WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon implanted alumina

  1. Effective Stress Reduction in Diamond Films on Alumina by Carbon Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方志军; 夏义本; 王林军; 张伟丽; 马哲国; 张明龙

    2002-01-01

    We show the effective stress reduction in diamond films by implanting carbon ions into alumina substrates prior to the diamond deposition. Residual stresses in the films are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and a more reliable method for stress determination is presented for the quantitative measurement of stress evolution. It is found that compressive stresses in the diamond films can be partly offset by the compressive stresses in the alumina substrates, which are caused by the ion pre-implantation. At the same time, the difference between the offset by the pre-stressed substrates and the total stress reduction indicates that some other mechanisms are also active.

  2. A broad chemical and structural characterization of the damaged region of carbon implanted alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As candidate materials for future thermonuclear fusion reactors, isolating ceramics will be submitted to high energy gamma and neutron radiation fluxes together with an intense particle flux. Amorphization cannot be tolerated in ceramics for fusion applications, due to the associated volume change and the deterioration of mechanical properties. Therefore, a comprehensive study was carried out to examine the effects of carbon beam irradiation on polycrystalline aluminium oxide (Al2O3), a ceramic component of some diagnostic and plasma heating systems. Complementary techniques have allowed a complete chemical and structural surface analysis of the implanted alumina. Implantation with 75 keV, mono-energetic carbon ions at doses of 1 x 1017 and 5 x 1017 ions/cm2 was performed on polished and thermally treated ceramic discs. The alumina targets were kept below 120 deg. C. The structural modifications induced during ion irradiation were studied by the GXRD and TEM techniques. Under these conditions, alumina is readily amorphized by carbon ions, the thickness of the ion-beam induced disordered area increasing with the ion dose. Matrix elements and ion implanted profiles were followed as a function of depth by using ToF-SIMS, indicating the maximum concentration of implanted ions to be in the deeper half of the amorphous region. Ion distribution and chemical modifications caused in the Al2O3 substrate by carbon irradiation were corroborated with XPS. The amount of oxygen in the vicinity of the implanted alumina surface was reduced, suggesting that this element was selectively sputtered during carbon irradiation. The intensity of those peaks referring to Al-O bonds diminishes, while contributions of reduced aluminium and metal carbides are found at the maximum of the carbon distribution. TEM observations on low temperature thermally annealed specimens indicate partial recovery of the initial crystalline structure.

  3. Nanocomposite formed by titanium ion implantation into alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composites of titanium nanoparticles in alumina were formed by ion implantation of titanium into alumina, and the surface electrical conductivity measured in situ as the implantation proceeded, thus generating curves of sheet conductivity as a function of dose. The implanted titanium self-conglomerates into nanoparticles, and the spatial dimensions of the buried nanocomposite layer can thus be estimated from the implantation depth profile. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry was performed to measure the implantation depth profile, and was in good agreement with the calculated profile. Transmission electron microscopy of the titanium-implanted alumina was used for direct visualization of the nanoparticles formed. The measured conductivity of the buried layer is explained by percolation theory. We determine that the saturation dose, φ0, the maximum implantation dose for which the nanocomposite material still remains a composite, is φ0 = 2.2 × 1016 cm−2, and the corresponding saturation conductivity is σ0 = 480 S/m. The percolation dose φc, below which the nanocomposite still has basically the conductivity of the alumina matrix, was found to be φc = 0.84 × 1016 cm−2. The experimental results are discussed and compared with a percolation theory model

  4. Dispersion Caused by Carbon Dioxide During Secondary Alumina Dissolution: A Lab-Scale Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Youjian; Gao, Bingliang; Wang, Zhaowen; Shi, Zhongning; Hu, Xianwei; Yu, Jiangyu

    2014-06-01

    Secondary alumina is the byproduct of dry scrubbing in aluminum smelting. Secondary alumina has superior dissolution characteristics to primary alumina. Secondary alumina dissolves in pieces in molten cryolite, which results in larger contact area and better diffusion kinetics. In this work, the dissolution phenomenon of primary alumina, secondary alumina, and primary alumina doped with sodium carbonate or calcium carbonate (mass ratio = 10:1, 20:1) was observed and compared to estimate carbon-induced dispersion in industrial secondary alumina. Temperature fluctuations during sample dissolution were measured to evaluate the benefits of preheating on alumina dissolution. It was found that carbon mixed in secondary alumina significantly influences the dispersion of alumina particles at the moment of feeding, and thermodynamic analysis also shows that the combustion heat from carbon facilitates dispersion.

  5. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration. PMID:26966555

  6. Carbon coatings for medical implants

    OpenAIRE

    K. Bakowicz-Mitura; P. Couvrat; I. Kotela; P. Louda; D. Batory; J. Grabarczyk

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper we report in vitro and in vivo results of Nanocrystalline Diamond Coatings whichare used in medicine onto medical implants The very important property of carbon coatings is the protectionliving organism against the metalosis. Different medical implants with complicated shapes are covering byNanocrystalline Diamond Coatings by RF dense plasma CVD.Design/methodology/approach: 1) Material characterizations of deposited coatings have been evaluated by using:Transmission Ele...

  7. Fracture Strength of Zirconia and Alumina Ceramic Crowns Supported by Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, Tonino; Sorrentino, Roberto; Gherlone, Enrico; Perfetti, Federico; Bollero, Patrizio; Zarone, Ferdinando

    2015-07-01

    Due to the brittleness and limited tensile strength of the veneering glass-ceramic materials, the methods that combine strong core material (as zirconia or alumina) are still under debate. The present study aims to evaluate the fracture strength and the mechanism of failure through fractographic analysis of single all-ceramic crowns supported by implants. Forty premolar cores were fabricated with CAD/CAM technology using alumina (n = 20) and zirconia (n = 20). The specimens were veneered with glass-ceramic, cemented on titanium abutments, and subjected to loading test until fracture. SEM fractographic analysis was also performed. The fracture load was 1165 (±509) N for alumina and 1638 (±662) N for zirconia with a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.026). Fractographic analysis of alumina-glass-ceramic crowns, showed the presence of catastrophic cracks through the entire thickness of the alumina core; for the zirconia-glass-ceramic crowns, the cracks involved mainly the thickness of the ceramic veneering layer. The sandblast procedure of the zirconia core influenced crack path deflection. Few samples (n = 3) showed limited microcracks of the zirconia core. Zirconia showed a significantly higher fracture strength value in implant-supported restorations, indicating the role played by the high resistant cores for premolar crowns. PMID:24779915

  8. Preparation of highly-ordered carbon nanotube arrays in the anodized alumina template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly-ordered, hexagonally arranged alumina nanopore template was prepared by self-organized two-step anodization process of aluminium in oxalic acid solution. Highly parallel pores were obtained within domains of a few micrometers. Highly-ordered, parallel carbon nanotube arrays were successfully grown in the alumina template nanopores by chemical vapor deposition catalyzed by alumina itself. The nanotube arrays are suitable for channeling of particle beams. The structures of aluminium, alumina template and carbon nanotubes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). The growth mechanism and formation condition of both alumina template and carbon nanotube were discussed. (authors)

  9. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Petersen

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-rein...

  10. Reliability evaluation of alumina-blasted/acid-etched versus laser-sintered dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Erika O; Júnior, Amilcar C Freitas; Bonfante, Estevam A; Silva, Nelson R F A; Coelho, Paulo G

    2013-05-01

    Step-stress accelerated life testing (SSALT) and fractographic analysis were performed to evaluate the reliability and failure modes of dental implant fabricated by machining (surface treated with alumina blasting/acid etching) or laser sintering for anterior single-unit replacements. Forty-two dental implants (3.75 × 10 mm) were divided in two groups (n=21 each): laser sintered (LS) and alumina blasting/acid etching (AB/AE). The abutments were screwed to the implants and standardized maxillary central incisor metallic crowns were cemented and subjected to SSALT in water. Use-level probability Weibull curves and reliability for a mission of 50,000 cycles at 200 N were calculated. Polarized light and scanning electron microscopes were used for failure analyses. The Beta (β) value derived from use-level probability Weibull calculation of 1.48 for group AB/AE indicated that damage accumulation likely was an accelerating factor, whereas the β of 0.78 for group LS indicated that load alone likely dictated the failure mechanism for this group, and that fatigue damage did not appear to accumulate. The reliability was not significantly different (p>0.9) between AB/AE (61 %) and LS (62 %). Fracture of the abutment and fixation screw was the chief failure mode. No implant fractures were observed. No differences in reliability and fracture mode were observed between LS and AB/AE implants used for anterior single-unit crowns. PMID:22843309

  11. An Alumina Toughened Zirconia Composite for Dental Implant Application: In Vivo Animal Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmario Schierano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic materials are widely used for biomedical applications because of their remarkable biological and mechanical properties. Composites made of alumina and zirconia are particularly interesting owing to their higher toughness with respect to the monolithic materials. On this basis, the present study is focused on the in vivo behavior of alumina toughened zirconia (ATZ dental implants treated with a hydrothermal process. A minipig model was implemented to assess the bone healing through histology and mRNA expression at different time points (8, 14, 28, and 56 days. The novel ATZ implant was compared to a titanium clinical standard. The implants were analyzed in terms of microstructure and surface roughness before in vivo tests. The most interesting result deals with a statistically significant higher digital histology index for ATZ implants with respect to titanium standard at 56 days, which is an unprecedented finding, to the authors’ knowledge. Even if further investigations are needed before proposing the clinical use in humans, the tested material proved to be a promising candidate among the possible ceramic dental implants.

  12. An alumina toughened zirconia composite for dental implant application: in vivo animal results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierano, Gianmario; Mussano, Federico; Faga, Maria Giulia; Menicucci, Giulio; Manzella, Carlo; Sabione, Cristian; Genova, Tullio; von Degerfeld, Mitzy Mauthe; Peirone, Bruno; Cassenti, Adele; Cassoni, Paola; Carossa, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic materials are widely used for biomedical applications because of their remarkable biological and mechanical properties. Composites made of alumina and zirconia are particularly interesting owing to their higher toughness with respect to the monolithic materials. On this basis, the present study is focused on the in vivo behavior of alumina toughened zirconia (ATZ) dental implants treated with a hydrothermal process. A minipig model was implemented to assess the bone healing through histology and mRNA expression at different time points (8, 14, 28, and 56 days). The novel ATZ implant was compared to a titanium clinical standard. The implants were analyzed in terms of microstructure and surface roughness before in vivo tests. The most interesting result deals with a statistically significant higher digital histology index for ATZ implants with respect to titanium standard at 56 days, which is an unprecedented finding, to the authors' knowledge. Even if further investigations are needed before proposing the clinical use in humans, the tested material proved to be a promising candidate among the possible ceramic dental implants. PMID:25945324

  13. Carbon coatings for medical implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bakowicz-Mitura

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this paper we report in vitro and in vivo results of Nanocrystalline Diamond Coatings whichare used in medicine onto medical implants The very important property of carbon coatings is the protectionliving organism against the metalosis. Different medical implants with complicated shapes are covering byNanocrystalline Diamond Coatings by RF dense plasma CVD.Design/methodology/approach: 1 Material characterizations of deposited coatings have been evaluated by using:Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Atomic Force Microscopy(AFM, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES, microX-Ray Spectroscopy and bend test 2 Biological investigationbased on: (a in vivo and (b in vitro examinations as well (c clinical investigations – contact allergy.Findings: It was revealed that Nanocrystalline Diamond Coatings form the barrier diffusion between implantand human environment as a consequence prevent leaching of metallic ions into the body. Additionally, theresearch on carbon coatings proved that diamond layers are biocompatible with living organism. Contact allergyon nickel is inhibited by diamond powders.Practical implications: Practical application metal implants with NCD in orthopedy, cardiosurgery, oralsurgery, maxillo-facial surgery and dermatology.Originality/value: We have observed anti-inflammatory, antiallergic and anticancerogenic responses from thecarbon coatings layers onto medical implants like wires and screws.

  14. Study of mechanical and physiochemical properties of polycrystalline alumina implanted with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of ion implantation in polycrystaline alumina has been undertaken aimed at two principal areas. Firstly the measurement of the evolution of mechanical properties in the treated surface, such as hardness and fracture toughness, was undertaken using a Vickers indentation method. These properties are very sensitive to the presence of residual stresses and to the surface microstructure. Secondly a physicochemical study of the treated surface using XRD and SEM techniques in order to identify the parameters that influence the mechanical changes was undertaken. (author)

  15. Bone-bonding behavior under load-bearing conditions of an alumina ceramic implant incorporating beads coated with glass-ceramic containing apatite and wollastonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z L; Kitsugi, T; Yamamuro, T; Chang, Y S; Senaha, Y; Takagi, H; Nakamura, T; Oka, M

    1995-09-01

    Alumina ceramic with a porous surface coated with glass-ceramic containing apatite and wollastonite (AW-GC) was implanted in a state of press-fit under load-bearing conditions in the femoral condylus of the mongrel dog and compared with a non-glass-ceramic-coated alumina ceramic. A trapezoid alumina ceramic implant (7 x 10 x 5 mm) with a lateral recess (0.9 mm deep) coated with alumina ceramic beads (mean diameter, 750 microns) in a single layer was prepared. The alumina ceramic beads were bonded to the alumina ceramic substratum using an identical alumina binder. The thickness of coating was 10-50 microns (mean, 30 microns). The surface of the beads and the substratum of the alumina implant were coated with AW-GC. A pull-out test and histologic examination were performed at 4, 8, and 24 weeks after implantation. The interfacial shear load was significantly increased from 8 to 24 weeks in both groups. The shear load of the glass-ceramic-coated implant was significantly greater than that of the noncoated implant at every stage. The interface shear load of the noncoated implant was 12.13 +/- 2.76 kg at 4 weeks, 13.92 +/- 4.18 kg at 8 weeks, and 24.17 +/- 5.17 kg at 24 weeks after implantation. The interface shear load of the glass-ceramic-coated implant was 17.96 +/- 2.81 kg at 4 weeks, 24.92 +/- 9.87 kg at 8 weeks, and 34.83 +/- 4.12 kg at 24 weeks after implantation. Histologic examination showed more ingrown bone tissue in the glass-ceramic-coated implants. It is suggested that AW-GC stimulated the bone ingrowth.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8567706

  16. Features of the interaction of alumina and silica with carbon-containing reducing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratenko, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    In the mining of Ekibastuz coals, a rock containing 35 to 49% of coal substance and 60 to 65% of mineral fractions, mainly silica and alumina, is sent to the waste dump. When this rock is heated in an inert atmosphere above 1500 C the alumina and silica are reduced by the carbon present, as a result of which, in prinicple, it is possible to obtain a number of valuable products. These reactions are discussed.

  17. Low-temperature carbon monoxide oxidation catalysed by regenerable atomically dispersed palladium on alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Eric J.; Delariva, Andrew T.; Lin, Sen; Johnson, Ryan S.; Guo, Hua; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Hun Kwak, Ja; Peden, Charles H. F.; Kiefer, Boris; Allard, Lawrence F.; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2014-09-01

    Catalysis by single isolated atoms of precious metals has attracted much recent interest, as it promises the ultimate in atom efficiency. Most previous reports are on reducible oxide supports. Here we show that isolated palladium atoms can be catalytically active on industrially relevant γ-alumina supports. The addition of lanthanum oxide to the alumina, long known for its ability to improve alumina stability, is found to also help in the stabilization of isolated palladium atoms. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirm the presence of intermingled palladium and lanthanum on the γ-alumina surface. Carbon monoxide oxidation reactivity measurements show onset of catalytic activity at 40 °C. The catalyst activity can be regenerated by oxidation at 700 °C in air. The high-temperature stability and regenerability of these ionic palladium species make this catalyst system of potential interest for low-temperature exhaust treatment catalysts.

  18. N-doped mesoporous alumina for adsorption of carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jayshri A.Thote; Ravikrishna V.Chatti; Kartik S.Iyer; Vivek Kumar; Arti N.Valechha; Nitin K.Labhsetwar; Rajesh B.Biniwale; M.K.N.Yenkie; Sadhana S.Rayalu

    2012-01-01

    N-doped mesoporous alumina has been synthesized using chitosan as the biopolymer template.The adsorbent has been thoroughly investigated for the adsorption of CO2 from a simulated flue gas stream (15% CO2 balanced with N2) and compared with commercially available mesoporous alumina procured from SASOL,Germany.CO2 adsorption was studied under different conditions of pretreatment and adsorption temperature,inlet CO2 concentration and in the presence of oxygen and moisture.The adsorption capacity was determined to be 29.4 mg CO2/g of adsorbent at 55℃.This value was observed to be 4 times higher in comparison to that of commercial mesoporous alumina at a temperature of 55℃.Basicity of alumina surface coupled with the presence of nitrogen in template in synthesized sample is responsible for this enhanced CO2 adsorption.Adsorption capacity for CO2 was retained in the presence of oxygen; however moisture had a deteriorating effect on the adsorption capacity reducing it to nearly half the value.

  19. Formation of highly adherent nano-porous alumina on Ti-based substrates: a novel bone implant coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, E P; Walpole, A R; Wilshaw, P R; Karlsson, M; Pålsgård, E

    2004-09-01

    Thin, nano-porous, highly adherent layers of anodised aluminium formed on the surface of titanium alloys are being developed as coatings for metallic surgical implants. The layers are formed by anodisation of a 1-5 microm thick layer of aluminium which has been deposited on substrate material by electron beam evaporation. The surface ceramic layer so produced is alumina with 6-8 wt % phosphate ions and contains approximately 5 x 10(8) cm(-2) pores with a approximately 160 nm average diameter, running perpendicular to the surface. Mechanical testing showed the coatings' shear and tensile strength to be at least 20 and 10 MPa, respectively. Initial cell/material studies show promising cellular response to the nano-porous alumina. A normal osteoblastic growth pattern with cell number increasing from day 1 to 21 was shown, with slightly higher proliferative activity on the nano-porous alumina compared to the Thermanox control. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the cells on the porous alumina membrane showed normal osteoblast morphology. Flattened cells with filopodia attaching to the pores and good coverage were also observed. In addition, the pore structure produced in these ceramic coatings is expected to be suitable for loading with bioactive material to enhance further their biological properties. PMID:15448410

  20. 5.3. Obtaining of cryolite-alumina concentrate from carbon-, and fluorine containing wastes by burning method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of obtaining of cryolite-alumina concentrate from carbon-, and fluorine containing wastes by means of burning method was elaborated. The flowsheet of obtaining of cryolite-alumina concentrate from carbon-, and fluorine containing wastes by means of burning method was considered and presented in this article.

  1. Highly Ordered Carbon Nanotube Arrays with Open Ends Grown in Anodic Alumina Nanoholes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Highly ordered multiwalled carbon nanotube arrays were fabricated by pyrolysis of acetylene within anodic alumina templates.Nanotubes are very uniform in diameter and open at both ends. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction analysis show that the carbon nanotubes are well graphitized. These standing and open carbon nanotubes are possible to offer a potential elegant technique for electron emitting devices,chemical functionalization and nanotube composites.

  2. Passivation of carbon steel through mercury implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, P. J.; Robinson, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment, in which carbon steel samples were implanted with mercury ions from a broad beam ion source and their corrosion characteristics in air were evaluated, is described. Mercury doses of a few mA min/square cm at energies of a few hundred electron volts are shown to effect significant improvements in the corrosion resistance of the treated surfaces. In a warm moist environment the onset of rusting was extended from 15 min. for an untreated sample to approximately 30 hrs. for one implanted at a dose of 33 mA min/square cm with 1000 eV mercury ions.

  3. Structural Characterization and Property Study on the Activated Alumina-activated Carbon Composite Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yan-Qing; WU Ren-Ping; YE Xian-Feng

    2012-01-01

    AlCl3,NH3·H2O,HNO3 and activated carbon were used as raw materials to prepare one new type of activated alumina-activated carbon composite material.The influence of heat treatment conditions on the structure and property of this material was discussed;The microstructures of the composite material were characterized by XRD,SEM,BET techniques;and its formaldehyde adsorption characteristic was also tested.The results showed that the optimal heat treatment temperature of the activated alumina-activated carbon composite material was 450 ℃,iodine adsorption value was 441.40 mg/g,compressive strength was 44 N,specific surface area was 360.07 m2/g,average pore size was 2.91 nm,and pore volume was 0.26 m3/g.According to the BET pore size distribution diagram,the composite material has dual-pore size distribution structure,the micro-pore distributes in the range of 0.6-1.7 nm,and the meso-pore in the range of 3.0-8.0 nm.The formaldehyde adsorption effect of the activated alumina-activated carbon composite material was excellent,much better than that of the pure activated carbon or activated alumina,and its saturated adsorption capacity was 284.19 mg/g.

  4. Analytical evaluation of the solid rocket motor nozzle surface recession by the alumina-carbon reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Matsukawa, Yutaka; Sato, Yutaka; 松川 豊; 佐藤 裕

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model describing the chemical ablation of a solid rocket motor nozzle ablator by the alumina-carbon reaction is presented. An application of it to a typical solid rocket motor with a graphite nozzle ablator indicates a large influence of the reaction on the nozzle surface recession.

  5. Alumina-Activated Carbon Composite as Adsorbent of Procion Red Dye from Wastewater Songket Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Poedji Loekitowati Hariani; Fatma Fatma; Zulfikar Zulfikar

    2015-01-01

    Alumina-activated carbon composite has been synthesized and studied for adsorption procion red dye. Composite was prepared by precipitation method aluminium hydroxide on the surface of activated carbon followed by calcinations. The Fourier transform Infra Red (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and Brunaeur Emmet Teller (BET) surface are being used to characterize the adsorbent. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out for the adsorption of...

  6. Synthesis and mechanical behavior of carbon nanotube-magnesium composites hybridized with nanoparticles of alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes reinforced magnesium based composites were prepared with diligence and care using the powder metallurgy route coupled with rapid microwave sintering. Nanometer-sized particles of alumina were used to hybridize the carbon nanotubes reinforcement in the magnesium matrix so as to establish the intrinsic influence of hybridization on mechanical behavior of the resultant composite material. The yield strength, tensile strength and strain-to-failure of the carbon nanotubes-magnesium composites were found to increase with the addition of nanometer-sized alumina particles to the composite matrix. Scanning electron microscopy observations of the fracture surfaces of the samples deformed and failed in uniaxial tension revealed the presence of cleavage-like features on the fracture surface indicative of the occurrence of locally brittle fracture mechanism in the composite microstructure

  7. Alumina-Activated Carbon Composite as Adsorbent of Procion Red Dye from Wastewater Songket Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poedji Loekitowati Hariani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alumina-activated carbon composite has been synthesized and studied for adsorption procion red dye. Composite was prepared by precipitation method aluminium hydroxide on the surface of activated carbon followed by calcinations. The Fourier transform Infra Red (FTIR, Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS and Brunaeur Emmet Teller (BET surface are being used to characterize the adsorbent. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out for the adsorption of procion red dye. Effect of the mass of composite, stirrer speed, contact times and pH of the solution on the adsorption capacity were studied. The obtained optimum conditions applied to adsorp of procion red dye from wastewater songket industry. The result showed that the adsorption optimum at mass of alumina-activated carbon composite 0.1 g, stirrer speed 150 rpm, contact times 2 hours at pH of the solution 9. The adsorption isotherm data according to Langmuir isotherm. The alumina-activated carbon composite can be removal of procion red dye from wastewater songket industry with effectiveness adsorption of 88.21 %.

  8. thesis of high-purity carbon nanotubes over alumina and silica supported bimetallic catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Ratković

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were synthesized by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition method (CCVD of ethylene over alumina and silica supported bimetallic catalysts based on Fe, Co and Ni. The catalysts were prepared by a precipitation method, calcined at 600 °C and in situ reduced in hydrogen flow at 700 °C. The CNTs growth was carried out by a flow the mixture of C2H4 and nitrogen over the catalyst powder in a horizontal oven. The structure and morphology of as-synthesized CNTs were characterized using SEM. The as-synthesized nanotubes were purified by acid and basic treatments in order to remove impurities such as amorphous carbon, graphite nanoparticles and metal catalysts. XRD and DTA/TG analyses showed that the amounts of by-products in the purified CNTs samples were reduced significantly. According to the observed results, ethylene is an active carbon source for growing high-density CNTs with high yield but more on alumina-supported catalysts than on their silica- supported counterparts. The last might be explained by SMSI formed in the case of alumina-supported catalysts, resulting in higher active phase dispersion.

  9. Study on organosilicon plasma polymers implanted by carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radeva, E; Yourukova, L; Kolentsov, K; Balabanov, S; Zhechev, D; Steflekova, V [Georgi Nadjakov Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Amov, B [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)], E-mail: eradeva@issp.bas.bg

    2008-05-01

    In the present work plasma polymer films obtained from hexamethyldisiloxane have been implanted by carbon ions at three different doses. The photoluminescent properties of the implanted polymers were investigated. The optical transmission of these polymer layers was investigated in the visible spectral region. Their electrical parameters were also measured. It was found that the resulting changes do not worsen the protective properties of the implanted polymer layer. The variations in the properties studied might be ascribed to the nanostructured carbon clusters formed on the polymer surface. The results obtained could form the basis for further optimization of the polymer structure by carbon ion implantation in view of applications in electroluminescent display structures.

  10. EFFECT OF LOW-ENERGY OXYGEN PLASMA TREATMENT ON PHOTOLUMINESCENCE OF CARBON-BEARING POROUS ALUMINA

    OpenAIRE

    Kovger, E.; Karpič, R.; Vrublesky, I.

    2015-01-01

    In this study the effect of low-energy oxygen plasma treatment on the photoluminescence properties of the carbon-bearing porous alumina obtained in 0.4 M aqueous solution of tartaric acid at constant current density of 150 and 700 A m–2 was investi-gated. It was also established that in as-anodized samples carbon content is increased from 2.98 to 3.18 (wt.) % with increasing anodizing current density. Increase in current density from 150 to 700 A m–2 results only in decrease in photoluminesce...

  11. Unifying the templating effects of porous anodic alumina on metallic nanoparticles for carbon nanotube synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, Mark R., E-mail: Mark.R.Haase@gmail.com, E-mail: haasemr@mail.uc.edu; Alvarez, Noe T.; Malik, Rachit; Schulz, Mark; Shanov, Vesselin [580 Engineering Research Center, Department of Biomedical, Chemical and Environmental Engineering (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a promising material for many applications, due to their extraordinary properties. Some of these properties vary in relation to the diameter of the nanotubes; thus, precise control of CNT diameter can be critical. Porous anodic alumina (PAA) membranes have been successfully used to template electrodeposited catalyst. However, the catalysts used in CNT synthesis are frequently deposited with more precise techniques, such as electron beam deposition. We test the efficacy of PAA as a template for electron beam-deposited catalyst by studying the diameter distribution of CNTs grown catalyst of various thicknesses supported by PAA. These are then compared by ANOVA to the diameter distributions of CNTs grown on metal catalyst supported by a conventional alumina film. These results also allow a unified description of two templating effects, the more common particles-in-pores model, and the recently described particles-between-pores.

  12. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media.

  13. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-19

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media. PMID:27389659

  14. Microstructural characterisation of carbon implanted austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low carbon (316L) austenitic stainless steel has been implanted with carbon ions with a fluence of 5 x 1017 C ions/cm2 using an ion energy of 75 keV. The effect of carbon ion implantation on the microstructure of the austenitic steel has been examined in cross-section using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) both before and after implantation, and the implantation data correlated with a computer based simulation, TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter). It has been found that the high-fluence carbon ion implantation modified the microstructure of the steel, as demonstrated by the presence of two amorphous layers separated by a layer of expanded austenite

  15. Microstructural characterisation of carbon implanted austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.E. [Scientific Affairs Research Group, Stryker Orthopaedics, Raheen Business Park, Limerick (Ireland)]. E-mail: matthew.murphy@stryker.com; Insley, G.M. [Scientific Affairs Research Group, Stryker Orthopaedics, Raheen Business Park, Limerick (Ireland); Laugier, M.T. [Department of Physics, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Newcomb, S.B. [Sonsam Ltd., Glebe Laboratories, Newport, Tipperary (Ireland)

    2005-06-01

    Low carbon (316L) austenitic stainless steel has been implanted with carbon ions with a fluence of 5 x 10{sup 17} C ions/cm{sup 2} using an ion energy of 75 keV. The effect of carbon ion implantation on the microstructure of the austenitic steel has been examined in cross-section using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) both before and after implantation, and the implantation data correlated with a computer based simulation, TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter). It has been found that the high-fluence carbon ion implantation modified the microstructure of the steel, as demonstrated by the presence of two amorphous layers separated by a layer of expanded austenite.

  16. The effect of additional high dose carbon implantation on the tribological properties of titanium implanted steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tribological properties and the structural changes of hardened steel implanted with titanium followed by carbon were investigated as a function of additional carbon dose. The dose of Ti was 5.1017 Ti cm-2 and the additional C doses were 0, 4.1017, 8.1017 and 1.2.1018 Ccm-2. After Ti implantation, the steel surface transformed to a Fe-Ti-C ternary amorphous phase. Additional implantation of carbon to a dose of 4.1017 Ccm-2 produced fine TiC precipitates dispersed in the ternary amorphous matrix. When the additional C dose exceeded 8.1017 Ccm-2, very fine graphite precipitates appeared in the ternary amorphous phase. The steel surface with very fine graphite precipitates exhibited superior tribological properties. The benefits provided by additional high dose carbon implantation are considered as follows: strengthening of the amorphous phase, thickening of the modified layer, dispersion strengthening of the implanted layer by very fine graphite precipitates and lubrication effect by graphite particles. Comparing the friction properties of Ti+C implanted steel with that of C implanted steel, the role of Ti implantation is to reduce the friction of the surface during sliding and the role of C implantation is to increase the lifetime of the surface against wear. (orig.)

  17. Recovery of alkali and alumina from Bayer red mud by the calcification-carbonation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-feng; Zhang, Ting-an; Wang, Yan-xiu; Lü, Guo-zhi; Zhang, Wei-guang

    2016-03-01

    Red mud produced in the Bayer process is a hazardous solid waste because of its high alkalinity; however, it is rich in valuable components such as titanium, iron, and aluminum. In this study, a novel calcification-carbonation method was developed to recover alkali and alumina from Bayer red mud under mild reaction conditions. Batch experiments were performed to evaluate the potential effects of important parameters such as temperature, amount of CaO added, and CO2 partial pressure on the recovery of alkali and alumina. The results showed that 95.2% alkali and 75.0% alumina were recovered from red mud with decreases in the mass ratios of Na2O to Fe2O3 and of Al2O3 to Fe2O3 from 0.42 and 0.89 to 0.02 and 0.22, respectively. The processed red mud with less than 0.5wt% Na2O can potentially be used as a construction material.

  18. Experimental study on solar-powered adsorption refrigeration cycle with activated alumina and activated carbon as adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himsar Ambarita

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Typical adsorbent applied in solar-powered adsorption refrigeration cycle is activated carbon. It is known that activated alumina shows a higher adsorption capacity when it is tested in the laboratory using a constant radiation heat flux. In this study, solar-powered adsorption refrigeration cycle with generator filled by different adsorbents has been tested by exposing to solar radiation in Medan city of Indonesia. The generator is heated using a flat-plate type solar collector with a dimension of 0.5 m×0.5 m. Four cases experiments of solar-powered adsorption cycle were carried out, they are with generator filled by 100% activated alumina (named as 100AA, by a mixed of 75% activated alumina and 25% activated carbon (75AA, by a mixed of 25% activated alumina and 75% activated carbon (25AA, and filled by 100% activated carbon. Each case was tested for three days. The temperature and pressure history and the performance have been presented and analyzed. The results show that the average COP of 100AA, 75AA, 25AA, and 100AC is 0.054, 0.056, 0.06, and 0.074, respectively. The main conclusion can be drawn is that for Indonesian condition and flat-plate type solar collector the pair of activated carbon and methanol is the better than activated alumina.

  19. Statistical analysis of mechanical properties of pressureless sintered multiwalled carbon nanotube/alumina nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical properties of pressureless sintered 0.15–1.2 vol.% multiwalled carbon nanotube reinforced alumina matrix nanocomposites have been analyzed using the 2-parameter Weibull statistics. Electron microscopy and phase analysis of nanocomposites sintered at 1700 °C for 2 h in Argon revealed existence of interpenetrating network of nanotubes in alumina, formation of thin interface resembling stoichiometric aluminum monoxycarbide and matrix grain refinement by nanotubes. Statistical analyses indicated that with increasing Vickers hardness testing load (4.9–19.6 N) and flexural strength measurement temperature (room temperature to 1100 °C), Weibull modulus of nanocomposites increased significantly suggesting improved consistency at higher load and temperature. The highest Weibull moduli were obtained for nanocomposites containing either 0.15 or 0.3 vol.% nanotube which were ∼40% and ∼15% higher than single phase alumina for hardness and strength, respectively, supporting the specimen size effect on reliability of present brittle ceramic matrix nanocomposites. Superior mechanical reliability of nanocomposites over pure alumina was primarily attributed to the presence of structurally intact nanotubes forming effective interface region to ensure proper load sharing, matrix grain refinement, and especially, at higher testing load and temperature, overall averaging effect of flaws to yield higher Weibull moduli. -- Highlights: ► Fabrication of MWCNT/Al2O3 nanocomposites by economical process. ► Nanocomposites offered improved mechanical properties over pure Al2O3. ► Statistical analyses have been performed first time on these nanocomposites. ► Up to 0.6 vol.% MWCNT, nanocomposites offered improved reliability than Al2O3. ► Microscopic analyses for better understanding of structure–property relationship.

  20. Magnesia tuned multi-walled carbon nanotubes–reinforced alumina nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar, E-mail: ifahmad@ksu.edu.sa [Center of Excellence for Research in Engineering Materials, Advanced Manufacturing Institute, King Saud University, P.O. Box. 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Islam, Mohammad; Dar, Mushtaq Ahmad [Center of Excellence for Research in Engineering Materials, Advanced Manufacturing Institute, King Saud University, P.O. Box. 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Xu, Fang [Division of Materials, Mechanics and Structure, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, University Park, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Shah, Syed Ismat [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Zhu, Yanqiu [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Magnesia tuned alumina ceramic nanocomposites, reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes, were condensed using pressureless and hot-press sintering processes. Densification, microstructure and mechanical properties of the produced nanocomposites were meticulously investigated. Electron microscopy studies revealed the homogenous carbon nanotube dispersion within the alumina matrix and confirmed the retention of carbon nanotubes' distinctive tubular morphology and nanoscale features during the extreme mixing/sintering processes. Pressureless sintered nanocomposites showed meagre mechanical responses due to the poorly-integrated microstructures with a slight improvement upon magnesia addition. Conversely, both the magnesia addition and application of hot-press sintering technique resulted in the nanocomposite formation with near-theoretical densities (~ 99%), well-integrated microstructures and superior mechanical properties. Hot-press sintered nanocomposites incorporating 300 and 600 ppm magnesia exhibited an increase in hardness (10 and 11%), flexural strength (5 and 10%) and fracture toughness (15 and 20%) with respect to similar magnesia-free samples. Compared to monolithic alumina, a decent rise in fracture toughness (37%), flexural strength (22%) and hardness (20%) was observed in the hot-press sintered nanocomposites tuned with merely 600 ppm magnesia. Mechanically superior hot-press sintered magnesia tailored nanocomposites are attractive for several load-bearing structural applications. - Highlights: • MgO tailored Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–2 wt.% CNT nanocomposites are presented. • The role of MgO and sintering on nanocomposite structures and properties was studied. • Well-dispersed CNTs maintained their morphology/structure after harsh sintering. • Hot-pressing and MgO led nanocomposites to higher properties/unified structures. • MgO tuned composites showed higher toughness (37%) and strength (22%) than Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  1. Magnesia tuned multi-walled carbon nanotubes–reinforced alumina nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesia tuned alumina ceramic nanocomposites, reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes, were condensed using pressureless and hot-press sintering processes. Densification, microstructure and mechanical properties of the produced nanocomposites were meticulously investigated. Electron microscopy studies revealed the homogenous carbon nanotube dispersion within the alumina matrix and confirmed the retention of carbon nanotubes' distinctive tubular morphology and nanoscale features during the extreme mixing/sintering processes. Pressureless sintered nanocomposites showed meagre mechanical responses due to the poorly-integrated microstructures with a slight improvement upon magnesia addition. Conversely, both the magnesia addition and application of hot-press sintering technique resulted in the nanocomposite formation with near-theoretical densities (~ 99%), well-integrated microstructures and superior mechanical properties. Hot-press sintered nanocomposites incorporating 300 and 600 ppm magnesia exhibited an increase in hardness (10 and 11%), flexural strength (5 and 10%) and fracture toughness (15 and 20%) with respect to similar magnesia-free samples. Compared to monolithic alumina, a decent rise in fracture toughness (37%), flexural strength (22%) and hardness (20%) was observed in the hot-press sintered nanocomposites tuned with merely 600 ppm magnesia. Mechanically superior hot-press sintered magnesia tailored nanocomposites are attractive for several load-bearing structural applications. - Highlights: • MgO tailored Al2O3–2 wt.% CNT nanocomposites are presented. • The role of MgO and sintering on nanocomposite structures and properties was studied. • Well-dispersed CNTs maintained their morphology/structure after harsh sintering. • Hot-pressing and MgO led nanocomposites to higher properties/unified structures. • MgO tuned composites showed higher toughness (37%) and strength (22%) than Al2O3

  2. Adsorption of Ferricyanide Ion onActivated Carbon and γ-Alumina

    OpenAIRE

    J. Ketcha Mbadcam; G. F. Tchatat Wouaha; V. Hambate Gomdje

    2010-01-01

    Iron-cyanide complexes are present in soil and ground water due to anthropogenic inputs. We compared the adsorption of ferricyanide ion, on two commercial activated carbons (COM3 and COM4) and γ-alumina (A1G) in aqueous solution. Isotherm parameters obtained from batch experiments of iron-cyanide complex adsorption on these adsorbents were carried-out. The mass of the adsorbents were varied at 40 mg, 60 mg and 100 mg and the inorganic ion initial concentrations, Co also varied between 3.04×10...

  3. Formation of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide on rhodium/alumina model catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When tunnel junctions containing carbon monoxide adsorbed on alumina-supported Rh are heated in hydrogen the vibrational peaks due to carbon monoxide decrease and a new set of vibrational peaks grows. Shifts in the positions of some of these new peaks are observed if the normal 12C16O is replaced by 13C16O, but not if it is replaced by 12C18O. This suggests that the new surface species includes the carbon from the CO, but not the oxygen. The set of new peaks grows together and is in one-to-one correspondence with the peaks of ethylidene as extrapolated between published spectra of halogenated derivatives. A different surface species, tentatively identified as formate ions, can be produced by heating without hydrogen. 33 references, 4 figures, 1 table

  4. Processing and Characterization of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Containing Alumina-Carbon Refractories Prepared by Nanocomposite Powder Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Feng; Li, Nan; Liu, Baikuan; He, Zhongyang

    2016-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have often been used as additives to improve the properties of refractories containing carbon. However, it is very difficult to evenly distribute CNTs in the matrix. In order to solve this difficulty, an alumina/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) (AM) composite powder in which MWCNTs had grown on the surfaces of Al2O3 particles was developed and used in alumina-carbon (Al2O3-C) refractories. The effects of the AM composite powders on the microstructure and properties of the Al2O3-C refractories were studied and compared with the commercial MWCNTs. The nanocomposite powders significantly improved the distribution uniformity of MWCNTs in the Al2O3-C matrix. The densification, fracture properties, thermal shock resistance, and slag corrosion resistance were enhanced due to the well-dispersed MWCNTs. On the contrary, no improvement of the densification, fracture properties, and thermal shock resistance of the refractories was achieved by addition of commercial MWCNTs due to the agglomeration of MWCNTs.

