacuum arc deposition system. Graphite was used as a source of carbon atoms and separate metallic electrode was simultaneously utilized to introduce Ni or Cu atoms. Films were irradiated by 100 MeV Ag7+ ions to fluences in the range 1 × 1010-3 × 1011 cm-2. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, Raman scattering, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy in conductive mode were used to investigate film properties and structure change under irradiation. Some conductive channels having metallic conductivity type were found in the films. Number of such channels is less than number of impinged ions. Presence of Ni and Cu atoms increases conductivity of those conductive channels. Fluence dependence of all properties studied suggests different mechanisms of swift heavy ion irradiation-induced transformation of carbon matrix due to different chemical effect of nickel and copper atoms.

  12. Heavy-Ion-Induced Electronic Desorption of Gas from Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Molvik, A W; Mahner, E; Kireeff Covo, M; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Krämer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2007-01-01

    During heavy-ion operation in several particle accelerators worldwide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion-induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dEe/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  13. Heavy-ion induced electronic desorption of gas from metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molvik, A W; Kollmus, H; Mahner, E; Covo, M K; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Kramer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2006-12-19

    During heavy ion operation in several particle accelerators world-wide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dE{sub e}/d/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  14. Induced radioactivity of a GSO scintillator by secondary fragments in carbon ion therapy and its effects on in-beam OpenPET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-01

    The accumulation of induced radioactivity within in-beam PET scanner scintillators is of concern for its long-term clinical usage in particle therapy. To estimate the effects on OpenPET which we are developing for in-beam PET based on GSOZ (Zi doped Gd2SiO5), we measured the induced radioactivity of GSO activated by secondary fragments in a water phantom irradiation by a (12)C beam with an energy of 290 MeV u(-1). Radioisotopes of Na, Ce, Eu, Gd, Nd, Pm and Tb including positron emitters were observed in the gamma ray spectra of the activated GSO with a high purity Ge detector and their absolute radioactivities were calculated. We used the Monte Carlo simulation platform, Geant4 in which the observed radioactivity was assigned to the scintillators of a precisely reproduced OpenPET and the single and coincidence rates immediately after one treatment and after one-year usage were estimated for the most severe conditions. Comparing the highest coincidence rate originating from the activated scintillators (background) and the expected coincidence rate from an imaging object (signal), we determined the expected signal-to-noise ratio to be more than 7 within 3 min and more than 10 within 1 min from the scan start time. We concluded the effects of scintillator activation and their accumulation on the OpenPET imaging were small and clinical long-term usage of the OpenPET was feasible.

  15. Induced radioactivity of a GSO scintillator by secondary fragments in carbon ion therapy and its effects on in-beam OpenPET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-01

    The accumulation of induced radioactivity within in-beam PET scanner scintillators is of concern for its long-term clinical usage in particle therapy. To estimate the effects on OpenPET which we are developing for in-beam PET based on GSOZ (Zi doped Gd2SiO5), we measured the induced radioactivity of GSO activated by secondary fragments in a water phantom irradiation by a (12)C beam with an energy of 290 MeV u(-1). Radioisotopes of Na, Ce, Eu, Gd, Nd, Pm and Tb including positron emitters were observed in the gamma ray spectra of the activated GSO with a high purity Ge detector and their absolute radioactivities were calculated. We used the Monte Carlo simulation platform, Geant4 in which the observed radioactivity was assigned to the scintillators of a precisely reproduced OpenPET and the single and coincidence rates immediately after one treatment and after one-year usage were estimated for the most severe conditions. Comparing the highest coincidence rate originating from the activated scintillators (background) and the expected coincidence rate from an imaging object (signal), we determined the expected signal-to-noise ratio to be more than 7 within 3 min and more than 10 within 1 min from the scan start time. We concluded the effects of scintillator activation and their accumulation on the OpenPET imaging were small and clinical long-term usage of the OpenPET was feasible. PMID:27280308

  16. Induced radioactivity of a GSO scintillator by secondary fragments in carbon ion therapy and its effects on in-beam OpenPET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-01

    The accumulation of induced radioactivity within in-beam PET scanner scintillators is of concern for its long-term clinical usage in particle therapy. To estimate the effects on OpenPET which we are developing for in-beam PET based on GSOZ (Zi doped Gd2SiO5), we measured the induced radioactivity of GSO activated by secondary fragments in a water phantom irradiation by a 12C beam with an energy of 290 MeV u‑1. Radioisotopes of Na, Ce, Eu, Gd, Nd, Pm and Tb including positron emitters were observed in the gamma ray spectra of the activated GSO with a high purity Ge detector and their absolute radioactivities were calculated. We used the Monte Carlo simulation platform, Geant4 in which the observed radioactivity was assigned to the scintillators of a precisely reproduced OpenPET and the single and coincidence rates immediately after one treatment and after one-year usage were estimated for the most severe conditions. Comparing the highest coincidence rate originating from the activated scintillators (background) and the expected coincidence rate from an imaging object (signal), we determined the expected signal-to-noise ratio to be more than 7 within 3 min and more than 10 within 1 min from the scan start time. We concluded the effects of scintillator activation and their accumulation on the OpenPET imaging were small and clinical long-term usage of the OpenPET was feasible.

  17. MOLECULAR ION DETECTION BY A LASER INDUCED CHANGE IN MOBILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Walkup, R.; Dreyfus, R.; Avouris, Ph.

    1983-01-01

    We report the optogalvanic detection of molecular ions (N+2, CO+) via a laser induced change in ion mobility. The technique relies on a difference in collision limited transport of excited vs. ground state ions, and provides a uniquely sensitive probe of ions in the cathode sheath region of glow discharges.

  18. Induction of apoptosis in murione spleen lymphocytes using carbon ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the capacity of heavy ions to induce apoptosis in lymphocytes, mice have been irradiated with accelerated carbon ions (95 MeV/nucleon) at doses ranging from 0.1 to 4 Gy. Their spleens were removed 24 h later and gently dissociated to prepare a single cell suspension. Mononuclear cells were then maintained in culture at 37oC, and the occurrence of apoptosis in these cells was analysed 24 h later. Lymphocytes were also irradiated in vitro, in the presence of Ac-DEVD-CHO, a potent caspase-3 and -7 inhibitor. Results from three experiments performed at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL, Caen, France) are reported here. They indicate that carbon ions induce a marked, dose-dependent, reduction of the spleen weight and cellularity. However, in sharp contrast with spleen cells prepared from X-ray irradiated mice, only a slight increase of apoptosis is evidenced in cultured lymphocytes from mice irradiated with heavy ions. The significance of such results is discussed. So far, few data exist concerning the biological effects of heavy ions, in particular their capacity to induce apoptosis in lymphocytes; the present study provides useful clues for further investigations. (author)

  19. Multifragmentation in light-ion-induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley, K.B.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Bracken, D.S. [and others

    1995-04-01

    Multifragmentation of {sup nat}Ag and {sup 197}Au nuclei induced by 4.8 GeV {sup 3}He ions has been studied with the ISiS 4{pi} detector array. Rapidity and moving source analyses are consistent with thermal emission from a source in approximate kinetic equilibrium. For the most dissipative collisions, the spectral Coulomb peaks are broadened to very low energies, indicative of emission from an expanded nuclear system. Predictions of an intranuclear cascade/expanding, emitting source model compare well with experimental multiplicity distributions and the evolution of fragment spectral shapes.

  20. Multifragmentation in light-ion-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multifragmentation of natAg and 197Au nuclei induced by 4.8 GeV 3He ions has been studied with the ISiS 4π detector array. Rapidity and moving source analyses are consistent with thermal emission from a source in approximate kinetic equilibrium. For the most dissipative collisions, the spectral Coulomb peaks are broadened to very low energies, indicative of emission from an expanded nuclear system. Predictions of an intranuclear cascade/expanding, emitting source model compare well with experimental multiplicity distributions and the evolution of fragment spectral shapes

  1. Ion beam induced stress formation and relaxation in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, T., E-mail: Tobias.Steinbach@uni-jena.de [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Reupert, A.; Schmidt, E.; Wesch, W. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Ion irradiation of crystalline solids leads not only to defect formation and amorphization but also to mechanical stress. In the past, many investigations in various materials were performed focusing on the ion beam induced damage formation but only several experiments were done to investigate the ion beam induced stress evolution. Especially in microelectronic devices, mechanical stress leads to several unwanted effects like cracking and peeling of surface layers as well as changing physical properties and anomalous diffusion of dopants. To study the stress formation and relaxation process in semiconductors, crystalline and amorphous germanium samples were irradiated with 3 MeV iodine ions at different ion fluence rates. The irradiation induced stress evolution was measured in situ with a laser reflection technique as a function of ion fluence, whereas the damage formation was investigated by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The investigations show that mechanical stress builds up at low ion fluences as a direct consequence of ion beam induced point defect formation. However, further ion irradiation causes a stress relaxation which is attributed to the accumulation of point defects and therefore the creation of amorphous regions. A constant stress state is reached at high ion fluences if a homogeneous amorphous surface layer was formed and no further ion beam induced phase transition took place. Based on the results, we can conclude that the ion beam induced stress evolution seems to be mainly dominated by the creation and accumulation of irradiation induced structural modification.

  2. Time-resolved ion beam induced charge collection (TRIBICC) in micro-electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The entire current transient induced by single 12 MeV Carbon ions was measured at a 5GHz analog bandwidth. A focused ion micro-beam was used to acquire multiple single ion transients at multiple locations of a single CMOS transistor. The current transients reveal clear and discernible contributions of drift and diffusive charge collection. Transients measured for drain and off-drain ion strikes compare well to 3D DAVINCI calculations. Estimates are presented for the drift assisted funneling charge collection depth

  3. Time-resolved ion beam induced charge collection (TRIBICC) in micro-electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoene, H. [Air Force Research Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walsh, D.S.; Sexton, F.W.; Doyle, B.L.; Aurand, J.F.; Dodd, P.E.; Flores, R.S.; Wing, N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The entire current transient induced by single 12 MeV Carbon ions was measured at a 5GHz analog bandwidth. A focused ion micro-beam was used to acquire multiple single ion transients at multiple locations of a single CMOS transistor. The current transients reveal clear and discernible contributions of drift and diffusive charge collection. Transients measured for drain and off-drain ion strikes compare well to 3D DAVINCI calculations. Estimates are presented for the drift assisted funneling charge collection depth.

  4. Response of SOI image sensor to therapeutic carbon ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumura, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy is known as a less invasive cancer treatment. The radiation quality is an important parameter to evaluate the biological effect and the clinical dose from the measured physical dose. The performance of SOPHIAS detector, which is the SOI image sensor having a wide dynamic range and large active area, was tested by using therapeutic carbon ion beam at Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC). It was shown that the primary carbon and secondary particles can be distinguishable by SOPHIAS detector. On the other hand, a LET dependence was observed especially at the high LET region. This phenomenon will be studied by using the device simulator together with Monte Carlo simulation.

  5. Carbon stripper foils for high current heavy ion operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the proposed new heavy ion linac'at'GSI the installation of a carbon foil stripper section is under discussion. High duty factor as well as high current (but low duty factor) heavy ion beams were used for machine experiments. Long term tests were performed to check the carbon foil durability. Relevant beam parameters have been measured in three measurement campaigns. After beam testing stripper foils were analyzed with different offline methods. Additionally promising results of high current beam irradiation of rotating target wheels will be presented. In the transfer line to the SIS 18 the heavy ion beam is stripped to higher charge states in a thick carbon foil. The stripper foil is loaded with 3 % of the beam power. To avoid evaporation in a single beam pulse, the beam is rapidly swept over its width. Experiences collected during the last decade of foil stripper operation at GSI will be presented. (author)

  6. Numerical and experimental studies of the carbon etching in EUV-induced plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Astakhov, D I; Lee, C J; Ivanov, V V; Krivtsun, V M; Yakushev, O; Koshelev, K N; Lopaev, D V; Bijkerk, F

    2015-01-01

    We have used a combination of numerical modeling and experiments to study carbon etching in the presence of a hydrogen plasma. We model the evolution of a low density EUV-induced plasma during and after the EUV pulse to obtain the energy resolved ion fluxes from the plasma to the surface. By relating the computed ion fluxes to the experimentally observed etching rate at various pressures and ion energies, we show that at low pressure and energy, carbon etching is due to chemical sputtering, while at high pressure and energy a reactive ion etching process is likely to dominate.

  7. Activated carbon is an electron-conducting amphoteric ion adsorbent

    OpenAIRE

    Biesheuvel, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Electrodes composed of activated carbon (AC) particles can desalinate water by ion electrosorption. To describe ion electrosorption mathematically, accurate models are required for the structure of the electrical double layers (EDLs) that form within electrically charged AC micropores. To account for salt adsorption also in uncharged ACs, an "attraction term" was introduced in modified Donnan models for the EDL structure in ACs. Here it will be shown how instead of using an attraction term, c...

  8. Glass-like carbon, pyrolytic graphite or nanostructured carbon for electrochemical sensing of bismuth ion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Milikić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Different carbon electrodes were explored for application in electroanalysis, namely for sensing of bismuth ion as model analyte. Carbon materials tested included glassy carbon, basal and edge plane pyrolytic graphite, as well as nanostructured carbonized polyaniline prepared in the presence of 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. Bismuth ion was chosen as model analyte as protocol for its detection and quantifications is still to be determined. Herein, anodic stripping voltammetry was used with study of effect of several parameters such as scan rate and deposition time. Electrode based on carbonized polyaniline showed the highest activity for bismuth ion sensing in terms of the highest current densities recorded both in a laboratory and in real sample, while basal plane pyrolytic graphite electrode gave the lowest limit of detection.

  9. Thermal ion effects on kinetic beta-induced Alfven eigenmodes excited by energetic ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi Longyu; Sheng, Z. M. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Dong, J. Q. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Bierwage, A. [Aomori Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Lu Gaimin [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2013-03-15

    Kinetic beta-induced Alfven eigenmodes (KBAEs) driven by energetic ions are numerically investigated using revised AWECS code. The thermal ion density and temperature gradients are taken into account. It is found that the growth rate of the KBAEs increases with the thermal ion pressure gradient, and the contributions from the density gradient and temperature gradient of the thermal ions to the enhancement of the instability are comparable. The damping effect of thermal ion dynamics on the modes is also observed.

  10. Laser-induced nuclear motions in the Coulomb explosion of C2H2+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser-induced multifragmentation of C2H2 into protons and multicharged carbon ions is shown to be a direct instantaneous explosion of the molecule. The evolution of the overall nuclear structure is studied through ion-ion correlation peak shapes. The ratios of the maxima of the kinetic-energy release distributions to the Coulomb repulsion energies calculated at the equilibrium internuclear distances are measured to be 45% for the protons and 53% for the CZ+ ions for all the detected H++CZ'++CZ+ +H+ fragmentation channels. The time scale for electronic polarization and stripping compared with the intramolecular electronic and nuclear time evolutions does not allow using a frozen molecular ion structure for the description of the explosion, thus explaining in part the observed fragmentation pattern. During the laser-induced alignment and subsequent stabilization of the molecular frame around the laser polarization direction, the carbon-carbon axis undergoes small damped oscillations that remain larger than the corresponding oscillations of the hydrogen-hydrogen axis. This difference comes from the lower moment of inertia of the hydrogen atoms compared with that of the carbon atoms in the molecule. However, the subsequent deviation from the initial linear structure remains small and is observed when the molecular ion is not completely aligned along the laser electric field

  11. Local brain heavy ion irradiation induced Immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Runhong; Deng, Yulin; Huiyang Zhu, Bitlife.; Zhao, Tuo; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Yingqi; Ma, Hong; Wang, Xiao; Zhuang, Fengyuan; Qing, Hong

    Purpose: To investigate the long term effect of acute local brain heavy ion irradiation on the peripheral immune system in rat model. Methodology: Only the brain of adult male Wistar rats were radiated by heavy ions at the dose of 15 Gy. One, two and three months after irradiation, thymus and spleen were analyzed by four ways. Tunel assay was performed to evaluate the percentage of apoptotic cells in thymus and spleen, level of Inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, SSAO, and TNF-α) was detected by ELISA assay, the differentiation of thymus T lymphocyte subsets were measured by flow cytometry and the relative expression levels of genes related to thymus immune cell development were measured by using quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Thymus and spleen showed significant atrophy from one month to three months after irradiation. A high level of apoptosis in thymus and spleen were obtained and the latter was more vulnerable, also, high level of inflammatory cytokines were found. Genes (c-kit, Rag1, Rag2 and Sca1) related to thymus lymphocytes’ development were down-regulated. Conclusion: Local area radiation in the rat brain would cause the immunosuppression, especially, the losing of cell-mediated immune functions. In this model, radiation caused inflammation and then induced apoptosis of cells in the immune organs, which contributed to immunosuppression.

  12. Hyperkalaemia induced by carbonic anhydrase inhibitor.

    OpenAIRE

    Wakabayashi, Y.

    1991-01-01

    An 81-year-old man developed hyperkalaemic and hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis following treatment with a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor for his glaucoma. He had mild renal failure and selective aldosterone deficiency was confirmed. In this case the treatment did not lead to hypokalaemia because of the limited potassium secretory capacity in the renal tubules from selective aldosterone deficiency; rather, it may have led to hyperkalaemia because metabolic acidosis induced by the carbonic anh...

  13. Non-invasive monitoring of therapeutic carbon ion beams in a homogeneous phantom by tracking of secondary ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwosch, K; Hartmann, B; Jakubek, J; Granja, C; Soukup, P; Jäkel, O; Martišíková, M

    2013-06-01

    Radiotherapy with narrow scanned carbon ion beams enables a highly accurate treatment of tumours while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. Changes in the patient's geometry can alter the actual ion range in tissue and result in unfavourable changes in the dose distribution. Consequently, it is desired to verify the actual beam delivery within the patient. Real-time and non-invasive measurement methods are preferable. Currently, the only technically feasible method to monitor the delivered dose distribution within the patient is based on tissue activation measurements by means of positron emission tomography (PET). An alternative monitoring method based on tracking of prompt secondary ions leaving a patient irradiated with carbon ion beams has been previously suggested. It is expected to help in overcoming the limitations of the PET-based technique like physiological washout of the beam induced activity, low signal and to allow for real-time measurements. In this paper, measurements of secondary charged particle tracks around a head-sized homogeneous PMMA phantom irradiated with pencil-like carbon ion beams are presented. The investigated energies and beam widths are within the therapeutically used range. The aim of the study is to deduce properties of the primary beam from the distribution of the secondary charged particles. Experiments were performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center, Germany. The directions of secondary charged particles emerging from the PMMA phantom were measured using an arrangement of two parallel pixelated silicon detectors (Timepix). The distribution of the registered particle tracks was analysed to deduce its dependence on clinically important beam parameters: beam range, width and position. Distinct dependencies of the secondary particle tracks on the properties of the primary carbon ion beam were observed. In the particular experimental set-up used, beam range differences of 1.3 mm were detectable. In addition, variations in

  14. Comparison of the effects of photon versus carbon ion irradiation when combined with chemotherapy in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of combination effects of chemotherapy drugs with carbon ions in comparison to photons in vitro. The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line WiDr was tested for combinations with camptothecin, cisplatin, gemcitabine and paclitaxel. In addition three other human tumour cell lines (A549: lung, LN-229: glioblastoma, PANC-1: pancreas) were tested for the combination with camptothecin. Cells were irradiated with photon doses of 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy or carbon ion doses of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 Gy. Cell survival was assessed using the clonogenic growth assay. Treatment dependent changes in cell cycle distribution (up to 12 hours post-treatment) were measured by FACS analysis after propidium-iodide staining. Apoptosis was monitored for up to 36 hours post-treatment by Nicoletti-assay (with qualitative verification using DAPI staining). All cell lines exhibited the well-known increase of killing efficacy per unit dose of carbon ion exposure, with relative biological efficiencies at 10% survival (RBE10) ranging from 2.3 to 3.7 for the different cell lines. In combination with chemotherapy additive toxicity was the prevailing effect. Only in combination with gemcitabine or cisplatin (WiDr) or camptothecin (all cell lines) the photon sensitivity was slightly enhanced, whereas purely independent toxicities were found with the carbon ion irradiation, in all cases. Radiation-induced cell cycle changes displayed the generally observed dose-dependent G2-arrest with little effect on S-phase fraction for all cell lines for photons and for carbon ions. Only paclitaxel showed a significant induction of apoptosis in WiDr cell line but independent of the used radiation quality. Combined effects of different chemotherapeutics with photons or with carbon ions do neither display qualitative nor substantial quantitative differences. Small radiosensitizing effects, when observed with photons are decreased with carbon ions. The data support the idea that a radiochemotherapy with common

  15. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  16. Ion Exclusion by Sub 2-nm Carbon Nanotube Pores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-04-09

    Carbon nanotubes offer an outstanding platform for studying molecular transport at nanoscale, and have become promising materials for nanofluidics and membrane technology due to their unique combination of physical, chemical, mechanical, and electronic properties. In particular, both simulations and experiments have proved that fluid flow through carbon nanotubes of nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast compared to what continuum hydrodynamic theories would predict when applied on this length scale, and also, compared to conventional membranes with pores of similar size, such as zeolites. For a variety of applications such as separation technology, molecular sensing, drug delivery, and biomimetics, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In particular, for water desalination, coupling the enhancement of the water flux with selective ion transport could drastically reduce the cost of brackish and seawater desalting. In this work, we study the ion selectivity of membranes made of aligned double-walled carbon nanotubes with sub-2 nm diameter. Negatively charged groups are introduced at the opening of the carbon nanotubes by oxygen plasma treatment. Reverse osmosis experiments coupled with capillary electrophoresis analysis of permeate and feed show significant anion and cation rejection. Ion exclusion declines by increasing ionic strength (concentration) of the feed and by lowering solution pH; also, the highest rejection is observed for the A{sub m}{sup Z{sub A}} C{sub n}{sup Z{sub C}} salts (A=anion, C=cation, z= valence) with the greatest Z{sub A}/Z{sub C} ratio. Our results strongly support a Donnan-type rejection mechanism, dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion

  17. Ion chromatography detection of fluoride in calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefler, Jamie E; Ivey, Michelle M

    2011-09-01

    Fluoride in aquatic systems is increasing due to anthropogenic pollution, but little is known about how this fluoride affects organisms that live in and around aquatic habitats. Fluoride can bioaccumulate in structures comprised of calcium carbonate, such as shells and skeletons of both freshwater and saltwater species as diverse as snails, corals, and coccolithophorid algae. In this article, ion chromatography (IC) techniques are developed to detect and quantify fluoride in a matrix of calcium carbonate. Solid samples are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, pretreated to remove the majority of the chloride ions, and then analyzed using IC. With these methods, the 3σ limit of detection is 0.2 mg of fluoride/kg of calcium carbonate. PMID:21859530

  18. Modeling Electrochemical Decomposition of Fluoroethylene Carbonate on Silicon Anode Surfaces in Lithium Ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Kevin; Rempe, Susan B.; Foster, Michael E.; Ma, Yuguang; del la Hoz, Julibeth M. Martinez; Sai, Na; Balbuena, Perla B.

    2014-01-01

    Fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) shows promise as an electrolyte additive for improving passivating solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) films on silicon anodes used in lithium ion batteries (LIB). We apply density functional theory (DFT), ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), and quantum chemistry techniques to examine excess-electron-induced FEC molecular decomposition mechanisms that lead to FEC-modified SEI. We consider one- and two-electron reactions using cluster models and explicit interfac...

  19. Physical and chemical response of 70 MeV carbon ion irradiated Kapton-H polymer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H S Virk; P S Chandi; A K Srivastava

    2001-10-01

    Physical and chemical responses of 70 MeV carbon ion irradiated Kapton-H polymer were studied by using UV-visible, FTIR and XRD techniques. The ion fluences ranging from 9.3 × 1011–9 × 1013 ions cm–2 were used. Recorded UV-visible spectra clearly showed a decrease in absorption initially with fluence, but for the higher fluences it showed a recovery characteristic. A decrease in band-gap energy of 0.07 eV was observed. The FTIR analysis indicated the high resistance to radiation induced degradation of polymer. The diffraction pattern of Kapton-H indicates that this polymer is semi-crystalline in its nature. In case of irradiated one, there was an average increase of crystallite size by 20%, but diffuse pattern indicates that there was a decrease in crystallinity, which may be attributed to the formation of complex structure induced by the cross-linking of the polymeric chains.

  20. Ions ejected from the surface: sputtering induced by swift heavy ion irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Alzaher, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Ion irradiation of solids leads to a deposition of its energy along the ion path. The energy deposited creates damage in the target as well as leads to the sputtering of neutral and charged particles. In this work we studied the damage induced by slow and swift ions in matter. We studied also the sputtering of secondary ions induced by swift heavy ion irradiation. We have measured the damage cross section of the surface of the Titanium (Insulator surface) and of the graphite (Conductor surfac...

  1. Ion irradiation of electronic-type-separated single wall carbon nanotubes: A model for radiation effects in nanostructured carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural and electrical properties of electronic-type-separated (metallic and semiconducting) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-films have been investigated after irradiation with 150 keV 11B+ and 150 keV 31P+ with fluences ranging from 1012 to 1015 ions/cm2. Raman spectroscopy results indicate that the ratio of the Raman D to G′ band peak intensities (D/G′) is a more sensitive indicator of SWCNT structural modification induced by ion irradiation by one order of magnitude compared to the ratio of the Raman D to G band peak intensities (D/G). The increase in sheet resistance (Rs) of the thin-films follows a similar trend as the D/G′ ratio, suggesting that the radiation induced variation in bulk electrical transport for both electronic-types is equal and related to localized defect generation. The characterization results for the various samples are compared based on the displacement damage dose (DDD) imparted to the sample, which is material and damage source independent. Therefore, it is possible to extend the analysis to include data from irradiation of transferred CVD-graphene films on SiO2/Si substrates using 35 keV C+ ions, and compare the observed changes at equivalent levels of ion irradiation-induced damage to that observed in the SWCNT thin-film samples. Ultimately, a model is developed for the prediction of the radiation response of nanostructured carbon materials based on the DDD for any incident ion with low-energy recoil spectra. The model is also related to the defect concentration, and subsequently the effective defect-to-defect length, and yields a maximum defect concentration (minimum defect-to-defect length) above which the bulk electrical transport properties in SWCNT thin-films and large graphene-based electronic devices rapidly degrade when exposed to harsh environments.

  2. Development of C{sup 6+} laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, T., E-mail: takayuki1.sako@toshiba.co.jp; Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama 235-8522 (Japan); Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T. [Cancer Research Center, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Takeuchi, T. [Accelerator Engineering Corporation, Chiba 263-0043 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A prototype C{sup 6+} injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  3. Development of C6+ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Sato, K.; Goto, A.; Iwai, T.; Nayuki, T.; Nemoto, K.; Kayama, T.; Takeuchi, T.

    2016-02-01

    A prototype C6+ injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4.

  4. Development of C⁶⁺ laser ion source and RFQ linac for carbon ion radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, T; Yamaguchi, A; Sato, K; Goto, A; Iwai, T; Nayuki, T; Nemoto, K; Kayama, T; Takeuchi, T

    2016-02-01

    A prototype C(6+) injector using a laser ion source has been developed for a compact synchrotron dedicated to carbon ion radiotherapy. The injector consists of a laser ion source and a 4-vane radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac. Ion beams are extracted from plasma and directly injected into the RFQ. A solenoid guides the low-energy beams into the RFQ. The RFQ is designed to accelerate high-intensity pulsed beams. A structure of monolithic vanes and cavities is adopted to reduce its power consumption. In beam acceleration tests, a solenoidal magnetic field set between the laser ion source and the RFQ helped increase both the peak currents before and after the RFQ by a factor of 4. PMID:26932119

  5. Defect structure induced by ion injection in WC-Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, S.-I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Silim-dong Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, E.-G.; Jun, J.-H. [Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, Nam-gu Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.-W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Silim-dong Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: youngwk@snu.ac.kr

    2008-04-15

    Microstructural changes were investigated when nitrogen ions were injected into a WC-Co surface. The crystallographic orientation of WC, relative to the incoming ions, affects the number density and the types of dislocations, but the penetration depth from the accelerated ions was constant regardless of grain orientation. It is believed that the injected nitrogen atoms replaced existing carbon atoms in the highly defective region.

  6. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavoto, G. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Cirillo, E.N.M. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento SBAI, Rome (Italy); Cocina, F. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Ferretti, J. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Polosa, A.D. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); CERN, Theory Division, Geneva (Switzerland); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (∼ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency. (orig.)

  7. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoto, G.; Cirillo, E. N. M.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A. D.

    2016-06-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (≈ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency.

  8. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Cavoto, G; Cocina, F; Ferretti, J; Polosa, A D

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (~ 10 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with ...

  9. Gated ion transport through dense carbon nanotube membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Funke, Hans H; Falconer, John L; Noble, Richard D

    2010-06-23

    Gated ion diffusion is found widely in hydrophobic biological nanopores, upon changes in ligand binding, temperature, transmembrane voltage, and mechanical stress. Because water is the main media for ion diffusion in these hydrophobic biological pores, ion diffusion behavior through these nanochannels is expected to be influenced significantly when water wettability in hydrophobic biological nanopores is sensitive and changes upon small external changes. Here, we report for the first time that ion diffusion through highly hydrophobic nanopores (approximately 3 nm) showed a gated behavior due to change of water wettability on hydrophobic surface upon small temperature change or ultrasound. Dense carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes with both 3-nm CNTs and 3-nm interstitial pores were prepared by a solvent evaporation process and used as a model system to investigate ion diffusion behavior. Ion diffusion through these membranes exhibited a gated behavior. The ion flux was turned on and off, apparently because the water wettability of CNTs changed. At 298 K, ion diffusion through dense CNT membranes stopped after a few hours, but it dramatically increased when the temperature was increased 20 K or the membrane was subjected to ultrasound. Likewise, water adsorption on dense CNT membranes increased dramatically at a water activity of 0.53 when the temperature increased from 293 to 306 K, indicating capillary condensation. Water adsorption isotherms of dense CNT membranes suggest that the adsorbed water forms a discontinuous phase at 293 K, but it probably forms a continuous layer, probably in the interstitial CNT regions, at higher temperatures. When the ion diffusion channel was opened by a temperature increase or ultrasound, ions diffused through the CNT membranes at a rate similar to bulk diffusion in water. This finding may have implications for using CNT membrane for desalination and water treatment. PMID:20504021

  10. Increased effectiveness of carbon ions in the production of reactive oxygen species in normal human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially superoxide anions (O2·-), is enhanced in many normal and tumor cell types in response to ionizing radiation. The influence of ionizing radiation on the regulation of ROS production is considered as an important factor in the long-term effects of irradiation (such as genomic instability) that might contribute to the development of secondary cancers. In view of the increasing application of carbon ions in radiation therapy, we aimed to study the potential impact of ionizing density on the intracellular production of ROS, comparing photons (X-rays) with carbon ions. For this purpose, we used normal human cells as a model for irradiated tissue surrounding a tumor. By quantifying the oxidization of Dihydroethidium (DHE), a fluorescent probe sensitive to superoxide anions, we assessed the intracellular ROS status after radiation exposure in normal human fibroblasts, which do not show radiation-induced chromosomal instability. After 3–5 days post exposure to X-rays and carbon ions, the level of ROS increased to a maximum that was dose dependent. The maximum ROS level reached after irradiation was specific for the fibroblast type. However, carbon ions induced this maximum level at a lower dose compared with X-rays. Within ∼1 week, ROS decreased to control levels. The time-course of decreasing ROS coincides with an increase in cell number and decreasing p21 protein levels, indicating a release from radiation-induced growth arrest. Interestingly, radiation did not act as a trigger for chronically enhanced levels of ROS months after radiation exposure. (author)

  11. Effect of magnetic field on light-induced ion drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper is devoted to theoretical study of the force aspect of magnetic field effect on the light-induced ion drift. One studied three-component (electrons, single-charge positive ions and neutral atoms) slightly ionized gas in the constant homogeneous magnetic field. One derived formulae describing ion drift under the effect of mobile monochromatic light wave. It was determined that in slightly ionized gas at superposition of the external magnetic field a component of light-induced ion drift speed that was transverse to the radiation propagation direction might occur. One estimates the magnetic field value when the projection of ion drift speed on radiation direction should change its sign. In this case, one may observe anomalous light-induced ion drift

  12. Effect of ion velocity on SHI-induced mixing in Ti/Bi system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Nisha; Kumar, Sarvesh; Khan, Saif Ahmad; Chauhan, R. S.

    2016-03-01

    Energetic ion beams are proving to be versatile tools for modification and depth profiling of materials. The energy and ion species are the deciding factor in the ion-beam-induced materials modification. Among the various parameters such as electronic energy loss, fluence and heat of mixing, velocity of the ions used for irradiation plays an important role in mixing at the interface. The present study is carried out to find the effect of the velocity of swift heavy ions on interface mixing of a Ti/Bi bilayer system. Ti/Bi/C was deposited on Si substrate at room temperature by an electron gun in a high-vacuum deposition system. Carbon layer is deposited on top to avoid oxidation of the samples. Eighty mega electron volts Au ions and 100 MeV Ag ions with same value of Se for Ti are used for the irradiation of samples at the fluences 1 × 1013-1 × 1014 ions/cm2. Different techniques like Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the pristine and irradiated samples. The mixing effect is explained in the framework of the thermal spike model. It has been found that the mixing rate is higher for low-velocity Au ions in comparison to high-velocity Ag ions. The result could be explained as due to less energy deposition in thermal spike by high-velocity ions.

  13. Self-organized formation of metal-carbon nanostructures by hyperthermal ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, I.K.

    2006-04-26

    The quasi-simultaneous deposition of mass-selected hyperthermal carbon and metal ions results in a variety of interesting film morphologies, depending on the metal used and the deposition conditions. The observed features are of the order of a few nanometres and are therefore interesting for future potential applications in the various fields of nanotechnology. The present study focuses on the structural analysis of amorphous carbon films containing either copper, silver, gold, or iron using amongst others Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The film morphologies found are as follows: copper-containing films consist of copper nanoclusters with sizes ranging from about 3 to 9 nm uniformly distributed throughout the amorphous carbon matrix. The cluster size hereby rises with the copper content of the films. The silver containing films decompose into a pure amorphous carbon film with silver agglomerates at the surface. Both, the gold- and the iron-containing films show a multilayer structure of metal-rich layers with higher cluster density separated by metal-depleted amorphous carbon layers. The layer distances are of the order of up to 15 nm in the case of gold-carbon films and 7 nm in the case of iron-carbon films. The formation of theses different structures cannot be treated in the context of conventional self-organization mechanisms basing upon thermal diffusion and equilibrium thermodynamics. Instead, an ion-induced atomic transport, sputtering effects, and the stability of small metal clusters were taken into account in order to model the structure formation processes. A similar multilayer morphology was recently also reported in the literature for metal-carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering techniques. In order to investigate, whether the mechanisms are the same as in the case of the ion beam deposited films described above, first experiments were conducted

  14. Heavy-ion-induced fission reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission-cross-section excitation functions were measured from near threshold to approx. 10 MeV/nucleon using heavy-ion beams from the Brookhaven National Laboratory three-stage Tandem Accelerator Facility. The systems studied included 210Po formed in 12C and 18O induced reactions, 186Os formed in 9Be, 12C, 16O, and 26Mg reactions, 158Er formed in 16O, 24Mg, 32S, and 64Ni reactions. In addition the composite systems 204206, 208Po formed with 16O and 18O projectiles were studied. The measured fission excitation functions along with previous data from 4He and 11B bombardments for the 186Os and 210Po systems and recent data on the 200Pb system are compared to predictions from a statistical model using recent fission-barrier calculations from A. Sierk. Comparisons of calculated and measured fission excitation functions show good overall agreement between data and calculations and between calculations with two different level-density functions. It is concluded that the barriers from Sierk give a good description of both the mass and angular momentum dependence of fission barriers in this region

  15. Laser Induced Fluorescence of the Iodine Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargus, William

    2014-10-01

    Iodine (I2) has been considered as a potential electrostatic spacecraft thruster propellant for approximately 2 decades, but has only recently been demonstrated. Energy conversion efficiency appears to be on par with xenon without thruster modification. Intriguingly, performance appears to exceed xenon at high acceleration potentials. As part of a continuing program for the development of non-intrusive plasma diagnostics for advanced plasma spacecraft propulsion, we have identified the I II 5d5D4 o state as metastable, and therefore containing a reservoir of excited state ions suitable for laser probing. The 5d5D4 o - 6p5P3 transition at 695.878 nm is convenient for diode laser excitation with the 5s5S2 o - 6p5P3 transition at 516.12 nm as an ideal candidate for non-resonant fluorescence collection. We have constructed a Penning type iodine microwave discharge lamp optimized for I II production for table-top measurements. This work demonstrates I II laser-induced fluorescence in a representative iodine discharge and will validate our previous theoretical work based on the limited available historical I II spectral data.

  16. Long-term Autophagy and Nrf2 Signaling in the Hippocampi of Developing Mice after Carbon Ion Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Zhao, Ting; Liu, Xiongxiong; Jin, Xiaodong; Liu, Xinguo; Wang, Tieshan; Li, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    To explore charged particle radiation-induced long-term hippocampus damage, we investigated the expression of autophagy and antioxidant Nrf2 signaling-related proteins in the mouse hippocampus after carbon ion radiation. Heads of immature female Balb/c mice were irradiated with carbon ions of different LETs at various doses. Behavioral tests were performed on the mice after maturation. Acute and chronic expression of LC3-II, p62/SQSTM1, nuclear Nrf2, activated caspase-3 and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio were measured in the hippocampi. Secondary X-ray insult was adopted to amplify potential damages. Long-term behavioral changes were observed in high-LET carbon ion-irradiated mice. There were no differences in the rates of LC3-II induction and p62/SQSTM1 degradation compared to the control group regardless of whether the mice received the secondary X-ray insult. A high nuclear Nrf2 content and low apoptosis level in hippocampal cells subjected to secondary X-rays were observed for the mice exposed to relatively low-LET carbon ions. Therefore, carbon ion exposure in the immature mouse led to an LET-dependent behavioral change after maturation. Although autophagy was intact, the persistently high nuclear Nrf2 content in the hippocampus might account for the unchanged behavioral pattern in mice exposed to the relatively low-LET carbon ions and the subsequent increased radioresistance of the hippocampus.

  17. Three dimensional reconstruction of therapeutic carbon ion beams in phantoms using single secondary ion tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhart, Anna Merle; Jakubek, Jan; Martisikova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion beam radiotherapy enables a very localised dose deposition. However, already small changes in the patient geometry or positioning errors can significantly distort the dose distribution. A live monitoring system of the beam delivery within the patient is therefore highly desirable and could improve patient treatment. We present a novel three-dimensional imaging method of the beam in the irradiated object, exploiting the measured tracks of single secondary ions emerging under irradiation. The secondary particle tracks are detected with a TimePix stack, a set of parallel pixelated semiconductor detectors. We developed a three-dimensional reconstruction algorithm based on maximum likelihood expectation maximisation. We demonstrate the applicability of the new method in an irradiation of a cylindrical PMMA phantom of human head size with a carbon ion pencil beam of 226MeV/u. The beam image in the phantom is reconstructed from a set of 9 discrete detector positions between -80 and 50 degrees from the bea...

  18. Biological systems: from water radiolysis to carbon ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuve, Michael; Moreau, Jean-Michel; Rodriguez, Claire; Testa, Etienne

    2015-07-01

    Hadron therapy is an innovative cancer treatment method based on the acceleration of light ions at high energy. In addition to their interesting profile of dose deposition, which ensures accurate targeting of localized tumors, carbon ions offer biological properties that lead to an efficient treatment for radio- and chemo-resistant tumors and to provide a boost for tumors in hypoxia. This paper is a short review of the progress in theoretical, experimental, fundamental and applied research, aiming at understanding the origin of the biological benefits of light ions better. As a limit of such a vast and multidisciplinary domain, this review adopts the point of view of the physicists, leaning on results obtained in connection with CIMAP's IRRABAT platform.

  19. Alanine Radiation Detectors in Therapeutic Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo;

    proportional to absorbed dose. A model by Hansen and Olsen, based on the Track Structure Theory is available, which can predict the relative efficiency of some detectors, when the particle spectrum is known. For alanine detectors the model was successfully validated by Hansen and Olsen for several ion species...... at energies below 20 MeV/u. We implemented this model in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. At the GSI heavy ion facility in Darmstadt, Germany, alanine has been irradiated with carbon ions at energies between 88 an 400 MeV/u, which is the energy range used for therapy. The irradiation and the detector response have...... been simulated with FLUKA. We found an agreement between measured values of the relative efficiency with values predicted by the Hansen and Olsen model with divergence less than 4%. With the implementation in FLUKA we are able to simulate the detector response in the depth dose curves with precisions...

  20. Activated carbon is an electron-conducting amphoteric ion adsorbent

    CERN Document Server

    Biesheuvel, P M

    2015-01-01

    Electrodes composed of activated carbon (AC) particles can desalinate water by ion electrosorption. To describe ion electrosorption mathematically, accurate models are required for the structure of the electrical double layers (EDLs) that form within electrically charged AC micropores. To account for salt adsorption also in uncharged ACs, an "attraction term" was introduced in modified Donnan models for the EDL structure in ACs. Here it will be shown how instead of using an attraction term, chemical information of the surface structure of the carbon-water interface in ACs can be used to construct an alternative EDL model for ACs. This EDL model assumes that ACs contain both acidic groups, for instance due to carboxylic functionalities, and basic groups, due to the adsorption of protons to the carbon basal planes. As will be shown, this "amphoteric Donnan" model accurately describes various data sets for ion electrosorption in ACs, for solutions of NaCl, of CaCl2, and mixtures thereof, as function of the exter...

  1. Neutron imaging of ion transport in mesoporous carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ketki; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Walker, Lakeisha M H; Voisin, Sophie; Mayes, Richard T; Kiggans, Jim O; Yiacoumi, Sotira; DePaoli, David W; Dai, Sheng; Tsouris, Costas

    2013-07-28

    Neutron imaging is presented as a tool for quantifying the diffusion of ions inside porous materials, such as carbon electrodes used in the desalination process via capacitive deionization and in electrochemical energy-storage devices. Monolithic mesoporous carbon electrodes of ∼10 nm pore size were synthesized based on a soft-template method. The electrodes were used with an aqueous solution of gadolinium nitrate in an electrochemical flow-through cell designed for neutron imaging studies. Sequences of neutron images were obtained under various conditions of applied potential between the electrodes. The images revealed information on the direction and magnitude of ion transport within the electrodes. From the time-dependent concentration profiles inside the electrodes, the average value of the effective diffusion coefficient for gadolinium ions was estimated to be 2.09 ± 0.17 × 10(-11) m(2) s(-1) at 0 V and 1.42 ± 0.06 × 10(-10) m(2) s(-1) at 1.2 V. The values of the effective diffusion coefficient obtained from neutron imaging experiments can be used to evaluate model predictions of the ion transport rate in capacitive deionization and electrochemical energy-storage devices. PMID:23756558

  2. Synthesis of amorphous carbon nitride by ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenZ.; OlofinjanaA.; BellJ

    2001-01-01

    N2+ were implanted into diamondlike carbon (DLC) films in an attempt to synthesizeamorphous carbon nitride. The DLC films were previously deposited on steel substrate by using anion beam sputtering deposition (IBSD) where a single Kaufman type ion gun with argon sourcewas used to sputter a graphite target and simultaneously bombard the growing film. Parallel to theion implantation route, amorphous carbon nitride films were also synthesized by directly using thereactive ion beam sputtering deposition (RIBSD) with nitrogen source to incorporate nitrogen intothe film. The structure and properties of the films were determined by using Raman spectroscopy,XPS and nano-indentation. The implantation of N2+ into a-C films offers a higher hardness thanthat directly synthesized by RIBSD, probably through an increase in sp3/sp2 ratio and in the pro-portion of nitrogen atoms chemically bonding to carbon atoms. The results show that althoughthere are differences in film composition, structure and properties between these two processes,both methods can be used for synthesis of nitrogen-containing amorphous DLC thin films whichsignificantly modify the substrate surface.

  3. Fragment kinetic energy distributions in ion induced CO2 fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissociation of CO3+2 formed in heavy ion induced ionization of CO2 has been studied using the technique of time of flight mass spectroscopy with position sensitive ion detector, with 5 MeV/u Si12+ ions as projectiles. The kinetic energy released in the CO3+2→ C+ + O+ + O+ is measured and compared to theoretical ab initio calculations as well as photoionization results.

  4. Swift Heavy Ion Induced Modification of Aliphatic Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Umme Habiba

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the high energy heavy ion induced modification of aliphatic polymers is studied. Two polymer groups, namely polyvinyl polymers (PVF, PVAc, PVA and PMMA) and fluoropolymers (PVDF, ETFE, PFA and FEP) were used in this work. Polyvinyl polymers were investigated since they will be used as insulating materials in the superconducting magnets of the new ion accelerators of the planned International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at the GSI Helmholtz-Centre of Heavy I...

  5. Comparison of Individual Radiosensitivity to γ-Rays and Carbon Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Grace; Normil, Marie Delna; Testard, Isabelle; Hempel, William M; Ricoul, Michelle; Sabatier, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ions are an up-and-coming ion species, currently being used in charged particle radiotherapy. As it is well established that there are considerable interindividual differences in radiosensitivity in the general population that can significantly influence clinical outcomes of radiotherapy, we evaluate the degree of these differences in the context of carbon ion therapy compared with conventional radiotherapy. In this study, we evaluate individual radiosensitivity following exposure to carbon-13 ions or γ-rays in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy individuals based on the frequency of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that was either misrepaired or left unrepaired to form chromosomal aberrations (CAs) (simply referred to here as DSBs for brevity). Levels of DSBs were estimated from the scoring of CAs visualized with telomere/centromere-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TC-FISH). We examine radiosensitivity at the dose of 2 Gy, a routinely administered dose during fractionated radiotherapy, and we determined that a wide range of DSBs were induced by the given dose among healthy individuals, with highly radiosensitive individuals harboring more IR-induced breaks in the genome than radioresistant individuals following exposure to the same dose. Furthermore, we determined the relative effectiveness of carbon irradiation in comparison to γ-irradiation in the induction of DSBs at each studied dose (isodose effect), a quality we term "relative dose effect" (RDE). This ratio is advantageous, as it allows for simple comparison of dose-response curves. At 2 Gy, carbon irradiation was three times more effective in inducing DSBs compared with γ-irradiation (RDE of 3); these results were confirmed using a second cytogenetic technique, multicolor-FISH. We also analyze radiosensitivity at other doses (0.2-15 Gy), to represent hypo- and hyperfractionation doses and determined that RDE is dose dependent: high ratios at low doses

  6. Comparison of Individual Radiosensitivity to γ-Rays and Carbon Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Grace; Normil, Marie Delna; Testard, Isabelle; Hempel, William M.; Ricoul, Michelle; Sabatier, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ions are an up-and-coming ion species, currently being used in charged particle radiotherapy. As it is well established that there are considerable interindividual differences in radiosensitivity in the general population that can significantly influence clinical outcomes of radiotherapy, we evaluate the degree of these differences in the context of carbon ion therapy compared with conventional radiotherapy. In this study, we evaluate individual radiosensitivity following exposure to carbon-13 ions or γ-rays in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy individuals based on the frequency of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that was either misrepaired or left unrepaired to form chromosomal aberrations (CAs) (simply referred to here as DSBs for brevity). Levels of DSBs were estimated from the scoring of CAs visualized with telomere/centromere-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TC-FISH). We examine radiosensitivity at the dose of 2 Gy, a routinely administered dose during fractionated radiotherapy, and we determined that a wide range of DSBs were induced by the given dose among healthy individuals, with highly radiosensitive individuals harboring more IR-induced breaks in the genome than radioresistant individuals following exposure to the same dose. Furthermore, we determined the relative effectiveness of carbon irradiation in comparison to γ-irradiation in the induction of DSBs at each studied dose (isodose effect), a quality we term “relative dose effect” (RDE). This ratio is advantageous, as it allows for simple comparison of dose–response curves. At 2 Gy, carbon irradiation was three times more effective in inducing DSBs compared with γ-irradiation (RDE of 3); these results were confirmed using a second cytogenetic technique, multicolor-FISH. We also analyze radiosensitivity at other doses (0.2–15 Gy), to represent hypo- and hyperfractionation doses and determined that RDE is dose dependent: high ratios at low

  7. Carbon Ionic Conductors for use in Novel Carbon-Ion Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin H. Cocks; W. Neal Simmons; Paul A. Klenk

    2005-11-01

    Carbon-consuming fuel cells have many potential advantages, including increased efficiency and reduced pollution in power generation from coal. A large amount of work has already been done on coal fuel cells that utilize yttria-stabilized zirconium carbide as an oxygen-ion superionic membrane material. But high-temperature fuel cells utilizing yttria-stabilized zirconium require partial combustion of coal to carbon monoxide before final oxidation to carbon dioxide occurs via utilization of the oxygen- ion zirconia membrane. A carbon-ion superionic membrane material would enable an entirely new class of carbon fuel cell to be developed, one that would use coal directly as the fuel source, without any intervening combustion process. However, a superionic membrane material for carbon ions has not yet been found. Because no partial combustion of coal would be required, a carbon-ion superionic conductor would allow the direct conversion of coal to electricity and pure CO{sub 2} without the formation of gaseous pollutants. The objective of this research was to investigate ionic lanthanide carbides, which have an unusually high carbon-bond ionicity as potential superionic carbide-ion conductors. A first step in this process is the stabilization of these carbides in the cubic structure, and this stabilization has been achieved via the preparation of pseudobinary lanthanide carbides. The diffusion rates of carbon have been measured in these carbides as stabilized to preserve the high temperature cubic structure down to room temperature. To prepare these new compounds and measure these diffusion rates, a novel, oxide-based preparation method and a new C{sup 13}/C{sup 12} diffusion technique have been developed. The carbon diffusion rates in La{sup 0.5}Er{sup 0.5}C{sub 2}, Ce{sup 0.5}Er{sup 0.5}C{sub 2}, and La{sup 0.5}Y{sup 0.5}C{sub 2}, and Ce{sup 0.5}Tm0.5C{sub 2} modified by the addition of 5 wt %Be{sub 2}C, have been determined at temperatures from 850 C to 1150 C. The

  8. Ion beam induced luminescence from diamond using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Allen, M.G. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Analysis of the luminescence induced by a MeV ion beam offers the potential to provide useful information about the chemical properties of atoms in crystals to complement the information provided by more traditional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), ion channeling and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Furthermore, the large penetration depth of the MeV ion beam offers several advantages over the relatively shallow penetration of keV electrons typically employed in cathodoluminescence. An Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) detection system was developed for the Melbourne microprobe that allows the spatial mapping of the luminescence signal along with the signals from RBS and PIXE. Homoepitaxial diamond growth has been studied and remarkable shifts in the characteristic blue luminescence of diamond towards the green were observed in the overgrowth. This has been tentatively identified as being due to transition metal inclusions in the epitaxial layers. 8 refs., 2 refs.