  5. Study on effects of carbon impurities and oxygen vacancies in amorphous alumina phosphor prepared via a solution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amorphous alumina phosphors without containing expensive or toxic elements were prepared via a solution method. The obtained sample indicates bluish-white emission centered at 390–430 nm by UV excitation. According to the measurement results of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and organic microanalysis, it is found that the carbon impurities exist in the sample and they are essential for luminescence. On the other hand, 27Al NMR measurements indicate the presence of Al of 5-coordination. Moreover, there is good correspondence among the excitation spectra of the emission samples, the experimental optical properties of amorphous alumina, and the calculated oxygen vacancies levels in amorphous alumina model. Therefore, the new luminescence mechanism can be proposed as follows; the electrons in valence band are excited to oxygen vacancies bands by UV light and return to ground state through the carbon impurities band, being accompanied by the bluish-white emission. - Highlights: • The amorphous alumina prepared via solution method shows bluish-white emission. • According to the ESR results, carbon impurities are necessary for luminescence. • FT-IR, NMR and UV–vis measurements of the samples were conducted. • Our results indicated that oxygen vacancies play an important role. • We proposed the new luminescence mechanism for amorphous alumina phosphor

  6. Study on effects of carbon impurities and oxygen vacancies in amorphous alumina phosphor prepared via a solution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakui, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Kanako [Department of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya-shi, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Shan, Yue Jin, E-mail: shan@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [Department of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya-shi, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Tezuka, Keitaro; Imoto, Hideo [Department of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya-shi, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Hosokawa, Shogo; Shinozaki, Norifumi [Tatsumori Ltd., 50 Minami-Kawada, Kami-Yukiai, Tamura-cho, Koriyama-shi, Fukushima 963-0724 (Japan); Ando, Mariko; Maekawa, Hideki [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-04 Aramaki Aoba, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    The amorphous alumina phosphors without containing expensive or toxic elements were prepared via a solution method. The obtained sample indicates bluish-white emission centered at 390–430 nm by UV excitation. According to the measurement results of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and organic microanalysis, it is found that the carbon impurities exist in the sample and they are essential for luminescence. On the other hand, {sup 27}Al NMR measurements indicate the presence of Al of 5-coordination. Moreover, there is good correspondence among the excitation spectra of the emission samples, the experimental optical properties of amorphous alumina, and the calculated oxygen vacancies levels in amorphous alumina model. Therefore, the new luminescence mechanism can be proposed as follows; the electrons in valence band are excited to oxygen vacancies bands by UV light and return to ground state through the carbon impurities band, being accompanied by the bluish-white emission. - Highlights: • The amorphous alumina prepared via solution method shows bluish-white emission. • According to the ESR results, carbon impurities are necessary for luminescence. • FT-IR, NMR and UV–vis measurements of the samples were conducted. • Our results indicated that oxygen vacancies play an important role. • We proposed the new luminescence mechanism for amorphous alumina phosphor.

  7. Ion implantation inhibits cell attachment to glassy polymeric carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implantation of MeV gold, oxygen, carbon ions into GPC alters the surface topography of GPC and enhances the already strong tendency for cells to attach to GPC. We have shown that implantation of silver ions near the surface strongly inhibits cell growth on GPC. Both enhanced adhesion of and inhibition of cell growth are desirable improvements on cardiac implants that have long been successfully fabricated from biocompatible glassy polymeric carbon (GPC). In vitro biocompatibility tests have been carried out with model cell lines to demonstrate that ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) of silver, as well as silver ion bombardment, can favorably influence the surface of GPC for biomedical applications

  8. CARBON NANOTUBES VIA METHANE DECOMPOSITION ON AN ALUMINA SUPPORTED COBALT AEROGEL CATALYST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingyu Piao; Jiuling Chen; Yongdan Li

    2003-01-01

    An alumina-supported cobalt aerogel catalyst prepared from a sol-gel and a supercritical drying method was used in the catalytic decomposition of methane. The physical-chemical properties of the catalyst were characterized and its activity for methane decomposition was investigated. The effects of calcination and reaction temperatures on the activity of the catalyst and the morphology of the carbon nanotubes produced were discussed. A CoAl2O4 spinel structure formed in the calcined catalyst. The quantity of the nanotubes produced in the reaction increases with the amount of cobalt in the reduced catalyst. A higher reaction temperature leads to a higher reaction rate, though faster deactivation of the catalyst occurs with the change. The carbon nanotubes grown on the catalyst have smooth walls and uniform diameter distribution.

  9. Lithium aluminosilicate reinforced with carbon nanofiber and alumina for controlled-thermal-expansion materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Borrell, Olga García-Moreno, Ramón Torrecillas, Victoria García-Rocha and Adolfo Fernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials with a very low or tailored thermal expansion have many applications ranging from cookware to the aerospace industry. Among others, lithium aluminosilicates (LAS are the most studied family with low and negative thermal expansion coefficients. However, LAS materials are electrical insulators and have poor mechanical properties. Nanocomposites using LAS as a matrix are promising in many applications where special properties are achieved by the addition of one or two more phases. The main scope of this work is to study the sinterability of carbon nanofiber (CNFs/LAS and CNFs/alumina/LAS nanocomposites, and to adjust the ratio among components for obtaining a near-zero or tailored thermal expansion. Spark plasma sintering of nanocomposites, consisting of commercial CNFs and alumina powders and an ad hoc synthesized β-eucryptite phase, is proposed as a solution to improving mechanical and electrical properties compared with the LAS ceramics obtained under the same conditions. X-ray diffraction results on phase compositions and microstructure are discussed together with dilatometry data obtained in a wide temperature range (−150 to 450 °C. The use of a ceramic LAS phase makes it possible to design a nanocomposite with a very low or tailored thermal expansion coefficient and exceptional electrical and mechanical properties.

  10. Lithium aluminosilicate reinforced with carbon nanofiber and alumina for controlled-thermal-expansion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials with a very low or tailored thermal expansion have many applications ranging from cookware to the aerospace industry. Among others, lithium aluminosilicates (LAS) are the most studied family with low and negative thermal expansion coefficients. However, LAS materials are electrical insulators and have poor mechanical properties. Nanocomposites using LAS as a matrix are promising in many applications where special properties are achieved by the addition of one or two more phases. The main scope of this work is to study the sinterability of carbon nanofiber (CNFs)/LAS and CNFs/alumina/LAS nanocomposites, and to adjust the ratio among components for obtaining a near-zero or tailored thermal expansion. Spark plasma sintering of nanocomposites, consisting of commercial CNFs and alumina powders and an ad hoc synthesized β-eucryptite phase, is proposed as a solution to improving mechanical and electrical properties compared with the LAS ceramics obtained under the same conditions. X-ray diffraction results on phase compositions and microstructure are discussed together with dilatometry data obtained in a wide temperature range (−150 to 450 °C). The use of a ceramic LAS phase makes it possible to design a nanocomposite with a very low or tailored thermal expansion coefficient and exceptional electrical and mechanical properties.

  11. Lithium aluminosilicate reinforced with carbon nanofiber and alumina for controlled-thermal-expansion materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Amparo; García-Moreno, Olga; Torrecillas, Ramón; García-Rocha, Victoria; Fernández, Adolfo

    2012-02-01

    Materials with a very low or tailored thermal expansion have many applications ranging from cookware to the aerospace industry. Among others, lithium aluminosilicates (LAS) are the most studied family with low and negative thermal expansion coefficients. However, LAS materials are electrical insulators and have poor mechanical properties. Nanocomposites using LAS as a matrix are promising in many applications where special properties are achieved by the addition of one or two more phases. The main scope of this work is to study the sinterability of carbon nanofiber (CNFs)/LAS and CNFs/alumina/LAS nanocomposites, and to adjust the ratio among components for obtaining a near-zero or tailored thermal expansion. Spark plasma sintering of nanocomposites, consisting of commercial CNFs and alumina powders and an ad hoc synthesized β-eucryptite phase, is proposed as a solution to improving mechanical and electrical properties compared with the LAS ceramics obtained under the same conditions. X-ray diffraction results on phase compositions and microstructure are discussed together with dilatometry data obtained in a wide temperature range (-150 to 450 °C). The use of a ceramic LAS phase makes it possible to design a nanocomposite with a very low or tailored thermal expansion coefficient and exceptional electrical and mechanical properties.

  12. Cooperativity between Al Sites Promotes Hydrogen Transfer and Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation upon Dimethyl Ether Activation on Alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas-Vives, Aleix; Valla, Maxence; Copéret, Christophe; Sautet, Philippe

    2015-09-23

    The methanol-to-olefin (MTO) process allows the conversion of methanol/dimethyl ether into olefins on acidic zeolites via the so-called hydrocarbon pool mechanism. However, the site and mechanism of formation of the first carbon-carbon bond are still a matter of debate. Here, we show that the Lewis acidic Al sites on the 110 facet of γ-Al2O3 can readily activate dimethyl ether to yield CH4, alkenes, and surface formate species according to spectroscopic studies combined with a computational approach. The carbon-carbon forming step as well as the formation of methane and surface formate involves a transient oxonium ion intermediate, generated by a hydrogen transfer between surface methoxy species and coordinated methanol on adjacent Al sites. These results indicate that extra framework Al centers in acidic zeolites, which are associated with alumina, can play a key role in the formation of the first carbon-carbon bond, the initiation step of the industrial MTO process. PMID:27162986

  13. Vertical single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes grown from modified porous anodic alumina templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertical single-walled and double-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT and DWNT) arrays have been grown using a catalyst embedded within the pore walls of a porous anodic alumina (PAA) template. The initial film structure consisted of a SiOx adhesion layer, a Ti layer, a bottom Al layer, a Fe layer, and a top Al layer deposited on a Si wafer. The Al and Fe layers were subsequently anodized to create a vertically oriented pore structure through the film stack. CNTs were synthesized from the catalyst layer by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The resulting structure is expected to form the basis for development of vertically oriented CNT-based electronics and sensors

  14. Preparation of Low-phenylalanine Whey Hydrolysates, Using Papain and Pancreatin Immobilized on Activated Carbon and Alumina

    OpenAIRE

    Viviane D.M. Silva; Leticia M. De Marco; Wendel O. Afonso; Daniella C.F. Lopes; JoseN. Januario; Marcos J.B. Aguiar; Ana Lucia P. Starling; Marialice P.C. Silvestre

    2007-01-01

    This study involves the preparation of whey hydrolysates with low phenylalanine (Phe) content aiming the treatment of phenylketonuria. For hydrolysing the proteins, two enzymes were used, papain and pancreatin, in an immobilized form, on Activated Carbon (AC) and alumina (AL) and three enzyme: substrate ratios (E:S) were tested for each enzyme. Activated carbon was used to remove Phe from hydrolysates. The second order spectrophotometry was used to evaluate the efficiency of Phe removal as we...

  15. Carbon Nanotube/Alumina/Polyethersulfone Hybrid Hollow Fiber Membranes with Enhanced Mechanical and Anti-Fouling Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Feng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were incorporated into alumina/polyethersulfone hollow fibre membranes to enhance the mechanical property and the efficiency of water treatment. Results show that the incorporation of CNTs can greatly limit the formation of large surface pores, decrease the void size in support layers and improve the porosity and pore connectivity of alumina/polyethersulfone membranes. As a result of such morphology change and pore size change, both improved flux and rejection were achieved in such CNTs/alumina/polyethersulfone membranes. Moreover, the CNTs/alumina/PES membranes show higher antifouling ability and the flux recoveries after being fouled by bovine serum albumin (BSA and humic acid were improved by 84.1% and 53.2% compared to the samples without CNT incorporation. Besides the improvement in water treatment performance, the incorporation of CNTs enhanced the tensile properties of inorganic/polymer membranes. Therefore, such CNTs/alumina/PES hollow fiber membranes are very promising candidates for good filter media in industry, considering their high efficiency and high mechanical properties.

  16. Controlling the number of walls in multi walled carbon nanotubes/alumina hybrid compound via ball milling of precipitate catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosbi, Norlin [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), 14300 Nibong Tebal, Seberang Perai Selatan, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Akil, Hazizan Md, E-mail: hazizan@usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), 14300 Nibong Tebal, Seberang Perai Selatan, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Cluster for Polymer Composite (CPC), Science and Engineering Research Centre, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), 14300 Nibong Tebal, Seberang Perai Selatan, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We report that, to manipulate carbon nanotubes geometry and number of walls are by controlling the precipitate catalyst size. • Number of walls and geometry effects depend on the milling time of the precipitate catalyst. • Increasing milling of time will decrease the carbon nanotubes number of walls. • Increasing milling of time will increase the carbon nanotubes thermal conductivity. - Abstract: This paper reports the influence of milling time on the structure and properties of the precipitate catalyst of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/alumina hybrid compound, produced through the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process. For this purpose, light green precipitate consisted of aluminium, nickel(II) nitrate hexahydrate and sodium hydroxide mixture was placed in a planetary mill equipped with alumina vials using alumina balls at 300 rpm rotation speed for various milling time (5–15 h) prior to calcinations and CVD process. The compound was characterized using various techniques. Based on high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis, increasing the milling time up to 15 h decreased the diameter of MWCNT from 32.3 to 13.1 nm. It was noticed that the milling time had a significant effect on MWCNT wall thickness, whereby increasing the milling time from 0 to 15 h reduced the number of walls from 29 to 12. It was also interesting to note that the carbon content increased from 23.29 wt.% to 36.37 wt.% with increasing milling time.

  17. Controlling the number of walls in multi walled carbon nanotubes/alumina hybrid compound via ball milling of precipitate catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We report that, to manipulate carbon nanotubes geometry and number of walls are by controlling the precipitate catalyst size. • Number of walls and geometry effects depend on the milling time of the precipitate catalyst. • Increasing milling of time will decrease the carbon nanotubes number of walls. • Increasing milling of time will increase the carbon nanotubes thermal conductivity. - Abstract: This paper reports the influence of milling time on the structure and properties of the precipitate catalyst of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/alumina hybrid compound, produced through the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process. For this purpose, light green precipitate consisted of aluminium, nickel(II) nitrate hexahydrate and sodium hydroxide mixture was placed in a planetary mill equipped with alumina vials using alumina balls at 300 rpm rotation speed for various milling time (5–15 h) prior to calcinations and CVD process. The compound was characterized using various techniques. Based on high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis, increasing the milling time up to 15 h decreased the diameter of MWCNT from 32.3 to 13.1 nm. It was noticed that the milling time had a significant effect on MWCNT wall thickness, whereby increasing the milling time from 0 to 15 h reduced the number of walls from 29 to 12. It was also interesting to note that the carbon content increased from 23.29 wt.% to 36.37 wt.% with increasing milling time

  18. A novel structure for carbon nanotube reinforced alumina composites with improved mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engineering ceramics have high stiffness, excellent thermostability, and relatively low density, but their brittleness impedes their use as structural materials. Incorporating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into a brittle ceramic might be expected to provide CNT/ceramic composites with both high toughness and high temperature stability. Until now, however, materials fabrication difficulties have limited research on CNT/ceramic composites. The mechanical failure of CNT/ceramic composites reported previously is primarily attributed to poor CNT-matrix connectivity and severe phase segregation. Here we show that a novel processing approach based on the precursor method can diminish the phase segregation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and render MWCNT/alumina composites highly homogeneous. The MWCNTs used in this study are modified with an acid treatment. Combined with a mechanical interlock induced by the chemically modified MWCNTs, this approach leads to improved mechanical properties. Mechanical measurements reveal that only 0.9 vol% acid-treated MWCNT addition results in 27% and 25% simultaneous increases in bending strength (689.6 ± 29.1 MPa) and fracture toughness (5.90 ± 0.27 MPa m1/2), respectively

  19. Adsorption properties of carbonized polyacrylonitrile deposited on γ-alumina and silica gel by precipitation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precipitation polymerization method was used for the deposition of various contents of polyacrylonitrile on two oxide-type supports (γ-alumina and silica gel). The synthesized materials were characterized by thermal analysis performed in inert and oxidizing atmospheres. The mechanism of polyacrylonitrile decomposition was proposed. In order to gain effective adsorbents of volatile organic compounds the polyacrylonitrile/support composites were carbonized at elevated temperatures. The texture and morphology of the calcined materials were examined by low-temperature sorption of N2 and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. An influence of thermal treatment conditions and carbonaceous species loading on adsorption capacity of methyl-ethyl ketone vapour was also determined. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements revealed that the ladder-type polyacrylonitrile species formed above 250 oC and stable up to about 350-400 oC are the most effective sites for methyl-ethyl ketone sorption. The carbonaceous species dispersion was found to be an additional factor influencing the adsorption capacity of the carbonized polyacrylonitrile/support composites.

  20. A simple electrochemical platform for detection of nitrobenzene in water samples using an alumina polished glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumalraj, Balamurugan; Palanisamy, Selvakumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Thangavelu, Kokulnathan; Periakaruppan, Prakash; Liu, Xiao-Heng

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we report a selective electrochemical sensing of nitrobenzene (NB) using an alumina (γ-Al2O3) polished glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for the first time. The scanning electron microscopy studies confirm the presence of alumina particles on the GCE surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal that the utilized alumina is γ-Al2O3. The alumina polished GCE shows an enhanced sensitivity and lower overpotential toward the reduction of NB compared to unpolished GCE. The differential pulse voltammetry response was used for the determination of NB and it shows that the reduction peak current of NB is linearly proportional to the concentrations of NB ranging from 0.5 to 145.5μM. The limit of detection is found to be 0.15μM based on 3σ. The fabricated electrode exhibits its appropriate selectivity towards NB in the presence of a range of nitro compounds and metal ions. The good practicality of the sensor in various water samples reveals that it can be a promising electrode material for practical applications. In addition, the proposed NB sensor is simple and cost effective one when compared with previously reported NB sensors in the literature. PMID:27163842

  1. Electrical resistance of diamond implanted at liquid nitrogen temperature with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon ion implantation of diamond to high fluence, below the temperature at which diamond growth can occur, usually leads to black layers of high conductivity. This study shows that for a low enough temperature of the diamond during implantation, a black layer with high electrical resistance can develop. In particular, carbon ion implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature, leads to an implanted layer with electrical resistance about one million times higher than the resistance obtained for implantation at temperatures above room temperature. (author)

  2. Controlling the number of walls in multi walled carbon nanotubes/alumina hybrid compound via ball milling of precipitate catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosbi, Norlin; Akil, Hazizan Md

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports the influence of milling time on the structure and properties of the precipitate catalyst of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/alumina hybrid compound, produced through the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process. For this purpose, light green precipitate consisted of aluminium, nickel(II) nitrate hexahydrate and sodium hydroxide mixture was placed in a planetary mill equipped with alumina vials using alumina balls at 300 rpm rotation speed for various milling time (5-15 h) prior to calcinations and CVD process. The compound was characterized using various techniques. Based on high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis, increasing the milling time up to 15 h decreased the diameter of MWCNT from 32.3 to 13.1 nm. It was noticed that the milling time had a significant effect on MWCNT wall thickness, whereby increasing the milling time from 0 to 15 h reduced the number of walls from 29 to 12. It was also interesting to note that the carbon content increased from 23.29 wt.% to 36.37 wt.% with increasing milling time.

  3. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... composite implant material. 878.3500 Section 878.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous...

  4. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 1017 ions-cm− 2, 2.4 × 1017 ions-cm− 2, and 4.8 × 1017 ions-cm− 2. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation

  5. Probabilistic predictive modelling of carbon nanocomposites for medical implants design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Matthew; Chui, Chee-Kong

    2015-04-01

    Modelling of the mechanical properties of carbon nanocomposites based on input variables like percentage weight of Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) inclusions is important for the design of medical implants and other structural scaffolds. Current constitutive models for the mechanical properties of nanocomposites may not predict well due to differences in conditions, fabrication techniques and inconsistencies in reagents properties used across industries and laboratories. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of the designed products are not deterministic, but exist as a probabilistic range. A predictive model based on a modified probabilistic surface response algorithm is proposed in this paper to address this issue. Tensile testing of three groups of different CNT weight fractions of carbon nanocomposite samples displays scattered stress-strain curves, with the instantaneous stresses assumed to vary according to a normal distribution at a specific strain. From the probabilistic density function of the experimental data, a two factors Central Composite Design (CCD) experimental matrix based on strain and CNT weight fraction input with their corresponding stress distribution was established. Monte Carlo simulation was carried out on this design matrix to generate a predictive probabilistic polynomial equation. The equation and method was subsequently validated with more tensile experiments and Finite Element (FE) studies. The method was subsequently demonstrated in the design of an artificial tracheal implant. Our algorithm provides an effective way to accurately model the mechanical properties in implants of various compositions based on experimental data of samples. PMID:25658876

  6. In-situ observation of sputtered particles for carbon implanted tungsten during energetic isotope ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oya, Y.; Sato, M.; Uchimura, H.; Okuno, K. [Graduate School of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan); Ashikawa, N.; Sagara, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan); Yoshida, N. [Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga (Japan); Hatano, Y. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Tungsten is a candidate for plasma facing materials in future fusion reactors. During DT plasma operations, carbon as an impurity will bombard tungsten, leading to the formation of tungsten-carbon (WC) layer and affecting tritium recycling behavior. The effect of carbon implantation for the dynamic recycling of deuterium, which demonstrates tritium recycling, including retention and sputtering, has been investigated using in-situ sputtered particle measurements. The C{sup +} implanted W, WC and HOPG were prepared and dynamic sputtered particles were measured during H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation. It has been found that the major hydrocarbon species for C{sup +} implanted tungsten is CH{sub 3}, while for WC and HOPG (Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite) it is CH{sub 4}. The chemical state of hydrocarbon is controlled by the H concentration in a W-C mixed layer. The amount of C-H bond and the retention of H trapped by carbon atom should control the chemical form of hydrocarbon sputtered by H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation and the desorption of CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 2} are due to chemical sputtering, although that for CH is physical sputtering. The activation energy for CH{sub 3} desorption has been estimated to be 0.4 eV, corresponding to the trapping process of hydrogen by carbon through the diffusion in W. It is concluded that the chemical states of hydrocarbon sputtered by H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation for W is determined by the amount of C-H bond on the W surface. (authors)

  7. β-alumina-14H and β-alumina-21R: Two chromic Na2-δ(Al,Mg,Cr)17O25 polysomes observed in slags from the production of low-carbon ferrochromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejny, Clivia; Kahlenberg, Volker; Schmidmair, Daniela; Tribus, Martina; deVilliers, Johan

    2016-09-01

    The crystal structures of unknown phases found in slags from the production of low-carbon ferrochromium were studied by powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Two phases of Na2-δ(Al, Mg, Cr)17O25 composition were found to be composed of an alternating stacking of a spinel-type and a Na-hosting block. Similar structures are known for β-alumina and β"-alumina, NaAl11O17. However, the spinel-type block in Na2-δ(Al, Mg, Cr)17O25 is composed of five cation layers in contrast to three cation layers in the β-alumina spinel-block. The two new phases, β-alumina-14H, P63/mmc, a=5.6467(2), c=31.9111(12) Å, and β-alumina-21R, R 3 ̅m, a=5.6515(3), c=48.068(3) Å have a 14-layer and 21-layer stacking with a 2 × (cccccch) and a 3 × (ccccccc) repeat sequence of oxygen layers in cubic and hexagonal close packing, respectively.

  8. Hollow carbon nanospheres/silicon/alumina core-shell film as an anode for lithium-ion batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bing; Yao, Fei; Bae, Jung Jun; Chang, Jian; Zamfir, Mihai Robert; Le, Duc Toan; Pham, Duy Tho; Yue, Hongyan; Lee, Young Hee

    2015-01-01

    Hollow carbon nanospheres/silicon/alumina (CNS/Si/Al2O3) core-shell films obtained by the deposition of Si and Al2O3 on hollow CNS interconnected films are used as the anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. The hollow CNS film acts as a three dimensional conductive substrate and provides void space for silicon volume expansion during electrochemical cycling. The Al2O3 thin layer is beneficial to the reduction of solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation. Moreover, as-designed structure...

  9. Characterization of surface enhancement of carbon ion-implanted TiN coatings by metal vapor vacuum arc ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C L

    2002-01-01

    The modification of the surfaces of energetic carbon-implanted TiN films using metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion implantation was investigated, by varying ion energy and dose. The microhardness, microstructure and chemical states of carbon, implanted on the surface layer of TiN films, were examined, as functions of ion energy and dose, by nanoindenter, transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results revealed that the microhardness increased from 16.8 up to 25.3 GPa and the friction coefficient decreased to approximately 0.2, depending on the implanted ion energy and dose. The result is attributed to the new microcrystalline phases of TiCN and TiC formed, and carbon concentration saturation of the implanted matrix can enhance the partial mechanical property of TiN films after MEVVA treatment. The concentration distribution, implantation depth and chemical states of carbon-implanted TiN coatings depended strongly on the ion dose and...

  10. De-oxygenation of CO2 by using Hydrogen, Carbon and Methane over Alumina-Supported Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Y. Raskar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The de-oxygenation of CO2 was explored by using hydrogen, methane, carbon etc., over alumina supported catalysts. The alumina-supported ruthenium, rhodium, platinum, molybdenum, vanadium and magnesium catalysts were first reduced in hydrogen atmosphere and then used for the de-oxygenation of CO2. Furthermore, experimental variables for the de-oxygenation of CO2 were temperature (range 50 to 650 oC, H2/CO2 mole ratios (1.0 to 5, and catalyst loading (0.5 to 10 wt %. During the de-oxygenation of CO2 with H2 or CH4 or carbon, conversion of CO2, selectivity to CO and CH4 were estimated. Moreover, 25.4 % conversion of CO2 by hydrogen was observed over 1 wt% Pt/Al2O3 catalyst at 650 oC with 33.8 % selectivity to CH4. However, 8.1 to 13.9 % conversion of CO2 was observed over 1 wt% Pt/Al2O3 catalyst at 550 oC in the presence of both H2 and CH4. Moreover, 42.8 to 79.4 % CH4 was converted with 9 to 23.1 % selectivity to CO. It was observed that the de-oxygenation of CO2 by hydrogen, carbon and methane produced carbon, CO and CH4. © 2012 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 6th February 2012; Revised: 23rd April 2012; Accepted: 24th April 2012[How to Cite: R. Y. Raskar, K. B. Kale, A. G. Gaikwad. (2011. De-oxygenation of CO2 by using Hydrogen, Carbon and Methane over Alumina-Supported Catalysts. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (1: 59-69.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1631.59-69][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1631.59-69 ] | View in 

  11. Surface bioactivity of plasma implanted silicon and amorphous carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul K CHU

    2004-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PⅢ&D) has been shown to be an effective technique to enhance the surface bioactivity of materials. In this paper, recent progress made in our laboratory on plasma surface modification single-crystal silicon and amorphous carbon is reviewed. Silicon is the most important material in the integrated circuit industry but its surface biocompatibility has not been investigated in details. We have recently performed hydrogen PⅢ into silicon and observed the biomimetic growth of apatite on its surface in simulated body fluid. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used in the industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and chemical inertness. The use of this material in biomedical engineering has also attracted much attention. It has been observed in our laboratory that doping DLC with nitrogen by means of PⅢ can improve the surface blood compatibility. The properties as well as in vitro biological test results will be discussed in this article.

  12. Plasma modification of medical implants by carbon coatings depositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Grabarczyk

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main goal was to work out the technology of deposition of carbon layers onto surface of medical implants made of the AISI316L medical steel. So far the results of carried investigations have proved that layers synthesized in RF PACVD process noticeably improve the biotolerance of the medical steel. Positive experimental results concerning the implementation of carbon layers conducted in the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering of the Technical University of Lodz were the basis for attempt of industrial application of the worked out technology.Design/methodology/approach: Carbon layers were manufactured using radio frequency plasma RF PACVD method. The technology was worked out for the surfaces of the intramedullary nails. The investigations were carried out in order to compare obtained synthesis results with the layers deposited under the laboratory conditions. In this work the following are presented: the surface topography investigation, results of nanohardness and adhesion measurements as well as the raman spectra. Medical examination results were presented in our earlier publications. In the description of obtained investigation results are also presented the preliminary results of the medical treatment effects with the use of intramedullary nails covered with the carbon layer.Findings: Carbon layers manufactured onto intramedullary nails presented good mechanical properties. Applied synthesis parameters made it possible to manufacture uniform film onto whole implant surface. Thickness of the layer was varied in the range of 200 – 400 nm, however total modification area contained 3.5 micrometers. Nails covered with the carbon layer positively passed the tests and were admitted into medical trade turnover. Positive medical treatment results were observed especially in case of patients with affirmed allergies onto alloying components contained in medical steels like chromium and nickel.Research limitations

  13. Colloidal Alumina-bonded TiB2 Coating on Cathode Carbon Blocks in Aluminum Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) with reduction process was used to fabricate TiB2 powder from TiO2-B2O3-Mg system. The colloidal alumina-bonded TiB2 paste was prepared and coated on the cathode carbonblocks. Various properties of the baked paste such as the corrosive resistance, thermal expansion and wettability were tested. Experimental results showed that the colloidal alumina-bonded TiB2 coating could be well wetted by liquid alum inum; and the thermal expansion coefficient of the coated material was 5.8× 10 6 ℃ -1 at 20-1000℃, which was close to that of the traditional anthracite block cathode (4× 10 6 ℃ 1); the electrical resistivity was 8 μΩ·m at 900℃ when the con tent of alumina in the coated material was about 9% in mass fraction. In addition, some other good results such as sodium resistance were also reported.

  14. Alumina-carbon nanofibers nanocomposites obtained by spark plasma sintering for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrell, A.; Torrecillas, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN) Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Oviedo, Principado de Asturias, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, Llanera Asturias (Spain); Rocha, V.G.; Fernandez, A. [ITMA Materials Technology, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, Llanera Asturias (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    There is an increasing demand of multifunctional materials for a wide variety of technological developments. Bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells are an example of complex functionality components that must show among other properties high mechanical strength, electrical, and thermal conductivity. The present research explored the possibility of using alumina-carbon nanofibers (CNFs) nanocomposites for this purpose. In this study, it was studied for the first time the whole range of powder compositions in this system. Homogeneous powders mixtures were prepared and subsequently sintered by spark plasma sintering. The materials obtained were thoroughly characterized and compared in terms of properties required to be used as bipolar plates. The control on material microstructure and composition allows designing materials where mechanical or electrical performances are enhanced. A 50/50 vol.% alumina-CNFs composite appears to be a very promising material for this kind of application. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Enhanced wear resistance of production tools and steel samples by implantation of nitrogen and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years ion implantation has become a feasible technique for obtaining improved wear resistance of production tools. However, basic knowledge of how and in which cases ion implantation is working at its best is still needed. The present paper discusses structural and tribological investigations of carbon and nitrogen implanted steels. The nitrogen data were obtained mainly from field tests and the investigation of carbon implantations took place mainly in the laboratory. A study was made of how the tribological behaviour of implanted steels changes with different implantation parameters. The tribological laboratory investigations were carried out using pin-on-disc equipment under controlled test conditions, and deal with high dose carbon implantation (approximately (1-2)x1018 ions cm-2). The wear resistance of steels was enhanced dramatically, by up to several orders of magnitude. The field test results cover a broad range of ion implanted production tools, which showed a marked improvement in wear resistance. Nitrogen implanted tools are also compared with carbon and titanium implanted tools. (orig.)

  16. Self-diffusion of carbon dioxide in samaria/alumina aerogel catalyst using high field NMR diffusometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert; Zhang, Suihua; Neumann, Björn; Bäumer, Marcus; Vasenkov, Sergey

    2013-10-01

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR was used to investigate the self-diffusion of carbon dioxide in alumina stabilized samaria aerogel catalyst, a promising porous catalyst for gas-phase reactions featuring high porosity and high surface area. For diffusion studies, the catalyst was prepared in two sample packing types, macroscopic monoliths (i.e., macroscopic cylindrical particles) and powder beds with particle sizes around 200 μm that are considered for catalytic applications. Studies of diffusion in these samples revealed how macroscopic packing influences the catalyst transport properties. Application of a high magnetic field of 17.6 T in the reported PFG NMR studies enabled diffusion measurements for relatively low carbon dioxide densities in the catalyst samples corresponding to a gas loading pressure of around 0.1 atm. As a result, it was possible to perform diffusion measurements for a large range of carbon dioxide loading pressures between 0.1 and 10 atm. The measured carbon dioxide diffusivities in the beds of catalyst particles are interpreted in the context of a simple diffusion-mediated exchange model previously used for zeolites and other porous materials.

  17. Microcalorimetric Adsorption of Alumina Oxide Catalysts for Combination of Ethylbenzene dehydrogenation and carbon Dioxide Shift-reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Xin; SHEN Jian-yi

    2004-01-01

    Styrene (STY) is now produced industrially in fairly large quantities by the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EB) using promoted iron oxide catalyst with superheated steam.In this case, small amount of carbon dioxide formed as a by-product was known to inhibit the catalytic activity of commercial catalyst. Recently, there have been some reports which carbon dioxide showed positive effects to promote catalytic activities on the reaction over several catalysts.In this study, we attempted to combine the dehydrogenation of EB to STY with the carbon dioxide shift-reaction. The combine reaction (EB + CO2 → STY + H2O + CO) can be considered as one of the ways of using CO2 resources and can yield simultaneously STY and Carbon oxide.Alumina oxide catalysts such as Al2O3, Na2O/Al2O3 and K2O/Al2O3 were prepared by the usual impregnation method with an aqueous solution of NaNO3 and KNO3, and then calcined at 650℃ for 5 h in a stream of air. The reaction condition is 600℃, flow of CO2 38ml/mon and space velocity (EB) 1.28h-1.

  18. Electro-oxidation of some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on an alumina nanoparticle-modified glassy carbon electrode

    OpenAIRE

    TABESHNIA, Mahla; HELI, Hossein; Jabbari, Ali

    2010-01-01

    The electro-oxidation of mefenamic acid, diclofenac, and indomethacin on glassy carbon and alumina nanoparticle-modified glassy carbon electrodes in a phosphate buffer solution at physiological pH was studied. The techniques of cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, impedance spectroscopy, and steady state polarization measurements were applied. The drugs were irreversibly oxidized on bath electrodes via an anodic peak and the process was controlled by diffusion in the bulk of soluti...

  19. Imobilização da pancreatina em carvão ativado e em alumina para o preparo de hidrolisados de soro de leite = Immobilization of pancreatin in activated carbon and in alumina for preparing whey hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Dias Medeiros Silva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Tendo como objetivo a redução de custos do processo de fabricação dehidrolisados protéicos, estudou-se neste trabalho a imobilização da pancreatina, por adsorção, em carvão ativado e em alumina. Para isso, foram testadas diferentes condições de imobilização (30, 60 e 90min a 25°C, e 12h a 5°C. Para verificar a taxa de imobilização, determinou-se indiretamente a enzima não adsorvida nos suportes. Ao se utilizar o carvão ativado, não foi observada diferença significativa entre as condições testadas, tendo-se obtido 100% de imobilização enzimática. Para a alumina, a melhor condição foi a de 90min, na qual se obteve 37% de imobilização. A medida do grau de exposição da fenilalanina, pela espectrofotometria derivada segunda, foi empregada para a determinação da estabilidade operacional da enzima, tendo sido mostrado que a imobilização em carvão ativado e emalumina permitiu a reutilização da pancreatina por até 5 vezes e 2 vezes, respectivamente.Immobilization of pancreatin in activated carbon and in alumina was studied for producing protein hydrolysates, in order to reduce the process costs. Different immobilization conditions were tested (30, 60 and 90min at 25°C, and 12h at 5°C. For estimating the immobilization rate the amount of the non-adsorbed enzyme on the supports was indirectly determined. When activated carbon was used, no significant difference was observed among the tested conditions, obtaining 100% of enzymatic immobilization. In case of alumina, the best condition showed to be the 90min treatment which produced 37% of immobilization. The evaluation of the degree of exposition ofphenylalanine, by second derivative spectrophotometry, was used for the determination of the enzyme operational stability, and showed that the immobilization in activated carbon and in alumina allowed the reusability of the pancreatin for 5 times and 2 times,respectively.

  20. Carbon-carbon composites for orthopedic prosthesis and implants. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T D; Klett, J W; Strizak, J P [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baker, C [FMI, Biddeford, ME (United States)

    1998-01-21

    The prosthetic implant market is extensive. For example, because of arthritic degeneration of hip and knee cartilage and osteoporotic fractures of the hip, over 200,000 total joint replacements (TJRs) are performed in the United States each year. Current TJR devices are typically metallic (stainless steel, cobalt, or titanium alloy) and are fixed in the bone with polymethylacrylate (PMMA) cement. Carbon-carbon composite materials offer several distinct advantages over metals for TJR prosthesis. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to match more closely the mechanical properties of human bone, and the composite may have up to 25% porosity, the size and distribution of which may be controlled through processing. The porous nature of carbon-carbon composites will allow for the ingrowth of bone, achieving biological fixation, and eliminating the need for PMMA cement fixation.

  1. A percolation theory approach to the implantation induced diamond to amorphous-carbon transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical fact that diamond is electrically insulating while amorphous carbon and graphite are conducting is used in the present work to study the local damage that each implanted ion creates around its track and to conclude about the processes through which implanted diamond turns amorphous. Experimental data for the conductivity of Sb implanted diamond for various geometries, energies and doses are analyzed by the use of percolation theory. It seems that the amorphization of implanted diamond proceeds gradually with no well defined amorphous regions formed around the ion track. Amorphization in implanted diamond seems to occur in a way different than is believed to be the case for implanted silicon, where some direct amorphization around an ion track is suggested. This major difference can be attributed to the abnormally large change in densities between diamond and amorphous carbon or graphite which suppresses the growth of local amorphous regions in diamond. (author)

  2. Preparation of Platinum Implanted Glassy Carbon Electrode and Electro-oxidation of Formic Acid and Formaldehyde

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The glassy carbon substrates were bombarded with 5×1017 ions/cm2 of platinum.The surface composition of implanted electrode and concentration-depth profiles of various elements were measured by AES.The chemical state of Pt in glassy carbon electrode implanted with platinum (Pt/GC) was detected by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS).The electro-oxidation of HCOOH and HCHO have been investigated on Pt/GC and smooth Pt electrodes.The results show that the platinum implanted into glassy carbon is much more active than the smooth platinum metal for electro-oxidation of HCOOH and HCHO.

  3. Carbon offers advantages as implant material in human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, J.

    1969-01-01

    Because of such characteristics as high strength and long-term biocompatability, aerospace carbonaceous materials may be used as surgical implants to correct pathological conditions in the body resulting from disease or injury. Examples of possible medical uses include bone replacement, implantation splints and circulatory bypass implants.

  4. Regenerable granular carbon nanotubes/alumina hybrid adsorbents for diclofenac sodium and carbamazepine removal from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Haoran; Deng, Shubo; Huang, Qian; Nie, Yao; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2013-08-01

    A novel granular carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/alumina (Al2O3) hybrid adsorbent with good sorption and regeneration properties was successfully prepared by mixing CNTs with surfactant Brij 35 and pseudo boehmite, followed by calcining to remove surfactant and form porous granules. Alumina binder increased the mechanical strength, hydrophilicity and porosity of the granular adsorbent, while the dispersed CNTs in the granular adsorbent were responsible for the sorption of diclofenac sodium (DS) and carbamazepine (CBZ). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the CNTs and Al2O3 were mixed well and the porous structure was formed in the granular adsorbent. The high surface area and appropriate pore size of granular CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent were favorable for sorption. The sorption of DS decreased with increasing solution pH, while pH had little effect on CBZ sorption. The maximum sorption capacities of CBZ and DS on the CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent were 157.4 and 106.5 μmol/g according to the Langmuir fitting. Moreover, the spent CNTs/Al2O3 adsorbent can be thermally regenerated at 400 °C in air due to the thermal stability of CNTs. The removal of CBZ and DS changed a little in the initial reuse cycles and then kept relatively constant until tenth cycles. The adsorbed CBZ and DS were decomposed in the regeneration process. This regenerable adsorbent may find potential application in water or wastewater treatment for the removal of some micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals. PMID:23579087

  5. Co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into silicon dioxide for synthesis of carbon nitride materials

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, M B; Nuesca, G; Moore, R

    2002-01-01

    Materials synthesis of carbon nitride has been attempted with co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into thermally grown SiO sub 2. Following implantation of C and N ions to doses of 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 , thermal annealing of the implanted SiO sub 2 sample was conducted at 1000 degree sign C in an N sub 2 ambient. As evidenced in Fourier transform infrared measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, different bonding configurations between C and N, including C-N single bonds, C=N double bonds and C=N triple bonds, were found to develop in the SiO sub 2 film after annealing. Chemical composition profiles obtained with secondary ion mass spectroscopy were correlated with the depth information of the chemical shifts of N 1s core-level electrons, allowing us to examine the formation of C-N bonding for different atomic concentration ratios between N and C. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed no sign of the formation of crystalline C sub 3 N sub 4 precipitates in the SiO ...

  6. Surface and corrosion characteristics of carbon plasma implanted and deposited nickel-titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, R. W. Y.; Liu, X. Y.; Chung, C. Y.; Chu, P. K.; Yeung, K. W. K.; Lu, W. W.; Cheung, K. M. C.

    2005-05-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) are potentially useful in orthopedic implants on account of their super-elastic and shape memory properties. However, the materials are prone to surface corrosion and the most common problem is out-diffusion of harmful Ni ions from the substrate into body tissues and fluids. In order to improve the corrosion resistance and related surface properties, we used the technique of plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition to deposit an amorphous hydrogenated carbon coating onto NiTi and implant carbon into NiTi. Both the deposited amorphous carbon film and carbon plasma implanted samples exhibit much improved corrosion resistances and surface mechanical properties and possible mechanisms are suggested.

  7. Nucleation and growth of carbon onions by means of simultaneous electron microscopic observation under ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ and ex-situ TEM observation was performed in copper implanted with carbon ions at temperature from 570 K to 973 K. Carbon clusters, such as carbon onions (concentric graphic spheres) and nanocapsules (concentric graphitic spheres with cavities), were observed with amorphous carbon layers. Statistics of cluster size as a function of implantation temperature, ion fluence and substrate crystallinity revealed the nucleation processes of the clusters. One is the formation of graphitic layers on grain boundaries. The other is the nucleation of graphitic cages, probably fullerenes, due to both high concentration of carbon atoms and high amount of radiation damage. Simultaneous observation of microstructural evolution under implantation revealed that onions were formed inside the substrate not surface and that they segregate at surface due to radiation-enhanced evaporation. (author)

  8. Electrochemical properties of carbon materials implanted with high energy heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon materials have some allotropes such as diamond, graphite and amorphous carbon. These allotropes show significantly different natures depending on their structures. Ion implantation has two different effects on the modification of material surface layers, that is, the structural modification induced by the energy radiation accompanying ion beam bombardment, and the composition change introduced by doping surface layers with different elements. Carbon materials have been used as fuel, tools, electrical conductors, chemical instruments, electrochemical electrodes and composite materials because of their natures, such as the brightness and hardness of diamond and the chemical stability and electro-conductivity of black carbon. For all these uses, the surface properties are important, accordingly, ion implantation is an important technique for modifying the surface layers. In this paper, the main features of the ion implantation on the surface modification of diamond and glassy carbon substrates, and the chemical and electrochemical properties of glassy carbon implanted with various elements are reported. The electrode characteristics of ion-implanted glassy carbon are affected by the composition change and the change to amorphous form. (K.I.)

  9. High quality bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass over alumina-supported sodium carbonate

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Performance of a novel alumina-supported sodium carbonate catalyst was studied to produce a valuable bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. Post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was investigated in a catalyst fixed bed reactor at the downstream of the pyrolysis reactor. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor was conducted in an entrained flow pyrolysis reactor by feeding a premixed feedstock of the catalyst and biomass. Na2CO3/gamma-Al2O3 was very effective for de-oxygenation of the pyrolysis liquid and oxygen content of the bio-oil was decreased from 47.5 wt.% to 16.4 wt.%. An organic rich bio-oil was obtained with 5.8 wt.% water content and a higher heating value of 36.1 MJ/kg. Carboxylic acids were completely removed and the bio-oil had almost a neutral pH. This bio-oil of high calorific low, low water and oxygen content may be an attractive fuel precursor. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor produced a very similar quality bio-oil compared to post treatment of pyrolysis vapors, and shows the possible application of Na2CO3/gamma-Al2O3 in a commercial type reactor system such as a fluidized bed reactor. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Direct electron transfer and biosensing of glucose oxidase immobilized at multiwalled carbon nanotube-alumina-coated silica modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations are reported regarding the direct electrochemical performance of glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilized on a film of multiwalled carbon nanotube-alumina-coated silica (MWCNT-ACS). The surface morphology of the GOD/MWCNT-ACS nanobiocomposite is characterized by scanning electron microscopy. In cyclic voltammetric response, the immobilized GOD displays a pair of well-defined redox peaks, with a formal potential (E°′) of − 0.466 V versus Ag/AgCl in a 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.5) at a scan rate of 0.05 V s−1; also the electrochemical response indicates a surface-controlled electrode process. The dependence of formal potential on solution pH indicates that the direct electron transfer reaction of GOD is a reversible two-electron coupled with a two-proton electrochemical reaction process. The glucose biosensor based on the GOD/MWCNT-ACS nanobiocomposite shows a sensitivity of 0.127 A M−1 cm−2 and an apparent Michaelis–Menten constant of 0.5 mM. Furthermore, the prepared biosensor exhibits excellent anti-interference ability to the commonly co-existed uric acid and ascorbic acid. - Highlights: ► A film composed of MWCNT-ACS was used for biosensor application. ► High sensitivity and good selectivity were obtained for the detection of glucose. ► This approach is potential for fabrication of mediator-free biosensor.

  11. Experimental lumbar spine fusion with novel tantalum-coated carbon fiber implant:Li H, Zou X, Woo C, Ding M, Lind M, Bünger C.

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Ming

    2007-01-01

    Implants of carbon fiber composite have been widely used in orthopedic and spinal surgeries. However, studies using carbon fiber-reinforced cages demonstrate frequent appearance of fibrous layer interposed between the implant and the surrounding bone. The aim of the present study was to test the possibility of coating a biocompatible metal layer on top of the carbon fiber material, to improve its biological performance. Tantalum was chosen because of its bone compatibility, based on our previ...

  12. Enhanced removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by composites of mesoporous carbon stabilized alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weichun; Tang, Qiongzhi; Wei, Jingmiao; Ran, Yajun; Chai, Liyuan; Wang, Haiying

    2016-04-01

    A novel adsorbent of mesoporous carbon stabilized alumina (MC/Al2O3) was synthesized through one-pot hard-templating method. The adsorption potential of MC/Al2O3 for Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solution was investigated compared with the mesoporous carbon. The results indicated the MC/Al2O3 showed excellent performance for Cd(II) and Pb(II) removal, the adsorption capacity reached 49.98 mg g-1 for Cd(II) with initial concentration of 50 mg L-1 and reached 235.57 mg g-1 for Pb(II) with initial concentration of 250 mg L-1, respectively. The kinetics data of Cd(II) adsorption demonstrated that the Cd(II) adsorption rate was fast, and the removal efficiencies with initial concentration of 10 and 50 mg L-1 can reach up 99% within 5 and 20 min, respectively. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model could describe the kinetics of Cd(II) adsorption well, indicating the chemical reaction was the rate-controlling step. The mechanism for Cd(II) and Pb(II) adsorption by MC/Al2O3 was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the results indicated that the excellent performance for Cd(II) and Pb(II) adsorption of MC/Al2O3 was mainly attributed to its high surface area and the special functional groups of hydroxy-aluminum, hydroxyl, carboxylic through the formation of strong surface complexation or ion-exchange. It was concluded that MC/Al2O3 can be recognized as an effective adsorbent for removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in aqueous solution.

  13. Catalytic graphitization of wood-based carbons with alumina by pulse current heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hata, T; Ishimaru, K; Fujisawa, M; Bronsveld, P; Vystavel, T; De Hosson, J; Kikuchi, H; Nishizawa, T; Imamura, Y

    2005-01-01

    Japanese cedar was preheated at 500 degrees C and subsequently mixed with 40 mu m Al2O3 particles. A pulse current heating method was used for a 5-min carbonization step under a pressure of 50MPa in order to promote the graphitization at temperatures between 2000 and 2200 degrees C. The samples were

  14. Characterization and antibacterial performance of ZrCN/amorphous carbon coatings deposited on titanium implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials have been used for dental/orthopedic implants due to their excellent biological compatibility, superior mechanical strength and high corrosion resistance. The osseointegration of Ti implants is related to their composition and surface treatment. Better biocompatibility and anti-bacterial performances of Ti implant are beneficial for the osseointegration and for avoiding the infection after implantation surgery. In this study, nanocomposite ZrCN/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents were deposited on a bio-grade pure Ti implant material. A cathodic-arc evaporation system with plasma enhanced duct equipment was used for the deposition of ZrCN/a-C coatings. Reactive gas (N2) and C2H2 activated by the zirconium plasma in the evaporation process were used to deposit the ZrCN/a-C coatings. To verify the susceptibility of implant surface to bacterial adhesion, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), one of the major pathogen frequently found in the dental implant-associated infections, was chosen for in vitro anti-bacterial analyses. In addition, the biocompatibility of human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells on coatings was also evaluated by a cell proliferation assay. The results suggested that the ZrCN/a-C coatings with carbon content higher than 12.7 at.% can improve antibacterial performance with excellent HGF cell compatibility as well.

  15. Characterization and antibacterial performance of ZrCN/amorphous carbon coatings deposited on titanium implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chih-Ho [School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, 404 Taiwan (China); Chang, Yin-Yu, E-mail: yinyu@mail2000.com.tw [Department of Mechanical and Computer-Aided Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin, Taiwan (China); Huang, Heng-Li [School of Dentistry, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Kao, Ho-Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Mingdao University, Changhua, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-30

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials have been used for dental/orthopedic implants due to their excellent biological compatibility, superior mechanical strength and high corrosion resistance. The osseointegration of Ti implants is related to their composition and surface treatment. Better biocompatibility and anti-bacterial performances of Ti implant are beneficial for the osseointegration and for avoiding the infection after implantation surgery. In this study, nanocomposite ZrCN/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents were deposited on a bio-grade pure Ti implant material. A cathodic-arc evaporation system with plasma enhanced duct equipment was used for the deposition of ZrCN/a-C coatings. Reactive gas (N{sub 2}) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} activated by the zirconium plasma in the evaporation process were used to deposit the ZrCN/a-C coatings. To verify the susceptibility of implant surface to bacterial adhesion, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), one of the major pathogen frequently found in the dental implant-associated infections, was chosen for in vitro anti-bacterial analyses. In addition, the biocompatibility of human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells on coatings was also evaluated by a cell proliferation assay. The results suggested that the ZrCN/a-C coatings with carbon content higher than 12.7 at.% can improve antibacterial performance with excellent HGF cell compatibility as well.

  16. Recent Development of High Alumina Refractories in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJin-xiang; LIUJie-hua

    1994-01-01

    The paper reviews the achievements which have been attained recently in China in high alumina refractories raw materials and their products,including 1) homogenization ,urification and electric fusion of high alumina raw materials and synthesizing of spinel from natural raw materials;2) processing principle and characteristics and microstructural features of creep-resistance high alu-mina brick ,alumina-magnesia-carbon brick and thermal shock resistanced high alumina brikc and their application in practice.

  17. Study of application of alumina-coated carbon nanotube for removal of Hydroxy Benzene from aqueous solutions: Adsorption and determination of equilibrium and kinetics parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Malakootian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Phenol and phenol derivatives in industrial wastewater are among the pollutants with priorities. The high cost and low efficiency of some routine treatment processes of industrial wastewater has limited their use. One of the new methods under consideration is, nowadays, adsorption using carbon nanotubes. This study was conducted in order to evaluate the application of alumina-coated multiwall carbon nanotubes in eliminating phenol from synthetic wastewater. Materials and Methods: This study was performed in laboratory at batch scale. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes were coated with Alumina. The concentration of phenol was determined by spectrophotometer through photometry. The effect of pH changes, dosage of adsorbent, contact time, the initial concentration of phenol, temperature, and the concentrations of different salts on the efficiency of absorption was evaluated. Then, the absorption results were described using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and the synthetics of absorption. Results: It was found that absorption efficiency increased significantly by decreasing the initial concentration of phenol and pH and by increasing the carbon nanotube dosage, temperature, and contact time. On the other hand, the maximum elimination of phenol from the solution (98.86% occurred at 4 mg/l phenol concentration, under acidic conditions (pH=3, at adsorbent dosage of 0.05 g/l, at temperature of 45°C, and contact time of 10 min. Evaluation of the regressions isotherms showed that the process follows the Langmuir model and second-degree synthetic absorption. Conclusion: The high efficacy (98% of the adsorption process in this study showed that alumina-coated multiwall carbon nanotubes have a good capability in eliminating phenol and can be used as an appropriate and new method for eliminating phenol and its derivatives from wastewater.

  18. The tribological properties of nanometre carbon films prepared by plasma-based ion implantation at various implanting voltages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 30 nm thick nanometre carbon films have been prepared on Si wafers by plasma-based ion implantation at various implanting voltages. The ball-on-disc sliding friction experiments show that the tribological properties of these carbon films are in good agreement with the corresponding structure characteristics which strongly depend on the implanting voltage. These structure characteristics include the film roughness, the film thickness, the C-Si transition layer between the carbon film and the Si substrate and the sp3/sp2 ratio. As the implanting voltage increases, the roughness and the thickness decrease, the C-Si transition layer thickens and the sp3/sp2 ratio first increases to the maximum value at about 30 kV and then decreases. 3 kV and below correspond to bad tribological properties owing to polymer-like carbon (PLC) film and no C-Si transition layer with poor adhesion to the Si substrate. When the implanting voltage increases to over 3 kV, a C-Si transition layer is gradually formed and thickens with increasing adhesion, and the PLC film is gradually turned into a diamond-like carbon (DLC) film, and hence the tribological properties are gradually improved and reach the best values at 30 kV. 10-50 kV correspond to two orders of increase in wear life, close to zero volume wear rate, but about 0.3 friction coefficient at 0.1 N applied load. With the increase in the applied load, the wear life and the friction coefficient decrease and the wear rate increases. For Si wafers coated with the DLC films at 30 kV, in the range of 0.5-1 N, there is an appropriate value corresponding to the wear life of above 18 000 s, friction coefficient of about 0.1 and wear rate of 10-9 mm3 N-1 m-1 level. Additionally, the wear mechanism is discussed

  19. Corrosion protection of cold-rolled steel with alkyd paint coatings composited with submicron-structure types polypyrrole-modified nano-size alumina and carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Alumina/carbon nanotube (CNT) supported polypyrrole (PPy) particles were prepared. ► Various paint compositions with alkyd binder were immersion tested. ► Alumina-supported PPy based coating provided steel protection in NaCl solution. ► Polyelectrolyte modified CNT embedded coating afforded long-term stable protection. ► sulphonated CNT loaded coating indicated firm corrosion resistance in HCL solution. ► Results are interpreted on the basis of nano and microstructure of the particles. - Abstract: This paper is focused on studying corrosion protection of cold-rolled steel with alkyd paint coatings comprising nano-size alumina and either polystyrene-sulphonate (PSS) modified or sulphonated multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) supported polypyrrole (PPy). Single layer coatings (in thickness of 40 ± 5 μm) comprising PPy deposited alumina and PSS modified MWCNT supported PPy afforded viable protection during the 1 M sodium chloride test. The coatings containing PSS modified and weakly sulphonated MWCNTs (at volume fractions of 9.9 × 10−4 and 2.5 × 10−4) with PPy volume fractions of 3.5 × 10−3 and 2.5 × 10−3 provided effective corrosion prevention during the 1 M sodium chloride and hydrochloric acid solution tests. While inhibitor particles were characterised by infrared spectroscopy, corrosion products formed at the paint–steel interface were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Apart from the electron microscopy observations, rheology study of three-dimensional structure of the inhibitor particles was performed in dispersions at similar compositions to those used for the paint formulations. Thus, protection mechanism relating to both types of immersion tests is discussed in terms of properties of the inhibitor particles and their microstructure in the coatings.

  20. Characterization of silicon and carbon dual ion-implanted metals with a nano-indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dual ion implantation of silicon and carbon into copper (99.9%), iron (99.9%), SKD11 steel and SUS304 austenitic stainless steels was carried out with a MeV energy ion accelerator. The cross-section of the implanted layer were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The surface layers of the implanted substrates were investigated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The hardness of the samples was tested with a nano-indentation. It was found with XPS Si (2p) spectra and TEM that a part of the Si ions and C ions formed an amorphous layer of SiC, carbide and metals by dual ion-implantation. The hardness of the dual ion-implanted steels were improved. The mechanism of hardness was suggested by cross-sectional TEM images. (author)

  1. Improvement of polydimethylsiloxane guide tube for nerve regeneration treatment by carbon negative-ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, H. E-mail: tsuji@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Izukawa, M.; Ikeguchi, R.; Kakinoki, R.; Sato, H.; Gotoh, Y.; Ishikawa, J

    2003-05-01

    Modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber by negative ion-implantation was investigated for improvement of nerve regeneration property. The PDMS rubber surface was found to have more hydrophilic property after carbon negative-ion implantation than before. At the conditions of 10 keV and 3.0 x 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, the contact angle decreased to 83 deg. from 100 deg. . The reason of the hydrophilic modification is due to hydrophilic functional groups such as hydroxyl formed at the surface by radiation effect of ion implantation. The in vivo regeneration test of rat sciatic nerve was performed by using 18-mm-long PDMS rubber tubes with inner diameter of 2 mm, the inner surface of which was implanted with carbon negative ions at the above conditions. At 24 weeks after the clinical surgery, the sciatic nerve was regenerated through the tube between the proximal and distal nerve stumps.

  2. In-vivo degradation of poly(carbonate-urethane) based spine implants

    OpenAIRE

    Cipriani, E.; Bracco, P.; Kurtz, S.M.; Costa, L.; Zanetti, M.

    2013-01-01

    Fourteen explanted Dynesys® spinal devices were analyzed for biostability and compared with a reference, never implanted, control. Both poly(carbonate-urethane) (PCU) spacers and polyethylene-terephthalate (PET) cords were analyzed. The effect of implantation was evaluated through the observation of physical alterations of the device surfaces, evaluation of the chemical degradation and fluids absorption on the devices and examination of the morphological and mechanical features. PCU spacers e...

  3. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide ...

  4. Peripheral nerve regeneration through a silicone chamber implanted with negative carbon ions: Possibility to clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Tadashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2014-08-01

    We investigated whether a tube with its inner surface implanted with negative-charged carbon ions (C- ions) would enable axons to extend over a distance greater than 10 mm. The tube was found to support nerves regenerating across a 15-mm-long inter-stump gap. We also investigated whether a C- ion-implanted tube pretreated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) promotes peripheral nerve regeneration. The C- ion implanted tube accelerated nerve regeneration, and this effect was enhanced by bFGF. Silicone treated with C- ions showed increased hydrophilic properties and cellular affinity, and axon regeneration was promoted with this increased biocompatibility.

  5. Strength and tribology of bulk and electroformed nickel amorphized by implantation of titanium and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual ion implantation of titanium and carbon was shown to produce an amorphous layer of exceptional strength within annealed bulk Ni and electroformed Ni and Ni80Fe20 materials used in micro-electromechanical systems. The intrinsic elastic and plastic mechanical properties of the implanted region were quantified using nanoindentation testing in conjunction with finite-element modeling, and the results were interpreted in the light of microstructures observed by electron microscopy. The implantation treatment was found to produce substantial reductions in unlubricated friction and wear

  6. Improvements in sliding wear for bearing-grade steel implanted with titanium and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sliding wear tests have been performed on ion-implanted AISI 52100 steel wearing on two different commercial alloys. AISI 52100 wear rings were implanted either with a 55 keV titanium beam to a dose of 2 X 1017 ions cm-2 or with a dual beam of titanium at 55 keV followed by a carbon beam of 35 keV both to a dose of 2 X 1017 ions cm-2. The performances of titanium- and titanium-plus-carbon-implanted rings have been tested in a block-on-ring apparatus. The wear on the blocks has been measured and compared with ion-implanted and non-treated AISI 52100 steel rings. The results clearly show that the ion-implanted ring samples manifest a significant reduction in wear of the mating blocks. The data also indicate that the scatter in the wear results (the wear variability) is much reduced for blocks worn against the ion-implanted samples. The analysis of the surfaces supports the formation of a protective layer by the ion implantation process. (Auth.)

  7. Direct electron transfer and biosensing of glucose oxidase immobilized at multiwalled carbon nanotube-alumina-coated silica modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wei-Che; Huang, Jian-Lung; Tsai, Yu-Chen, E-mail: yctsai@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2012-05-01

    Investigations are reported regarding the direct electrochemical performance of glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilized on a film of multiwalled carbon nanotube-alumina-coated silica (MWCNT-ACS). The surface morphology of the GOD/MWCNT-ACS nanobiocomposite is characterized by scanning electron microscopy. In cyclic voltammetric response, the immobilized GOD displays a pair of well-defined redox peaks, with a formal potential (E Degree-Sign Prime ) of - 0.466 V versus Ag/AgCl in a 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.5) at a scan rate of 0.05 V s{sup -1}; also the electrochemical response indicates a surface-controlled electrode process. The dependence of formal potential on solution pH indicates that the direct electron transfer reaction of GOD is a reversible two-electron coupled with a two-proton electrochemical reaction process. The glucose biosensor based on the GOD/MWCNT-ACS nanobiocomposite shows a sensitivity of 0.127 A M{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and an apparent Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.5 mM. Furthermore, the prepared biosensor exhibits excellent anti-interference ability to the commonly co-existed uric acid and ascorbic acid. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A film composed of MWCNT-ACS was used for biosensor application. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High sensitivity and good selectivity were obtained for the detection of glucose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This approach is potential for fabrication of mediator-free biosensor.

  8. Microhardness tests of stainless steel 52100 implanted with nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    Mardanian, M; Taheri, Z

    2003-01-01

    In this research work, samples of stainless steel 52100 disks were implanted with nitrogen and carbon dioxide ions at the energy of 90 keV. Microhardness measurement were performed to determine the hardness of the surface. The N-2 sup + implanted steels at the doses of 1x10 sup 1 8 ions cm sup sub 2 gave the highest hardness of 49.70%, while for the CO sub 2 sup + ions implantation, the hardness of 17% and 5% were obtained at the doses of 3x10 sup 1 8 and 1x10 sup 1 9 ions cm sup - 2, respectively. To support the interpretation of our microhardness results the implanted surface were analyzed by the use of XRD method. Our results indicated that the hardness of the N sub 2 sup + implanted samples are due to formation of beta-Cr N phase in the surface layer, while in the CO sub 2 + implanted samples no observation of carbon as graphite or carbide was made. In addition, the absence of any hump in the XRD spectrum indicating that carbon is not in the amorphous phase either.

  9. Modification of tribomechanical properties of commercial TiN coatings by carbon ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical vapour deposited commercial TiN coatings of about 2μm thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1x1017 and 8x1017ionscm-2. An ultra-microhardness apparatus (UMIS-2000) was used to measure hardness, and a pin-on-disc machine (CSEM tribometer) with a sapphire ball was used to measure wear, friction and adhesion. Carbon implantation induced a significant improvement in ultra-microhardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose φcrit is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by implantation. Proton elastic scattering (PES) measurements show loss of nitrogen after implantation by up to 27%. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analysis indicated that some implanted carbon has diffused out from the implanted region towards the TiN surface. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible second phase formation. ((orig.))

  10. Evaluation of porous vitreous carbon or silicon implants by radiology in rat's skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Evaluate by CT the use of porous vitreous carbon (PVC) and silicon (S) implants as the replacement bone in the craniofacial skeleton of rats. Methods: 40 rats divided in: Group A (n=20) PVC submitted to the implant of a fragment in skull. After the euthanasia, the animals were divided into two subgroups: A I: 10 animals, studied in the 7th postoperative day (P.O) and AII: 10 animals, studied in the 28th P.O. In group B, S, 20 rats were submitted to S implant in the skull. All other steps were identical to group A, with designation of subgroups BI and BII. CT with beams in axial cuts of 1 mm thickness to obtain 3-D information It was used Hounsfield scale for evaluate the radio density of the implant. They were used non parametric tests to analyze the results. Results: The 7th PO boss remained in the two groups, but for 28th PO, observed reduction in the volume of the implant in Group A, not observed in group B. CT studies noticed different radio densities around all of S prostheses (pseudo capsule), that do not appeared in CPV implants. The S has remained unchanged in the CT, but the CPV has had a modification in its radio density (p≤0,05), in all implants. Conclusion: In CT evaluation the implants of CPV have greater deformation that the S, which makes them not suitable for replacement of membranous bone in the rat skull. (author)

  11. Carbon plasma immersion ion implantation of nickel-titanium shape memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, R W Y; Yeung, K W K; Liu, X Y; Chu, P K; Chung, C Y; Lu, W W; Cheung, K M C; Chan, D

    2005-05-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloys possess super-elasticity in addition to the well-known shape memory effect and are potentially suitable for orthopedic implants. However, a critical concern is the release of harmful Ni ions from the implants into the living tissues. We propose to enhance the corrosion resistance and other surface and biological properties of NiTi using carbon plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D). Our corrosion and simulated body fluid tests indicate that either an ion-mixed amorphous carbon coating fabricated by PIII&D or direct carbon PIII can drastically improve the corrosion resistance and block the out-diffusion of Ni from the materials. Our tribological tests show that the treated surfaces are mechanically more superior and cytotoxicity tests reveal that both sets of plasma-treated samples favor adhesion and proliferation of osteoblasts. PMID:15585228

  12. Laser annealing effects of the Raman laser on nitrogen implanted glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara, D.; Prawer, S.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Raman analysis is a popular method of investigating crystallite sizes, ordering and the types of bonds that exist in ion irradiated carbon materials, namely graphite, diamond and glassy carbon (G.C.). In particular Raman spectroscopy is used in determining the tetrahedral bonding required for the elusive and potentially important new material called carbon nitride. Carbon nitride, {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, is predicted to exist in several forms. Forming the tetrahedral bond between C and N has proved troublesome bain of many experimenters. A proven method for synthesizing novel materials is ion implantation. Thus G.C. was implanted with N at low temperatures so that diffusion of the implanted N would be hindered. G.C. is a relatively hard, chemically inert, graphitic material. The opaque property of G.C. means that Raman spectroscopy will only give information about the structures that exist at the surface and near surface layers. It was decided, after observing conflicting Raman spectra at different laser powers, that an investigation of the laser annealing effects of the Raman laser on the N implanted G.C. was warranted. The results of the preliminary investigation of the effects of increasing the Raman laser power and determining a power density threshold for high dose N implanted G.C. are discussed. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo

  14. Adsorptive desulfurization by activated alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastav, Ankur; Srivastava, Vimal Chandra

    2009-10-30

    This study reports usage of commercial grade activated alumina (aluminum oxide) as adsorbent for the removal of sulfur from model oil (dibenthiophene (DBT) dissolved in n-hexane). Bulk density of alumina was found to be 1177.77 kg/m(3). The BET surface area of alumina was found to decrease from 143.6 to 66.4 m(2)/g after the loading of DBT at optimum conditions. The carbon-oxygen functional groups present on the surface of alumina were found to be effective in the adsorption of DBT onto alumina. Optimum adsorbent dose was found to be 20 g/l. The adsorption of DBT on alumina was found to be gradual process, and quasi-equilibrium reached in 24 h. Langmuir isotherm best represented the equilibrium adsorption data. The heat of adsorption and change in entropy for DBT adsorption onto alumina was found to be 19.5 kJ/mol and 139.2 kJ/mol K, respectively. PMID:19523762

  15. Neuron attachment properties of carbon negative-ion implanted bioabsorbable polymer of poly-lactic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modification of a bioabsorbable polymer of poly-lactic acid (PLA) by negative carbon ion implantation was investigated with resect to radiation effects on surface physical properties and nerve-cell attachment properties. Carbon negative ions were implanted to PLA at energy of 5-30 keV with a dose of 1014-1016 ions/cm2. Most C-implanted PLA samples showed contact angles near 80 deg. and almost same as that of unimplanted PLA, although a few samples at 5 keV and less 3x1014 ions/cm2 had contact angles larger than 90 deg. The attachment properties of nerve cells of PC-12h (rat adrenal phechromocytoma) in vitro were studied. PC-12h cells attached on the unimplanted region in C-implanted PLA samples at 5 and 10 keV. On the contrary, the nerve cells attached on only implanted region for the C-implanted PLA sample at 30 keV and 1x1015 ions/cm2

  16. Photoluminescence and reflectivity of polymethylmethacrylate implanted by low-energy carbon ions at high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Photoluminescence was studied in carbon implanted polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). ► A significant photoluminescence enhancement occurred at ion fluence of 5 × 1016 cm−2. ► Photoluminescence and Raman responses revealed carbon nanoclustered structures. ► Reflectivity of carbon implanted PMMA depended on both ion fluence and wavelength. ► A noticeable reflectivity modification appeared at ion fluence of 1 × 1016 cm−2. - Abstract: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) specimens were implanted with 30 keV carbon ions in a fluence range of 1 × 1016 to 2 × 1017 cm−2, and photoluminescence (PL) and reflectivity of the implanted samples were examined. A luminescent band with one peak was found in PL spectra excited by 480 nm line, but its intensity did not vary in parallel with ion fluence. The strongest PL occurred at the fluence of 5 × 1016 cm−2. Results from visible-light-excited micro-Raman spectra indicated that the formation of hydrogenated amorphous carbon structures in subsurface layer and their evolutions with ion fluence could be responsible for the observed PL responses. Measurements of the small-angle reflectance spectra from both the implanted and rear surfaces of samples in the ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) range demonstrated a kind of both fluence-dependent and wavelength-related reflectivity variations, which were attributed to the structural changes induced by ion implantation. A noticeable reflectivity modification, which may be practically used, could be found at the fluence of 1 × 1016 cm−2.

  17. Photoluminescence and reflectivity of polymethylmethacrylate implanted by low-energy carbon ions at high fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jun; Zhu Fei; Zhang Bei; Liu Huixian; Jia Guangyi [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu Changlong, E-mail: liuchanglong@tju.edu.cn [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, Institute of Advanced Materials Physics Faculty of Science, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoluminescence was studied in carbon implanted polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A significant photoluminescence enhancement occurred at ion fluence of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoluminescence and Raman responses revealed carbon nanoclustered structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reflectivity of carbon implanted PMMA depended on both ion fluence and wavelength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A noticeable reflectivity modification appeared at ion fluence of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. - Abstract: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) specimens were implanted with 30 keV carbon ions in a fluence range of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}, and photoluminescence (PL) and reflectivity of the implanted samples were examined. A luminescent band with one peak was found in PL spectra excited by 480 nm line, but its intensity did not vary in parallel with ion fluence. The strongest PL occurred at the fluence of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. Results from visible-light-excited micro-Raman spectra indicated that the formation of hydrogenated amorphous carbon structures in subsurface layer and their evolutions with ion fluence could be responsible for the observed PL responses. Measurements of the small-angle reflectance spectra from both the implanted and rear surfaces of samples in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) range demonstrated a kind of both fluence-dependent and wavelength-related reflectivity variations, which were attributed to the structural changes induced by ion implantation. A noticeable reflectivity modification, which may be practically used, could be found at the fluence of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}.

  18. Immobilization of extracellular matrix on polymeric materials by carbon-negative-ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sommani, Piyanuch; Muto, Takashi; Utagawa, Yoshiyuki; Sakai, Shun; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2005-08-01

    Effects of ion implantation into polystyrene (PS), silicone rubber (SR) and poly-L-lactic acid (PLA) have been investigated for immobilization of extracellular matrix. Carbon negative ions were implanted into PS and SR sheets at various energies between 5-30 keV and various doses between 1.0 × 1014-1.0 × 1016 ions/cm2. Contact angles of pure water on C-implanted surfaces of PS and SR were decreased as increase in ion energy and in dose due to formation of functional groups such as OH and C-O. Selective attachment of nerve cells was observed on C-implanted them at 10 keV and 3 × 1015 ions/cm2 after in vitro cell culture of nerve cells of PC-12 h. Neurite outgrowth also extended over the implanted area. After dipping in a serum medium and in a fibronectin solution for 2 h, the detection of N 1s electrons by X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) revealed a significant distinction of protein adhesion on the implanted area. Thus, immobilization of proteins on surface is used for considering the selective cell-attachment. For PLA, the selective attachment of cells and protein depended on the implantation conditions.

  19. Effects of Mo ion implantation on rolling contact fatigue behavior of carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolling Contact Fatigue (RCF) is one of the most serious material surface damage problems encountered by many critical components, especially in ball-bearing applications. RCF is sensitive to the material strength, hardness, surface morphology, microstructure and stress status, which may be dramatically changed by surface modifications. In present work, the surface modification of molybdenum ion implantation into quenched carbon steel was employed, and RCF tests on the implanted specimens, as well as the unimplanted, were performed. It was found out that carbon steel specimens, with and without ion implantation, have the same fatigue damage characteristics. They both have circular and fan-like pits on the fatigue failed surfaces, with many spherical debris existing in the fan-like pits. However, molybdenum ion implantation reduced the rolling contact fatigue life of quenched carbon steel. The possible reasons are the following: the ion beam current is too large, which causes the specimen to undergo the annealing process and soften during the implantation process; the incident angles of ions are different for different spots of curve specimen surface, which causes the uneven distribution of residual stress. These will promote the crack initiation and propagation

  20. Suppression of tin precipitation in SiSn alloy layers by implanted carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By combining transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we have identified carbon related suppression of dislocations and tin precipitation in supersaturated molecular-beam epitaxial grown SiSn alloy layers. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has exposed the accumulation of carbon in the SiSn layers after high temperature carbon implantation and high temperature thermal treatment. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects and formation of dopant-defect complexes are suggested to be responsible for the effects. The possibility for carbon assisted segregation-free high temperature growth of heteroepitaxial SiSn/Si and GeSn/Si structures is argued.

  1. Suppression of tin precipitation in SiSn alloy layers by implanted carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiduk, P. I., E-mail: gaiduk@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Belarusian State University, prosp. Nezavisimosti 4, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Lundsgaard Hansen, J., E-mail: johnlh@phys.au.dk; Nylandsted Larsen, A., E-mail: anl@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Bregolin, F. L., E-mail: f.lipp-bregolin@hzdr.de; Skorupa, W., E-mail: W.Skorupa@hzdr.de [Department of Semiconductor Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-06-09

    By combining transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we have identified carbon related suppression of dislocations and tin precipitation in supersaturated molecular-beam epitaxial grown SiSn alloy layers. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has exposed the accumulation of carbon in the SiSn layers after high temperature carbon implantation and high temperature thermal treatment. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects and formation of dopant-defect complexes are suggested to be responsible for the effects. The possibility for carbon assisted segregation-free high temperature growth of heteroepitaxial SiSn/Si and GeSn/Si structures is argued.

  2. Nanocrystalline diamond in carbon implanted SiO{sub 2}.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoi, K.A.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Walker, R. J.; Weiser, P.S. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Recently, it was reported that nanocrystalline diamond can be produced via laser annealing of a high dose C implanted fused quartz (SiO{sub 2}) substrate. The aim of this investigation is to reproduce this result on higher C{sup +} dose samples and the non-implanted silicon sample, as well as optimise the power range and annealing time for the production of these nanocrystals of diamond. In order to provide a wide range of laser powers the samples were annealed using an Ar ion Raman laser. The resulting annealed spots were analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman analysis. These techniques are employed to determine the type of bonding produced after laser annealing has occurred. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Experimental lumbar spine fusion with novel tantalum-coated carbon fiber implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Haisheng; Zou, Xuenong; Woo, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    Implants of carbon fiber composite have been widely used in orthopedic and spinal surgeries. However, studies using carbon fiber-reinforced cages demonstrate frequent appearance of fibrous layer interposed between the implant and the surrounding bone. The aim of the present study was to test the...... carbon-carbon composite material through chemical vapor deposition. Mechanical and biological performance was tested in vitro and in vivo. Compress strength was found to be 4.9 kN (SD, 0.2). Fatigue test with 500,000 cycles was passed. In vitro radiological evaluation demonstrated good compatibility with...... X-ray and CT scan examinations. In vivo test employed eight pigs weighing 50 kg each. Instrumented lumbar spine fusion of L3/4 and L4/5 with these cages was performed on each pig. After 3 months, excellent bone integration property was demonstrated by direct contact of the cage with the host bone...

  4. Degradation of alumina and zirconia toughened alumina (ZTA) hip prostheses tested under microseparation conditions in a shock device

    CERN Document Server

    Uribe, Juliana; Gremillard, Laurent; Reynard, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the degradation of alumina and zirconia toughened alumina vs. alumina for hip implants. The materials are as assumed to be load bearing surfaces subjected to shocks in wet conditions. The load is a peak of force; 9 kN was applied over 15 ms at 2 Hz for 800,000 cycles. The volumetric wear and roughness are lower for ZTA than for alumina. The long ZTA ageing did not seem to have a direct influence on the roughness. The ageing increased the wear volumes of ZTA and it was found to have a higher wear resistance compared to alumina.

  5. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats reve...

  6. Ion implanted pyrolitic carbon for the hip prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Hip joint arthroplasty is a successful surgical procedure, but loosening induced by polyethylene wear debris continues to be a problem. Fine grained isotropic graphite (POCO ZXF-5Q) coated with Pyrolite (trademark of Carbomedics Inc.) combines biocompatibility, strength and tribological properties which could be utilised in a hip prosthesis. Some preliminary work has been conducted on this material, and the effect nitrogen ion implantation has on its wear resistance. Finite element analysis was conducted on a femoral head of a canine hip prosthesis with diameter 19mm made from POCO ZXF-5Q . An optimum design was obtained after design variables such as taper angle and width, internal recess radius, crown thickness were varied so that internal stresses were minimised. This was then translated into an human sized femoral head with diameter 28mm, which was subjected to mechanical testing. Loading was at 20 deg C to the taper, with loading rate 10kN/s used in static loading, whilst fatigue testing was carried out between 300 - 3000N at 30Hz for 107 cycles. Pin-on-disc wear testing was carried out using a CSEM Tribometer. A 1N load was applied to 6mm diameter pins. Wear track radii were 11 and 13mm, with linear velocity 5cm/s and sliding distance 2.5km. Test temperature was 37±1degC with Ringer solution and bovine serum being used as lubricant. Nitrogen implanted samples were irradiated to a dose of 5x1016 ions.cm-2 at 50keV. Static testing was carried out to loads of 8000N and all five POCO ZXF-5Q femoral heads tested survived. Then three of these pre-tested femoral heads were subjected to fatigue testing and no failures occured before 107 cycles. Wear was reduced by nitrogen ion implantation only when an irradiated pin was tested against as polished Pyrolite. Nitrogen ion implanted Pyrolite on a POCO ZXF-5Q substrate may have clinical potential. The substrate has appropriate mechanical properties, and nitrogen ion implantation can improve the already

  7. Reduction of friction and wear by ion-implanted carbonized photoresist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of ion-implanted carbonized photoresist layers (AZ 5210) on wear and friction is discussed in this paper. Photoresist, an organic resin, was used because of the simplicity of coating the sample, accurate control of the layer thickness, and high amount of carbon. The samples investigated were coated by conventional spin-on techniques with layer thicknesses varying from 0.2 μm to 2.2μm. Subsequent ion bombardment at energies of 200 keV and 1.4 MeV with doses ranging from 1x1016 cm-2 to 1x1017 cm-2 caused carburization, densification, and a mixing of the layer with the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy investigations, Raman spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, and microhardness measurements confirmed the production of a hard, amorphous, hydrogen-containing (about 17%) carbon layer after implantation. The layers were deposited onto different steels (AISI 52100, AISI 440 B unhardened, and AISI M2) and after implantation of boron, aluminium, phosphorus, arsenic and titanium, showed a strongly reduced friction coefficient (lower than 0.2) and drastically reduced wear behaviour. The duration of the wear reduction depended on both the thickness of the carbonized photoresist layer and on the implanted ion dose. Doses of 5x1016 cm-2 for hard steels and doses of 1x1017 cm-2 for soft steels are necessary to produce a sufficient layer adhesion by ion beam mixing. (orig.)