  9. Carbon Nanotubes Produced from Ambient Carbon Dioxide for Environmentally Sustainable Lithium-Ion and Sodium-Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Stuart; Douglas, Anna; Ren, Jiawen; Carter, Rachel; Lefler, Matthew; Pint, Cary L

    2016-03-23

    The cost and practicality of greenhouse gas removal processes, which are critical for environmental sustainability, pivot on high-value secondary applications derived from carbon capture and conversion techniques. Using the solar thermal electrochemical process (STEP), ambient CO2 captured in molten lithiated carbonates leads to the production of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at high yield through electrolysis using inexpensive steel electrodes. These low-cost CO2-derived CNTs and CNFs are demonstrated as high performance energy storage materials in both lithium-ion and sodium-ion batteries. Owing to synthetic control of sp(3) content in the synthesized nanostructures, optimized storage capacities are measured over 370 mAh g(-1) (lithium) and 130 mAh g(-1) (sodium) with no capacity fade under durability tests up to 200 and 600 cycles, respectively. This work demonstrates that ambient CO2, considered as an environmental pollutant, can be attributed economic value in grid-scale and portable energy storage systems with STEP scale-up practicality in the context of combined cycle natural gas electric power generation. PMID:27163042

  10. Carbon Cryogel and Carbon Paper-Based Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 6 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-5 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  11. Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries Based on Carbon Cryogels and Carbon Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nanofoams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  12. Carbon cluster ions for a study of the accuracy of ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerbauer, A G; Bollen, G; Herfurth, F; Kluge, H J; Kuckein, M; Sauvan, E; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L

    2003-01-01

    Cyclotron frequency measurements of singly charged carbon clusters $^{12}$C$_{n}^{+}$ were carried out with the ISOLTRAP apparatus. The carbon cluster ions were produced externally by use of laser- induced desorption, fragmentation, and ionization of C$_{60}$ fullerenes. They were injected into and stored in the Penning trap system. The observation of carbon clusters of different sizes has provided detailed insight into the final mass uncertainty achievable with ISOLTRAP and yielded a value of $u(m)/m = 8 \\times 10^{-9}$. Since the unified atomic mass unit is defined as 1/12 the mass of the $^{12}$C atom, ISOLTRAP can now be used to carry out absolute mass measurements.

  13. Carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water promotes skin wound healing in nude rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jingyan; Kang, Dedong; Wang, Yingge; Yu, Ying; Fan, Jianglin; Takashi, En

    2015-01-01

    Hot spring or hot spa bathing (Onsen) is a traditional therapy for the treatment of certain ailments. There is a common belief that hot spring bathing has therapeutic effects for wound healing, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To examine this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of Nagano hot spring water (rich in carbonate ion, 42°C) on the healing process of the skin using a nude rat skin wound model. We found that hot spring bathing led to an enhanced healing speed compared to both the unbathed and hot-water (42°C) control groups. Histologically, the hot spring water group showed increased vessel density and reduced inflammatory cells in the granulation tissue of the wound area. Real-time RT-PCR analysis along with zymography revealed that the wound area of the hot spring water group exhibited a higher expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 compared to the two other control groups. Furthermore, we found that the enhanced wound healing process induced by the carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water was mediated by thermal insulation and moisture maintenance. Our results provide the evidence that carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water is beneficial for the treatment of skin wounds. PMID:25671581

  14. Carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water promotes skin wound healing in nude rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyan Liang

    Full Text Available Hot spring or hot spa bathing (Onsen is a traditional therapy for the treatment of certain ailments. There is a common belief that hot spring bathing has therapeutic effects for wound healing, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To examine this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of Nagano hot spring water (rich in carbonate ion, 42°C on the healing process of the skin using a nude rat skin wound model. We found that hot spring bathing led to an enhanced healing speed compared to both the unbathed and hot-water (42°C control groups. Histologically, the hot spring water group showed increased vessel density and reduced inflammatory cells in the granulation tissue of the wound area. Real-time RT-PCR analysis along with zymography revealed that the wound area of the hot spring water group exhibited a higher expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 compared to the two other control groups. Furthermore, we found that the enhanced wound healing process induced by the carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water was mediated by thermal insulation and moisture maintenance. Our results provide the evidence that carbonate ion-enriched hot spring water is beneficial for the treatment of skin wounds.

  15. Regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon saturated with inorganic ions by cavitation united with ion exchange method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Gao, Hong; Li, Yansheng; Yang, Huixin

    2011-06-01

    Using ion exchange resin as transfer media, regenerate powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbed inorganic ions by cavitation to enhance the transfer; we studied how the regeneration time and the mass ratio of resin and PAC influence the regeneration rate respectively through re-adsorption. The result showed that the effective regeneration of PAC saturated with inorganic ions was above 90% using ion exchange resin as media and transfer carrier, the quantity of PAC did not reduced but activated in the process. PMID:25084579

  16. Induction of apoptosis in murione spleen lymphocytes using carbon ion beam; Induction de l'apoptose dans les lymphocytes spleniques de souris par un faisceau d'ions carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holl, V.; Coelho, D. [Lab. de Cancerologie Experimentale et de Radiobiologie, LCER, Inst. de Recherche contre les Cancers de l' Appareil Digestif, Hopitaux Universitaires, Strasbourg (France); Weltin, D. [Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France); Dufour, P. [Lab. de Cancerologie Experimentale et de Radiobiologie, LCER, Inst. de Recherche contre les Cancers de l' Appareil Digestif, Hopitaux Universitaires, Strasbourg (France); Denis, J.M. [Faculte de Medecine, Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles (Belgium); Florentin, I. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CNRS, Unite de Recherche Associee, Hopital Cochin, Paris (France); Mathieu, J. [Centre de Recherche du Service de Sante des Armees, CRSSA, La Tronche (France); Gueulette, J. [Faculte de Medecine, Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles (Belgium); Bischoff, P. [Lab. de Cancerologie Experimentale et de Radiobiologie, LCER, Inst. de Recherche contre les Cancers de l' Appareil Digestif, Hopitaux Universitaires, Strasbourg (France)

    2001-02-01

    To assess the capacity of heavy ions to induce apoptosis in lymphocytes, mice have been irradiated with accelerated carbon ions (95 MeV/nucleon) at doses ranging from 0.1 to 4 Gy. Their spleens were removed 24 h later and gently dissociated to prepare a single cell suspension. Mononuclear cells were then maintained in culture at 37{sup o}C, and the occurrence of apoptosis in these cells was analysed 24 h later. Lymphocytes were also irradiated in vitro, in the presence of Ac-DEVD-CHO, a potent caspase-3 and -7 inhibitor. Results from three experiments performed at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL, Caen, France) are reported here. They indicate that carbon ions induce a marked, dose-dependent, reduction of the spleen weight and cellularity. However, in sharp contrast with spleen cells prepared from X-ray irradiated mice, only a slight increase of apoptosis is evidenced in cultured lymphocytes from mice irradiated with heavy ions. The significance of such results is discussed. So far, few data exist concerning the biological effects of heavy ions, in particular their capacity to induce apoptosis in lymphocytes; the present study provides useful clues for further investigations. (author)

  17. Experimental Investigation of DNA Damage Induced by Heavy Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    DNA is considered the critical target for radiobiological effects. It is highly important to study DNAdamage induced by ionizing radiation. Especially DNA double strand breaks have been identified as themost initial damage. In this experiment, DNA double strand breaks induced by heavy ions wereinvestigated with atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  18. Radiative transitions in highly-stripped carbon-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transition energies and weighted absorption oscillator strength (gf) values are evaluated for a number of dipole-allowed transitions in highly-charged ions Ne4+, Si8+, Ar12+ and Ti16+ belong to the astrophysically important carbon series employing the time-dependent coupled Hartree-Fock (TDCHF) theory. Estimated values compare favourably with other existing results and the new ones repoted here may constitute a useful set for reference. The large-Z behaviour of the gf values is also examined. (orig.)

  19. Protontherapy versus carbon ion therapy advantages, disadvantages and similarities

    CERN Document Server

    d’Ávila Nunes, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comparison analysis of two cancer treatment therapies: carbon ion therapy and protontherapy. It is divided in 5 sections. The first ones gives the reader a brief history of Radiotherapy and types of radiation. In the second section, the techniques and equipments, including new ones in development such as Cyclinac , Laser and DWA, are described. The third section describes biophysical (such as stopping power and LET) and biological (such as RBE and OER) properties, the fundamental experiments and clinical area. The fourth section presents models and the fifth section compares both techniques, showing advantages and disadvantages of each, and their similarities.

  20. Ion induced x-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types of perturbation theory have been used to describe inner shell vacancy production by light to medium ion bombardment. Inclusion of Coulomb deflection and binding effects in the plane wave Born approximation is discussed. More recently this relativistic Coulomb deflection corrected perturbed stationary state theory has been extended to include energy loss effects. This ECPSSR theory is one of the most successful in predicting inner shell ionisation cross sections for both K and L shells, provided the projectile to target atomic number ratio is less than about 0.3 and, for the heavier ions, electron capture processes by the projectile are included

  1. Substrate-induced strain in carbon nanodisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphitic nanodisks of typically 20–50 nm in thickness, produced by the so-called Kvaerner Carbon Black and Hydrogen Process were dispersed on gold substrate and investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and confocal Raman spectroscopy. The roughness of the gold surface was drastically changed by annealing at 400 °C. AFM measurements show that this change in the surface roughness induces changes also in the topography of the nanodisks, as they closely follow the corrugation of the gold substrate. This leads to strained nanodisks, which is confirmed also by confocal Raman microscopy. We found that the FE-SEM contrast obtained from the disks depends on the working distance used during the image acquisition by In-lens detection, a phenomenon which we explain by the decrease in the amount of electrons reaching the detector due to diffraction. This process may affect the image contrast in the case of other layered materials, like hexagonal boron nitride, and other planar hybrid nanostructures, too. - Highlights: • Bending of carbon nanodisks is induced by the roughness of the gold substrate. • Confocal Raman microscopy shows a compressive strain induced in the nanodisks. • The electron microscopy contrast of nanodisks depends on the working distance

  2. Particulate inverse opal carbon electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Da-Young; Kim, Sang-Ok; Chae, Yu Jin; Lee, Joong Kee; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2013-01-29

    Inverse opal carbon materials were used as anodes for lithium ion batteries. We applied particulate inverse opal structures and their dispersion in the formation of anode electrodes via solution casting. We prepared aminophenyl-grafted inverse opal carbons (a-IOC), inverse opal carbons with mesopores (mIOC), and bare inverse opal carbons (IOC) and investigated the electrochemical behavior of these samples as anode materials. Surface modification by aminophenyl groups was confirmed by XPS measurements. TEM images showed mesopores, and the specific area of mIOC was compared with that of IOC using BET analysis. A half-cell test was performed to compare a-IOC with IOC and mIOC with IOC. In the case of the a-IOC structure, the cell test revealed no improvement in the reversible specific capacity or the cycle performance. The mIOC cell showed a reversible specific capacity of 432 mAh/g, and the capacity was maintained at 88%-approximately 380 mAh/g-over 20 cycles.

  3. EUD-based biological optimization for carbon ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brüningk, Sarah C., E-mail: sarah.brueningk@icr.ac.uk; Kamp, Florian; Wilkens, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Technische Universität München, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Ismaninger Str. 22, München 81675, Germany and Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, Garching 85748 (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for carbon ion therapy requires an accurate modeling of the biological response of each tissue to estimate the clinical outcome of a treatment. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) accounts for this biological response on a cellular level but does not refer to the actual impact on the organ as a whole. For photon therapy, the concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) represents a simple model to take the organ response into account, yet so far no formulation of EUD has been reported that is suitable to carbon ion therapy. The authors introduce the concept of an equivalent uniform effect (EUE) that is directly applicable to both ion and photon therapies and exemplarily implemented it as a basis for biological treatment plan optimization for carbon ion therapy. Methods: In addition to a classical EUD concept, which calculates a generalized mean over the RBE-weighted dose distribution, the authors propose the EUE to simplify the optimization process of carbon ion therapy plans. The EUE is defined as the biologically equivalent uniform effect that yields the same probability of injury as the inhomogeneous effect distribution in an organ. Its mathematical formulation is based on the generalized mean effect using an effect-volume parameter to account for different organ architectures and is thus independent of a reference radiation. For both EUD concepts, quadratic and logistic objective functions are implemented into a research treatment planning system. A flexible implementation allows choosing for each structure between biological effect constraints per voxel and EUD constraints per structure. Exemplary treatment plans are calculated for a head-and-neck patient for multiple combinations of objective functions and optimization parameters. Results: Treatment plans optimized using an EUE-based objective function were comparable to those optimized with an RBE-weighted EUD-based approach. In agreement with previous results from photon

  4. Polarization phenomena in heavy ion induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanisms of heavy ion reactions are discussed from the experimental results on polarization of products 12B in 14N + 100Mo and 14N + 232Th reactions. Polarization determines the signs of deflection functions corresponding to large energy losses. (author)

  5. Mapping ion beam induced current changes in a commercial MOSFET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, A.D.C.; Thompson, S.; Yang, C. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Jamieson, D.N., E-mail: d.jamieson@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    We demonstrate a novel nuclear microprobe imaging and analysis modality for micrometre-scale field effect transistor devices probed with focused beams of MeV ions. By recording the drain current as a function of time during ion irradiation it is possible to identify current transients induced by the passage of single ions through the sensitive structures of the device. This modality takes advantage of the fact that the ionization produced by the passage of a single ion acts in an equivalent way to a transient change in the gate bias which therefore modulates the drain current as a function of time. This differs from the traditional ion beam induced charge technique where the ionization drifts in an internal electric field and induces a single charge pulse in an electrode applied to the device. Instead a richer variety of phenomena are observed, with different time constants which depend on the proximity of the ion strike to the channel of the device. The signals may be used to examine device function, radiation sensitivity or to count ion impacts within the channel.

  6. Ion irradiation of electronic-type-separated single wall carbon nanotubes: A model for radiation effects in nanostructured carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Jamie E. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Cress, Cory D.; Messenger, Scott R.; Weaver, Brad D. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, United States Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Helenic, Alysha R.; Landi, Brian J. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Schauerman, Chris M. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Golisano Institute of Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); DiLeo, Roberta A.; Cox, Nathanael D. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hubbard, Seth M. [NanoPower Research Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Physics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The structural and electrical properties of electronic-type-separated (metallic and semiconducting) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-films have been investigated after irradiation with 150 keV {sup 11}B{sup +} and 150 keV {sup 31}P{sup +} with fluences ranging from 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Raman spectroscopy results indicate that the ratio of the Raman D to G Prime band peak intensities (D/G Prime ) is a more sensitive indicator of SWCNT structural modification induced by ion irradiation by one order of magnitude compared to the ratio of the Raman D to G band peak intensities (D/G). The increase in sheet resistance (R{sub s}) of the thin-films follows a similar trend as the D/G Prime ratio, suggesting that the radiation induced variation in bulk electrical transport for both electronic-types is equal and related to localized defect generation. The characterization results for the various samples are compared based on the displacement damage dose (DDD) imparted to the sample, which is material and damage source independent. Therefore, it is possible to extend the analysis to include data from irradiation of transferred CVD-graphene films on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates using 35 keV C{sup +} ions, and compare the observed changes at equivalent levels of ion irradiation-induced damage to that observed in the SWCNT thin-film samples. Ultimately, a model is developed for the prediction of the radiation response of nanostructured carbon materials based on the DDD for any incident ion with low-energy recoil spectra. The model is also related to the defect concentration, and subsequently the effective defect-to-defect length, and yields a maximum defect concentration (minimum defect-to-defect length) above which the bulk electrical transport properties in SWCNT thin-films and large graphene-based electronic devices rapidly degrade when exposed to harsh environments.

  7. Fabrication and Optimization of Carbon Nanomaterial-Based Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes

    OpenAIRE

    Somnhot, Parina

    2012-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries possess high energy and power densities, making them ideal candidates for energy storage requirements in various military applications. Commercially produced lithium-ion battery anodes are commonly graphitic carbon-based. However, graphitic carbons are limited in surface area and possess slow intercalation kinetics. The energy and power density demands of future technologies require improved lithium-ion battery performance. Carbon nanomaterials, such as carbide-derived c...

  8. Metal carbonates as anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Lianyi; Ma, Rui; Wu, Kaiqiang; Shui, Miao; Lao, Mengmeng; Wang, Dongjie; Long, Nengbing; Ren, Yuanlong; Shu, Jie, E-mail: sergio_shu@hotmail.com

    2013-12-25

    Highlights: •Metal carbonates are probable anode materials for lithium ion batteries. •CoCO{sub 3}/C composite can deliver an initial discharge capacity of 2096.6 mAh g{sup −1} . •Co, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}O, and low-valence carbon are final lithiated products for CoCO{sub 3}. -- Abstract: Six metal carbonates (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, SrCO{sub 3}, BaCO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, CoCO{sub 3}) are tested and compared as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. The electrochemical results show that only CoCO{sub 3} is electrochemically active material and can deliver a high initial capacity of 1425.9 mAh g{sup −1}. The lithium storage mechanism in CoCO{sub 3} is studied by ex situ X-ray diffraction technique, ex situ infrared method, ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and in situ X-ray diffraction technique. It is found that the electrochemical reactions between CoCO{sub 3} and Li firstly result in the formation of metal Co and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and then partial Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is further reduced into carbon (C{sup 0}), low-valence carbon (C{sup 2+}), and Li{sub 2}O. It also demonstrates that the electrochemical reaction between CoCO{sub 3} and Li is a partially reversible process. Based on these electrochemical results, it is obvious that narrow potential range can acquire a better reversibility for CoCO{sub 3}/Li batteries by suppressing particle pulverization. Besides, the comparison of CoCO{sub 3}, ball-milled CoCO{sub 3} and ball-milled CoCO{sub 3}/C composite also indicates that smaller active particle and carbon buffer are beneficial to obtain better cycling performance and higher reversible capacity.

  9. Electron emission and molecular fragmentation during hydrogen and deuterium ion impact on carbon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, A.; Schustereder, W.; Mair, C.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.; Cernusca, S.; Winter, HP.; Aumayr, F.

    2003-03-01

    Molecular fragmentation and electron emission during hydrogen ion impact on graphite surfaces has been investigated in the eV to keV impact energy region typical for fusion edge plasma conditions. As a target surface graphite tiles for the Tokamak experiment Tore Supra in CEA-Cadarache/France and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) have been used. For both surfaces studied, the experimentally observed threshold for electron emission is at about 50 eV/amu impact energy. Electron emission from the high conductivity side of the carbon tile is 15-20% less as compared to its low conductivity side, whereas results for HOPG are generally between these two cases. Deuterium and hydrogen ions are almost equally effective in liberating electrons from graphite when comparing results for the same impact velocity. Surface-induced dissociation of deuterium ions D 3+ upon impact on Tore Supra graphite tiles, in the collision energy range of 20-100 eV, produced only atomic fragment ions D +. The other possible fragment ion D 2+ could not be observed.

  10. Immobilization of extracellular matrix on polymeric materials by carbon-negative-ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sommani, Piyanuch; Muto, Takashi; Utagawa, Yoshiyuki; Sakai, Shun; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2005-08-01

    Effects of ion implantation into polystyrene (PS), silicone rubber (SR) and poly-L-lactic acid (PLA) have been investigated for immobilization of extracellular matrix. Carbon negative ions were implanted into PS and SR sheets at various energies between 5-30 keV and various doses between 1.0 × 1014-1.0 × 1016 ions/cm2. Contact angles of pure water on C-implanted surfaces of PS and SR were decreased as increase in ion energy and in dose due to formation of functional groups such as OH and C-O. Selective attachment of nerve cells was observed on C-implanted them at 10 keV and 3 × 1015 ions/cm2 after in vitro cell culture of nerve cells of PC-12 h. Neurite outgrowth also extended over the implanted area. After dipping in a serum medium and in a fibronectin solution for 2 h, the detection of N 1s electrons by X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) revealed a significant distinction of protein adhesion on the implanted area. Thus, immobilization of proteins on surface is used for considering the selective cell-attachment. For PLA, the selective attachment of cells and protein depended on the implantation conditions.

  11. Electron emission and molecular fragmentation during hydrogen and deuterium ion impact on carbon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular fragmentation and electron emission during hydrogen ion impact on graphite surfaces has been investigated in the eV to keV impact energy region typical for fusion edge plasma conditions. As a target surface graphite tiles for the Tokamak experiment Tore Supra in CEA-Cadarache/France and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) have been used. For both surfaces studied, the experimentally observed threshold for electron emission is at about 50 eV/amu impact energy. Electron emission from the high conductivity side of the carbon tile is 15-20% less as compared to its low conductivity side, whereas results for HOPG are generally between these two cases. Deuterium and hydrogen ions are almost equally effective in liberating electrons from graphite when comparing results for the same impact velocity. Surface-induced dissociation of deuterium ions D3+ upon impact on Tore Supra graphite tiles, in the collision energy range of 20-100 eV, produced only atomic fragment ions D+. The other possible fragment ion D2+ could not be observed

  12. Contribution of nitric oxide radicals in bystander and adaptive responses induced by heavy ion-beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether radioadaptive responses were induced after irradiation with accelerated ion beams through nitric oxide-mediated bystander response in cultured cells in vitro and in some organs of mice in vivo. Human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells transfected with wild-type p53 (H1299/wtp53 cells) were used. The cells were irradiated with accelerated carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u, 31 keV/μm or 135 MeV/u, 31 keV/μm). Then, the cells were allowed forming colonies. ICR male mice (Jcl: ICR) were used. The mice were irradiated on 2 days with accelerated carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u, 13 keV/μm or 135 MeV/u, 25 keV/μm) or argon ion beams (500 MeV/u, 90 keV/μm). The small intestine and testis were excised 2 days after the last irradiation. These excised tissues were fixed, embedded in paraffin and made of thin-sections on slide glasses. Then the TUNEL- and activated caspase-3-positive cells in the thin-sections of tissues were detected by the immunohistochemical method. A significant elevated surviving fractions of cells was observed when the cells were challengingly irradiated after the priming irradiation with accelerate carbon ion beams. This enhancement was partially suppressed by Nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenger, carboxy-PTIO (c-PTIO). The bystander-induced apoptotic and activated caspase-3-positive cells were obviously observed in the unirradiated small intestine and testis when mice were irradiated with carbon or argon ion beams across the upper body. In addition, a significant reduction of apoptotic cells in the intestine and testis, when mice were challengingly irradiated after the priming irradiation with accelerate carbon or argon ion beams. These observations were partially suppressed by c-PTIO into the peritoneal cavity. Furthermore, it is suggested that the apoptosis may be induced in the tissue stem cells of small intestine and testis. (author)

  13. Liquid flow-induced energy harvesting in carbon nanotubes: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baoxing; Chen, Xi

    2013-01-28

    Energy harvesting by the flow of a hydrochloric acid-water solution through a carbon nanotube (CNT) is explored using atomistic simulations. Through ion configurations near the CNT wall, the ion drifting velocity is obtained, and the induced voltage along the axial direction is obtained as a function of key material and system parameters, including the applied flow rate, ambient temperature, solution concentration and nanotube diameter. The molecular mechanism of ion hopping and motion is elucidated and related to the variation of material and system parameters. PMID:23223386

  14. Influence of 400 keV carbon ion implantation on structural, optical and electrical properties of PMMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation is a useful technique to modify surface properties of polymers without altering their bulk properties. The objective of this work is to explore the 400 keV C+ ion implantation effects on PMMA at different fluences ranging from 5 × 1013 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. The surface topographical examination of irradiated samples has been performed using Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The structural and chemical modifications in implanted PMMA are examined by Raman and Fourier Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) respectively. The effects of carbon ion implantation on optical properties of PMMA are investigated by UV–Visible spectroscopy. The modifications in electrical conductivity have been measured using a four point probe technique. AFM images reveal a decrease in surface roughness of PMMA with an increase in ion fluence from 5 × 1014 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. The existence of amorphization and sp2-carbon clusterization has been confirmed by Raman and FTIR spectroscopic analysis. The UV–Visible data shows a prominent red shift in absorption edge as a function of ion fluence. This shift displays a continuous reduction in optical band gap (from 3.13 to 0.66 eV) due to formation of carbon clusters. Moreover, size of carbon clusters and photoconductivity are found to increase with increasing ion fluence. The ion-induced carbonaceous clusters are believed to be responsible for an increase in electrical conductivity of PMMA from (2.14 ± 0.06) × 10−10 (Ω-cm)−1 (pristine) to (0.32 ± 0.01) × 10−5 (Ω-cm)−1 (irradiated sample)

  15. Carbon Quantum Dots and Their Derivative 3D Porous Carbon Frameworks for Sodium-Ion Batteries with Ultralong Cycle Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hongshuai; Banks, Craig E; Jing, Mingjun; Zhang, Yan; Ji, Xiaobo

    2015-12-16

    A new methodology for the synthesis of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) for large production is proposed. The as-obtained CQDs can be transformed into 3D porous carbon frameworks exhibiting superb sodium storage properties with ultralong cycle life and ultrahigh rate capability, comparable to state-of-the-art carbon anode materials for sodium-ion batteries.

  16. Ion induced high energy electron emission from copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruano, G. [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)], E-mail: gdruano@ceride.gov.ar; Ferron, J. [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2008-11-15

    We present measurements of secondary electron emission from Cu induced by low energy bombardment (1-5 keV) of noble gas (He{sup +}, Ne{sup +} and Ar{sup +}) and Li{sup +} ions. We identify different potential and kinetic mechanisms and find the presence of high energetic secondary electrons for a couple of ion-target combinations. In order to understand the presence of these fast electrons we need to consider the Fermi shuttle mechanism and the different ion neutralization efficiencies.

  17. L X-ray emission induced by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajek, M.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Semaniak, J.; Fijał-Kirejczyk, I.; Jaskóła, M.; Czarnacki, W.; Korman, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Mukoyama, T.; Trautmann, D.

    2015-11-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique is usually applied using typically 1 MeV to 3 MeV protons or helium ions, for which the ion-atom interaction is dominated by the single ionization process. For heavier ions the multiple ionization plays an increasingly important role and this process can influence substantially both the X-ray spectra and atomic decay rates. Additionally, the subshell coupling effects are important for the L- and M-shells ionized by heavy ions. Here we discuss the main features of the X-ray emission induced by heavy ions which are important for PIXE applications, namely, the effects of X-ray line shifts and broadening, vacancy rearrangement and change of the fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields in multiple ionized atoms. These effects are illustrated here by the results of the measurements of L X-ray emission from heavy atoms bombarded by 6 MeV to 36 MeV Si ions, which were reported earlier. The strong L-subshell coupling effects are observed, in particular L2-subshell, which can be accounted for within the coupling subshell model (CSM) developed within the semiclassical approximation. Finally, the prospects to use heavy ions in PIXE analysis are discussed.

  18. Ion irradiation-induced structure damage to botanic samples using the ion transmission energy spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of irradiation-induced damage ofbotanic samples caused by low energy heavy ions, transmission energy spectrum mea-surement was performed. Kidney bean slice samples 100μm in thickness were irradi-ated by 50 kev N+ ions. The irradiation beam current density was about 30μA/cm2,and the irradiation ion doses were 1×1015, 1×1016, 3×1016 and 1×1017 ions@cm-2,respectively. A target set up that could greatly reduce the incident ion current densitywas designed to achieve the damage-free measurement. The 3.2 MeV H+ transmittedion energy spectrum measurement was carried out before and after the irradiation.From the transmission ion energy spectrum, it was found that the kidney bean sliceitself was structurally inhomogeneous compared with the PET films (C10HsO4). Ourresults indicated that the average mass thickness changed little when the N+ iondose was below 3×1016 ions.cm-2, but changed obviously whcn ion dose was beyond3×1016 ions.cm-2.

  19. Advanced ion beam analysis of materials using ion-induced fast electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Atsushi; Ishihara, Toyoyuki [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Recent progress in the study of high-energy shadowing effect using ion-induced electron spectroscopy is reported with emphasis on a possibility of determination of local electronic structure in solids, which has been a difficult problem to approach with other experimental techniques. We demonstrate real-space determination of covalent-bond electron distribution in Si crystal. The analysis technique may provide a new field of ion beam analysis of solids. (author)

  20. Carbon matrix/SiNWs heterogeneous block as improved reversible anodes material for lithium ion batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao; Wang; Long; Ren; Yundan; Liu; Xuejun; Liu; Kai; Huang; Xiaolin; Wei; Jun; Li; Xiang; Qi; Jianxin; Zhong

    2014-01-01

    A novel carbon matrix/silicon nanowires(SiNWs) heterogeneous block was successfully produced by dispersing SiNWs into templated carbon matrix via a modified evaporation induced self-assembly method. The heterogeneous block was determined by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra and scanning electron microscopy. As an anode material for lithium batteries, the block was investigated by cyclic voltammograms(CV), charge/discharge tests, galvanostatic cycling performance and A. C. impedance spectroscopy. We show that the SiNWs disperse into the framework, and are nicely wrapped by the carbon matrix. The heterogeneous block exhibits superior electrochemical reversibility with a high specific capacity of 529.3 mAh/g in comparison with bare SiNWs anode with merely about 52.6 mAh/g capacity retention. The block presents excellent cycle stability and capacity retention which can be attributed to the improvement of conductivity by the existence of carbon matrix and the enhancement of ability to relieve the large volume expansion of SiNWs during the lithium insertion/extraction cycle. The results indicate that the as-prepared carbon matrix/SiNWs heterogeneous block can be an attractive and potential anode material for lithium-ion battery applications.

  1. Data compilation for depth distribution of ion-induced damage and ion-implanted atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the recent progress of utilizing ion bombardment technique to ion implantation and neutron irradiation simulation, the experimental data have accumulated concerning the depth distribution of deposited atoms and induced damage along ion incident direction. In the ion-induced damage experiments, the density of point defects or void swelling has been investigated as a function of depth. In this study, the data available until the present time are compiled and compared with theoretical prediction represented by E-DEP-1 computer code. It is recognized in general that the experimentally observed damage peak is deeper than that E-DEP-1 calculated using the LSS electronic stopping parameter, k sub(LSS). Agreement between the observation and calculation can be obtained using a modified electronic stopping parameter k = 0.8 - 0.9 k sub(LSS). With regard to the deposited atoms by ion bombardment, the peak of the observed distribution is deeper in some cases and shallower in other cases than that calculated by E-DEP-1, indicating that the modified electronic stopping parameter k is oscillating relative to k sub(LSS). This oscillatory behavior is not recognized in the damage distribution. It is suggested that future work should be made to determine the distribution of ion-induced damage in relation to that of the deposited atoms, since the defect evolution may directly be related to the implanted atoms. (author)

  2. Effects of carbon ion beam irradiation on the shoot regeneration from in vitro axillary bud explants of the Impatiens hawkeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Libin; Zhou, Libin; Li, Wenjian; Li, Ping; Dong, Xicun; Qu, Ying; Ma, Shuang; Li, Qiang

    Accelerated ion beams is an excellent mutagen in plant breeding which can induce higher mutation frequencies and wider mutation spectrum than those of low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiations, such as X-rays (Okamura et al. 2003, Yamaguchi et al. 2003). Mutation breeding operation of two Saintpaulia ionahta cultivars using the method combining plant tissue culture technique and carbon ion beam irradiations were set out at Institute of Modern Physics from 2005 (Zhou et al. 2006). The effects of 960 MeV carbon ion beam and 8 MeV X-ray irradiations on regenerated shoots of Impatiens hawkeri from another kind of explants named in vitro axillary buds explants were studied recently. The biology endpoints in this study included relative number of roots (RNR), relative length of roots (RLR), relative height of shoots (RHS), relative number of nodes (RNN), survival fraction (SF) and morphology changes in the regenerated shoots. The experimental results showed that carbon ion beams inhibited the root and stem developments of axillary bud explants more severely than X-rays did. And the 50% lethal dose (LD50 ) is about 23.3 Gy for the carbon ion beam and 49.1 Gy for the X-rays, respectively. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of Impatiens hawkeri with respect to X-rays according to 50% SF was about two. Secondly, the percentage of shoots regenerated with malformed shoots including curliness, carnification, nicks in all Impatiens hawkeri axillary bud explants irradiated with carbon ion beam at 20 Gy accounted for 55.6%, while the highest number for the 40 Gy X-ray irradiation was 40%. Last, many regenerated shoots whose vascular bundle fused together were obtained only from explants irradiated with carbon ion beams. Based on the results above, it can be concluded that the effect of mutation induction by carbon ion beam irradiation on the axillary explants of Impatiens hawkeri is better than that by X-ray irradiation; and the optimal mutagenic dose varies from 20 Gy

  3. Study of secondary electron emission from thin carbon targets with swift charged particles: heavy ions, hydrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main subject of this work is the study of electron emission from the two surfaces of thin solid targets bombarded with swift charged particles. The slowing down of swift ions in matter is mainly due to inelastic interaction with target electrons (ionization, excitation): the energy transfer to target electrons is responsible for the secondary electron emission process. The phenomenological and theoretical descriptions of this phenomena are the subject of the first chapter. We focused on secondary electron emission induced by different kind of projectiles on thin carbon foils. In chapter two we describe hydrogen cluster induced electron emission measurement between 40 and 120 keV/proton. These projectiles, composed of several atoms, allowed us to study and highlight collective effects of the electron emission process. We extended our study of electron emission to molecular (H2+, H3+) and composite (H-, H0) projectiles at higher energies (<= 2 MeV): we have designed an experimental set-up devoted to electron emission statistics measurements which allowed us to study, among others things, the role of projectile electrons in secondary electron emission. This experiment is described in the third chapter. Finally, the fourth chapter describes new measurements of electron emission induced by energetic (13 MeV/u) and highly charged argon ion provided by the medium energy beam line (SME) of GANIL (Caen), which have been analyzed in the framework of a semi-empirical model of secondary electron emission. This set of experiments brings new results on composite projectile interaction with matter, and on the consequences of high energy deposition in solids. (author)

  4. Carbon Ion Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Demizu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon ion therapy is a type of radiotherapies that can deliver high-dose radiation to a tumor while minimizing the dose delivered to the organs at risk; this profile differs from that of photon radiotherapy. Moreover, carbon ions are classified as high-linear energy transfer radiation and are expected to be effective for even photon-resistant tumors. Recently, high-precision radiotherapy modalities such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT, proton therapy, and carbon ion therapy have been used for patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer, and the results are promising, as, for carbon ion therapy, local control and overall survival rates at 5 years are 80–90% and 40–50%, respectively. Carbon ion therapy may be theoretically superior to SBRT and proton therapy, but the literature that is currently available does not show a statistically significant difference among these treatments. Carbon ion therapy demonstrates a better dose distribution than both SBRT and proton therapy in most cases of early-stage lung cancer. Therefore, carbon ion therapy may be safer for treating patients with adverse conditions such as large tumors, central tumors, and poor pulmonary function. Furthermore, carbon ion therapy may also be suitable for dose escalation and hypofractionation.

  5. Relative biological effectiveness of carbon ions for causing fatal liver failure after partial hepatectomy in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Kato, Hirotoshi; Otsu, Hiroshi [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate the acute phase damage to liver by carbon ions, BALB/c mice were irradiated with carbon ions or X-rays after two-thirds partial hepatectomy, and their survival was followed. The 50% lethal dose within 60 days (LD{sub 50/60}) was 42.2{+-}0.25 Gy (standard error) for X-rays, and 22.7{+-}0.25 Gy for carbon ions. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon ions was 1.86 (95% confident limits: 1.69-2.04) as calculated from the LD{sub 50/60}. Mice irradiated at much higher doses, 60 Gy of X-rays or 24 Gy of carbon ions, showed significantly higher serum ammonia levels and lower serum albumin levels than normal, suggesting hepatic failure as a cause of death. Hepatocytes showed karyorrhexis and karyolysis in carbon ion irradiated and spotty necrosis in X-ray irradiated mice, suggesting nuclear damage. Mice irradiated with LD{sub 50} of X-rays or carbon ions had a remarkably lower bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling index and mitotic index than control. Treatments with both BrdU and vincristine showed that none of the hepatocytes that synthesized DNA after irradiation completed mitosis, indicating G2 arrest. The liver weight of irradiated mice significantly decreased depending on the dose. Carbon ions as well as X-rays damaged hepatocytes directly and suppressed liver regeneration leading to fatal liver failure. (author)

  6. Relative biological effectiveness of carbon ions for causing fatal liver failure after partial hepatectomy in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the acute phase damage to liver by carbon ions, BALB/c mice were irradiated with carbon ions or X-rays after two-thirds partial hepatectomy, and their survival was followed. The 50% lethal dose within 60 days (LD50/60) was 42.2±0.25 Gy (standard error) for X-rays, and 22.7±0.25 Gy for carbon ions. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon ions was 1.86 (95% confident limits: 1.69-2.04) as calculated from the LD50/60. Mice irradiated at much higher doses, 60 Gy of X-rays or 24 Gy of carbon ions, showed significantly higher serum ammonia levels and lower serum albumin levels than normal, suggesting hepatic failure as a cause of death. Hepatocytes showed karyorrhexis and karyolysis in carbon ion irradiated and spotty necrosis in X-ray irradiated mice, suggesting nuclear damage. Mice irradiated with LD50 of X-rays or carbon ions had a remarkably lower bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling index and mitotic index than control. Treatments with both BrdU and vincristine showed that none of the hepatocytes that synthesized DNA after irradiation completed mitosis, indicating G2 arrest. The liver weight of irradiated mice significantly decreased depending on the dose. Carbon ions as well as X-rays damaged hepatocytes directly and suppressed liver regeneration leading to fatal liver failure. (author)

  7. Transport of Carbonate Ions by Novel Cellulose Fiber Supported Solid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Gaikwad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Transport of carbonate ions was explored through fiber supported solid membrane. A novel fiber supported solid membrane was prepared by chemical modification of cellulose fiber with citric acid, 2′2-bipyridine and magnesium carbonate. The factors affecting the permeability of carbonate ions such as immobilization of citric acid-magnesium metal ion -2′2-bipyridine complex (0 to 2.5 mmol/g range over cellulose fiber, carbon-ate ion concentration in source phase and NaOH concentration in receiving phase were investigated. Ki-netic of carbonate, sulfate, and nitrate ions was investigated through fiber supported solid membrane. Transport of carbonate ions with/without bubbling of CO2 (0 to 10 ml/min in source phase was explored from source to receiving phase. The novel idea is to explore the adsorptive transport of CO2 from source to receiving phase through cellulose fiber containing magnesium metal ion organic framework. Copyright © 2012 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.Received: 25th November 2011; Revised: 17th December 2011; Accepted: 19th December 2011[How to Cite: A.G. Gaikwad. (2012. Transport of Carbonate Ions by Novel Cellulose Fiber Supported Solid Membrane. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (1: 49– 57.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1225.49-57][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1225.49-57 ] | View in 

  8. Clinical oxygen enhancement ratio of tumors in carbon ion radiotherapy: the influence of local oxygenation changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonovic, Laura; Lindblom, Emely; Dasu, Alexandru;

    2014-01-01

    The effect of carbon ion radiotherapy on hypoxic tumors has recently been questioned because of low linear energy transfer (LET) values in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of hypoxia and local oxygenation changes (LOCs) in fractionated carbon ion...

  9. The Level and Distribution of Chromosomal Aberration of Tomato Seeds at Different Penetration Depths of Carbon Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jufang; LI Wenjian; ZHANG Ying

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between the penetration depth and the level and distribution of chromosomal aberration of the root tip cells were investigated by exposure of the superposed tomato seeds to 80 MeV/u carbon ions. The results showed that on the entrance of the beam the chromosomal aberration level was low. Damage such as breaks and gaps were dominant. At the Bragg peak, the chromosomal aberration level was high. The yields of dicentrics, rings and disintegrated small chromosomes increased but the yields of breaks and gaps decreased. These results are consistent with the distribution of the physical depth dose profile of carbon ions. It is effective to deposit the Bragg peak on the seeds to induce hereditary aberration in the mutation breeding with heavy ions.

  10. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-01

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms.

  11. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-01

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms. PMID:21900733

  12. Assessment of DNA damage of Lewis lung carcinoma cells irradiated by carbon ions and X-rays using alkaline comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA damage and cell reproductive death determined by alkaline comet and clonogenic survival assays were examined in Lewis lung carcinoma cells after exposure to 89.63 MeV/u carbon ion and 6 MV X-ray irradiations, respectively. Based on the survival data, Lewis lung carcinoma cells were verified to be more radiosensitive to the carbon ion beam than to the X-ray irradiation. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value, which was up to 1.77 at 10% survival level, showed that the DNA damage induced by the high-LET carbon ion beam was more remarkable than that induced by the low-LET X-ray irradiation. The dose response curves of 'Tail DNA (%)' (TD) and 'Olive tail moment' (OTM) for the carbon ion irradiation showed saturation beyond about 8 Gy. This behavior was not found in the X-ray curves. Additionally, the carbon ion beam produced a lower survival fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) value and a higher initial Olive tail moment 2 Gy (OTM2) than those for the X-ray irradiation. These results suggest that carbon ion beams having high-LET values produced more severe cell reproductive death and DNA damage in Lewis lung carcinoma cells in comparison with X-rays and comet assay might be an effective predictive test even combining with clonogenic assay to assess cellular radiosensitivity

  13. Assessment of DNA damage of Lewis lung carcinoma cells irradiated by carbon ions and X-rays using alkaline comet assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Zhou, Li-Bin; Jin, Xiao-Dong; He, Jing; Dai, Zhong-Ying; Zhou, Guang-Ming; Gao, Qing-Xiang; Li, Sha; Li, Qiang

    2008-01-01

    DNA damage and cell reproductive death determined by alkaline comet and clonogenic survival assays were examined in Lewis lung carcinoma cells after exposure to 89.63 MeV/u carbon ion and 6 MV X-ray irradiations, respectively. Based on the survival data, Lewis lung carcinoma cells were verified to be more radiosensitive to the carbon ion beam than to the X-ray irradiation. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value, which was up to 1.77 at 10% survival level, showed that the DNA damage induced by the high-LET carbon ion beam was more remarkable than that induced by the low-LET X-ray irradiation. The dose response curves of “Tail DNA (%)” (TD) and “Olive tail moment” (OTM) for the carbon ion irradiation showed saturation beyond about 8 Gy. This behavior was not found in the X-ray curves. Additionally, the carbon ion beam produced a lower survival fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) value and a higher initial Olive tail moment 2 Gy (OTM2) than those for the X-ray irradiation. These results suggest that carbon ion beams having high-LET values produced more severe cell reproductive death and DNA damage in Lewis lung carcinoma cells in comparison with X-rays and comet assay might be an effective predictive test even combining with clonogenic assay to assess cellular radiosensitivity.

  14. Mass analysis of cesium ion induced fragmentation of C/sub 60/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of Cs ion induced C/sub 60/ fragmentation in source of negative ions by cesium sputtering (SNICS) from 5 MeV Tandem accelerator are presented. The mass analysis was performed from bending magnet. Mass spectra of C/sub 60/ fragments are compared with that of graphite under similar conditions. Yield of carbon clusters for both cases is plotted for Cs ion energy range of 2-5 keV. It is observed that heavier clusters appear in the case of C/sub 60/. Intensity of C/sub 2/ is much higher in comparison with other clusters for both C/sub 60/ and graphite due to difference in their bond energies. Prominence of C/sub 2/ yield confirms formation mechanism of C/sub 60/ by addition of C/sub 2/ route. (author)

  15. SAGA-HIMAT project for carbon ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Project of SAGA Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Tosu (SAGA HIMAT) is promoted by Saga prefecture with private financial supports, investments, and also personal donations. With this funding, facility construction is conducted by a collaboration of SAGA-HIMAT foundation and SAGA HIMAT company. The facility is constructing in Tosu-shi near Shinn-Tosu shinkansen station, which has easy access from Kyushu island area and also south west Japan. In the facility, there are three treatment rooms, where first one has been equipped with horizontal and 45 degree oblique beam lines, second one has horizontal and vertical beam lines, and third one is for future preparation of spot scanning irradiation system. Design of an accelerator itself is same as a therapy facility at Gunma University, i.e., acceleration ion is carbon, maximum beam energy is 400MeV/u, and maximum beam intensity is 1.3x109pps. An injection line to a synchrotron and transport lines to three treatment rooms had been rearranged. Designs of the accelerator and an irradiation system have started at beginning of 2010, and the construction of a facility building has started at beginning of this year (2011). Installations of accelerator devices are expected to start at beginning of 2012, and the facility is planned to complete in 2013. In this paper, we present our project and current status of the facility construction. (author)

  16. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Gonon, P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Light-ion-induced multifragmentation. A fast, evolutionary process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GeV light-ion-induced reactions offer a unique tool for preparing hot, dilute nuclear matter. Time evolution of nuclear multifragmentation in 3He + natAg and 3He + 197Au reactions are investigated. Fragment-fragment correlations are studied in order to gain information on multifragmentation mechanism. (K.A.)

  18. Light-ion-induced multifragmentation. A fast, evolutionary process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viola, V.E.; Bracken, D.S.; Foxford, E.R.; Ginger, D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Morley, K.B.; Hsi, W.C.; Wang, G. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Korteling, R.G. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Legrain, R. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee] [and others

    1996-09-01

    GeV light-ion-induced reactions offer a unique tool for preparing hot, dilute nuclear matter. Time evolution of nuclear multifragmentation in {sup 3}He + {sup nat}Ag and {sup 3}He + {sup 197}Au reactions are investigated. Fragment-fragment correlations are studied in order to gain information on multifragmentation mechanism. (K.A.). 15 refs.

  19. Experimental studies of superhard materials carbon nitride CNx prepared by ion-beam synthesis method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛火平; 林成鲁; 许华平; 邹世昌; 石晓红; 吴兴龙; 朱宏; P.L.FHemment

    1996-01-01

    Formation of superhard materials carbon nitride CNt by using ion-beam synthesis method is reported.100-keV high-dose N+ ions were implanted into carbon thin films at different temperatures.The samples were evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),Fourier transformation-infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR),Raman spectroscopy,cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM),Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS).X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and Vickers microhardness measurement.The results show that the buried carbon nitride CN> layer has been successfully formed by using 100-keV high-dose N+ ions implantation into carbon thin film.Implantation of reactive ions into silicon (IRIS) computer program has been used to simulate the formation of the buried β-C3N4 layer as N+ ions are implanted into carbon.A good agreement between experimental measurements and IRIS simulation is found.

  20. Characteristics of Ions Emitted from Laser-Induced Silver Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. S. RAFIQUE; M. KHALEEQ-UR-RAHMAN; Shakoor MUNAZZA; K. A. BHATTI

    2008-01-01

    In this work, study of laser-induced ions is presented. The plasma was produced by focusing a Nd:YAG laser, with a wavelength of 1064 nm, a pulsed width of 9~14 ns, a power of 1.1 MW and energy of 10 mJ, on silver target in vacuum (10'-3> Torr = 1.3332 Pa). The charac-teristics of ion streams were investigated by CR-39 detectors located at angles of 0°, 30°, 60° and 90° with respect to normal of the target. The distance between the silver target and each detector was 11 cm. The energy of silver ions was found ranging from 1.5 eV to 1.06E4 eV. There was a high concentration of ions with low energy as compared to those with high energy, showing the energy distribution amongst the ions. The flux of ions was maximum in the axial direction which was decreasing with the angle increase with respect to normal of the target, and finally became minimum in the radial direction. Hence the silver ions have shown anisotropic behaviour.