  8. Physicochemical and tribological characterization of titanium or titanium plus carbon implanted AISI M2 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AISI M2 steel samples were implanted with 110 keV titanium ions at fluences ranging from 5x1016 to 4x1017Ti cm-2. Titanium plus carbon dual implantation was also studied. Titanium distribution profiles were determined using the 48Ti(p,γ)49V resonant nuclear reaction. The incorporation of carbon and oxygen from residual gases was studied as a function of titanium fluence and residual pressure using nuclear backscattering spectrometry at 5.7 and 7.5 MeV He+ ion energies respectively. A competition phenomenon between carbon and oxygen incorporation is pointed out. Analysis of the phases formed was performed using conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy. Fe(Ti) solid solution, a-FexTi100-x and superficial a-Fe-Ti-C amorphous phases were identified. Tribological tests involving a ball (Al2O3 or 52100) and disc contact were performed to characterize the friction behaviour of the implanted surface. It is shown that titanium plus carbon implantation leads to a reduction in the friction coefficient. The wear tracks and debris were examined using scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe cartography. For the two types of balls a reduction in the wear track width was observed together with oxidation of the wear debris. The tribological improvement observed depends not only on the presence of the superficial a-Fe-Ti-C amorphous layer but also on the surface chemical reaction during the wear process. (orig.)

  9. Wafer-scale synthesis of multi-layer graphene by high-temperature carbon ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the synthesis of wafer-scale (4 in. in diameter) high-quality multi-layer graphene using high-temperature carbon ion implantation on thin Ni films on a substrate of SiO2/Si. Carbon ions were bombarded at 20 keV and a dose of 1 × 1015 cm−2 onto the surface of the Ni/SiO2/Si substrate at a temperature of 500 °C. This was followed by high-temperature activation annealing (600–900 °C) to form a sp2-bonded honeycomb structure. The effects of post-implantation activation annealing conditions were systematically investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Carbon ion implantation at elevated temperatures allowed a lower activation annealing temperature for fabricating large-area graphene. Our results indicate that carbon-ion implantation provides a facile and direct route for integrating graphene with Si microelectronics

  10. Photovoltage improvements in Cz–Si by low-energy implantation of carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadtochiy, A.; Korotchenkov, O.; Romanyuk, B.; Melnik, V.; Popov, V.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate photovoltage improvements in Czochralski-grown silicon wafers by low-energy implantation of carbon ions. After annealing at temperatures above ≈550 °C the surface photovoltage (SPV) increases in both implanted and unimplanted sample sets. The increase in the SPV signal observed in implanted samples, which are subsequently annealed at 650 °C and 750 °C, is roughly two times greater than the appropriate values observed in unimplanted wafers. The effect in implanted samples is accompanied by longer time decays in the SPV transients (roughly from several to hundreds of microseconds). In marked contrast, unimplanted samples do not show such a significant difference in the decay times upon annealing. The decay times are fairly evenly distributed across the surface of the implanted but unannealed wafer, whereas the surface distribution function is essentially non-uniform in annealed samples. The results are discussed in terms of the temperature specific defect chemistry. The results of this work open new possibilities for studying defect rearrangement and clustering of atoms in implanted Si and advancing the development of silicon based photovoltaic materials with high photovoltage response. Supplementary data are available from stacks.iop.org/SST/.

  11. The effect of carbon impurities on the distribution of implanted iron atoms in titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moessbauer Spectroscopy along with Rutherford Backscattering Analysis (R.B.S.) has been used to analyse the chemical phases formed during implantation of 40 keV 57Fe into titanium foils at a dose of 2 x 101757Fe ions cm-2. Two different substrate temperatures were used, nominal room temperature and 550 deg C. For the foil implanted at 550 deg C the components of the Moessbauer spectrum were identified as α-iron and iron carbide. The room temperature implant, however, resulted in the formation of a highly disordered iron carbide which was converted to a mixture of 'crystalline' Fe3C and α-iron after annealing at 600 deg C. The implantations were repeated under cleaner conditions when the Moessbauer spectra of the samples were completely different with no evidence for the previously observed disordered phase. The implantation profiles as determined from R.B.S. were also different. Estimates of the levels of oxygen and carbon were determined from a (d,p) analysis of the samples. The relationship between the presence of impurities and the distribution of implanted iron atoms is discussed. (author)

  12. Mechanical and tribological properties of amorphous carbon films deposited on implanted steel substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen-free amorphous carbon (a-C) films were deposited using unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique from graphite targets on AISI 440C steel substrates implanted with (1) carbon (C), (2) titanium (Ti), and (3) titanium followed by carbon (Ti+C), respectively. After deposition, the adhesion strength of the films was examined by scratch test and Rockwell-C indentation test. The tribological performance of the films was evaluated by a typical ball-on-disk tribometer and a reciprocating wear tester. A dynamic impact tester was also carried out to study the fatigue strength of the films. In order to study the effect of the pre-treatment of steel substrates by means of ion implantation on the actual performance of a-C films, the implanted substrates were investigated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nano-indentation, from which the composition depth profile as well as the hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E) depth profiles could be accurately obtained. As a result, due to higher contents of carbide bonds appeared at the outmost surface of the C and Ti+C implanted substrates, a critical load over 65 N was obtained, indicating good scratch resistance of the films. The combination of high interfacial strength and high plastic deformation resistance (H3/E2) of the Ti+C implanted substrates led to a higher load-carrying capacity and longer duration lifetime in the sliding wear test. In the dynamic impact test, the good adhesion strength and high toughness of C and Ti+C implanted substrates improved the impact resistance of the films

  13. Progress on implantable biofuel cell: Nano-carbon functionalization for enzyme immobilization enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babadi, Arman Amani; Bagheri, Samira; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abdul

    2016-05-15

    Biofuel cells are bio-electrochemical devices, which are suitable for the environmentally friendly generation of energy. Enzymatic biofuel cell (EBFC) operates at ambient temperature and pH. Biofuel cells utilize vegetable and animal fluids (e.g. glucose) as a biofuel to produce energy. Fundamental part of each Glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) is two bioelectrodes which their surface utilizes as an enzyme immobilized site. Glucose oxidase (GOx) or glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) were immobilized on bioanode and oxidize glucose while oxygen reduced in biocathode using immobilized laccase or bilirubin oxidase in order to generate sufficient power. Glucose biofuel cells are capable to generate sufficient power for implanted devices. The key step of manufacturing a bioelectrode is the effective enzyme immobilization on the electrode surface. Due to the thin diameter of carbon nanomaterials, which make them accessible to the enzyme active sites, they are applicable materials to establish electronic communication with redox enzymes. Carbon nanomaterials regenerate the biocatalysts either by direct electron transfer or redox mediators which serve as intermediated for the electron transfer. Nano-carbon functionalization is perfectly compatible with other chemical or biological approaches to enhance the enzyme functions in implantable biofuel cells. Efficient immobilization of enzyme using the functionalized nano-carbon materials is the key point that greatly increases the possibilities of success. Current review highlights the progress on implantable biofuel cell, with focus on the nano-carbon functionalization for enzyme immobilization enhancement in glucose/O2 biofuel cells. PMID:26785309

  14. Mechanical properties of nickel ion-implanted with titanium and carbon and their relation to microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual ion implantation of titanium and carbon into nickel was shown to produce an amorphous layer with exceptionally high strength and hardness and substantially improved tribological properties. Indentation testing at submicrometer penetrations combined with finite-element modeling permitted quantification of the intrinsic elastic and plastic properties of the amorphous layer, which was found to have a yield strength near 5 GPa. During unlubricated sliding contact with a steel pin, the implantation treatment reduced friction, suppressed adhesion-and-fracture wear, and reduced wear depth. These tribological effects may enhance the performance and lifetime of microelectromechanical systems constructed from nickel

  15. Experimental lumbar spine fusion with novel tantalum-coated carbon fiber implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haisheng; Zou, Xuenong; Woo, Charlotte; Ding, Ming; Lind, Martin; Bünger, Cody

    2007-04-01

    Implants of carbon fiber composite have been widely used in orthopedic and spinal surgeries. However, studies using carbon fiber-reinforced cages demonstrate frequent appearance of fibrous layer interposed between the implant and the surrounding bone. The aim of the present study was to test the possibility of coating a biocompatible metal layer on top of the carbon fiber material, to improve its biological performance. Tantalum was chosen because of its bone compatibility, based on our previous studies. A novel spinal fusion cage was fabricated by applying a thin tantalum coating on the surface of carbon-carbon composite material through chemical vapor deposition. Mechanical and biological performance was tested in vitro and in vivo. Compress strength was found to be 4.9 kN (SD, 0.2). Fatigue test with 500,000 cycles was passed. In vitro radiological evaluation demonstrated good compatibility with X-ray and CT scan examinations. In vivo test employed eight pigs weighing 50 kg each. Instrumented lumbar spine fusion of L3/4 and L4/5 with these cages was performed on each pig. After 3 months, excellent bone integration property was demonstrated by direct contact of the cage with the host bone and newly formed bone. No inflammatory cells were found around the implant. Cages packed with two different graft materials (autograft and COLLOSS) achieved the same new bone formation. The present study proved that coating tantalum on top of the carbon-based implant is feasible, and good bone integration could be achieved. PMID:16924610

  16. Diffusion of indium implanted in silicon: The effect of the pre-amorphisation treatment and of the presence of carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gennaro, S. [ITC-irst, Istituto Trentino di Cultura, Centro per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica, Via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy)]. E-mail: gennaro@itc.it; Barozzi, M. [ITC-irst, Istituto Trentino di Cultura, Centro per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica, Via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Bersani, M. [ITC-irst, Istituto Trentino di Cultura, Centro per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica, Via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Sealy, B.J. [Advanced Technology Institute, School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Gwilliam, R. [Advanced Technology Institute, School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    We investigate the effect of the pre-amorphisation damage on the structural properties, and dopant diffusion behaviour of indium and carbon co-implanted layers in silicon. Ion implantation of indium and carbon in silicon was used to produce co-implanted specimens. Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy have been performed on as-implanted and annealed samples to assess in detail the structural properties of the doped layers and the diffusion behaviour. The results have been compared with data obtained for similar implants performed into crystalline silicon to achieve a deeper understanding of the mechanisms driving the diffusion of the indium in silicon in presence of co-implanted species. In particular a reduction of the indium diffusion and a saturation level for the indium substitutional retained dose were observed.

  17. Influence of Zn ion implantation on structures and field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The structures and field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays implanted with Zn+ by MEVVA ion implanter have been investigated.The results revealed that Zn+implantation induced structural damage and that the top of carbon nanotubes with multi-layered graphite structure were transformed into carbon nanowires with amorphous structure.Meanwhile,C:Zn solid solution was synthesized after Zn+ implantation.The turn-on field and threshold field were 0.80 and 1.31 V/μm,respectively for original multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays and were reduced to 0.66 and 1.04 V/μm due to the synthesis of C and Zn composite,in which the work function was reduced after low doses of Zn+implantation.It is indicated that low doses of Zn+implantation can improve field emission performance of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays.Otherwise,high doses of Zn+implantation can reduce field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays,because radiation damage reduces the electric field enhancement factor.

  18. Waveguiding properties in Yb:YAG crystals implanted with protons and carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, G V; Ramírez, D; Márquez, H; Flores-Romero, E; Rickards, J; Trejo-Luna, R

    2012-08-01

    We report the fabrication and analysis of optical waveguides in Yb:YAG crystals using either proton or carbon ion implantation. Planar waveguides were obtained by implanting the whole surface of the crystals. Channel waveguides were defined using an electroformed mask with apertures of 10, 15, and 20 micrometers in width. The waveguiding properties of the structures were analyzed, showing good light confinement based on the transversal mode distribution and optical transmission measurements. The spectroscopic properties of the Yb ions in the YAG host are preserved after the implantation process, which demonstrates the potential of this technique for tailoring microcomponents for integrated optics applications. In particular, the Yb:YAG waveguides have the potential to operate as miniature lasers. PMID:22859050

  19. Effects of CPII implantation on the characteristics of diamond-like carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ya-Chi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250, Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Weng, Ko-Wei, E-mail: wl2426@ms26.hinet.net [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MingDao University, 369-B, Wen-Hua Road, Peetow, Chang-Hwa 523, Taiwan (China); Chao, Ching-Hsun; Lien, Shui-Yang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MingDao University, 369-B, Wen-Hua Road, Peetow, Chang-Hwa 523, Taiwan (China); Han, Sheng [Department of Leisure and Recreation Management, National Taichung Institute of Technology 129 San-min Road, Section 3, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Chen, Tien-Lai [Department of Holistic Wellness, MingDao University, 369-B, Wen-Hua Road, Peetow, Chang-Hwa 523, Taiwan (China); Lee, Ying-Chieh [Department of Materials Engineering,Nationla Pingtung University of Science and Technology 1, Hseuh Fu Road, Nei Pu, Pingtung, 91201, Taiwan (China); Shih, Han-Chang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250, Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Wang, Da-Yung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MingDao University, 369-B, Wen-Hua Road, Peetow, Chang-Hwa 523, Taiwan (China)

    2009-05-30

    A diamond-like carbon film (DLC) was successfully synthesized using a hybrid PVD process, involving a filter arc deposition source (FAD) and a carbon plasma ion implanter (CPII). A quarter-torus plasma duct filter markedly reduced the density of the macro-particles. Graphite targets were used in FAD. Large electron and ion energies generated from the plasma duct facilitate the activation of carbon plasma and the deposition of high-quality DLC films. M2 tool steel was pre-implanted with 45 kV carbon ions before the DLC was deposited to enhance the adhesive and surface properties of the film. The ion mixing effect, the induction of residual stress and the phase transformation at the interface were significantly improved. The hardness of the DLC increased to 47.7 GPa and 56.5 GPa, and the wear life was prolonged to over 70 km with implantation fluences of 1 x 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} and 2 x 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}, respectively.

  20. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P<10−4, and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P<10−8. Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential.

  1. Effects of CPII implantation on the characteristics of diamond-like carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diamond-like carbon film (DLC) was successfully synthesized using a hybrid PVD process, involving a filter arc deposition source (FAD) and a carbon plasma ion implanter (CPII). A quarter-torus plasma duct filter markedly reduced the density of the macro-particles. Graphite targets were used in FAD. Large electron and ion energies generated from the plasma duct facilitate the activation of carbon plasma and the deposition of high-quality DLC films. M2 tool steel was pre-implanted with 45 kV carbon ions before the DLC was deposited to enhance the adhesive and surface properties of the film. The ion mixing effect, the induction of residual stress and the phase transformation at the interface were significantly improved. The hardness of the DLC increased to 47.7 GPa and 56.5 GPa, and the wear life was prolonged to over 70 km with implantation fluences of 1 x 1017 ions/cm2 and 2 x 1017 ions/cm2, respectively.

  2. Nanocarbon-Coated Porous Anodic Alumina for Bionic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Aramesh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A highly-stable and biocompatible nanoporous electrode is demonstrated herein. The electrode is based on a porous anodic alumina which is conformally coated with an ultra-thin layer of diamond-like carbon. The nanocarbon coating plays an essential role for the chemical stability and biocompatibility of the electrodes; thus, the coated electrodes are ideally suited for biomedical applications. The corrosion resistance of the proposed electrodes was tested under extreme chemical conditions, such as in boiling acidic/alkali environments. The nanostructured morphology and the surface chemistry of the electrodes were maintained after wet/dry chemical corrosion tests. The non-cytotoxicity of the electrodes was tested by standard toxicity tests using mouse fibroblasts and cortical neurons. Furthermore, the cell–electrode interaction of cortical neurons with nanocarbon coated nanoporous anodic alumina was studied in vitro. Cortical neurons were found to attach and spread to the nanocarbon coated electrodes without using additional biomolecules, whilst no cell attachment was observed on the surface of the bare anodic alumina. Neurite growth appeared to be sensitive to nanotopographical features of the electrodes. The proposed electrodes show a great promise for practical applications such as retinal prostheses and bionic implants in general.

  3. Suppression of tin precipitation in SiSn alloy layers by implanted carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaiduk, Peter; Hansen, John Lundsgaard; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne;

    2014-01-01

    By combining transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we have identified carbon related suppression of dislocations and tin precipitation in supersaturated molecular-beam epitaxial grown SiSn alloy layers. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has exposed the accumul......By combining transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we have identified carbon related suppression of dislocations and tin precipitation in supersaturated molecular-beam epitaxial grown SiSn alloy layers. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has exposed...... the accumulation of carbon in the SiSn layers after high temperature carbon implantation and high temperature thermal treatment. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects and formation of dopant-defect complexes are suggested to be responsible for the effects. The possibility for carbon assisted segregation......-free high temperature growth of heteroepitaxial SiSn/Si and GeSn/Si structures is argued....

  4. Creation of internal point defect drains in silicon by carbon implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-dose carbon implantations into silicon at temperatures between 150 and 250 deg. C result in the formation of a buried amorphous layer with a layer of self-organized nanometric amorphous SiCx precipitates and a completely crystalline Si top layer above. It is shown by RBS channeling and cross-sectional TEM that the nature of defects in the top layer critically depends on the implantation temperature and determines the annealing behaviour of amorphous SiCx precipitates. For lower implantation temperatures, when extended defects are absent in the top layer, 900 deg. C annealing leads to partial crystallization of amorphous SiCx precipitates, accompanied by void formation. Crystallizing SiCx precipitates then act as sinks for silicon self-interstitials. For higher implantation temperatures, dislocations on {1 1 1} planes and {3 1 1}-defects effectively trap the self-interstitials and inhibit the crystallization of amorphous SiCx. It is also shown that the crystallization temperature of SiC in the continuous buried amorphous layer depends on the implantation temperature

  5. Active waveguides by low-fluence carbon implantation in Nd3+-doped fluorophosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Xiao; Luo, Zhe-Yuan; Li, Yu-Wen; Chen, Meng; Xu, Jun; Fu, Li-Li; Yu, Ke-Han; Zheng, Rui-Lin; Zhou, Zhi-Guang; Li, Wei-Nan; Guo, Hai-Tao; Lin, She-Bao; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A planar waveguide in the Nd3+-doped fluorophosphate glass is fabricated by a 6.0 MeV C3+ ion implantation at a low-fluence of 1.0 × 1014 ions/cm2. The fluence is close to that in semiconductor industry. The dark mode spectra are recorded by a model 2010 prism coupler. The energy losses during the implantation process and the refractive index profile of the waveguide are simulated by the SRIM 2010 code and the reflectivity calculation method (RCM), respectively. The near-field light intensity profile and the propagation loss of the waveguide are measured by an end-face coupling system. The two-dimensional (2D) modal profile of transverse electric (TE) mode for the fabricated waveguide is calculated by the finite difference beam propagation method (FD-BPM). The results of microluminescence and optical absorption reveal that the spectroscopic characteristics of the Nd3+-doped fluorophosphate glass are nearly unaffected by the carbon ion implantation process. This work suggests that the carbon-implanted Nd3+-doped fluorophosphate glass waveguide is a promising candidate for integrated active devices.

  6. Preparation of graphene on Cu foils by ion implantation with negative carbon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on few-layer graphene synthesized on Cu foils by ion implantation using negative carbon cluster ions, followed by annealing at 950 °C in vacuum. Raman spectroscopy reveals IG/I2D values varying from 1.55 to 2.38 depending on energy and dose of the cluster ions, indicating formation of multilayer graphene. The measurements show that the samples with more graphene layers have fewer defects. This is interpreted by graphene growth seeded by the first layers formed via outward diffusion of C from the Cu foil, though nonlinear damage and smoothing effects also play a role. Cluster ion implantation overcomes the solubility limit of carbon in Cu, providing a technique for multilayer graphene synthesis. (paper)

  7. Design and evaluation of carbon nanofiber and silicon materials for neural implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Janice L.

    Reduction of glial scar tissue around central nervous system implants is necessary for improved efficacy in chronic applications. Design of materials that possess tunable properties inspired by native biological tissue and elucidation of pertinent cellular interactions with these materials was the motivation for this study. Since nanoscale carbon fibers possess the fundamental dimensional similarities to biological tissue and have attractive material properties needed for neural biomaterial implants, this present study explored cytocompatibility of these materials as well as modifications to traditionally used silicon. On silicon materials, results indicated that nanoscale surface features reduced astrocyte functions, and could be used to guide neurite extension from PC12 cells. Similarly, it was determined that astrocyte functions (key cells in glial scar tissue formation) were reduced on smaller diameter carbon fibers (125 nm or less) while PC12 neurite extension was enhanced on smaller diameter carbon fibers (100 nm or less). Further studies implicated laminin adsorption as a key mechanism in enhancing astrocyte adhesion to larger diameter fibers and at the same time encouraging neurite extension on smaller diameter fibers. Polycarbonate urethane (PCU) was then used as a matrix material for the smaller diameter carbon fibers (100 and 60 nm). These composites proved very versatile since electrical and mechanical properties as well as cell functions and directionality could be influenced by changing bulk and surface composition and features of these matrices. When these composites were modified to be smooth at the micronscale and only rough at the nanoscale, P19 cells actually submerged philopodia, extensions, or whole cells bodies beneath the PCU in order to interact with the carbon nanofibers. These carbon nanofiber composites that have been formulated are a promising material to coat neural probes and thereby enhance functionality at the tissue interface. This

  8. Improvement on corrosion resistance of NiTi orthopedic materials by carbon plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Ray W. Y.; Ho, Joan P. Y.; Luk, Camille M. Y.; Liu, Xuanyong; Chung, Jonathan C. Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Lu, William W.; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.

    2006-01-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) have potential applications as orthopedic implants because of their unique super-elastic properties and shape memory effects. However, the problem of out-diffusion of harmful Ni ions from the alloys during prolonged use inside a human body must be overcome before they can be widely used in orthopedic implants. In this work, we enhance the corrosion resistance of NiTi using carbon plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D). Our corrosion and simulated body fluid tests indicate that either an ion-mixed amorphous carbon coating fabricated by PIII&D or direct carbon PIII can drastically improve the corrosion resistance and block the out-diffusion of Ni from the materials. Results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicate that both C2H2-PIII&D and C2H2-PIII do not roughen the original flat surface to an extent that can lead to degradation in corrosion resistance.

  9. Degradation of alumina and zirconia toughened alumina (ZTA) hip prostheses tested under microseparation conditions in a shock device

    OpenAIRE

    Uribe, Juliana; Geringer, Jean; Gremillard, Laurent; Reynard, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the degradation of alumina and zirconia toughened alumina vs. alumina for hip implants. The materials are as assumed to be load bearing surfaces subjected to shocks in wet conditions. The load is a peak of force; 9 kN was applied over 15 ms at 2 Hz for 800,000 cycles. The volumetric wear and roughness are lower for ZTA than for alumina. The long ZTA ageing did not seem to have a direct influence on the roughness. The ageing increased the wear volumes of ZTA and it was fou...

  10. Highly wear-resistant and biocompatible carbon nanocomposite coatings for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkov, Oleksiy V; Pukha, Vladimir E; Starikova, Svetlana L; Khadem, Mahdi; Starikov, Vadym V; Maleev, Maxim V; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon coatings are increasingly used as wear-protective coatings for dental implants, artificial joints, etc. Despite their advantages, they may have several weak points such as high internal stress, poor adhesive properties or high sensitivity to ambient conditions. These weak points could be overcome in the case of a new carbon nanocomposite coating (CNC) deposited by using a C60 ion beam on a Co/Cr alloy. The structure of the coatings was investigated by Raman and XPS spectroscopy. The wear resistance was assessed by using a reciprocating tribotester under the loads up to 0.4 N in both dry and wet sliding conditions. Biocompatibility of the dental implants was tested in vivo on rabbits. Biocompatibility, bioactivity and mechanical durability of the CNC deposited on a Co/Cr alloy were investigated and compared with those of bulk Co/Cr and Ti alloys. The wear resistance of the CNC was found to be 250-650 fold higher compared to the Co/Cr and Ti alloys. Also, the CNC demonstrated much better biological properties with respect to formation of new tissues and absence of negative morphological parameters such as necrosis and demineralization. Development of the CNC is expected to aid in significant improvement of lifetime and quality of implants for dental applications. PMID:27336185

  11. Tubular electrodeposition of chitosan-carbon nanotube implants enriched with calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrotek, Katarzyna; Tylman, Michał; Rudnicka, Karolina; Gatkowska, Justyna; Balcerzak, Jacek

    2016-07-01

    A new approach for obtaining chitosan-carbon nanotube implants enriched with calcium ions in the form of tubular hydrogels is fostered. The intended application of the hydrogels is tissue engineering, especially peripheral nervous tissue regeneration. The fabrication method, based on an electrodeposition phenomenon, shows significant advantages over current solutions as implants can now be obtained rapidly at any required dimensions. Thus, it may open a new avenue to treat patients with peripheral nerve injuries. Either single walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes enhance the mechanical properties of the tubular hydrogels. The controlled presence of calcium ions, sourced from hydroxyapatite, is also expected to augment the regenerative response. Because in vitro cytotoxic assays on mouse cell lines (L929 fibroblasts and mHippoE-18 hippocampal cells) as well as pro-inflammatory tests on THP-1XBlue™ cells show that the manufactured implants are biocompatible, we next intend to evaluate their immune- and nervous-safety on an animal model. PMID:26913639

  12. The effectiveness of Ti implants as barriers to carbon diffusion in Ti implanted steel under CVD diamond deposition conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond onto iron based substrates complicated by preferential soot formation and carbon diffusion into the substrate [1], leading to poor quality films and poor adhesion. In the initial stages of exposure to a microwave plasma, a layer of graphite is rapidly formed on an untreated Fe based substrate. Once this graphite layer reaches a certain thickness, reasonable quality diamond nucleates and grows upon it. However, the diamond film easily delaminates from the substrate, the weak link being the graphitic layer. Following an initial success in using a TiN barrier layer to inhibit the formation of such a graphitic layer the authors report on attempts to use an implanted Ti layer for the same purpose. This work was prompted by observation that, although the TiN proved to be an extremely effective diffusion barrier, adhesion may be further enhanced by the formation of a TiC interface layer between the diamond film and the Fe substrate. 3 refs., 6 figs

  13. Ion-implanted Mechanism of the Deposition Process for Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue-Min; WU Wei-Dong; WANG Yu-Ying; WANG Hai-Ping; GE Fang-Fang; TANG Yong-Jian; JU Xin

    2011-01-01

    Due to the local densification, high-energy C and doped ions can greatly affect the bonding configurations of diamond-like carbon films. We investigate the corresponding affection of different incident ions with energy from WeV to 600eV by Monte Carlo methods. The ion-implanted mechanism called the subplantation (for C, N, O, W, Y, etc.) is confirmed. Obvious thermal effect could be induced by the subplantation of the incident ions. Further, the subplantation of C ions is proved by in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The observation from an atomic force microscope (AFM) indicates that the initial implantation of C ions might result in the final primitive-cell-like morphology of the smooth film (in an area of 1.2 mm × 0.9 mm, rms roughness smaller than 20 nm by Wyko).

  14. Imobilização da pancreatina em carvão ativado e em alumina para o preparo de hidrolisados de soro de leite - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v27i2.1417 Immobilization of pancreatin in activated carbon and in alumina for preparing whey hydrolysates - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v27i2.1417

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marialice Pinto Coelho Silvestre

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Tendo como objetivo a redução de custos do processo de fabricação de hidrolisados protéicos, estudou-se neste trabalho a imobilização da pancreatina, por adsorção, em carvão ativado e em alumina. Para isso, foram testadas diferentes condições de imobilização (30, 60 e 90min a 25°C, e 12h a 5°C. Para verificar a taxa de imobilização, determinou-se indiretamente a enzima não adsorvida nos suportes. Ao se utilizar o carvão ativado, não foi observada diferença significativa entre as condições testadas, tendo-se obtido 100% de imobilização enzimática. Para a alumina, a melhor condição foi a de 90min, na qual se obteve 37% de imobilização. A medida do grau de exposição da fenilalanina, pela espectrofotometria derivada segunda, foi empregada para a determinação da estabilidade operacional da enzima, tendo sido mostrado que a imobilização em carvão ativado e em alumina permitiu a reutilização da pancreatina por até 5 vezes e 2 vezes, respectivamenteImmobilization of pancreatin in activated carbon and in alumina was studied for producing protein hydrolysates, in order to reduce the process costs. Different immobilization conditions were tested (30, 60 and 90min at 25°C, and 12h at 5°C. For estimating the immobilization rate the amount of the non-adsorbed enzyme on the supports was indirectly determined. When activated carbon was used, no significant difference was observed among the tested conditions, obtaining 100% of enzymatic immobilization. In case of alumina, the best condition showed to be the 90min treatment which produced 37% of immobilization. The evaluation of the degree of exposition of phenylalanine, by second derivative spectrophotometry, was used for the determination of the enzyme operational stability, and showed that the immobilization in activated carbon and in alumina allowed the reusability of the pancreatin for 5 times and 2 times, respectively

  15. Irradiation effect of carbon negative-ion implantation on polytetrafluoroethylene for controlling cell-adhesion property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommani, Piyanuch; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo; Takaoka, Gikan H.

    2010-10-01

    We have investigated the irradiation effect of negative-ion implantation on the changes of physical surface property of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) for controlling the adhesion property of stem cells. Carbon negative ions were implanted into PTFE sheets at fluences of 1 × 10 14-1 × 10 16 ions/cm 2 and energies of 5-20 keV. Wettability and atomic bonding state including the ion-induced functional groups on the modified surfaces were investigated by water contact angle measurement and XPS analysis, respectively. An initial value of water contact angles on PTFE decreased from 104° to 88° with an increase in ion influence to 1 × 10 16 ions/cm 2, corresponding to the peak shifting of XPS C1s spectra from 292.5 eV to 285 eV with long tail on the left peak-side. The change of peak position was due to decrease of C-F 2 bonds and increase of C-C bonds with the formation of hydrophilic oxygen functional groups of OH and C dbnd O bonds after the ion implantation. After culturing rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) for 4 days, the cell-adhesion properties on the C --patterned PTFE were observed by fluorescent microscopy with staining the cell nuclei and their actin filament (F-actin). The clear adhesion patterning of MSCs on the PTFE was obtained at energies of 5-10 keV and a fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. While the sparse patterns and the uncontrollable patterns were found at a low fluence of 3 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 and a high fluence of 3 × 10 15 ions/cm 2, respectively. As a result, we could improve the surface wettability of PTFE to control the cell-adhesion property by carbon negative-ion implantation.

  16. Stoichiometric carbon nitride synthesized by ion beam sputtering and post nitrogen ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Carbon nitride films have been deposited on Si (100) by ion beam sputtering a vitreous graphite target with nitrogen and argon ions with and without concurrent N2 ion bombardment at room temperature. The sputtering beam energy was 1000 eV and the assisted beam energy was 300 eV with ion / atom arrival ratio ranging from 0.5 to 5. The carbon nitride films were deposited both as single layer directly on silicon substrate and as multilayer between two layers of stoichiometric amorphous silicon nitride and polycrystalline titanium nitride. The deposited films were implanted ex-situ with 30 keV nitrogen ions with various doses ranging from 1E17 to 4E17 ions.cm-2 and 2 GeV xenon ion with a dose of 1E12 ions.cm-2 . The nitrogen concentration of the films was measured with Rutherford Backscattering (RBS), Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS) and Parallel Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (PEELS). The nitrogen concentration for as deposited sample was 34 at% and stoichiometric carbon nitride C3N4 was achieved by post nitrogen implantation of the multi-layered films. Post bombardment of single layer carbon nitride films lead to reduction in the total nitrogen concentration. Carbon K edge structure obtained from PEELS analysis suggested that the amorphous C3N4 matrix was predominantly sp2 bonded. This was confirmed by Fourier Transforrn Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the single CN layer which showed the nitrogen was mostly bonded with carbon in nitrile (C≡N) and imine (C=N) groups. The microstructure of the film was determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) which indicated that the films were amorphous

  17. 活性炭负载铝吸附去除水中氟离子的研究%Adsorption of Fluoride Ions from Water by Alumina Supported on Activated Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谌任平; 汪昆平; 徐乾前

    2013-01-01

      采用载铝活性炭,通过批实验研究了对水中氟离子吸附特点,考察了负载条件、操作条件对水中氟离子吸附过程的影响。结果表明,载铝活性炭吸附水中的氟离子在24 h时达到吸附平衡;对于氟离子浓度为20 mg/L ,载铝活性炭单位当量氧化铝的氟离子吸附容量是单一活性Al2 O3吸附容量的40多倍;溶液过低或过高的pH对载铝活性炭吸附水中氟离子都有不利影响,在本实验条件下,当pH=8时载铝活性炭饱和吸附容量达到最大值;载铝活性炭对水中氟离子的吸附总体上属于放热过程,温度在30℃时已明显构成对吸附的不利影响。%Using alumina supported on activated carbon as adsorbent in batch experiments ,this paper studied the ad-sorption characteristics ,and the loading and operation conditions of adsorbents affecting the removal of fluoride in water .The results showed that the adsorption of fluoride ions by the adsorbent reached adsorption equilibrium in 24 h .For an ion concentration of 20 mg/L ,the adsorption capacity of alumina supported on activated carbon was more than 40 times as large as that of activated alumina alone .Too low or too high a pH value of the solution would have adverse effects on the adsorption of fluoride ions by alumina supported on activated carbon .Under the condi-tions of this experiment ,the saturated adsorption capacity of alumina supported on activated carbon reached the maximum at pH=8 .The adsorption of fluoride ions in water by the alumina supported on activated carbon was gen-erally exothermic ,which appeared to adversely affect the adsorption at 30℃ .

  18. Dissolution of alumina in stainless steelmaking slags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divakar, M.; Lahiri, A.K. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Metallurgy; Goernerup, M. [Uddeholm Technology AB (Sweden)

    2001-02-01

    Dissolution of alumina in stainless steelmaking slags was studied by conducting laboratory scale experiments on typical slags in the temperature range 1823-1923 K. The mechanism of dissolution was studied under the actual steelmaking conditions where several phenomena such as simultaneous reduction of chromium, iron and vanadium oxides by carbon, in-situ gas generated due to the reduction, foam/emulsion formation occur. The kinetics of alumina dissolution are studied under the influence of the above mentioned phenomena. (orig.)

  19. Effects of carbon dioxide plasma immersion ion implantation on the electrochemical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy in physiological environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ruizhen; Yang, Xiongbo; Zhang, Xuming; Wang, Mei; Li, Penghui; Zhao, Ying; Wu, Guosong; Chu, Paul K.

    2013-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is conducted to improve the intrinsically poor corrosion properties of biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy in the physiological environment. Carbon dioxide is implanted into the samples and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy are used to characterize the materials. The corrosion properties are systematically studied by potentiodynamic polarization tests in two simulated physiological environments, namely simulated body fluids and cell culture medium. The plasma-implanted materials exhibit a lower initial corrosion rate. Being a gaseous ion PIII technique, conformal ion implantation into an object with a complex shape such as an orthopedic implant can be easily accomplished and CO2 PIII is a potential method to improve the biological properties of magnesium and its alloys in clinical applications.

  20. Effects of carbon dioxide plasma immersion ion implantation on the electrochemical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy in physiological environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is conducted to improve the intrinsically poor corrosion properties of biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy in the physiological environment. Carbon dioxide is implanted into the samples and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy are used to characterize the materials. The corrosion properties are systematically studied by potentiodynamic polarization tests in two simulated physiological environments, namely simulated body fluids and cell culture medium. The plasma-implanted materials exhibit a lower initial corrosion rate. Being a gaseous ion PIII technique, conformal ion implantation into an object with a complex shape such as an orthopedic implant can be easily accomplished and CO2 PIII is a potential method to improve the biological properties of magnesium and its alloys in clinical applications.

  1. Rheology of Alumina-Based Graphite-Containing Castables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Fangbao; M. Rigaud; LIU Xinhong; ZHONG Xiangchong

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the rheological behavior of ultra-low cement alumina-based castables with addition of flake graphite and extruded graphite pellets has been investigated by using IBB rheometer. Emphasis has been laid on the influence of the type and amount of carbon addition on rheological properties of the alumina-based castables and the results are compared with corresponding alumina castable samples without any carbon addition. It is found that alumina-based castables with extruded graphite pellets have good rheological behavior and flowability with lower water demand ( < 6. 3% )and no segregation during the shearing of castable.

  2. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings on implants drastically reduce biofilm formation and water permeation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammations and crystalline bacterial biofilms (encrustations) remain a major complication in long-term artificial urinary tract drainage. To solve this problem we present urological implants with coatings made of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) that show excellent protection from encrustation in-vitro as well as in-vivo. Part of the success of a-C:H coatings is attributed to their ability to act as a diffusion barrier between an implant and the body, which prevents leaching of solvents from polymeric implants. To further enhance their barrier properties a-C:H coatings are combined with parylene coatings to develop diffusion-barrier multilayer coatings with a total thickness between 0.2 μm and 0.8 μm. The combination of the two types of coatings leads to a reduction of water diffusion by a factor of up to ten with respect to uncoated 25 μm thick polyimide sub-strates. The diffusion of water vapour from a controlled atmospheric pressure chamber through coated foils to a vacuum chamber is measured in a custom-built device

  3. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the ‘dry’ reforming of methane over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst operating under conditions where filamentous carbon formation is prevalent

    OpenAIRE

    Lennon, D.; McFarlane, AR; Silverwood, IP; Warringham, R; Norris, EL; Ormerod, RM; Frost, CD; Parker, SF

    2013-01-01

    The use of CO2 in reforming methane to produce the industrial feedstock syngas is an economically and environmentally attractive reaction. An alumina-supported nickel catalyst active for this reaction additionally forms filamentous carbon. The catalyst is investigated by inelastic neutron scattering as well as elemental analysis, temperature-programmed oxidation, temperature-programmed hydrogenation, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. Isotopic substituti...

  4. Tissue Response to, and Degradation Rate of, Photocrosslinked Trimethylene Carbonate-Based Elastomers Following Intramuscular Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian G. Amsden

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical elastomers were prepared through the UV-initiated crosslinking of terminally acrylated, 8,000 Da star-poly(trimethylene carbonate-co-ε-caprolactone and star-poly(trimethylene carbonate-co-D,L-lactide. These elastomers were implanted intramuscularly into the hind legs of male Wistar rats to determine the influence of the comonomer on the weight loss, tissue response, and change in mechanical properties of the elastomer. The elastomers exhibited only a mild inflammatory response that subsided after the first week; the response was greater for the stiffer D,L-lactide-containing elastomers. The elastomers exhibited weight loss and sol content changes consistent with a bulk degradation mechanism. The D,L-lactide-containing elastomers displayed a nearly zeroorder change in Young’s modulus and stress at break over the 30 week degradation time, while the ε-caprolactone-containing elastomers exhibited little change in modulus or stress at break.

  5. Graphitic carbon in a nanostructured titanium oxycarbide thin film to improve implant osseointegration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanoni, R., E-mail: robertino.zanoni@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’ p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Ioannidu, C.A.; Mazzola, L.; Politi, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biochimiche, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Misiano, C. [Romana Film Sottili, Anzio, Rome (Italy); Longo, G. [Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, SB IPSB LPMV, BSP 409 (Cubotron UNIL), R.te de la Sorge, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Falconieri, M. [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Applicazioni delle Radiazioni, via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Scandurra, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biochimiche, Università di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, p.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    A nanostructured coating layer on titanium implants, able to improve their integration into bones and to protect against the harsh conditions of body fluids, was obtained by Ion Plating Plasma Assisted, a method suitable for industrial applications. A titanium carbide target was attached under vacuum to a magnetron sputtering source powered with a direct current in the 500–1100 W range, and a 100 W radio frequency was applied to the sample holder. The samples produced at 900 W gave the best biological response in terms of overexpression of some genes of proteins involved in bone turnover. We report the characterization of a reference and of an implant sample, both obtained at 900 W. Different micro/nanoscopic techniques evidenced the morphology of the substrates, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy was used to disclose the surface composition. The layer is a 500 nm thick hard nanostructure, composed of 60% graphitic carbon clustered with 15% TiC and 25% Ti oxides. - Highlights: • Nanostructured TiC protective layers were produced on Ti samples for prostheses. • Ion Plating Plasma-Assisted Deposition from TiC targets was used on Ti samples. • A model of the surface layer has been drawn from XPS, Raman, AFM, FIB/SEM, TEM. • The layer is mainly composed of graphitic carbon in addition to TiC and Ti oxides.

  6. Characterization and nanomechanical properties of novel dental implant coatings containing copper decorated-carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasani, N; Vahdati Khaki, J; Mojtaba Zebarjad, S

    2014-09-01

    Fluorapatite-titania coated Ti-based implants are promising for using in dental surgery for restoring teeth. One of the challenges in implantology is to achieve a bioactive coating with appropriate mechanical properties. In this research, simple sol-gel method was developed for synthesis of fluorapatite-titania-carbon nanotube decorated with antibacterial agent. Triethyl phosphate [PO4(C2H5)3], calcium nitrate [Ca(NO3)2] and ammonium fluoride (NH4F) were used as precursors under an ethanol-water based solution for fluorapatite (FA) production. Titanium isopropoxide and isopropanol were used as starting materials for making TiO2 sol-gels. Also, Copper acetate [Cu(C2H3O2)2·H2O] was used as precursor for decoration of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with wet chemical method. The decorated MWCNTs (CNT(Cu)) were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The phase identification of the FA-TiO2-CNT(Cu) coating was carried out by XRD analysis. Morphology of coated samples was investigated by SEM observations. The surface elastic modulus and hardness of coatings were studied using nanoindentation technique. The results indicate that novel dental implant coating containing FA, TiO2 and copper decorated MWCNTs have proper morphological features. The results of nanoindentation test show that incorporation of CNT(Cu) in FA-TiO2 matrix can improve the nanomechanical properties of composite coating. PMID:24905179

  7. Graphitic carbon in a nanostructured titanium oxycarbide thin film to improve implant osseointegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nanostructured coating layer on titanium implants, able to improve their integration into bones and to protect against the harsh conditions of body fluids, was obtained by Ion Plating Plasma Assisted, a method suitable for industrial applications. A titanium carbide target was attached under vacuum to a magnetron sputtering source powered with a direct current in the 500–1100 W range, and a 100 W radio frequency was applied to the sample holder. The samples produced at 900 W gave the best biological response in terms of overexpression of some genes of proteins involved in bone turnover. We report the characterization of a reference and of an implant sample, both obtained at 900 W. Different micro/nanoscopic techniques evidenced the morphology of the substrates, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy was used to disclose the surface composition. The layer is a 500 nm thick hard nanostructure, composed of 60% graphitic carbon clustered with 15% TiC and 25% Ti oxides. - Highlights: • Nanostructured TiC protective layers were produced on Ti samples for prostheses. • Ion Plating Plasma-Assisted Deposition from TiC targets was used on Ti samples. • A model of the surface layer has been drawn from XPS, Raman, AFM, FIB/SEM, TEM. • The layer is mainly composed of graphitic carbon in addition to TiC and Ti oxides

  8. Nitrogen oxide reduction by carbon monoxide in the presence of oxygen over a fresh and aged Pd/alumina catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction of nitrogen oxide with carbon monoxide in presence of oxygen over a palladium based catalyst is studied. Metal dispersion decreases with the thermal aging of the fresh solid in a wet and oxidant atmosphere. However, the aged solid shows a catalytic activity for the oxidation of carbon monoxide and the reduction of nitrogen oxide higher than the fresh solid. After reaction, particle sizes and surface state were determined. The state of oxidation and the kind of surface oxide are different for the fresh and aged solids

  9. Effects of a carbon implant on thermal stability of Ni0.95(Pt0.05)Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of a carbon implant on thermal stability of Ni0.95(Pt0.05)Si films are investigated by implanting carbon of different doses into Si substrates before silicidation with two steps of rapid thermal annealing. Compared with the Ni0.95(Pt0.05)Si films without carbon implanting, the thermal stability of Ni0.95(Pt0.05)Si films with two carbon implant doses are improved 100 °C (1 × 1015 cm−2) and 150 °C (3 × 1015 cm−2), respectively. Through sheet resistance measurement, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, we conclude that carbon atoms precipitated at Ni(Pt0.05)Si grain boundaries and Ni0.95(Pt0.05)Si/Si interface account for the improved thermal stability of Ni0.95(Pt0.05)Si films. Furthermore, the presence of C in Ni0.95(Pt0.05)Si films changes the preferred orientation of polycrystalline NiSi which will benefit the practical application of this material. (paper)

  10. Bauxite and alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    The article provides information on bauxite and alumina mining. U.S. states like Alabama, Arkansas and Georgia produced small amounts of bauxite and bauxitic clays for nonmetallurgical uses. Total metallurgical-grade bauxite imports in 2008 is cited. The leading suppliers of bauxite to the U.S. are Jamaica, Guinea and Brazil. The estimated domestic production of alumina in 2008 is mentioned. It also discusses consumption and prices of both bauxite and alumina.

  11. Porous Alumina Films with Width-Controllable Alumina Stripes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Shi-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Porous alumina films had been fabricated by anodizing from aluminum films after an electropolishing procedure. Alumina stripes without pores can be distinguished on the surface of the porous alumina films. The width of the alumina stripes increases proportionally with the anodizing voltage. And the pores tend to be initiated close to the alumina stripes. These phenomena can be ascribed to the electric field distribution in the alumina barrier layer caused by the geometric structure of the aluminum surface.

  12. Porous Alumina Films with Width-Controllable Alumina Stripes

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Shi-Ming; Pu Lin; Shi Yi; Huang Kai; Wu Zhi-Ming; Ji Li; Kang Jun-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Porous alumina films had been fabricated by anodizing from aluminum films after an electropolishing procedure. Alumina stripes without pores can be distinguished on the surface of the porous alumina films. The width of the alumina stripes increases proportionally with the anodizing voltage. And the pores tend to be initiated close to the alumina stripes. These phenomena can be ascribed to the electric field distribution in the alumina barrier layer caused by the geometric structure o...

  13. B and N ion implantation into carbon nanotubes: Insight from atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By employing atomistic computer simulations with empirical potential and density functional force models, we study B/N ion implantation onto carbon nanotubes. We simulate irradiation of single-walled nanotubes with B and N ions and show that up to 40% of the impinging ions can occupy directly the sp2 positions in the nanotube atomic network. We further estimate the optimum ion energies for direct substitution. Ab initio simulations are used to get more insight into the structure of the typical atomic configurations which appear under the impacts of the ions. As annealing should further increase the number of sp2 impurities due to dopant atom migration and annihilation with vacancies, we also study migration of impurity atoms over the tube surface. Our results indicate that irradiation-mediated doping of nanotubes is a promising way to control the nanotube electronic and even mechanical properties due to impurity-stimulated crosslinking of nanotubes

  14. Silver nanoparticle-enriched diamond-like carbon implant modification as a mammalian cell compatible surface with antimicrobial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzelanny, Christian; Kmeth, Ralf; Obermeier, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander T.; Halter, Natalia; Kümpel, Katharina; Schneider, Matthias F.; Wixforth, Achim; Gollwitzer, Hans; Burgkart, Rainer; Stritzker, Bernd; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The implant-bone interface is the scene of competition between microorganisms and distinct types of tissue cells. In the past, various strategies have been followed to support bony integration and to prevent bacterial implant-associated infections. In the present study we investigated the biological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces containing silver nanoparticles. DLC is a promising material for the modification of medical implants providing high mechanical and chemical stability and a high degree of biocompatibility. DLC surface modifications with varying silver concentrations were generated on medical-grade titanium discs, using plasma immersion ion implantation-induced densification of silver nanoparticle-containing polyvinylpyrrolidone polymer solutions. Immersion of implants in aqueous liquids resulted in a rapid silver release reducing the growth of surface-bound and planktonic Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Due to the fast and transient release of silver ions from the modified implants, the surfaces became biocompatible, ensuring growth of mammalian cells. Human endothelial cells retained their cellular differentiation as indicated by the intracellular formation of Weibel-Palade bodies and a high responsiveness towards histamine. Our findings indicate that the integration of silver nanoparticles into DLC prevents bacterial colonization due to a fast initial release of silver ions, facilitating the growth of silver susceptible mammalian cells subsequently.

  15. Silver nanoparticle-enriched diamond-like carbon implant modification as a mammalian cell compatible surface with antimicrobial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzelanny, Christian; Kmeth, Ralf; Obermeier, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander T.; Halter, Natalia; Kümpel, Katharina; Schneider, Matthias F.; Wixforth, Achim; Gollwitzer, Hans; Burgkart, Rainer; Stritzker, Bernd; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-01-01

    The implant-bone interface is the scene of competition between microorganisms and distinct types of tissue cells. In the past, various strategies have been followed to support bony integration and to prevent bacterial implant-associated infections. In the present study we investigated the biological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces containing silver nanoparticles. DLC is a promising material for the modification of medical implants providing high mechanical and chemical stability and a high degree of biocompatibility. DLC surface modifications with varying silver concentrations were generated on medical-grade titanium discs, using plasma immersion ion implantation-induced densification of silver nanoparticle-containing polyvinylpyrrolidone polymer solutions. Immersion of implants in aqueous liquids resulted in a rapid silver release reducing the growth of surface-bound and planktonic Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Due to the fast and transient release of silver ions from the modified implants, the surfaces became biocompatible, ensuring growth of mammalian cells. Human endothelial cells retained their cellular differentiation as indicated by the intracellular formation of Weibel-Palade bodies and a high responsiveness towards histamine. Our findings indicate that the integration of silver nanoparticles into DLC prevents bacterial colonization due to a fast initial release of silver ions, facilitating the growth of silver susceptible mammalian cells subsequently. PMID:26955791

  16. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marc A.; Sheng, Guangyao

    1993-01-01

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  17. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (∼10 μs pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron microscopy, and its structure characteristics are examined by XPS and laser Raman spectroscopy. Subsequent processing using acetylene or acetylene and Ar (20%) produced thin carbon layers that are confirmed to be graphite-dominated DLC. Also, this PSII method is employed in order to deposit the DLC layer on the inside surface of the PET bottle and to reduce oxygen permeation rate by 40%

  18. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T.; Yoshida, M.; Shinohara, M.; Takagi, T.

    2002-05-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (~10 μs pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron microscopy, and its structure characteristics are examined by XPS and laser Raman spectroscopy. Subsequent processing using acetylene or acetylene and Ar (20%) produced thin carbon layers that are confirmed to be graphite-dominated DLC. Also, this PSII method is employed in order to deposit the DLC layer on the inside surface of the PET bottle and to reduce oxygen permeation rate by 40%.

  19. Modeling adsorption on fluoride and application of Box–Behnken design and response surface methodology for arsenic(V removal from aqueous solution using Nano-Scale Alumina on Multi Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Zarei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective and Background: Fluoride is an element widely found in the earth crust. Advantages and disadvantages of fluoride in the human body are depended on its concentration. Long-term consumption of drinking water contaminated with arsenic can cause adverse health effects such as skin lesions and cancer in humans. The aim of this study was to study efficiency of nano alumina on multi walled carbon nano tube  for removal As(V and fluoride from aqueous solution. Materials and Method: In this study, nano-scale crystalline alumina was synthesized on single walled carbon nanotube by sol-gel method for using as a sorbent for solid phase extraction of Fluorine ion and arsenic(V. Response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken was used to assess the effect of independent variables on the response function and prediction of the best response value. In this study, effect of different parameters, such as contact time (10 to 120 min, pH (3-9, adsorbent dosage (0.25-1.5 g/L and initial concentration of fluoride (2-8 mg/L on efficiency of process was investigated. The structure of nano-scale alumina on multi walled carbon nano tube was determined by XRD and SEM techniques. Moreover, Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were used to calculate equilibrium constant. Results: It was found that by increasing contact time and adsorbent dosage the rate of fluoride removal increased. However, by increasing pH and initial concentration the efficiency of fluoride removal decreased. High value for R2 (0.94 shows that removal of arsenic(V can be described by this model. The Freundlich isotherm was the best fitted graph for experimental data with R2 more than 0.997. Conclusion: In this study, it was observed that efficiency of arsenic(V and fluoride  removal was greatly increased by using nano-scale alumina on multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs.

  20. Reuse of activated alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobensack, J.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Activated alumina is used as a trapping media to remove trace quantities of UF{sub 6} from process vent streams. The current uranium recovery method employs concentrated nitric acid which destroys the alumina pellets and forms a sludge which is a storage and disposal problem. A recently developed technique using a distilled water rinse followed by three dilute acid rinses removes on average 97% of the uranium, and leaves the pellets intact with crush strength and surface area values comparable with new material. Trapping tests confirm the effectiveness of the recycled alumina as UF{sub 6} trapping media.

  1. Microstructure of metal Ion implanted ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructure of alumina and silicon nitride after metal ion implantation has been studied. A metal vapour vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source was employed to implant Ti ions into alumina with 7.6x1016 and 3.1x1017 ions/cm2 at 40 keV. Ti ions were also implanted into silicon nitride at a dose of 4x1017 ions/cm2 at 70 keV. The characterisation of ion implanted ceramics by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) showed low dose Ti implantation into alumina resulted in a highly defective surface layer. At higher dose, TiO2 precipitates in an amorphous matrix were detected. In contrast, Ti implantation into silicon nitride produced a layered structure. The upper most layer consisted of extremely fine TiN particles in an amorphous matrix. Underneath this layer, an amorphous layer was formed. (authors)

  2. Tribological property enhancement of CrN films by metal vapor vacuum arc implantation of Vanadium and Carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CrN films have been extensively used in precision forming and molding applications because of their excellent tribological properties and oxidation-resisting characteristics. Vanadium and carbon ions are introduced into the near surface layer of deposited CrN films via metal vapor vacuum arc implantation to improve the wear performance of CrN films. Dense and smooth CrN film was deposited using a filtered arc deposition system, which provides fully ionized Cr plasma on the substrate surface. Subsequently, surface bombardment of the deposited CrN film with vanadium and carbon ions densifies the film and forms an alloy near the surface. These CrN-based films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron electron and Auger electron spectroscopies. Examinations of the tribological and mechanical film properties, including wear resistance, corrosion resistance and fracture toughness were performed and correlated with respect to the implantation parameters

  3. Influence of 400 keV carbon ion implantation on structural, optical and electrical properties of PMMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arif, Shafaq, E-mail: sarif2005@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rafique, M. Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering & Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Saleemi, Farhat; Sagheer, Riffat [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Naab, Fabian; Toader, Ovidiu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory, University of Michigan, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Mahmood, Arshad; Rashid, Rashad [National Institute of Lasers and Optronics (NILOP), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mahmood, Mazhar [Department of Metallurgy & Materials Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering & Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-09-01

    Ion implantation is a useful technique to modify surface properties of polymers without altering their bulk properties. The objective of this work is to explore the 400 keV C{sup +} ion implantation effects on PMMA at different fluences ranging from 5 × 10{sup 13} to 5 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The surface topographical examination of irradiated samples has been performed using Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The structural and chemical modifications in implanted PMMA are examined by Raman and Fourier Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) respectively. The effects of carbon ion implantation on optical properties of PMMA are investigated by UV–Visible spectroscopy. The modifications in electrical conductivity have been measured using a four point probe technique. AFM images reveal a decrease in surface roughness of PMMA with an increase in ion fluence from 5 × 10{sup 14} to 5 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The existence of amorphization and sp{sup 2}-carbon clusterization has been confirmed by Raman and FTIR spectroscopic analysis. The UV–Visible data shows a prominent red shift in absorption edge as a function of ion fluence. This shift displays a continuous reduction in optical band gap (from 3.13 to 0.66 eV) due to formation of carbon clusters. Moreover, size of carbon clusters and photoconductivity are found to increase with increasing ion fluence. The ion-induced carbonaceous clusters are believed to be responsible for an increase in electrical conductivity of PMMA from (2.14 ± 0.06) × 10{sup −10} (Ω-cm){sup −1} (pristine) to (0.32 ± 0.01) × 10{sup −5} (Ω-cm){sup −1} (irradiated sample)

  4. Influence of 400 keV carbon ion implantation on structural, optical and electrical properties of PMMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation is a useful technique to modify surface properties of polymers without altering their bulk properties. The objective of this work is to explore the 400 keV C+ ion implantation effects on PMMA at different fluences ranging from 5 × 1013 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. The surface topographical examination of irradiated samples has been performed using Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The structural and chemical modifications in implanted PMMA are examined by Raman and Fourier Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) respectively. The effects of carbon ion implantation on optical properties of PMMA are investigated by UV–Visible spectroscopy. The modifications in electrical conductivity have been measured using a four point probe technique. AFM images reveal a decrease in surface roughness of PMMA with an increase in ion fluence from 5 × 1014 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. The existence of amorphization and sp2-carbon clusterization has been confirmed by Raman and FTIR spectroscopic analysis. The UV–Visible data shows a prominent red shift in absorption edge as a function of ion fluence. This shift displays a continuous reduction in optical band gap (from 3.13 to 0.66 eV) due to formation of carbon clusters. Moreover, size of carbon clusters and photoconductivity are found to increase with increasing ion fluence. The ion-induced carbonaceous clusters are believed to be responsible for an increase in electrical conductivity of PMMA from (2.14 ± 0.06) × 10−10 (Ω-cm)−1 (pristine) to (0.32 ± 0.01) × 10−5 (Ω-cm)−1 (irradiated sample)

  5. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, T; Shinohara, M; Takagi, T

    2002-01-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (approx 10 mu s pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N sub 2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N sub 2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron mic...

  6. Preliminary joining experiment of alumina pipes by using ceramics sleeve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary experiments on alumina ceramics pipes joining by using shrinkable alumina sleeve and high melting point oxide solder have been carried out. Sleeves were prepared by way of sintering at relatively low temperature to shrink 1% during following joining process. As solder, alumina-calcia system was selected and paste containing alumina and calcium carbonate powder mixture was prepared. Joining was carried out by inserting the paste between sleeve and pipes, and by heating at 1500degC in air. By the shrink of sleeve and the formation of interface by solder, it was possible to realize the joined pipe without the vacuum leakage. The airtightness of the joined alumina pipes is almost equal to it of the metal pipe welding. (author)

  7. Formation of low friction and wear-resistant carbon coatings on tool steel by 75keV, high-dose carbon ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardened AISI D2 steel samples were subjected to mass-separated C+ ion bombardment at 75keV with ion doses in the range 0.5-15x1018C+cm-2. It was observed that sputtering was still limited, and the system exhibited internal growth, because most of the ions penetrated more than 0.1μm into the growing carbon film. At the lowest ion doses applied, carbon was implanted into the steel, while higher doses resulted in the implanted carbon concentration near the surface being almost 100%. For the highest doses applied, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and surface profilometry analyses showed that layers about 0.5-1μm thick of almost pure carbon grew outward from the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the carbon layers were amorphous and exhibited an intermixed layer-substrate interface. The layers were hard and exhibited pronounced elastic recovery when subjected to ultralow load indentation. Low friction and excellent wear properties were measured when tested under dry conditions with a ball-on-disc tribometer. ((orig.))

  8. Effects of maternal exposure to nano-alumina during pregnancy on neurodevelopment in offspring mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁勇

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of maternal exposure to nano-alumina during pregnancy on the neurodevelopment in offspring mice.Methods Female ICR mice were exposed to nano-alumina 10 d before mating,and the nano-alumina exposure lasted till offspring mice were born.All the female mice were randomly divided into 5groups:solvent control group (saline) ,nano-carbon group (11.76 mg/ml) ,microalumina group (50 mg/ml) ,50 nm alumina group (50 mg/ml) ,and 13 nm alumina group (50 mg/ml) .All the mice were treated by

  9. Evaluation of porous vitreous carbon or silicon implants by radiology in rat's skull; Avaliacao radiologica de implantes de carbono vitreo poroso ou silicone em cranio de ratos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccari-Mazzetti, Marcelo Paulo; Kobata, Celio Toshiro [Lusiada University of Santos, SP (Brazil). Hospital Defeitos da Face. Dept. of Surgery]. E-mail: mmgvaccari@ig.com.br; Fabiani, Paulo [Lusiada University of Santos, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology; Martins, Dulce Maria Fonseca Soares [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Plastic Surgery; Gomes, Paulo de Oliveira [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Operatory Technique and Experimental Surgery; Martins, Jose Luiz [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery. Div. of Pediatric Surgery

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: Evaluate by CT the use of porous vitreous carbon (PVC) and silicon (S) implants as the replacement bone in the craniofacial skeleton of rats. Methods: 40 rats divided in: Group A (n=20) PVC submitted to the implant of a fragment in skull. After the euthanasia, the animals were divided into two subgroups: A I: 10 animals, studied in the 7th postoperative day (P.O) and AII: 10 animals, studied in the 28th P.O. In group B, S, 20 rats were submitted to S implant in the skull. All other steps were identical to group A, with designation of subgroups BI and BII. CT with beams in axial cuts of 1 mm thickness to obtain 3-D information It was used Hounsfield scale for evaluate the radio density of the implant. They were used non parametric tests to analyze the results. Results: The 7th PO boss remained in the two groups, but for 28th PO, observed reduction in the volume of the implant in Group A, not observed in group B. CT studies noticed different radio densities around all of S prostheses (pseudo capsule), that do not appeared in CPV implants. The S has remained unchanged in the CT, but the CPV has had a modification in its radio density (p{<=}0,05), in all implants. Conclusion: In CT evaluation the implants of CPV have greater deformation that the S, which makes them not suitable for replacement of membranous bone in the rat skull. (author)

  10. The microstructure of type 304 stainless steel implanted with titanium and carbon and its relation to friction and wear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have used transmission electron microscopy to examine the microstructure of type 304 stainless steel which was ion implanted with high doses (2 X 1017 atoms cm-2) of titanium and carbon. It is found that the resulting surface alloy is an amorphous phase similar to that observed when pure iron is identically implanted. This result is important for identifying the mechanisms by which the coefficient of friction and the wear depth are reduced in unlubricated pin-on-disc tests of type 304 stainless steel implanted with titanium and carbon. The effect of temperature on the amorphous alloy during annealing in the microscope has also been examined. It is found that devitrification begins after 15 min at 5000C and that the alloy fully crystallizes into f.c.c., b.c.c. and TiC phases after 15 min at 6500C. A comparison of mechanical test results from devitrified specimens with results from amorphous specimens demonstrates that the reduction in the coefficient of friction correlates with the presence of the amorphous layer, whereas the reduction in the wear depth is obtained for both amorphous and crystalline alloys. (Auth.)

  11. Impact of temperature during He+ implantation on deuterium retention in tungsten, tungsten with carbon deposit and tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Sato, Misaki; Li, Xiaochun; Yuyama, Kenta; Fujita, Hiroe; Sakurada, Shodai; Uemura, Yuki; Hatano, Yuji; Yoshida, Naoaki; Ashikawa, Naoko; Sagara, Akio; Chikada, Takumi

    2016-02-01

    Temperature dependence on deuterium (D) retention for He+ implanted tungsten (W) was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) to evaluate the tritium retention behavior in W. The activation energies were evaluated using Hydrogen Isotope Diffusion and Trapping (HIDT) simulation code and found to be 0.55 eV, 0.65 eV, 0.80 eV and 1.00 eV. The heating scenarios clearly control the D retention behavior and, dense and large He bubbles could work as a D diffusion barrier toward the bulk, leading to D retention enhancement at lower temperature of less than 430 K, even if the damage was introduced by He+ implantation. By comparing the D retention for W, W with carbon deposit and tungsten carbide (WC), the dense carbon layer on the surface enhances the dynamic re-emission of D as hydrocarbons, and induces the reduction of D retention. However, by He+ implantation, the D retention was increased for all the samples.

  12. On the influence of carbon implantation on the structural properties of hard TiN coatings studied by glancing incidence X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we investigate the structural properties and, in particular, the residual stress of carbon-implanted TiN coatings by means of glancing incidence X-ray diffraction and secondary ion mass spectrometry techniques. The coatings were grown by ion-beam physical vapor deposition on steel substrates and subsequently implanted at 100 keV with carbon doses of 1x1017,3x1017 and 7x1017 ions/cm2. The carbon depth profiles obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry enable us to choose the more appropriate X-ray beam incidence angles in order to detect the structural variations in proximity to the implanted region. The X-ray results indicate notable variations both in the crystallinity and in the residual stress and such modifications depend on the carbon dose and penetration depth. In particular, in the coating implanted with a dose of 1x1017 ions/cm2 the initial compressive residual stress is reduced until a penetration depth of at least 400 nm. In addition, the lattice is re-crystallized in the first 100 nm. The coatings implanted with doses of 3x1017 and 7x1017 ions/cm2 have a surface region (100 nm thick) in the tensile stress state and a peak of compressive stress well above the non-implanted value at a depth between Rp and 2Rp. Moreover, the effect of C+ implantation is to reduce the lattice parameters for all the investigated samples. Such results can be explained by considering the defect distribution induced by the implantation process and the competition between the implantation amorphization and the self-annealing behavior

  13. Application of Laser-Induced Bone Therapy by Carbon Dioxide Laser Irradiation in Implant Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Takahiro Naka; Satoshi Yokose

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the application of laser-induced bone therapy (LIBT) to reduce implant healing time in rat tibia. Twenty 10-week-old female Sprague-Dawlay rats were used. The rats received laser irradiation (laser group) or sham operation (control group) on either side of the tibia. Five days after invasion, titanium implants were inserted in proximal tibia. Five, 10, and 20 days after implant placement, tibiae were collected. After taking micro-CT and performing a torque test, the tibia...

  14. Carbon implanted waveguides in soda lime glass doped with Yb3+ and Er3+ for visible light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, G. V.; Valiente, R.; Gómez-Salces, S.; Flores-Romero, E.; Rickards, J.; Trejo-Luna, R.

    2016-05-01

    Channel waveguides were fabricated by carbon implantation in soda lime glass samples doped with Er3+ and Yb3+, exhibiting good confinement and both monomode and multimode behaviour at 633 nm. Excitation at near infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) spectral ranges were used in order to obtain anti-Stokes (upconversion) and Stokes (downshift) emission in the visible range, respectively. The characteristic green and red bands of Er3+ transitions were observed, showing the potential of Yb3+ and Er3+ co-doping for the generation of visible guided emission under NIR excitation.

  15. Alumina Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2002-02-01

    The Alumina Technology Roadmap outlines a comprehensive long-term research and development plan that defines the industry's collective future and establishes a clear pathway forward. It emphasizes twelve high-priority R&D areas deemed most significant in addressing the strategic goals.

  16. Solid Lubricant For Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Pepper, Stephen V.; Honecy, Frank S.

    1993-01-01

    Outer layer of silver lubricates, while intermediate layer of titanium ensures adhesion. Lubricating outer films of silver deposited on thin intermediate films of titanium on alumina substrates found to reduce sliding friction and wear. Films provide effective lubrication for ceramic seals, bearings, and other hot sliding components in advanced high-temperature engines.

  17. Fabrication of silicon carbide nanowires/carbon nanotubes heterojunction arrays by high-flux Si ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaping; Cheng, Guo-An; Liang, Changlin; Zheng, Ruiting

    2008-06-18

    An array of silicon carbide nanowire (SiCNW)-carbon nanotube (CNT) heterojunctions was fabricated by high-flux Si ion implantation into a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) array with a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. Under Si irradiation, the top part of a CNT array was gradually transformed into an amorphous nanowire array with increasing Si dose while the bottom part still remained a CNT structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis shows that the SiC compound was produced in the nanowire part even at the lower Si dose of 5 × 10(16) ions cm(-2), and the SiC amount increased with increasing the Si dose. Therefore, the fabrication of a SiCNW-CNT heterojunction array with the MEVVA technique has been successfully demonstrated. The corresponding formation mechanism of SiCNWs was proposed. PMID:21825818

  18. The effect of ion implantation on the tribomechanical properties of carbon fibre reinforced polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphite fibre reinforced epoxy composite material (GFRP) is used extensively in the aerospace and other industries for structural application. The trend is to address the 20 to 30 year life endurance of this material in service. Mechanical joints in air crafts are exposed to dynamic loads during service and wear may be experienced by the composite material joint. Generally it has been shown that graphite fibre reinforced polymers have superior wear and friction properties as compared with the unfilled polymers. In the described experiment, ion implantation was used as a novel surface treatment. Wear and friction of a polymer composite material (GFRP) was studied and ion implantation was used in order to observe the effect on the tribomechanical properties of the material. It was found that ion implantation of C on GFRP sliding against Ti changes the tribological properties of the system, and in particular decreases the coefficient of friction and wear. 4 refs., 2 figs

  19. The effect of ion implantation on the tribomechanical properties of carbon fibre reinforced polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistica, R.; Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Janardhana, M.N. [Deakin University, Geelong, VIC (Australia). School of Engineering and Technology

    1993-12-31

    Graphite fibre reinforced epoxy composite material (GFRP) is used extensively in the aerospace and other industries for structural application. The trend is to address the 20 to 30 year life endurance of this material in service. Mechanical joints in air crafts are exposed to dynamic loads during service and wear may be experienced by the composite material joint. Generally it has been shown that graphite fibre reinforced polymers have superior wear and friction properties as compared with the unfilled polymers. In the described experiment, ion implantation was used as a novel surface treatment. Wear and friction of a polymer composite material (GFRP) was studied and ion implantation was used in order to observe the effect on the tribomechanical properties of the material. It was found that ion implantation of C on GFRP sliding against Ti changes the tribological properties of the system, and in particular decreases the coefficient of friction and wear. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Titanium coated with functionalized carbon nanotubes — A promising novel material for biomedical application as an implantable orthopaedic electronic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przekora, Agata, E-mail: agata.przekora@umlub.pl [Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Medical University of Lublin, Faculty of Pharmacy with Medical Analytics Division, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin (Poland); Benko, Aleksandra; Nocun, Marek; Wyrwa, Jan; Blazewicz, Marta [Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, A. Mickiewicz 30 Ave., 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Ginalska, Grazyna [Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Medical University of Lublin, Faculty of Pharmacy with Medical Analytics Division, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin (Poland)

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to fabricate titanium (Ti) material coated with functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs) that would have potential medical application in orthopaedics as an implantable electronic device. The novel biomedical material (Ti-CNTs-H{sub 2}O) would possess specific set of properties, such as: electrical conductivity, non-toxicity, and ability to inhibit connective tissue cell growth and proliferation protecting the Ti-CNTs-H{sub 2}O surface against covering by cells. The novel material was obtained via an electrophoretic deposition of CNTs-H{sub 2}O on the Ti surface. Then, physicochemical, electrical, and biological properties were evaluated. Electrical property evaluation revealed that a Ti-CNTs-H{sub 2}O material is highly conductive and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that there are mainly COOH groups on the Ti-CNTs-H{sub 2}O surface that are found to inhibit cell growth. Biological properties were assessed using normal human foetal osteoblast cell line (hFOB 1.19). Conducted cytotoxicity tests and live/dead fluorescent staining demonstrated that Ti-CNTs-H{sub 2}O does not exert toxic effect on hFOB cells. Moreover, fluorescence laser scanning microscope observation demonstrated that Ti-CNTs-H{sub 2}O surface retards to a great extent cell proliferation. The study resulted in successful fabrication of highly conductive, non-toxic Ti-CNTs-H{sub 2}O material that possesses ability to inhibit osteoblast proliferation and thus has a great potential as an orthopaedic implantable electronic device. - Highlights: • Functionalized carbon nanotubes were electrophoretically deposited on Ti surface. • Physicochemical, electrical, and biological properties were evaluated. • Ti-CNTs-H{sub 2}O is highly conductive and there are mainly COOH groups on its surface. • Novel material is non-toxic and retards to a great extent osteoblast proliferation. • Ti-CNTs-H{sub 2}O has a promising potential as implantable orthopaedic

  1. Preparation of diamond-like carbon films in methane by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were prepared on Si(100) substrates by ion implantation from an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma source. During the implantation, 650 W microwave power was used to produce discharge plasma with methane as working gas, and -20 kV voltage pulses were applied to the substrate holder to accelerate ions in the plasma. Confocal Raman spectra confirmed the DLC characteristics of the films. Fourier-transform infrared characterization indicates that the DLC films were composed of sp3 and sp2 carbon-bonded hydrogen. The hardness of the films was evaluated with a Nano Indenter-XP System. The result shows that the highest hardness value was 14.6 GPa. The surface rms roughness of the films was as low as 0.104 nm measured with an atomic force microscope. The friction coefficient of the films was checked using a ball-on-disk microtribometer. The average friction coefficient is approximately 0.122

  2. Effects of H2 gas addition into process and H ion implantation on the microstructure of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films prepared by bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films are deposited on Si(1 0 0) and SiO2 glass substrates by a bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation system. The films are prepared using toluene gas at a constant flow rate of 2 sccm. The effects of H2 gas addition during deposition on the microstructure of the films are examined by electrical conductivity measurements, Raman spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and optical spectroscopy. In addition, H implantation is also carried out using H2 plasma discharge. Thickness of the films is approximately 60 nm for all samples. It is found that electrical conductivity slightly increases with increasing additive H2 flow rate. However, the conductivity drastically decreases after H implantation. Raman analysis reveals that H2 gas addition slightly causes the film graphitization, but the H implantation does it amorphization. The results of ERDA show that the H concentration in the films slightly decreases with increasing H2 gas addition, but increases by H implantation. In spite of H2 gas addition, the optical band gap is not changed and kept approximately 0.7 eV. However, H implantation makes it increase up to approximately 1.0 eV

  3. A study of calcium carbonate/multiwalled-carbon nanotubes/chitosan composite coatings on Ti–6Al–4V alloy for orthopedic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an attempt to increase the stability, bioactivity and corrosion resistance of Ti–6Al–4V alloy, chitosan (CS) biocomposite coatings reinforced with multiwalled-carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) for surface modification were utilized by electroless deposition. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) reveals the formation of a compact and highly crosslinked coatings. Electrochemical techniques were used to investigate the coats stability and resistivity for orthopedic implants in simulated body fluid (SBF). The results show that Est value is more positive in the following order: CaCO3/MWCNTs/CS > CS/MWCNTs > CS > MWCNTs. The calculated icorr was 0.02 nA cm−2 for CaCO3/MWCNTs/CS which suggested a high corrosion resistance.

  4. Study of carbon nitride compounds synthesised by co-implantation of 13C and 14N in copper at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Simultaneous implantation of 13C and 14N in copper were performed to synthesise CNx compounds. → The formation of fullerene-like CNx compounds was highlighted by XPS and TEM. → Only about 20% of the implanted 14N atoms are contained in the FL CxNy structures. → The exceeding of implanted nitrogen precipitates in large N2 gas bubbles. → A growth model for the FL CxNy structures is proposed. - Abstract: Carbon nitride compounds have been synthesised in copper by simultaneous high fluence (1018 at. cm-2) implantation of 13C and 14N ions. During the implantation process, the substrate temperature was maintained at 25, 250, 350 or 450 deg. C. Depth profiles of 13C and 14N were determined using the non-resonant nuclear reactions (NRA) induced by a 1.05 MeV deuteron beam. The retained doses were deduced from NRA measurements and compared to the implanted fluence. The chemical bonds between carbon and nitrogen were studied as a function of depth and temperature by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The curve fitting of C 1s and N 1s core level photoelectron spectra reveal different types of C-N bonds and show the signature of N2 molecules. The presence of nitrogen gas bubbles in copper was highlighted by mass spectroscopy. The structure of carbon nitride compounds was characterised by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For that purpose, cross-sectional samples were prepared using a focused ion beam (FIB) system. TEM observations showed the presence of small amorphous carbon nitride 'nano-capsules' and large gas bubbles in copper. Based on our observations, we propose a model for the growth of these nano-objects. Finally, the mechanical properties of the implanted samples were investigated by nano-indentation.

  5. Nanoindentation of shock deformed alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current study, the experimental results on the nanoindentation response of both as prepared and shock recovered alumina of 10 μm grain size and identical processing history are presented and analyzed. The shock recovery experiments were deliberately conducted with gas gun arrangements at shock pressures much above the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) of alumina. The nanoindentation experiments were conducted at 10-1000 mN load with a Berkovich indenter. The nanohardness and Young's modulus value of shock recovered alumina were always lower than those of the as prepared alumina samples. Subsequently, the detailed characterizations of the shock recovered alumina samples by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to understand the reasons behind the drop in nanohardness and Young's modulus of shock recovered alumina samples.