  1. Contribution of nitric oxide radicals in bystander and adaptive responses induced by heavy ion-beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether radioadaptive responses were induced after irradiation with accelerated ion beams through nitric oxide-mediated bystander response in cultured cells in vitro and in some organs of mice in vivo. Human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells transfected with wild-type p53 (H1299/wtp53 cells) were used. The cells were irradiated with accelerated neon (400 MeV/u, 31 keV/μm) or iron (500 MeV/u, 200 keV/μm) ion beams. Then, the cells were allowed forming colonies, were cultured for 48 h to obtained samples for Western blot analysis, or were cultured for several weeks to fix mutations in the locus of hprt gene. ICR male mice (Jcl:ICR) were used. The mice were irradiated on 2 days with accelerated carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u, 13 keV/μm) or argon ion beams (500 MeV/u, 90 keV/μm). The intestine and testis were excised 2 days after the last irradiation. These excised tissues were fixed, embedded in paraffin and made of thin-sections on slide glasses. Then the TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL)- and activated caspase-3-positive cells in the thin-sections of tissues were detected by the immunohistochemical method. A significant reduction of mutation rate of the hprt gene was observed when the cells were challengingly irradiated after the priming irradiation with accelerate neon or iron ion beams. This reduction was partially suppressed by NO radical scavenger, carboxy-PTIO. The bystander-induced apoptotic and activated caspase-3-positive cells were obviously observed in unirradiated intestine and testis when mice were irradiated with carbon or argon ion beams across the upper body. These observations were partially suppressed by carboxy-PTIO into the peritoneal cavity. (author)

  2. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, K.; Chen, Y.J.; Ohira, C.; Nojima, K.; Ando, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Ohbuchi, T.; Shimizu, W. [Space and Particle Radiation Science Research Group, Chiba (Japan); Koike, S.; Kanai, T. [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Accelerator Physics

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/{mu}m also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/{mu}m in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/{mu}m were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/{mu} steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  3. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean time series sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30-year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these results

  4. Fabrication of micro carbon pillar by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周健; 罗迎社; 李立君; 钟琦文; 李新华; 殷水平

    2008-01-01

    Argon ion laser was used as the induced light source and ethane(C2H4) was selected as the precursor gas,in the variety ranges of laser power from 0.5 W to 4.5 W and the pressure of the precursor gas from 225×133.3 Pa to 680×133.3 Pa,the experiments of laser induced chemical vapor deposition were proceeded for fabrication of micro carbon pillar.In the experiments,the influences of power of laser and pressure of work gas on the diameter and length of micro carbon pillar were investigated,the variety on averaged growth rate of carbon pillar with the laser irradiation time and moving speed of focus was discussed.Based on experiment data,the micro carbon pillar with an aspect ratio of over 500 was built through the method of moving the focus.

  5. Simulation of stripping injection into HITFiL with carbon ion

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Xiucui; Zhang, Xiaohu

    2013-01-01

    Stripping injection is one of the crucial stages in the accumulation process of the hadron therapy synchrotron HITFiL (Heavy Ion Therapy Facility in Lanzhou). In order to simulate the stripping injection process of carbon ions for HITFiL, the interactions between carbon ions and foil has been studied, and simulated with a code developed by ourselves .The optimized parameters of the injecting beam and the scheme of the injection system have been presented for HITFiL.

  6. Simulation of stripping injection into HITFiL with carbon ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Xiu-Cui; SONG Ming-Tao; ZHANG Xiao-Hu

    2013-01-01

    Stripping injection is one of the crucial stages in the accumulation process of the hadron therapy synchrotron HITFiL (Heavy Ion Therapy Facility in Lanzhou).In order to simulate the stripping injection process of carbon ions for HITFiL,the interactions between carbon ions and foil has been studied,and simulated with a code developed by ourselves.The optimized parameters of the injecting beam and the scheme of the injection system have been presented for HITFiL.

  7. Cyclability study of silicon-carbon composite anodes for lithium-ion batteries using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Juchen; Sun, Ann; Chen Xilin [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Wang Chunsheng, E-mail: cswang@umd.ed [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Manivannan, Ayyakkannu [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Silicon-carbon anode materials for Li-ion batteries were synthesized. {yields} Carbonization and annealing processes were used in electrode preparation. {yields} Capacity fading mechanism was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. {yields} Impedance evolution revealed better stability of the carbonized anode material. - Abstract: The effects of carbonization process and carbon nanofiber/nanotube additives on the cycling stability of silicon-carbon composite anodes were investigated by monitoring the impedance evolution during charge/discharge cycles with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Three types of Si-C anodes were investigated: the first type consisted of Si nanoparticles incorporated into a network of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), with annealed polymer binder. The second type of Si-C anodes was prepared by further heat treatment of the first Si-C anodes to carbonize the polymer binder. The third Si-C anode was as same as the second one except no CNFs and MWNTs being added. Impedance analysis revealed that the carbonization process stabilized the Si-C anode structure and decreased the charge transfer resistance, thus improving the cycling stability. On the other hand, although the MWNTs/CNFs additives could enhance the electronic conductivity of the Si-C anodes, the induced inhomogeneous structure decreased the integrity of the electrode, resulting in a poor long term cycling stability.

  8. Adsorption efficiencies of calcium (II ion and iron (II ion on activated carbon obtained from pericarp of rubber fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orawan Sirichote

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of adsorption efficiencies of activated carbon from pericarp of rubber fruit for calcium (II ion and iron (II ion has been performed by flowing the solutions of these ions through a column of activated carbon. The weights of activated carbon in 500 mL buret column (diameter 3.2 cm for flowing calcium (II ion and iron (II ion solutions were 15 g and 10 g, respectively. The initial concentration of calcium ion was prepared to be about eight times more diluted than the true concentration found in the groundwater from the lower part of southern Thailand. Calcium (II ion concentrations were analysed by EDTA titration and its initial concentration was found to be 23.55 ppm. With a flow rate of 26 mL/min, the adsorption efficiency was 11.4 % with passed through volume 4.75 L. Iron (II ion concentrations were analysed by spectrophotometric method; its initial concentration was found to be 1.5565 ppm. At a flow rate of 22 mL/min, the adsorption efficiency was 0.42 % with passed through volume of 34.0 L.

  9. Ion implanted pyrolitic carbon for the hip prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Hip joint arthroplasty is a successful surgical procedure, but loosening induced by polyethylene wear debris continues to be a problem. Fine grained isotropic graphite (POCO ZXF-5Q) coated with Pyrolite (trademark of Carbomedics Inc.) combines biocompatibility, strength and tribological properties which could be utilised in a hip prosthesis. Some preliminary work has been conducted on this material, and the effect nitrogen ion implantation has on its wear resistance. Finite element analysis was conducted on a femoral head of a canine hip prosthesis with diameter 19mm made from POCO ZXF-5Q . An optimum design was obtained after design variables such as taper angle and width, internal recess radius, crown thickness were varied so that internal stresses were minimised. This was then translated into an human sized femoral head with diameter 28mm, which was subjected to mechanical testing. Loading was at 20 deg C to the taper, with loading rate 10kN/s used in static loading, whilst fatigue testing was carried out between 300 - 3000N at 30Hz for 107 cycles. Pin-on-disc wear testing was carried out using a CSEM Tribometer. A 1N load was applied to 6mm diameter pins. Wear track radii were 11 and 13mm, with linear velocity 5cm/s and sliding distance 2.5km. Test temperature was 37±1degC with Ringer solution and bovine serum being used as lubricant. Nitrogen implanted samples were irradiated to a dose of 5x1016 ions.cm-2 at 50keV. Static testing was carried out to loads of 8000N and all five POCO ZXF-5Q femoral heads tested survived. Then three of these pre-tested femoral heads were subjected to fatigue testing and no failures occured before 107 cycles. Wear was reduced by nitrogen ion implantation only when an irradiated pin was tested against as polished Pyrolite. Nitrogen ion implanted Pyrolite on a POCO ZXF-5Q substrate may have clinical potential. The substrate has appropriate mechanical properties, and nitrogen ion implantation can improve the already

  10. A disordered carbon as a novel anode material in lithium-ion cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonino, F.; Brutti, S.; Reale, P.; Scrosati, B. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita ' ' La Sapienza' ' , I-00185 Rome (Italy); Gherghel, L.; Wu, J.; Muellen, K. [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, D-55124 Mainz (Germany)

    2005-03-22

    The electrochemical behavior of a disordered carbon used as the anode in a lithium battery has been tested. The characteristics of this carbon, especially its specific capacity and cycle life, are such that it is a potentially unique, high-performance anode material for new types of lithium-ion batteries. The Figure shows the specific capacity versus cycle number of the disordered carbon electrode in a lithium-ion cell. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Mechanism of heavy ion radiation-induced cancer cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported that the carbon beam triggers apoptosis in radio-resistant cancer cell lines via extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)- and mitochondrial Bcl-2 family protein-dependant mechanism. Here, we further examined the further apoptosis-inducing mechanism of carbon beam in two glioma cell lines (T98G, U251). ERK1/2 knockdown experiments revealed that ERK regulates this apoptosis-inducing machinery upstream of mitochondria. Furthermore, we also found that both T98G cell and U251 cell stably expressing dominant-negative ERK2 suppress cell death induced by carbon beam irradiation. We also found proapoptotic PUMA and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 dynamically chang their expression levels corresponding to ERK activation after CB irradiation in U251 cell, and knockdown of PUMA decreased CB-induced U251 cell death. These data suggest that kinase action of ERK is essential for CB-induced glioma cell death, and proapoptotic PUMA and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 might be downstream targets of ERK in CB-induced glioma cell death mechanism. (author)

  12. Rapid ion-beam-induced Ostwald ripening in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-beam-induced grain coarsening in initially amorphous (Zr,Y)Ox layers is observed by atomic force microscopy. The films were bombarded at room temperature. Grain-boundary grooves indicate that the larger grains have a diameter of about 83 nm at 2 min, and 131 nm at 5 min. Up to 5 min, the grain size evolves with time as tβ, with β=0.5±0.2. Based on a new parametrization of ion-induced grain-boundary translation, we derive a theoretical estimate of β=3/7, consistent with our measurement. By 7.5 min, many of the grain-boundary grooves are shallow and indistinct, suggesting that the surviving grains are mutually well aligned. Such rapid grain growth at room temperature is unusual and is enabled by the ion bombardment. Similar grain growth processes are expected during ion-beam-assisted deposition film growth. The status of ion-textured yttria stabilized zirconia films as buffer layers for high-current high-temperature superconducting films is briefly summarized

  13. Nanopillar growth by focused helium ion-beam-induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ping; Salemink, Huub W M; Alkemade, Paul F A [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Veldhoven, Emile van; Maas, Diederik J [TNO Science and Industry, Stieltjesweg 1, 2628 CK Delft (Netherlands); Sanford, Colin A [Carl Zeiss SMT, Inc., One Corporation Way, Peabody, MA 01960 (United States); Smith, Daryl A; Rack, Philip D, E-mail: p.f.a.alkemade@tudelft.nl [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States)

    2010-11-12

    A 25 keV focused helium ion beam has been used to grow PtC nanopillars on a silicon substrate by beam-induced decomposition of a (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Pt(C{sub P}CH{sub 3}) precursor gas. The ion beam diameter was about 1 nm. The observed relatively high growth rates suggest that electronic excitation is the dominant mechanism in helium ion-beam-induced deposition. Pillars grown at low beam currents are narrow and have sharp tips. For a constant dose, the pillar height decreases with increasing current, pointing to depletion of precursor molecules at the beam impact site. Furthermore, the diameter increases rapidly and the total pillar volume decreases slowly with increasing current. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed with realistic values for the fundamental deposition processes. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations. In particular, they reproduce the current dependences of the vertical and lateral growth rates and of the volumetric deposition efficiency. Furthermore, the simulations reveal that the vertical pillar growth is due to type-1 secondary electrons and primary ions, while the lateral outgrowth is due to type-2 secondary electrons and scattered ions.

  14. Nanopillar growth by focused helium ion-beam-induced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 25 keV focused helium ion beam has been used to grow PtC nanopillars on a silicon substrate by beam-induced decomposition of a (CH3)3Pt(CPCH3) precursor gas. The ion beam diameter was about 1 nm. The observed relatively high growth rates suggest that electronic excitation is the dominant mechanism in helium ion-beam-induced deposition. Pillars grown at low beam currents are narrow and have sharp tips. For a constant dose, the pillar height decreases with increasing current, pointing to depletion of precursor molecules at the beam impact site. Furthermore, the diameter increases rapidly and the total pillar volume decreases slowly with increasing current. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed with realistic values for the fundamental deposition processes. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations. In particular, they reproduce the current dependences of the vertical and lateral growth rates and of the volumetric deposition efficiency. Furthermore, the simulations reveal that the vertical pillar growth is due to type-1 secondary electrons and primary ions, while the lateral outgrowth is due to type-2 secondary electrons and scattered ions.

  15. Stationary plume induced by carbon dioxide dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, laminar convection flows induced by carbon dioxide absorption are addressed from experimental, numerical and theoretical points of view. A vertical glass tube (of centimetre scale) filled with distilled water is subjected to a sudden increase in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. As a result of the diffusion of the gas into the unsaturated solution, a thin layer of fluid located underneath the surface becomes heavier. This initial density gradient first destabilizes to form a plume, which goes downwards through the entire cell. After a first transient pulsating regime (periodic succession of such Rayleigh-Benard plumes), a stationary flow settles in the tube, which is maintained by the constant supply of gas at the surface. At late stages, this stationary regime is followed by an aperiodic regime, which lasts until the complete saturation of the solution (thermodynamic equilibrium). The present study only focuses on the stationary regime, whose characteristics appear to be almost independent of the Bond number and the aspect ratio but strongly dependent on the chemical Rayleigh number. Three decades of Rayleigh numbers are explored using particle image velocimetry measurements, which allows for a precise determination of the scaling exponents for the vertical velocity amplitude and the plume width. The assumption that gravity and a constant pressure gradient balance the viscous effects enables us to derive an analytic expression for the stationary vertical velocity on the axis, which scales as Ra2/3 (ln Ra)1/3. As a consequence, the width of the plume scales as Ra-1/6 (ln Ra)-1/3 and the mass Nusselt number as (Ra= ln Ra)1/3. These scalings are in excellent agreement with the experimental and numerical results. The multiplicative constants of these scalings can also be calculated and show a fairly good agreement if a rigid boundary condition (no-slip) is assumed at the free surface. (authors)

  16. Helium ion beam induced growth of hammerhead AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanda, G.; Van Veldhoven, E.; Maas, D.; Sadeghian, H.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the direct-write growth of hammerhead atomic force microscope(AFM) probes by He+beam induced deposition of platinum-carbon. In order to grow a thin nanoneedle on top of a conventional AFM probe, the authors move a focused He+beam during exposure to a PtC precursor gas. In the fina

  17. Helium ion beam induced growth of hammerhead AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanda, G.; Veldhoven, E. van; Maas, D.J.; Sadeghian Marnani, H.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the direct-write growth of hammerhead atomic force microscope (AFM) probes by He+ beam induced deposition of platinum-carbon. In order to grow a thin nanoneedle on top of a conventional AFM probe, the authors move a focused He+ beam during exposure to a PtC precursor gas. In the f

  18. Investigation of ion induced bending mechanism for nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion induced bending is a promising controlled technique for manipulating nanoscale structures. However, the underlying mechanism of the process is not well understood. In this letter, we report a detailed study of the bending mechanism of Si nanowires (NWs) under Ga+ irradiation. The microstructural changes in the NW due to ion beam irradiation are studied and molecular dynamics simulations are used to explore the ion–NW interaction processes. The simulation results are compared with the microstructural studies of the NW. The investigations inform a generic understanding of the bending process in crystalline materials, which we suggest to be feasible as a versatile manipulation and integration technique in nanotechnology. (paper)

  19. Systematics of quasi-elastic processes induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to delineate the areas in the systematics of quasi-elastic processes induced by heavy ions that are well described theoretically from the specific features that seem not to be understood. One- and two-particle transfer reactions are considered. A general systematic seen in transfer angular distribution data and theory, some successes and failures of the DWBA and coupled-channels theories in describing heavy-ion-reaction data, and the specific example 232Th(40Ar,K) and implications for deep inelastic reactions with even heavier projectiles such as Kr and Xe are considered

  20. TL response of Eu activated LiF nanocubes irradiated by 85 MeV carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salah, Numan, E-mail: nsalah@kau.edu.sa [Center of Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Alharbi, Najlaa D. [Sciences Faculty for Girls, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Habib, Sami S. [Center of Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Lochab, S.P. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2015-09-01

    Carbon ions were found to be effective for cancer treatment. These heavy ions have a high relative biological effectiveness compared to those of photons. They have higher linear energy transfer and sharper Bragg peak with a very excellent local tumor control. However, the dose of these swift heavy ions needs to be measured with great accuracy. Lithium fluoride (LiF) is a highly sensitive phosphor widely used for radiation dosimetry. In this work Eu activated LiF nanocubes were exposed to 85 MeV C{sup 6+} ion beam and evaluated for their thermoluminescence (TL) response. Pellet forms of this nanomaterial were exposed to these ions in the fluence range 10{sup 9}–10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The obtained result shows a prominent TL glow peak at around 320 °C, which is different than that induced by gamma rays. This glow peak exhibits a linear response in the range 10{sup 9}–10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}, corresponding to the equivalent absorbed doses 0.273–273 kGy. The absorbed doses, penetration depths and main energy loss were calculated using TRIM code based on the Monte Carlo simulation. The supralinearity function and stopping power in this nanomaterial were also studied. The modification induced in the glow curve structure as a result of changing irradiation type might be utilized to use LiF:Eu nanocubes as a dosimeter for mixed filed radiations. Moreover, the wide linear response of LiF:Eu nanocubes along with the low fading are another imperative results suggesting that this nanomaterial might be a good candidate for carbon ions dosimetry.

  1. Numerical modeling of ion dynamics in a carbon nanotube field-ionized thruster

    OpenAIRE

    Michael, Sarah F.

    2011-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Carbon nanotube field ionization technology has the potential to make ion propulsion feasible for use in micro and nano-satellites. To better understand the phenomenon and optimize the ion thruster design, it is useful to have an accurate model of the system. Numerical modeling of large-scale electron bombardment ion engines is a relatively mature field, but modeling of field-ionized ion engines is in its infancy. A simpler code may be...

  2. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Muñoz, Roberto [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de [Private Practice, P° San Francisco, 43 A-1°, 20400 Tolosa (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm{sup 2}) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  3. Study of the degradation process of polyimide induced by high energetic ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissertation focuses on the radiation hardness of Kapton under extreme radiation environment conditions. To study ion-beam induced modifications, Kapton foils were irradiated at the GSI linear accelerator UNILAC using several projectiles (e.g. Ti, Mo, Au, and U) within a large fluence regime (1 x 1010-5 x 1012 ions/cm2). The irradiated Kapton foils were analysed by means of infrared and UV/Vis spectroscopy, tensile strength measurement, mass loss analysis, and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. For testing the radiation stability of Kapton at the cryogenic operation temperature (5-10 K) of the superconducting magnets, additional irradiation experiments were performed at the Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL, France) focusing on the online analysis of the outgassing process of small volatile degradation fragments. The investigations of the electrical properties analysed by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy exhibit a different trend: high fluence irradiations with light ions (e.g. Ti) lead to a slight increase of the conductivity, whereas heavy ions (e.g. Sm, Au) cause a drastic change already in the fluence regime of nonoverlapping tracks (5 x 1010 ions/cm2). Online analysis of the outgassing process during irradiation at cryogenic temperatures shows the release of a variety of small gaseous molecules (e.g. CO, CO2, and short hydro carbons). Also a small amount of large polymer fragments is identified. The results allow the following conclusions which are of special interest for the application of Kapton as insulating material in a high-energetic particle radiation environment. a) The material degradation measured with the optical spectroscopy and tensile strength tests are scalable with the dose deposited by the ions. The high correlation of the results allows the prediction of the mechanical degradation with the simple and non-destructive infrared spectroscopy. The degradation curve points to a critical material degradation which has to be

  4. Study of the degradation process of polyimide induced by high energetic ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severin, Daniel

    2008-09-19

    The dissertation focuses on the radiation hardness of Kapton under extreme radiation environment conditions. To study ion-beam induced modifications, Kapton foils were irradiated at the GSI linear accelerator UNILAC using several projectiles (e.g. Ti, Mo, Au, and U) within a large fluence regime (1 x 10{sup 10}-5 x 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}). The irradiated Kapton foils were analysed by means of infrared and UV/Vis spectroscopy, tensile strength measurement, mass loss analysis, and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. For testing the radiation stability of Kapton at the cryogenic operation temperature (5-10 K) of the superconducting magnets, additional irradiation experiments were performed at the Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL, France) focusing on the online analysis of the outgassing process of small volatile degradation fragments. The investigations of the electrical properties analysed by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy exhibit a different trend: high fluence irradiations with light ions (e.g. Ti) lead to a slight increase of the conductivity, whereas heavy ions (e.g. Sm, Au) cause a drastic change already in the fluence regime of nonoverlapping tracks (5 x 10{sup 10} ions/cm{sup 2}). Online analysis of the outgassing process during irradiation at cryogenic temperatures shows the release of a variety of small gaseous molecules (e.g. CO, CO{sub 2}, and short hydro carbons). Also a small amount of large polymer fragments is identified. The results allow the following conclusions which are of special interest for the application of Kapton as insulating material in a high-energetic particle radiation environment. a) The material degradation measured with the optical spectroscopy and tensile strength tests are scalable with the dose deposited by the ions. The high correlation of the results allows the prediction of the mechanical degradation with the simple and non-destructive infrared spectroscopy. The degradation curve points to a

  5. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (∼10 μs pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron microscopy, and its structure characteristics are examined by XPS and laser Raman spectroscopy. Subsequent processing using acetylene or acetylene and Ar (20%) produced thin carbon layers that are confirmed to be graphite-dominated DLC. Also, this PSII method is employed in order to deposit the DLC layer on the inside surface of the PET bottle and to reduce oxygen permeation rate by 40%

  6. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T.; Yoshida, M.; Shinohara, M.; Takagi, T.

    2002-05-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (~10 μs pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron microscopy, and its structure characteristics are examined by XPS and laser Raman spectroscopy. Subsequent processing using acetylene or acetylene and Ar (20%) produced thin carbon layers that are confirmed to be graphite-dominated DLC. Also, this PSII method is employed in order to deposit the DLC layer on the inside surface of the PET bottle and to reduce oxygen permeation rate by 40%.

  7. Calculation of stopping power ratios for carbon ion dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithner, Oksana; Andreo, P.; Sobolevsky, N.; Hartmann, G.; Jäkel, O.

    2006-05-01

    Water-to-air stopping power ratio calculations for the ionization chamber dosimetry of clinical carbon ion beams with initial energies from 50 to 450 MeV/u have been performed using the Monte Carlo technique. To simulate the transport of a particle in water the computer code SHIELD-HIT v2 was used, which is a newly developed version where substantial modifications were implemented on its predecessor SHIELD-HIT v1 (Gudowska et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 1933-58). The code was completely rewritten replacing formerly used single precision variables with double precision variables. The lowest particle transport specific energy was decreased from 1 MeV/u down to 10 keV/u by modifying the Bethe-Bloch formula, thus widening its range for medical dosimetry applications. In addition, the code includes optionally MSTAR and ICRU-73 stopping power data. The fragmentation model was verified and its parameters were also adjusted. The present code version shows excellent agreement with experimental data. It has been used to compute the physical quantities needed for the calculation of stopping power ratios, swater,air, of carbon beams. Compared with the recommended constant value given in the IAEA Code of Practice, the differences found in the present investigations varied between 0.5% and 1% at the plateau region, respectively for 400 MeV/u and 50 MeV/u beams, and up to 2.3% in the vicinity of the Bragg peak for 50 MeV/u.

  8. Microarray Analysis of Human Liver Cells irradiated by 80MeV/u Carbon Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Tian, Xiaoling; Kong, Fuquan; Li, Qiang; Jin, Xiaodong; Dai, Zhongying; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Mingjian; Zhao, Kui

    Objective Biological effect of heavy ion beam has the important significance for cancer therapy and space exploring owing its high LET and RBE, low OER, especially forming Bragg spike at the end of the tracks of charged particles. More serious damage for cells are induced by heavy ions and difficult repair than other irradiation such as X-ray and ν-ray . To explore the molecular mechanism of biological effect caused by heavy ionizing radiation (HIR) and to construct the gene expression profile database of HIR-induced human liver cells L02 by microarray analysis. Methods In this study, L02 cells were irradiated by 80MeV/u carbon ions at 5 Gy delivered by HIRFL (Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou) at room temperature. Total RNAs of cells incubated 6 hours and 24hours after irradiation were extracted with Trizol. Unirradiated cells were used as a control. RNAs were transcripted into cDNA by reverse transcription and labelled with cy5-dCTP and cy3-dCTP respectively. A human genome oligonucleotide set consisting of 5 amino acid-modified 70-mer probes and representing 21,329 well-characterized Homo sapiens genes was selected for microarray analysis and printed on amino-silaned glass slides. Arrays were fabricated using an OmniGrid microarrayer. Only genes whose alteration tendency was consistent in both microarrays were selected as differentially expressed genes. The Affymetrix's short oligonucleotide (25-mer) HG U133A 2.0 array analyses were performed per the manufacturer's instructions. Results Of the 21,329 genes tested, 37 genes showed changes in expression level with ratio higher than 2.0 and lower than 0.5 at 6hrs after irradiation. There were 19 genes showing up-regulation in radiated L02 cells, whereas 18 genes showing down-regulation; At 24hrs after irradiation, 269 genes showed changes in expression level with ratio higher than 2.0 and lower than 0.5. There were 67 genes showing up-regulation in radiated L02 cells, whereas 202 genes showing down

  9. Ion-induced molecular fragmentation: beyond the Coulomb explosion picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fragmentation of the CO molecule by O7+ ion impact is investigated in two different energy regimes by fragment ion momentum spectroscopy. The improved resolution of the present kinetic energy release measurement together with application of a time-dependent wave packet dynamics method used in conjunction with new high-level computations of a large number of dication potential energy curves enables one to unambiguously assign each line to an excited state of the transient molecular dication produced during the collision. This is the first direct experimental evidence of the limitations of the Coulomb explosion model to reproduce the molecular fragmentation dynamics induced by ion impact. Electron removal due to a capture process is shown to transfer less excitation to the target than direct ionization. At low collision velocity, the three-body interaction between the projectile and the two fragments is also clearly highlighted. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  10. Residual chromatin breaks as biodosimetry for cell killing by carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M.; Kase, Y.; Nakano, T.; Kanai, T.; Ando, K.

    1998-11-01

    We have studied the relationship between cell killing and the induction of residual chromatin breaks on various human cell lines and primary cultured cells obtained by biopsy from patients irradiated with either X-rays or heavy-ion beams to identify potential bio-marker of radiosensitivity for radiation-induced cell killing. The carbon-ion beams were accelerated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). Six primary cultures obtained by biopsy from 6 patients with carcinoma of the cervix were irradiated with two different mono-LET beams (LET = 13 keV/μm, 76 keV/μm) and 200kV X rays. Residual chromatin breaks were measured by counting the number of non-rejoining chromatin fragments detected by the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique after a 24 hour post-irradiation incubation period. The induction rate of residual chromatin breaks per cell per Gy was the highest for 76 keV/μm beams on all of the cells. Our results indicated that cell which was more sensitive to the cell killing was similarly more susceptible to induction of residual chromatin breaks. Furthermore there is a good correlation between these two end points in various cell lines and primary cultured cells. This suggests that the detection of residual chromatin breaks by the PCC technique may be useful as a predictive assay of tumor response to cancer radiotherapy.

  11. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a long control simulation with a fully-coupled Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean timeseries sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30 year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these

  12. The role of ammonia in sulfuric acid ion induced nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Ortega

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multi-step strategy for quantum chemical calculations on atmospherically relevant cluster structures that makes calculation for large clusters affordable with a good accuracy-to-computational effort ratio. We have applied this strategy to evaluate the relevance of ternary ion induced nucleation; we have also performed calculations for neutral ternary nucleation for comparison. The results for neutral ternary nucleation agree with previous results, and confirm the important role of ammonia in enhancing the growth of sulfuric acid clusters. On the other hand, we have found that ammonia does not enhance the growth of ionic sulfuric acid clusters. The results also confirm that ion-induced nucleation is a barrierless process at high altitudes, but at ground level there exists a barrier due to the presence of a local minimum on the free energy surface.

  13. Evaluation of beam delivery and ripple filter design for non-isocentric proton and carbon ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at selecting and evaluating a ripple filter design compatible with non-isocentric proton and carbon ion scanning beam treatment delivery for a compact nozzle. The use of non-isocentric treatments when the patient is shifted as close as possible towards the nozzle exit allows for a reduction in the air gap and thus an improvement in the quality of scanning proton beam treatment delivery. Reducing the air gap is less important for scanning carbon ions, but ripple filters are still necessary for scanning carbon ion beams to reduce the number of energy steps required to deliver homogeneous SOBP. The proper selection of ripple filters also allows a reduction in the possible transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities that could appear in non-isocentric conditions in particular.A thorough review of existing ripple filter designs over the past 16 years is performed and a design for non-isocentric treatment delivery is presented. A unique ripple filter quality index (QIRiFi) independent of the particle type and energy and representative of the ratio between energy modulation and induced scattering is proposed. The Bragg peak width evaluated at the 80% dose level (BPW80) is proposed to relate the energy modulation of the delivered Bragg peaks and the energy layer step size allowing the production of homogeneous SOBP. Gate/Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations have been validated for carbon ion and ripple filter simulations based on measurements performed at CNAO and subsequently used for a detailed analysis of the proposed ripple filter design.A combination of two ripple filters in a series has been validated for non-isocentric delivery and did not show significant transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities. Non-isocentric conditions allow a significant reduction in the spot size at the patient entrance (up to 350% and 200% for protons and carbon ions with range shifter, respectively), and therefore in the lateral penumbra in the patients. (paper)

  14. Evaluation of beam delivery and ripple filter design for non-isocentric proton and carbon ion therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grevillot, L.; Stock, M.; Vatnitsky, S.

    2015-10-01

    This study aims at selecting and evaluating a ripple filter design compatible with non-isocentric proton and carbon ion scanning beam treatment delivery for a compact nozzle. The use of non-isocentric treatments when the patient is shifted as close as possible towards the nozzle exit allows for a reduction in the air gap and thus an improvement in the quality of scanning proton beam treatment delivery. Reducing the air gap is less important for scanning carbon ions, but ripple filters are still necessary for scanning carbon ion beams to reduce the number of energy steps required to deliver homogeneous SOBP. The proper selection of ripple filters also allows a reduction in the possible transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities that could appear in non-isocentric conditions in particular. A thorough review of existing ripple filter designs over the past 16 years is performed and a design for non-isocentric treatment delivery is presented. A unique ripple filter quality index (QIRiFi) independent of the particle type and energy and representative of the ratio between energy modulation and induced scattering is proposed. The Bragg peak width evaluated at the 80% dose level (BPW80) is proposed to relate the energy modulation of the delivered Bragg peaks and the energy layer step size allowing the production of homogeneous SOBP. Gate/Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations have been validated for carbon ion and ripple filter simulations based on measurements performed at CNAO and subsequently used for a detailed analysis of the proposed ripple filter design. A combination of two ripple filters in a series has been validated for non-isocentric delivery and did not show significant transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities. Non-isocentric conditions allow a significant reduction in the spot size at the patient entrance (up to 350% and 200% for protons and carbon ions with range shifter, respectively), and therefore in the lateral penumbra in the patients.

  15. Ion-Induced Surface Modification of Magnetically Operated Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Arushanov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A study has been made of permalloy (iron-nickel contacts of reed switches before and after ion-induced surface modification using atomic force and optical microscopy, Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It has been found that the formation of surface nitride layers enhances corrosion and erosion resistance of contacts. We proposed to produce such layers directly into sealed reed switches by means of pulsing glow-discharge nitrogen plasma.

  16. Behavior of the extraction of metallic ions in carbonate medium, using N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine (BPHA) - benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of separating quantitatively trace impurities like Cu, Fe, In and Pb, present in uranium base materials of nuclear grade, is demonstrated. A solvent extraction is employed which makes use of -benzoylphenylhydroxylamine(BPHA)-benzene solution and separation is effected in a medium containing 252 moles per liter of sodium-uranyl tricarbonate at pH of 9,0. Carbonate ions under such conditions inhibit uranium extraction by masking uranyl ion-BPHA reaction. The uranyl ions show a demasking action, releasing, thereby, Pb(II) ions which are being extracted from carbonate medium. The Atomic Absorption Spectrophometry technique is used to obtain the experimental data

  17. Modeling Diffusion Induced Stresses for Lithium-Ion Battery Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu Huang, Cheng-Kai

    Advancing lithium-ion battery technology is of paramount importance for satisfying the energy storage needs in the U.S., especially for the application in the electric vehicle industry. To provide a better acceleration for electric vehicles, a fast and repeatable discharging rate is required. However, particle fractures and capacity loss have been reported under high current rate (C-rate) during charging/discharging and after a period of cycling. During charging and discharging, lithium ions extract from and intercalate into electrode materials accompanied with the volume change and phase transition between Li-rich phase and Li-poor phase. It is suggested that the diffusion-induced-stress is one of the main reasons causing capacity loss due to the mechanical degradation of electrode particles. Therefore, there is a fundamental need to provide a mechanistic understanding by considering the structure-mechanics-property interactions in lithium-ion battery materials. Among many cathode materials, the olivine-based lithium-iron-phosphate (LiFePO4) with an orthorhombic crystal structure is one of the promising cathode materials for the application in electric vehicles. In this research we first use a multiphysic approach to investigate the stress evolution, especially on the phase boundary during lithiation in single LiFePO4 particles. A diffusion-controlled finite element model accompanied with the experimentally observed phase boundary propagation is developed via a finite element package, ANSYS, in which lithium ion concentration-dependent anisotropic material properties and volume misfits are incorporated. The stress components on the phase boundary are used to explain the Mode I, Mode II, and Mode III fracture propensities in LiFePO4 particles. The elastic strain energy evolution is also discussed to explain why a layer-by-layer lithium insertion mechanism (i.e. first-order phase transformation) is energetically preferred. Another importation issue is how current

  18. Protons from carbon ion fragmentation at 0.3–2.0 GeV/nucleon: Comparison with models of ion-ion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yields of protons at 3.5° from carbon ion fragmentation at energies of T0 = 0.3, 0.6, 0.95, and 2.0 GeV/nucleon on a Be target were measured in the FRAGM experiment at TWA-ITEP heavy-ion facility. Proton momentum spectra cover both the region of the fragmentation maximum and the cumulative region. The differential cross sections span six orders of its magnitude. The spectra are compared with the predictions of four models of ion-ion interactions: LAQGSM03.03, SHIELD-HIT, QMD, and BC

  19. Confinement-Induced Resonances in Ultracold Atom-Ion Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Melezhik, Vladimir S

    2016-01-01

    We investigate confinement-induced resonances in a system composed by a tightly trapped ion and a moving atom in a waveguide. We determine the conditions for the appearance of such resonances in a broad region -- from the "long-wavelength" limit to the opposite case when the typical length scale of the atom-ion interaction essentially exceeds the transverse waveguide width. We find considerable dependence of the resonance position on the atomic mass which, however, disappears in the "long-wavelength" limit, where the result for the confined atom-atom scattering is reproduced. We also derive an analytic formula for the resonance position in the "long-wavelength zero-energy" limit. Our results, which can be investigated in current experiments, indicate a strategy to determine the atom-ion scattering length, the temperature of the atomic ensemble in the presence of an ion impurity, and a pathway to control the atom-phonon coupling in a one dimensional ion crystal in interaction with an atomic quantum gas.

  20. Confinement-induced resonances in ultracold atom-ion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melezhik, V. S.; Negretti, A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate confinement-induced resonances in a system composed of a tightly trapped ion and a moving atom in a waveguide. We determine the conditions for the appearance of such resonances in a broad region—from the "long-wavelength" limit to the opposite case when the typical length scale of the atom-ion polarization potential essentially exceeds the transverse waveguide width. We find considerable dependence of the resonance position on the atomic mass which, however, disappears in the "long-wavelength and zero-energy" limit, where the known result for the confined atom-atom scattering is reproduced. We also derive an analytic and a semianalytic formula for the resonance position in the long-wavelength and zero-energy limit and we investigate numerically the dependence of the resonance condition on the finite atomic colliding energy. Our results, which can be investigated experimentally in the near future, could be used to determine the atom-ion scattering length, to determine the temperature of the atomic ensemble in the presence of an ion impurity, and to control the atom-phonon coupling in a linear ion crystal in interaction with a quasi-one-dimensional atomic quantum gas.

  1. Quantitative Traits of Ion Beam Induced Mutagenesis in Triticum aestivum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan FANG; Zhen JIAO

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The aim of this study was to elucidate the quantitative traits of plants mutagenized by ion beam. [Method] The particular variation phenotypes, a- gronomic traits, and protein and wet gluten contents of progenies derived from the same ion beam induced mutant were investigated. [Result] Morphological polymor- phism existed in some individuals. Plant height, spike length and protein content were significantly influenced by ion beam, and effective tiller number and wet gluten content were moderately influenced. Multiple comparisons of all the indices within groups indicated genomic instability among these groups. Coefficient of variation im- plied the differences within group were very low. [Conclusion] Ion beam irradiation displayed characteristics of multi-directivity and non-directiveness. It aroused multiple variations in the same mutant. Instability among progeny indicates cells had different fate even in the same irradiated tissue. It may take several generations for mutants to stabilize particular phenotypes. The effects of ion beam irradiation may be the in- terrelated direct irradiation damage, indirect irradiation damage and late effect, such as bystander effect and adaptive response.

  2. Defect effects on THz wave emission induced by ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: As the core component of terahertz system, terahertz source determines the performance of the whole system. The THz wave emission efficiency depends decisively on the THz emitting materials which are usually made of low-temperature-grown gallium arsenide. It is found that through ion irradiation better THz wave emission material can be prepared, which overcomes the poor reproducibility of high quality material prepared by the traditional method. Purpose: In order to find out the best irradiation condition for producing the required photoconductive material, we try to clarify the mechanism of the THz wave emission induced by ion implantation. Methods: Applying Monte Carlo method, we simulated the terahertz emission under different defect conditions, and tested the emission efficiency of GaAs and InP(Fe) irradiated by N ions with the energy of 500 keV and 1.5 MeV, respectively. Results: MC simulation study shows that both capture cross-section and trap density can cause changes in terahertz pulse width and peak intensity. From the experiments conducted on ion irradiated semiconductors we found only the peak intensity changes with the irradiation fluence. Conclusion: It is proposed that intrinsic defects introduced during growth of crystals are the key defects that contribute mainly to the terahertz wave emission behavior, and defects introduced by ion irradiation may only modify the transport property of carriers through scattering in semiconductor, by which it changes the terahertz wave emission performance. (authors)

  3. Ion beam deposition of amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, John C.; Mirtich, Michael J.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1982-01-01

    Carbon films were deposited on silicon, quartz, and potassium bromide substrates from an ion beam. Growth rates were approximately 0.3 micron/hour. The films were featureless and amorphous and contained only carbon and hydrogen in significant amounts. The density and carbon/hydrogen ratio indicate the film is a hydrogen deficient polymer. One possible structure, consistent with the data, is a random network of methylene linkages and tetrahedrally coordinated carbon atoms.

  4. Characterization of surface enhancement of carbon ion-implanted TiN coatings by metal vapor vacuum arc ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C L

    2002-01-01

    The modification of the surfaces of energetic carbon-implanted TiN films using metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion implantation was investigated, by varying ion energy and dose. The microhardness, microstructure and chemical states of carbon, implanted on the surface layer of TiN films, were examined, as functions of ion energy and dose, by nanoindenter, transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results revealed that the microhardness increased from 16.8 up to 25.3 GPa and the friction coefficient decreased to approximately 0.2, depending on the implanted ion energy and dose. The result is attributed to the new microcrystalline phases of TiCN and TiC formed, and carbon concentration saturation of the implanted matrix can enhance the partial mechanical property of TiN films after MEVVA treatment. The concentration distribution, implantation depth and chemical states of carbon-implanted TiN coatings depended strongly on the ion dose and...

  5. Controlling the profile of ion-cyclotron-resonant ions in JET with the wave-induced pinch effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantsinen, M. J.; Ingesson, L. C.; Johnson, T.; Kiptily, V. G.; Mayoral, M. L.; Sharapov, S. E.; Alper, B.; Bertalot, L.; Conroy, S.; Eriksson, L. G.; Hellsten, T.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Popovichev, S.; Righi, E.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments on the JET tokamak show that the wave-induced pinch in the presence of toroidally asymmetric waves can provide a tool for controlling the profile of ion-cyclotron-resonant He-3 ions. Direct evidence for the wave-induced pinch has been obtained from the measured gamma-ray emission profile

  6. Microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep groundwater environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliina eRajala

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The metallic low and intermediate level radioactive waste generally consists of carbon steel and stainless steels. The corrosion rate of carbon steel in deep groundwater is typically low, unless the water is very acidic or microbial activity in the environment is high. Therefore, the assessment of microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep bedrock environment has become important for evaluating the safety of disposal of radioactive waste. Here we studied the corrosion inducing ability of indigenous microbial community from a deep bedrock aquifer. Carbon steel coupons were exposed to anoxic groundwater from repository site 100 m depth (Olkiluoto, Finland for periods of three and eight months. The experiments were conducted at both in situ temperature and room temperature to investigate the response of microbial population to elevated temperature. Our results demonstrate that microorganisms from the deep bedrock aquifer benefit from carbon steel introduced to the nutrient poor anoxic deep groundwater environment. In the groundwater incubated with carbon steel the planktonic microbial community was more diverse and 100-fold more abundant compared to the environment without carbon steel. The betaproteobacteria were the most dominant bacterial class in all samples where carbon steel was present, whereas in groundwater incubated without carbon steel the microbial community had clearly less diversity. Microorganisms induced pitting corrosion and were found to cluster inside the corrosion pits. Temperature had an effect on the species composition of microbial community and also affected the corrosion deposits layer formed on the surface of carbon steel.

  7. Microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep groundwater environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Pauliina; Carpén, Leena; Vepsäläinen, Mikko; Raulio, Mari; Sohlberg, Elina; Bomberg, Malin

    2015-01-01

    The metallic low and intermediate level radioactive waste generally consists of carbon steel and stainless steels. The corrosion rate of carbon steel in deep groundwater is typically low, unless the water is very acidic or microbial activity in the environment is high. Therefore, the assessment of microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep bedrock environment has become important for evaluating the safety of disposal of radioactive waste. Here we studied the corrosion inducing ability of indigenous microbial community from a deep bedrock aquifer. Carbon steel coupons were exposed to anoxic groundwater from repository site 100 m depth (Olkiluoto, Finland) for periods of 3 and 8 months. The experiments were conducted at both in situ temperature and room temperature to investigate the response of microbial population to elevated temperature. Our results demonstrate that microorganisms from the deep bedrock aquifer benefit from carbon steel introduced to the nutrient poor anoxic deep groundwater environment. In the groundwater incubated with carbon steel the planktonic microbial community was more diverse and 100-fold more abundant compared to the environment without carbon steel. The betaproteobacteria were the most dominant bacterial class in all samples where carbon steel was present, whereas in groundwater incubated without carbon steel the microbial community had clearly less diversity. Microorganisms induced pitting corrosion and were found to cluster inside the corrosion pits. Temperature had an effect on the species composition of microbial community and also affected the corrosion deposits layer formed on the surface of carbon steel. PMID:26257707

  8. Centrifugally-spun carbon microfibers and porous carbon microfibers as anode materials for sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirican, Mahmut; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2016-09-01

    Natural abundance and low cost of sodium resources bring forward the sodium-ion batteries as a promising alternative to widely-used lithium-ion batteries. However, insufficient energy density and low cycling stability of current sodium-ion batteries hinder their practical use for next-generation smart power grid and stationary storage applications. Electrospun carbon microfibers have recently been introduced as a high-performance anode material for sodium-ion batteries. However, electrospinning is not feasible for mass production of carbon microfibers due to its complex processing condition, low production rate and high cost. Herein, we report centrifugal spinning, a high-rate and low-cost microfiber production method, as an alternative approach to electrospinning for carbon microfiber production and introduce centrifugally-spun carbon microfibers (CMFs) and porous carbon microfibers (PCMFs) as anode materials for sodium-ion batteries. Electrochemical performance results indicated that the highly porous nature of centrifugally-spun PCMFs led to increased Na+ storage capacity and improved cycling stability. The reversible capacity of centrifugally-spun PCMF anodes at the 200th cycle was 242 mAh g-1, which was much higher than that of centrifugally-spun CMFs (143 mAh g-1). The capacity retention and coulombic efficiency of the centrifugally-spun PCMF anodes were 89.0% and 99.9%, respectively, even at the 200th cycle.

  9. Molecular dynamics study of accelerated ion-induced shock waves in biological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vera, Pablo; Mason, Nigel J.; Currell, Fred J.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2016-09-01

    We present a molecular dynamics study of the effects of carbon- and iron-ion induced shock waves in DNA duplexes in liquid water. We use the CHARMM force field implemented within the MBN Explorer simulation package to optimize and equilibrate DNA duplexes in liquid water boxes of different sizes and shapes. The translational and vibrational degrees of freedom of water molecules are excited according to the energy deposited by the ions and the subsequent shock waves in liquid water are simulated. The pressure waves generated are studied and compared with an analytical hydrodynamics model which serves as a benchmark for evaluating the suitability of the simulation boxes. The energy deposition in the DNA backbone bonds is also monitored as an estimation of biological damage, something which is not possible with the analytical model. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey V. Solov'yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  10. Molecular dynamics study of accelerated ion-induced shock waves in biological media

    CERN Document Server

    de Vera, Pablo; Currell, Fred J; Solov'yov, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    We present a molecular dynamics study of the effects of carbon- and iron-ion induced shock waves in DNA duplexes in liquid water. We use the CHARMM force field implemented within the MBN Explorer simulation package to optimize and equilibrate DNA duplexes in liquid water boxes of different sizes and shapes. The translational and vibrational degrees of freedom of water molecules are excited according to the energy deposited by the ions and the subsequent shock waves in liquid water are simulated. The pressure waves generated are studied and compared with an analytical hydrodynamics model which serves as a benchmark for evaluating the suitability of the simulation boxes. The energy deposition in the DNA backbone bonds is also monitored as an estimation of biological damage, something which lies beyond the possibilities of the analytical model.

  11. Carbon Ion Irradiation Inhibits Glioma Cell Migration Through Downregulation of Integrin Expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of carbon ion irradiation on glioma cell migration. Methods and Materials: U87 and Ln229 glioma cells were irradiated with photons and carbon ions. Migration was analyzed 24 h after irradiation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was performed in order to quantify surface expression of integrins. Results: Single photon doses of 2 Gy and 10 Gy enhanced ανβ3 and ανβ5 integrin expression and caused tumor cell hypermigration on both vitronectin (Vn) and fibronectin (Fn). Compared to integrin expression in unirradiated cells, carbon ion irradiation caused decreased integrin expression and inhibited cell migration on both Vn and Fn. Conclusion: Photon radiotherapy (RT) enhances the risk of tumor cell migration and subsequently promotes locoregional spread via photon induction of integrin expression. In contrast to photon RT, carbon ion RT causes decreased integrin expression and suppresses glioma cell migration on both Vn and Fn, thus promising improved local control.

  12. Clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy for bone and soft tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First choice of treatment for bone and soft tissue tumors is surgical tumor resection, but some cases have difficulties to resect radically because of tumor size, location, or their reduction in QOL after surgery. Carbon ion radiotherapy has been reported that have both good local tumor control and high QOL for patients with bone and soft tissue tumors, especially sacral chordoma and unresectable osteosarcoma of the tract. Some articles of the results with carbon ion radiotherapy for sacral chordoma show better local control and QOL than that of surgery. Moreover, several reports show good local control and preservation of QOL for patients with unresectable osteosarcoma of the tract, retroperitoneal sarcoma, and other situations of sarcomas. Now carbon ion radiotherapy can offer a promising alternative to surgery for patients with unresectable sarcomas. We will discuss about the results of carbon ion radiotherapy for bone and soft tissue tumors in this issue. (author)

  13. Effect of carbon coating on electrochemical performance of hard carbons as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Hyuk; Lee, Heon-Young; Oh, Seh-Min; Lee, Seo-Jae; Lee, Ki-Young; Lee, Sung-Man

    Surface modification by a soft-carbon coating is used to improve the electrochemical performance of hard carbons as the negative-electrode (anode) material in lithium-ion batteries. The coating process involves simple heat-treatment of a mixture of coal-tar pitch and hard carbon powders at 1000 °C. The carbon coating significantly reduces the reaction of lithium with surface functional groups or absorbed species caused by air exposure. This is attributed to the effective suppression of the diffusion of both air and water into the hard carbon by the soft-carbon coating, and the better resistance of soft carbon to air. As a result, the charge-discharge coulombic efficiency during cycling, as well as during the first cycle, is improved.