  6. The structure investigation of thin silicon layers implanted by carbon ions with energy 40 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation of crystallization process in thin silicon layers at various conditions of ion implantation and annealing is very important for microelectronics. In this investigation the X-ray diffraction of thin silicon layers implanted by carbon ions with energy of 40 keV were made. A mechanism of both the Si and SiC crystallite formation in silicon layers having a Gaussian distribution of the implanted carbon is discussed. The implantation of 12C+ into silicon was carried out using a modernized accelerator ILU-4 in full oil less condition. To prevention of ion beam heating of samples the ion current density was kept below 4 μA/cm2. The single crystal of (100) oriented silicon of dimensions 7x12x0.4 mm overall with resistivity 4-10 Ωcm as samples were used. Post implantation annealing of samples over the range of 200-1250 deg. C with step 50 or 100 deg. C in argon atmosphere for 30 min was performed. The concentrations of carbon in a peak of Gaussian distribution wereNC/NSi=0.51. An uniform increase of average sizes of Si and β-SiC crystallites over the range 1000-1200 deg. C is observed. The rate of the average size increase of silicon crystallites in this temperature range is greater by one and half fold than the same for silicon carbide. These rates for Si and β-SiC are increased 5-6 times over the range 1200-1270 deg. C and they are equal (Δd/ΔT)Si = 1.27 A/degree and (Δd/ΔT)SiC = 0.59 A/degree, respectively. The rate of the average size increase of silicon crystallites in this temperature range is greater by 2.2 fold than the same for silicon carbide. At 1270 deg. C the increase of silicon carbide crystallites is decelerated, the curve goes to saturation. In spite of the intensive increase of average sizes of Si- and SiC crystallites a dependence of the integral intensity from the temperature shows an insignificant change of the polycrystalline SiC phase volume and a several increase (one and a half times) of the polycrystalline Si over the range

  7. Evaluation of porous vitreous carbon or silicon implants by radiology in rat's skull Avaliação radiológica de implantes de carbono vítreo poroso ou silicone em crânio de ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Paulo Vaccari-Mazzetti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evaluate by CT the use of porous vitreous carbon (PVC and silicon (S implants as the replacement bone in the craniofacial skeleton of rats. METHODS: 40 rats divided in: Group A (n=20 PVC submitted to the implant of a fragment in skull. After the euthanasia, the animals were divided into two subgroups: A I: 10 animals, studied in the 7th postoperative day (P.O and AII: 10 animals, studied in the 28th P.O. In group B, S, 20 rats were submitted to S implant in the skull. All other steps were identical to group A, with designation of subgroups BI and BII. CT with beams in axial cuts of 1 mm thickness to obtain 3-D information It was used Hounsfield scale for evaluate the radio density of the implant. They were used non parametric tests to analyze the results. RESULTS: The 7th PO boss remained in the two groups, but for 28th PO, observed reduction in the volume of the implant in Group A, not observed in group B. CT studies noticed different radio densities around all of S prostheses (pseudo-capsule, that don't appeared in CPV implants. The S has remained unchanged in the CT, but the CPV has had a modification in its radio density (pOBJETIVO: Realizar avaliação através de tomografia computadorizada (TC de implantes de carbono vítreo poroso (CVP e silicone (S para sua utilização na substituição óssea no esqueleto craniofacial de ratos. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 40 ratos Wistar divididos em: Grupo A (n=20, implantes subperiostais de CVP no crânio. Após o momento da eutanásia os animais foram divididos em dois subgrupos: A I: 10 animais, estudados no 7(0 dia pós-operatório (PO e AII: 10 animais, estudados no 28(0 PO. No grupo B (n=20, os ratos foram submetidos ao implante de silicone no crânio. Todas outras etapas foram idênticas ao grupo A, com a designação de subgrupos BI e BII. Foi realizada tomografia computadorizada com cortes axiais de 1 mm de espessura para obtenção de imagens tridimensionais. A escala de Hounsfield

  8. Diagnostic possibilities following implantation of carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP) total hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: There are many problems in the radiological diagnosis of aseptic loosening in total hip arthroplasty. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) are not usable for metallic implants (stainless steel, cobalt alloy, titanium alloy). Material and Methods: From April 1993 to December 1993 15 CFRP non-cemented hip prostheses have been implanted. In a prospective clinical study plane radiographs, CT and MRT have been analysed. Results: Three stems were revised (1 femoral fracture, 1 severe thigh pain, 1 aseptic loosening). CFRP are not visible in plane radiographs. There was a complete (two-third of the cases) or nearly complete (one-third of the cases) small sclerotic interface between the prosthesis and the bone, these were apparent in CT and MRT in stable implant cases and did not have any clinical correlations. Discussion: The small sclerotic interface is quite different in comparison to so called 'Reactive lines'. In one case of aseptic loosening there was an interposition of soft tissue between prothesis and bone in MRT and CT. CFRP inaugurates new diagnostic possibilities in aseptic loosening of hip prosthesis and in tumour surgery too. (orig.)

  9. Optical properties and oxidation of carbonized and cross-linked structures formed in polycarbonate by plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Structure and properties of polycarbonate films spin-coated on silicon are studied. • The films have two thicknesses: thicker and thinner than a depth of ion penetration. • Effect of radio frequency plasma and plasma immersion ion implantation is compared. - Abstract: At ion fluences higher than 5 · 1015 ions/cm2, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of polycarbonate (PC) results in a formation of a carbonized surface layer. The thickness of this layer is close to the depth of ion penetration. A comparison of PIII treated, spin-coated PC films with pre-treatment thicknesses designed to match and exceed the carbonized layer thickness is employed to study the properties of the carbonised layer independently from the less modified underlying structure. At ion fluencies higher than 1016 ions/cm2, the thinner PC film is completely transformed into an amorphous carbon-like material with no traces of the initial PC structure. The thicker films, however, incorporated two layers: a top carbonised layer and a cross-linked layer below. Compared to the two-layered PC film, the completely carbonized layer was found to have a much higher concentration of C=O bonds and much lower concentration of O–H bonds after exposure to atmospheric oxygen. The refractive index of the thicker PC films PIII treated with high ion fluencies is close to the refractive index of diamond-like carbon. Anomalous dispersion of the refractive index of the thicker PC films is observed after formation of the carbonised layer. The refractive index of the thinner PC film has normal dispersion at all ion fluences. At ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2, both PC films were found to have the same etching rate as polystyrene. Washing in dichloromethane had no effect on the carbonised layer but affected the underlying material in the case of the thicker PC films leading to a wrinkled structure up to ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2. At this and higher fluence, areas of an ordered

  10. Optical properties and oxidation of carbonized and cross-linked structures formed in polycarbonate by plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosobrodova, E., E-mail: elenak@physics.usyd.edu.au [Department of Applied Plasma and Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kondyurin, A. [Department of Applied Plasma and Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Chrzanowski, W. [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research, Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); McCulloch, D.G. [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); McKenzie, D.R.; Bilek, M.M.M. [Department of Applied Plasma and Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Structure and properties of polycarbonate films spin-coated on silicon are studied. • The films have two thicknesses: thicker and thinner than a depth of ion penetration. • Effect of radio frequency plasma and plasma immersion ion implantation is compared. - Abstract: At ion fluences higher than 5 · 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of polycarbonate (PC) results in a formation of a carbonized surface layer. The thickness of this layer is close to the depth of ion penetration. A comparison of PIII treated, spin-coated PC films with pre-treatment thicknesses designed to match and exceed the carbonized layer thickness is employed to study the properties of the carbonised layer independently from the less modified underlying structure. At ion fluencies higher than 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, the thinner PC film is completely transformed into an amorphous carbon-like material with no traces of the initial PC structure. The thicker films, however, incorporated two layers: a top carbonised layer and a cross-linked layer below. Compared to the two-layered PC film, the completely carbonized layer was found to have a much higher concentration of C=O bonds and much lower concentration of O–H bonds after exposure to atmospheric oxygen. The refractive index of the thicker PC films PIII treated with high ion fluencies is close to the refractive index of diamond-like carbon. Anomalous dispersion of the refractive index of the thicker PC films is observed after formation of the carbonised layer. The refractive index of the thinner PC film has normal dispersion at all ion fluences. At ion fluences of 2 · 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, both PC films were found to have the same etching rate as polystyrene. Washing in dichloromethane had no effect on the carbonised layer but affected the underlying material in the case of the thicker PC films leading to a wrinkled structure up to ion fluences of 2 · 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. At

  11. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-CVD) yields better Hydrolytical Stability of Biocompatible SiOx Thin Films on Implant Alumina Ceramics compared to Rapid Thermal Evaporation Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böke, Frederik; Giner, Ignacio; Keller, Adrian; Grundmeier, Guido; Fischer, Horst

    2016-07-20

    Densely sintered aluminum oxide (α-Al2O3) is chemically and biologically inert. To improve the interaction with biomolecules and cells, its surface has to be modified prior to use in biomedical applications. In this study, we compared two deposition techniques for adhesion promoting SiOx films to facilitate the coupling of stable organosilane monolayers on monolithic α-alumina; physical vapor deposition (PVD) by thermal evaporation and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD). We also investigated the influence of etching on the formation of silanol surface groups using hydrogen peroxide and sulfuric acid solutions. The film characteristics, that is, surface morphology and surface chemistry, as well as the film stability and its adhesion properties under accelerated aging conditions were characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and tensile strength tests. Differences in surface functionalization were investigated via two model organosilanes as well as the cell-cytotoxicity and viability on murine fibroblasts and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC). We found that both SiOx interfaces did not affect the cell viability of both cell types. No significant differences between both films with regard to their interfacial tensile strength were detected, although failure mode analyses revealed a higher interfacial stability of the PE-CVD films compared to the PVD films. Twenty-eight day exposure to simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C revealed a partial delamination of the thermally deposited PVD films whereas the PE-CVD films stayed largely intact. SiOx layers deposited by both PVD and PE-CVD may thus serve as viable adhesion-promoters for subsequent organosilane coupling agent binding to α-alumina. However, PE-CVD appears to be favorable for long-term direct film exposure to aqueous

  12. Optical properties and oxidation of carbonized and cross-linked structures formed in polycarbonate by plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosobrodova, E.; Kondyurin, A.; Chrzanowski, W.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2014-06-01

    At ion fluences higher than 5 · 1015 ions/cm2, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of polycarbonate (PC) results in a formation of a carbonized surface layer. The thickness of this layer is close to the depth of ion penetration. A comparison of PIII treated, spin-coated PC films with pre-treatment thicknesses designed to match and exceed the carbonized layer thickness is employed to study the properties of the carbonised layer independently from the less modified underlying structure. At ion fluencies higher than 1016 ions/cm2, the thinner PC film is completely transformed into an amorphous carbon-like material with no traces of the initial PC structure. The thicker films, however, incorporated two layers: a top carbonised layer and a cross-linked layer below. Compared to the two-layered PC film, the completely carbonized layer was found to have a much higher concentration of Cdbnd O bonds and much lower concentration of O-H bonds after exposure to atmospheric oxygen. The refractive index of the thicker PC films PIII treated with high ion fluencies is close to the refractive index of diamond-like carbon. Anomalous dispersion of the refractive index of the thicker PC films is observed after formation of the carbonised layer. The refractive index of the thinner PC film has normal dispersion at all ion fluences. At ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2, both PC films were found to have the same etching rate as polystyrene. Washing in dichloromethane had no effect on the carbonised layer but affected the underlying material in the case of the thicker PC films leading to a wrinkled structure up to ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2. At this and higher fluence, areas of an ordered island-like structure were observed.

  13. Osteoblast adhesion to orthopaedic implant alloys: effects of cell adhesion molecules and diamond-like carbon coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornu, R; Maloney, W J; Kelly, M A; Smith, R L

    1996-11-01

    In total joint arthroplasty, long-term outcomes depend in part on the biocompatibility of implant alloys. This study analyzed effects of surface finish and diamond-like carbon coating on osteoblast cell adhesion to polished titanium-aluminum-vanadium and polished or grit-blasted cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys. Osteoblast binding was tested in the presence and absence of the cell adhesion proteins fibronectin, laminin, fibrinogen, and vitronectin and was quantified by measurement of DNA content. Although adherence occurred in serum-free medium, maximal osteoblast binding required serum and was similar for titanium and cobalt alloys at 2 and 12 hours. With the grit-blasted cobalt alloy, cell binding was reduced 48% (p Coating the alloys with diamond-like carbon did not alter osteoblast adhesion, whereas fibronectin pretreatment increased cell binding 2.6-fold (p enhance cell adhesion. These results support the hypothesis that cell adhesion proteins can modify cell binding to orthopaedic alloys. Although osteoblast binding was not affected by the presence of diamond-like carbon, this coating substance may influence other longer term processes, such as bone formation, and deserves further study. PMID:8982128

  14. High Temperature Stability of Potassium Beta Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. M.; Kisor, A.; Ryan, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    None. From Objectives section: Evaluate the stability of potassium beta alumina under potassium AMTEC operating conditions. Evaluate the stability regime in which potassium beta alumina can be fabricated.

  15. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, A.R.; McCulloch, D.; McKenzie, D.R.; Yin, Y.; Gerstner, E.G. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp{sup 2} bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into `rings` to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  16. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp2 bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into 'rings' to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C3N4, or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  17. Changes in friction characteristics and microstructure of steel by ion implantation of titanium and additional carbon in various doses (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that Ti and Ti+C implantation improves the tribological properties of steels. The surface implanted with Ti+C exhibits superior performance in comparison with that implanted with Ti only. In this study, the difference in the microstructure and friction properties between Ti-implanted and Ti+C-implanted steel is investigated through transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After the implantation of Ti to a dose of 5x1017ionscm-2, the steel surface transformed to the amorphous phase only. On the contrary, the surface implanted with 5x1017 Ticm-2 followed by C implantation to a dose of 4x1017ionscm-2 transformed to the amorphous phase embedded with very fine TiC precipitates. After the dry sliding tests, wear tracks were studied by TEM. In Ti-implanted specimens, local damage via the loss of the amorphous layer and oxidation were observed in the wear track. On the contrary, in Ti+C-implanted specimens, uniform wear with very fine stripes was observed. This difference in the wear mode between Ti-implanted specimens and Ti+C-implanted specimens is interpreted in terms of the strength of the implanted layer and the chemical stability of the amorphous phase made by the additional C implantation. ((orig.))

  18. Carbon nanotube growth from catalytic nano-clusters formed by hot-ion-implantation into the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Yasushi, E-mail: yhoshino@kanagawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Information Sciences, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Arima, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Ai; Saito, Yasunao; Nakata, Jyoji [Department of Information Sciences, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    We have studied growth of chirality-controlled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from hot-implantation-formed catalytic nano-clusters in a thermally grown SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. This procedure has the advantage of high controllability of the diameter and the number of clusters by optimizing the conditions of the ion implantation. In the present study, Co{sup +} ions with ion dose of 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} are implanted in the vicinity of the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface at 300 Degree-Sign C temperature. The implanted Co atoms located in the SiO{sub 2} layer has an amorphous-like structure with a cluster diameter of several nm. In contrast, implanted Co atoms in the Si substrate are found to take a cobalt silicide structure, confirmed by the high-resolution image of transmission electron microscope. CNTs are grown by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. We have confirmed a large amount of vertically-aligned multi-walled CNTs from the Co nano-clusters formed by the hot-ion-implantation near the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface.

  19. Optical planar waveguide in sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystals by carbon ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is great interest in niobate crystals which belong to the tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) families owing to their intriguing properties. As one representative of such crystals, CBN (calcium barium niobate) has attracted rapidly growing attention. Because it has a higher Curie temperature than SBN (strontium barium niobate), possesses outstanding ferroelectric and it possesses optical properties. In addition, doped with sodium, CBN will show a higher Curie temperature than pure CBN. We report on the fabrication and characterization of optical planar waveguide in x-cut sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystal by using C ion implantation. The guided-mode properties at the wavelength of 633 and 1539 nm are investigated through prism-coupling measurements, respectively. By applying direct end-face coupling arrangement, the near-field optical intensity distribution of waveguide modes is measured at 633 nm. For comparison, the modal profile of the same guided mode is also numerically calculated by the finite difference beam-propagation method via computer software BeamPROP. The transmission spectra of the waveguide before and after ion implantation treatments were investigated also. Our experiment results reveal that the waveguide could propagate light with transverse magnetic polarized direction only and it is assumed that the polarization selectivity of CBN crystal may responsible for this phenomenon

  20. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC epi-layers by near-surface ion implantation: Influence of the ion species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon vacancy (VC) is a prevailing point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, and it plays a decisive role in controlling the charge carrier lifetime. One concept of reducing the VC-concentration is based on carbon self-ion implantation in a near surface layer followed by thermal annealing. This leads to injection of carbon interstitials (Ci's) and annihilation of VC's in the epi-layer “bulk”. Here, we show that the excess of C atoms introduced by the self-ion implantation plays a negligible role in the VC annihilation. Actually, employing normalized implantation conditions with respect to displaced C atoms, other heavier ions like Al and Si are found to be more efficient in annihilating VC's. Concentrations of VC below ∼2 × 1011 cm−3 can be reached already after annealing at 1400 °C, as monitored by deep-level transient spectroscopy. This corresponds to a reduction in the VC-concentration by about a factor of 40 relative to the as-grown state of the epi-layers studied. The negligible role of the implanted species itself can be understood from simulation results showing that the concentration of displaced C atoms exceeds the concentration of implanted species by two to three orders of magnitude. The higher efficiency for Al and Si ions is attributed to the generation of collision cascades with a sufficiently high energy density to promote Ci-clustering and reduce dynamic defect annealing. These Ci-related clusters will subsequently dissolve during the post-implant annealing giving rise to enhanced Ci injection. However, at annealing temperatures above 1500 °C, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions start to apply for the VC-concentration, which limit the net effect of the Ci injection, and a competition between the two processes occurs

  1. Nanotube Arrays in Porous Anodic Alumina Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang LI; Naoto KOSHIZAKI; Guanghai LI

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes the various techniques developed for fabricating nanotube arrays in porous anodic alumina membranes (AAMs). After a brief introduction to the fabrication process of AAMs, taking carbons, metals, semiconductors, organics, biomoleculars, and heterojunctions as typical examples, attention will be focused on the recently established methods to fabricate nanotubes in AAM, including electrochemical deposition, surface sol-gel, modified chemical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition, and layer-by-layer growth. Every method is demonstrated by one or two reported results. Finally, this review is concluded with some perspectives on the research directions and focuses on the AAM-based nanotubes fields.

  2. Investigation of Pt, Ti, TiN, and nano-porous carbon electrodes for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norlin, A.; Pan, J.; Leygraf, C

    2004-09-15

    The electrochemical behavior and stability of Pt, Ti, TiN, and nano-porous carbon for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) electrode application were investigated in a phosphate buffered saline solution. The electrochemical interfacial properties were examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and the potential and current response during ICD shock pulses were recorded by a digital oscilloscope. Changes in surface composition and structure were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy. When exposed to anodic 700 V shock pulses with duration of 10 ms, only Pt was stable, nano-porous carbon electrode was slightly attacked, whereas Ti and TiN electrodes suffered severe degradation. Upon cathodic shock pulsing, all the materials were stable, but Ti and TiN electrodes with a smooth surface showed evidence of hydrogen adsorption. Porous and rough electrodes produced less gas evolution compared to a smooth surfaces, due to a higher amount of charge transferred through non-Faradaic processes. The reason for this could be higher interfacial capacity due to the large surface area.

  3. Mechanical properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films fabricated on polyethylene terephthalate foils by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films have been deposited on polyethylene terephthalate by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. The influence of deposition parameters such as gas pressure, bias voltage, and nitrogen incorporation on the mechanical properties of the a-C:H films are investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the ratio of sp3 to sp2 is 0.24 indicating that the film is mainly composed of graphitelike carbon. Nanoindentation tests disclose enhanced surface hardness of ∼6 GPa. The friction coefficient of the film deposited at higher gas pressure, for instance, 2.0 Pa, is lower than that of the film deposited at a lower pressure such as 0.5 Pa. The films deposited using a low bias voltage tend to fail easily in the friction tests and nitrogen incorporation into the a-C:H films decreases the friction coefficient. Mechanical folding tests show that deformation failure is worse on a thinner a-C:H film

  4. Computer simulation of channelling measurements in carbon-implanted NbC-single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte-Carlo-program has been used to study the channelling process in NbC-single crystals implanted with C-ions at 8300C. The dechannelling yields measured in the -direction separately for the Nb- and the C-sublattice are compared to calculated results. In the calculation two defect models (statistically displaced C-atoms and stacking faults) were applied and the characteristic parameters for these models were varied in order to reproduce the behavior of the experimental spectra. The best agreement was obtained by assuming a defect structure consisting of stacking faults with a Burger's vector of a6 [112] and a stacking fault length of 7 nm. The analyzing ion beam energy was varied in the calculation and the expected energy independence of the dechannelling yield for stacking faults was found which lies in reasonable agreement with the experimental values. (orig.)

  5. Beam induced annealing of damage in carbon implanted silicon, ch. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annealing of damage introduced by 70 keV C implantation of Si is studied for impact of H+ and He+ beams in the energy interval 30 - 200 keV. For a good description of the annealing behaviour it is necessary to account for the damage introduction which occurs simultaneously. It turns out that the initial damage annealing rate is proportional to the amount of damage. The proportionality constant is related to the quantity fsub(a)sigmasub(a) introduced in an earlier paper in order to describe saturation effects in the damage production after H+ or He+ impact in unimplanted Si. This indicates that the same mechanism governs both processes: beam induced damage annealing and saturation of the damage introduction. (Auth.)

  6. Urbach's rule criteria in alumina irradiated with ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of dielectrics with ions is available for aims of the optical, mechanical and other properties modification. The defect localized states effect on alumina optical absorption properties depends on ability of incorporated elements to substitute the lattice cations. The complex energetic spectrum of the defect localized states demands the generalized approaches which characterize the radiation induced disorder in materials as a whole. The Urbach's rule criteria for the absorption spectra of alumina irradiated with the silicon, chromium and titanium ions (Φ=1017 cm-2, Ei=100 keV) were investigated. The induced defect, their clusters and hard solid solution effect on the Urbach's equation parameters was determined. Analysis the reasons of the absorption change was given. Absorption spectra of irradiated alumina were subjected the Urbach's rule as all it criteria were fulfilled. This is stipulated by the static disorder in crystalline lattice induced by substitution defects, intrinsic defects and cluster formation on its base. A common focal point in absorption spectrums situated at 4.4 eV was fixed. This Urbach's focus is determine by the processes of defects clusterization, the energetic characteristics of clusters and depend on ability of the implanted ions to form the hard solid solutions in alumina. A correlation between the interband and exponential absorption parameters indicates to synthesis in Al2O3 a new strongly defect material having band gap width near the 4.5 eV and absorption edge stipulated by the defect cluster levels. (authors)

  7. Alumina-Reinforced Zirconia Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Alumina-reinforced zirconia composites, used as electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells, were fabricated by hot pressing 10 mol percent yttria-stabilized zirconia (10-YSZ) reinforced with two different forms of alumina particulates and platelets each containing 0 to 30 mol percent alumina. Major mechanical and physical properties of both particulate and platelet composites including flexure strength, fracture toughness, slow crack growth, elastic modulus, density, Vickers microhardness, thermal conductivity, and microstructures were determined as a function of alumina content either at 25 C or at both 25 and 1000 C. Flexure strength and fracture toughness at 1000 C were maximized with 30 particulate and 30 mol percent platelet composites, respectively, while resistance to slow crack growth at 1000 C in air was greater for 30 mol percent platelet composite than for 30 mol percent particulate composites.

  8. Alumina supported iridium catalysts - preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the method employed in the preparation of alumina supported iridium catalysts, with metal contents between 30 and 40%, that will be used for hydrazine monopropellant decomposition. (author)

  9. Atomic layer deposition of TiO2 thin films on nanoporous alumina templates: Medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Roger J.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Brigmon, Robin L.; Pellin, Michael J.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-06-01

    Nanostructured materials may play a significant role in controlled release of pharmacologic agents for treatment of cancer. Many nanoporous polymer materials are inadequate for use in drug delivery. Nanoporous alumina provides several advantages over other materials for use in controlled drug delivery and other medical applications. Atomic layer deposition was used to coat all the surfaces of a nanoporous alumina membrane in order to reduce the pore size in a controlled manner. Neither the 20 nm nor the 100 nm TiO2-coated nanoporous alumina membranes exhibited statistically lower viability compared to the uncoated nanoporous alumina membrane control materials. Nanostructured materials prepared using atomic layer deposition may be useful for delivering a pharmacologic agent at a precise rate to a specific location in the body. These materials may serve as the basis for “smart” drug delivery devices, orthopedic implants, or self-sterilizing medical devices.

  10. Synthesis and structural evaluation of freeze-cast porous alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we fabricated alumina samples by the freeze-casting technique using tert-butanol as the solvent. The prepared materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microtomography. Next, they were coated with sol–gel silica films by dip-coating. Permeability tests were carried out in order to assess the permeation behavior of the materials processed in this study. We observed that the sintering time and alumina loading showed a remarkable effect on both the structural properties and flexural strength of the freeze-cast samples. Nitrogen adsorption tests revealed that the silica prepared in this study exhibited a microporous structure. It was observed that the presence of silica coatings on the alumina surface decreased the CO2 permeance by about one order of magnitude. Because of the similar kinetic diameters of nitrogen and carbon dioxide, the CO2/N2 system showed a separation efficiency that was lower than that observed for the He/CO2 and He/N2 systems. We noticed that increasing the feed pressure improved the separation capacity of the obtained materials. - Highlights: • Porous alumina samples obtained by the freeze-casting technique • Microporous silica coating prepared by a simple sol–gel dip-coating methodology • Samples examined by SEM, μ-CT, and nitrogen sorption tests • Mechanical tests were carried out in the freeze-cast samples. • The presence of silica coatings on the alumina surface decreased the CO2 permeance

  11. Dental Implants

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Dental Implants A fuller, more complete smile is within reach. The following information is designed to provide helpful ... whether dental implants are right for your situation. Dental Implants and Roots The key benefit of dental implants ...

  12. Surface modification of steel by high-dose pulse-ion implantation of titanium, tungsten, molybdenum and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ions of Ti, Mo, W, and C, produced by a pulsed metal (MEVVA) ion source were implanted into H13 steel. Energies were from 25-50 keV. Hardness were increased by as much as 40% and wear resistances were improved by factors of 3 to 5 by the implantations. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) measurements demonstrated that implanted Mo can penetrate to depths of 1400 A into steel during the implantation period of 25 min for the fluence of 1x1017/cm2. This depth is greater than the calculated range. The average doping concentration was greater than 15 at.% for the various implants. It was observed by X-ray diffraction and by transmission electron microscopy that intermetallic compounds such as FeTi, Fe2Ti and FeMo were formed. It was concluded that the MEVVA type of ion source shows promise for metal-ion implantations into steel components for industrial application. (orig.)

  13. Solid solubility and diffusivity in an alumina/zirconia system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline zirconia-coated single crystal sapphire fiber displays reconstruction of the sapphire surface in regions of contact with zirconia grains. This is a concern where ZrO2-coated sapphire fiber is desired for reinforcement of ceramic matrices. Previous work has demonstrated pitting is partially attributed to impurity-induced transient liquid phase formation with local dissolution of alumina; however, the extent of reconstruction witnessed via microscopy suggests that other mechanisms are active. The present study has addressed the issue of solid solubility and interdiffusivity to more thoroughly understand the solid state mechanisms contributing to pitting. Single crystal sapphire and zirconia were ion implanted with zirconium and yttrium, and aluminum, respectively, and then subjected to diffusion anneals at 1,200--1,600 C to study redistribution of implanted cations. Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to profile the redistribution of implanted ions for measurement of diffusion coefficients and solubility limits after heat treatments. The results will offer a significant set of data on interface stability in the alumina/zirconia system

  14. Gelcasting polycrystalline alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janney, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This work is being done as part of a CRADA with Osram-Sylvania, Inc. (OSI) OSI is a major U.S. manufacturer of high-intensity lighting. Among its products is the Lumalux{reg_sign} line of high-pressure sodium vapor arc lamps, which are used for industrial, highway, and street lighting. The key to the performance of these lamps is the polycrystalline alumina (PCA) tube that is used to contain the plasma that is formed in the electric arc. That plasma consists of ionized sodium, mercury, and xenon vapors. The key attributes of the PCA tubes are their transparency (95% total transmittance in the visible region), their refractoriness (inner wall temperature can reach 1400{degrees}C), and their chemical resistance (sodium and mercury vapor are extremely corrosive). The current efficiency of the lamps is very high, on the order of several hundred lumens / watt. (Compare - incandescent lamps -13 lumens/watt fluorescent lamps -30 lumens/watt.) Osram-Sylvania would like to explore using gelcasting to form PCA tubes for Lumalux{reg_sign} lamps, and eventually for metal halide lamps (known as quartz-halogen lamps). Osram-Sylvania, Inc. currently manufactures PCA tubes by isostatic pressing. This process works well for the shapes that they presently use. However, there are several types of tubes that are either difficult or impossible to make by isostatic pressing. It is the desire to make these new shapes and sizes of tubes that has prompted Osram-Sylvania`s interest in gelcasting. The purpose of the CRADA is to determine the feasibility of making PCA items having sufficient optical quality that they are useful in lighting applications using gelcasting.

  15. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC epi-layers by near-surface ion implantation: Influence of the ion species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayedh, H. M.; Svensson, B. G. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics/Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Hallén, A. [School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Royal Institute of Technology, SE-164 40 Kista-Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-11-07

    The carbon vacancy (V{sub C}) is a prevailing point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, and it plays a decisive role in controlling the charge carrier lifetime. One concept of reducing the V{sub C}-concentration is based on carbon self-ion implantation in a near surface layer followed by thermal annealing. This leads to injection of carbon interstitials (C{sub i}'s) and annihilation of V{sub C}'s in the epi-layer “bulk”. Here, we show that the excess of C atoms introduced by the self-ion implantation plays a negligible role in the V{sub C} annihilation. Actually, employing normalized implantation conditions with respect to displaced C atoms, other heavier ions like Al and Si are found to be more efficient in annihilating V{sub C}'s. Concentrations of V{sub C} below ∼2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} can be reached already after annealing at 1400 °C, as monitored by deep-level transient spectroscopy. This corresponds to a reduction in the V{sub C}-concentration by about a factor of 40 relative to the as-grown state of the epi-layers studied. The negligible role of the implanted species itself can be understood from simulation results showing that the concentration of displaced C atoms exceeds the concentration of implanted species by two to three orders of magnitude. The higher efficiency for Al and Si ions is attributed to the generation of collision cascades with a sufficiently high energy density to promote C{sub i}-clustering and reduce dynamic defect annealing. These C{sub i}-related clusters will subsequently dissolve during the post-implant annealing giving rise to enhanced C{sub i} injection. However, at annealing temperatures above 1500 °C, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions start to apply for the V{sub C}-concentration, which limit the net effect of the C{sub i} injection, and a competition between the two processes occurs.

  16. Structure and tribological properties of modified layer on 2024 aluminum alloy by plasma-based ion implantation with nitrogen/titanium/carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玲召; 廖家轩; 夏立芳; 刘维民; 徐洮; 薛群基

    2003-01-01

    2024 aluminum alloy was implanted with nitrogen then titanium finally carbon by plasma-based ion implantatio to form a gradient layer.The structure and tribological properties of the layer were investigated.Its composition profiles and chemical states were analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS).The surface carbonlayer was analyzed by Raman spectrum.The appearances were observed by atomic force microscope(AFM).Thesurface hardness was measured with the mechanical property microprobe.The dry wear tests against GCr15 steelball at various sliding loads were performed with a ball-on-disk wear tester in ambient environment.The resultsshow that the thickness of the modified layer is 1 200 nm,the carbon layer is a smooth and compact diamond-likecarbon(DLC)films,and the carbon-titanium interface is broadened due to carbon ions implantation,resulting in agood composition and structure transition between DLC films and titanium layer.Surface hardness is improvedmarkedly,with a slow and uniform change.Tribological properties are improved greatly although they reduce withthe increase of sliding loads because the modified layer becomes thin rapidly.

  17. Combination for electrolytic reduction of alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-04-30

    An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound is, a fluoride; oxide, or carbonate. The metal is nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath is employed in a combination including a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the instant bath during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum improves the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode.

  18. Synthesis of alumina/YAG 20 vol% composite by co-precipitation

    OpenAIRE

    Radosław Lach; Krzysztof Haberko; Mirosław Bućko

    2011-01-01

    Co-precipitation of alumina/YAG precursor from aluminum and yttrium nitrate solution with ammonium carbonate results in dawsonite. Its crystallographic parameters differ from the compound precipitated with no yttrium additive. It suggests that yttrium ions become incorporated into the dawsonite structure. The DSC/TG and X-ray diffraction measurements show decomposition of dawsonite at elevated temperatures resulting in γ-Al2O3 and then δ- and θ-alumina modifications. Full transformation to α-...

  19. Dynamic Tensile Response of Structured Alumina-Al Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atisivan, Raj; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Gupta, Yogendra

    2001-06-01

    Plate impact experiments were carried out to examine the high strain-rate tensile response of alumina-aluminum composites with tailored microstructures. A novel processing technique was used to fabricate interpenetrating phase alumina-aluminum composites with controlled and reproducible microstructures. Fused deposition modeling (FDM), a commercially available rapid prototyping technique, was used to produce the controlled porosity mullite ceramic preforms. Alumina-Al composites were then processed via reactive metal infiltration of porous mullite ceramics. With this approach, both the micro as well as the macro structures can be designed via computer aided design (CAD) to tailor the properties of the composites. Two sets of dynamic tensile experiments were performed. In the first, the metal content was varied between 23 and 39 wt. percent. In the second, the microstructure was varied while holding the metal content nearly constant. Samples with higher metal content, as expected, displayed better spall resistance. For a given metal content, samples with finer metal diameter showed better spall resistance. Relationship of the microstructural parameters on the dynamic tensile response of the structured composites will be discussed. Work supported by DOE.

  20. Transport properties of alumina nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies have showed that nanofluids have significantly greater thermal conductivity compared to their base fluids. Large surface area to volume ratio and certain effects of Brownian motion of nanoparticles are believed to be the main factors for the significant increase in the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. In this paper all three transport properties, namely thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and viscosity, were studied for alumina nanofluid (aluminum oxide nanoparticles in water). Experiments were performed both as a function of volumetric concentration (3-8%) and temperature (2-50 deg. C). Alumina nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 36 nm were dispersed in water. The effect of particle size was not studied. The transient hot wire method as described by Nagaska and Nagashima for electrically conducting fluids was used to test the thermal conductivity. In this work, an insulated platinum wire of 0.003 inch diameter was used. Initial calibration was performed using de-ionized water and the resulting data was within 2.5% of standard thermal conductivity values for water. The thermal conductivity of alumina nanofluid increased with both increase in temperature and concentration. A maximum thermal conductivity of 0.7351 W m-1 K-1 was recorded for an 8.47% volume concentration of alumina nanoparticles at 46.6 deg. C. The effective thermal conductivity at this concentration and temperature was observed to be 1.1501, which translates to an increase in thermal conductivity by 22% when compared to water at room temperature. Alumina being a good conductor of electricity, alumina nanofluid displays an increasing trend in electrical conductivity as volumetric concentration increases. A microprocessor-based conductivity/TDS meter was used to perform the electrical conductivity experiments. After carefully calibrating the conductivity meter's glass probe with platinum tip, using a standard potassium chloride solution, readings were taken at various

  1. Severe wear behaviour of alumina balls sliding against diamond ceramic coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ANURADHA JANA; NANDADULAL DANDAPAT; MITUN DAS; VAMSI KRISHNA BALLA; SHIRSHENDU CHAKRABORTY; RAJNARAYAN SAHA; AWADESH KUMAR MALLIK

    2016-04-01

    At present alumina is themost widely used bio-ceramic material for implants.However, diamond surface offers very good solid lubricant for different machinery, equipment including biomedical implants (hip implants, knee implants, etc.), since the coefficient of friction (COF) of diamond is lower than alumina. In this tribological study, alumina ball was chosen as the counter body material to show better performance of the polycrystalline diamond (PCD) coatings in biomedical load-bearing applications.Wear and friction data were recorded for microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition (MWCVD) grown PCD coatings of four different types, out of which two sampleswere as-deposited coatings, one was chemo-mechanically polished and the other diamond sample was made free standing by wet-chemical etching of the silicon wafer. The coefficient of friction of the MWCVD grown PCD against Al$_2$O$_3$ ball under dry ambient condition was found in the range of 0.29–0.7, but in the presence of simulated body fluid, the COF reduces significantly, in the range of 0.03–0.36. The samples were then characterized by Raman spectroscopy for their quality, by coherence scanning profilometer for surface roughness and by electron microscopy for their microstructural properties. Alumina balls worn out ($14.2 \\times 10^{−1}$ mm$^3$) very rapidly with zero wear for diamond ceramic coatings. Since the generation of wear particle is the main problem for load-bearing prosthetic joints, it was concluded that the PCD material can potentially replace existing alumina bio-ceramic for their bettertribological properties.

  2. Dental Implants

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Dental Implants A fuller, more complete smile is within reach. The following information is designed to provide ... whether dental implants are right for your situation. Dental Implants and Roots The key benefit of dental ...

  3. Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Implants A fuller, more complete smile is within reach. The following information is designed to provide ... whether dental implants are right for your situation. Dental Implants and Roots The key benefit of dental ...

  4. Nanocarbon-Coated Porous Anodic Alumina for Bionic Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Aramesh; Wei Tong; Kate Fox; Ann Turnley; Dong Han Seo; Steven Prawer; Kostya (Ken) Ostrikov

    2015-01-01

    A highly-stable and biocompatible nanoporous electrode is demonstrated herein. The electrode is based on a porous anodic alumina which is conformally coated with an ultra-thin layer of diamond-like carbon. The nanocarbon coating plays an essential role for the chemical stability and biocompatibility of the electrodes; thus, the coated electrodes are ideally suited for biomedical applications. The corrosion resistance of the proposed electrodes was tested under extreme chemical conditions, su...

  5. Ion guiding in alumina capillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhász, Z.; Sulik, B.; Biri, S.;

    2009-01-01

    Transmission of a few keV impact energy Ne ions through capillaries in anodic alumina membranes has been studied with different ion counting methods using an energy dispersive electrostatic spectrometer, a multichannel plate (MCP) array and sensitive current-measurement. In the present work, we...

  6. Changes in friction characteristics and microstructure of steel by ion implantation of titanium and additional carbon in various doses. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the macroscopic tribology of Ti+Ci ion-implanted steel depending on the supplemental carbon dose were studied. Titanium ions were implanted at 5 x1017 ions cm-2 followed by carbon ions at 0, 1 x1016, 4 x1016, 1 x1017 and 4 x1017 ions cm-2, into quenched and tempered steel. The coefficient of friction and amount of wear were evaluated through a reciprocating ball-on-disc wear test, at weight loads of 0.98 N, 1.96 N, 4.9 N and 9.8 N. The maximum weight load to accomplish the reduced friction coefficient increased with increase in the dose of supplemental carbon. Scanning electron microscopy observation of the wear tracks revealed that a decrease in wear was achieved when the coefficient of friction was kept at 0.2 - 0.3, and the morphology of the wear tracks appeared to be ploughing. The maximum depth of the wear tracks was kept below 0.1 μm when the type of wear was ploughing. (orig.)

  7. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF ALUMINA-ZIRCONIA COMPOSITE BY SLURRY METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    JYOTI PRAKASH; DEVENDRA KUMAR; KALYANI MOHANTA

    2011-01-01

    Alumina has got some excellent properties like chemical inertness, thermal and mechanical strength against hazardous environment. Alumina is a good ceramic material which is being used for structuralapplications. To enhance the toughness and strength of the body some Zirconia is also used with it. The use of Zirconia in alumina is known as toughening of alumina. One difficulty arises, when alumina and alumina toughened composite are sintered , because the low sinterability of Alumina-Zirconia...

  8. Implant Supported Fixed Dental Prostheses Using a New Monotype Zirconia Implant—A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Roehling; Georges Ghazal; Thomas Borer; Florian Thieringer; Michael Gahlert

    2015-01-01

    Currently, titanium or specific titanium alloys are the most often used materials for the fabrication of dental implants. Many studies have confirmed the osseointegrative capacity and clinical long-term performance of moderately rough titanium implants. However, disadvantages have also been reported with regard to peri-implant infections and the titanium metal properties. Tooth colored ceramic implants have attracted the interest of clinicians since the end of the 1960s. Initially, alumina wa...

  9. Dental implant surface treatments for osseointegration improvement: presentation and comparisonof methods

    OpenAIRE

    Faidra KAPOPOULOU; Nadia THEOLOGIE-LYGIDAKIS; Fotios TZERMPOS

    2014-01-01

    The growing use of dental implants and the increase in requirements directed scientists to search for the implant surface which will ensure the greater bone to implant contact (BIC). Nowadays, implants are acid- etched (HCl, H 2 S Ο 4 ) promoting the osteoconductive ac- tivity or are grit-blasted with alumina particles, titanium oxide or calcium phosphates or finally they undergo dual treatment (combination of the two previous methods), which seems to ha...