  14. Thermal property tuning in aligned carbon nanotube films and random entangled carbon nanotube films by ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Chen, Di; Wang, Xuemei [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Bykova, Julia S.; Zakhidov, Anvar A. [The Alan G. MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Shao, Lin, E-mail: lshao@tamu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    Ion irradiation effects on thermal property changes are compared between aligned carbon nanotube (A-CNT) films and randomly entangled carbon nanotube (R-CNT) films. After H, C, and Fe ion irradiation, a focusing ion beam with sub-mm diameter is used as a heating source, and an infrared signal is recorded to extract thermal conductivity. Ion irradiation decreases thermal conductivity of A-CNT films, but increases that of R-CNT films. We explain the opposite trends by the fact that neighboring CNT bundles are loosely bonded in A-CNT films, which makes it difficult to create inter-tube linkage/bonding upon ion irradiation. In a comparison, in R-CNT films, which have dense tube networking, carbon displacements are easily trapped between touching tubes and act as inter-tube linkage to promote off-axial phonon transport. The enhancement overcomes the phonon transport loss due to phonon-defect scattering along the axial direction. A model is established to explain the dependence of thermal conductivity changes on ion irradiation parameters including ion species, energies, and current.

  15. Role of Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and its target genes in human lung adenocarcinoma cells after photon- versus carbon ion irradiation; Expression HIF-1-abhaengiger Gene in humanen Lungenadenokarzinom (A549)-Zellen und deren Regulation nach Photonen- und Schwerionenbestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill, Verena Maria

    2013-11-26

    Exposed to hypoxia tumor cells are notably resistant to photon irradiation. The hypoxiainducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α) seems to play a fundamental role in this resistance, while its role after heavy-ion beam remains unknown. The intention of this study was to determine how A549-cells (non-small-cell lung carcinoma) react in different oxygenation states after irradiation with photons or heavy ions, particularly in regards to their expression of HIF-1 target genes. Resistance of hypoxic A549 cells after photon irradiation was documented by cellular and clonogenic survival. In contrast, cellular survival after heavy-ion irradiation in hypoxic cells was not elevated to normoxic cells. Among the oxygen dependent regulation of HIF-1 target genes, gene expression analyses showed an increased expression of GLUT-1, LDH-A, PDK-1 and VEGF after photon irradiation but not after heavy-ion irradiation after 48 hours in normoxic cells. As expected, CDKN1A as inhibitor of cell cycle progression showed higher expression after both radiation forms; interestingly CDKN1A was also in an oxygen dependent manner lightly upregulated. In western blot analyses we demonstrated a significant increase of HIF-1 and GLUT-1 caused by hypoxia, but only a tendency of increased protein level in hypoxia after photon irradiation and no changes after heavy-ion irradiation. Significantly higher protein level of secreted VEGF-A could be measured 72 hours after photon irradiation in normoxic cells by ELISA analyses. Controversially discussed, I could not detect an association between HIF-1 and SCF or Trx-1 in A549-cells in this study. Whereas Trx-1-expression was neither influenced by changed oxygen partial pressure nor irradiation, I could show increased SCF mRNA by quantitative Real Time-PCR and secreted protein level by ELISA after photon irradiation independent of oxygen state. In summary, this study showed that HIF-1 and its target genes (GLUT-1, LDHA; PDK, VEGF) and also SCF was

  16. Unexpected radiation laryngeal necrosis after carbon ion therapy using conventional dose fractionation for laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demizu, Yusuke; Fujii, Osamu; Nagano, Fumiko; Terashima, Kazuki; Jin, Dongcun; Mima, Masayuki; Oda, Naoharu; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Takeda, Makiko; Ito, Kazuyuki; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Okimoto, Tomoaki

    2015-11-01

    Carbon ion therapy is a type of radiotherapy that can deliver high-dose radiation to a tumor while minimizing the dose delivered to organs at risk. Moreover, carbon ions are classified as high linear energy transfer radiation and are expected to be effective for even photon-resistant tumors. A 73-year-old man with glottic squamous cell carcinoma, T3N0M0, refused laryngectomy and received carbon ion therapy of 70 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) in 35 fractions. Three months after the therapy, the patient had an upper airway inflammation, and then laryngeal edema and pain occurred. Five months after the therapy, the airway stenosis was severe and computed tomography showed lack of the left arytenoid cartilage and exacerbation of laryngeal necrosis. Despite the treatment, 5 and a half months after the therapy, the laryngeal edema and necrosis had become even worse and the surrounding mucosa was edematous and pale. Six months after the therapy, pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy and reconstruction with free jejunal autograft were performed. The surgical specimen pathologically showed massive necrosis and no residual tumor. Three years after the carbon ion therapy, he is alive without recurrence. The first reported laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma case treated with carbon ion therapy resulted in an unexpected radiation laryngeal necrosis. Tissue damage caused by carbon ion therapy may be difficult to repair even for radioresistant cartilage; therefore, hollow organs reinforced by cartilage, such as the larynx, may be vulnerable to carbon ion therapy. Caution should be exercised when treating tumors in or adjacent to such organs with carbon ion therapy.

  17. Visualization of DNA clustered damage induced by heavy ion exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most lethal damage induced by ionizing radiations. Accelerated heavy-ions have been shown to induce DNA clustered damage, which is two or more DNA lesions induced within a few helical turns. Higher biological effectiveness of heavy-ions could be provided predominantly by induction of complex DNA clustered damage, which leads to non-repairable DSBs. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is composed of catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and DNA-binding heterodimer (Ku70 and Ku86). DNA-PK acts as a sensor of DSB during non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), since DNA-PK is activated to bind to the ends of double-stranded DNA. On the other hand, NBS1 and histone H2AX are essential for DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR) in higher vertebrate cells. Here we report that phosphorylated H2AX at Ser139 (named γ-H2AX) and NBS1 form large undissolvable foci after exposure to accelerated Fe ions, while DNA-PKcs does not recognize DNA clustered damage. NBS1 and γ-H2AX colocalized with forming discrete foci after exposure to X-rays. At 0.5 h after Fe ion irradiation, NBS1 and γ-H2AX also formed discrete foci. However, at 3-8 h after Fe ion irradiation, highly localized large foci turned up, while small discrete foci disappeared. Large NBS1 and γ-H2AX foci were remained even 16 h after irradiation. DNA-PKcs recognized Ku-binding DSB and formed foci shortly after exposure to X-rays. DNA-PKcs foci were observed 0.5 h after 5 Gy of Fe ion irradiation and were almost completely disappeared up to 8 h. These results suggest that NBS1 and γ-H2AX can be utilized as molecular marker of DNA clustered damage, while DNA-PK selectively recognizes repairable DSBs by NHEJ

  18. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosteo, S. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Anania, M.P. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Caresana, M. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); De Martinis, C. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Delle Side, D. [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Gatti, G. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Giove, D. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Giulietti, D. [Physics Department, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Gizzi, L.A.; Labate, L. [INO-CNR and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Londrillo, P. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Maggiore, M. [INFN LNL, Legnaro (Italy); Nassisi, V., E-mail: vincenzo.nassisi@le.infn.it [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Sinigardi, S. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Scuderi, V. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Turchetti, G. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); and others

    2014-07-15

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50–75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  19. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50–75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given

  20. Clinical output factors for carbon-ion beams passing through polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Ogata, Risa; Himukai, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A recent study suggested that polyethylene (PE) range compensators would cause extra carbon-ion attenuation by 0.45%/cm due to limitations in water equivalence. The present study aims to assess its influence on tumor dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy. Methods: Carbon-ion radiation was modeled to be composed of primary carbon ions and secondary particles. For these components, tumor dose fraction and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) were estimated at a reference depth in the middle of spread-out Bragg peak. The PE effect was estimated for clinical carbon-ion beams and was partially tested by experiment. The two-component model was integrated into a treatment-planning system, with which the PE effect on tumor dose was investigated in two clinical cases. Results: The fluence and clinical attenuation coefficients for dose decrease per polyethylene thickness were estimated to be 0.1%-0.3%/cm and 0.2%-0.4%/cm, depending on energy and modulation of clinical carbon-ion beams. In the treatment-planning s...

  1. Collisions of fast, highly stripped carbon, niobium, and lead ions with molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The range of experimental confirmation of our scaling rule for electron loss from a hydrogen atom in collision with a heavy, highly stripped ion has been considerably broadened by new measurements on carbon-, niobium-, and lead-ion projectiles in molecular hydrogen

  2. Beam Energy Scaling of Ion-Induced Electron Yield from K+ Ions Impact on Stainless Steel Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kireeff-Covo, Michel; Barnard, John J; Bieniosek, Frank; Celata, C M; Cohen, Ronald; Friedman, Alex; Grote, D P; Kwan, Joe W; Lund, Steven M; Molvik, Arthur; Seidl, Peter; Vay, Jean-Luc; Vujic, Jasmina L; Westenskow, Glen

    2005-01-01

    The cost of accelerators for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF) can be reduced by using the smallest possible clearance between the beam and the wall from the beamline. This increases beam loss to the walls, generating ion-induced electrons that could be trapped by beam space charge potential into an "electron cloud," which can cause degradation or loss of the ion beam. In order to understand the physical mechanism of production of ion-induced electrons we have measured impact of K+ ions with energies up to 400 KeV on stainless steel surfaces near grazing incidence, using the ion source test stand (STS-500) at LLNL. The electron yield will be discussed and compared with experimental measurements from 1 MeV K+ ions in the High-Current Experiment at LBNL.*

  3. Study of the ion beam induced amorphisation, bond breaking and optical gap change processes in PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaléo, R. M.; de Araújo, M. A.; Livi, R. P.

    1992-03-01

    Ion beam bombardment induced effects on the crystalline and chemical structures, as well as in the thermal, optical, and electrical properties of PET (Mylar) were studied. The induced modifications were followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS), X-ray diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and electrical resistance measurements. The melting temperature and the crystalline fraction started to decrease at fluences where the chemical degradation was not significant. The hydrogen and oxygen losses led preferentially to new carbon-carbon bonds within the polymer chains and gradually increased the aliphatic and aromatic conjugation. Simultaneously, a decrease in the optical gap as function of the ion fluencc is observed. For 40Ar 2+-bombarded samples the optical gap saturates around 0.7 eV lor f'luences of the order of 10 15 cm -2, At those fluences the electrical resistivity is relatively high (τ ≫ 10 6 Ω cm) , but for higher fluences it decreases by several orders of magnitude before saturation. The cross sections for the amorphisation, for the optical gap change and for the ester group bond reorganization processes were extracted.

  4. Semiconductor characterization by scanning ion beam induced charge (IBIC) microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Vittone, E; Olivero, P; Manfredotti, C; Jaksic, M; Giudice, A Lo; Fizzotti, F; Colombo, E

    2016-01-01

    The acronym IBIC (Ion Beam Induced Charge) was coined in early 1990's to indicate a scanning microscopy technique which uses MeV ion beams as probes to image the basic electronic properties of semiconductor materials and devices. Since then, IBIC has become a widespread analytical technique to characterize materials for electronics or for radiation detection, as testified by more than 200 papers published so far in peer-reviewed journals. Its success stems from the valuable information IBIC can provide on charge transport phenomena occurring in finished devices, not easily obtainable by other analytical techniques. However, IBIC analysis requires a robust theoretical background to correctly interpret experimental data. In order to illustrate the importance of using a rigorous mathematical formalism, we present in this paper a benchmark IBIC experiment aimed to test the validity of the interpretative model based on the Gunn's theorem and to provide an example of the analytical capability of IBIC to characteriz...

  5. Nanoclustering in Silicon Induced by Oxygen Ions Implanted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Manno

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We report about the nanoclustering induced by oxygen‐implantation in silicon. A tandem‐type accelerator, with a maximum acceleration voltage of 3 MV, equipped with a sputtering ion source suitable for the production of high current ion beams by sputtering of solid cathodes has been used. The surface modifications and the structure of nanoclusters are investigated. The topographic images, obtained by scanning tunnelling microscope showed that the surface is covered with a dense array of tetragonal nanostructures oriented with respect to the substrate. Raman spectroscopy data allowed us to estimate an average cluster size of about 50 nm. Resistivity and Hall effect measurements evidenced that the electron transport in the implanted silicon samples is affected by the nanoclusters array and it could be explained by thermally activated hopping between localized states.

  6. Hypofractionated carbon ion therapy delivered with scanned ion beams for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma – feasibility and clinical response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photon-based radiation therapy does currently not play a major role as local ablative treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Carbon ions offer distinct physical and biological advantages. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak, precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Furthermore, carbon ions have an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) compared to photons. A total of six patients with one or more HCC-lesions were treated with carbon ions delivered by the raster-scanning technique according to our clinical trial protocol. Diagnosis of HCC was confirmed by histology or two different imaging modalities (CT and MRI) according to the AASLD-guidelines. Applied fractionation scheme was 4 × 10 Gy(RBE). Correct dose application was controlled by in-vivo PET measurement of β + −activity in the irradiated tissue shortly after treatment. Patients were observed for a median time period of 11.0 months (range, 3.4 – 12.7 months). Imaging studies showed a partial response in 4/7 lesions and a stable disease in 3/7 lesions in follow-up CT- and MRI scans. Local control was 100%. One patient with multifocal intrahepatic disease underwent liver transplantation 3 months after carbon ion therapy. During radiotherapy and the follow-up period no severe adverse events have occurred. We report the first clinical results of patients with HCC undergoing carbon ion therapy using the rasterscanning technique at our institution. All patients are locally controlled and experienced no higher toxicities in a short follow-up period. Further patients will be included in our prospective Phase-I clinical trial PROMETHEUS-01 (NCT01167374)

  7. Modifying the electronic structure of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by Ar+ ion irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolvanen, A.; Buchs, G.; Ruffieux, P.; Gröning, P.; Gröning, O.; Krasheninnikov, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Local controllable modification of the electronic structure of carbon nanomaterials is important for the development of carbon-based nanoelectronics. By combining density-functional theory simulations with Ar-ion-irradiation experiments and low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectrosc

  8. Metal Ions Extraction with Glucose Derivatives as Chelating Reagents in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Chen YANG; Hai Jian YANG

    2006-01-01

    A series of glucose derivatives have been used as chelating reagents to extract metal ions in supercritical carbon dioxide. With perfluoro-1-octanesulfonic acid tetraethylammonium salt as additive, glucose derivatives were selective for Sr2+ and Pb2+ extraction in supercritical carbon dioxide.

  9. Assessment of biological changes in wheat seedlings induced by 12C6+-ion irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Luwei; ZHANG Hong; ZHANG Xiaofu; ZHU Jianlan

    2008-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of 12C6+ ion beam (10~80 Gy) on biological changes of wheat seedlings. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related biomarkers and the quantification of plant survival and growth were examined at 10 day after carbon ions irradiation (LET: 30.8keV/μm). The results showed that heavy ions obviously enhanced ROSs reflected by the production of O2 and H2O2 as well as TBARS, and treatment with 20 Gy achieved the peak value, suggesting that higher mutagenic potential may occur at 20 Gy. Simultaneously, increase of SOD activity was induced by heavy ions to counteract ROS accumulation. On the other hand, higher doses at 40 and 80 Gy inhibited wheat growth and survival in comparison with the control, and reversely lower doses at 10 or 20 Gy stimulated wheat growth and survival. In conclusion, the above observations imply that a dose range of 20~40 Gy is likely promised for wheat mutation breeding.

  10. Charge equilibrium of a laser-generated carbon-ion beam in warm dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ion carbon beams generated by high intensity short pulse lasers we perform measurements of single shot mean charge equilibration in cold or isochorically heated solid density aluminum matter. We demonstrate that plasma effects in such matter heated up to 1 eV do not significantly impact the equilibration of carbon ions with energies 0.045-0.5 MeV/nucleon. Furthermore, these measurements allow for a first evaluation of semiempirical formulas or ab initio models that are being used to predict the mean of the equilibrium charge state distribution for light ions passing through warm dense matter. (authors)

  11. A new prompt heavy-ion-induced fission mode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W Udo Schröder

    2015-08-01

    Fission instabilities induced by mechanical and thermal stresses on intermediate nuclear systems in heavy-ion reactions are poorly understood but should reveal independent evidence for the nuclear equation of state (EoS), notably the tensile strength of finite nuclei. Experimental evidence is presented in support of a new mode of prompt fission of the composite nucleus formed in central 78Kr+40Ca collisions at only a few MeV per nucleon above the interaction barrier. The new process recalls the ‘L-window for fusion’ phenomenon, which was predicted by the early reaction theory and reappears in modern DFT model calculations.

  12. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, T; Shinohara, M; Takagi, T

    2002-01-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (approx 10 mu s pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N sub 2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N sub 2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron mic...

  13. Computational Evaluation of Amorphous Carbon Coating for Durable Silicon Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Jeongwoon Hwang; Jisoon Ihm; Kwang-Ryeol Lee; Seungchul Kim

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of graphite-like amorphous carbon coating on bulky silicon to examine whether it can improve the durability of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries using molecular dynamics simulations and ab-initio electronic structure calculations. Structural models of carbon coating are constructed using molecular dynamics simulations of atomic carbon deposition with low incident energies (1–16 eV). As the incident energy decrease...

  14. Irradiation-induced structure and property changes in tokamak plasma-facing, carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma-facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce large neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600 degree C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included uni-directional, two-directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Dimensional changes are reported for the composite materials and are related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, the irradiation-induced dimensional changes are reported and discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. The effect of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of two three-directional, carbon-carbon composites is reported and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is discussed

  15. Tilting of carbon encapsulated metallic nanocolumns in carbon-nickel nanocomposite films by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Matthias [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Muecklich, Arndt; Zschornak, Matthias; Wintz, Sebastian; Gemming, Sibylle; Abrasonis, Gintautas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Oates, Thomas W. H. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaft, ISAS e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Luis Endrino, Jose [Surfaces and Coatings Department, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, c/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Baehtz, Carsten; Shalimov, Artem [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Rossendorf Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2012-07-30

    The influence of assisting low-energy ({approx}50-100 eV) ion irradiation effects on the morphology of C:Ni ({approx}15 at. %) nanocomposite films during ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is investigated. It is shown that IBAD promotes the columnar growth of carbon encapsulated metallic nanoparticles. The momentum transfer from assisting ions results in tilting of the columns in relation to the growing film surface. Complex secondary structures are obtained, in which a significant part of the columns grows under local epitaxy via the junction of sequentially deposited thin film fractions. The influence of such anisotropic film morphology on the optical properties is highlighted.

  16. Ozone-Induced Dissociation of Conjugated Lipids Reveals Significant Reaction Rate Enhancements and Characteristic Odd-Electron Product Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Huong T.; Maccarone, Alan T.; Campbell, J. Larry; Mitchell, Todd W.; Blanksby, Stephen J.

    2013-02-01

    Ozone-induced dissociation (OzID) is an alternative ion activation method that relies on the gas phase ion-molecule reaction between a mass-selected target ion and ozone in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Herein, we evaluated the performance of OzID for both the structural elucidation and selective detection of conjugated carbon-carbon double bond motifs within lipids. The relative reactivity trends for [M + X]+ ions (where X = Li, Na, K) formed via electrospray ionization (ESI) of conjugated versus nonconjugated fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) were examined using two different OzID-enabled linear ion-trap mass spectrometers. Compared with nonconjugated analogues, FAMEs derived from conjugated linoleic acids were found to react up to 200 times faster and to yield characteristic radical cations. The significantly enhanced reactivity of conjugated isomers means that OzID product ions can be observed without invoking a reaction delay in the experimental sequence (i.e., trapping of ions in the presence of ozone is not required). This possibility has been exploited to undertake neutral-loss scans on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer targeting characteristic OzID transitions. Such analyses reveal the presence of conjugated double bonds in lipids extracted from selected foodstuffs. Finally, by benchmarking of the absolute ozone concentration inside the ion trap, second order rate constants for the gas phase reactions between unsaturated organic ions and ozone were obtained. These results demonstrate a significant influence of the adducting metal on reaction rate constants in the fashion Li > Na > K.

  17. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) study of ion dynamics in nanoporous carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wan-Yu; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice

    2014-06-18

    Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements were used to characterize ion adsorption in carbide-derived carbon (CDC) with two different average pore sizes (1 and 0.65 nm), from neat and solvated 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI) electrolytes. From the electrode mass change in neat EMI-TFSI, it was shown that one net charge stored corresponds almost to one single ion at high polarization; in that case, no ion-pairing or charge screening by co-ions were observed. In 2 M EMI-TFSI in acetonitrile electrolyte, experimental solvation numbers were estimated for EMI(+) cation, showing a partial desolvation when cations were adsorbed in confined carbon pores. The extent of desolvation increased when decreasing the carbon pore size (from 1 down to 0.65 nm). The results also suggest that EMI(+) cation owns higher mobility than TFSI(-) anion in these electrolytes.

  18. Effect of p53 on lung carcinoma cells irradiated by carbon ions or X-rays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi; ZHANG Hong; HAO Jifang; ZHAO Weiping; WU Zhenhua; QIU Rong; WANG Xiaohu

    2009-01-01

    The study is to investigate the feasibility and advantages of heavy ion beams on radiotherapy. The cellular cycle and apoptosis, cell reproductive death and p53 expression evaluated with flow cytometry, clonogenic survival assays and Western blot analysis were examined in lung carcinoma cells after exposure to 89.63 MeV/u carbon ion and 6 MV X-ray irradiations, respectively. The results showed that the number colonyforming assay of A549 was higher than that of H1299 cells in two radiation groups; A549 cellular cycle was arrested in G2/M in 12 h and the per-centage of apoptosis ascended at each time point of carbon ion radiation with doses, the expression of p53 upregulated with doses exposed to X-ray or carbon ion. The cell number in G2/M of H1299 and apoptosis were increasing at all time points with doses in 12C6+ ion irradiation group. The results suggested that the effects of carbon ions or X rays ir-radiation on lung carcinoma cells were different, 12C6+ ion irradiation could have more effect on upregulating the ex-pression of p53 than X-ray, and the upregulated expression of p53 might produce the cellular cycle G2/M arrested, apoptosis increasing; and p53 gene might affect the lung cancer cells radiosensitivity.

  19. In vitro evaluation of photon and carbon ion radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy in glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combs Stephanie E

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the cytotoxic effect of carbon ion radiotherapy and chemotherapy in glioblastoma cells in vitro. Methods and Materials The human glioblastoma (GBM cell line U87 was irradiated with photon radiotherapy (RT doses of 2 Gy, 4 Gy and 6 Gy. Likewise, irradiation with carbon ions was performed with single carbon doses of 0.125, 0.5, 2 and 3 Gy. Four chemotherapeutic substances, camptothecin, gemcitabine, paclitaxel and cisplatinum, were used for single and combination experiments. The assessment of the effect of single and double treatment on cell viability was performed using the clonogenic growth assay representing the radiobiological gold standard. Results The RBE of carbon ions ranges between 3.3 and 3.9 depending on survival level and dose. All chemotherapeutic substances showed a clear does-response relationhips. in their characteristic concentrations. For subsequent combination experiments, two dose levels leading to low and medium reduction of cell survival were chosen. Combination experiments showed additive effects independently of the drugs' mechanisms of action. Paclitaxel and campthothecin demonstrated the most prominent cytotoxic effect in combination with carbon ion radiotherapy. Conclusion In conclusion, combination of carbon ion radiotherapy with chemotherapies of different mechanisms of action demonstrates additive effects. The most dominant effect was produced by paclitaxel, followed by camptothecin, as espected from previously published work. The present data serve as an important radiobiological basis for further combination experiments, as well as clinical studies on combination treatments.

  20. Highly ordered three-dimensional macroporous carbon spheres for determination of heavy metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres (MPCSs) were prepared. ► MPCS was covalently modified by cysteine (MPCS–CO–Cys). ► MPCS–CO–Cys was first time used in electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. ► Heavy metal ions such as Pb2+ and Cd2+ can be simultaneously determined. -- Abstract: An effective voltammetric method for detection of trace heavy metal ions using chemically modified highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres electrode surfaces is described. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were prepared by carbonization of glucose in silica crystal bead template, followed by removal of the template. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were covalently modified by cysteine, an amino acid with high affinities towards some heavy metals. The materials were characterized by physical adsorption of nitrogen, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. While the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of carbon spheres. High sensitivity was exhibited when this material was used in electrochemical detection (square wave anodic stripping voltammetry) of heavy metal ions due to the porous structure. And the potential application for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions was also investigated.

  1. Ion beam induced luminescence analysis of painting pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been exploited for the first time in the analysis of inorganic painting pigments. The elemental constituents of the different compounds have been determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The acquisition time of each spectrum ranges from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the luminescence intensity. The luminescence features are fingerprints of the different compounds, thus identifying the provenience of pigments of the same nominal composition. Organic varnish layers do not affect the IBIL features, allowing the identification of pigments, like lapis-lazuli, whose identification with PIXE is hindered by the varnish. IBIL proved to be a technique complementary to PIXE in the archeometry and cultural heritage analysis fields

  2. Ion beam induced luminescence analysis of painting pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, A.; Salomon, J.; Dran, J. C.; Tonezzer, M.; Della Mea, G.

    2007-01-01

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been exploited for the first time in the analysis of inorganic painting pigments. The elemental constituents of the different compounds have been determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The acquisition time of each spectrum ranges from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the luminescence intensity. The luminescence features are fingerprints of the different compounds, thus identifying the provenience of pigments of the same nominal composition. Organic varnish layers do not affect the IBIL features, allowing the identification of pigments, like lapis-lazuli, whose identification with PIXE is hindered by the varnish. IBIL proved to be a technique complementary to PIXE in the archeometry and cultural heritage analysis fields.

  3. The Anion Effect on Li+ Ion Coordination Structure in Ethylene Carbonate Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Bo; Shen, Yuneng; Yang, Xueming; Yuan, Kaijun; Vetere, Valentina; Mossa, Stefano; Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Zhang, Yufan; Zheng, Junrong

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries are an attractive alternative power source for a wide variety of applications. To optimize their performances, a complete description of the solvation properties of the ion in the electrolyte is crucial. A comprehensive understanding at the nanoscale of the solvation structure of lithium ions in nonaqueous carbonate electrolytes is, however, still unclear. We have measured by femtosecond vibrational spectroscopy the orientational correlation time of the CO stretching mode of Li+-bound and Li+-unbound ethylene carbonate molecules, in LiBF4, LiPF6, and LiClO4 ethylene carbonate solutions with different concentrations. Surprisingly, we have found that the coordination number of ethylene carbonate in the first solvation shell of Li+ is only two, in all solutions with concentrations higher than 0.5 M. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the presence of anions in the first coordination shell modifies the generally accepted tetrahedral structure of the complex, all...

  4. Exposure to carbon ions triggers pro-inflammatory signals, changes in homeostasis and epidermal tissue organization to a similar extent as photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palma eSimoniello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing application of charged particles in radiotherapy requires a deeper understanding of early and late side effects occurring in skin, which is exposed in all radiation treatments. We measured cellular and molecular changes related to the early inflammatory response of human skin irradiated with carbon ions, in particular cell death induction and changes in differentiation and proliferation of epidermal cells during the first days after exposure.Model systems for human skin from healthy donors of different complexity, i.e. keratinocytes, co-culture of skin cells, 3D skin equivalent and skin explants, were used to investigate the alterations induced by carbon ions (spread-out Bragg-peak, dose averaged LET 100 keV/µm in comparison to X-ray and UV-B exposure. After exposure to ionizing radiation, in none of the model systems apoptosis/necrosis was observed. Carbon ions triggered inflammatory signalling and accelerated differentiation of keratinocytes to a similar extent as X-rays at the same doses. High doses of carbon ions were more effective than X-rays in reducing proliferation and inducing abnormal differentiation. In contrast, changes identified following low dose exposure (≤ 0.5 Gy were induced more effectively after X-ray exposure, i.e. enhanced proliferation and change in the polarity of basal cells.

  5. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Jasper; Duplissy, Jonathan; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K.; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E.; Seinfeld, John H.; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L.; Wagner, Andrea C.; Wagner, Paul E.; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere, and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster binding energies of representative HOMs. Ion-induced nucleation of pure organic particles constitutes a potentially widespread source of aerosol particles in terrestrial environments with low sulfuric acid pollution.

  6. Monte Carlo modeling of ion beam induced secondary electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, U; Cho, W; Joy, D C

    2016-09-01

    Ion induced secondary electrons (iSE) can produce high-resolution images ranging from a few eV to 100keV over a wide range of materials. The interpretation of such images requires knowledge of the secondary electron yields (iSE δ) for each of the elements and materials present and as a function of the incident beam energy. Experimental data for helium ions are currently limited to 40 elements and six compounds while other ions are not well represented. To overcome this limitation, we propose a simple procedure based on the comprehensive work of Berger et al. Here we show that between the energy range of 10-100keV the Berger et al. data for elements and compounds can be accurately represented by a single universal curve. The agreement between the limited experimental data that is available and the predictive model is good, and has been found to provide reliable yield data for a wide range of elements and compounds. PMID:27337603

  7. Successive ionization of positive ions of carbon and nitrogen by electron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of deep ionization of heavy ions are described. The applications of such studies in atomic physics, plasma physics and space physics are discussed. Investigations using intersecting ion-electron beams, shifted beams and ion trap sources are described, and data are presented for multi-charged ions of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen. A detailed description of the development of the IEL (electron beam ionizer) source, and the KRION (cryogenic version) source is given, and further data for the multiple ionization of carbon and nitrogen are given for charge states up to C6+ and N7+. The advantages and disadvantages of the KRION source are discussed, and preliminary studies of a new torroidal ion trap source (HIRAC) are presented. (11 figs, 57 refs) (U.S.)

  8. Confinement, Desolvation, And Electrosorption Effects on the Diffusion of Ions in Nanoporous Carbon Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pean, Clarisse; Daffos, Barbara; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Levitz, Pierre; Haefele, Matthieu; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Salanne, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    Supercapacitors are electrochemical devices which store energy by ion adsorption on the surface of a porous carbon. They are characterized by high power delivery. The use of nanoporous carbon to increase their energy density should not hinder their fast charging. However, the mechanisms for ion transport inside electrified nanopores remain largely unknown. Here we show that the diffusion is characterized by a hierarchy of time scales arising from ion confinement, solvation, and electrosorption effects. By combining electrochemistry experiments with molecular dynamics simulations, we determine the in-pore conductivities and diffusion coefficients and their variations with the applied potential. We show that the diffusion of the ions is slower by 1 order of magnitude compared to the bulk electrolyte. The desolvation of the ions occurs on much faster time scales than electrosorption.

  9. Field-effect ion-transport devices with carbon nanotube channels: schematics and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Yul; Kang, Jeong Won; Byun, Ki Ryang; Kang, Eu Seok; Hwang, Ho Jung [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ha; Lee, Hoong Joo [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Keun [Semyung University, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Min [Chung-Cheong University, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-08-15

    We investigated field-effect ion-transport devices based on carbon nanotubes by using classical molecular dynamics simulations under applied external force fields, and we present model schematics that can be applied to the nanoscale data storage devices and unipolar ionic field-effect transistors. As the applied external force field is increased, potassium ions rapidly flow through the nanochannel. Under low external force fields, thermal fluctuations of the nanochannels affect tunneling of the potassium ions whereas the effects of thermal fluctuations are negligible under high external force fields. Since the electric current conductivity increases when potassium ions are inserted into fullerenes or carbon nanotubes, the field effect due to the gate, which can modify the position of the potassium ions, changes the tunneling current between the drain and the source.

  10. Confinement, Desolvation, And Electrosorption Effects on the Diffusion of Ions in Nanoporous Carbon Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pean, Clarisse; Daffos, Barbara; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Levitz, Pierre; Haefele, Matthieu; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Salanne, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    Supercapacitors are electrochemical devices which store energy by ion adsorption on the surface of a porous carbon. They are characterized by high power delivery. The use of nanoporous carbon to increase their energy density should not hinder their fast charging. However, the mechanisms for ion transport inside electrified nanopores remain largely unknown. Here we show that the diffusion is characterized by a hierarchy of time scales arising from ion confinement, solvation, and electrosorption effects. By combining electrochemistry experiments with molecular dynamics simulations, we determine the in-pore conductivities and diffusion coefficients and their variations with the applied potential. We show that the diffusion of the ions is slower by 1 order of magnitude compared to the bulk electrolyte. The desolvation of the ions occurs on much faster time scales than electrosorption. PMID:26369420

  11. Copper ions removal from water using functionalized carbon nanotubes–mullite composite as adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tofighy, Maryam Ahmadzadeh; Mohammadi, Toraj, E-mail: torajmohammadi@iust.ac.ir

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • CNTs–mullite composite was prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. • The prepared composite was modified with concentrated nitric acid and chitosan. • The modified CNTs–mullite composites were used as novel adsorbents. • Copper ion removal from water by the prepared adsorbents was performed. • Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and two kinetic models were applied to fit the experimental data. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes–mullite composite was synthesized by direct growth of carbon nanotubes on mullite particles via chemical vapor deposition method using cyclohexanol and ferrocene as carbon precursor and catalyst, respectively. The carbon nanotubes–mullite composite was oxidized with concentrated nitric acid and functionalized with chitosan and then used as a novel adsorbent for copper ions removal from water. The results demonstrated that modification with concentrated nitric acid and chitosan improves copper ions adsorption capacity of the prepared composite, significantly. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and two kinetic models were applied to fit the experimental data. The carbon nanotubes growth on mullite particles to form the carbon nanotubes–mullite composite with further modification is an inherently safe approach for many promising environmental applications to avoid some concerns regarding environment, health and safety. It was found that the modified carbon nanotubes–mullite composite can be considered as an excellent adsorbent for copper ions removal from water.

  12. Nonelastic nuclear reactions induced by light ions with the BRIEFF code

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, H

    2010-01-01

    The intranuclear cascade (INC) code BRIC has been extended to compute nonelastic reactions induced by light ions on target nuclei. In our approach the nucleons of the incident light ion move freely inside the mean potential of the ion in its center-of-mass frame while the center-of-mass of the ion obeys to equations of motion dependant on the mean nuclear+Coulomb potential of the target nucleus. After transformation of the positions and momenta of the nucleons of the ion into the target nucleus frame, the collision term between the nucleons of the target and of the ion is computed taking into account the partial or total breakup of the ion. For reactions induced by low binding energy systems like deuteron, the Coulomb breakup of the ion at the surface of the target nucleus is an important feature. Preliminary results of nucleon production in light ion induced reactions are presented and discussed.

  13. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development

  14. Influence of Zn ion implantation on structures and field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The structures and field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays implanted with Zn+ by MEVVA ion implanter have been investigated.The results revealed that Zn+implantation induced structural damage and that the top of carbon nanotubes with multi-layered graphite structure were transformed into carbon nanowires with amorphous structure.Meanwhile,C:Zn solid solution was synthesized after Zn+ implantation.The turn-on field and threshold field were 0.80 and 1.31 V/μm,respectively for original multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays and were reduced to 0.66 and 1.04 V/μm due to the synthesis of C and Zn composite,in which the work function was reduced after low doses of Zn+implantation.It is indicated that low doses of Zn+implantation can improve field emission performance of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays.Otherwise,high doses of Zn+implantation can reduce field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays,because radiation damage reduces the electric field enhancement factor.

  15. Spray-pyrolyzed silicon/disordered carbon nanocomposites for lithium-ion battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, S. H.; Wang, J.; Konstantinov, K.; Wexler, D.; Chew, S. Y.; Guo, Z. P.; Liu, H. K.

    A new and effective approach to prepare carbon-coated Si nanocomposites as high capacity anode materials for lithium-ion batteries with markedly improved electrochemical performance is described. Initially, nanosized Si particles (citric acid in ethanol solution via ultrasonication. Spray pyrolysis of these mixtures at 400 °C in air resulted in an amorphous carbon coating on the spherical Si nanoparticles. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis confirms a homogeneous layer of amorphous carbon coating of ∼10 nm. These resultant nanocomposites show excellent cycling performance, especially when the disordered carbon (DC) content is above 50 wt.%. The 44Si/56DC nanocomposite shows the highest specific capacity retention of 1120 mAh g -1 after 100 cycles. The carbon-coating on the nanocrystalline Si particles appears to be the main reason for the good cyclability, suggesting the excellent potential of these Si/DC-based nanocomposites for use as alternative anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

  16. Ion-radical intermediates of the radiation-chemical transformations of organic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiryaeva, Ekaterina S.; Sosulin, Ilya S.; Saenko, Elizaveta V.; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2016-07-01

    The spectral features and reactions of ion-radical intermediates produced from organic carbonates in low-temperature matrices were investigated by EPR spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations. It was shown that radical cations of diethyl carbonate and dimethyl carbonate underwent intramolecular hydrogen transfer to yield alkyl-type species, as was suggested previously. Meanwhile, radical cation of EC demonstrates a ring cleavage even at 77 K, while radical cation of PC is probably intrinsically stable and undergo an ion-molecule reaction with a neighboring neutral molecule in dimers or associates. Radical anions were obtained in glassy matrices of diethyl ether or perdeuteroethanol. The radical anions of linear carbonates show photoinduced fragmentation to yield the corresponding alkyl radicals; such process may also occur directly under radiolysis. Radical anions of cyclic carbonates are relatively stable and yield only trace amounts of fragmentation products under similar conditions.

  17. Modified granular activated carbon: A carrier for the recovery of nickel ions from aqueous wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satapathy, D.; Natarajan, G.S.; Sen, R. [Central Fuel Research Inst., Nagpur (India)

    2004-07-01

    Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) is widely used for the removal and recovery of toxic pollutants including metals because of its low cost and high affinity towards the scavenging of metal ions. Activated carbon derived from bituminous coal is preferred for wastewater treatment due to its considerable hardness, a characteristic needed to keep down handling losses during re-activation. Commercial grade bituminous coal based carbon, viz. Filtrasorb (F-400), was used in the present work. The scavenging of precious metals such as nickel onto GAC was studied and a possible attempt made to recover the adsorbed Ni{sup 2+} ions through the use of some suitable leaching processes. As part of the study, the role of complexing agents on the surface of the carbon was also investigated. The use of organic complexing agents such as oxine and 2-methyloxine in the recovery process was found to be promising. In addition, the surface of the carbon was modified with suitable oxidising agents that proved to be more effective than chelating agents. Several attempts were made to optimise the recovery of metal ions by carrying out experiments with oxidising agents in order to obtain maximum recovery from the minimum quantity of carbon. Experiments with nitric acid indicated that not only was the carbon surface modified but such modification also helped in carbon regeneration.

  18. Mechanisms of ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sangwijit, K. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Phanchaisri, B. [Institute of Science and Technology Research, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thopan, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Singkarat, S. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Ion bombardment could induce DNA transfer into E. coli cells. • The DNA transfer induction depended on ion energy and fluence. • The mechanism was associated with the bacterial cell envelope structure. • A mechanism phase diagram was proposed to summarize the mechanism. - Abstract: As a useful ion beam biotechnology, ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells has been successfully operated using argon ions. In the process ion bombardment of the bacterial cells modifies the cell envelope materials to favor the exogenous DNA molecules to pass through the envelope to enter the cell. The occurrence of the DNA transfer induction was found ion energy and fluence dependent in a complex manner. At ion energy of a few keV and a few tens of keV to moderate fluences the DNA transfer could be induced by ion bombardment of the bacterial cells, while at the same ion energy but to high fluences DNA transfer could not be induced. On the other hand, when the ion energy was medium, about 10–20 keV, the DNA transfer could not be induced by ion bombardment of the cells. The complexity of the experimental results indicated a complex mechanism which should be related to the complex structure of the bacterial E. coli cell envelope. A phase diagram was proposed to interpret different mechanisms involved as functions of the ion energy and fluence.

  19. Li-ion capacitors with carbon cathode and hard carbon/stabilized lithium metal powder anode electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, W. J.; Zheng, J. P.

    2012-09-01

    A lithium-ion capacitor was developed using a mixture of stabilized lithium metal powder and hard carbon as the anode electrode, while activated carbon was used as the cathode. A specific energy of approximately 82 Wh kg-1 was obtained based on the weight of electrode materials; however, when the electrolyte, separator, and current collectors were included, the specific energy of an assembled Li-ion capacitor was about 25 Wh kg-1. The capacitor was able to deliver over 60% of the maximum energy at a discharge C-rate of 44C. Through continuous galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling, the capacitance of the Li-ion capacitor degraded less than 3% over 600 cycles.

  20. Oxygen loss induced by swift heavy ions of low and high dE/dx in PMMA thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, R.; Gutierres, L. I.; Morais, J.; Louette, P.; Severin, D.; Trautmann, C.; Pireaux, J. J.; Papaléo, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Investigations on the chemical modifications induced by swift heavy ions in PMMA thin films were carried out using beams of high dE/dx (2.2 GeV Bi, 14,090 eV/nm) and low dE/dx (2 MeV H, 19 eV/nm). The induced chemical modifications were monitored by XPS for films with initial thickness of 50 and 100 nm. For both beams, the irradiation decreased the amount of carbon atoms bound to oxygen (Cdbnd O and Csbnd Osbnd C), with a larger decrease of the carboxyl moiety, as expected. However, the chemical changes induced by light and heavy ions were qualitatively different. For the same mean deposited energy density, proton irradiation induced a decrease of the relative intensity of the carbon-oxygen bonds up to ∼20% larger than the irradiation with Bi ions. This suggests a greater importance of particle ejection by unzipping of PMMA chains at high dE/dx, which tends to keep the O/C ratio closer to the pristine value.

  1. Exact Dirac equation calculation of ionization induced by ultrarelativistic heavy ions

    OpenAIRE

    Baltz, Anthony J.

    1999-01-01

    The time-dependent Dirac equation can be solved exactly for ionization induced by ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. Ionization calculations are carried out in such a framework for a number of representative ion-ion pairs. For each ion-ion pair, the computed cross section consists of two terms, a constant energy independent term and a term whose coefficient is ln(gamma). Scaled values of both terms are found to decrease with increasing Z of the nucleus that is ionized.

  2. Advanced carbon materials/olivine LiFePO4 composites cathode for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chunli; Xue, Zhigang; Wen, Sheng; Ye, Yunsheng; Xie, Xiaolin

    2016-06-01

    In the past two decades, LiFePO4 has undoubtly become a competitive candidate for the cathode material of the next-generation LIBs due to its abundant resources, low toxicity and excellent thermal stability, etc. However, the poor electronic conductivity as well as low lithium ion diffusion rate are the two major drawbacks for the commercial applications of LiFePO4 especially in the power energy field. The introduction of highly graphitized advanced carbon materials, which also possess high electronic conductivity, superior specific surface area and excellent structural stability, into LiFePO4 offers a better way to resolve the issue of limited rate performance caused by the two obstacles when compared with traditional carbon materials. In this review, we focus on advanced carbon materials such as one-dimensional (1D) carbon (carbon nanotubes and carbon fibers), two-dimensional (2D) carbon (graphene, graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide) and three-dimensional (3D) carbon (carbon nanotubes array and 3D graphene skeleton), modified LiFePO4 for high power lithium ion batteries. The preparation strategies, structure, and electrochemical performance of advanced carbon/LiFePO4 composite are summarized and discussed in detail. The problems encountered in its application and the future development of this composite are also discussed.

  3. Influence of bicarbonate and carbonate ions on sonochemical degradation of Rhodamine B in aqueous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Saoudi, Fethi; Chiha, Mahdi; Pétrier, Christian

    2010-03-15

    The influence of bicarbonate and carbonate ions on sonolytic degradation of cationic dye, Rhodamine B (RhB), in water was investigated. As a consequence of ultrasonic cavitation that generates .OH radicals, carbonate radicals were secondary products of water sonochemistry when it contains dissolved bicarbonate or carbonate ions. The results clearly demonstrated the significant intensification of sonolytic destruction of RhB in the presence of bicarbonate and carbonate, especially at lower dye concentrations. Degradation intensification occurs because carbonate radicals sonochemically formed undergo radical-radical recombination at a lesser extent than hydroxyl radicals. The generated carbonate radicals are likely able to migrate far from the cavitation bubbles towards the solution bulk and are suitable for degradation of an organic dye such as RhB. Therefore, at low dye concentrations, carbonate radical presents a more selective reactivity towards RhB molecules than hydroxyl radical. In the presence of bicarbonate, degradation rate reached a maximum at 3 g L(-1) bicarbonate, but subsequent addition retards the destruction process. In RhB solutions containing carbonate, the oxidation rate gradually increased with increasing carbonate concentration up to 10 g L(-1) and slightly decreased afterward. Carbonate radicals sonochemically generated are suitable for total removal of COD of sonicated RhB solutions. PMID:19910116

  4. Killing effect of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accelerated carbon ions and RBE determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Survival curves of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accclerated carbon ions with linear energy transfers of 125.5, 200 and 700 keV/μm were measured, respectively. Inactivation cross sections corresponding to the irradiation above were deduced from the V79 cell survival curves. They are 7.86±0.17, 10.44±1.11 and 32.32±3.58 μm2 in turn. With the surviving response of V79 cells to 60Co γ-rays as a reference value, relative biological effectiveness at 10%, 20%, 50% and 80% survival levels were given for the accelerated carbon ions. The results showed that carbon ions with LET of 125.5 keV/μm had a higher value of RBE at all the four survival levels than the carbon ions with other LETs. It was prompted that the maximum value of RBE for the V79 cell surviving as the biological endpoint emerged at the LET below 200 keV/μm for carbon ions.

  5. The Experimental Measurement of the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Carbon Ions with Different Qualities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jufang; LI Wenjian

    2008-01-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon ions with linear energy transfer (LET) of 172 keV/μm and 13.7 keV/μm were determined in this study. The clonogenic survival and premature terminal differentiation were measured on normal human fibroblasts AG01522C and NHDF after exposure of the cells to 250 kV X-rays and carbon ions with different qualities. RBE was determined for these two biological end points. The results showed that the measured RBE10 with a survival fraction of 10% was 3.2 for LET 172 keV/μm, and 1.33 for LET 13.7 keV/μm carbon ions. RBE for a doubling of post-mitotic fibroblasts (PMF) in the population was 2.8 for LET 172 keV/μm, and 1 for LET 13.7 keV/μm carbon ions. For the carbon ion therapy, a high RBE value on the Bragg peak results in a high biological dose on the tumour. The tumour cells can be killed effectively. At the same time, the dose on healthy tissue would be reduced accordingly. This will lighten the late effect such as fibrosis on normal tissue.

  6. Killing effect of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accelerated carbon ions and RBE determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIQiang; ZHOUGuang-Ming; 等

    2002-01-01

    Survival curves of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accelerated carbon ions with linear energy transfers of 125.5,200 and 700keV/um were measured,respectively,Inactivation cross sections corresponding to the irradiation above were deduced from the V79 cell survival curves.They are 7.86±0.17,10.44±1.11 and 32.32±3.59um2 in turn.With the surviving response of V79 cells to 60Co γ-rays as a reference value,relative biological effectiveness at 10%,20%,50%and 80% survival levels were given for the accelerated carbon ions,The results showed that carbon ions with LET of 125.5keV/um had a higher value of RBE at all the four survival levels than the carbon ions with other LETs.It was prompted that the maximum value of RBE for the V79 cell surviving as the biological endpoint emerged at the LET below 200keV/um for carbon ions.

  7. Experience With Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for WHO Grade 2 Diffuse Astrocytomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Azusa [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy Hospital, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Mizoe, Jun-Etsu, E-mail: junetsumizoe@gmail.com [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy Hospital, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Jingu, Keiichi [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy Hospital, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Iwadate, Yasuo [Department of Neurological Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan); Nakazato, Youichi [Department of Human Pathology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Matsutani, Masao [Department of Neurological Surgery, Saitama Medical University, Saitama (Japan); Takakura, Kintomo [Department of Neurological Surgery, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To assess outcomes of carbon ion radiotherapy for diffuse astrocytomas in adults. Methods and Materials: Between October 1994 and February 2002, 14 patients with diffuse astrocytoma, identified as eligible for carbon ion radiotherapy, were enrolled in a phase I/II clinical trial. Carbon ion radiotherapy was administered in 24 fractions over 6 weeks. The normal tissue morbidity was monitored carefully, and the carbon ion dose was escalated from 50.4 Gy equivalent (GyE) to 55.2 GyE. Patients were divided into two groups according to their carbon ion doses: a low-dose group in which 2 patients were irradiated with 46.2 GyE and 7 patients were irradiated with 50.4 GyE, and a high-dose group in which 5 patients were irradiated with 55.2 GyE. Results: Toxicities were within acceptable limits, and none of the patients developed Grade 3 or higher acute or late reactions. The median progression-free survival (PFS) time was 18 months for the low-dose group and 91 months for the high-dose group (p = 0.0030). The median overall survival (OS) time was 28 months for the low-dose group and not reached for the high-dose group (p = 0.0208). Conclusion: High-dose group patients showed significant improvement in PFS and OS rates compared to those in the low-dose group, and both dose groups showed acceptable toxicity.