  10. Processing and Performance of Alumina Fiber Reinforced Alumina Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.Y.Lee; T.Uchijima; T.Yano

    2003-01-01

    Processing of alumina fiber-reinforced alumina matrix composites by hot-pressing was described. The mechanical properties of the composites fabricated by different sintering conditions including temperature and pressure have been investigated. The results indicated that the higher sintering temperature and pressure corresponded to the higher bulk density and higher maximum strength of the composite, whereas the pseudo-ductility of the composite was lower. The preliminary results of the composite with monazite-coated fibers showed that maximum strength could be improved up to 35% compared with the noncoated fiber composite in the same sintering condition. Moreover, the fracture behavior of the composite changed from completely brittle fracture to non-brittle fracture under the suitable sintering conditions. SEM observation of the fracture surface indicated that the coating worked as a protective barrier and avoided sintering of the fibers together even at high temperature and pressure during densification process.

  11. Synthesis and structural evaluation of freeze-cast porous alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Douglas F., E-mail: souzadf@outlook.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 2, sala 2230 (Brazil); Nunes, Eduardo H.M., E-mail: eduardohmn@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 2, sala 2230 (Brazil); Pimenta, Daiana S.; Vasconcelos, Daniela C.L. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 2, sala 2230 (Brazil); Nascimento, Jailton F.; Grava, Wilson [Petrobras/CENPES, Avenida Horácio Macedo 950, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ CEP:21941-915 (Brazil); Houmard, Manuel [Department of Materials Engineering and Civil Construction, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 1, sala 3304 (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Wander L., E-mail: wlv@demet.ufmg.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 2, sala 2230 (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    In this work we fabricated alumina samples by the freeze-casting technique using tert-butanol as the solvent. The prepared materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microtomography. Next, they were coated with sol–gel silica films by dip-coating. Permeability tests were carried out in order to assess the permeation behavior of the materials processed in this study. We observed that the sintering time and alumina loading showed a remarkable effect on both the structural properties and flexural strength of the freeze-cast samples. Nitrogen adsorption tests revealed that the silica prepared in this study exhibited a microporous structure. It was observed that the presence of silica coatings on the alumina surface decreased the CO{sub 2} permeance by about one order of magnitude. Because of the similar kinetic diameters of nitrogen and carbon dioxide, the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} system showed a separation efficiency that was lower than that observed for the He/CO{sub 2} and He/N{sub 2} systems. We noticed that increasing the feed pressure improved the separation capacity of the obtained materials. - Highlights: • Porous alumina samples obtained by the freeze-casting technique • Microporous silica coating prepared by a simple sol–gel dip-coating methodology • Samples examined by SEM, μ-CT, and nitrogen sorption tests • Mechanical tests were carried out in the freeze-cast samples. • The presence of silica coatings on the alumina surface decreased the CO{sub 2} permeance.

  12. Sintering behaviour of spinel–alumina composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soumen Pal; A K Bandyopadhyay; P G Pal; S Mukherjee; B N Samaddar

    2009-04-01

    Study of alumina–magnesia binary phase diagram reveals that around 40–50 wt% alumina dissolves in spinel (MgAl2O4) at 1600°C. Solid solubility of alumina in spinel decreases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which causes exsolution of alumina from spinel phase. Previous work of one of the authors revealed that the exsolution of alumina makes some interlocking structures in between alumina and spinel phases. In the present investigation, refractory grade calcined alumina and spinel powder were used to make different batch compositions. Green pellets, formed at a pressure of 1550 kg cm-2 were fired at different temperatures of 1500°, 1550° and 1600°C for 2 h soaking time. Bulk density, percent apparent porosity, firing shrinkage etc were measured at each temperature. Sintering results were analysed to understand the mechanism of spinel–alumina interactions. SEM study of present samples does not reveal the distinct precipitation of needle shaped -alumina from spinel, but has some effect on densification process of spinel–alumina composites. Microstructural differences between present and previous work suggest an ample scope of further work in spinel–alumina composites.

  13. Dental Implants

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... helpful facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your situation. Dental Implants and Roots The key benefit of dental implants over other tooth replacement systems is that an implant connects directly to the ...

  14. [Mandibular bone tissue regeneration after the introduction of the implantation system performed on the basis of carbon composite material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetvertnykh, V A; Loginova, N P; Astashina, N B; Rogozhnikov, G I; Rapekta, S I

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the processes of regeneration of bone tissue after the introduction of new implant systems. In the experiment, performed on 10 male pigs of Landras breed aged 50-55 days and weighing 17-18.5 kg, the time course of histological changes was studied in the area of mandibular regeneration after the formation of tissue defect and the introduction of the implant of a proposed construction. Morphological analysis of the experimental results 90, 180 and 270 days after the operation demonstrated the process of reparative regeneration of damaged bone along implant-bone block boundaries. Bone repair proceeded through the stage of formation of the woven bone with its progressive substitution by the lamellar bone, with the maintenance of the shape, size and symmetry of the damaged organ. PMID:23805619

  15. Adsorption and desorption of uranium on nano goethite and nano alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nano goethite and nano alumina were synthesized to investigate the effect of nanoscale size on adsorption-desorption of U(VI) from aqueous solution. It was determined that the site densities of nanoparticles are higher than α-alumina and goethite, whereas slight effect of carbonate on adsorption of U(VI) onto nanoparticles was observed. The maximum adsorption capacities of nano alumina and nano goethite were ∼151 and 79 mg/g, respectively. The batch desorption indicated stronger binding affinity of U(VI) for nanoparticles as compared to non-nanoparticles, which were consistent with the results of surface complexation modeling assuming weak and strong sites for nanoparticles while weak sites for α-alumina and goethite. (author)

  16. Effect of sintering temperature on densification and mechanical properties of pressureless sintered CNT-alumina nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit excellent mechanical, electrical and thermal properties thus have been considered for applications in the production of nanocomposite materials. This work presents results of sintered CNTs-reinforced alumina nanocomposites that can be used for many structural and engineering applications. Gas purging sonication (GPS) was used to achieve homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in alumina powder. Nanocomposites were synthesized by conventional pressureless sintering technique using varying amounts of CNTs in alumina matrix. Densification, hardness and fracture toughness of the resulted nanocomposites were examined. It is found that considerable improvement in fracture toughness at 1 wt% CNT-alumina nanocomposite has occurred. Role of CNTs in improving the fracture toughness of nanocomposites is explained which is attributed to well known bridging and pullout mechanism of CNTs in the matrix

  17. Preparation of Ag-containing diamond-like carbon films on the interior surface of tubes by a combined method of plasma source ion implantation and DC sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatada, R., E-mail: hatada@ca.tu-darmstadt.de [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Flege, S.; Bobrich, A.; Ensinger, W.; Dietz, C. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Baba, K. [Industrial Technology Center of Nagasaki, Applied Technology Division, Omura, Nagasaki 856-0026 (Japan); Sawase, T.; Watamoto, T. [Nagasaki University, Department of Applied Prosthodontics, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Matsutani, T. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Kinki University, Department of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Higashi-osaka 577-2332 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Deposition of Ag-containing diamond-like carbon films inside of tubes. • Combination of plasma source ion implantation and DC sputtering. • Antibacterial effect against S. aureus bacteria. - Abstract: Adhesive diamond-like carbon (DLC) films can be prepared by plasma source ion implantation (PSII), which is also suitable for the treatment of the inner surface of a tube. Incorporation of a metal into the DLC film provides a possibility to change the characteristics of the DLC film. One source for the metal is DC sputtering. In this study PSII and DC sputtering were combined to prepare DLC films containing low concentrations of Ag on the interior surfaces of stainless steel tubes. A DLC film was deposited using a C{sub 2}H{sub 4} plasma with the help of an auxiliary electrode inside of the tube. This electrode was then used as a target for the DC sputtering. A mixture of the gases Ar and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} was used to sputter the silver. By changing the gas flow ratios and process time, the resulting Ag content of the films could be varied. Sample characterizations were performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, a ball-on-disk test was performed to investigate the tribological properties of the films. The antibacterial activity was determined using Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

  18. Preparation of Ag-containing diamond-like carbon films on the interior surface of tubes by a combined method of plasma source ion implantation and DC sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Deposition of Ag-containing diamond-like carbon films inside of tubes. • Combination of plasma source ion implantation and DC sputtering. • Antibacterial effect against S. aureus bacteria. - Abstract: Adhesive diamond-like carbon (DLC) films can be prepared by plasma source ion implantation (PSII), which is also suitable for the treatment of the inner surface of a tube. Incorporation of a metal into the DLC film provides a possibility to change the characteristics of the DLC film. One source for the metal is DC sputtering. In this study PSII and DC sputtering were combined to prepare DLC films containing low concentrations of Ag on the interior surfaces of stainless steel tubes. A DLC film was deposited using a C2H4 plasma with the help of an auxiliary electrode inside of the tube. This electrode was then used as a target for the DC sputtering. A mixture of the gases Ar and C2H4 was used to sputter the silver. By changing the gas flow ratios and process time, the resulting Ag content of the films could be varied. Sample characterizations were performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, a ball-on-disk test was performed to investigate the tribological properties of the films. The antibacterial activity was determined using Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

  19. Synthesis of zirconia toughened alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the synthesis of zirconia toughened alumina (ZTA) and evaluation of its mechanical properties. ZTA ceramics were prepared by partial chemical route. High purity alumina (particle size 0.48 μm) was coated with yttria stabilised zirconia through solution techniques. Small amounts of dopants such as MgO, MnO and TiO2 were added to ZTA as densification aids. These powders were calcined at 650 deg C for 1 hour, followed by wet ball milling, compaction, sintering at 1600 deg C for 2.5 hour. Sintered density values upto 90% of theoretical density of ZTA were achieved. Hardness values upto 1800 VPN and modulus of rupture values upto 180 MPa were obtained. (author)

  20. Influence of the alumina microstructure and composition in thermoluminescence for using in dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, M R

    2001-01-01

    Among its various applications alumina may be used in thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) to radiations. The TLD are commonly used to determine the absorbed doses of radiation received in many application fields as nuclear installations, radiodiagnostic and radiotherapy in medicine. In this work it was developed a study of the influence of the microstructure, grain size and composition on the thermoluminescent properties in alumina (pure and carbon doped). The alumina and carbon powders used as starting materials were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), chemical analysis, particle size distribution and surface area were determined by and BET analysis, respectively. The Al sub 2 O sub 3 samples were sintered at 1650 deg C in air for one, three, five, seven and ten hours. The carbon doped samples were sintered using the same temperature for one hour, in a graphite resistance furnace in argon. Sintered materials were further characterised for phase composition and microstructure by XRD and scanning electron...

  1. Bauxite Mining and Alumina Refining

    OpenAIRE

    Donoghue, A. Michael; Frisch, Neale; Olney, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe bauxite mining and alumina refining processes and to outline the relevant physical, chemical, biological, ergonomic, and psychosocial health risks. Methods: Review article. Results: The most important risks relate to noise, ergonomics, trauma, and caustic soda splashes of the skin/eyes. Other risks of note relate to fatigue, heat, and solar ultraviolet and for some operations tropical diseases, venomous/dangerous animals, and remote locations. Exposures to bauxite dust,...

  2. In vitro and in vivo degradation of biomimetic octacalcium phosphate and carbonate apatite coatings on titanium implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrere, F.; Valk, van der C.M.; Dalmeijer, R.A.J.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Groot, de K.; Layrolle, P.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (Ca-P) coatings have been applied onto titanium alloys prosthesis to combine the srength of metals with the bioactivity of Ca-P. It has been clearly shown in many publications that Ca-P coating accelerates bone formation around the implant. However, longevity of the Ca-P coating fo

  3. ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF TITANIUM OXIDE THIN FILMS ONNANOPOROUS ALUMINA TEMPLATES FOR MEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.

    2009-05-05

    Nanostructured materials may play a significant role in controlled release of pharmacologic agents for treatment of cancer. Many nanoporous polymer materials are inadequate for use in drug delivery. Nanoporous alumina provides several advantages over other materials for use in controlled drug delivery and other medical applications. Atomic layer deposition was used to coat all the surfaces of the nanoporous alumina membrane in order to reduce the pore size in a controlled manner. Both the 20 nm and 100 nm titanium oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes did not exhibit statistically lower viability compared to the uncoated nanoporous alumina membrane control materials. In addition, 20 nm pore size titanium oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes exposed to ultraviolet light demonstrated activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Nanostructured materials prepared using atomic layer deposition may be useful for delivering a pharmacologic agent at a precise rate to a specific location in the body. These materials may serve as the basis for 'smart' drug delivery devices, orthopedic implants, or self-sterilizing medical devices.

  4. Effect of change in cation composition of cryolite-alumina melts on anodic overwork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stationary polarization of platinum and glass carbon anodes in minor KF and LiF doped cryolite-alumina melt at different concentrations of alumina is searched in laboratory cell. Individual additive of LiF results in the raise of anode overvoltage by 50-80 mV at glass carbon and ∼25 mV at platinum anodes. Substitution of part of Na+ ions for Li+ in the amount to ∼3.7 mol.% of LiF (∼1.8 mas.%) results in the low polarization

  5. Synthesis of high porosity, monolithic alumina aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poco, J F; Satcher, J H; Hrubesh, L W

    2000-09-20

    Many non-silica aerogels are notably weak and fragile in monolithic form. Particularly, few monolithic aerogels with densities less than 50kg/m3 have any significant strength. It is especially difficult to prepare uncracked monoliths of pure alumina aerogels that are robust and moisture stable. In this paper, we discuss the synthesis of strong, stable, monolithic, high porosity (>98% porous) alumina aerogels, using a two-step sol-gel process. The alumina aerogels have a polycrystalline morphology that results in enhanced physical properties. Most of the measured physical properties of the alumina aerogels are superior to those for silica aerogels for equivalent densities.

  6. Influence of Alumina Addition on the Optical Property of Zirconia/Alumina Composite Dental Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Li; LIAO Yunmao; LI Wei; WAN Qianbing; ZHAO Yongqi

    2011-01-01

    The influence of various alumina additions on the optical property of zirconia/alumina composite ceramics was investigated.The relative sintered densities,transmittances,color and the microstructure of the composite ceramics were studied.The experimental results showed that the relative sintered densities and transmittances decreased with alumina addition.The lightness increased obviously but the chroma change was small.Pure zirconia nanopowders sintered densely could obtain the relatively high transmittance,while the transmittance and the lightness of slight addition changed significantly.The zirconia/alumina composite ceramics with alumina addition less than 7.5wt% could achieve the relatively stable and reliable optical properties.

  7. Fracture toughness of advanced alumina ceramics and alumina matrix composites used for cutting tool edges

    OpenAIRE

    M. Szutkowska

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Specific characteristics in fracture toughness measurements of advanced alumina ceramics and alumina matrix composites with particular reference to α-Al2O3, Al2O3-ZrO2, Al2O3-ZrO2-TiC and Al2O3-Ti(C,N) has been presented.Design/methodology/approach: The present study reports fracture toughness obtained by means of the conventional method and direct measurements of the Vickers crack length (DCM method) of selected tool ceramics based on alumina: pure alumina, alumina-zirconia composit...

  8. Surface analysis of titanium dental implants with different topographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva M.H. Prado da

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical dental implants made of commercially pure titanium were analysed in four different surface finishes: as-machined, Al2O3 blasted with Al2O3 particles, plasma-sprayed with titanium beads and electrolytically coated with hydroxyapatite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM with Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX revealed the topography of the surfaces and provided qualitative results of the chemical composition of the different implants. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS was used to perform chemical analysis on the surface of the implants while Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSM produced topographic maps of the analysed surfaces. Optical Profilometry was used to quantitatively characterise the level of roughness of the surfaces. The implant that was plasma-sprayed and the hydroxyapatite coated implant showed the roughest surface, followed by the implant blasted with alumina and the as-machined implant. Some remnant contamination from the processes of blasting, coating and cleaning was detected by XPS.

  9. Carmustine Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmustine implant is used along with surgery and sometimes radiation therapy to treat malignant glioma (a certain type of ... Carmustine implant comes as a small wafer that is placed in the brain by a doctor during surgery to ...

  10. Goserelin Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goserelin implant is used in combination with radiation therapy and other medications to treat localized prostate cancer and is ... treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications called gonadotropin- ...

  11. Dental Implants

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is lost for the most predictable esthetic outcome. Timeline Replacing a tooth with an implant and a ... months to complete the process . Due to the timeline, dental implants are actually a series of steps; ...

  12. Environmentally stable adsorbent of tetrahedral silica and non-tetrahedral alumina for removal and recovery of malachite green dye from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional adsorbents like activated carbon, agricultural wastes, molecular sieves, etc., used for dye adsorption are unstable in the environment for long time, and hence the adsorbed dyes again gets liberated and pollute the environment. To avoid this problem, environmentally stable adsorbent of silica and alumina should be employed for malachite green adsorption. The adsorbents were characterized by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) to confirm the tetrahedral framework of silica and non-tetrahedral framework of alumina. The adsorption equilibrium of dye on alumina and silica were 4 and 5 h, respectively, this less adsorption time on alumina might be due to the less activation energy on alumina (63.46 kJ mol-1) than silica (69.93 kJ mol-1). Adsorption increased with increase of temperature on silica, in alumina, adsorption increased up to 60 deg. C, and further increase of temperature decreased the adsorption due to the structural change of non-tetrahedral alumina in water. The optimum pH for dye adsorption on alumina was 5 and silica was 6. The dye adsorptions on both adsorbents followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. The adsorption well matched with Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms and found that adsorption capacity on alumina was more than silica. The thermodynamic studies proved that the adsorption was endothermic and chemisorptions (ΔHo > 40 kJ mol-1) on alumina and silica. Recovery of dye on alumina and silica were studied from 30 to 90 deg. C and observed that 52% of dye was recovered from alumina and only 3.5% from silica. The less recovery on silica proved the strong adsorption of dye on silica than alumina

  13. Alumina Matrix Composites with Non-Oxide Nanoparticle Addition and Enhanced Functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Galusek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The addition of SiC or TiC nanoparticles to polycrystalline alumina matrix has long been known as an efficient way of improving the mechanical properties of alumina-based ceramics, especially strength, creep, and wear resistance. Recently, new types of nano-additives, such as carbon nanotubes (CNT, carbon nanofibers (CNF, and graphene sheets have been studied in order not only to improve the mechanical properties, but also to prepare materials with added functionalities, such as thermal and electrical conductivity. This paper provides a concise review of several types of alumina-based nanocomposites, evaluating the efficiency of various preparation methods and additives in terms of their influence on the properties of composites.

  14. Characterization and application of electrospun alumina nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Alumina nanofibers were prepared by a technique that combined the sol–gel and electrospinning methods. The solution to be electrospun was prepared by mixing aluminum isopropoxide (AIP) in ethanol, which was then refluxed in the presence of an acid catalyst and polyvinylpyrolidone (PVP) in ethanol. The characterization results showed that alumina nanofibers with diameters in the range of 102 to 378 nm were successfully prepared. On the basis of the results of the XRD and FT-IR, the alumina nanofibers calcined at 1,100°C were identified as comprising the α-alumina phase, and a series of phase transitions such as boehmite → γ-alumina → α-alumina were observed from 500°C to 1,200°C. The pore size of the obtained γ-alumina nanofibers is approximately 8 nm, and it means that they are mesoporous materials. The kinetic study demonstrated that MO adsorption on alumina nanofibers can be seen that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. PMID:24467944

  15. MECHANISMS OF INITIAL SINTERING OF A FINE ALUMINA POWDER

    OpenAIRE

    S. Raman; Doremus, R.; R. German

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism of initial sintering of alumina was explored by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The transformation of gamma to alpha alumina influenced sintering behavior. This transformation appears to involve plastic deformation in the alumina. Sintering of fine alpha alumina powder directly occurs with an activation energy close to that of grain boundary diffusion of oxygen.

  16. Dissolution Kinetics of Alumina Calcine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas

    2001-09-01

    Dissolution kinetics of alumina type non-radioactive calcine was investigated as part of ongoing research that addresses permanent disposal of Idaho High Level Waste (HLW). Calcine waste was produced from the processing of nuclear fuel at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Acidic radioactive raffinates were solidified at ~500°C in a fluidized bed reactor to form the dry granular calcine material. Several Waste Management alternatives for the calcine are presented in the Idaho High Level Waste Draft EIS. The Separations Alternative addresses the processing of the calcine so that the HLW is ready for removal to a national geological repository by the year 2035. Calcine dissolution is the key front-end unit operation for the separations alternative.

  17. Alumina forming iron base superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Brady, Michael P.

    2014-08-26

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, consists essentially of, in weight percent 2.5 to 4 Al; 25 to 35 Ni; 12 to 19 Cr; at least 1, up to 4 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; 0.5 to 3 Ti; less than 0.5 V; 0.1 to 1 of at least on element selected from the group consisting of Zr and Hf; 0.03 to 0.2 C; 0.005 to 0.1 B; and base Fe. The weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni. The alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, and contains coherent precipitates of .gamma.'-Ni.sub.3Al, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure. The austenitic matrix is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  18. Alumina Thin Film Growth: Experiments and Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Wallin, Erik

    2007-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis deals with experimental and theoretical studies related to the growth of crystalline alumina thin films. Alumina, Al2O3, is a polymorphic material utilized in a variety of applications, e.g., in the form of thin films. Many of the possibilities of alumina, and the problems associated with thin film synthesis of the material, are due to the existence of a range of different crystalline phases. Controlling the formation of the desired phase and the transformati...

  19. Characterization and application of electrospun alumina nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeon-Hee; Yoo, Seung-Joon; Kwak, Dong-Heui; Jung, Heung-Joe; KIM, Tae-Young; Park, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Jae-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Alumina nanofibers were prepared by a technique that combined the sol–gel and electrospinning methods. The solution to be electrospun was prepared by mixing aluminum isopropoxide (AIP) in ethanol, which was then refluxed in the presence of an acid catalyst and polyvinylpyrolidone (PVP) in ethanol. The characterization results showed that alumina nanofibers with diameters in the range of 102 to 378 nm were successfully prepared. On the basis of the results of the XRD and FT-IR, the alumina nan...

  20. Burned Microporous Alumina-Graphite Brick

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the definition,classifica-tion,technical requirements,test methods,inspection rules,marking,packing,transportation and quality certificate of burned microporous alumina-graphite brick.

  1. Acoustic Emission and Damage Characteristics of Alumina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Hui-lan; NING Jian-guo; HE Jian-hua

    2009-01-01

    gy, AE counts, AE amplitude changing with loading time are analyzed for the notched alumina specimen. It is indicated that AE characteristic parameters reflect the damage process and fracture of material.

  2. Loss tangent measurements on unirradiated alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Goulding, R.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Unirradiated room temperature loss tangent for sapphire and several commercial grades of polycrystalline alumina are complied for frequencies between 10{sup 5} and 4x10{sup 11} Hz. Sapphire exhibits significantly lower values for the loss tangent at frequencies up to 10{sup 11} Hz. The loss tangents of 3 different grades of Wesgo alumina (AL300, AL995, AL998) and 2 different grades of Coors alumina (AD94, AD995) have typical values near {approx}10{sup -4} at a frequency of 10{sup 8} Hz. On the other hand, the loss tangent of Vitox alumina exhibits a large loss peak tan d{approx} 5x10{sup -3} at this frequency.

  3. Differences between buccal and lingual bone quality and quantity of peri-implant regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Gyoon; Elias, Kathy L; Jeong, Yong-Hoon; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Clements, Matthew; Brantley, William A; Lee, Damian J; Han, Jung-Suk

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to examine whether peri-implant bone tissue properties are different between the buccal and lingual regions treated by growth factors. Four dental implant groups were used: titanium (Ti) implants, alumina-blasted zirconia implants (ATZ-N), alumina-blasted zirconia implants with demineralized bone matrix (DBM) (ATZ-D), and alumina-blasted zirconia implants with rhBMP-2 (ATZ-B). These implants were placed in mandibles of six male dogs. Nanoindentation elastic modulus (E) and plastic hardness (H) were measured for the buccal and lingual bone tissues adjacent and away from the implants at 3 and 6 weeks post-implantation. A total of 2281 indentations were conducted for 48 placed implants. The peri-implant buccal region had less bone quantity resulting from lower height and narrower width of bone tissue than the lingual region. Buccal bone tissues had significant greater mean values of E and H than lingual bone tissues at each distance and healing period (pimplant treatment groups displayed lower mean values of the E at the lingual bone tissues than at the buccal bone tissues (pimplant group (p=0.758). The DBM and rhBMP-2 treatments stimulated more peri-implant bone remodeling at the lingual region, producing more immature new bone tissues with lower E than at the buccal region. This finding suggests that the growth factor treatments to the zirconia implant system may help balance the quantity and quality differences between the peri-implant bone tissues. PMID:26773652

  4. Spectrophotometric determination of silicon in alumina grit used for sand blasting of zircaloy tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a spectrophotometric method for the determination of silicon in alumina grit used for sand blasting of surface of zircaloy tubes including the inner surface. The spectrophotometric method involves fusion of the alumina grit with a mixture of sodium carbonate and borax, dissolution of the fused melt, addition of necessary reagents and measurement of absorbance of the solution at 815 nm. The molar extinction coefficients obtained for silico-molybdenum blue complex in the absence and presence of matrix respectively are 1.7309 x 104 and 1.6278 x 104 L mol-1 cm-1.The RSD achieved in this method is 1.1% (n=10) at 1% silica in alumina grit. (author)

  5. Reactivity of non-stoichiometric black alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxides such as alumina, when divided or poorly crystallized, show enhanced physico-chemical properties with respect to those of non-divided crystals of the same solids. A stoichiometric difference may even be produced in the alumina, which brings about a new modification of its properties. However its characteristics of hydrogen chemisorption or of catalytic activity in ethylene hydrogenation do not appear to depend on the stoichiometric difference. (author)

  6. Point defects in alumina studied by thermoluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Papin, Eric; Grosseau, Philippe; Guilhot, Bernard; Benabdesselam, Mourad; Iacconi, Philibert

    1997-01-01

    Alpha alumina powders have been produced by thermal treatment under controlled atmosphere of highly pure gamma alumina. The influence of the atmosphere and the addition of dopants (Mg2+, Cr3+, Th4+) were studied by thermoluminescence (TL). TL is a technique which gives information about point defects. It allowed to reveal the presence of oxygen and aluminium vacancies. The sintering of undoped powders prepared under different atmosphere was investigated by dilatometry. Powders prepared under ...

  7. Monitoring Transport Across Modified Nanoporous Alumina Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Steinle, Erich D.; Andrew L. Molder; Hardin, Jonathan L.; Ravikanth Kona; Penumetcha, Sai S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the use of several characterization methods to examine alumina nanotubule membranes that have been modified with specific silanes. The function of these silanes is to alter the transport properties through the membrane by changing the local environment inside the alumina nanotube. The presence of alkyl groups, either long (C18) or short and branched (isopropyl) hydrocarbon chains, on these silanes significantly decreases the rate of transport of permeant molecules through...

  8. Silicide characterization at alumina-niobium interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    McKeown, JT; Radmilovic, Velimir R; Gronsky, R.; Glaeser, AM

    2011-01-01

    Alumina–niobium interfaces formed by liquidfilm-assisted joining with copper/niobium/copper interlayers exhibited microstructures that depend on the nature of the alumina components. Characterization of these interfaces in the transmission electron microscope provided insight on the relationship between interfacial microstructure and fracture performance. Interfaces between sapphire and niobium and those between high-purity (99.9%) polycrystalline alumina and niobium were free of secondary ph...

  9. Highly-sensitive Detection of Salvianolic Acid B using Alumina Microfibers-modified Electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alumina microfibers with porous structures were prepared through hydrothermal reaction, and then used to modify the surface of carbon paste electrode (CPE). After modification with alumina microfibers, the electrochemical activity of CPE was found to be greatly improved. On the surface of alumina microfibers-modified CPE, the oxidation peak current of salvianolic acid B, a main bioactive compound in Danshen with anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, was remarkably increased compared with that on the bare CPE surface. The influences of pH value, amount of alumina microfibers and accumulation time were studied. Based on the strong signal amplification effects of alumina microfibers, a novel electrochemical method was developed for the detection of salvianolic acid B. The linear range was from 5 μg L-1 to 0.3 mg L-1, and the detection limit was 2 μg L-1 (2.78 nM) after 1-min accumulation. The new method was successfully used to detect salvianolic acid B in ShuangDan oral liquid samples, and the recovery was over the range from 97.4% to 102.9%

  10. Alumina Recovery from Kaolin with Mineral Impurities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SI Peng; QIAO Xiuchen; YU Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    The alumina recovery from low grade kaolin (K-JS) treated through thermal and mechanical methods was investigated.High grade kaolin (K-SX) was used as comparison.The optimum calcination temperatures for K-JS and K-SX were both 600 ℃,which resulted in 89.34wt% of alumina extraction from K-JS and 83.37wt% from K-SX.With the increase in calcination temperature,the chemical reactivity of calcined K-JS and K-SX to acid decreased.Mechanical treatment was much more effective in increasing the alumina extraction from activated kaolin.Around 99wt% of alumina was extracted from K-JS ground for 10 hours and 95wt% of alumina was extracted from K-SX ground for 20 hours.The IR results showed that the substitute of Al for Si occurred in calcined K-SX,however,the impurities in K-JS decreased this substitute.More alumina could be extracted from low grade kaolin than that from high grade kaolin under identical thermal or mechanical conditions.

  11. Amorphous polyphosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate implant material with enhanced bone healing efficacy in a critical-size defect in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ackermann, Maximilian; Wang, Shunfeng; Tolba, Emad; Neufurth, Meik; Feng, Qingling; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effect of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) microparticles and amorphous calcium polyphosphate (polyP) microparticles (termed aCa-polyP-MP) on bone mineral forming cells/tissue was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The ACC particles (termed ACC-P10-MP) were prepared in the presence of Na-polyP. Only the combinations of polyP and ACC microparticles enhanced the proliferation rate of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Gene expression studies revealed that ACC causes an upregulation of the expression of the cell membrane-associated carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX; formation of ACC), while the transcript level of the alkaline phosphatase (ALP; liberation of orthophosphate from polyP) changes only relatively little. In contrast, aCa-polyP-MP primarily induces ALP expression. If both components are applied together a strong stimulation of expression of both marker genes is observed. In order to investigate whether ACC also enhances bone regeneration induced by polyP in vivo, the particles were encapsulated into PLGA (poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide)) microspheres (diameter ~800 μm) and implanted into rat critical-size calvarial defects. The studies revealed that animals that received aCa-polyP-MP microspheres showed an increased rate of regeneration compared to β-tri-calcium phosphate (β-TCP) controls. This effect is even accelerated if microspheres with both aCa-polyP-MP and ACC-P10-MP (1 : 1 weight ratio) are applied, resulting in an almost complete restoration of the defect area after 12 weeks. qRT-PCR analyses of tissue sections through the regeneration zone with microspheres containing both aCa-polyP-MP and ACC-P10-MP revealed a significantly higher upregulation of expression of the marker genes compared to each of the components alone. The Young's moduli for microspheres containing aCa-polyP-MP (1.74 MPa) and aCa-polyP-MP/ACC-P10-MP (2.38 MPa) were markedly higher compared to β-TCP-controls (0.63 mPa). Our results show that the combined

  12. Ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is the purpose of the present paper to give a review of surface alloy processing by ion implantation. However, rather than covering this vast subject as a whole, the survey is confined to a presentation of the microstructures that can be found in metal surfaces after ion implantation. The presentation is limited to alloys processed by ion implantation proper, that is to processes in which the alloy compositions are altered significantly by direct injection of the implanted ions. The review is introduced by a presentation of the processes taking place during development of the fundamental event in ion implantation - the collision cascade, followed by a summary of the various microstructures which can be formed after ion implantation into metals. This is compared with the variability of microstructures that can be achieved by rapid solidification processing. The microstructures are subsequently discussed in the light of the processes which, as the implantations proceed, take place during and immediately after formation of the individual collision cascades. These collision cascades define the volumes inside which individual ions are slowed down in the implanted targets. They are not only centres for vigorous agitation but also the sources for formation of excess concentrations of point defects, which will influence development of particular microstructures. A final section presents a selection of specific structures which have been observed in different alloy systems. (orig./GSCH)

  13. Active Sites Implanted Carbon Cages in Core-Shell Architecture: Highly Active and Durable Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huabin; Ma, Zuju; Duan, Jingjing; Liu, Huimin; Liu, Guigao; Wang, Tao; Chang, Kun; Li, Mu; Shi, Li; Meng, Xianguang; Wu, Kechen; Ye, Jinhua

    2016-01-26

    Low efficiency and poor stability are two major challenges we encounter in the exploration of non-noble metal electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in both acidic and alkaline environment. Herein, the hybrid of cobalt encapsulated by N, B codoped ultrathin carbon cages (Co@BCN) is first introduced as a highly active and durable nonprecious metal electrocatalysts for HER, which is constructed by a bottom-up approach using metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as precursor and self-sacrificing template. The optimized catalyst exhibited remarkable electrocatalytic performance for hydrogen production from both both acidic and alkaline media. Stability investigation reveals the overcoating of carbon cages can effectively avoid the corrosion and oxidation of the catalyst under extreme acidic and alkaline environment. Electrochemical active surface area (EASA) evaluation and density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed that the synergetic effect between the encapsulated cobalt nanoparticle and the N, B codoped carbon shell played the fundamental role in the superior HER catalytic performance. PMID:26649629

  14. Combustion chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of LaPO4 monazite and beta-alumina on alumina fibers for ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research used the low cost, open atmosphere combustion chemical vapor deposition (CCVDSM) method to efficiently deposit protective coatings onto alumina fibers (3M NextelTM610) for use in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). La-monazite (LaPO4) and beta-alumina were the primary candidate debonding coating materials investigated. The coated fibers provide thermochemical stability, as well as desired debonding/sliding interface characteristics to the CMC. Dense and uniform La-phosphate coatings were obtained at deposition temperatures as low as 900-1000 C with minimal degradation of fibers. However, all of the β-alumina phases required high deposition temperatures and, thus, could not be applied onto the NextelTM610 alumina fibers. The fibers appeared to have complete and relatively uniform coatings around individual filaments when 420 and 1260 filament tows were coated via the CCVD process. Fibers up to 3 feet long were fed through the deposition flame in the laboratory of MicroCoating Technologies (MCT). TEM analyses performed at Wright-Patterson AFB on the CCVD coated fibers showed a 10-30 nm thick La-rich layer at the fiber/coating interface, and a layer of columnar monazite 0.1-1 μm thick covered with sooty carbon of <50 nm thick on the outside. A single strength test on CCVD coated fibers performed by 3M showed that the strength value fell in the higher end of data from other CVD coated samples. (orig.)

  15. A flexible and implantable microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertical carbon nanotubes and a biocompatible polymer substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a novel microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) integrated on a flexible and biocompatible parylene substrate. A simple microfabrication process is proposed to unite the high quality vertical CNTs grown at high temperature with the heat sensitive parylene substrate in a highly controllable manner. Briefly, the CNTs electrode is encapsulated by two layers of parylene and the device is released using xenon difluoride (XeF2). The process is compatible with wafer-scale post complementary metal oxide semiconductor integration. Lower impedance and larger interfacial capacitance have been demonstrated using CNTs compared to a Pt electrode. The flexible CNT electrodes have been utilized for extracellular neuronal recording and stimulation in rats. The signal-to-noise ratio of the device is about 12.5. The threshold voltage for initiating action potential is about 0.5 V. (paper)

  16. Alumina Inlay Failure in Cemented Polyethylene-backed Total Hip Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Iwakiri, Kentaro; Iwaki, Hiroyoshi; Minoda, Yukihide; Ohashi, Hirotsugu; Takaoka, Kunio

    2008-01-01

    Alumina-on-alumina bearings for THA have markedly improved in mechanical properties through advances in technology; however, alumina fracture is still a concern. We retrospectively reviewed 77 patients (82 hips) with cemented alumina-on-alumina THAs to identify factors relating to alumina failure. The mean age of the patients at surgery was 63 years. The prostheses had a cemented polyethylene-backed acetabular component with an alumina inlay and a 28-mm alumina head. Revision surgery was perf...

  17. Monitoring Transport Across Modified Nanoporous Alumina Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich D. Steinle

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of several characterization methods to examinealumina nanotubule membranes that have been modified with specific silanes. The functionof these silanes is to alter the transport properties through the membrane by changing thelocal environment inside the alumina nanotube. The presence of alkyl groups, either long(C18 or short and branched (isopropyl hydrocarbon chains, on these silanes significantlydecreases the rate of transport of permeant molecules through membranes containingalumina nanotubes as monitored via absorbance spectroscopy. The presence of an ionicsurfactant can alter the polarity of these modified nanotubes, which correlates to anincreased transport of ions. Fluorescent spectroscopy is also utilized to enhance thesensitivity of detecting these permeant molecules. Confirmation of the alkylsilaneattachment to the alumina membrane is achieved with traditional infrared spectroscopy,which can also examine the lifetime of the modified membrane. The physical parameters ofthese silane-modified porous alumina membranes are studied via scanning electronmicroscopy. The alumina nanotubes are not physically closed off or capped by the silanesthat are attached to the alumina surfaces.

  18. High contrast laser marking of alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Laser marking of alumina using near infrared (NIR) lasers was experimentally analyzed. • Color change produced by NIR lasers is due to thermally induced oxygen vacancies. • Laser marking results obtained using NIR lasers and green laser are compared. • High contrast marks on alumina were achieved. - Abstract: Alumina serves as raw material for a broad range of advanced ceramic products. These elements should usually be identified by some characters or symbols printed directly on them. In this sense, laser marking is an efficient, reliable and widely implemented process in industry. However, laser marking of alumina still leads to poor results since the process is not able to produce a dark mark, yielding bad contrast. In this paper, we present an experimental study on the process of marking alumina by three different lasers working in two wavelengths: 1064 nm (Near-infrared) and 532 nm (visible, green radiation). A colorimetric analysis has been carried out in order to compare the resulting marks and its contrast. The most suitable laser operating conditions were also defined and are reported here. Moreover, the physical process of marking by NIR lasers is discussed in detail. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were also employed to analyze the results. Finally, we propose an explanation for the differences of the coloration induced under different atmospheres and laser parameters. We concluded that the atmosphere is the key parameter, being the inert one the best choice to produce the darkest marks

  19. Superplastic properties of alumina-zirconia composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superplastic deformation of two alumina-zirconia composites batches: the first with tetragonal ZrO2 stabilised with 3 mol.% Y2O3 and the second with ZrO2 stabilised with 2 mol.% Y2O3 (containing alumina volume fraction 10 - 86%) was studied. Grain sizes of two constituents were about 0.18-0.37 μm in the batch 1 and 0.36-0.14 μm in the batch 2. The composites were studied as a function of stress (20-130 MPa) and temperature (1451-1623 K) in compressive and bending tests. The strain rate was analysed in function of alumina volume fraction. It appeared that, the bigger than predicted by the rule of mixture strain rate decrease in function of alumina volume fraction is caused by improved creep resistance due to zirconium and yttrium ions doping of alumina grains. In zirconia grains modified interface-controlled Coble creep and simultaneously the intragranular dislocations motions contribute to the accommodation of grain boundary sliding (which is now thought to be main mechanism of superplastic behaviour). (author)

  20. Dental Implants

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are lost, it’s not uncommon to suffer from social consequences and poor nutrition. Rebuilding Bone When the ... not a one-day procedure. The implant needs time to properly adhere to the bone and create ...

  1. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on this topic can be found in our Audiology Information Series [PDF]. How does a cochlear implant ... speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. ...