  8. Experience With Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for WHO Grade 2 Diffuse Astrocytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess outcomes of carbon ion radiotherapy for diffuse astrocytomas in adults. Methods and Materials: Between October 1994 and February 2002, 14 patients with diffuse astrocytoma, identified as eligible for carbon ion radiotherapy, were enrolled in a phase I/II clinical trial. Carbon ion radiotherapy was administered in 24 fractions over 6 weeks. The normal tissue morbidity was monitored carefully, and the carbon ion dose was escalated from 50.4 Gy equivalent (GyE) to 55.2 GyE. Patients were divided into two groups according to their carbon ion doses: a low-dose group in which 2 patients were irradiated with 46.2 GyE and 7 patients were irradiated with 50.4 GyE, and a high-dose group in which 5 patients were irradiated with 55.2 GyE. Results: Toxicities were within acceptable limits, and none of the patients developed Grade 3 or higher acute or late reactions. The median progression-free survival (PFS) time was 18 months for the low-dose group and 91 months for the high-dose group (p = 0.0030). The median overall survival (OS) time was 28 months for the low-dose group and not reached for the high-dose group (p = 0.0208). Conclusion: High-dose group patients showed significant improvement in PFS and OS rates compared to those in the low-dose group, and both dose groups showed acceptable toxicity.

  9. Detection of DNA damage induced by heavy ion irradiation in the individual cells with comet assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, S.; Natsuhori, M.; Ito, N.; Funayama, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2003-05-01

    Investigating the biological effects of high-LET heavy ion irradiation at low fluence is important to evaluate the risk of charged particles. Especially it is important to detect radiation damage induced by the precise number of heavy ions in the individual cells. Thus we studied the relationship between the number of ions traversing the cell and DNA damage produced by the ion irradiation. We applied comet assay to measure the DNA damage in the individual cells. Cells attached on the ion track detector CR-39 were irradiated with ion beams at TIARA, JAERI-Takasaki. After irradiation, the cells were stained with ethidium bromide and the opposite side of the CR-39 was etched. We observed that the heavy ions with higher LET values induced the heavier DNA damage. The result indicated that the amount of DNA damage induced by one particle increased with the LET values of the heavy ions.

  10. Heavy Ion Beams Induce Survivin Expression in Human Hepatoma SMMC-7721 Cells More Effectively than X-rays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li GONG; Xiaodong JIN; Qiang LI; Jiangtao LIU; Lizhe AN

    2007-01-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ion radiation is more effective in inducing biological damage than low-LET X-rays or γ-rays. Heavy ion beam provides good dose localization (Bragg peak) in critical cancer tissue and gives higher relative biological effectiveness in cell killing across the dose peak, so high-LET heavy ion beam is superior to low-LET radiation in cancer treatment. Survivin, as a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, might help cancerous cells to overcome the G2/M apoptotic checkpoint and favor the aberrant progression of transformed cells through mitosis. Survivin expression in the human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cell line after exposure to low-LET X-ray and high-LET carbon ion irradiation was investigated in this study. Compared with X-ray irradiation, the carbon ion beam clearly caused G2/M arrest and promoted the expression of the survivin gene in a dose-dependent manner. Clonogenic survival assay showed that SMMC-7721 cells were more radiosensitive to the high-LET carbon ions than to the X-rays, and the radiosensitivity was promoted after treatment with specific survivin short interfering RNA. Differential survivin expression at both transcriptional and translational levels was found for SMMC-7721 cells following low- and high-LET irradiation. The overexpression of survivin in SMMC-7721 cells is probably an important reason why the cancerous cells have radioresistance to strong stimulus such as dense ionizing high-LET radiation. However, the direct killing effect on cancerous cells by high-LET radiation might be more significant than the apoptosis inhibition through the overexpression of survivin following heavy ion irradiation.

  11. Removal of Lead (II Ions from Aqueous Solutions onto Activated Carbon Derived from Waste Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Erdem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of lead (II ions from aqueous solutions was carried out using an activated carbon prepared from a waste biomass. The effects of various parameters such as pH, contact time, initial concentration of lead (II ions, and temperature on the adsorption process were investigated. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS analysis after adsorption reveals the accumulation of lead (II ions onto activated carbon. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to analyze equilibrium data. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of activated carbon was found to be 476.2 mg g−1. The kinetic data were evaluated and the pseudo-second-order equation provided the best correlation. Thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process is endothermic and spontaneous.

  12. Benchmarking nuclear models of FLUKA and GEANT4 for carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bohlen, TT; Quesada, J M; Bohlen, T T; Cerutti, F; Gudowska, I; Ferrari, A; Mairani, A

    2010-01-01

    As carbon ions, at therapeutic energies, penetrate tissue, they undergo inelastic nuclear reactions and give rise to significant yields of secondary fragment fluences. Therefore, an accurate prediction of these fluences resulting from the primary carbon interactions is necessary in the patient's body in order to precisely simulate the spatial dose distribution and the resulting biological effect. In this paper, the performance of nuclear fragmentation models of the Monte Carlo transport codes, FLUKA and GEANT4, in tissue-like media and for an energy regime relevant for therapeutic carbon ions is investigated. The ability of these Monte Carlo codes to reproduce experimental data of charge-changing cross sections and integral and differential yields of secondary charged fragments is evaluated. For the fragment yields, the main focus is on the consideration of experimental approximations and uncertainties such as the energy measurement by time-of-flight. For GEANT4, the hadronic models G4BinaryLightIonReaction a...

  13. Recent studies in heavy ion induced fission reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Choudhury

    2001-08-01

    Nuclear fission process involves large scale shape changes of the nucleus, while it evolves from a nearly spherical configuration to two separated fission fragments. The dynamics of these shape changes in the nuclear many body system is governed by a strong interplay of the collective and single particle degrees of freedom. With the availability of heavy ion accelerators, there has been an impetus to study the nuclear dynamics through the investigations of nucleus–nucleus collisions involving fusion and fission process. From the various investigations carried out in the past years, it is now well recognized that there is large scale damping of collective modes in heavy ion induced fission reactions, which in other words implies that nuclear motion is highly viscous. In recent years, there have been many experimental observations in heavy ion induced fission reactions at medium bombarding energies, which suggest possible occurrence of various non-equilibrium modes of fission such as quasi-fission, fast fission and pre-equilibrium fission, where some of the internal degrees of freedom of the nucleus is not fully equilibrated. We have carried out extensive investigations on the fission fragment angular distributions at near barrier bombarding energies using heavy fissile targets. The measured fragment anisotropies when compared with the standard saddle point model (SSPM) calculations show that for projectile-target systems having zero or low ground state spins, the angular anisotropy exhibits a peak-like behaviour at the sub barrier energies, which cannot be explained by the SSPM calculations. For projectiles or targets with large ground state spins, the anomalous peaking gets washed out due to smearing of the -distribution by the intrinsic entrance channel spins. Recently studies have been carried out on the spin distributions of fission fragments through the gamma ray multiplicity measurements. The fission fragments acquire spin mainly from two

  14. Heavy-ion induced desorption yields of cryogenic surfaces bombarded with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Evans, L; Kollmus, H; Küchler, D; Scrivens, R; Severin, D; Wengenroth, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2011-01-01

    The ion-induced desorption experiment, installed in the CERN Heavy-Ion Accelerator LINAC 3, has been used to study the dynamic outgassing of cryogenic surfaces. Two different targets, bare and goldcoated copper, were bombarded under perpendicular impact with 4.2 MeV/u Pb54+ ions. Partial pressure rises of H2, CH4, CO, and CO2 and effective desorption yields were measured at 300, 77, and 6.3 K using single shot and continuous ion bombardment techniques. We find that the heavy-ion-induced desorption yield is temperature dependent and investigate the influence of CO gas cryosorbed at 6.3 K. The gain in desorption yield reduction at cryogenic temperature vanishes after several monolayers of CO are cryosorbed on both targets. In this paper we describe the new cryogenic target assembly, the temperature-dependent pressure rise, desorption yield, and gas adsorption measurements.

  15. Plasma-ion Induced Sputtering and Heating of Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. E.; Tucker, O. J.

    2007-05-01

    Titan is unique among the outer solar system icy satellites in having an atmosphere with a column density about ten times that of the Earth's atmosphere and an atmospheric mass to solid mass ratio comparable to that of Venus. Atmospheres equivalent in size to that at Titan would have been removed from the icy Galilean satellites by the plasma trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere (Johnson 2004). Therefore, the use of Cassini data to determine the present erosion rate of Titan's atmosphere provides an important end point for studying the erosion and heating of planetary and satellite atmospheres by an ambient plasma. In this paper we describe the deposition of energy, the erosion and the expansion of the upper atmosphere of Titan using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo models (Shematovich et al. 2003; Michael et al. 2005; Michael and Johnson 2005). These calculations are used to calibrate semi-empirical models of atmospheric sputtering (Johnson 1994) that are used to interpret Cassini data at Titan. Using a number of plasma conditions, the temperature and density vs. altitude above the exobase and the rate of escape are calculated. References: Johnson, R.E. "Plasma-induced Sputtering of an Atmosphere" in Space Science Reviews 69 215-253 (1994). Johnson. R.E., " The magnetospheric plasmadriven evolution of satellite atmospheres" Astrophys. J. 609, L99-L102 (2004). Michael, M. and R.E. Johnson, "Energy deposition of pickup ions and heating of Titan's atmosphere", Planetary & Space Sci.53, 1510-1514 (2005). Michael M., R.E. Johnson, F. Leblanc, M. Liu, J.G. Luhmann, and V.I. Shematovich, "Ejection of nitrogen from Titan's atmosphere by magnetospheric ions and pick-up ions", Icarus 175, 263-267 (2005). Shematovich, V.I., R.E. Johnson, M. Michael, and J.G. Luhmann, "Nitrogen loss from Titan", JGR 108, No. E8, 5087, doi:10.1029/2003JE002094 (2003).

  16. Electron and ion induced electron emission from metals and insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbatz, M

    2001-01-01

    gradually exposed to oxygen as an experimental probe. The experimental data are fitted with an analytical model, that is able to describe the observed kinetics. The fit parameters give absolute values of sticking probabilities and of surface reaction rates. During oxidation of aluminum and magnesium also spontaneous emission of electrons (exoelectrons) is observed. This effect is quantitatively studied for different oxygen partial pressures. The experimental data also indicate a significant influence of the surface morphology on the exoemission process. An important consequence of atomic collisions in solids is ionization leading to electron ejection from the target atoms with subsequent migration through the solid. A certain fraction of these electrons finally reaches the surface and is ejected into vacuum. A standard measurement of this phenomenon is the observation of the particle (electron, ion) induced electron emission yield g, defined as the average number of ejected electrons per incoming projectile. ...

  17. Ion beam induced luminescence on white inorganic pigments for paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been used for studying the emission features and the radiation hardness of white pigments. In particular, ZnO, gypsum and basic lead sulphate pigments have been analyzed with a 3.0 MeV H+ beam at the AGLAE Louvre laboratory. The same pigments mixed with different binders have been also analyzed on a canvas, in order to evaluate the contribution of the binders both to the IBIL spectra and to the radiation hardness. It turns out that the binder affects both the IBIL spectra and the radiation hardness of pigments when the emission bands are related to point defects, as occurs for ZnO

  18. Ion beam induced luminescence on white inorganic pigments for paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, A.; Dran, J. C.; Salomon, J.; Tonezzer, M.; Scian, C.; Beck, L.; Carturan, S.; Maggioni, G.; Della Mea, G.

    2008-05-01

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been used for studying the emission features and the radiation hardness of white pigments. In particular, ZnO, gypsum and basic lead sulphate pigments have been analyzed with a 3.0 MeV H+ beam at the AGLAE Louvre laboratory. The same pigments mixed with different binders have been also analyzed on a canvas, in order to evaluate the contribution of the binders both to the IBIL spectra and to the radiation hardness. It turns out that the binder affects both the IBIL spectra and the radiation hardness of pigments when the emission bands are related to point defects, as occurs for ZnO.

  19. Inclusive spectra of stripping reactions induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectra of inclusive transfer reactions induced by heavy ions and leading to continuum final states show high-lying broad resonancelike structures superimposed on a large continuum. Recent experimental spectra for neutron stripping on targets in the lead region are analyzed by the Bonaccorso and Brink single-particle transfer model. The results of the calculation suggest that the structures are due to the population of high-spin single-particle states which are unbound and mix with the underlying states giving rise to a broadening of the peak. The main characteristics of the spectra are reproduced. Moreover, an estimate of the elastic and inelastic breakup contributions to the inclusive spectra is given

  20. Heavy ion induced double strand breaks in bacteria and bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micke, U.; Schäfer, M.; Anton, A.; Horneck, G.; Bücker, H.

    DNA damage induced by heavy ions in bacterial cells and bacteriophages such as Bacillus subtilis, E. coli and Bacteriophage Tl were investigated by analyzing the double strand breaks in the chromosomal DNA. This kind of lesion is considered as one of the main reasons for lethal events. To analyze double strand breaks in long molecules of DNA - up to some Mbp in length - the technique of pulse field agarose gel electrophoresis has been used. This allows the detection of one double strand break per genome. Cell lysis and DNA isolation were performed in small agarose blocks directly. This procedure secured minimum DNA destruction by shearing forces. After running a gel, the DNA was stained with ethidium bromide. The light intensity of ethidium bromide fluorescence for both the outcoming (running) DNA and the remaining intact DNA were measured by scanning. The mean number of double strand breaks was calculated by determining the quotient of these intensities. Strand break induction after heavy ion and X-ray irradiation was compared.

  1. Ion Induced Changes in Phosphoinositide Monolayers at Phisiological Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazadi Badiambile, Adolphe; Forstner, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) play a crucial role in many cellular process that occur at the plasma membrane such as calcium release, exocytosis or endocytosis. In order to specifically regulate these functions PIPs must segregate in pools at the plasma membrane. A possible mechanism that could induce and regulate such organization of phosphoinositides is their interaction with bivalent cations. Understanding the physicochemical mechanism that can regulate membrane structure is a crucial step in the development of adaptive biomimetic membrane systems. Using Langmuir monolayers, we investigated the effect of calcium and magnesium on the surface pressure-area/lipid isotherm of monolayer of phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2), dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) and palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). It is found that the decrease of area per lipid, i.e. the increase in aggregation, is mostly dependent on the lipid's head group charge but ion specific. In addition, we discuss changes in free energy and compressibility of these monolayer-ion systems. NSF

  2. Influence of nuclear interactions in polyethylene range compensators for carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki, E-mail: nkanemat@nirs.go.jp; Koba, Yusuke; Ogata, Risa [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Himukai, Takeshi [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, 415 Harakoga-machi, Tosu, Saga 841-0071 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: A recent study revealed that polyethylene (PE) would cause extra carbon-ion attenuation per range shift by 0.45%/cm due to compositional differences in nuclear interactions. The present study aims to assess the influence of PE range compensators on tumor dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy. Methods: Carbon-ion radiation was modeled to be composed of primary carbon ions and secondary particles, for each of which the dose and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) were estimated at a tumor depth in the middle of spread-out Bragg peak. Assuming exponential behavior for attenuation and yield of these components with depth, the PE effect on dose was calculated for clinical carbon-ion beams and was partly tested by experiment. The two-component model was integrated into a treatment-planning system and the PE effect was estimated in two clinical cases. Results: The attenuation per range shift by PE was 0.1%–0.3%/cm in dose and 0.2%–0.4%/cm in RBE-weighted dose, depending on energy and range-modulation width. This translates into reduction of RBE-weighted dose by up to 3% in extreme cases. In the treatment-planning study, however, the effect on RBE-weighted dose to tumor was typically within 1% reduction. Conclusions: The extra attenuation of primary carbon ions in PE was partly compensated by increased secondary particles for tumor dose. In practical situations, the PE range compensators would normally cause only marginal errors as compared to intrinsic uncertainties in treatment planning, patient setup, beam delivery, and clinical response.

  3. Laser induced deformation in polydimethylsiloxane membranes with embedded carbon nanopowder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate optically induced micron-range deformation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes with embedded carbon nanopowder. The mechanical deformation can be controlled by low power laser irradiation of the samples and the resulting surface modifications are analyzed via dynamic speckle measurements. Photothermal effects due to optical absorption by the nanopowder are shown to deform the polymer samples leading to localized mechanical stresses induced via thermal expansion of the PDMS. (technical note)

  4. Robotic-based carbon ion therapy and patient positioning in 6 degrees of freedom: setup accuracy of two standard immobilization devices used in carbon ion therapy and IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Alexandra D

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To investigate repositioning accuracy in particle radiotherapy in 6 degrees of freedom (DOF and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, 3 DOF for two immobilization devices (Scotchcast masks vs thermoplastic head masks currently in use at our institution for fractionated radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients. Methods and materials Position verifications in patients treated with carbon ion therapy and IMRT for head and neck malignancies were evaluated. Most patients received combined treatment regimen (IMRT plus carbon ion boost, immobilization was achieved with either Scotchcast or thermoplastic head masks. Position corrections in robotic-based carbon ion therapy allowing 6 DOF were compared to IMRT allowing corrections in 3 DOF for two standard immobilization devices. In total, 838 set-up controls of 38 patients were analyzed. Results Robotic-based position correction including correction of rotations was well tolerated and without discomfort. Standard deviations of translational components were between 0.5 and 0.8 mm for Scotchcast and 0.7 and 1.3 mm for thermoplastic masks in 6 DOF and 1.2 - 1.4 mm and 1.0 - 1.1 mm in 3 DOF respectively. Mean overall displacement vectors were between 2.1 mm (Scotchcast and 2.9 mm (thermoplastic masks in 6 DOF and 3.9 - 3.0 mm in 3 DOF respectively. Displacement vectors were lower when correction in 6 DOF was allowed as opposed to 3 DOF only, which was maintained at the traditional action level of > 3 mm for position correction in the pre-on-board imaging era. Conclusion Setup accuracy for both systems was within the expected range. Smaller shifts were required when 6 DOF were available for correction as opposed to 3 DOF. Where highest possible positioning accuracy is required, frequent image guidance is mandatory to achieve best possible plan delivery and maintenance of sharp gradients and optimal normal tissue sparing inherent in carbon ion therapy.

  5. Robotic-based carbon ion therapy and patient positioning in 6 degrees of freedom: setup accuracy of two standard immobilization devices used in carbon ion therapy and IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate repositioning accuracy in particle radiotherapy in 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, 3 DOF) for two immobilization devices (Scotchcast masks vs thermoplastic head masks) currently in use at our institution for fractionated radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients. Position verifications in patients treated with carbon ion therapy and IMRT for head and neck malignancies were evaluated. Most patients received combined treatment regimen (IMRT plus carbon ion boost), immobilization was achieved with either Scotchcast or thermoplastic head masks. Position corrections in robotic-based carbon ion therapy allowing 6 DOF were compared to IMRT allowing corrections in 3 DOF for two standard immobilization devices. In total, 838 set-up controls of 38 patients were analyzed. Robotic-based position correction including correction of rotations was well tolerated and without discomfort. Standard deviations of translational components were between 0.5 and 0.8 mm for Scotchcast and 0.7 and 1.3 mm for thermoplastic masks in 6 DOF and 1.2 - 1.4 mm and 1.0 - 1.1 mm in 3 DOF respectively. Mean overall displacement vectors were between 2.1 mm (Scotchcast) and 2.9 mm (thermoplastic masks) in 6 DOF and 3.9 - 3.0 mm in 3 DOF respectively. Displacement vectors were lower when correction in 6 DOF was allowed as opposed to 3 DOF only, which was maintained at the traditional action level of > 3 mm for position correction in the pre-on-board imaging era. Setup accuracy for both systems was within the expected range. Smaller shifts were required when 6 DOF were available for correction as opposed to 3 DOF. Where highest possible positioning accuracy is required, frequent image guidance is mandatory to achieve best possible plan delivery and maintenance of sharp gradients and optimal normal tissue sparing inherent in carbon ion therapy

  6. Effects of Carbon Structure and Surface Oxygen on the Carbon's Performance as the Anode in Lithium-Ion Battery Determined

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    2000-01-01

    Four carbon materials (C1, C2, C3, and C4) were tested electrochemically at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to determine their performance in lithium-ion batteries. They were formed as shown in the figure. This process caused very little carbon loss. Products C1 and C3 contained very little oxygen because of the final overnight heating at 540 C. Products C2 and C4, on the other hand, contained small amounts of basic oxide. The electrochemical test involved cycles of lithium intercalation and deintercalation using C/saturated LiI-50/50 (vol %) ethylene carbonate (EC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC)/Li half cell. The cycling test, which is summarized in the table, resulted in three major conclusions. The capacity of the carbon with a basic oxide surface converges to a constant 1. value quickly (within 4 cycles), possibly because the oxide prevents solvent from entering the carbon structure and, therefore, prolongs the carbon s cycle life. Under certain conditions, the disordered carbon can store more lithium than its 2. precursor. These samples and their precursor can intercalate at 200 mA/g and deintercalate at 3. a rate of 2000 mA/g without significant capacity loss.

  7. Swift heavy ion induced modification of aliphatic polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Umme Habiba

    2015-01-15

    In this thesis, the high energy heavy ion induced modification of aliphatic polymers is studied. Two polymer groups, namely polyvinyl polymers (PVF, PVAc, PVA and PMMA) and fluoropolymers (PVDF, ETFE, PFA and FEP) were used in this work. Polyvinyl polymers were investigated since they will be used as insulating materials in the superconducting magnets of the new ion accelerators of the planned International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at the GSI Helmholtz-Centre of Heavy Ion Research (GSI) in Darmstadt. In order to study ion-beam induced degradation, all polymer foils were irradiated at the GSI linear accelerator UNILAC using several projectiles (U, Au, Sm, Xe) and experimentation sites (beam lines X0 and M3) over a large fluence regime (1 x 10{sup 10} - 5 x 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}). Five independent techniques, namely infrared (FT-IR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, residual gas analysis (RGA), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and mass loss analysis (ML), were used to analyze the irradiated samples. FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that ion irradiation led to the decrease of characteristic band intensities showing the general degradation of the polymers, with scission of side groups and the main backbone. As a consequence of the structural modification, new bands appeared. UV-Vis transmission analysis showed an absorption edge shift from the ultraviolet region towards the visible region indicating double bond and conjugated double bond formation. On-line massspectrometric residual gas analysis showed the release of small gaseous fragment molecules. TGA analysis gave evidence of a changed thermal stability. With ML analysis, the considerable mass loss was quantified. The results of the five complementary analytical methods show how heavy ion irradiation changes the molecular structure of the polymers. Molecular degradation mechanisms are postulated. The amount of radiation damage is found to be sensitive to the used type of ionic

  8. Coupled, Nitrogen, Oxygen, Carbon and Ion Chemistry on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelle, Roger; Vuitton, Veronique; Lavvas, Panayotis; Klippenstein, Stephen; Horst, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    We present simulations of the coupled nitrogen, oxygen, and ion chemistry on Titan using a state-of-the-art photochemical model. The model is one dimensional and extends from the surface to the exobase. The chemistry linking 160 neutral species and 172 ion species is described through networks including 1139 neutral reactions and 4361 ion reactions. UV photolysis of 59 species is included as well as dissociation and ionization of 16 species due to suprathermal electrons. Reaction rate coefficients are obtained from a thorough review of the literature supplemented by calculations of rates of important reactions when laboratory values are not available. Comparison of the model with available observational constraints helps to determine the fundamental chemical pathways in the atmosphere. We will discuss in particular the importance of recent measurements of HNC, HC15N, CO2, and H2O and the role of ion chemistry in the synthesis of neutral species. Key reactions that require further laboratory of theoretical study will be identified.

  9. Decomposition of cyclohexane ion induced by intense femtosecond laser fields by ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decomposition of cyclohexane cations induced by intense femtosecond laser fields at the wavelength of 800 nm is investigated by ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry in which cyclohexane cations C6H12+ stored in an ion trap are irradiated with intense femtosecond laser pulses and the generated fragment ions are recorded by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The various fragment ion species, C5Hn+ (n = 7, 9), C4Hn+ (n = 5–8), C3Hn+ (n = 3–7), C2Hn+ (n = 2–6), and CH3+, identified in the mass spectra show that decomposition of C6H12+ proceeds efficiently by the photo-irradiation. From the laser intensity dependences of the yields of the fragment ion species, the numbers of photons required for producing the respective fragment ions are estimated

  10. Influence of anodic surface treatment of activated carbon on adsorption and ion exchange properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.J.; Kim, K.D.

    1999-10-01

    The effect of anodic surface treatment of activated carbon on adsorption and ion exchange characteristics was investigated in the condition of 35 wt% NaOH electrolyte for 60 s. The acid and base values were determined by a titration technique, and surface and pore structures were studied in terms of BET volumetric measurement with N{sub 2} adsorption. The ion exchange capacity of the anodized activated carbons was characterized by a dry weight capacity technique. It was observed that an increase in current intensity leads to an increase in the surface functional groups of activated carbons, resulting in increasing pH, acid-base values, and anion-cation exchange capacities, without significant change of surface and pore structures (i.e., specific surface area, total pore volume, micropore volume, and average pore diameter). Also, anodically treated activated carbons are more effectively evaluated on the base value or cation exchange capacity than on the oppose properties in this electrolytic system.

  11. The Anion Effect on Li(+) Ion Coordination Structure in Ethylene Carbonate Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Ponnuchamy, Veerapandian; Shen, Yuneng; Yang, Xueming; Yuan, Kaijun; Vetere, Valentina; Mossa, Stefano; Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Zhang, Yufan; Zheng, Junrong

    2016-09-15

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries are an attractive alternative power source for a wide variety of applications. To optimize their performances, a complete description of the solvation properties of the ion in the electrolyte is crucial. A comprehensive understanding at the nanoscale of the solvation structure of lithium ions in nonaqueous carbonate electrolytes is, however, still unclear. We have measured by femtosecond vibrational spectroscopy the orientational correlation time of the CO stretching mode of Li(+)-bound and Li(+)-unbound ethylene carbonate molecules, in LiBF4, LiPF6, and LiClO4 ethylene carbonate solutions with different concentrations. Surprisingly, we have found that the coordination number of ethylene carbonate in the first solvation shell of Li(+) is only two, in all solutions with concentrations higher than 0.5 M. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the presence of anions in the first coordination shell modifies the generally accepted tetrahedral structure of the complex, allowing only two EC molecules to coordinate to Li(+) directly. Our results demonstrate for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the anion influence on the overall structure of the first solvation shell of the Li(+) ion. The formation of such a cation/solvent/anion complex provides a rational explanation for the ionic conductivity drop of lithium/carbonate electrolyte solutions at high concentrations.

  12. Two-Dimensional Porous Carbon: Synthesis and Ion-Transport Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaoyu; Luo, Jiayan; Lv, Wei; Wang, Da-Wei; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2015-09-23

    Their chemical stability, high specific surface area, and electric conductivity enable porous carbon materials to be the most commonly used electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors (also known as supercapacitors). To further increase the energy and power density, engineering of the pore structures with a higher electrochemical accessible surface area, faster ion-transport path and a more-robust interface with the electrolyte is widely investigated. Compared with traditional porous carbons, two-dimensional (2D) porous carbon sheets with an interlinked hierarchical porous structure are a good candidate for supercapacitors due to their advantages in high aspect ratio for electrode packing and electron transport, hierarchical pore structures for ion transport, and short ion-transport length. Recent progress on the synthesis of 2D porous carbons is reported here, along with the improved electrochemical behavior due to enhanced ion transport. Challenges for the controlled preparation of 2D porous carbons with desired properties are also discussed; these require precise tuning of the hierarchical structure and a clarification of the formation mechanisms. PMID:26207982

  13. Operation of KeiGM for the carbon ion therapy facility at Gunma University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy is being carried out at Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Centre (GHMC) since March 2010. A compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for GHMC, so-called KeiGM, supplies carbon 4+ ions for treatment. The general structure of KeiGM was copied from a prototype compact source, so-called Kei2. Based on experimental studies for production of carbon 4+ ions with a 10 GHz ECR source at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), so-called NIRS-ECR, the field distribution of the mirror magnet for Kei2 and KeiGM was designed. A microwave source with the traveling-wave-tube (TWT) was adopted for KeiGM, with a frequency range and maximum power of 9.75 - 10.25 GHz and 750 W, respectively. The KeiGM was installed in the GHMC facility in December 2008. The paper is followed by the associated poster. (authors)

  14. Ferrous ion oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans immobilized on activated carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ji-kui; QIN Wen-qing; NIU Yin-jian; LI Hua-xia

    2006-01-01

    The immobilization of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans on the activated carbon particles as support matrix was investigated. Cycling batch operation results in the complete oxidation of ferrous iron in 8 d when the modified 9 K medium is set to flow through the mini-bioreactor at a rate of 0.104 L/h at 25 ℃. The oxidation rate of ferrous iron with immobilized T. ferrooxidans is 9.38 g/(L·h). The results show that the immobilization of T. ferrooxidans on activated carbon can improve the rate of oxidation of ferrous iron. The SEM images show that a build-up of cells of T. ferrooxidans and iron precipitates is formed on the surface of activated carbon particles.

  15. Oxidation processes on conducting carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    La Mantia, Fabio

    2012-11-21

    The oxidation processes at the interface between different types of typical carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries and carbonates electrolyte above 5 V versus Li/Li+ were investigated. Depending on the nature and surface area of the carbon additive, the irreversible capacity during galvanostatic cycling between 2.75 and 5.25 V versus Li/Li+ could be as high as 700 mAh g-1 (of carbon). In the potential region below 5 V versus Li/Li+, high surface carbon additives also showed irreversible plateaus at about 4.1-4.2 and 4.6 V versus Li/Li+. These plateaus disappeared after thermal treatments at or above 150 °C in inert gas. The influence of the irreversible capacity of carbon additives on the overall performances of positive electrodes was discussed. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  16. Highly stable linear carbonate-containing electrolytes with fluoroethylene carbonate for high-performance cathodes in sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongwon; Lee, Jaegi; Kim, Hyungsub; Kang, Kisuk; Choi, Nam-Soon

    2016-07-01

    Employing linear carbonates such as dimethyl carbonate (DMC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and diethyl carbonate (DEC) as electrolyte solvents provides an opportunity to design appropriate electrolyte systems for high-performance sodium-ion batteries (SIBs). However, in practice, the use of linear carbonate-containing electrolytes is quite challenging because linear carbonates readily decompose at Na metal electrodes or sodiated anodes. One of the promising approaches is using an electrolyte additive to resolve the critical problems related to linear carbonates. Our investigation reveals that remarkable enhancement in electrochemical performance of Na4Fe3(PO4)2(P2O7) cathodes with linear carbonate-containing electrolytes is achieved by using a fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) additive. Importantly, the initial Coulombic efficiency of the Na deposition/stripping on a stainless steel (SS) electrode is drastically improved from 16% to 90% by introducing the FEC additive into ethylene carbonate (EC)/propylene carbonate (PC)/DEC (5/3/2, v/v/v)/0.5 M NaClO4. The underlying mechanism of FEC at the electrode-electrolyte interface is clearly demonstrated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In addition, the Na4Fe3(PO4)2(P2O7) cathode in EC/PC/DEC (5/3/2, v/v/v)/0.5 M sodium perchlorate (NaClO4) with FEC delivers a discharge capacity of 90.5 mAh g-1 at a current rate of C/2 and exhibits excellent capacity retention of 97.5% with high Coulombic efficiency of 99.6% after 300 cycles at 30 °C.

  17. Effects of low-dose carbon ion irradiation on the proliferation of splenocytes and the concentration of interferon in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning

    AIM: To investigate the changes in the proliferation response of splenic lymphocytes and the concentration of serum interferon (IFN-γ) in mice induced by low doses carbon ion irradiation. METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the laboratory of physical medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in November 2006. 1. Thirty Kunming mice were randomly divided into five groups with six animals in each group and irradiated with 0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.10 Gy carbon ion at Heavy Ion Research Facility Laboratory of Lanzhou. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, the eyeballs of mice were taken out under anesthesia and blood was harvested. 2. The concentration of IFN-γ in serum was detected by ELISA kit. After the mice were executed, the spleen was harvested under sterile condition to prepare spleen mononuclear cell suspension. The effects of concanavalin A(ConA) and lipopolysaccharide(LPS) on the proliferations of mononuclear cells was tested by MTT assay. RESULTS: All thirty mice were involved in the result analysis. 1. The concentration of IFN-γ in serum remarkably increased after irradiation with 0.01 Gy and 0.03 Gy compared with that in controls (p<0.05). However, the concentration of IFN-γ decreased after irradiation with 0.05 Gy and 0.1 Gy. 2. Compared with control group, the proliferation of T lymphocytes induced by ConA and B lymphocytes induced by LPS remarkably increased after irradiation with 0.01 Gy (p<0.001) and the effect was of significant difference compared with that of 0.03 Gy (p<0.01). The irradiation with 0.05 Gy presented an inhibition to the proliferation of splenic lymphocytes. This inhibition was also obvious when irradiated with 0.10 Gy. CONCLUSION: 0.01 Gy and 0.03 Gy carbon ion irradiation can stimulate the proliferation of splenocytes, induce the secretion of IFN-γ and, in consequence, enhance the immune function.

  18. The Radiation Enhancement of 15 nm Citrate-Capped Gold Nanoparticles Exposed to 70 keV/μm Carbon Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Xi; Jin, Xiaodong; He, Pengbo; Zheng, Xiaogang; Ye, Fei; Chen, Weiqiang; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy is an important modality for tumor treatment. The central goal of radiotherapy is to deliver a therapeutic dose to the tumor as much as possible whilst sparing the surrounding normal tissues. On one hand, heavy ion radiation induces maximum damage at the end of the track (called the Bragg Peak). Hadron therapy based on heavy ions is considered superior to conventional X-rays and γ-rays radiations for tumors sited in sensitive tissues, childhood cases and radioresistant cancers. On the other hand, radiation sensitizers enhanced the radiation effects in tumors by increasing the dose specifically to the tumor cells. Recently, the use of gold nanoparticles as potential tumor selective radio-sensitizers has been proposed as a breakthrough in radiotherapy with conventional radiations. The enhanced radiation effect of heavy ions in tumor by using gold nanoparticles as radio-sensitizer may provide alternative in hadron therapy. In this study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effects of carbon ions with a linear energy transfer of 70 keV/μm in the presence of 15 nm citrate-capped AuNPs. The existing of AuNPs resulted in 5.5-fold enhancement in hydroxyl radical production and 24.5% increment in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for carbon-ion-irradiated HeLa cells. The study indicated gold nanoparticles can be used as potential radio-sensitizer in carbon ions therapy. PMID:27455642

  19. Identification of promoters and enhancers induced by carbon nanotube exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornholdt, Jette; Lilje, Berit; Saber, Anne Thoustrup;

    Usage of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is increasing in industry due to their mechanical and electrical properties. However, pulmonary exposure to CNTs induces, an asbestos-like toxicological response characterized by persistent inflammation, granuloma formation and fibrosis with low no-effect levels...

  20. Biogrout, ground improvement by microbial induced carbonate precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Paassen, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    Biogrout is a new ground improvement method based on microbially induced precipitation of calcium carbonate (MICP). When supplied with suitable substrates, micro-organisms can catalyze biochemical conversions in the subsurface resulting in precipitation of inorganic minerals, which change the mechan

  1. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Gunst, Tue; Brandbyge, Mads;

    2011-01-01

    voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed...

  2. Potassium Ions are More Effective than Sodium Ions in Salt Induced Peptide Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubina, Michael V.; Vyazmin, Sergey Yu.; Boitsov, Vitali M.; Nikolaev, Eugene N.; Popov, Igor A.; Kononikhin, Alexey S.; Eliseev, Igor E.; Natochin, Yuri V.

    2013-04-01

    Prebiotic peptide formation under aqueous conditions in the presence of metal ions is one of the plausible triggers of the emergence of life. The salt-induced peptide formation reaction has been suggested as being prebiotically relevant and was examined for the formation of peptides in NaCl solutions. In previous work we have argued that the first protocell could have emerged in KCl solution. Using HPLC-MS/MS analysis, we found that K+ is more than an order of magnitude more effective in the L-glutamic acid oligomerization with 1,1'-carbonyldiimidazole in aqueous solutions than the same concentration of Na+, which is consistent with the diffusion theory calculations. We anticipate that prebiotic peptides could have formed with K+ as the driving force, not Na+, as commonly believed.

  3. Quantum ion-acoustic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S.A. [Kyoto Univ., Katsura (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Quaid-i-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan). National Centre for Physics; Iqbal, Z. [University of Management and Technology, Sialkot (Pakistan); Wazir, Z. [Riphah International Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Basic Sciences; Rehman, Aman ur [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-08-01

    Quantum ion-acoustic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes are studied by employing a quantum hydrodynamics model. The dispersion equation is obtained by Fourier transformation, which exhibits the existence of quantum ion-acoustic wave affected by change of density balance due to presence of positive or negative heavy species as stationary ion clusters and wave potential at equilibrium. The numerical results are presented, and the role of quantum degeneracy, nanotube geometry, electron exchange-correlation effects, and concentration and polarity of heavy species on wave dispersion is pointed out for typical systems of interest.

  4. Metal ion binding with carbon nanotubes and graphene: Effect of chirality and curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umadevi, Deivasigamani; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2012-10-01

    First principles calculations have been used to comprehensively study the binding of a series alkali (Li+, Na+, K+) and alkaline earth (Be2+, Mg2+, Ca2+) metal ions with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene. It is interesting to note that the mono-cationic systems prefer binding to armchair CNTs over zigzag CNTs, while the preference for the di-cationic systems is exactly opposite. We have also observed significant changes in the HOMO-LUMO energy gap of the CNTs on metal ion binding and these results indicate that the fine tuning of energy gap of the CNTs can be effected through metal ion binding.

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by different concentrations of gadolinium ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Jin, Jian-Cheng; Yuan, Lian; He, Huan; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Yang, Xiao-Gang; Dai, Jie; Liu, Yi

    2014-04-01

    Gadolinium-based compounds are the most widely used paramagnetic contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging on the world. But the tricationic gadolinium ion (Gd(3+)) could induce cell apoptosis probably because of its effects on mitochondria. Until now, the mechanism about how Gd(3+) interacts with mitochondria is not well elucidated. In this work, mitochondrial swelling, collapsed transmembrane potential and decreased membrane fluidity were observed to be important factors for mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP) opening induced by Gd(3+). The protection effect of CsA (Cyclosporin A) could confirm high concentration of Gd(3+) (500 μM) would trigger mtPTP opening. Moreover, mitochondrial outer membrane breakdown and volume expansion observed clearly by transmission electron microscopy and the release of Cyt c (Cytochrome c) could explain the mtPTP opening from another aspect. In addition, MBM(+) (monobromobimane(+)) and DTT (dithiothreitol) could protect thiol (-SH) groups from oxidation so that the toxicity of Gd(3+) might be resulted from the chelation of -SH of membrane proteins by free Gd(3+). Gd(3+) could inhibit the initiation of mitochondrial membrane lipid peroxidation, so it might interact with anionic lipids too. These findings will highly contribute to the safe applications of Gd-based agents.

  6. Thermal management of a Li-ion battery using carbon fiber-PCM composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of latent and sensible heat capabilities has made phase change materials (PCMs) very useful in a variety of heat transfer applications. The main purpose of using the phase change material in lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery thermal management systems (BTMs) is to mitigate the excessive temperature rise in the cells and to create uniform temperature distribution within the battery pack. In this work, carbon fibers were added to a PCM to enhance its heat transfer potentials. Various strategies were adopted to manage temperature distribution around a single AA-battery-like simulator. The effects of carbon fiber size and weight percent within the PCM on thermal performance were studied. Experimental results have indicated that a mixture of PCM with 2-mm-long carbon fibers and mass percentage of 0.46% showed the best thermal performance for which the maximum temperature rise in the battery simulator can be reduced by up to 45%. - Graphical abstract: The schematic of the experimental setup and data acquisition system (1-power source 2-container 3-battery module 4-thermocouples 5-temperature indicator 6-data acquisition system). - Highlights: • Thermal performance of a Li-ion battery simulator is studied in the presence of PCM. • The effect of carbon fiber on heat transfer enhancement is examined. • Better thermal management can be achieved by the presence of carbon fiber in PCM. • Both carbon fiber mass fraction and length play crucial role in thermal management

  7. Computational Evaluation of Amorphous Carbon Coating for Durable Silicon Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwoon Hwang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of graphite-like amorphous carbon coating on bulky silicon to examine whether it can improve the durability of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries using molecular dynamics simulations and ab-initio electronic structure calculations. Structural models of carbon coating are constructed using molecular dynamics simulations of atomic carbon deposition with low incident energies (1–16 eV. As the incident energy decreases, the ratio of sp2 carbons increases, that of sp3 decreases, and the carbon films become more porous. The films prepared with very low incident energy contain lithium-ion conducting channels. Also, those films are electrically conductive to supplement the poor conductivity of silicon and can restore their structure after large deformation to accommodate the volume change during the operations. As a result of this study, we suggest that graphite-like porous carbon coating on silicon will extend the lifetime of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries.

  8. Carbon analysis for inspecting carbonation of concrete using a TEA CO2 laser-induced plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Kiichiro; Idris, Nasrullah; Wada, Munehide; Kurniawan, Hendrik; Tsuyuki, Kenichiro; Miura, Satoru

    2004-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that a spectrochemical analysis of carbon using the laser plasma method can be successfully applied to inspect the carbonation of concrete by detecting carbon produced in aged concrete by a chemical reaction of Ca(OH)2 with CO2 gas in environmental air, turning into CaCO3, which induces degradation of the quality of building concrete. A comparative study has been made using a TEA CO2 laser (500-1000 mJ) and a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (50-200 mJ) to search for the optimum conditions for carbon analysis, proving the advantage of the TEA CO2 laser for this purpose. Also, it was clarified that laser irradiation with suitable defocusing conditions is a crucial point for obtaining high sensitivity in the detection of carbon. Practical experiments on the inspection of carbonation were carried out using both a concrete sample that had been intentionally carbonated by exposure to high concentrations of CO2 gas and a naturally carbonated concrete sample. As a result, good coincidence was observed between the laser method and the ordinary method, which uses the chemical indicator phenolphthalein, implying that this laser technique is applicable as an in situ quantitative method of inspection for carbonation of concrete. PMID:18070383

  9. Adsorption of rare earth ions using carbonized polydopamine nano carbon shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓琦; LUO Huimin; Shannon M. Mahurin; LIU Rui; HOU Xisen; DAI Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Herein we reported the structure effects of carbon nano-shells prepared by the carbonization of polydopamine for the ad-sorption of rare earth elements (REEs) for the first time. Solid carbon spheres, 60 nm carbon shells and 500 nm carbon shells were prepared and evaluated for adsorption and desorption of REEs. The adsorption performance of carbon nano-shells for REEs was far superior to the solid carbon spheres. In addition, the effect of acidity on the adsorption and desorption properties was discussed. The good adsorption performance of the carbon nano-shells could be attributed to their pore structure, specific surface area, and the pres-ence of both amine and carbonyl groups from the grafted dopamine.

  10. Dosimetric characterization of a microDiamond detector in clinical scanned carbon ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinelli, Marco; Prestopino, G., E-mail: giuseppe.prestopino@uniroma2.it; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G. [INFN—Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, Roma 00133 (Italy); Ciocca, M.; Mirandola, A.; Mairani, A. [Fondazione CNAO, Strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Raffaele, L. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, Catania 95123, Italy and Fondazione CNAO, Strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Magro, G. [INFN—Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia, Via U. Bassi 6, Pavia 27100, Italy and Fondazione CNAO, Strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate for the first time the dosimetric properties of a new commercial synthetic diamond detector (PTW microDiamond) in high-energy scanned clinical carbon ion beams generated by a synchrotron at the CNAO facility. Methods: The detector response was evaluated in a water phantom with actively scanned carbon ion beams ranging from 115 to 380 MeV/u (30–250 mm Bragg peak depth in water). Homogeneous square fields of 3 × 3 and 6 × 6 cm{sup 2} were used. Short- and medium-term (2 months) detector response stability, dependence on beam energy as well as ion type (carbon ions and protons), linearity with dose, and directional and dose-rate dependence were investigated. The depth dose curve of a 280 MeV/u carbon ion beam, scanned over a 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} area, was measured with the microDiamond detector and compared to that measured using a PTW Advanced Markus ionization chamber, and also simulated using FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The detector response in two spread-out-Bragg-peaks (SOBPs), respectively, centered at 9 and 21 cm depths in water and calculated using the treatment planning system (TPS) used at CNAO, was measured. Results: A negligible drift of detector sensitivity within the experimental session was seen, indicating that no detector preirradiation was needed. Short-term response reproducibility around 1% (1 standard deviation) was found. Only 2% maximum variation of microDiamond sensitivity was observed among all the evaluated proton and carbon ion beam energies. The detector response showed a good linear behavior. Detector sensitivity was found to be dose-rate independent, with a variation below 1.3% in the evaluated dose-rate range. A very good agreement between measured and simulated Bragg curves with both microDiamond and Advanced Markus chamber was found, showing a negligible LET dependence of the tested detector. A depth dose curve was also measured by positioning the microDiamond with its main axis oriented orthogonally to the beam

  11. Carbon monoxide production in low energy oxygen ion bombardment of pyrolytic graphite and Kapton surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, C. C.; Eck, T. G.; Hoffman, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The results of an investigtion of the interaction of low energy oxygen ions with pyrolytic graphite and Kapton surface are reported. CO molecules emitted from the surface as a result of the ion bombardment were detected by a mass spectrometer. Because the ion-induced signals were small compared to that arising from the CO background pressure in the vacuum system, the ion beam was modulated and the modulated component of the CO signal measured with a lock-in amplifier. The quantum yield (CO molecules emitted per incident oxygen ion) for graphite rose from 1.9 at 4.5 eV ion energy to 6.6 at 465 eV. Comparable yields were obtained for Kapton. The large size of the yields suggests contributions to the reaction process from the background O2 molecules in the vacuum system.

  12. Experimental control of the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Munib

    2008-12-15

    The laser generation of energetic high quality beams of protons and heavier ions has opened up the door to a plethora of applications. These beams are usually generated by the interaction of a short pulse high power laser with a thin metal foil target. They could already be applied to probe transient phenomena in plasmas and to produce warm dense matter by isochoric heating. Other applications such as the production of radioisotopes and tumour radiotherapy need further research to be put into practice. To meet the requirements of each application, the properties of the laser-accelerated particle beams have to be controlled precisely. In this thesis, experimental means to control the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions are investigated. The production and control of proton and carbon ion beams is studied using advanced ion source designs: Experiments concerning mass-limited (i.e. small and isolated) targets are conducted. These targets have the potential to increase both the number and the energy of laser-accelerated protons. Therefore, the influence of the size of a plane foil target on proton beam properties is measured. Furthermore, carbon ion sources are investigated. Carbon ions are of particular interest in the production of warm dense matter and in cancer radiotherapy. The possibility to focus carbon ion beams is investigated and a simple method for the production of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion beams is presented. This thesis also provides an insight into the physical processes connected to the production and the control of laser-accelerated ions. For this purpose, laser-accelerated protons are employed to probe plasma phenomena on laser-irradiated targets. Electric fields evolving on the surface of laser-irradiated metal foils and hollow metal foil cylinders are investigated. Since these fields can be used to displace, collimate or focus proton beams, understanding their temporal and spatial evolution is crucial for the design of

  13. Technical Note: Experimental carbon ion range verification in inhomogeneous phantoms using prompt gammas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Dedes, G.; Krimmer, J.; Ray, C.; Testa, E., E-mail: e.testa@ipnl.in2p3.fr; Testa, M. [IPNL, Université de Lyon, Lyon F-69003 |(France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); De Rydt, M. [IPNL, Université de Lyon, Lyon F-69003 (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Leuven B-3001 (Belgium); Freud, N.; Létang, J. M. [CREATIS, Université de Lyon, Lyon F-69003 (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, INSA-Lyon, Centre Léon Bérard, 69008 Lyon (France)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to experimentally assess the possibility to monitor carbon ion range variations—due to tumor shift and/or elongation or shrinking—using prompt-gamma (PG) emission with inhomogeneous phantoms. Such a study is related to the development of PG monitoring techniques to be used in a carbon ion therapy context. Methods: A 95 MeV/u carbon ion beam was used to irradiate phantoms with a variable density along the ion path to mimic the presence of bone and lung in homogeneous humanlike tissue. PG profiles were obtained after a longitudinal scan of the phantoms. A setup comprising a narrow single-slit collimator and two detectors placed at 90° with respect to the beam axis was used. The time of flight technique was applied to allow the selection between PG and background events. Results: Using the positions at 50% entrance and 50% falloff of the PG profiles, a quantity called prompt-gamma profile length (PGPL) is defined. It is possible to observe shifts in the PGPL when there are absolute ion range shifts as small as 1–2 mm. Quantitatively, for an ion range shift of −1.33 ± 0.46 mm (insertion of a Teflon slab), a PGPL difference of −1.93 ± 0.58 mm and −1.84 ± 1.27 mm is obtained using a BaF{sub 2} and a NaI(Tl) detector, respectively. In turn, when an ion range shift of 4.59 ± 0.42 mm (insertion of a lung-equivalent material slab) is considered, the difference is of 4.10 ± 0.54 and 4.39 ± 0.80 mm for the same detectors. Conclusions: Herein, experimental evidence of the usefulness of employing PG to monitor carbon ion range using inhomogeneous phantoms is presented. Considering the homogeneous phantom as reference, the results show that the information provided by the PG emission allows for detecting ion range shifts as small as 1–2 mm. When considering the expected PG emission from an energy slice in a carbon ion therapy scenario, the experimental setup would allow to retrieve the same PGPL as the high statistics of

  14. Ion-beam-induced nanodots formation from Au/Si thin films on quartz surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, D. P.; Siva, V.; Singh, A.; Joshi, S. R.; Kanjilal, D.; Sahoo, P. K.

    2016-07-01

    We report the synthesis of Si nanodots on quartz surface using ion irradiation. When a bi-layer of ultrathin Au and Si on quartz surface is irradiated by 500 keV Xe-ion beam, the bi-layer spontaneously transforms into nanodots at a fluence of 5 × 1014 ions cm-2. The spatial density and diameter of the nanodots are reduced with increase in applied ion fluence. The nanostructures exhibit photoluminescence in the visible range at room temperature where the intensity and wavelength depends upon ion fluence. The observed evolution seems to be correlated to ion beam mixing induced silicide formation at Au-Si interface.

  15. Selective removal of nitrate ion using a novel composite carbon electrode in capacitive deionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu-Jin; Choi, Jae-Hwan

    2012-11-15

    We fabricated nitrate-selective composite carbon electrodes (NSCCEs) for use in capacitive deionization to remove nitrate ions selectively from a solution containing a mixture of anions. The NSCCE was fabricated by coating the surface of a carbon electrode with the anion exchange resin, BHP55, after grinding the resin into fine powder. BHP55 is known to be selective for nitrate ions. We performed desalination experiments on a solution containing 5.0 mM NaCl and 2.0 mM NaNO(3) using the NSCCE system constructed with the fabricated electrode. The selective removal of nitrate in the NSCCE system was compared to a membrane capacitive deionization (MCDI) system constructed with ion exchange membranes and carbon electrodes. The total quantity of chloride and nitrate ions adsorbed onto the unit area of the electrode in the MCDI system was 25 mmol/m(2) at a cell potential of 1.0 V. The adsorption of nitrate ions was 8.3 mmol/m(2), accounting for 33% of the total. In contrast, the total anion adsorption in the NSCCE system was 34 mmol/m(2), 36% greater than the total anion adsorption of the MCDI system. The adsorption of nitrate ions was 19 mmol/m(2), 2.3-times greater than the adsorption in the MCDI system. These results showed that the ions were initially adsorbed by an electrostatic force, and the ion exchange reactions then occurred between the resin powder in the coated layer and the solution containing mixed anions. PMID:22980574

  16. Field—ion microscopy observation of single—walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兆祥; 顾镇南; 等

    2002-01-01

    Field-ion microscopy(FIM),a tool for surface analysis with atomic resolution,has been employed to observe the end structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWCNTs).FIM images revealed the existence of open SWCNT ends,Amorphous carbon atoms were also observed to occur around SWCNTs and traditional field evaporation failed to remove them.Heat treatment was found to be efficacious in altering the end structures of SWCNT bundles.Carbon and oxygen atoms released from heated tungsten filament are believed to be responsible for the decoration imposed on the SWCNT ends.

  17. Carbonation of wollastonite(001) competing hydration: microscopic insights from ion spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Roberto C; Cho, Kyeongjae; Brüner, Philipp; Welle, Alexander; Gerdes, Andreas; Thissen, Peter

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we report about the influence of the chemical potential of water on the carbonation reaction of wollastonite (CaSiO3) as a model surface of cement and concrete. Total energy calculations based on density functional theory combined with kinetic barrier predictions based on nudge elastic band method show that the exposure of the water-free wollastonite surface to CO2 results in a barrier-less carbonation. CO2 reacts with the surface oxygen and forms carbonate (CO3(2-)) complexes together with a major reconstruction of the surface. The reaction comes to a standstill after one carbonate monolayer has been formed. In case one water monolayer is covering the wollastonite surface, the carbonation is no more barrier-less, yet ending in a localized monolayer. Covered with multilayers of water, the thermodynamic ground state of the wollastonite completely changes due to a metal-proton exchange reaction (also called early stage hydration) and Ca(2+) ions are partially removed from solid phase into the H2O/wollastonite interface. Mobile Ca(2+) reacts again with CO2 and forms carbonate complexes, ending in a delocalized layer. By means of high-resolution time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry images, we confirm that hydration can lead to a partially delocalization of Ca(2+) ions on wollastonite surfaces. Finally, we evaluate the impact of our model surface results by the meaning of low-energy ion-scattering spectroscopy combined with careful discussion about the competing reactions of carbonation vs hydration. PMID:25648453

  18. Development of a facility for high-precision irradiation of cells with carbon ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Niemantsverdriet, Maarten; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Coppes, Robert P.; van Luijk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Compared to photons, using particle radiation in radiotherapy reduces the dose and irradiated volume of normal tissues, potentially reducing side effects. The biological effect of dose deposited by particles such as carbon ions, however, differs from that of dose deposited by photons. The i

  19. Benchmarking nuclear models of FLUKA and GEANT4 for carbon ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As carbon ions, at therapeutic energies, penetrate tissue, they undergo inelastic nuclear reactions and give rise to significant yields of secondary fragment fluences. Therefore, an accurate prediction of these fluences resulting from the primary carbon interactions is necessary in the patient's body in order to precisely simulate the spatial dose distribution and the resulting biological effect. In this paper, the performance of nuclear fragmentation models of the Monte Carlo transport codes, FLUKA and GEANT4, in tissue-like media and for an energy regime relevant for therapeutic carbon ions is investigated. The ability of these Monte Carlo codes to reproduce experimental data of charge-changing cross sections and integral and differential yields of secondary charged fragments is evaluated. For the fragment yields, the main focus is on the consideration of experimental approximations and uncertainties such as the energy measurement by time-of-flight. For GEANT4, the hadronic models G4BinaryLightIonReaction and G4QMD are benchmarked together with some recently enhanced de-excitation models. For non-differential quantities, discrepancies of some tens of percent are found for both codes. For differential quantities, even larger deviations are found. Implications of these findings for the therapeutic use of carbon ions are discussed.

  20. The effects of high-voltage pulse electric discharges on ion adsorption on activated carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafurov, M. M.; Sveshnikova, D. A.; Larin, S. V.; Rabadanov, K. Sh.; Shabanova, Z. E.; Yusupova, A. A.; Ramazanov, A. Sh.

    2008-07-01

    The effects of high-voltage pulse electric discharges (HPED) on sorption of boron and sulfate ions on activated carbons of different kinds (KM-2, BAU, DAK) were investigated. The effect of HPED activation on the sorption characteristics of the systems was found to be similar to the temperature effect.

  1. Interfacial electrical properties of ion-beam sputter deposited amorphous carbon on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A. A.; Woollam, J. A.; Chung, Y.; Banks, B.

    1983-01-01

    Amorphous, 'diamond-like' carbon films have been deposited on Si substrates, using ion-beam sputtering. The interfacial properties are studied using capacitance and conductance measurements. Data are analyzed using existing theories for interfacial electrical properties. The density of electronic states at the interface, along with corresponding time constants are determined.

  2. Cancer stem cells: The potential of carbon ion beam radiation and new radiosensitizers (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sung-Jae; Ishii, Hideshi; Tamari, Keisuke; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Nishida, Naohiro; Konno, Masamitsu; Kawamoto, Koichi; Koseki, Jun; Fukusumi, Takahito; Hasegawa, Shinichiro; Ogawa, Hisataka; Hamabe, Atsushi; Miyo, Masaaki; Noguchi, Kozo; Seo, Yuji; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small population of cells in cancer with stem-like properties such as cell proliferation, multiple differentiation and tumor initiation capacities. CSCs are therapy-resistant and cause cancer metastasis and recurrence. One key issue in cancer therapy is how to target and eliminate CSCs, in order to cure cancer completely without relapse and metastasis. To target CSCs, many cell surface markers, DNAs and microRNAs are considered as CSC markers. To date, the majority of the reported markers are not very specific to CSCs and are also present in non-CSCs. However, the combination of several markers is quite valuable for identifying and targeting CSCs, although more specific identification methods are needed. While CSCs are considered as critical therapeutic targets, useful treatment methods remain to be established. Epigenetic gene regulators, microRNAs, are associated with tumor initiation and progression. MicroRNAs have been recently considered as promising therapeutic targets, which can alter the therapeutic resistance of CSCs through epigenetic modification. Moreover, carbon ion beam radiotherapy is a promising treatment for CSCs. Evidence indicates that the carbon ion beam is more effective against CSCs than the conventional X-ray beam. Combination therapies of radiosensitizing microRNAs and carbon ion beam radiotherapy may be a promising cancer strategy. This review focuses on the identification and treatment resistance of CSCs and the potential of microRNAs as new radiosensitizers and carbon ion beam radiotherapy as a promising therapeutic strategy against CSCs. PMID:26330103

  3. Rigid versus Flexible Ligands on Carbon Nanotubes for the Enhanced Sensitivity of Cobalt Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Pingping; Kraut, Nadine D.; Feigel, Ian Matthew; Star, Alexander

    2013-02-26

    Carbon nanotubes have shown great promise in the fabrication of ultra-compact and highly sensitive chemical and biological sensors. Additional chemical functionalization schemes can controllably improve selectivity of the carbon nanotube-based sensors; however the exact transduction mechanism is still under debate. In this article we detail the synthesis and selective response of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with polyazomethine (PAM) polymer towards the application of a specific trace metal ion detector. The response of the polymer system was compared to shape persistent macrocycle (MAC) comprised of identical ion coordination ligands. While ion detection with rigid MAC/SWNT chemiresistor was comparable to bare SWNT, flexible PAM offers significant SWNT signal amplification, allowing for picomolar detection of Co{sup 2+} ions with both selectivity and a fast response. We hypothesized that rearrangement of the flexible PAM on the SWNT network is a sensing mechanism which allows for ultrasensitive detection of metal ions. The electron transfer and polymer rearrangement on the SWNT was studied by a combination of optical spectroscopy and electrical measurements - ultimately allowing for a better understanding of fundamental mechanisms that prompt device response.

  4. Effects of main traits of sweet sorghum irradiated by carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the influence of carbon ion irradiation on important agronomic characters of sweet sorghum, dry seeds of Sweet Sorghum BJ0601 and BJ0602 were irradiated by 100 MeV/u 12C+6 ion beam to different doses at Heavy Ion Accelerator National Laboratory in Lanzhou (HIANLL). When matured, the main traits of sweet sorghum were measured. The correlation coefficient of five main agronomic characters, i.e. number of node, plant height, stalk diameter, sugar content and stem weight per plant, were analyzed using the SPSS 13.0 software. The results indicated that the obvious influence of sweet sorghum irradiated by carbon ion beam was observed. In addition, the correlation of main traits was studied. This study may provide rudimental data to select novel variety of sweet sorghum suited for fuel ethanol production. In addition, the average of sugar content of early mutant BJ0601-1 is higher than BJ0601 in M2, and the sugar content of sweet sorghum may be improved by carbon ion beam irradiation. (authors)

  5. A carbon cluster ion source for mass calibration at TRIGA-TRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRIGA-TRAP is a high-precision penning trap mass spectrometer installed at the research reactor TRIGA Mainz in order to determine the masses of short-lived fission products and - in addition to that - also the masses of actinide elements ranging from uranium up to californium. In order to determine precisely the masses of the nuclides of interest, the superconducting magnet providing the strong magnetic field for the Penning trap has to be calibrated by measuring the cyclotron frequency of an ion with well-known mass, which is, if possible, an isobaric nuclide of the ion of interest. Therefore, the best possible choice for mass calibration is to use carbon clusters as mass references, as demonstrated at the ISOLTRAP facility at ISOLDE/CERN. A laser ablation ion source for the production of carbon clusters has been developed using a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The design, current status, and results of the production of carbon cluster ions, using C60 and Sigradure registered samples, as well as other ions are presented

  6. Alternate dipping preparation of biomimetic apatite layers in the presence of carbonate ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classical simulated body fluids method cannot be employed to prepare biomimetic apatites encompassing metallic ions that lead to very stable phosphates. This is the case for heavy metals such as uranium, whose presence in bone mineral after contamination deserves toxicological study. We have demonstrated that existing methods, based on alternate dipping into calcium and phosphate ions solutions, can be adapted to achieve this aim. We have also especially studied the impact of the presence of carbonate ions in the medium as these are necessary to avoid hydrolysis of the contaminating metallic cations. Both the apatite–collagen complex method and a standard chemical (STD) method employing only mineral solutions lead to biomimetic apatites when calcium and carbonate ions are introduced simultaneously. The obtained materials were fully characterized and we established that the STD method tolerates the presence of carbonate ions much better, and this leads to homogeneous samples. Emphasis was set on the repeatability of the method to ensure the relevancy of further work performed on series of samples. Finally, osteoblasts cultured on these samples also proved a similar yield and standard-deviation in their adenosine triphosphate content when compared to commercially available substrates designed to study of such cell cultures. (paper)

  7. Rigid versus Flexible Ligands on Carbon Nanotubes for the Enhanced Sensitivity of Cobalt Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Pingping; Kraut, Nadine D; Feigel, Ian Matthew; Star, Alexander

    2013-02-26

    Carbon nanotubes have shown great promise in the fabrication of ultra-compact and highly sensitive chemical and biological sensors. Additional chemical functionalization schemes can controllably improve selectivity of the carbon nanotube-based sensors; however the exact transduction mechanism is still under debate. In this article we detail the synthesis and selective response of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with polyazomethine (PAM) polymer towards the application of a specific trace metal ion detector. The response of the polymer system was compared to shape persistent macrocycle (MAC) comprised of identical ion coordination ligands. While ion detection with rigid MAC/SWNT chemiresistor was comparable to bare SWNT, flexible PAM offers significant SWNT signal amplification, allowing for picomolar detection of Co{sup 2+} ions with both selectivity and a fast response. We hypothesized that rearrangement of the flexible PAM on the SWNT network is a sensing mechanism which allows for ultrasensitive detection of metal ions. The electron transfer and polymer rearrangement on the SWNT was studied by a combination of optical spectroscopy and electrical measurements − ultimately allowing for a better understanding of fundamental mechanisms that prompt device response.

  8. Geant4 Simulation Study of Dose Distribution and Energy Straggling for Proton and Carbon Ion Beams in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dose distribution and energy straggling for proton and carbon ion beams in water are investigated by using a hadrontherapy model based on the Geant4 toolkit. By gridding water phantom in N×N×N voxels along X, Y and Z axes, irradiation dose distribution in all the voxels is calculated. Results indicate that carbon ion beams have more advantages than proton beams. Proton beams have bigger width of the Bragg peak and broader lateral dose distribution than carbon ion beams for the same position of Bragg peaks. Carbon ion has a higher local ionization density and produces more secondary electrons than proton, so carbon ion beams can achieve a higher value of relative biological effectiveness.

  9. Germanium-doped carbon dots as a new type of fluorescent probe for visualizing the dynamic invasions of mercury(ii) ions into cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yun Huan; Li, Rong Sheng; Wang, Qiang; Wu, Zhu Lian; Wang, Jian; Liu, Hui; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-10-01

    Carbon dots doped with germanium (GeCDs) were firstly prepared by a new simple 15 min carbonation synthesis route, exhibiting excitation-independent photoluminescence (PL), which could avoid autofluorescence in bioimaging applications. The as-prepared GeCDs have low cell toxicity, good biocompatibility, high intracellular delivery efficiency, stability and could be applied for detection of mercury(ii) ions with excellent selectivity in complicated medium. It is to be noted that the as-prepared GeCDs used as a new type of probe for visualization of dynamic invasions of mercury(ii) ions into Hep-2 cells display greatly different properties from most of the previously reported CDs which are regularly responsive to iron ions. All the results suggest that the GeCDs can be employed for visualization and monitoring of the significant physiological changes of living cells induced by Hg2+.Carbon dots doped with germanium (GeCDs) were firstly prepared by a new simple 15 min carbonation synthesis route, exhibiting excitation-independent photoluminescence (PL), which could avoid autofluorescence in bioimaging applications. The as-prepared GeCDs have low cell toxicity, good biocompatibility, high intracellular delivery efficiency, stability and could be applied for detection of mercury(ii) ions with excellent selectivity in complicated medium. It is to be noted that the as-prepared GeCDs used as a new type of probe for visualization of dynamic invasions of mercury(ii) ions into Hep-2 cells display greatly different properties from most of the previously reported CDs which are regularly responsive to iron ions. All the results suggest that the GeCDs can be employed for visualization and monitoring of the significant physiological changes of living cells induced by Hg2+. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section and additional figures (Fig. S1-15). See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05326a

  10. Ion-beam and microwave-stimulated functionalization and derivatization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makala, Raghuveer S.

    Derivatizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with other low-dimensional nanostructures is of widespread interest for creating CNT-based nanocomposites and devices. Conventional routes based on wet-chemical oxidation or hydrophobic adsorption do not allow premeditated control over the location or spatial extent of functionalization. Moreover, aggressive oxidative treatments and agitation in corrosive environments lead to CNT shortening, damage, and incorporation of excess impurity concentrations. Thus, it is imperative to explore and develop alternative functionalization methods to overcome these shortcomings. The work presented in this thesis outlines two such methodologies: one based on focused ion irradiation for siteselective functionalization and the other that employs microwave-stimulation for mild, yet rapid and homogenous CNT functionalization. The utility of 10 and 30 kcV Ga+ focused ion beams (FIB) to thin, slice, weld, and alter the structure and composition at precise locations along the CNT axis is presented. This strategy of harnessing ion-beam-induced defect generation and doping is attractive for modulating chemical and electrical properties along the CNT length, and fabricate CNT-based heterostructures and networks. A novel approach that utilizes focused ion irradiation to site-selectively derivatize preselected segments of CNTs with controlled micro-/nano-scale lateral spatial resolution is demonstrated. Irradiation followed by air-exposure results in functionalized CNT segments ranging from the nanoscopic to the macroscopic scale. The functional moieties are utilized to site-selectively anchor Au nanoparticles, fluorescent nanospheres, an amino acid---lysine, a charge-transfer metalloprotein---azurin, and a photoactive protein---bacteriorhodopsin by means of electrostatic or covalent interactions. This approach is versatile and can be extended to obtaining other molecular moieties and derivatives opening up possibilities for building new types of nano

  11. Tribological properties of ion beam deposited diamond-like carbon film on silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present article reports on the physical characterization and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited on structural Si3N4 substrates. The films were deposited by the direct ion beam deposition technique. The ion beam was produced by plasma discharge of pre-mixed methane and hydrogen gas in a Kaufman-type ion source. The deposited films were found to be amorphous and contained about 70% carbon and 30% hydrogen. The friction coefficient of an uncoated Si3N4 ball on a DLC coated Si3N4 disc starts at about 0.2, then decreases rapidly to 0.1-0.15 with increasing sliding distance. Increasing humidity results in a slight increase in friction coefficient, but a significant decrease in wear factor. The wear factor for the tests at ≅60% rh (relative humidity) are about an order of magnitude smaller than the tests at 3% rh. (orig.)

  12. Adsorption of manganese(II) ions by EDTA-treated activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, A.Y.; Mazyck, D.W. [Jones Edmunds & Associates, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The adsorption of manganese(II) ions from aqueous solution onto three different granular activated carbons treated with ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and its sodium salt was investigated. Characterization of the chelate-treated carbons showed that EDTA altered the physical and chemical properties of the sorbents relative to their untreated counterparts. Furthermore, the modified sorbents exhibited a heightened capacity towards the adsorption of Mn(II) ions from aqueous media. Manganese(II) ion removal increased from 0 to 6.5 mg/g for the lignite coal-based sorbent, from 3.5 to 14.7 mg/g for the wood-based sorbent and from 1.3 to 7.9 mg/g for the bituminous coal-based sorbent. The increased removal is attributed, in part, to the creation of Lewis base sites that participate in covalent interactions and hydrolysis reactions.

  13. Electrosorptive desalination by carbon nanotubes and nanofibres electrodes and ion-exchange membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haibo; Gao, Yang; Pan, Likun; Zhang, Yanping; Chen, Yiwei; Sun, Zhuo

    2008-12-01

    A novel membrane capacitive deionization (MCDI) device, integrating both the advantages of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers (CNTs-CNFs) composite film and ion-exchange membrane, was proposed with high removal efficiency, low energy consumption and low cost. The CNTs-CNFs film was synthesized by low pressure and low temperature thermal chemical vapor deposition. Several experiments were conducted to compare desalination performance of MCDI with capacitive deionization (CDI), showing that salt removal of the MCDI system was 49.2% higher than that of the CDI system. The electrosorption isotherms of MCDI and CDI show both of them follow Langmuir adsorption, indicating no change in adsorption behavior when ion-exchange membranes are introduced into CDI system. The better desalination performance of MCDI than that of CDI is due to the minimized ion desorption during electrosorption. PMID:18929385

  14. Swift carbon ion irradiated Nd:YAG ceramic optical waveguide amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yang; Luan, Qingfang; Liu, Fengqin; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Zhou, Shengqiang; Chen, Feng

    2013-06-17

    A high-gain optical waveguide amplifier has been realized in a channel waveguide platform of Nd:YAG ceramic produced by swift carbon ion irradiation with metal masking. The waveguide is single mode at wavelength of 810 and 1064 nm, and with the enhanced fluorescence intensity at around 1064 nm due to the Nd(3+) ion emissions. In conjunction with the low propagation loss of the waveguide, about 26.3 dB/cm of the small signal gain at 1064 nm is achieved with an 18 ns pulse laser as the seeder under the 810-nm laser excitation. This work suggests the carbon ion irradiated Nd:YAG waveguides could serve as efficient integrated amplifiers for the signal amplification. PMID:23787589

  15. Polyhydroxyfullerene binds cadmium ions and alleviates metal-induced oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Arunava; Pinheiro, José Paulo; Seena, Sahadevan; Pascoal, Cláudia; Cássio, Fernanda

    2014-09-01

    The water-soluble polyhydroxyfullerene (PHF) is a functionalized carbon nanomaterial with several industrial and commercial applications. There have been controversial reports on the toxicity and/or antioxidant properties of fullerenes and their derivatives. Conversely, metals have been recognized as toxic mainly due to their ability to induce oxidative stress in living organisms. We investigated the interactive effects of PHF and cadmium ions (Cd) on the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by exposing cells to Cd (≤5 mg liter(-1)) in the absence or presence of PHF (≤500 mg liter(-1)) at different pHs (5.8 to 6.8). In the absence of Cd, PHF stimulated yeast growth up to 10.4%. Cd inhibited growth up to 79.7%, induced intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and promoted plasma membrane disruption in a dose- and pH-dependent manner. The negative effects of Cd on growth were attenuated by the presence of PHF, and maximum growth recovery (53.8%) was obtained at the highest PHF concentration and pH. The coexposure to Cd and PHF decreased ROS accumulation up to 36.7% and membrane disruption up to 30.7% in a dose- and pH-dependent manner. Two mechanisms helped to explain the role of PHF in alleviating Cd toxicity to yeasts: PHF decreased Cd-induced oxidative stress and bound significant amounts of Cd in the extracellular medium, reducing its bioavailability to the cells.

  16. Hydronium-dominated ion transport in carbon-dioxide-saturated electrolytes at low salt concentrations in nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Jensen, Kristian; Kristensen, Jesper Toft; Crumrine, Andrew Michael;

    2011-01-01

    Nanochannel ion transport is known to be governed by surface charge at low ionic concentrations. In this paper, we show that this surface charge is typically dominated by hydronium ions arising from dissolution of ambient atmospheric carbon dioxide. Taking the hydronium ions into account, we model...

  17. Kinetic-Energy Distributions of Positive and Negative Ions in DC Townsend Discharges of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; van Brunt, R. J.; Olthoff, J. K.

    1997-10-01

    Ion kinetic-energy distributions (IEDs), mean energies, and relative abundances are measured for CO_2^+, CO^+, O_2^+, O^+, C^+, and O^- ions produced in dc Townsend discharges in pure carbon dioxide. The discharges are generated at electric field-to-gas density ratios (E/N) ranging from 3.5 x 10-18 Vm^2 to 20 x 10-18 Vm^2 (3.5 to 20 kTd). Ions sampled from the discharge through a small orifice in the center of the grounded electrode were energy and mass analyzed by an electrostatic energy analyzer attached to a quadrupole mass spectrometer.(M. V. V. S. Rao, R. J. Van Brunt, and J. K. Olthoff, Phys. Rev. E 54), 5641 (1996) In the present experiments, CO_2^+ was determined to be the dominant positive ion (greater than 85%) at all E/N. The IEDs of CO_2^+, O_2^+, and O^+ are Maxwellian at all E/N, with CO^+ exhibiting non-Maxwellian behavior above 10 kTd, and C^+ exhibiting non-Maxwellian behavior at all E/N. Negative ion fluxes were substantially lower than positive ion fluxes, with O^- being the only detectable negative ion. The IEDs for O^- are Maxwellian at 6 kTd and below. The fact that O^- is the only negative ion indicates that no asymmetric charge transfer exists for O^- in CO_2.

  18. Charge and Mass Effects on Low Energy Ion Channeling in Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong; ZHENG Li-Ping; ZHANG Wei; XV Zi-Jian; REN Cui-Lan; HUAI Ping; ZHU Zhi-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    @@ Channeling phenomena of He, Ne, Ar and Kr ions at energy (200-5000eV) in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation with analytical potentials.The critical angles for the particles to be channeled in an SWCNT are analyzed.In the incident energy range of 200-5000 eV, it is found that the ion energy dependence of the critical angle obeys an improved Lindhard equation which is closely related to the ratio of nuclear charge number to atomic mass Z/M.The critical angle for different types of ions channeling in SWCNTs is determined by both the atomic nuclear charge and mass.%Channeling phenomena of He, Ne, Ar and Kr ions at energy (200-5000eV) in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation with analytical potentials. The critical angles for the particles to be channeled in an SWCNT are analyzed. In the incident energy range of 200-5000eV, it is found that the ion energy dependence of the critical angle obeys an improved Lindhard equation which is closely related to the ratio of nuclear charge number to atomic mass Z/M. The critical angle for different types of ions channeling in SWCNTs is determined by both the atomic nuclear charge and mass.

  19. Effects of a 2-step culture with cytokine combinations on megakaryocytopoiesis and thrombopoiesis from carbon-ion beam-irradiated human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate whether the continuous treatment of two cytokine combinations is effective in megakaryocytopoiesis and thrombopoiesis in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells exposed to heavy ion beams, the effects of a 2-step culture by a combination of recombinant human interleukin-3 (IL-3)+stem cell factor (SCF)+thrombopoietin (TPO), which just slightly protected against carbon-ion beam-induced damages, and a combination of IL-3+TPO, which selectively stimulated the differentiation of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to megakaryocytes and platelets, were examined. CD34+-hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells isolated from the human placental and umbilical cord blood were exposed to carbon-ion beams (linear energy transfer (LET)=50 keV/μm) at 2 Gy. These cells were cultured under three cytokine conditions. The number of megakaryocytes, platelets and hematopoietic progenitors were assessed using a flow cytometer and a clonogenic assay at 14 and 21 days after irradiation, respectively. However, the efficacy of each 2-step culture was equal or lower than that of using the IL-3+SCF+TPO combination alone and the 2-step culture could not induce megakaryocytes and platelets from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells exposed to high LET-radiation such as carbon-ion beams. Therefore, additional cytokines and/or hematopoietic promoting compounds might be required to overcome damage to hematopoietic cells by high LET radiation. (author)

  20. Ion-induced ionization and fragmentation of DNA building blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlathölter, T.A.; Alvarado, F.; Bari, S.; Hoekstra, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of singly and multiply charged ions with DNA can play a crucial role in biological radiation damage processes. In proton or heavy-ion therapy, high-energy ion beams are already employed for tumour treatment. The most relevant bio-molecular processes occur in the Bragg-peak region and

  1. Biological intercomparison using gut crypt survivals for proton and carbon-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charged particle therapy depends on biological information for the dose prescription. Relative biological effectiveness or RBE for this requirement could basically be provided by experimental data. As RBE values of protons and carbon ions depend on several factors such as cell/tissue type, biological endpoint, dose and fractionation schedule, a single RBE value could not deal with all different radiosensitivities. However, any biological model with accurate reproducibility is useful for comparing biological effectiveness between different facilities. We used mouse gut crypt survivals as endpoint, and compared the cell killing efficiency of proton beams at three Japanese facilities. Three Linac X-ray machines with 4 and 6 MeV were used as reference beams, and there was only a small variation (coefficient of variance<2%) in biological effectiveness among them. The RBE values of protons relative to Linac X-rays ranged from 1.0 to 1.11 at the middle of a 6-cm SOBP (spread-out Bragg peak) and from 0.96 to 1.01 at the entrance plateau. The coefficient of variance for protons ranged between 4.0 and 5.1%. The biological comparison of carbon ions showed fairly good agreement in that the difference in biological effectiveness between National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS)/ Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) and Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI)/Heavy Ion Synchrotron (SIS) was 1% for three positions within the 6-cm SOBP. The coefficient of variance was <1.7, <0.6 and <1.6% for proximal, middle and distal SOBP, respectively. We conclude that the inter-institutional variation of biological effectiveness is smaller for carbon ions than protons, and that beam-spreading methods of carbon ions do not critically influence gut crypt survival. (author)

  2. Hierarchical mesoporous/microporous carbon with graphitized frameworks for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Lv

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A hierarchical meso-/micro-porous graphitized carbon with uniform mesopores and ordered micropores, graphitized frameworks, and extra-high surface area of ∼2200 m2/g, was successfully synthesized through a simple one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The commercial mesoporous zeolite Y was utilized as a meso-/ micro-porous template, and the small-molecule methane was employed as a carbon precursor. The as-prepared hierarchical meso-/micro-porous carbons have homogeneously distributed mesopores as a host for electrolyte, which facilitate Li+ ions transport to the large-area micropores, resulting a high reversible lithium ion storage of 1000 mA h/g and a high columbic efficiency of 65% at the first cycle.

  3. Hardness and stress of amorphous carbon film deposited by glow discharge and ion beam assisting deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Marques, F C

    2000-01-01

    The hardness and stress of amorphous carbon films prepared by glow discharge and by ion beam assisting deposition are investigated. Relatively hard and almost stress free amorphous carbon films were deposited by the glow discharge technique. On the other hand, by using the ion beam assisting deposition, hard films were also obtained with a stress of the same order of those found in tetrahedral amorphous carbon films. A structural analysis indicates that all films are composed of a sp sup 2 -rich network. These results contradict the currently accepted concept that both stress and hardness are only related to the concentration of sp sup 3 sites. Furthermore, the same results also indicate that the sp sup 2 sites may also contribute to the hardness of the films.

  4. Hierarchical mesoporous/microporous carbon with graphitized frameworks for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Yingying; Fang, Yin; Qian, Xufang; Tu, Bo [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu, Zhangxiong [Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Asiri, Abdullah M. [Chemistry Department and The Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Zhao, Dongyuan, E-mail: dyzhao@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2014-11-01

    A hierarchical meso-/micro-porous graphitized carbon with uniform mesopores and ordered micropores, graphitized frameworks, and extra-high surface area of ∼2200 m{sup 2}/g, was successfully synthesized through a simple one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The commercial mesoporous zeolite Y was utilized as a meso-/ micro-porous template, and the small-molecule methane was employed as a carbon precursor. The as-prepared hierarchical meso-/micro-porous carbons have homogeneously distributed mesopores as a host for electrolyte, which facilitate Li{sup +} ions transport to the large-area micropores, resulting a high reversible lithium ion storage of 1000 mA h/g and a high columbic efficiency of 65% at the first cycle.

  5. Double-ion imprinted polymer @magnetic nanoparticles modified screen printed carbon electrode for simultaneous analysis of cerium and gadolinium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Bhim Bali, E-mail: prof.bbpd@yahoo.com; Jauhari, Darshika

    2015-05-22

    Highlights: • Synthesis of a double-ion imprinted polymer for analysis of Ce(IV) and Gd(III). • Imprinted nano-beads were grown on MNPs-modified SPCE surface. • Voltammetric determination of both templates was carried out simultaneously. • Ultra-trace analysis with LOD (ng mL{sup −1}) 0.07 for Ce(IV) and 0.19 for Gd(III) is achieved. - Abstract: A typical, reproducible, and rugged screen printed carbon electrode, modified with dual-ion imprinted beads, was fabricated employing the “surface grafting from” approach. For this, the acyl chloride functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were first immobilized and chemically attached with a typical functional monomer (but-2-enedioic acid bis-[(2-amino-ethyl)-amide]) on the electrode surface. This was subsequently subjected to the thermal polymerization in the presence of template ions (Ce(IV) and Gd(III)), cross-linker (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate), initiator (AIBN), and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The modified sensor was used for the simultaneous analysis of both template ions in aqueous, blood serum, and waste-water samples, using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry which revealed two oxidation peaks for respective templates with resolution as much as 950 mV, without any cross reactivity, interferences and false-positives. The detection limits realized by the proposed sensor, under optimized conditions, were found to be as low as 0.07 ng mL{sup −1} for Ce(IV) and 0.19 ng mL{sup −1} for Gd(III) (S/N = 3) that could eventually be helpful for lanthanide estimation at stringent levels.

  6. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions with Acid Activated Carbons Derived from Oil Palm and Coconut Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhlesur M. Rahman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, batch adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate the suitability of prepared acid activated carbons in removing heavy metal ions such as nickel(II, lead(II and chromium(VI. Acid activated carbons were obtained from oil palm and coconut shells using phosphoric acid under similar activation process while the differences lie either in impregnation condition or in both pretreatment and impregnation conditions. Prepared activated carbons were modified by dispersing hydrated iron oxide. The adsorption equilibrium data for nickel(II and lead(II were obtained from adsorption by the prepared and commercial activated carbons. Langmuir and Freundlich models fit the data well. Prepared activated carbons showed higher adsorption capacity for nickel(II and lead(II. The removal of chromium(VI was studied by the prepared acid activated, modified and commercial activated carbons at different pH. The isotherms studies reveal that the prepared activated carbon performs better in low concentration region while the commercial ones in the high concentration region. Thus, a complete adsorption is expected in low concentration by the prepared activated carbon. The kinetics data for Ni(II, Pb(II and Cr(VI by the best selected activated carbon fitted very well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  7. Influence of Age on the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Carbon Ion Radiation for Induction of Rat Mammary Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The risk of developing secondary cancer after radiotherapy, especially after treatment of childhood cancers, remains a matter of concern. The high biological effects of carbon-ion radiation have enabled powerful radiotherapy, yet the approach is commonly restricted to the treatment of adults. Susceptibility of the fetus to particle radiation–induced cancer is also unclear. The present study is aimed to investigate the effect of carbon-ion irradiation in childhood on breast carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: We irradiated female Sprague-Dawley rats of various ages (embryonic days 3, 13, and 17 and 1, 3, 7, and 15 weeks after birth) with 137Cs γ rays or a 290-MeV/u monoenergetic carbonion beam (linear energy transfer, 13 keV/μm). All animals were screened weekly for mammary carcinoma by palpation until they were 90 weeks old. Results: Irradiation of fetal and mature (15-week-old) rats with either radiation source at a dose of 0.2 or 1 Gy did not substantially increase the hazard ratio compared with the nonirradiated group. Dose responses (0.2-2.0 Gy) to γ rays were similar among the groups of rats irradiated 1, 3, and 7 weeks after birth. The effect of carbon ions increased along with the age at the time of irradiation, indicating relative biological effectiveness values of 0.2 (−0.3, 0.7), 1.3 (1.0, 1.6), and 2.8 (1.8, 3.9) (mean and 95% confidence interval) for animals that were 1, 3, and 7 weeks of age, respectively. Conclusions: Our findings imply that carbonion therapy may be associated with a risk of secondary breast cancer in humans, the extent of which may depend on the age of the patient at the time of irradiation

  8. Influence of Age on the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Carbon Ion Radiation for Induction of Rat Mammary Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko, E-mail: t_imaoka@nirs.go.jp [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Nishimura, Mayumi; Daino, Kazuhiro [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kokubo, Toshiaki [Department of Technical Support and Development, Research Development and Support Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Doi, Kazutaka [Regulatory Sciences Research Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Iizuka, Daisuke [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Molecular Radiobiology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nishimura, Yukiko [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Okutani, Tomomi [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Takabatake, Masaru [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo (Japan); Kakinuma, Shizuko; Shimada, Yoshiya [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The risk of developing secondary cancer after radiotherapy, especially after treatment of childhood cancers, remains a matter of concern. The high biological effects of carbon-ion radiation have enabled powerful radiotherapy, yet the approach is commonly restricted to the treatment of adults. Susceptibility of the fetus to particle radiation–induced cancer is also unclear. The present study is aimed to investigate the effect of carbon-ion irradiation in childhood on breast carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: We irradiated female Sprague-Dawley rats of various ages (embryonic days 3, 13, and 17 and 1, 3, 7, and 15 weeks after birth) with {sup 137}Cs γ rays or a 290-MeV/u monoenergetic carbonion beam (linear energy transfer, 13 keV/μm). All animals were screened weekly for mammary carcinoma by palpation until they were 90 weeks old. Results: Irradiation of fetal and mature (15-week-old) rats with either radiation source at a dose of 0.2 or 1 Gy did not substantially increase the hazard ratio compared with the nonirradiated group. Dose responses (0.2-2.0 Gy) to γ rays were similar among the groups of rats irradiated 1, 3, and 7 weeks after birth. The effect of carbon ions increased along with the age at the time of irradiation, indicating relative biological effectiveness values of 0.2 (−0.3, 0.7), 1.3 (1.0, 1.6), and 2.8 (1.8, 3.9) (mean and 95% confidence interval) for animals that were 1, 3, and 7 weeks of age, respectively. Conclusions: Our findings imply that carbonion therapy may be associated with a risk of secondary breast cancer in humans, the extent of which may depend on the age of the patient at the time of irradiation.

  9. Analysis of heavy-ion-induced DNA strand breaks in plasmid pUC18

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Plasmid DNA was irradiated or implanted by mixed particle field(CR) or lithium-ion-beam to detect strand breaks.The primary results showed that mixed particle field could induce single and double strand breaks with positive linear-dose-effects;most of sequence changes induced by CR were point mutant.Lithium-ion-beam could induce strand breaks also,but it was only at dose of 20Gy.

  10. The EGFR mutation status affects the relative biological effectiveness of carbon-ion beams in non-small cell lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amornwichet, Napapat; Oike, Takahiro; Shibata, Atsushi; Nirodi, Chaitanya S; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Makino, Haruhiko; Kimura, Yuka; Hirota, Yuka; Isono, Mayu; Yoshida, Yukari; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kohno, Takashi; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT) holds promise to treat inoperable locally-advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), a disease poorly controlled by standard chemoradiotherapy using X-rays. Since CIRT is an extremely limited medical resource, selection of NSCLC patients likely to benefit from it is important; however, biological predictors of response to CIRT are ill-defined. The present study investigated the association between the mutational status of EGFR and KRAS, driver genes frequently mutated in NSCLC, and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon-ion beams over X-rays. The assessment of 15 NSCLC lines of different EGFR/KRAS mutational status and that of isogenic NSCLC lines expressing wild-type or mutant EGFR revealed that EGFR-mutant NSCLC cells, but not KRAS-mutant cells, show low RBE. This was attributable to (i) the high X-ray sensitivity of EGFR-mutant cells, since EGFR mutation is associated with a defect in non-homologous end joining, a major pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and (ii) the strong cell-killing effect of carbon-ion beams due to poor repair of carbon-ion beam-induced DSBs regardless of EGFR mutation status. These data highlight the potential of EGFR mutation status as a predictor of response to CIRT, i.e., CIRT may show a high therapeutic index in EGFR mutation-negative NSCLC.

  11. Enhanced mercury ion adsorption by amine-modified activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Jianzhong [Center of Environmental Sciences, Lincoln University of Missouri, Jefferson City, MO 65102 (United States); Yang, John, E-mail: yangj@lincolnu.edu [Center of Environmental Sciences, Lincoln University of Missouri, Jefferson City, MO 65102 (United States); Deng Baolin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2009-07-30

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic metals found in water and sediments. In an effort to develop an effective adsorbent for aqueous Hg removal, activated carbon (AC) was modified with an amino-terminated organosilicon (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APTES). Surface properties of the APTES-modified AC (MAC) were characterized by the scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with the energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and potentiometry. The impacts of solvent, APTES concentration, reactive time and temperature on the surface modification were evaluated. The aqueous Hg adsorptive kinetics and capacity were also determined. Results demonstrated that the strong Hg-binding amine ligands were effectively introduced onto the AC surfaces through the silanol reaction between carbon surface functional groups (-COOH, -COH) and APTES molecules. The modification lowered the pH at the point of zero charge (pH{sub pzc}) to 4.54 from 9.6, favoring cation adsorption. MAC presented a faster rate of the Hg (II) adsorption and more than double adsorptive capacity as compared with AC.

  12. Extraction of copper ions by supercritical carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Complexation combined with supercritical fluid extraction was used to extract Cu2+ in this study. The effects of pressure, temperature, volume of CO2 on the efficiency of extraction were systematically investigated. At the optimum condition a 57.32% recovery was achieved. Addition of suitable amount of methanol(v/v = 5 % ) to the supercritical CO2 can increase in the extraction of Cu2+ (72.69 %, RSD = 2.12 %, n = 3). And the recovery can further increase in the presence of non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 because of its function of solubilization. Surfactant was first used in the extraction of metal ions in the present study, and the results are satisfied (90.52%, RSD=2.20%, n =3).

  13. Analysis of fast ion induced instabilities in tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, László

    2015-01-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices like tokamaks, it is crucial to confine the high energy fusion-born helium nuclei ($\\alpha$-particles) to maintain the energy equilibrium of the plasma. However, energetic ions can excite various instabilities which can lead to their enhanced radial transport. Consequently, these instabilities may degrade the heating efficiency and they can also cause harmful power loads on the plasma-facing components of the device. Therefore, the understanding of these modes is a key issue regarding future burning plasma experiments. One of the main open questions concerning energetic particle (EP) driven instabilities is the non-linear evolution of the mode structure. In this thesis, I present my results on the investigation of $\\beta$-induced Alfv\\'{e}n eigenmodes (BAEs) and EP-driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAMs) observed in the ramp-up phase of off-axis NBI heated plasmas in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. These modes were well visible on several line-of-sights (LOSs) of the soft X-ra...

  14. Light-ion-induced multifragmentation: The ISiS project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viola, V.E. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)]. E-mail: viola@indiana.edu; Kwiatkowski, K. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Beaulieu, L. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Bracken, D.S. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Breuer, H. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Brzychczyk, J. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Jagellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Souza, R.T. de [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Ginger, D.S. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Hsi, W-C. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Korteling, R.G. [Simon Fraser University, Burnaby BC, V5A IS6 (Canada); Lefort, T. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Lynch, W.G. [National Superconducting Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Morley, K.B. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Legrain, R. [CEA Saclay, Saclay (France); Pienkowski, L. [Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland); Pollacco, E.C. [CEA Saclay, Saclay (France); Renshaw, E. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Ruangma, A. [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Tsang, M.B. [National Superconducting Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Volant, C. [CEA Saclay, Saclay (France); Wang, G. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Yennello, S.J. [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Yoder, N.R. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2006-11-15

    An extensive study of GeV light-ion-induced multifragmentation and its possible interpretation in terms of a nuclear liquid-gas phase transition has been performed with the Indiana Silicon Sphere (ISiS) 4{pi} detector array. Measurements were performed with 5-15GeV/cp, p-bar , and {pi}{sup -} beams incident on {sup 197}Au and 2-5GeV {sup 3}He incident on {sup nat}Ag and {sup 197}Au targets. Both the reaction dynamics and the subsequent decay of the heavy residues have been explored. The data provide evidence for a dramatic change in the reaction observables near an excitation energy of E*/A=4-5MeV/residuenucleon. In this region, fragment multiplicities and energy spectra indicate emission from an expanded/dilute source on a very short time scale (20-50fm/c). These properties, along with caloric curve and scaling-law behavior, yield a pattern that is consistent with a nuclear liquid-gas phase transition.

  15. Light-ion-induced multifragmentation: The ISiS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive study of GeV light-ion-induced multifragmentation and its possible interpretation in terms of a nuclear liquid-gas phase transition has been performed with the Indiana Silicon Sphere (ISiS) 4π detector array. Measurements were performed with 5-15GeV/cp, p-bar , and π- beams incident on 197Au and 2-5GeV 3He incident on natAg and 197Au targets. Both the reaction dynamics and the subsequent decay of the heavy residues have been explored. The data provide evidence for a dramatic change in the reaction observables near an excitation energy of E*/A=4-5MeV/residuenucleon. In this region, fragment multiplicities and energy spectra indicate emission from an expanded/dilute source on a very short time scale (20-50fm/c). These properties, along with caloric curve and scaling-law behavior, yield a pattern that is consistent with a nuclear liquid-gas phase transition

  16. Recent results on fast electron production induced by energetic heavy ions on thin solid targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzanò, G.; Anzalone, A.; Arena, N.; De Filippo, E.; Geraci, M.; Giustolisi, F.; Pagano, A.; Rothard, H.; Volant, C.

    2003-08-01

    In order to study the emission of energetic electrons induced by the impact of swift heavy ions on thin solid targets, we carried out a series of experiments at the Superconducting Cyclotron of the Catania Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) in November and December 2001. We bombarded solid thin targets, ranging from carbon to bismuth, with different ion beams at fixed velocity, i.e. ˜23 MeV/nucleon 197Au 36+, 58Ni 14+ and 12C 3+. Absolute velocity spectra were measured in a wide laboratory angular range, from 1.5° to 175°. At forward angles, besides the well-known convoy and binary encounter components with the beam velocity and two times the beam velocity respectively, we observe also a high velocity tail and an intermediate velocity component. At backward laboratory angles, the spectra remain complex, still presenting an energetic tail. These electron velocity spectra strongly depend on the beam and target atomic numbers. We suggest a Fermi-Shuttle (or multiscattering) mechanism and an in-flight-emission of projectile Auger electrons to explain some of the observed features in the velocity spectra.

  17. Analysis of heavy ion induced DNA damage site using high resolution immunofluorescence microscopy imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy ion therapy is a promising cancer therapy for patients having tumors that cannot be surgically removed or chemotherapeutically treated. Carbon therapy shows less side-effect such as skin inflammation by specifically targeting tumors due to the Bragg peak. Although the clinical benefit is evident, molecular mechanisms underlying heavy ion induced DNA damage response and the repair are not fully understood. Ionizing radiation causes a DNA double strand break, which is one of the toxic DNA damages, leading to cell death if unrepaired. An advanced molecular biology technique enables the visualization of DSB site in individual cell by using immuno-fluorescence microscopy. DNA damage response protein, H2AX, is phosphorylated at DSB site, and it forms discrete focus. Since γH2AX focus represent a DSB site following X-irradiation, this focus assay is utilized as a sensitive technique to detect DSB. Furthermore, advanced microscope technologies enable us to visualize high resolution image by deconvolution which is a computationally intensive image processing technique that is being increasingly utilized for improving the contrast and resolution of digital images captured by the microscope. In this review, we describe our novel technique for DSB repair analysis using high resolution microscope images, and further we discuss an application possibilities of this useful technique for DNA repair research. (author)

  18. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Tao Lü

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of electric current on the motion of atoms still poses many questions, and several mechanisms are at play. Recently there has been focus on the importance of the current-induced nonconservative forces (NC and Berry-phase derived forces (BP with respect to the stability of molecular-scale contacts. Systems based on molecules bridging electrically gated graphene electrodes may offer an interesting test-bed for these effects.Results: We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach in combination with DFT calculations to study the current-induced vibrational dynamics of an atomic carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed. Molecular dynamics including current-induced forces enables an energy redistribution mechanism among the modes, mediated by anharmonic interactions, which is found to be vital in the description of the electrical heating.Conclusion: We have developed a semiclassical Langevin equation approach that can be used to explore current-induced dynamics and instabilities. We find instabilities at experimentally relevant bias and gate voltages for the carbon-chain system.

  19. Validation of recent Geant4 physics models for application in carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lechner, A; Ivanchenko, V N

    2010-01-01

    Cancer treatment with energetic carbon ions has distinct advantages over proton or photon irradiation. In this paper we present a simulation model integrated into the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit (version 9.3) which enables the use of ICRU 73 stopping powers for ion transport calculations. For a few materials, revised ICRU 73 stopping power tables recently published by ICRU (P. Sigmund, A. Schinner, H. Paul, Errata and Addenda: ICRU Report 73 (Stopping of Ions Heavier than Helium), International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, 2009) were incorporated into Geant4, also covering media like water which are of importance in radiotherapeutical applications. We examine, with particular attention paid to the recent developments, the accuracy of current Geant4 models for simulating Bragg peak profiles of C-12 ions incident on water and polyethylene targets. Simulated dose distributions are validated against experimental data available in the literature, where the focus is on beam energies relevant to io...

  20. Cyclam Modified Carbon Paste Electrode as a Potentiometric Sensor For Determination of Cobalt(Ⅱ) Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Reza POURETEDAL; Mohammad Hossein KESHAVARZ

    2005-01-01

    A new modified carbon paste electrode based on cyclam as a modifier was prepared for the determination of Co(Ⅱ) ions. The proposed electrode shows a Nernstian slope 28.4 mV per decade over a wide concentration range 5.0×10-6_1.0×10-1 mol/L of Co2+ ions with detection limit 2.5×10-6 mol/L. The sensor exhibits good selectivities for Co2+ over a wide variety of other cations. It can be used as an indicator electrode in potentiometric titration of cobalt(Ⅱ) ions as well as in direct determination of cobalt(Ⅱ) ions in wastewater of acidic cobalt electroplating bath. The electrode shows Nernestian behavior in a solution of 25% ethanol.

  1. Evaluation of the specific damage induced by heavy-ion beams on human hematopoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To clarify the effects of X-ray or heavy-ion beams on the myeloid differentiation pathways from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), the CD34''+ cells derived from human placental/umbilical cord blood were exposed to X-irradiation (0.5 Gy and 1.5 Gy) or monoenergetic carbon-ion beams (linear energy transfer (LET)=50 keV/μm, 0.5 Gy and 1.5 Gy), and then were assayed for their surviving fraction stimulated with five cytokine combination (G-CSF + GM-CSF + IL-3 + SCF + EPO). In addition, the exposed cells were cultured in serum-free medium supplemented with same cytokine for 14 days. The total progenitor cells, colony-forming cells (CFC) including granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, erythroid progenitors and granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte progenitors were assessed. All progenitors were far more sensitive to carbon-ion beams than to X-rays. In addition, the number of total mononuclear cells that could be expanded by liquid culture was significantly decreased in carbon-ion beam-irradiated cells compared to X-irradiated cells. However, no significant difference was observed in the cell surface antigens expressed on the generated cells derived from X-irradiated cells and carbon-ion beam-irradiated cells. These results showed that carbon-ion beams inflicted severe damage on their clonogenic potential of myeloid HSPCs; however, no significant influence was observed on the differentiation pathway. (author)

  2. Nano-sized Fe3O4/carbon as anode material for lithium ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano-sized Fe3O4/carbon material is prepared via a simple citric-nitrate combustion method combining with a hydrothermal carbon coating technique. The synthesized Fe3O4/carbon composite shows a high reversible specific capacity (ca. 850 mAh g−1 at 100 mA g−1; ca. 600 mAh g−1 at 500 mA g−1), good rate-capability as well as superior cycling stability as anode for lithium-ion batteries. The ameliorated electrochemical performance of Fe3O4/carbon electrode is associated to the nano-sized particle feature and the continuous carbon coating layer. The former provides short lithium-ion/electron diffusion distance, while the latter enables the fast electron transport pathways. Besides, the carbon layer can act as a protective component to prevent the active particle Fe3O4 from aggregation and pulverization during the charge/discharge processes. - Highlights: • Nano-sized Fe3O4/C was prepared by a simple citric-nitrate combustion process. • Fe3O4/C particles show core–shell structure. • Fe3O4/C powder displays high specific capacity and good cycling stability. • Fe3O4/C composite exhibits a superior rate-capability

  3. Differential effects of p53 on bystander phenotypes induced by gamma ray and high LET heavy ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Konishi, Teruaki; Tu, Wenzhi; Liu, Weili; Shiomi, Naoko; Kobayashi, Alisa; Uchihori, Yukio; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Hei, Tom K.; Dang, Bingrong; Shao, Chunlin

    2014-04-01

    High LET particle irradiation has several potential advantages over γ-rays such as p53-independent response. The purpose of this work is to disclose the effect of p53 on the bystander effect induced by different LET irradiations and underlying mechanism. Lymphocyte cells of TK6 (wild type p53) and HMy2.CIR (mutated p53) were exposed to either low or high LET irradiation, then their mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS generation were detected. The micronuclei (MN) induction in HL-7702 hepatocytes co-cultured with irradiated lymphocytes was also measured. It was found that the mitochondrial dysfunction, p66Shc activation, and intracellular ROS were enhanced in TK6 but not in HMy2.CIR cells after γ-ray irradiation, but all of them were increased in both cell lines after carbon and iron irradiation. Consistently, the bystander effect of MN formation in HL-7702 cells was only triggered by γ-irradiated TK6 cells but not by γ-irradiated HMy2.CIR cells. But this bystander effect was induced by both lymphocyte cell lines after heavy ion irradiation. PFT-μ, an inhibitor of p53, only partly inhibited ROS generation and bystander effect induced by 30 keV/μm carbon-irradiated TK6 cells but failed to suppress the bystander effect induced by the TK6 cells irradiated with either 70 keV/μm carbon or 180 keV/μm iron. The mitochondrial inhibitors of rotenone and oligomycin eliminated heavy ion induced ROS generation in TK6 and HMy2.CIR cells and hence diminished the bystander effect on HL-7702 cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the bystander effect is p53-dependent for low LET irradiation, but it is p53-independent for high LET irradiation which may be because of p53-independent ROS generation due to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  4. Study of Exotic Ions in Superfluid Helium-4 Using a Carbon Nanotube Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have extended our measurements of the properties of exotic negatively-charged ions in superfluid helium-4. We measured the ion mobility using the time-of-of-flight method at temperatures in the range between 1.03 and 1.16 K. Ions were generated by an electrical discharge produced by applying a voltage to sharp tips in the helium vapor above the liquid surface. Previous studies by Ihas and Sanders, Eden and McClintock, and by our group used tungsten tips and were able to detect at least twelve exotic ions in addition to the normal electron bubble. In the present work we have experimented with tips each consisting of a stainless steel wire coated with carbon nanotubes. We have found that with these tips the strength of the exotic ion signal is substantially increased making it possible to detect several ions which previously could not be seen. The present data combined with the results of the previous studies indicate that there are at least eighteen exotic ions with different mobility

  5. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy in Advanced Hypofractionated Regimens for Prostate Cancer: From 20 to 16 Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Tohru [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi, E-mail: h_tsuji@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Akakura, Koichiro; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Shimazaki, Jun [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Tsujii, Hirohiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the effects of differences in dose fractionation on late radiation toxicity and biochemical control in patients with prostate cancer treated with carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 740 prostate cancer patients who received C-ion RT between April 2000 and February 2009 were analyzed. Of those, 664 patients followed for at least 1 year were analyzed with regard to late radiation toxicity. Biochemical relapse-free (BRF) and overall survival (OS) rates in patient subgroups with each dose-fractionation were analyzed. Results: Only 1 case of grade 3 genitourinary (GU) morbidity was observed in 20 fractions, and none of the patients developed higher grade morbidities. The incidence of late GU toxicity in patients treated with 16 fractions was lower than that of patients treated with 20 fractions. The OS rate and BRF rate of the entire group at 5 years were 95.2% and 89.7%, respectively. The 5-year BRF rate of the patients treated with 16 fractions of C-ion RT (88.5%) was comparable to that of the patients treated with 20 fractions (90.2%). Conclusion: C-ion RT of 57.6 GyE (the physical C-ion dose [Gy] Multiplication-Sign RBE) in 16 fractions could offer an even lower incidence of genitourinary toxicity and comparable BRF rate than that in 20 fractions. Advancement in hypofractionation could be safely achieved with C-ion RT for prostate cancer.

  6. Lithium iron phosphate/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes for high energy lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yanyi; Liu Dawei; Zhang Qifeng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Yu Danmei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Liu Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Cao Guozhong, E-mail: gzcao@u.washington.ed [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports sol-gel derived nanostructured LiFePO{sub 4}/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes exhibiting enhanced electrochemical properties and cyclic stabilities. LiFePO{sub 4}/carbon films were obtained by spreading sol on Pt coated Si wafer followed by ambient drying overnight and annealing/pyrolysis at elevated temperature in nitrogen. Uniform and crack-free LiFePO{sub 4}/carbon nanocomposite films were readily obtained and showed olivine phase as determined by means of X-Ray Diffractometry. The electrochemical characterization revealed that, at a current density of 200 mA/g (1.2 C), the nanocomposite film cathodes demonstrated an initial lithium-ion intercalation capacity of 312 mAh/g, and 218 mAh/g after 20 cycles, exceeding the theoretical storage capacity of conventional LiFePO{sub 4} electrode. Such enhanced Li-ion intercalation performance could be attributed to the nanocomposite structure with fine crystallite size below 20 nm as well as the poor crystallinity which provides a partially open structure allowing easy mass transport and volume change associated with Li-ion intercalation. Moreover the surface defect introduced by carbon nanocoating could also effectively facilitate the charge transfer and phase transitions.

  7. Lithium iron phosphate/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes for high energy lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanyi; Liu, Dawei; Zhang, Qifeng; Yu, Danmei; Liu, Jun; Cao, Guozhong

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports sol-gel derived nanostructured LiFePO4/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes exhibiting enhanced electrochemical properties and cyclic stabilities. LiFePO4/carbon films were obtained by spreading sol on Pt coated Si wafer followed by ambient drying overnight and annealing/pyrolysis at elevated temperature in nitrogen. Uniform and crack-free LiFePO4/carbon nanocomposite films were readily obtained and showed olivine phase as determined by means of X-Ray Diffractometry. The electrochemical characterization revealed that, at a current density of 200 mA/g (1.2 C), the nanocomposite film cathodes demonstrated an initial lithium-ion intercalation capacity of 312 mAh/g, and 218 mAh/g after 20 cycles, exceeding the theoretical storage capacity of conventional LiFePO4 electrode. Such enhanced Li-ion intercalation performance could be attributed to the nanocomposite structure with fine crystallite size below 20 nm as well as the poor crystallinity which provides a partially open structure allowing easy mass transport and volume change associated with Li-ion intercalation. Moreover the surface defect introduced by carbon nanocoating could also effectively facilitate the charge transfer and phase transitions.

  8. Lithium iron phosphate/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes for high energy lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports sol-gel derived nanostructured LiFePO4/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes exhibiting enhanced electrochemical properties and cyclic stabilities. LiFePO4/carbon films were obtained by spreading sol on Pt coated Si wafer followed by ambient drying overnight and annealing/pyrolysis at elevated temperature in nitrogen. Uniform and crack-free LiFePO4/carbon nanocomposite films were readily obtained and showed olivine phase as determined by means of X-Ray Diffractometry. The electrochemical characterization revealed that, at a current density of 200 mA/g (1.2 C), the nanocomposite film cathodes demonstrated an initial lithium-ion intercalation capacity of 312 mAh/g, and 218 mAh/g after 20 cycles, exceeding the theoretical storage capacity of conventional LiFePO4 electrode. Such enhanced Li-ion intercalation performance could be attributed to the nanocomposite structure with fine crystallite size below 20 nm as well as the poor crystallinity which provides a partially open structure allowing easy mass transport and volume change associated with Li-ion intercalation. Moreover the surface defect introduced by carbon nanocoating could also effectively facilitate the charge transfer and phase transitions.

  9. Response of a silicon telescope microdosimeter to 400 AMeV carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A monolithic silicon telescope consisting of a surface ΔE detector 2 μm in thickness coupled to an E detector about 500 μm in thickness made out of a single silicon wafer was recently proposed for the microdosimetric characterization of hadron beams. This device and its pixelated version are intended to be irradiated at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO, National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy, Pavia, Italy) with a 400 AMeV carbon ion beam. The response of the silicon microdosimeter under these conditions was calculated with Monte Carlo simulations by using the FLUKA code, in order to have reference available for comparison with the experimental results. - Highlights: • FLUKA simulations performed to study the response of silicon telescope to carbon ions. • Energy distribution of ions from carbon fragmentation were calculated. • Microdosimetric spectra corrected for tissue-equivalence were derived. • Feasibility of the ΔE stage telescope in a 400 AMeV carbon beam was demonstrated

  10. Mitochondrial membranes with mono- and divalent salt: changes induced by salt ions on structure and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pöyry, Sanja; Róg, Tomasz; Karttunen, Mikko;

    2009-01-01

    membrane electrostatic potential. The changes induced by salt are more prominent in dynamical properties related to ion binding and formation of ion-lipid complexes and lipid aggregates, as rotational diffusion of lipids is slowed down by ions, especially in the case of CaCl(2). In the same spirit, lateral...... diffusion of lipids is slowed down rather considerably for increasing concentration of CaCl(2). Both findings for dynamic properties can be traced to the binding of ions with lipid head groups and the related changes in interaction patterns in the headgroup region, where the binding of Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions...

  11. Fast-ion transport induced by Alfvén eigenmodes in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Classen, I.G.J.; Geiger, B.;

    2011-01-01

    unstable by fast ions from ICRH as well as NBI origin. In ICRF heated plasmas, diffusive and convective fast-ion losses induced by AEs have been characterized in fast-ion phase space. While single RSAEs and TAEs eject resonant fast ions in a convective process directly proportional to the fluctuation...... amplitude, δB/B, the overlapping of multiple RSAE and TAE spatial structures and wave–particle resonances leads to a large diffusive loss, scaling as (δB/B)2. In beam heated discharges, coherent fast-ion losses have been observed primarily due to TAEs. Core localized, low amplitude NBI driven RSAEs have...

  12. Aggregation-induced emission active tetraphenylethene-based sensor for uranyl ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jun; Huang, Zeng; Hu, Sheng; Li, Shuo; Li, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-11-15

    A novel tetraphenylethene-based fluorescent sensor, TPE-T, was developed for the detection of uranyl ions. The selective binding of TPE-T to uranyl ions resulted in a detectable signal owing to the quenching of its aggregation-induced emission. The developed sensor could be used to visually distinguish UO2(2+) from lanthanides, transition metals, and alkali metals under UV light; the presence of other metal ions did not interfere with the detection of uranyl ions. In addition, TPE-T was successfully used for the detection of uranyl ions in river water, illustrating its potential applications in environmental systems. PMID:27439180

  13. Homologous recombination in Arabidopsis seeds along the track of energetic carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ting [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei 230026 (China); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Li Fanghua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu Qingfang [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Bian Po, E-mail: bianpo@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang Jufang [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wu Yuejin; Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Li Wenjian [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2012-09-01

    Heavy ion irradiation has been used as radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors, and is also an inevitable health concern for astronauts in space mission. Unlike photons such as X-rays and {gamma}-rays, a high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ion has a varying energy distribution along its track. Therefore, it is important to determine the correlation of biological effects with the Bragg curve energy distribution of heavy ions. In this study, a continuous biological tissue equivalent was constructed using a layered cylinder of Arabidopsis seeds, which was irradiated with carbon ions of 87.5 MeV/nucleon. The position of energy loss peak in the seed pool was determined with CR-39 track detectors. The mutagenic effect in vivo along the path of carbon ions was investigated with the seeds in each layer as an assay unit, which corresponded to a given position in physical Bragg curve. Homologous recombination frequency (HRF), expression level of AtRAD54 gene, germination rate of seeds, and survival rate of young seedlings were used as checking endpoints, respectively. Our results showed that Arabidopsis S0 and S1 plants exhibited significant increases in HRF compared to their controls, and the expression level of AtRAD54 gene in S0 plants was significantly up-regulated. The depth-biological effect curves for HRF and the expression of AtRAD54 gene were not consistent with the physical Bragg curve. Differently, the depth-biological effect curves for the developmental endpoints matched generally with the physical Bragg curve. The results suggested a different response pattern of various types of biological events to heavy ion irradiation. It is also interesting that except for HRF in S0 plants, the depth-biological effect curves for each biological endpoint were similar for 5 Gy and 30 Gy of carbon irradiation.

  14. Argon ion beam induced surface pattern formation on Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofsäss, H.; Bobes, O.; Zhang, K. [2nd Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, University Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-01-21

    The development of self-organized surface patterns on Si due to noble gas ion irradiation has been studied extensively in the past. In particular, Ar ions are commonly used and the pattern formation was analyzed as function of ion incidence angle, ion fluence, and ion energies between 250 eV and 140 keV. Very few results exist for the energy regime between 1.5 keV and 10 keV and it appears that pattern formation is completely absent for these ion energies. In this work, we present experimental data on pattern formation for Ar ion irradiation between 1 keV and 10 keV and ion incidence angles between 50° and 75°. We confirm the absence of patterns at least for ion fluences up to 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. Using the crater function formalism and Monte Carlo simulations, we calculate curvature coefficients of linear continuum models of pattern formation, taking into account contribution due to ion erosion and recoil redistribution. The calculations consider the recently introduced curvature dependence of the erosion crater function as well as the dynamic behavior of the thickness of the ion irradiated layer. Only when taking into account these additional contributions to the linear theory, our simulations clearly show that that pattern formation is strongly suppressed between about 1.5 keV and 10 keV, most pronounced at 3 keV. Furthermore, our simulations are now able to predict whether or not parallel oriented ripple patterns are formed, and in case of ripple formation the corresponding critical angles for the whole experimentally studied energies range between 250 eV and 140 keV.

  15. EPR study of N+-ion-induced free radical formation in antibiotic-producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the room temperature, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer was used to study free radical formation in antibiotic-producers in order to investigate antibiotic-producer mutagenic breeding, which were induced by N+ ion implanting into antibiotic-producers (e.g., Streptomyces ribosidificus, Streptomyces kanamyceticus and the phage-resistant culture of Streptomyces kanamyceticus). The results show that a lot of free radicals can be induced by N+ ion implanting into antibiotic-producers, and the yields of the free radicals increase with implanting dose. The death rate of antibiotic-producers rises due to the increase of N+-ion-induced free radical yields. (author)

  16. Optimizing pyrolysis of resin carbon for anode of lithium ion batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolytic resin carbon anode for lithoum ion batteries was prepared from thermosetting phenolic resin.Pyrolysis of the primary phenolic resin and the dewatered one was studied by thermal gravimetric analysis. Structures and characteristics of the carbon materials were determined by X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmer-Teller surface area analysis and electrochemical measurements. With the increase of pyrolyzing temperature and soaking time,the resin carbon material has larger crystallite sizes of Lc and La, lower specific surface area, smaller irreversible capacity and higher initial coulombic efficiency. The pyrolyzing temperature and soaking time are optimized to be 1050℃ and 2 h. The resin carbon anode obtained under the optimum conditions shows good electrochemical performances with reversible capacity of 387 mA · h/g and initial coulombic efficiency of 69.1%.

  17. Ion exchange reactions in interaction of basic zirconium sulfate with sodium carbonate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic zirconium sulfates, extracted from basic zirconium chloride solution and zirconium disulfate solution, as well as products of their interaction with sodium carbonate solution, which was exposed and not exposed to hydrolysis, were investigated by chemical and NMR spectroscopy methods. It has been established that the process of interaction of the basic zirconium sulfate with sodium carbonate solutions sulfatocarbonatozicrconates and carbonatozirconates of sodium are sequentially formed. In this case carbonate groups, due to different strenght of addition of hydroxogroups in initial basic sulfates, substitute either SOsub(h)sup(2)-)- groups and H2O or SO42--and OH--groups, and sodium ions substitute H3O+-groups. Carbonate groups, if they have substituted sulfato- or hydroxogroup, during hydrolysis of carbonatozirconates are splitted out to a less degree

  18. Transport of carbon ion test particles and hydrogen recycling in the plasma of the Columbia tokamak ''HBT'' [High Beta Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon impurity ion transport is studied in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak (HBT), using a carbon tipped probe which is inserted into the plasma (ne ∼ 1 - 5 x 1014 (cm-3), Te ∼ 4 - 10 (eV), Bt ∼ 0.2 - 0.4(T)). Carbon impurity light, mainly the strong lines of CII(4267A, emitted by the C+ ions) and CIII (4647A, emitted by the C++ ions), is formed by the ablation or sputtering of plasma ions and by the discharge of the carbon probe itself. The diffusion transport of the carbon ions is modeled by measuring the space-and-time dependent spectral light emission of the carbon ions with a collimated optical beam and photomultiplier. The point of emission can be observed in such a way as to sample regions along and transverse to the toroidal magnetic field. The carbon ion diffusion coefficients are obtained by fitting the data to a diffusion transport model. It is found that the diffusion of the carbon ions is ''classical'' and is controlled by the high collisionality of the HBT plasma; the diffusion is a two-dimensional problem and the expected dependence on the charge of the impurity ion is observed. The measurement of the spatial distribution of the Hα emissivity was obtained by inverting the light signals from a 4-channel polychromator, the data were used to calculate the minor-radial influx, the density, and the recycling time of neutral hydrogen atoms or molecules. The calculation shows that the particle recycling time τp is comparable with the plasma energy confinement time τE; therefore, the recycling of the hot plasma ions with the cold neutrals from the walls is one of the main mechanisms for loss of plasma energy

  19. Effective Stress Reduction in Diamond Films on Alumina by Carbon Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方志军; 夏义本; 王林军; 张伟丽; 马哲国; 张明龙

    2002-01-01

    We show the effective stress reduction in diamond films by implanting carbon ions into alumina substrates prior to the diamond deposition. Residual stresses in the films are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and a more reliable method for stress determination is presented for the quantitative measurement of stress evolution. It is found that compressive stresses in the diamond films can be partly offset by the compressive stresses in the alumina substrates, which are caused by the ion pre-implantation. At the same time, the difference between the offset by the pre-stressed substrates and the total stress reduction indicates that some other mechanisms are also active.

  20. The influence of ion bombardment on emission properties of carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chepusov, Alexander, E-mail: chepusov@iep.uran.ru [The Institute of Electrophysics of the Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IEP UD RAS), 620016, 106 Amundsen Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 620002, 19 Mira Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Komarskiy, Alexander, E-mail: aakomarskiy@gmail.com [The Institute of Electrophysics of the Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IEP UD RAS), 620016, 106 Amundsen Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 620002, 19 Mira Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Vadim, E-mail: kuznetsov@iep.uran.ru [The Institute of Electrophysics of the Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IEP UD RAS), 620016, 106 Amundsen Street, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    When electric-vacuum device works its cathode surface experiences bombardment with ions of residual gases. Effects of ion bombardment impact on surface of field emission cathodes made of carbon materials may essentially change emission properties of such cathodes. It changes emission start electric field strength, voltage vs. current characteristic of material, its relief and electron structure of the surface layer. Field emission cathode operating mode, variation of radiation doses allow to obtain both good effects: maximal electric current, surface recovery – and negative ones: the worst emission properties and surface destruction, amorphization.

  1. Nutrient and carbonate ion proxy calibrations in the deep sea coral D. dianthus (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, E.; Lavigne, M.; Gagnon, A. C.; Adkins, J. F.; McDonough, W. F.; Sherrell, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    Marine carbonates are among the most successful and reliable substrates for chemical paleoceanographic studies. Deep-sea corals are especially useful because they allow measurement of both 14C and U-Th dates in a single coral. Tracers, however, are needed to derive ventilation rates in the past from the mixing ratio of distinct endmember water masses. Reconstruction of nutrient abundances and carbonate ion distributions, even in regions where deep mixing is sluggish and regeneration is significant, could provide clues about basin-scale variations in export production, changes in whole-ocean nutrient inventory, and carbonate system equilibria on geological timescales. To fill this gap, we present modern calibrations of two paleo-nutrient proxies and a carbonate ion proxy in the deep sea coral D. dianthus. We demonstrate that P/Ca, Ba/Ca and U/Ca are direct proxies for phosphate (remineralized at shallow depths), dissolved barium (a deep-remineralized element with silicate-type distribution) and seawater carbonate ion, respectively. We analyzed 20, globally distributed, D. dianthus specimens using a 193nm excimer laser ablation HR-ICP-MS, along growth axis-oriented septal thick sections, which reveals the internal structure. Using an 80-100 μm spot size, data are collected from within the fibrous aragonite avoiding central band material as well as contamination and altered aragonite on the exterior of the septa. All seawater data used are derived from nearby WOCE/GEOSECS/CLIVAR stations. Plotting the coralline P/Ca against ambient seawater phosphate resulted in a calibration with an apparent partition coefficient (D= Element/Cacoral / Element/Caseawater) of 0.5 ± 0.1 (r=0.8, P<0.05, n=17). Similarly, the Ba/Ca in the coral versus dissolved seawater barium gave a DBa= 1.3 ± 0.3 (r= 0.8, P<0.05, n=15), and coralline U/Ca (µmol/mol) versus seawater carbonate ion (µmol/kg) gave a regression slope of -0.098 ± 0.002 (r=0.8, P<0.05, n=13). We tested potential

  2. Ion implantation induced by Cu ablation at high laser fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy laser plasma-produced Cu ions have been implanted in silicon substrates placed at different distances and angles with respect to the normal to the surface of the ablated target. The implanted samples have been produced using the iodine high power Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) using 438 nm wavelength irradiating in vacuum a Cu target. The high laser pulse energy (up to 230 J) and the short pulse duration (400 ps) produced a non-equilibrium plasma expanding mainly along the normal to the Cu target surface. Time-of-flight (TOF) technique was employed, through an electrostatic ion energy analyzer (IEA) placed along the target normal, in order to measure the ion energy, the ion charge state, the energy distribution and the charge state distribution. Ions had a Boltzmann energy distributions with an energy increasing with the charge state. At a laser fluence of the order of 6 x 106 J/cm2, the maximum ion energy was about 600 keV and the maximum charge state was about 27+. In order to investigate the implantation processes, Cu depth profiles have been performed with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) of 1.5 MeV helium ions, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) with 3 keV electron beam and 1 keV Ar sputtering ions in combination with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Surface analysis results indicate that Cu ions are implanted within the first surface layers and that the ion penetration ranges are in agreement with the ion energy measured with IEA analysis

  3. A stretchable polymer-carbon nanotube composite electrode for flexible lithium-ion batteries: porosity engineering by controlled phase separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hojun; Yoo, Jung-Keun; Jung, Yeon Sik [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong-Hyun [Material R and D Department, LG Display Co., Ltd., Paju-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Ho [Icheon Branch, Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, Icheon-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Kisuk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Flexible energy-storage devices have attracted growing attention with the fast development of bendable electronic systems. However, it still remains a challenge to find reliable electrode materials with both high mechanical flexibility/toughness and excellent electron and lithium-ion conductivity. This paper reports the fabrication and characterization of highly porous, stretchable, and conductive polymer nanocomposites embedded with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for application in flexible lithium-ion batteries. The systematic optimization of the porous morphology is performed by controllably inducing the phase separation of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and removing PMMA, in order to generate well-controlled pore networks. It is demonstrated that the porous CNT-embedded PDMS nanocomposites are capable of good electrochemical performance with mechanical flexibility, suggesting these nanocomposites could be outstanding anode candidates for use in flexible lithium-ion batteries. The optimization of the pore size and the volume fraction provides higher capacity by nearly seven-fold compared to a nonporous nanocomposite. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Charge-exchange Induced Modulation of the Heliosheath Ion Distribution Downstream of the Termination Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, H. J.; Fichtner, H.; Scherer, K.

    2015-12-01

    We consider the evolution of the solar wind ion distribution function alongthe plasma flow downstream from the termination shock induced by chargeexchange processes with cold interstellar H-atoms. We start from a kineticphase space transport equation valid in the bulk frame of the plasma flowthat takes into account convective changes, cooling processes, energydiffusion and ion injection, and describes solar wind and pick-up ionsas a co-moving, isotropic, joint ion population. From this kinetic transportequation one can ascend to an equation for the pressure moment of the iondistribution function, a so-called pressure transport equation, describingthe evolution of the ion pressure in the comoving rest frame. Assuming thatthe local ion distribution can be represented by an adequate kappa functionwith a kappa parameter that varies with the streamline coordinate, weobtain an ordinary differential equation for kappa as function of thestreamline coordinate s. With this result then we gain the heliosheath iondistribution function downstream of the termination shock. The latter thencan be used to predict the Voyager-2 measured moments of the distributionfunction like ion density and ion temperature, and it can also be used topredict spectral fluxes of ENA`s originating from these ions and registeredby IBEX-Hi and IBEX-Lo.We especially analyse the solar wind ion temperature decreasemeasured by Voyager-2 between the years 2008 to 2011 and try to explain itas a charge-exchange induced cooling of the ion distribution function duringthe associated ion convection period.

  5. In Situ Carbonized Cellulose-Based Hybrid Film as Flexible Paper Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shaomei; Feng, Xin; Song, Yuanyuan; Liu, Hongjiang; Miao, Miao; Fang, Jianhui; Shi, Liyi

    2016-01-20

    Flexible free-standing carbonized cellulose-based hybrid film is integrately designed and served both as paper anode and as lightweight current collector for lithium-ion batteries. The well-supported heterogeneous nanoarchitecture is constructed from Li4Ti5O12 (LTO), carbonized cellulose nanofiber (C-CNF) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using by a pressured extrusion papermaking method followed by in situ carbonization under argon atmospheres. The in situ carbonization of CNF/CNT hybrid film immobilized with uniform-dispersed LTO results in a dramatic improvement in the electrical conductivity and specific surface area, so that the carbonized paper anode exhibits extraordinary rate and cycling performance compared to the paper anode without carbonization. The flexible, lightweight, single-layer cellulose-based hybrid films after carbonization can be utilized as promising electrode materials for high-performance, low-cost, and environmentally friendly lithium-ion batteries. PMID:26727586

  6. Chemically and biologically modified activated carbon sorbents for the removal of lead ions from aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M; Osman, Maher M; Ahmed, Somia B

    2012-01-01

    A method is described for hybridization of the adsorption and biosorption characteristics of chemically treated commercial activated carbon and baker's yeast, respectively, for the formation of environmental friendly multifunctional sorbents. Activated carbon was loaded with baker's yeast after acid-base treatment. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy were used to characterize these sorbents. Moreover, the sorption capabilities for lead (II) ions were evaluated. A value of 90 μmol g(-1) was identified as the maximum sorption capacity of activated carbon. Acid-base treatment of activated carbon was found to double the sorption capacity (140-180 μmol g(-1)). Immobilization of baker's yeast on the surface of activated carbon sorbents was found to further improve the sorption capacity efficiency of lead to 360, 510 and 560 μmol g(-1), respectively. Several important factors such as pH, contact time, sorbent dose, lead concentration and interfering ions were examined. Lead sorption process was studied and evaluated by several adsorption isotherms and found to follow the Langmuir and BET models. The potential applications of various chemically and biologically modified sorbents and biosorbents for removal of lead from real water matrices were also investigated via multistage micro-column technique and the results referred to excellent recovery values of lead (95.0-99.0 ± 3.0-5.0 %).

  7. Geant4 Simulation Study of Dose Distribution and Energy Straggling for Proton and Carbon Ion Beams in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Qiang; Zhang Zheng; Li Yang

    2016-01-01

    Dose distribution and energy straggling for proton and carbon ion beams in water are investigated by using a hadrontherapy model based on the Geant4 toolkit. By gridding water phantom in N×N×N voxels along X, Y and Z axes, irradiation dose distribution in all the voxels is calculated. Results indicate that carbon ion beams have more advantages than proton beams. Proton beams have bigger width of the Bragg peak and broader lateral dose distribution than carbon ion beams for the same position o...

  8. Carbon-Coated SnO2 Nanorod Array for Lithium-Ion Battery Anode Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Xiaoxu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon-coated SnO2 nanorod array directly grown on the substrate has been prepared by a two-step hydrothermal method for anode material of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs. The structural, morphological and electrochemical properties were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and electrochemical measurement. When used as anodes for LIBs with high current density, as-obtained array reveals excellent cycling stability and rate capability. This straightforward approach can be extended to the synthesis of other carbon-coated metal oxides for application of LIBs.

  9. Field-ion microscopy observation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兆祥; 张耿民; 杜民; 金新喜; 侯士敏; 孙建平; 顾镇南; 赵兴钰; 刘惟敏; 吴锦雷; 薛增泉

    2002-01-01

    Field-ion microscopy (FIM), a tool for surface analysis with atomic resolution, has been employed to observethe end structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). FIM images revealed the existence of open SWCNTends. Amorphous carbon atoms were also observed to occur around SWCNTs and traditional field evaporation failedto remove them. Heat treatment was found to be efficacious in altering the end structures of SWCNT bundles. Carbonand oxygen atoms released from heated tungsten filament are believed to be responsible for the decoration imposed onthe SWCNT ends.

  10. Range Measurements of keV Hydrogen Ions in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.; Andersen, H.H.;

    1984-01-01

    Ranges of 1.3–3.5 keV/atom hydrogen and deuterium molecular ions have been measured by a thin-film reflection method. The technique, used here for range measurements in solid oxygen and carbon monoxide targets, is identical to the one used previously for range measurements in hydrogen and nitrogen....... The main aim was to look for phase-effects, i.e. gas-solid differences in the stopping processes. While measured ranges in solid oxygen were in agreement with known gas data, the ranges in solid carbon monoxide were up to 50% larger than those calculated from gas-stopping data. The latter result...

  11. Probing the complex ion structure in liquid carbon at 100 GPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, D; Vorberger, J; Gericke, D O; Bagnoud, V; Blažević, A; Cayzac, W; Frank, A; Gregori, G; Ortner, A; Otten, A; Roth, F; Schaumann, G; Schumacher, D; Siegenthaler, K; Wagner, F; Wünsch, K; Roth, M

    2013-12-20

    We present the first direct experimental test of the complex ion structure in liquid carbon at pressures around 100 GPa, using spectrally resolved x-ray scattering from shock-compressed graphite samples. Our results confirm the structure predicted by ab initio quantum simulations and demonstrate the importance of chemical bonds at extreme conditions similar to those found in the interiors of giant planets. The evidence presented here thus provides a firmer ground for modeling the evolution and current structure of carbon-bearing icy giants like Neptune, Uranus, and a number of extrasolar planets. PMID:24483747

  12. Fractioning electrodialysis : a current induced ion exchange process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, A. H.; Daubaras, G.; Burheim, O. S.; Rijnaarts, H. H. M.; Post, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    In desalination often multi ionic compositions are encountered. A preferential removal of multivalent ions over monovalent ions can be of interest to prevent scaling in the desalination process. Recently, a novel fractionating electrodialysis stack is described by Zhang et al., 2012 (in Sep. purify.

  13. Fractioning electrodialysis: a current induced ion exchange process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, A.H.; Daubaras, G.; Burheim, O.S.; Rijnaarts, H.; Post, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In desalination often multi ionic compositions are encountered. A preferential removal of multivalent ions over monovalent ions can be of interest to prevent scaling in the desalination process. Recently, a novel fractionating electrodialysis stack is described by Zhang et al., 2012 (in Sep. purify.

  14. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm-2) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation (p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  15. ION-BEAM INDUCED GENERATION OF CU ADATOMS ON CU(100)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BREEMAN, M; BOERMA, DO

    1992-01-01

    Low-energy ion scattering was used to study on-beam induced adatom generation during irradiation of a Cu(100) surface with 6 keV Ne ions at a sample temperature of 60 K. It was found that the number of adatoms produced per incoming ion decreases from an average of 3.5 to a saturation level of 1.8 af

  16. Diamond-Like Carbon Film Deposition Using DC Ion Source with Cold Hollow Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Shevchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon diamond-like thin films on a silicon substrate were deposited by direct reactive ion beam method with an ion source based on Penning direct-current discharge system with cold hollow cathode. Deposition was performed under various conditions. The pressure (12–200 mPa and the plasma-forming gas composition consisting of different organic compounds and hydrogen (C3H8, CH4, Si(CH32Cl2, H2, the voltage of accelerating gap in the range 0.5–5 kV, and the substrate temperature in the range 20–850°C were varied. Synthesized films were researched using nanoindentation, Raman, and FTIR spectroscopy methods. Analysis of the experimental results was made in accordance with a developed model describing processes of growth of the amorphous and crystalline carbon materials.

  17. Synergistic strengthening of polyelectrolyte complex membranes by functionalized carbon nanotubes and metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; An, Quan-Fu; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Jia-Kai; Song, Yi-Hu; Zhu, Bao-Ku; Gao, Cong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophilic polymers have garnered much attention due to their critical roles in various applications such as molecular separation membranes, bio-interfaces, and surface engineering. However, a long-standing problem is that their mechanical properties usually deteriorate at high relative humidity (RH). Through the simultaneous incorporation of functionalized carbon nanotubes and copper ions (Cu(2+)), this study introduces a facile method to fabricate high strength polyelectrolyte complex nanohybrid membranes resistant to high RH (90%). For example, the tensile strength of the nanohybrid membranes is 55 MPa at 90% RH (80% of the original value at 30% RH). These results are explained by copper ions depressing the swelling degree of the membrane, and functionalized carbon nanotubes promoting stress transfer between the polymer matrix and them. The nanohybrid membranes are efficient in separating water/alcohol mixtures containing relatively high water content (up to 30 wt%), whereas common hydrophilic polymer membranes usually suffer from excessive swelling under this condition. PMID:25586650

  18. Relationship between initial efficiency and structure parameters of carbon anode material for Li-ion battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Jian-bin; TANG You-gen; LIANG Yi-zeng; TAN Xin-xin

    2008-01-01

    The initial efficiency is a very important criterion for carbon anode material of Li-ion battery. The relationship between initial efficiency and structure parameters of carbon anode material of Li-ion battery was investigated by an artificial intelligence approach called Random Forests using D10, D50, D90, BET specific surface area and TP density as inputs, initial efficiency as output.The results give good classification performance with 91% accuracy. The variable importance analysis results show the impact of 5 variables on the initial efficiency descends in the order of D90, TP density, BET specific surface area, D50 and D10; smaller D90 and larger TP density have positive impact on initial efficiency. The contribution of BET specific surface area on classification is only 18.74%, which indicates the shortcoming of BET specific surface area as a widely used parameter for initial efficiency evaluation.

  19. Carbon-coated silicon nanotube arrays on carbon cloth as a hybrid anode for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Gu, Lin; Qian, Haolei; Zhao, Ming; Ding, Xi; Peng, Xinsheng; Sha, Jian; Wang, Yewu

    2016-03-01

    Silicon hollow nanostructure has been considered as one of the most promising material for commercial application in lithium-ion batteries due to its significant improvement of cycling stability. The fabricated hybrid structures, carbon-coated silicon nanotube arrays on carbon cloth substrate, with a high surface area and short electron collection pathway have been directly used as anode electrodes without any additional binder. The electrodes exhibit high capacity, excellent rate capability and good cycling stability. The discharge capacity of the hybrid electrode (the deposition time of silicon shell: 5 min) keeps stable, and after 100 cycles, the discharge capacities still remain 3654 mAh g-1 at the rate of 0.5 C.

  20. Carbon-Based Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, and Their Hybrid Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fei; Pham, Duy Tho; Lee, Young Hee

    2015-07-20

    A rapidly developing market for portable electronic devices and hybrid electrical vehicles requires an urgent supply of mature energy-storage systems. As a result, lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors have lately attracted broad attention. Nevertheless, it is well known that both devices have their own drawbacks. With the fast development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, various structures and materials have been proposed to overcome the deficiencies of both devices to improve their electrochemical performance further. In this Review, electrochemical storage mechanisms based on carbon materials for both lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors are introduced. Non-faradic processes (electric double-layer capacitance) and faradic reactions (pseudocapacitance and intercalation) are generally explained. Electrochemical performance based on different types of electrolytes is briefly reviewed. Furthermore, impedance behavior based on Nyquist plots is discussed. We demonstrate the influence of cell conductivity, electrode/electrolyte interface, and ion diffusion on impedance performance. We illustrate that relaxation time, which is closely related to ion diffusion, can be extracted from Nyquist plots and compared between lithium-ion batteries and electrochemical capacitors. Finally, recent progress in the design of anodes for lithium-ion batteries, electrochemical capacitors, and their hybrid devices based on carbonaceous materials are reviewed. Challenges and future perspectives are further discussed. PMID:26140707

  1. Fast-ion losses induced by ACs and TAEs in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Hicks, N.; van Voornveld, R.; Classen, I.G.J.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Brambilla, M.; Bruedgam, M.; Fahrbach, H. U.; Igochine, V.; Jaemsae, S.; Maraschek, M.; Sassenberg, K.

    2010-01-01

    The phase-space of convective and diffusive fast-ion losses induced by shear Alfven eigenmodes has been characterized in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Time-resolved energy and pitch-angle measurements of fast-ion losses correlated in frequency and phase with toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) and Alfven

  2. Focused helium and neon ion beam induced etching for advanced extreme ultraviolet lithography mask repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez, Carlos M.; Timilsina, Rajendra; Li, Guoliang; Duscher, Gerd; Rack, Philip D.; Slingenbergh, Winand; van Dorp, Willem F.; De Hosson, Jeff T. M.; Klein, Kate L.; Wu, Huimeng M.; Stern, Lewis A.

    2014-01-01

    The gas field ion microscope was used to investigate helium and neon ion beam induced etching of nickel as a candidate technique for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography mask editing. No discernable nickel etching was observed for room temperature helium exposures at 16 and 30 keV in the dose range

  3. Study of transient current induced by heavy-ion microbeams in Si and GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirao, Toshio; Nashiyama, Isamu; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Suda, Tamotu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Heavy-ion microbeams were applied to the study of mechanism of single event upset (SEU). Transient current induced in p{sup +}n junction diodes by strike of heavy ion microbeam were measured by using a high-speed digitizing sampling system. (author)

  4. Biological dose representation for carbon-ion radiotherapy of unconventional fractionation

    OpenAIRE

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku

    2016-01-01

    In carbon-ion radiotherapy, single-beam delivery each day in alternate directions has been commonly practiced for operational efficiency, taking advantage of the Bragg peak and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for uniform dose conformation to a tumor. The treatment plans are usually evaluated with total RBE-weighted dose, which is however deficient in relevance to the biological effect in the linear-quadratic model due to its quadratic-dose term, or the dose-fractionation effect. I...

  5. Synthesis of Microspherical LiFePO4-Carbon Composites for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Maria-Magdalena Titirici; Haihui Wang; Dandan Cai; Linghui Yu

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an “all in one” procedure to produce mesoporous, micro-spherical LiFePO4 composed of agglomerated crystalline nanoparticles. Each nanoparticle is individually coated with a thin glucose-derived carbon layer. The main advantage of the as-synthesized materials is their good performance at high charge-discharge rates. The nanoparticles and the mesoporosity guarantee a short bulk diffusion distance for both lithium ions and electrons, as well as additional active sites for the ...

  6. Energy loss of swift H3+-molecule ions in carbon foils

    OpenAIRE

    Denton Zanello, Cristian D.; Pérez Pérez, F. Javier; Abril Sánchez, Isabel; García Molina, Rafael; Arista, Néstor R.

    1996-01-01

    The energy loss of H3+-molecule beams interacting with amorphous carbon targets has been calculated, both as a function of the target thickness and the projectile velocity. We have considered the spatial changes, due to Coulomb repulsion, of the initial molecular configuration after the H3+ ion enters the target and then used a dielectric formalism to evaluate the stopping power of the correlated protons. The ratio between the stopping power of the H3+ molecule and that of its constituents co...

  7. In situ formed lithium sulfide/microporous carbon cathodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shiyou; Chen, Yvonne; Xu, Yunhua; Yi, Feng; Zhu, Yujie; Liu, Yihang; Yang, Junhe; Wang, Chunsheng

    2013-12-23

    Highly stable sulfur/microporous carbon (S/MC) composites are prepared by vacuum infusion of sulfur vapor into microporous carbon at 600 °C, and lithium sulfide/microporous carbon (Li2S/MC) cathodes are fabricated via a novel and facile in situ lithiation strategy, i.e., spraying commercial stabilized lithium metal powder (SLMP) onto a prepared S/MC film cathode prior to the routine compressing process in cell assembly. The in situ formed Li2S/MC film cathode shows high Coulombic efficiency and long cycling stability in a conventional commercial Li-ion battery electrolyte (1.0 M LiPF6 + EC/DEC (1:1 v/v)). The reversible capacities of Li2S/MC cathodes remain about 650 mAh/g even after 900 charge/discharge cycles, and the Coulombic efficiency is close to 100% at a current density of 0.1C, which demonstrates the best electrochemical performance of Li2S/MC cathodes reported to date. Furthermore, this Li2S/MC film cathode fabricated via our in situ lithiation strategy can be coupled with a Li-free anode, such as graphite, carbon/tin alloys, or Si nanowires to form a rechargeable Li-ion cell. As the Li2S/MC cathode is paired with a commercial graphite anode, the full cell of Li2S/MC-graphite (Li2S-G) shows a stable capacity of around 600 mAh/g in 150 cycles. The Li2S/MC cathodes prepared by high-temperate sulfur infusion and SLMP prelithiation before cell assembly are ready to fit into current Li-ion batteries manufacturing processes and will pave the way to commercialize low-cost Li2S-G Li-ion batteries. PMID:24251957

  8. Copper Nanoparticle-Incorporated Carbon Fibers as Free-Standing Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Pan; Yuan, Tao; Yao, Long; Han, Zhuo; Yang, Junhe; Zheng, Shiyou

    2016-01-01

    Copper-incorporated carbon fibers (Cu/CF) as free-standing anodes for lithium-ion batteries are prepared by electrospinning technique following with calcination at 600, 700, and 800 °C. The structural properties of materials are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman, thermogravimetry (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS). It is found that the Cu/CF composites have smooth, regular, and long fi...

  9. Electrocatalytic Activity of Carbonized Nanostructured Polyanilines for Oxidation Reactions: Sensing of Nitrite Ions and Ascorbic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Carbonized PANIs prepared from various nanostructured PANI precursors • Electroanalytical performances of carbonized PANIs evaluated using voltammetry • Study of carbonized PANIs physico-chemical properties related to electroactivity • The lowest over-potential for NO2− oxidation at c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE) • The lowest over-potential for ascorbic acid oxidation at both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA - Abstract: A comparative study of the electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-containing carbon nanomaterials, prepared by the carbonization of nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) salts, for the electrooxidation reactions is presented. Nanostructured PANI salts were synthesized by the oxidative polymerization of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate in an aqueous solution in the presence of 5-sulfosalicylic acid (PANI-SSA), 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (PANI-DNSA) as well as without added acid (PANI), and subsequently carbonized to c-PANI-SSA, c-PANI-DNSA and c-PANI, respectively. Glassy carbon tip was modified with nanostructured c-PANIs and used for the investigation of sensing of nitrite and ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions as model analytes by linear sweep voltammetry. All three types of the investigated c-PANIs gave excellent response to the nitrite ions and ascorbic acid electrooxidation. The lowest peak potential for nitrite ion oxidation exhibited c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE), and for ascorbic acid oxidation both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA (ca. + 0.13 V vs. SCE). Electrochemical data were correlated with structural and textural data obtained by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elemental and nitrogen sorption analysis

  10. Structural modification of tantalum crystal induced by nitrogen ion implantation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A H RAMEZANI; M R HANTEHZADEH; M GHORANNEVISS; E DARABI

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the effect of nitrogen ion implantation on tantalum surface structure. In this experiment, nitrogen ions which had an energy of 30 keV and doses of $1 \\times 10^{17}$ to $10 \\times 10^{17}$ ions cm$^{−2}$ were used. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was applied for both the metallic Ta substrate and the study of new structures that have been created through the nitrogen ion implantation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was also used tocheck the roughness variations prior to and also after the implantation phase. The experimental results show the formation of hexagonal tantalum nitride (TaN$_{0.43}$) in addition to the fact that by increasing the ion dose, the nitrogen atoms occupy more interstitial spaces in the target crystal. The nitride phase also seen for $3\\times 10^{17}$ and $5\\times 10^{17}$ ions cm$^{−2}$, while it disappeared for higher dose of $7\\times 10^{17}$ and $1\\times 10^{18}$ ions cm$^{−2}$. The FWHM of the dominant peak of tantalum nitride suggest the growth of the crystallite’s size, which is in agreement with the AFM results ofthe grains.

  11. Modeling of induced seismicity during mineral carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarushina, V.; Bercovici, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Rapidly developing carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies are a promising way of reducing the climate impact of greenhouse gases. These technologies involve injecting large amounts of CO2-bearing fluids underground, which potentially leads to high pore pressure and the conditions for seismic activity in the proximity of the injection site. Previously, we developed a simple conceptual model to estimate the seismic risk of mineral or mafic CCS operations (Yarushina & Bercovici, GRL vol.40, doi:10.1002/grl.50196, 2013). In this model, the storage reservoir is treated as a porous rock with grains that evolve during carbonation reactions. Seismic triggering occurs when local stresses at grain-grain contacts reach the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. We showed that injection of CO2 into reactive mafic or ultramafic rocks potentially reduces seismic risk since carbonation reactions increase the contact area between the rock grains and reduce the local stresses. Here we further develop this model and consider the effect of fluid injection flux and pressure gradients along grain boundaries on induced seismicity. Grain evolution not only changes the stress support but also alters the matrix permeability, which in turn affects the driving pressure gradients and the associated deviatoric stresses. The resulting coupled porous flow, chemical reactive grain-growth and failure model is an important step in understanding the seismic risks of carbon sequestration.

  12. Composite alginate hydrogel microparticulate delivery system of zidovudine hydrochloride based on counter ion induced aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Harekrishna; Rao, P. Venkateswar; Panda, Sanjay Kumar; Biswal, Asim Kumar; Parida, Kirti Ranjan; Dash, Jharana

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The present study deals with preparation of zidovudine loaded microparticle by counter ion induced aggregation method. During this study effect of polyacrylates and hypromellose polymers on release study were investigated. Materials and Methods: The ion induced aggregated alginate based microparticles were characterized for surface morphology, particle size analysis, drug entrapment study, in-vitro study, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimet...

  13. The photodetachment cross-section and threshold energy of negative ions in carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, E. M.; Woo, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    Threshold energy and sunlight photodetachment measurements on negative carbon dioxide ions, using a 2.5 kw light pressure xenon lamp, show that: (1) Electron affinity of CO3(+) is larger than 2.7 e.V. and that an isomeric form of CO3(+) is likely an error; (2) The photodetachment cross section of CO3(-) will roughly be like a step function across the range of 4250 to 2500A, having its threshold energy at 4250A; (3) Sunlight photodetachment rate for CO3(-) is probably much smaller than elsewhere reported; and (4) The probability of having photodetached electrons re-attach to form negative ions is less than 1%. Mass identifying drift tube tests confirm that the slower ion is CO3(-), formed through the O(-) + 2CO2 yields CO3(-) + CO2 reaction.

  14. Highly stretchable carbon nanotube transistors enabled by buckled ion gel gate dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Meng-Yin; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Ma, Zhenqiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Zhao, Juan [School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Xu, Feng; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Arnold, Michael S., E-mail: michael.arnold@wisc.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-08-03

    Deformable field-effect transistors (FETs) are expected to facilitate new technologies like stretchable displays, conformal devices, and electronic skins. We previously demonstrated stretchable FETs based on buckled thin films of polyfluorene-wrapped semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes as the channel, buckled metal films as electrodes, and unbuckled flexible ion gel films as the dielectric. The FETs were stretchable up to 50% without appreciable degradation in performance before failure of the ion gel film. Here, we show that by buckling the ion gel, the integrity and performance of the nanotube FETs are extended to nearly 90% elongation, limited by the stretchability of the elastomer substrate. The FETs maintain an on/off ratio of >10{sup 4} and a field-effect mobility of 5 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} under elongation and demonstrate invariant performance over 1000 stretching cycles.

  15. Ion field-evaporation from ionic liquids infusing carbon xerogel microtips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Martinez, C. S., E-mail: carlita@mit.edu; Lozano, P. C. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-07-27

    Ionic liquid ion sources capable of producing positive and negative molecular ion beams from room-temperature molten salts have applications in diverse fields, from materials science to space propulsion. The electrostatic stressing of these ionic liquids places the liquid surfaces in a delicate balance that could yield unwanted droplet emission when not properly controlled. Micro-tip emitter configurations are required to guarantee that these sources will operate in a pure ionic regime with no additional droplets. Porous carbon based on resorcinol-formaldehyde xerogels is introduced as an emitter substrate. It is demonstrated that this material can be shaped to the required micron-sized geometry and has appropriate transport properties to favor pure ionic emission. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to verify that charged particle beams contain solvated ions exclusively.

  16. Multi-reference configuration-interaction calculations on multiply charged ions of carbon monosulfide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Bing; Zhang Yu-Juan

    2013-01-01

    The potential energy curves for neutrals and multiply charged ions of carbon monosulfide are computed with highly correlated multi-reference configuration interaction wavefunctions.The correlations of inner-shell electrons with the scalar relativistic effects are included in the present computations.The spectroscopic constants,dissociation energies,ionization energies for ground and low-lying excited states together with corresponding electronic configurations of ions are obtained,and a good agreement between the present work and existing experiments is found.No theoretical evidence is found for the adiabatically stable CSq+ (q > 2) ions according to the present ab initio calculations.The calculated values for lst-6th ionization energies are 11.25,32.66,64.82,106.25,159.75,and 224.64 eV,respectively.The kinetic energy release data of fragments are provided by the present work for further experimental comparisons.

  17. Improvement on corrosion resistance of NiTi orthopedic materials by carbon plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Ray W. Y.; Ho, Joan P. Y.; Luk, Camille M. Y.; Liu, Xuanyong; Chung, Jonathan C. Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Lu, William W.; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.

    2006-01-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) have potential applications as orthopedic implants because of their unique super-elastic properties and shape memory effects. However, the problem of out-diffusion of harmful Ni ions from the alloys during prolonged use inside a human body must be overcome before they can be widely used in orthopedic implants. In this work, we enhance the corrosion resistance of NiTi using carbon plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D). Our corrosion and simulated body fluid tests indicate that either an ion-mixed amorphous carbon coating fabricated by PIII&D or direct carbon PIII can drastically improve the corrosion resistance and block the out-diffusion of Ni from the materials. Results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicate that both C2H2-PIII&D and C2H2-PIII do not roughen the original flat surface to an extent that can lead to degradation in corrosion resistance.

  18. Mutagenic effects of carbon ion beam irradiations on dry Lotus japonicus seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shanwei; Zhou, Libin; Li, Wenjian; Du, Yan; Yu, Lixia; Feng, Hui; Mu, Jinhu; Chen, Yuze

    2016-09-01

    Carbon ion beam irradiation is a powerful method for creating mutants and has been used in crop breeding more and more. To investigate the effects of carbon ion beams on Lotus japonicus, dry seeds were irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam at dosages of 0, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 Gy. The germination rate, survival rate and root length of M1 populations were explored and the dose of 400 Gy was selected as the median lethal dose (LD50) for a large-scale mutant screening. Among 2472 M2 plants, 127 morphological mutants including leaf, stem, flower and fruit phenotypic variation were found, and the mutation frequency was approximately 5.14%. Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) assays were utilized to investigate the DNA polymorphism between seven mutants and eight plants without phenotypic variation from M2 populations. No remarkable differences were detected between these two groups, and the total polymorphic rate was 0.567%.

  19. CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING THE INFLUENCE OF METALIC IONS OF THE STABILITY OF CARBONATES FROM SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bulgariu

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of minor elements in heterogeneous mineral / aqueous solutions systems represent one of important problem, with many applications in environmental geochemistry field. Ours studies was focus on the metal ions distribution in carbonate (CaCO3 / solution systems, from applicability point of view to the estimation of formation conditions and of carbonates stability from soils. On the base of our results obtained by sequential solid / liquid extraction for 17 soil samples and theoretical modeling of CaCO3 / solution systems, and the results from literature we try to develop the McIntire prognosis models and the free Gibbs enthalpy linear correlation model, by the inclusion in calculus relations of distribution coefficients a higher number of factors which effective influenced the thermodynamics and kinetics of interphase distribution processes of metal ions. The established correlations has been used to the estimation of time evolution of carbonate / solution equilibrium under the influence of some metal ions (Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb, Bi, which appear usual as pollutants in soils. The prognosis realized on the base of the established correlations are in agreement with the theoretical modelling results and studies of case for different types of polluted soils with heavy metals.

  20. Fate of D3 mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to X-rays or carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, S; Pignalosa, D; Nasonova, E; Arrizabalaga, O; Helm, A; Durante, M; Ritter, S

    2014-01-15

    The risk of radiation exposure during embryonic development is still a major problem in radiotoxicology. In this study we investigated the response of the murine embryonic stem cell (mESC) line D3 to two radiation qualities: sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions. We analyzed clonogenic cell survival, proliferation, induction of chromosome aberrations as well as the capability of cells to differentiate to beating cardiomyocytes up to 3 days after exposure. Our results show that, for all endpoints investigated, carbon ions are more effective than X-rays at the same radiation dose. Additionally, in long term studies (≥8 days post-irradiation) chromosomal damage and the pluripotency state were investigated. These studies reveal that pluripotency markers are present in the progeny of cells surviving the exposure to both radiation types. However, only in the progeny of X-ray exposed cells the aberration frequency was comparable to that of the control population, while the progeny of carbon ion irradiated cells harbored significantly more aberrations than the control, generally translocations. We conclude that cells surviving the radiation exposure maintain pluripotency but may carry stable chromosomal rearrangements after densely ionizing radiation.

  1. In situ analysis of ion-induced polymer surface modification using secondary ion mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuji, Shigeto; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the surface modification process consisting of ion irradiation immediately followed by exposure to ambient gas for three types of polymers having the same main chain, sbnd Csbnd Csbnd , but different atoms bound to the main chain, using in situ secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The polymers' surface was irradiated with 30 keV Au ions at a total fluence for up to 1 × 1017 cm-2 and exposed to ambient gas in a ultra-high-vacuum chamber (1 × 10-6 Pa) for 30 min after the ion irradiation. Low density polyethylene mainly exhibited a hydrogen dissociation during the ion irradiation and a recombination with hydrogen atoms by the exposure, polytetrafluoroethylene mainly showed a main chain scission and no recombination during the exposure, and polyvinylidene difluoride lost hydrogen and fluorine atoms by the ion irradiation and partially recombined with hydrogen and fluorine atoms upon the exposure. The deposited energy density on the polymer surfaces reflects the dependence of the modification on the incident ion species, Au or Ga ions.

  2. Optical properties and oxidation of carbonized and cross-linked structures formed in polycarbonate by plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosobrodova, E.; Kondyurin, A.; Chrzanowski, W.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2014-06-01

    At ion fluences higher than 5 · 1015 ions/cm2, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of polycarbonate (PC) results in a formation of a carbonized surface layer. The thickness of this layer is close to the depth of ion penetration. A comparison of PIII treated, spin-coated PC films with pre-treatment thicknesses designed to match and exceed the carbonized layer thickness is employed to study the properties of the carbonised layer independently from the less modified underlying structure. At ion fluencies higher than 1016 ions/cm2, the thinner PC film is completely transformed into an amorphous carbon-like material with no traces of the initial PC structure. The thicker films, however, incorporated two layers: a top carbonised layer and a cross-linked layer below. Compared to the two-layered PC film, the completely carbonized layer was found to have a much higher concentration of Cdbnd O bonds and much lower concentration of O-H bonds after exposure to atmospheric oxygen. The refractive index of the thicker PC films PIII treated with high ion fluencies is close to the refractive index of diamond-like carbon. Anomalous dispersion of the refractive index of the thicker PC films is observed after formation of the carbonised layer. The refractive index of the thinner PC film has normal dispersion at all ion fluences. At ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2, both PC films were found to have the same etching rate as polystyrene. Washing in dichloromethane had no effect on the carbonised layer but affected the underlying material in the case of the thicker PC films leading to a wrinkled structure up to ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2. At this and higher fluence, areas of an ordered island-like structure were observed.

  3. Radiation biophysical studies with mammalian cells and a modulated carbon ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinese hamster (V-79) and human kidney (T-1) cells were irradiated in stirred suspensions placed at various positions in the plateau and extended Bragg peak of a 400-MeV/amu carbon ion beam. The range of the ions was modulated by a lead (translational) ridge filter and a brass (spiral) ridge filter designed to produce extended peaks of approximately 4 and 10 cm, respectively. Stationary-phase and G1-phase populations of Chinese hamster cells were found to have different absolute radiosensitivities which, in turn, were different from that of asynchronous human kidney cells. The increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) observed as carbon ions were slowed down and stopped in water was similar for the three cell populations at doses greater than 400 rad. At lower doses the RBE was greater for the hamster cell populations than for the human kidney cells. The gain in RBE (at the 50% survival level) between the plateaus and the middle region of the extended peaks was approximately 2.0 and 1.7 for the 4- and 10-cm extended peaks, respectively. Oxygen enhancement ratios (OER) were determined at the 10% survival levels with stationary-phase populations of hamster cells. Values of 2.8, 2.65, and 1.65 were obtained for the OER of 220-kV x rays, plateau carbon, and the middle region of the 4-cm carbon peak, respectively. Across the 10-cm carbon peak the OER was found to vary between values of 2.4 to 1.55 from the proximal to distal positions

  4. Fluorescent carbon quantum dot hydrogels for direct determination of silver ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayuela, A; Soriano, M L; Kennedy, S R; Steed, J W; Valcárcel, M

    2016-05-01

    The paper reports for the first time the direct determination of silver ion (Ag(+)) using luminescent Carbon Quantum Dot hydrogels (CQDGs). Carbon Quantum Dots (CQDs) with different superficial moieties (passivate-CQDs with carboxylic groups, thiol-CQDs and amine-CQDs) were used to prepare hybrid gels using a low molecular weight hydrogelator (LMWG). The use of the gels results in considerable fluorescence enhancement and also markedly influences selectivity. The most selective CQDG system for Ag(+) ion detection proved to be those containing carboxylic groups onto their surface. The selectivity towards Ag(+) ions is possibly due to its flexible coordination sphere compared with other metal ions. This fluorescent sensing platform is based on the strong Ag-O interaction which can quench the photoluminescence of passivate-CQDs (p-CQDs) through charge transfer. The limit of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of the proposed method were 0.55 and 1.83µgmL(-1), respectively, being applied in river water samples. PMID:26946015

  5. Bucky-gel coated glassy carbon electrodes, for voltammetric detection of femtomolar leveled lead ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qijin; Yu, Fen; Zhu, Lina; Wang, Xiaoxia; Yang, Nianjun

    2010-10-15

    Femtomolar (fM) leveled lead ions were electrochemically detected using a bucky-gel coated glassy carbon electrode and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. The bucky-gel was composed of dithizone, ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The fabrication of the bucky-gel coated electrode was optimized. The modified electrode was characterized with voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and chronoamperometry. After the accumulation of lead ions into the bucky-gel modified electrode at -1.2V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE) for 5 min in a pH 4.4 sodium acetate-acetate acid buffer solution, differential pulse anodic stripping voltammograms of the accumulated lead show an anodic wave at -0.58 V. The anodic peak current is detectable for lead ions in the concentration range from 1.0 μM down to 500 fM. The detection limit is calculated to be 100 fM. The proposed method was successfully applied for the detection of lead ions in lake water. PMID:20875583

  6. A numerical method to optimise the spatial dose distribution in carbon ion radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzanka, L; Korcyl, M; Olko, P; Waligorski, M P R

    2015-09-01

    The authors describe a numerical algorithm to optimise the entrance spectra of a composition of pristine carbon ion beams which delivers a pre-assumed dose-depth profile over a given depth range within the spread-out Bragg peak. The physical beam transport model is based on tabularised data generated using the SHIELD-HIT10A Monte-Carlo code. Depth-dose profile optimisation is achieved by minimising the deviation from the pre-assumed profile evaluated on a regular grid of points over a given depth range. This multi-dimensional minimisation problem is solved using the L-BFGS-B algorithm, with parallel processing support. Another multi-dimensional interpolation algorithm is used to calculate at given beam depths the cumulative energy-fluence spectra for primary and secondary ions in the optimised beam composition. Knowledge of such energy-fluence spectra for each ion is required by the mixed-field calculation of Katz's cellular Track Structure Theory (TST) that predicts the resulting depth-survival profile. The optimisation algorithm and the TST mixed-field calculation are essential tools in the development of a one-dimensional kernel of a carbon ion therapy planning system. All codes used in the work are generally accessible within the libamtrack open source platform.

  7. PIC Simulations of the Ion Flow Induced by Radio Frequency Waves in Ion Cyclotron Frequency Range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: PIC simulations have been conducted to study the nonlinear interactions of plasmas and radio frequency wave in the ion cyclotron frequency range. It is found that in the presence of the mode conversion from an electromagnetic wave into an electrostatic wave (ion Bernstein wave), the ions near the lower hybrid resonance can be heated by nonlinear Landau damping via the parametric decay. As a result, the ion velocity distribution in the poloidal direction becomes asymmetric near the lower hybrid resonance and an ion poloidal flow is thus produced. The flow directions are opposite on both sides of the lower hybrid resonance. The poloidal flow is mainly produced by the nonlinear Reynolds stress and the electromagnetic force of the incident wave in the radial direction rather than poloidal direction predicted by the existing theories. (author)

  8. Potential energy, force distribution and oscillatory motion of chloride ion inside electrically charged carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, F.; Ansari, R.; Darvizeh, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this research, a continuum-based model is presented to explore potential energy, force distribution and oscillatory motion of ions, and in particular chloride ion, inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs) decorated by functional groups at two ends. To perform this, van der Waals (vdW) interactions between ion and nanotube are modeled by the 6-12 Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential, whereas the electrostatic interactions between ion and functional groups are modeled by the Coulomb potential and the total interactions are analytically derived by summing the vdW and electrostatic interactions. Making the assumption that carbon atoms and charge of functional groups are all uniformly distributed over the nanotube surface and the two ends of nanotube, respectively, a continuum approach is utilized to evaluate the related interactions. Based on the actual force distribution, the equation of motion is also solved numerically to arrive at the time history of displacement and velocity of inner core. With respect to the proposed formulations, comprehensive studies on the variations of potential energy and force distribution are carried out by varying functional group charge and nanotube length. Moreover, the effects of these parameters together with initial conditions on the oscillatory behavior of system are studied and discussed in detail. It is found out that chloride ion escapes more easily from negatively charged CNTs which is followed by uncharged and positively charged ones. It is further shown that the presence of functional groups leads to enhancing the operating frequency of such oscillatory systems especially when the electric charges of ion and functional groups have different signs.

  9. Comparing the biological washout of β+-activity induced in mice brain after 12C-ion and proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In clinical ion beam therapy, protons as well as heavier ions such as carbon are used for treatment. For protons, β+-emitters are only induced by fragmentation reactions in the target (target fragmentation), whereas for heavy ions, they are additionally induced by fragmentations of the projectile (further referred to as autoactivation). An approach utilizing these processes for treatment verfication, by comparing measured Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data to predictions from Monte Carlo simulations, has already been clinically implemented. For an accurate simulation, it is important to consider the biological washout of β+-emitters due to vital functions. To date, mathematical expressions for washout have mainly been determined by using radioactive beams of 10C- and 11C-ions, both β+-emitters, to enhance the counting statistics in the irradiated area. Still, the question of how the choice of projectile (autoactivating or non-autoactivating) influences the washout coefficients, has not been addressed. In this context, an experiment was carried out at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center with the purpose of directly comparing irradiation-induced biological washout coefficients in mice for protons and 12C-ions. To this aim, mice were irradiated in the brain region with protons and 12C-ions and measured after irradiation with a PET/CT scanner (Siemens Biograph mCT). After an appropriate waiting time, the mice were sacrificed, then irradiated and measured again under similar conditions. The resulting data were processed and fitted numerically to deduce the main washout parameters. Despite the very low PET counting statistics, a consistent difference could be identified between 12C-ion and proton irradiated mice, with the 12C data being described best by a two component fit with a combined medium and slow washout fraction of 0.50 ± 0.05 and the proton mice data being described best by a one component fit with only one (slow) washout fraction of 0.73 ± 0

  10. Synergistic effect of heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin and X-rays, but not carbon-ion beams, on lethality in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect of a heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), in combination with X-rays or carbon-ion beams on cell killing in human oral squamous cell carcinoma LMF4 cells. Cell survival was measured by colony formation assay. Cell-cycle distribution was analyzed by flow cytometry. Expression of DNA repair-related proteins was investigated by western blotting. The results showed 17-AAG to have synergistic effects on cell lethality with X-rays, but not with carbon-ion beams. The 17-AAG decreased G2/M arrest induced by X-rays, but not by carbon-ion beams. Both X-ray and carbon-ion irradiation up-regulated expression of non-homologous end-joining-associated proteins, Ku70 and Ku80, but 17-AAG inhibited only X-ray-induced up-regulation of these proteins. These results show that 17-AAG with X-rays releases G2/M phase arrest; cells carrying misrepaired DNA damage then move on to the G1 phase. We demonstrate, for the first time, that the radiosensitization effect of 17-AAG is not seen with carbon-ion beams because 17-AAG does not affect these changes. (author)

  11. Biomass carbon micro/nano-structures derived from ramie fibers and corncobs as anode materials for lithium-ion and sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhenghao; Yin, Shengyu; Guo, Zaiping; Wang, Shiquan; Feng, Chuanqi

    2016-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) rod-like carbon micro-structures derived from natural ramie fibers and two-dimensional (2D) carbon nanosheets derived from corncobs have been fabricated by heat treatment at 700 °C under argon atomsphere. The structure and morphology of the as-obtained ramie fiber carbon (RFC) and corncob carbon (CC) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique. The electrochemical performances of the biomass carbon-based anode in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) were investigated. When tested as anode material for lithium ion batteries, both the RFC microrods and CC nanosheets exhibited high capacity, excellent rate capability, and stable cyclability. The specific capacity were still as high as 489 and 606 mAhg-1 after 180 cycles when cycled at room temperature in a 3.0-0.01 V potential (vs. Li/Li+) window at current density of 100 mAg-1, respectively, which are much higher than that of graphite (375 mAhg-1) under the same current density. Although the anodes in sodium ion batteries showed poorer specific capability than that in lithium-ion batteries, they still achieve a reversible sodium intercalation capacity of 122 and 139 mAhg-1 with similar cycling stability. The feature of stable cycling performance makes the biomass carbon derived from natural ramie fibers and corncobs to be promising candidates as electrodes in rechargeable sodium-ion batteries and lithium-ion batteries.

  12. Asymmetric catalytic formation of quaternary carbons by iminium ion trapping of radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John J.; Bastida, David; Paria, Suva; Fagnoni, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    An important goal of modern organic chemistry is to develop new catalytic strategies for enantioselective carbon–carbon bond formation that can be used to generate quaternary stereogenic centres. Whereas considerable advances have been achieved by exploiting polar reactivity, radical transformations have been far less successful. This is despite the fact that open-shell intermediates are intrinsically primed for connecting structurally congested carbons, as their reactivity is only marginally affected by steric factors. Here we show how the combination of photoredox and asymmetric organic catalysis enables enantioselective radical conjugate additions to β,β-disubstituted cyclic enones to obtain quaternary carbon stereocentres with high fidelity. Critical to our success was the design of a chiral organic catalyst, containing a redox-active carbazole moiety, that drives the formation of iminium ions and the stereoselective trapping of photochemically generated carbon-centred radicals by means of an electron-relay mechanism. We demonstrate the generality of this organocatalytic radical-trapping strategy with two sets of open-shell intermediates, formed through unrelated light-triggered pathways from readily available substrates and photoredox catalysts—this method represents the application of iminium ion activation (a successful catalytic strategy for enantioselective polar chemistry) within the realm of radical reactivity.

  13. MoS2 coated hollow carbon spheres for anodes of lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufei; Wang, Ye; Yang, Jun; Shi, Wenhui; Yang, Huiying; Huang, Wei; Dong, Xiaochen

    2016-06-01

    With the assistance of resorcinol-formaldehyde, MoS2 coated hollow carbon spheres (C@MoS2) were synthesized through a facile hydrothermal route followed by heat and alkali treatments. The measurements indicate that the hollow carbon spheres with an average diameter of 300 nm and shell thickness of 20 nm. And the hollow core are uniformly covered by ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets with a length increased to 400 nm. The unique hollow structure and the synergistic effect between carbon layer and MoS2 nanosheets significantly enhance the rate capability and electrochemical stability of C@MoS2 spheres as anode material of lithium-ion battery. The synthesized C@MoS2 delivered a capacity of 750 mAh g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1. More importantly, the C@MoS2 maintained a reversible capacity of 533 mAh g-1 even at a high current density of 1000 mA g-1. The study indicated that MoS2 coated hollow carbon spheres can be promising anode material for next generation high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

  14. Rice paper-derived 3D-porous carbon films for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Carbonization of a rice paper (RP) results in a highly porous free-standing hard carbon film composed of carbon fibers. ► Free-standing LiFePO4@C laminate is prepared through a one-step co-sintering process. ► A RP-based full cell with reversible cycling characteristic is fabricated. -- Abstract: Rice paper (RP) is thermally carbonized in nitrogen to prepare three-dimensionally porous carbon films, which are used for the first time as both a free-standing active anode material and a current collector of a cathode (LiFePO4 here) for lithium-ion batteries. The latter is fabricated through a one-step co-sintering of a Li–Fe–P–O precursor top layer supported on the rice paper. The rate and cycling performances of both these electrodes are found to be rather good or even better than the traditional electrodes due to the three-dimensionally porous structure of the RP-derived carbon. We also design and fabricate an RP-based full cell constructed with the above mentioned anode and cathode together with an RP membrane as the separator. Without using traditional metallic current collectors and separator membranes, such a cell exhibits reversible cycling performance

  15. Fabrication and evaluation of an electrodialytic carbonate eluent generator for ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guobin; Lu, Yifei; Chen, Feifei; Zhang, Feifang; Yang, Bingcheng

    2016-10-01

    An electrodialytic potassium carbonate eluent generator and its associated potassium bicarbonate eluent generator have been fabricated for ion chromatography (IC). The device can withstand high backpressure up to ∼32MPa and no observable leakage under such pressure is found during 2h. In the range of 0-13.7mM, potassium carbonate concentration can be generated linearly with the applied current with a slope that is essentially Faradaic. At least 10mM potassium carbonate can be online changed into 10mM potassium bicarbonate via a potassium bicarbonate eluent generator, which offers an easy way to manipulate the separation selectivity. When coupled with IC system, the device demonstrated good reproducibility indicated by less than 0.52% of the relative standard deviation of the retention times.

  16. Hard Carbon Fibers Pyrolyzed from Wool as High-Performance Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Li, Qian; Qiu, Shen; Liu, Xiaoling; Xiao, Lifen; Ai, Xinping; Yang, Hanxi; Cao, Yuliang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we first demonstrate that the wool from worn-out clothes can serve as a low-cost and easy-to-collect precursor to preparing high-performance hard carbons for Na-ion batteries. Morphological characterizations demonstrate that this wool-derived hard carbon presents well-defined and homogeneously dispersed fiber networks. X-ray diffraction results combined with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis reveal that the interlayer space (d(002)) of the graphitic layers is 0.376 nm, sufficient for Na insertion into the stacked graphene layers. Electrochemical results show that the wool-derived hard carbon can deliver a high capacity of 303 mAh g-1 and excellent cycle stability over 80 cycles. This satisfactory electrochemical performance and easy synthetic procedure make it a promising anode material for practical SIBs.

  17. A Combustion Chemistry Analysis of Carbonate Solvents in Li-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, S J; Timmons, A; Pitz, W J

    2008-11-13

    Under abusive conditions Li-ion batteries can rupture, ejecting electrolyte and other flammable gases. In this paper we consider some of the thermochemical properties of these gases that will determine whether they ignite and how energetically they burn. We show that flames of carbonate solvents are fundamentally less energetic than those of conventional hydrocarbons. An example of this difference is given using a recently developed mechanism for dimethyl carbonate (DMC) combustion, where we show that a diffusion flame burning DMC has only half the peak energy release rate of an analogous propane flame. We find a significant variation among the carbonate solvents in the factors that are important to determining flammability, such as combustion enthalpy and vaporization enthalpy. This result suggests that thermochemical and kinetic factors might well be considered when choosing solvent mixtures.

  18. Changes of gene expression of E.Coli induced by low-energy nitrogen ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Yanhua; QIU Guanying

    2004-01-01

    Changes of gene expression in E.coli DH5α following 25 keV nitrogen ions irradiation are investigated.The results indicate:(1) The expression of total protein increases obviously after N+ ion irradiation; (2) 23 differential expression segments are separated from E.coli cells by using mRNA differential display reverse transcription-PCR (DDRT-PCR) and blot hybridization techniques,12 of them are activated (damage-induced expression),4 suppressed,6 increased and only one decreased.These experimental data suggest that the changes of gene expression of E.coli induced by low-energy ion beam are remarkable and in a diverse form.

  19. Development of a facility for high-precision irradiation of cells with carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, Marc-Jan van; Niemantsverdriet, Maarten; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Coppes, Robert P.; Luijk, Peter van [Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, A. Deusinglaan 1, 9713AV Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 30001, 9700RB Groningen (Netherlands); Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747AA Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 30001, 9700RB Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, A. Deusinglaan 1, 9713AV Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 30001, 9700RB Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Compared to photons, using particle radiation in radiotherapy reduces the dose and irradiated volume of normal tissues, potentially reducing side effects. The biological effect of dose deposited by particles such as carbon ions, however, differs from that of dose deposited by photons. The inaccuracy in models to estimate the biological effects of particle radiation remains the most important source of uncertainties in particle therapy. Improving this requires high-precision studies on biological effects of particle radiation. Therefore, the authors aimed to develop a facility for reproducible and high-precision carbon-ion irradiation of cells in culture. The combined dose nonuniformity in the lateral and longitudinal direction should not exceed {+-}1.5%. Dose to the cells from particles than other carbon ions should not exceed 5%. Methods: A uniform lateral dose distribution was realized using a single scatter foil and quadrupole magnets. A modulator wheel was used to create a uniform longitudinal dose distribution. The choice of beam energy and the optimal design of these components was determined using GEANT4 and SRIM Monte Carlo simulations. Verification of the uniformity of the dose distribution was performed using a scintillating screen (lateral) and a water phantom (longitudinal). The reproducibility of dose delivery between experiments was assessed by repeated measurements of the spatial dose distribution. Moreover, the reproducibility of dose-response measurements was tested by measuring the survival of irradiated HEK293 cells in three independent experiments. Results: The relative contribution of dose from nuclear reaction fragments to the sample was found to be <5% when using 90 MeV/u carbon ions. This energy still allows accurate dosimetry conforming to the IAEA Report TRS-398, facilitating comparison to dose-effect data obtained with other radiation qualities. A 1.3 mm long spread-out Bragg peak with a diameter of 30 mm was created, allowing

  20. Impact of electrochemical cycling on the tensile properties of carbon fibres for structural lithium-ion composite batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Jacques, Eric; Kjell, Maria H.; Zenkert, Dan; Lindbergh, Göran; Behm, Mårten; Willgert, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Carbon fibres are particularly well suited for use in a multifunctional lightweight design of a structural composite material able to store energy as a lithium-ion battery. The fibres will in this case act as both a high performance structural reinforcement and one of the battery electrodes. However, the electrochemical cycling consists of insertions and extractions of lithium ions in the microstructure of carbon fibres and its impact on the mechanical performance is unknown. This study inves...

  1. A New Method of Measuring Electron Emission Induced by Low Energy Ions from Solids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Heng-Da; A. Breskin; R. Chechik; S. Shckemelinin; E. Cheifetz

    2005-01-01

    @@ A new mathematical method of measuring electron emission induced by low energy ions from solids is described and used to calculate secondary electron emission according to the recorded pulse-height spectra of ions and ultraviolet (UV) photons. Using the UV single secondary electron spectra, we predict the shape of many secondary electron distributions under consideration of detection efficiency of MCP detector. These calculated distributions allow us to characterize the secondary electrons yield, and to give a secondary electron distribution for measured data. It seems rather feasible to determine secondary electron yield emitted by low energy ions at very low ion fluxes.

  2. Ion-induced triple fragmentation of CO23+ into C++O++O+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissociation of CO23+ formed in fast, heavy-ion-induced ionization of CO2, using 5 MeV u-1 Si12+ ions as projectiles, has been studied by the technique of multi-ion coincidence momentum imaging. From the momentum correlation between the ejected ions, we conclude that dissociation of CO23+ into C++O++O+ is a concerted process involving linear and bent conformations of CO23+. The kinetic-energy-release spectrum of the dissociation channel CO23+→C++O++O+ is measured and the possible excited states of CO23+ are computed ab initio.

  3. Mixed ion-exchanger chemically modified carbon paste ion-selective electrodes for determination of triprolidine hydrochloride

    OpenAIRE

    Yousry M. Issa; Fekria M. Abu Attia; Nahla S. Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Triprolidine hydrochloride (TpCl) ion-selective carbon paste electrodes were constructed using Tp-TPB/Tp-CoN and Tp-TPB/Tp-PTA as ion-exchangers. The two electrodes revealed Nernstian responses with slopes of 58.4 and 58.1 mV decade−1 at 25 °C in the ranges 6 × 10−6–1 × 10−2 and 2 × 10−5–1 × 10−2 M for Tp-TPB/Tp-CoN and Tp-TPB/Tp-PTA, respectively. The potentials of these electrodes were independent of pH in the ranges of 2.5–7.0 and 4.5–7.0, and detection limits were 6 × 10−6 and 1 × 10−5 M ...

  4. The influence of projectile ion induced chemistry on surface pattern formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Prasanta; Satpati, Biswarup

    2016-07-01

    We report the critical role of projectile induced chemical inhomogeneity on surface nanostructure formation. Experimental inconsistency is common for low energy ion beam induced nanostructure formation in the presence of uncontrolled and complex contamination. To explore the precise role of contamination on such structure formation during low energy ion bombardment, a simple and clean experimental study is performed by selecting mono-element semiconductors as the target and chemically inert or reactive ion beams as the projectile as well as the source of controlled contamination. It is shown by Atomic Force Microscopy, Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy measurements that bombardment of nitrogen-like reactive ions on Silicon and Germanium surfaces forms a chemical compound at impact zones. Continuous bombardment of the same ions generates surface instability due to unequal sputtering and non-uniform re-arrangement of the elemental atom and compound. This instability leads to ripple formation during ion bombardment. For Argon-like chemically inert ion bombardment, the chemical inhomogeneity induced boost is absent; as a result, no ripples are observed in the same ion energy and fluence.

  5. A large area position-sensitive ionization chamber for heavy-ion-induced reaction studies

    CERN Document Server

    Pant, L M; Dinesh, B V; Thomas, R G; Saxena, A; Sawant, Y S; Choudhury, R K

    2002-01-01

    A large area position-sensitive ionization chamber with a wide dynamic range has been developed to measure the mass, charge and energy of the heavy ions and the fission fragments produced in heavy-ion-induced reactions. The split anode geometry of the detector makes it suitable for both particle identification and energy measurements for heavy ions and fission fragments. The detector has been tested with alpha particles from sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am- sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu source, fission fragments from sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and the heavy-ion beams from the 14UD Mumbai Pelletron accelerator facility. Using this detector, measurements on mass and total kinetic energy distributions in heavy-ion-induced fusion-fission reactions have been carried out for a wide range of excitation energies. Results on deep inelastic collisions and mass-energy correlations on different systems using this detector setup are discussed.

  6. UV-induced carbon monoxide emission from living vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard;

    2013-01-01

    The global burden of carbon monoxide (CO) is rather uncertain. In this paper we address the potential for UV-induced CO emission by living terrestrial vegetation surfaces. Real-time measurements of CO concentrations were made with a cavity enhanced laser spectrometer connected in closed loop...... to either an ecosystem chamber or a plant-leaf scale chamber. Leaves of all examined plant species exhibited emission of CO in response to artificial UV-radiation as well as the UV-component of natural solar radiation. The UV-induced rate of CO emission exhibited a rather low dependence on temperature......, indicating an abiotic process. The emission of CO in response to the UV-component of natural solar radiation was also evident at the ecosystem scale....

  7. Removal of some metal ions by activated carbon prepared from Phaseolus aureus hulls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, M. Madhava; Ramana, D.K.; Seshaiah, K. [Analytical and Environmental Chemistry Division, Department of Chemistry, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517 502 (India); Wang, M.C., E-mail: mcwang@cyut.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, Chaoyang University of Technology, Wufong Township 41349, Taichung County, Taiwan (China); Chien, S.W. Chang [Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, Chaoyang University of Technology, Wufong Township 41349, Taichung County, Taiwan (China)

    2009-07-30

    Removal of lead [Pb(II)], zinc [Zn(II)], copper [Cu(II)], and cadmium [Cd(II)] from aqueous solutions using activated carbon prepared from Phaseolus aureus hulls (ACPAH), an agricultural waste was studied. The influence of various parameters such as effect of pH, contact time, adsorbent dose, and initial concentration of metal ions on the removal was evaluated by batch method. The removal of metal ions by ACPAH was pH dependent and the optimum pH values were 7.0, 8.0, 7.0 and 6.0 for Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II), respectively. The sorption isotherms were studied using Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R), and Temkin isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity values of ACPAH for metal ions were 21.8 mg g{sup -1} for Pb(II), 21.2 mg g{sup -1} for Zn(II), 19.5 mg g{sup -1} for Cu(II), and 15.7 mg g{sup -1} for Cd(II). The experiments demonstrated that the removal of metal ions followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Desorption experiments were carried out using HCl solution with a view to regenerate the spent adsorbent and to recover the adsorbed metal ions.

  8. Determination of Mercury (II Ion on Aryl Amide-Type Podand-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Güney

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new voltammetric sensor based on an aryl amide type podand, 1,8-bis(o-amidophenoxy-3,6-dioxaoctane, (AAP modified glassy carbon electrode, was described for the determination of trace level of mercury (II ion by cyclic voltammetry (CV and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV. A well-defined anodic peak corresponding to the oxidation of mercury on proposed electrode was obtained at 0.2 V versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The effect of experimental parameters on differential voltammetric peak currents was investigated in acetate buffer solution of pH 7.0 containing 1 × 10−1 mol L−1 NaCl. Mercury (II ion was preconcentrated at the modified electrode by forming complex with AAP under proper conditions and then reduced on the surface of the electrode. Interferences of Cu2+, Pb2+, Fe3+, Cd2+, and Zn2+ ions were also studied at two different concentration ratios with respect to mercury (II ions. The modified electrode was applied to the determination of mercury (II ions in seawater sample.

  9. Heavy ion induced mutations in mammalian cells: Cross sections and molecular analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, U.; Schmidt, P.; Schneider, E.; Kiefer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Our investigations of heavy ion-induced mutations in mammalian cells, which had been begun a few years ago, were systematically continued. For the first time, it was possible to cover a large LET range with a few kinds of ions. To do this, both UNILAC and SIS were used to yield comparable data for a large energy range. This is a necessary condition for a comprehensive description of the influence of such ion parameters as energy and LET. In these experiments, the induced resistance against the poison 6-thioguanin (6-TG), which is linked to the HPRT locus on the genome, is being used as mutation system. In addition to the mutation-induction cross-section measurements, the molecular changes of the DNA are being investigated by means of Multiplex PCR ('Polymerase Chain Reaction') gene amplification. From these experiments we expect further elucidation of the mutation-inducing mechanisms composing the biological action of heavy-ion radiation.

  10. Ion-induced pattern formation on indium tin oxide for alignment of liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Škereň, T., E-mail: tomas.skeren@fjfi.cvut.cz [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven Belgium (Belgium); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Doornaert, D. [Laboratory for Acoustics and Thermal Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Wave Propagation and Signal Processing Research Group, KU Leuven Campus Kortrijk, E. Sabbelaan 53, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium); Glorieux, C. [Laboratory for Acoustics and Thermal Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Modarresi, H. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven Belgium (Belgium); Guan, T. [Departement Elektrotechniek ESAT-MICAS, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Temst, K. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven Belgium (Belgium); Vandervorst, W. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven Belgium (Belgium); IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vantomme, A. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven Belgium (Belgium)

    2015-08-31

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is broadly used as a transparent conducting material for electrodes in optoelectronic devices. Irradiation of ITO with low energy ions can result in the formation of periodic surface nanopatterns which can serve as an alternative for the polymer alignment layer in liquid crystal devices. We investigated the formation of the ion-induced surface nanopatterns on ITO with focus on the influence of the crystalline structure of the material. We find that the crystallinity plays a crucial role in the pattern formation, with no pattern developing on an amorphous ITO surface. We discuss these findings in the context of the state-of-the-art theory for ion-induced patterning. We show that the ion-induced pattern plays a critical role in the liquid crystal alignment on ITO surfaces.

  11. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications.

  12. Low contact resistance carbon thin film modified current collectors for lithium Ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shi-Kun; Chiu, Kuo-Feng, E-mail: kfchiu@fcu.edu.tw; Su, Shih-Hsuan; Liu, Shih-Hsien; Hou, Kai Hsiang; Leu, Hoang-Jyh; Hsiao, Chung-Chun

    2014-12-01

    Carbon films have been synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on AISI 304 stainless steel (304SS) sheets with various C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2} flow ratios at 810 °C. The films exhibit three different morphologies and structures: filament, sphere and transition types at different C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2} flow ratios, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the degree of graphitization increased with decreasing C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2} flow ratios. The carbon film modified 304SS sheets were used as cathode current collectors and coated with an active layer containing LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} active materials, conducting additives and binders for lithium ion batteries. The electrochemical properties of these LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cells with bare and carbon film modified current collectors were investigated. Under high current operation, such as 3000 mA/g, the capacity of the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cell with transition type carbon film modified current collector is 55% higher than the cell with bare current collector. The enhanced performances of high current density charge–discharge cycles can be attributed to the reduced contact resistance and improved charge transfer efficiency provided by the transition type carbon film modified current collectors. - Highlights: • Carbon films were synthesized by CVD on 304SS sheets. • The carbon film modified 304SS sheets were used as cathode current collectors. • The carbon film modified current collectors improved charge transfer efficiency.

  13. Characterisation of Swift Heavy Ion-induced Mixing using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Chakraborty

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Swift heavy ions of Au at 120 MeV are irradiated at the interface of Si/Me/Si (Me=V,Fe,Co and the behaviour of mixing examined wrt to different ion doses. The fluences were varied from 1x1013 ions/cm2 to 1x1014 ions/cm2 on the multilayers of Si/Me/Se (Me=V,Fe,Co and the interface of Si/Me(Me=V,Fe,Co were characterised using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy(RBS and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS. The atomic mixing width was found to be increasing monotonically with ion fluence in all the three cases,. The mixing rate and efficiency calculations were made and the diffusivity values thus obtained suggested a transient melt phase at the interface according to thermal spike model. In case of Me=Co, it was further probed with XRD and Raman spectroscopy to confirm the formation of cobalt silicides even at room temperature.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(4, pp.356-362, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1534

  14. Synthesis of carbon nanoparticles using one step green approach and their application as mercuric ion sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshni, V.; Ottoor, Divya, E-mail: divya@chem.unipune.ac.in

    2015-05-15

    Carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) have been evolved as a promising candidate for the metal sensing applications due to their synthesis from naturally occurring and easily available non-toxic molecular precursors by green chemistry. A simple and one step procedure is reported here for the synthesis of CNPs from coconut milk by thermal pyrolysis at a temperature of 120–150 °C for 2–5 min without using any carbonizing or passivating agent. On pyrolysis the coconut oil is separated from the carbon rich residue and the residue when dissolved in water showed blue fluorescence under UV light. The CNPs produced are found to show an emission maximum at 440 nm when excited at 360 nm. Synthesis by green approach makes CNPs a promising substitute for the metal sensing applications. Series of metal ions which have a hazardous impact on the ecological system have been taken for the analysis and it is observed that the fluorescence of CNPs gets remarkably quenched by mercuric ions. Fluorescence quenching was studied using standard Stern–Volmer quenching model. Limit of detection was found to be 16.5 nM Hg{sup 2+} concentration. - Highlights: • Green and economical synthesis of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) from naturally abundant material. • Coconut milk is used as molecular precursor, which on thermal pyrolysis at 120 °C yielded CNPs. • Highly fluorescent CNPs show an emission maxima of 440 nm when excited at 360 nm. • Application of CNPs for metal ion sensing using fluorescence quenching phenomena. • Hg{sup 2+} is most effectively sensed with a detection limit of 16.5 nM.

  15. Effect of Fiber Length on Carbon Nanotube-Induced Fibrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amruta Manke

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Given their extremely small size and light weight, carbon nanotubes (CNTs can be readily inhaled by human lungs resulting in increased rates of pulmonary disorders, particularly fibrosis. Although the fibrogenic potential of CNTs is well established, there is a lack of consensus regarding the contribution of physicochemical attributes of CNTs on the underlying fibrotic outcome. We designed an experimentally validated in vitro fibroblast culture model aimed at investigating the effect of fiber length on single-walled CNT (SWCNT-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The fibrogenic response to short and long SWCNTs was assessed via oxidative stress generation, collagen expression and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β production as potential fibrosis biomarkers. Long SWCNTs were significantly more potent than short SWCNTs in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS response, collagen production and TGF-β release. Furthermore, our finding on the length-dependent in vitro fibrogenic response was validated by the in vivo lung fibrosis outcome, thus supporting the predictive value of the in vitro model. Our results also demonstrated the key role of ROS in SWCNT-induced collagen expression and TGF-β activation, indicating the potential mechanisms of length-dependent SWCNT-induced fibrosis. Together, our study provides new evidence for the role of fiber length in SWCNT-induced lung fibrosis and offers a rapid cell-based assay for fibrogenicity testing of nanomaterials with the ability to predict pulmonary fibrogenic response in vivo.

  16. The Significance and Insignificance of Carbon Nanotube-Induced Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S.P. Boyles

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present review article immune responses induced by carbon nanotubes (CNTs are addressed. As inhalation is considered to be the primary entry route, and concern has been raised by similar high aspect ratio materials, the main focus lies on immune responses upon pulmonary exposure. Inflammation-related findings from both in vivo studies and in vitro models are reviewed, and the major responsible characteristics, which may drive CNT-induced inflammation in the lung, are discussed. In a second part, responses upon intentional administration of CNTs via subcutaneous and intravenous application are addressed, including their potential benefits and drawbacks for immunotherapy. Finally, the gastrointestinal tract as an alternative exposure route is briefly discussed. While there are many studies identifying numerous other factors involved in CNT-driven toxicity, e.g., cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity, the focus of this review was kept solely on CNT-induced inflammation. Overall the literature has shown that CNTs are able to induce inflammation, which in some cases was a particularly robust response coinciding with the development of pro-fibrotic conditions. In the majority of cases the greatest inflammatory responses were associated with CNTs of considerable length and a high aspect ratio, accompanied by other factors like dispersion and sample purity.

  17. Calculation of complex DNA damage induced by ions

    CERN Document Server

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of the complex damage of DNA irradiated by ions. The analysis and assessment of complex damage is important because cells in which it occurs are less likely to survive because the DNA repair mechanisms may not be sufficiently effective. We studied the flux of secondary electrons through the surface of nucleosomes and calculated the radial dose and the distribution of clustered damage around the ion's track. The calculated radial dose distribution is compared to simulations. The radial distribution of the complex damage is found to be different from that of the dose. Comparison with experiments may solve the question of what is more lethal for the cell, damage complexity or absorbed energy. We suggest a way to calculate the probability of cell death based on the complexity of the damage. This work is done within the framework of the phenomenon-based multiscale approach to radiation damage by ions.

  18. Ion-induced chemistry in condensed gas solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, J.W.; Johnson, R.E.; Reimann, C.T.; Garret, J.W. (Virginia Univ., Charlottesville (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics); Brown, W.L.; Marcantonio, K.J. (Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (USA))

    1983-12-15

    Solids of H/sub 2/O, D/sub 2/O, CO/sub 2/, and SO/sub 2/ have been bombarded by MeV and keV ions, and the sputtering of these materials investigated by measuring the total yield and the mass and energy spectra of ejected particles. One observes the results of considerable chemical activity in these low temperature solids. With MeV ions incident on D/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/, the production of D/sub 2/, O/sub 2/ and CO, O/sub 2/ respectively are found, while keV ions on SO/sub 2/ produce SO, SO/sub 3/, and O/sub 2/.

  19. Structural changes of DNA in heavy ion-induced mutants on Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tano, S.; Shikazono, N.; Tanaka, A.; Yokota, Y.; Watanabe, H. [Japan Atomic Research Research Inst., Watanuki, Takasaki (Japan). Advanced Science Research Center

    1997-09-01

    In order to investigate the frequency of structural changes induced by high LET radiation in plants, a comparison was made between DNA fragments amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from C ion- and electron-induced Arabidopsis mutants at GL and TT loci. (orig./MG)

  20. Multiscale physics of ion-induced radiation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, A V

    2014-01-01

    This is a review of a multiscale approach to the physics of ion-beam cancer therapy, an approach suggested in order to understand the interplay of a large number of phenomena involved in the radiation damage scenario occurring on a range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. We describe different effects that take place on different scales and play major roles in the scenario of interaction of ions with tissue. The understanding of these effects allows an assessment of relative biological effectiveness that relates the physical quantities, such as dose, to the biological values, such as the probability of cell survival.