  2. Atomic-layer-deposition alumina induced carbon on porous NixCo1 − xO nanonets for enhanced pseudocapacitive and Li-ion storage performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A unique composite nanonet of metal oxide@carbon interconnected sheets is obtained by atomic layer deposition (ALD)-assisted fabrication. In this nanonet structure, mesoporous metal oxide nanosheets are covered by a layer of amorphous carbon nanoflakes. Specifically, quasi-vertical aligned and mesoporous NixCo1 − xO nanosheets are first fabricated directly on nickel foam substrates by a hydrothermal method. Then, an ALD-enabled carbon coating method is applied for the growth of carbon nanoflakes on the surface of the nanosheets. The thus formed 3D hierarchical structure of NixCo1 − xO@carbon composite flakes have a higher surface area, better electrical conductivity and structure stability than the bare NixCo1 − xO. The application of such composite nanomaterials is demonstrated as electrodes for a supercapacitor and a lithium-ion battery. In both tests, the composite electrode shows enhancement in capacity and cycling stability. This effective composite nanostructure design of metal oxides@carbon flakes could provide a promising method to construct high-performance materials for energy and environment applications. (paper)

  3. Dielectric Performance of a High Purity HTCC Alumina at High Temperatures - a Comparison Study with Other Polycrystalline Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangyu

    2014-01-01

    A very high purity (99.99+%) high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) alumina has recently become commercially available. The raw material of this HTCC alumina is very different from conventional HTCC alumina, and more importantly there is no glass additive in this alumina material for co-firing processing. Previously, selected HTCC and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) alumina materials were evaluated at high temperatures as dielectric and compared to a regularly sintered 96% polycrystalline alumina (96% Al2O3), where 96% alumina was used as the benchmark. A prototype packaging system based on regular 96% alumina with Au thickfilm metallization successfully facilitated long term testing of high temperature silicon carbide (SiC) electronic devices for over 10,000 hours at 500 C. In order to evaluate this new high purity HTCC alumina for possible high temperature packaging applications, the dielectric properties of this HTCC alumina substrate were measured and compared with those of 96% alumina and a previously tested LTCC alumina from room temperature to 550 C at frequencies of 120 Hz, 1 KHz, 10 KHz, 100 KHz, and 1 MHz. A parallel-plate capacitive device with dielectric of the HTCC alumina and precious metal electrodes were used for measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the co-fired alumina material in the temperature and frequency ranges. The capacitance and AC parallel conductance of the capacitive device were directly measured by an AC impedance meter, and the dielectric constant and parallel AC conductivity of the dielectric were calculated from the capacitance and conductance measurement results. The temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the HTCC alumina substrate are presented and compared to those of 96% alumina and a selected LTCC alumina. Other technical advantages of this new co-fired material for possible high packaging applications are also discussed.

  4. Challenges and Strategies in the Synthesis of Mesoporous Alumina Powders and Hierarchical Alumina Monoliths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Galarneau

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A new rapid, very simple and one-step sol-gel strategy for the large-scale preparation of highly porous γ-Al2O3 is presented. The resulting mesoporous alumina materials feature high surface areas (400 m2 g−1, large pore volumes (0.8 mL g−1 and the ��-Al2O3 phase is obtained at low temperature (500 °C. The main advantages and drawbacks of different preparations of mesoporous alumina materials exhibiting high specific surface areas and large pore volumes such as surfactant-nanostructured alumina, sol-gel methods and hierarchically macro-/mesoporous alumina monoliths have been analyzed and compared. The most reproducible synthesis of mesoporous alumina are given. Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly (EISA is the sole method to lead to nanostructured mesoporous alumina by direct templating, but it is a difficult method to scale-up. Alumina featuring macro- and mesoporosity in monolithic shape is a very promising material for in flow applications; an optimized synthesis is described.

  5. Mechanical properties of free standing porous anodic alumina films

    OpenAIRE

    Ignashev, E.; Shulgov, V.

    2012-01-01

    Free-standing films of anodic alumina obtained from the one-sided anodization of aluminum were studied. The flexural strength of free-standing porous anodic alumina films to the lateral bending, circular bending, and microhardness were studied.

  6. Dynamical Mechanical Properties for AD90 Alumina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Hui-lan; NING Jian-guo; LI Ping

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic response of polycrystalline alumina was investigated in the pressure range of 0 -13 GPa by planar impact experiments.Velocity interferometer system for any reflector(VISAR) was used to obtain free surface velocity profile and determine the Hugoniot elastic limit,and manganin gauges were employed to obtain the stress-time histories and determine Hugoniot curve.Both the free surface particle velocity profiles and Hugoniot curves indicate the dispersion of the "plastic" wave for alumina.With the measured stress histories,the complete histories of strain,particle velocity,specific volume and specific internal energy are gained by using path line principle of Lagrange analysis.The dynamic mechanical behaviors for alumina under impact loading are analyzed,such as nonlinear characteristic,strain rate dependence,dispersion and declination of shock wave in the material.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of alumina precursor and alumina to be used as nano composite; Sintese e caracterizacao de precursores de alumina e alumina para uso em nanocompositos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, M.L.P., E-mail: malu@sorocaba.unesp.b [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Santos, H. Souza [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Santos, P. Souza [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EP/USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica

    2009-07-01

    With the evolution of nanomaterials technology, mainly in the 90s, it was possible to observe produced composites with alumina matrix and nanomaterial as reinforcing materials. It results in a significant improvement of mechanical proprieties of these composites. Thenceforth the study of synthesis and characterization of nanostructured materials has attracted great scientific interest. In this perspective, the aim of this work is to present an experimental procedure to obtain nordstrandite (aluminum hydroxide) with nanometric dimensions. Nordstrandite synthesis, obtained by the reaction of slightly amalgamated aluminum foil with aqueous ethylene glycol, which allows the control of the size of crystal produced. This control could be confirmed by X-Ray Diffraction and Electron Microscopy. Thermal transformation study is also presented. This study allowed the identification of transition aluminas that have potential to produce nanometric aluminas. (author)

  8. Blocking of grain reorientation in self-doped alumina materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alumina nanoparticles 10-20 nm in diameter were nucleated on alumina particles, 150 nm average diameter, by a colloidal route followed by calcination. It is shown that after sintering, the final grain size is up to 20% smaller due to the addition of the alumina nanoparticles. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis shows that whereas a correlation in the relative crystalline orientations between neighbouring grains exists in the pure materials, the addition of alumina nanoparticles results in a random crystalline orientation.

  9. A Novel Processing Route for Ni-doped Alumina Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Mao-xiang; SHEN Xiang-qian; ZHOU Jian-xin; LI Dong-hong; LI Wang-xing

    2006-01-01

    Alumina-based composites containing 0-15wt% Ni metallic phase were produced by hot press-sintering Ni-coated alumina powders. The Ni-coated alumina powders were prepared by the aqueous heterogeneous precipitation of alumina micro-powders and nickel sulfate salt followed by reduction process. The microstructural features and dispersion of Ni phase in Ni-coated alumina powders and the subsequent alumina-Ni cermets were investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The relative density of the hot press-sintered composites was measured with the Archimedes' method while the fracture strength and the fracture toughness were defined with the three-point bending method and the micro-indentation fracture method. In the formation of alumina-Ni cermets from sintered Ni-coated alumina powders, Ni phase to some extent limits the densification rate and stifles the coarsening and growing process of alumina grains. The Ni phase is found to be located at the interfaces and the triple-joint junctions of alumina grains which results into alteration of the fracture mode of alumina and its increased fracture strength and fracture toughness if compared with monolithic alumina.

  10. Tribological properties of nanoscale alumina-zirconia composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkwijk, B.; Winnubst, A.J.A.; Verweij, H.; Mulder, E.J.; Metselaar, H.S.C.; Schipper, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    The tribological properties of zirconia (Y-TZP), alumina and their composites, alumina dispersed in zirconia (ADZ) and zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA), were investigated. These ceramics are made by colloidal processing methods such that well-defined, homogeneous microstructures with submicron grain

  11. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Siloxane modified alumina... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  13. Effects of electrical conductivity of substrate materials on microstructure of diamond-like carbon films prepared by bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are prepared by a bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation, and the structural differences between DLC films deposited on different electrical conductive substrates, i.e., conductive Si wafers and insulating glass plates are examined by Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photo emission spectroscopy (XPS). In the Raman measurements, graphite (G) and disorder (D) peaks are observed for both samples. However, the additional photo luminescence is overlapped on the spectra in the case of on-glass sample. To elucidate the structural difference, the intensity ratio of D to G peak (I(D)/I(G)), G peak position and full width at half maximum (FWHM) are obtained by curve fitting using Gaussian function and linear baseline. It is found that the I(D)/I(G) is lower, G peak position is higher and FWHM of G peak is narrower for on-glass sample than for on-Si sample. According to Robertson [1], lower I(D)/I(G) seems more sp3 C-C bonding in amount for on-glass sample. In contrast, higher G peak position and narrower FWHM of G peak suggest less sp3 C-C bonding in amount for on-glass sample. The results of XPS analysis with C1s spectra reveal that sp3 ratio, i.e., the intensity ratio of sp3/(sp3+sp2) is smaller for on-glass sample than for on-Si sample. The inconsistency of the trend between I(D)/I(G) and other parameters (G peak position and FWHM of G peak) might be caused by the overlap of photo luminescence signal on Raman spectrum as to on-glass sample. From these results, it is considered that sp3 C-C bonding is reduced in amount when using insulating substrate in comparison with conductive substrate.

  14. Effect of Implantation Sequence on Tribological Behavior of GCr15 Steel by PBII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Le; Zhou, Hui; Cao, Guojian; Tang, Guangze; Ma, Xinxin; Wang, Liqin

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, the effect of implantation sequence on tribological behavior of GCr15 steel treated by plasma-based ion implantation of carbon and nitrogen has been investigated. The treated GCr15 steels were characterized for microstructure and abrasive wear performance through combination of Raman spectroscopy, nano-indentation, and wear tests. Raman spectroscopy indicated that diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were formed after implantation of carbon with or without implantation of nitrogen, and the implantation of nitrogen after the implantation of carbon destroyed the graphite structure of the DLC films. The nano-indentation and wear tests showed that nanohardness as well as wear resistance of the GCr15 steel treated with the implantation sequence of nitrogen-carbon was better than those with the implantation sequence of carbon-nitrogen. Meanwhile, the properties were improved with increasing of carbon ion fluence.

  15. Surface characterization of titanium based dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dental implantology uses metallic devices made of commercially pure titanium in order to replace lost teeth. Titanium presents favorable characteristics as bio material and modern implants are capable of integrate, witch is the union between bone and implant without fibrous tissue development. Three of the major Brazilian implant manufacturers were chosen to join the study. A foreign manufacturer participated as standard. The manufacturers had three specimens of each implant with two different surface finishing, as machined and porous, submitted to analysis. Surface chemical composition and implant morphology were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microprobe. Implant surface is mainly composed of titanium, oxygen and carbon. Few contaminants commonly present on implant surface were found on samples. Superficial oxide layer is basically composed of titanium dioxide (TiO2), another oxides as Ti O and Ti2O3 were also found in small amount. Carbon on implant surface was attributed to manufacturing process. Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Silicon appeared in smaller concentration on surface. There was no surface discrepancy among foreign and Brazilian made implants. SEM images were made on different magnification, 35 X to 3500 X, and showed similarity among as machined implants. Porous surface finishing implants presented distinct morphology. This result was attributed to differences on manufacturing process. Implant bioactivity was accessed through immersion on simulated body solution (SBF) in order to verify formation of an hydroxyapatite (HA) layer on surface. Samples were divided on three groups according to immersion time: G1 (7 days), G2 (14 days), G3 (21 days), and deep in SBF solution at 37 deg C. After being removed from solution, XPS analyses were made and then implants have been submitted to microprobe analysis. XPS showed some components of SBF solution on sample surface but microprobe examinations did not

  16. Synthesis of alumina nano-sheets via supercritical fluid technology with high uranyl adsorptive capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supercritical carbon dioxide is beneficial to the synthesis of superior ultrafine and uniform materials due to its high chemical stability, low viscosity, high diffusivity, and 'zero' surface tension. γ-Alumina nano-sheets were obtained by a simple hydrothermal route in the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide. XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM and nitrogen sorption isotherm were employed to characterize the samples. Alumina as-prepared has a high specific surface area of up to 200 ± 6 m2 g-1, which presents a high adsorption capacity (4.66 ± 0.02 mg g-1) for uranyl ions from aqueous solution. Furthermore, the adsorption process was found to be endothermic and spontaneous in nature. (authors)

  17. Enhanced H2/CH4 and H2/CO2 Separation by Carbon Molecular Sieve Membrane Coated on Titania Modified Alumina Support: Effects of TiO2 Intermediate Layer Preparation Variables on Interfacial Adhesion.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tseng, H.-H.; Wang, Ch.-T.; Zhuang, G.-L.; Uchytil, Petr; Řezníčková Čermáková, Jiřina; Setničková, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 510, JUL 15 (2016), s. 391-404. ISSN 0376-7388 Grant ostatní: NSC(TW) NSC100-2221-E- 040-004-MY3 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : carbon membrane * intermediate layer * adhesion Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 5.056, year: 2014

  18. Study of the molybdenum retention in alumina; Estudio de la retencion de molibdeno en alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, Maria V.; Mondino, Angel V.; Manzini, Alberto [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Centro Atomico Ezeiza. Radioquimica y Quimica de las Radiaciones

    2002-07-01

    The Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission routinely produces {sup 99} Mo by fission of highly enriched uranium contained in targets irradiated in RA-3 reactor. The current process begins with the dissolution of the irradiated target in a basic media, considering the possibility of changing the targets, it could be convenient to dissolve them in acid media. The use of alumina as a first separation step in acid dissolution processes is already known although it is necessary to determine both the type of alumina to be used and the separation conditions. The study of molybdenum retention in alumina was performed at laboratory scale, using Mo-99 as radiotracer. Different kinds of alumina were tried, varying charge solution acidity. Influence of uranium concentration in the loading solution on molybdenum retention was also studied. (author)

  19. Study on alumina-alumina brazing for application in vacuum chambers of proton synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes an experimental study to standardize vacuum brazing process to obtain satisfactory high purity alumina brazed joints for application in rapid cycle proton synchrotron machine. Two different brazing routes, adopted for making alumina-alumina brazed joints, included (i) multi-step Mo-Mn metallization and brazing with BVAg-8 alloy and (ii) advanced single-step active brazing with CuSil-ABA alloy. Brazed alumina specimens, prepared by both the routes, yielded ultra high vacuum compatible, helium leak tight and bakeable joints. Active-brazed specimens exhibited satisfactory strength values in tensile and four-point bend tests. Metallized-brazed specimens, although exhibited relatively lower tensile strength than the targeted value, displayed satisfactory flexural strength in four-point bend test. The results of the study demonstrated that active brazing is the simple and cost effective alternative to conventional metallization route for producing satisfactory brazed joints for application in rapid cycle proton synchrotron machine. (author)

  20. Selective metallization of alumina by laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shrivastva, P.B.; Boose, C.A.; Kolster, B.H.; Harteveld, C.; Meinders, B.

    1991-01-01

    Nickel has been selectively deposited on an alumina substrate without any pretreatment from a flow of a nickel acetate solution using the focused beam of an excimer laser. Nickel spots as well as nickel lines were drawn and subsequently plated with an electroless Ni-B coating. Excellent adhesion of

  1. Adsorption of Nitrogen on Organized Mesoporous Alumina

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čejka, Jiří; Veselá, Lenka; Rathouský, Jiří; Zukal, Arnošt

    Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2002 - (Sayari, A.; Jaroniec, M.), s. 429-436 - ( Studies in Surface Science and Catalysis.. 141). [International Symposium on Nanoporous Materials /3./. Ottawa (CA), 12.06.2002-15.06.2002] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : alumina * nitrogen * adsorption Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  2. Method of making nanocrystalline alpha alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Richard W.; Hahn, Horst; Eastman, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Method of making selected phases of nanocrystalline ceramic materials. Various methods of controlling the production of nanocrystalline alpha alumina and titanium oxygen phases are described. Control of the gas atmosphere and use of particular oxidation treatments give rise to the ability to control the particular phases provided in the aluminum/oxygen and titanium/oxygen system.

  3. Mechanical properties of zirconia-toughened alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bend samples of four compositions of zirconia-toughened alumina were heat treated at 10000C for 100 and 500 H and tested for strength and fracture toughness at room temperature. These results are compared with as-received properties, as well as stress rupture and stepped-temperature stress rupture data

  4. One-step Synthesis of n-Butanol from Ethanol Condensation over Alumina-supported Metal Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Wu YANG; Xuan Zhen JIANG; Wei Chao ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    One-step synthesis of n-butanol from bimolecular condensation of ethanol was firstly achieved over nickel supported gamma alumina catalyst. A mechanism of dehydration path for the growth of carbon chain by eliminating a hydroxy group from one ethanol molecule with a α-H of other ethanol molecule rather than aldol condensation was verified.

  5. Fatigue behaviour of fine-grained alumina hip-joint heads under normal walking conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Basu

    2003-06-01

    In prosthetic applications, the reliability of implant materials over a period of thirty years is absolutely essential. Calculation of the lifetimes of alumina ceramic heads is generally made on the basis of experimental fatigue and slow crack growth tests using finite element analysis. This investigation is aimed at understanding the fatigue behaviour of fine-grained alumina heads of hip joints. The service conditions of cyclic stress experienced by hip joints during walking are used in evaluating the fatigue behaviour of alumina femoral heads. These femoral heads have successfully withstood 107 cycles at a maximum walking stress of 17.2 kN, which is equivalent to a body weight of 400 kg. The femoral heads did not exhibit any sub-critical crack growth at the maximum walking load of 10 kN, indicating the quasi-infinite performance life in patients up to a body weight of 250 kg. The details of proof testing designed for evaluating the performance of femoral heads over 40 years are also presented.

  6. Cochlear Implant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this text, the authors recall the main principles and data ruling cochlear implants. Then, a first circle of technical equipment for assistance is presented. This circle includes: device setting (DS), Electrically evoked Auditory Brainstem Responses (EABR), Neural Response Telemetry (NRT), Stapedial Reflex (SR) and Electrodogram Acquisition (EA). This first cycle becomes more and more important as children are implanted younger and younger; the amount of data available with this assistance makes necessary the use of models (implicit or explicit) to handle this information. Consequently, this field is more open than ever.

  7. Third-body Wear Damage Produced in CoCr Surfaces by Hydroxyapatite and Alumina Ceramic Debris: A 10-cycle Metal-on-Metal Simulator Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Halim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic particles are believed to be particularly abrasive due to their extreme hardness. Ceramic debris has been reported in retrieved total hip arthroplasty (THA due to chipping and fracture of alumina components or by flaking of hydroxyapatite from implant coatings. However there appears to be no abrasion ranking of such particle behavior. The hypotheses in this study were, i alumina particles would create large scratches in CoCr surfaces and ii hydroxyapatite would produce very mild scratching comparable to bone-cement particles. Hydroxyapatite beads came in two types of commercial powders while the flakes were scraped from retrieved femoral stems. Alumina beads came in two commercial powders and flakes were retrieved from a fractured ceramic head. Particle morphologies were determined by SEM and CoCr surface damage by interferometry and SEM. Six 38-mm MOM were mounted inverted in a hip simulator and run with ceramic particles inserted for a 10-second test. Surface-roughness ranking after 10-second abrasion test revealed that bone cement and hydroxyapatite produced least damage to CoCr surfaces while alumina produced the most. Alumina increased surface roughness 19-fold greater than either hydroxyapatite or bone-cement particles. The alumina debris produced numerous scratches typically 20-80 µm wide with some up to 140µm wide. Surprisingly the alumina beads and flakes were pulverized within the 10-second test interval and remained adherent to the CoCr surfaces. Additionally, the hydroxyapatite although also a ceramic had no more effect on CoCr than the bone-cement debris. Use of well-characterized and commercially available alumina and hydroxyapatite powders appeared advantageous for abrasion tests. These new data indicated that such ceramic powders have merit.

  8. Dielectric Performance of High Purity HTCC Alumina at High Temperatures - A Comparison Study with Other Polycrystalline Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Yu

    2012-01-01

    A very high purity (99.99+) high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) alumina has recently become commercially available. The raw material of this HTCC alumina is very different from conventional HTCC alumina, and more importantly there is no glass additive in this co-fired material. Previously, selected HTCC and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) alumina materials were evaluated at high temperatures as dielectric and compared to a regularly sintered 96 polycrystalline alumina (96 Al2O3), where 96 alumina was used as the benchmark. A prototype packaging system based on regular 96 alumina with Au thick-film metallization successfully facilitated long term testing of high temperature silicon carbide (SiC) electronic devices for over 10,000 hours at 500C. In order to evaluate this new HTCC alumina for possible high temperature packaging applications, the dielectric properties of this HTCC alumina substrate were measured and compared with those of 96 alumina and a LTCC alumina from room temperature to 550C at frequencies of 120 Hz, 1 KHz, 10 KHz, 100 KHz, and 1 MHz. A parallel-plate capacitive device with dielectric of the HTCC alumina and precious metal electrodes were used for measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the co-fired alumina material in the temperature and frequency ranges. The capacitance and AC parallel conductance of the capacitive device were directly measured by an AC impedance meter, and the dielectric constant and parallel AC conductivity of the dielectric were calculated from the capacitance and conductance measurement results. The temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the HTCC alumina substrate are presented and compared to those of 96 alumina. Other technical advantages of this new co-fired material for possible high packaging applications are also discussed.

  9. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF ALUMINA-ZIRCONIA COMPOSITE BY SLURRY METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JYOTI PRAKASH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Alumina has got some excellent properties like chemical inertness, thermal and mechanical strength against hazardous environment. Alumina is a good ceramic material which is being used for structuralapplications. To enhance the toughness and strength of the body some Zirconia is also used with it. The use of Zirconia in alumina is known as toughening of alumina. One difficulty arises, when alumina and alumina toughened composite are sintered , because the low sinterability of Alumina-Zirconia forced the compact to give very low density body. To overcome this problem alumina and alumina composites are made from slurry method which gives nearly theoretical density. The combined effect of alumina and Zirconia on the phase transformation and microstructure development of heat-treated Alumina-Zirconia composites has been studied. Slurry is prepared by adding water, dispersant, binder and anti-foaming agent. In the present study, Sintering schedule is optimized and kept constant for all samples. After sintering, mechanical behaviour of the composite has been studied.

  10. Preparation of novel bulk carbon nano tubes dental materials for implant%新型牙用碳纳米管种植体材料的制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈蕾; Mian Farrukh Imran; 蔡惠; 徐国富

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is about 1 mm in diameter and about 1-10 μm in length cylinder-like material, and it only contains the spiral of carbon atoms arranged on the surface. Because of its unique tubular structure, lower density than that of graphite and with a high enough intensity, CNTs are expected to substitute bone.OBJECTIVE: To primarily study the influence of the content of polycarbosilane (PCS) and the sintering pressure on CNTs, look for the most optimum condition for the preparation of chunk CNTs, analyze the physical properties and biocompatibility of the material, and provide a choice for candidate implant denture material.DESIGN: The content of cement and the sintering pressure are adjusted in the experiment to make sure the most optimum condition for the preparation, and the capabilities of the material are observed and analyzed to make sure if that the material is suitable for implant denture.SETTING: Department of Stomatology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University; Prosthodontics Staff Room, Oral Medical College of Central South University. MATERIALS: 80% pure molecules of CNT (Nano Lab Company USA), 20-40 nm in diameter, 5-20 mm in length, was provided by Nacheng Technology Development Corporation of Beijing. PCS was compounded by 502 Development Room of Defense Technology University, and the molecular weight is 1 300; Ten male white Wistar rats with 8 weeks old were provided by Animal Experiment Center of Guangxi Medical University. The treatments with the animals accorded to animal ethical standard in the experiment.METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Experimental Center of Material College, Central South University from January to August 2005. By using the spark plasma sintering (SPS), at the sintering temperature of 1 200 ℃, the pressure from 20 MPa to 60 MPa, PCS was used as the cement to produce the new chunk multi-wall CNTs.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: By using Archimedes method and adsorption of gases method

  11. Effect of thermal residual stresses on the strength for both alumina/Ni/alumina and alumina/Ni/nickel alloy bimaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Hattali, Lamine; Stéphane, Valette; Ropital, Francois; Mesrati, Nadir; Tréheux, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes some technical limitations encountered in joining ceramics-ceramics or ceramics-metals, and how, to some extent, they have been practically overcome. The effect of the residual stresses on the strength of joints fabricated between alumina-alumina or alumina and the nickel base alloy HAYNES 214TM using a solid-state bonding technique with Ni interlayer was studied. Finite element analyses (FEA) for the elastic-plastic and elastic-plastic-creep behavior have also been used ...

  12. Characterization of Glasses in One Type of Alumina Rich Fly Ash by Chemical Digestion Methods: Implications for Alumina Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Lijun Zhao; Hanshuang Xiao; Baodong Wang; Qi Sun

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, one type of alumina rich fly ash (ARFA) with about 50 wt% of alumina has been extensively investigated for alumina extraction in China. Due to the silica in ARFA, alumina extraction would have to generate a huge amount of solid waste. There is a growing interest in the glasses in ARFA, because they are composed mainly of silica and could be removed prior to alumina extraction. In this work, the glasses in ARFA have been investigated by chemical methods, that is, acid and base...

  13. Ion implantation for combating wear and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion implantation provides a means of introducing chosen atomic species into the surface layers of a material or component without the need for heating. Atoms which form strong interatomic bonds, such as nitrogen or carbon, will harden a metal surface and improve wear resistance. Species which impart protection against corrosion, such as nickel, chromium or rare earths can be implanted. Various mechanisms result in a protective layer which far exceeds in thickness the range of implanted ions. Ion implantation is not a coating technique: there is no interface which could form a plane of weakness, nor are there dimensional changes. It is applied to finished components using equipment which will be described. (author)

  14. Cochlear implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are sent along the auditory nerve to the brain. A deaf person does not have a functioning inner ear. A cochlear implant tries to replace the function of the inner ear by ... signals to the brain. Sound is picked up by a microphone worn ...

  15. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an optimal period to develop speech and language skills. Research has shown that when these children receive a cochlear implant followed by intensive therapy before they are 18 months ... age develop language skills at a rate comparable to children with normal ...

  16. Dental Implants

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... suffer from social consequences and poor nutrition. Rebuilding Bone When the supporting alveolar bone melts away , it’s gone for good, but through grafting, a skilled dental professional can recreate bone to fuse with and support an implant. This ...

  17. Dental Implants

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an implant connects directly to the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , ... may feel you don’t need to replace it, since no one can see that it’s missing ...

  18. Dental Implants

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Dental Implants A fuller, more complete smile is within reach. The following information is designed to provide helpful facts so you ... found in nature. What Happens When You Lose a Tooth? When you lose a tooth, especially a ...

  19. Chemical treatment and biomimetic coating evaluating in zirconia-alumina ceramics; Avaliacao de tratamentos quimicos e recobrimento biomimetico em ceramicas de alumina-zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Amanda Abati

    2007-07-01

    Ceramic materials, as alumina and zirconia have been explored along the years as biomaterials application. The bio inert nature has been stimulating the development of new alternatives, as chemical treatments to improve the biological application of these ceramics. The biomimetic process of bio inert ceramics for coating apatite is based on soaking the implant in a simulated body fluid, SBF, with ion concentrations nearly equal to those of human blood plasma. The bioactivity of the material is related with the formation of a layer constituted of hydroxyapatite low crystalline, similar to the biological apatite. The biocompatibility associated to the structural properties of the alumina and zirconia has been stimulating the clinical use of these materials, mainly in areas of larger mechanical requests, places not recommended for bioactive hydroxyapatite, for instance. In this work samples of alumina, zirconia doped with Yttria (3% mol) and composites of alumina and zirconia doped with Yttria (3% mol) were prepared by co-precipitation method, calcinate, sintered, chemically treated with solutions of acid phosphoric and sodium hydroxide and them immersed in 1.0 M and 1.5 M SBF. The calcinate powders were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), gas adsorption (BET) and laser diffraction. The XRD results indicate that the samples are low crystalline. It was observed for BET that the samples present high specific surface area. The results of laser diffraction and SEM showed that the powders are agglomerates. The sintered samples were analyzed by XRD, SEM and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The phases quantified by Rietveld method were: cubic, tetragonal and monoclinic of the zirconia, besides the phase alpha of the alumina. The chemical treatment with phosphoric acid didn't present a tendency of larger apatite formation in relation to the samples no chemically treated. The treatment with sodium hydroxide provoked accentuated transformation

  20. Graphene coated with alumina and its utilization as a thermal conductivity enhancer for alumina sphere/thermoplastic polyurethane composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphene was oxidized with H2O2 to introduce additional anchoring sites for effective alumina coating on graphene by the sol–gel method. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies showed that the oxygen-containing groups such as hydroxyl group useful for coating were introduced by the oxidation. The transmission electron microscopy images and thermogravimetric analysis data demonstrated that the additional anchoring sites enhanced the efficiency of the alumina coating. A small amount of alumina-coated graphene synergistically improved the thermal conductivity of the alumina sphere/thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) composite without any increase in the electrical conductivity, because the electrical conductivity of graphene effectively decreased by the alumina coating. Moreover, the synergistic effect of a small amount of graphene was enhanced by the alumina coating, and the stiffening of the alumina sphere/TPU composite due to the added graphene was alleviated by the alumina coating. - Highlights: • Oxidation of graphene with H2O2 introduced anchoring sites for alumina coating. • The anchoring sites improved the efficiency of alumina coating on graphene. • The alumina-coated graphene synergistically enhanced the thermal conductivity

  1. Sputtering studies during lanthanum implantation in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanthanum ions of 100 keV have been implanted in AISI304 specimens at different doses. The erosion or sputtering of the surface atoms, either from the steel matrix or already implanted, during the implantation process imposes a limitation on the maximum implantable dose. Hoping to increase this dose, we deposited thin layers of aluminium and alumina (Al2O3) on top of steel samples of similar composition and sputtering behaviour (AISI302), as the sputtering effect is much weaker on such species and this layer could also prevent the steel atoms from being removed from the surface. The experimental determination of the sputtering coefficients, total or partial, and its comparison with theoretical values, when possible, is another aim of this work. (orig.)

  2. Sputtering studies during lanthanum implantation in stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, F. J.; Respaldiza, M. A.; Soares, J. C.; da Silva, M. F.; Odriozola, J. A.

    1997-05-01

    Lanthanum ions of 100 keV have been implanted in AISI304 specimens at different doses. The erosion or sputtering of the surface atoms, either from the steel matrix or already implanted, during the implantation process imposes a limitation on the maximum implantable dose. Hoping to increase this dose, we deposited thin layers of aluminium and alumina (Al 2O 3) on top of steel samples of similar composition and sputtering behaviour (AISI302), as the sputtering effect is much weaker on such species and this layer could also prevent the steel atoms from being removed from the surface. The experimental determination of the sputtering coefficients, total or partial, and its comparison with theoretical values, when possible, is another aim of this work.

  3. Sputtering studies during lanthanum implantation in stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ager, F.J. [Sevilla Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear; Respaldiza, M.A. [Sevilla Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear; Soares, J.C. [CFNUL, Avda. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, P-1699, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Da Silva, M.F. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, P-2685, Sacavem (Portugal); Odriozola, J.A. [ICMSE, Universidad de Sevilla-CSIC, PO Box 874, E-41071, Sevilla (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    Lanthanum ions of 100 keV have been implanted in AISI304 specimens at different doses. The erosion or sputtering of the surface atoms, either from the steel matrix or already implanted, during the implantation process imposes a limitation on the maximum implantable dose. Hoping to increase this dose, we deposited thin layers of aluminium and alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on top of steel samples of similar composition and sputtering behaviour (AISI302), as the sputtering effect is much weaker on such species and this layer could also prevent the steel atoms from being removed from the surface. The experimental determination of the sputtering coefficients, total or partial, and its comparison with theoretical values, when possible, is another aim of this work. (orig.).

  4. Rheological Properties of Aqueous Nanometric Alumina Suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuanping Li

    2004-12-19

    Colloidal processing is an effective and reliable approach in the fabrication of the advanced ceramic products. Successful colloidal processing of fine ceramic powders requires accurate control of the rheological properties. The accurate control relies on the understanding the influences of various colloidal parameters on the rheological properties. Almost all research done on the rheology paid less attention to the interactions of particle and solvent. However, the interactions of the particles are usually built up through the media in which the particles are suspended. Therefore, interactions of the particle with the media, the adsorbed layers on the particle surface, and chemical and physical properties of media themselves must influence the rheology of the suspension, especially for the dense suspensions containing nanosized particles. Relatively little research work has been reported in this area. This thesis addresses the rheological properties of nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions, and paying more attention to the interactions between particle and solvent, which in turn influence the particle-particle interactions. Dense nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions with low viscosity were achieved by environmentally-benign fructose additives. The rheology of nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions and its variation with the particle volume fraction and concentration of fructose were explored by rheometry. The adsorptions of solute (fructose) and solvent (water) on the nanometric alumina particle surfaces were measured and analyzed by TG/DSC, TOC, and NMR techniques. The mobility of water molecules in the suspensions and its variation with particle volume fractions and fructose additive were determined by the {sup 17}O NMR relaxation method. The interactions between the nanometric alumina particles in water and fructose solutions were investigated by AFM. The results indicated that a large number of water layers were physically bound on the particles

  5. Effect of the reactive element addition on the alumina scale growth in high temperature material alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FeAl and FeCrAl high temperature material alloys exhibit the oxidation resistance at high temperatures due to the protective alumina scale formed on their surfaces. Small additions of reactive elements on these high temperature alloys have shown the considerable improvements in high temperature oxidation behaviour. In this paper, the effect of yttrium reactive element additions to alumina protective scale growth on the surface of FeAl and FeCrAl high temperature alloys has been discussed. The yttrium reactive element was added on surface of FeAl samples by using ion implantation techniques with variation of ion dose on the order of 1,015 ion/cm2 and the ion energy of 100 keV, and on the surface of FeCrAl samples with ion dose of 1,017 ion/cm2 and the ion energy of 85 keV. Oxidation test of the FeAl samples was done in dry oxygen media on the temperature of 850°C with many times of thermal cycling, while the FeCrAl samples was oxidized on the temperature of 950°C and 1,100°C, and the characterization of elemental composition of the samples were done by using SEM-EDAX techniques. It is also discussed the influence of small additions of hafnium and cerium reactive elements on the high temperature alloys. Based on this study was obtained that the implantation of reactive elements on the surface of the FeAl and FeCrAl high temperature material alloys influence the growth of alumina scale and to increase its high temperature oxidation average around 160%. (author)

  6. Continuous and Localized Mn Implantation of ZnO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present results derived from continuous and localized 35 keV55Mn+ion implantations into ZnO. Localized implantations were carried out by using self-ordered alumina membranes as masks leading to ordered arrays of implanted volumes on the substrate surfaces. Defects and vacancies in the small implantation volumes of ZnO were generated due to the implantation processes besides the creation of new phases. Rapid thermal annealing was applied in the case of continuous implantation. The samples were characterized by HRSEM, GIXRD, Raman spectroscopy and RBS/C. Magnetic characterization of the samples pointed out appreciable differences among the samples obtained by the different implantation methods. This fact was mainly attributed to the different volume/surface ratios present in the implanted zones as well as to the increase of Mn atom concentrations along the grain frontiers in the nanostructured surfaces. The samples also showed a ferromagnetic transition phase at temperature value higher than room temperature.

  7. Surface characterization of titanium based dental implants; Caracterizacao de implantes odontologicos a base de titanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilho, Guilherme Augusto Alcaraz

    2006-07-01

    Dental implantology uses metallic devices made of commercially pure titanium in order to replace lost teeth. Titanium presents favorable characteristics as bio material and modern implants are capable of integrate, witch is the union between bone and implant without fibrous tissue development. Three of the major Brazilian implant manufacturers were chosen to join the study. A foreign manufacturer participated as standard. The manufacturers had three specimens of each implant with two different surface finishing, as machined and porous, submitted to analysis. Surface chemical composition and implant morphology were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microprobe. Implant surface is mainly composed of titanium, oxygen and carbon. Few contaminants commonly present on implant surface were found on samples. Superficial oxide layer is basically composed of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), another oxides as Ti O and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} were also found in small amount. Carbon on implant surface was attributed to manufacturing process. Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Silicon appeared in smaller concentration on surface. There was no surface discrepancy among foreign and Brazilian made implants. SEM images were made on different magnification, 35 X to 3500 X, and showed similarity among as machined implants. Porous surface finishing implants presented distinct morphology. This result was attributed to differences on manufacturing process. Implant bioactivity was accessed through immersion on simulated body solution (SBF) in order to verify formation of an hydroxyapatite (HA) layer on surface. Samples were divided on three groups according to immersion time: G1 (7 days), G2 (14 days), G3 (21 days), and deep in SBF solution at 37 deg C. After being removed from solution, XPS analyses were made and then implants have been submitted to microprobe analysis. XPS showed some components of SBF solution on sample surface but microprobe

  8. High-pressure phases of alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Matthew; Pickard, Chris; Needs, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Alumina (Al2O3) has been widely used as a pressure standard in static diamond anvil cell experiments and is a major chemical component of the Earth. So a detailed knowledge of its high-pressure stability is of great importance in both materials science and deep Earth science. A phase transition is known to occur at roughly 80-100 GPa between corundum and the Rh2O3 (II) structure. A second phase transition to the CaIrO3 structure occurs at even higher pressures. Here we present a computational structure search to reveal three additional structures which are competitive at these pressures but hitherto unknown to be stable in high-pressure alumina.

  9. Li + ion diffusion in nanoscale alumina coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Michelle; Bernstein, Noam

    Nanoscale coatings of alumina are used to stabilize surfaces for a variety of technologies. Diffusion of ions through these coatings is of primary importance: in some cases, diffusion is unwanted (e.g. corrosion) and in others (e.g. electrode materials), it is necessary. In this work DFT and AIMD calculations are used to investigate Li+ ion diffusion through a nano-layer of alumina, examining the phase (alpha, gamma, and amorphous), ion concentration, and electron count dependence. We look at the role of the surface itself in promoting diffusion. One of our main findings is that as the number of ions or charge increases, the diffusivity rises. We show how our data can explain electrochemical data from coated LiCoO2 cathodes and may point toward better and more efficient coatings for stabilizing electrodes.

  10. Slip casting alumina with Na-CMC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruys, A.J.; Sorrell, C.C. [Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    1996-11-01

    Many forming methods are in common use for engineering ceramics. Of these, slip casting is an ideal forming method because of its low cost, simplicity and flexibility, potential for uniform particle packing and suitability to the production of articles of intricate shape. Slip casting nonclay materials, such as alumina, requires the use of both a deflocculant and a binder. There are many commercially available deflocculants and binders that can be tested in alumina casting slips. However, determination of a suitable deflocculant/binder combination and quantification of the optimal additions of the deflocculant/binder pair can be time consuming. Certain deflocculants are capable of acting as binders. One such additive is sodium carboxymethylcellulose (Na-cmc), a cellulose ether. Na-cmc is a powerful binder. It is a member of the carbohydrate binder group--the binder group with the strongest binding power. It is capable of acting as a deflocculant in glazes and nonclay casting slips.

  11. Microstructural evolution of alumina-zirconia nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic materials have limited use due to their brittleness. The inclusion of nanosized particles in a ceramic matrix, which are called nanocomposites, and ceramic processing control by controlling the grain size and densification can aid in obtaining ceramic products of greater strength and toughness. Studies showed that the zirconia nano inclusions in the matrix of alumina favors an increase in mechanical properties by inhibiting the grain growth of the matrix and not by the mechanism of the transformation toughening phase of zirconia. In this work, the microstructural evolution of alumina nanocomposites containing 15% by volume of nanometric zirconia was studied. From the results it was possible to understand the sintering process of these nanocomposites. (author)

  12. Activation of consolidation processes of alumina ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrenin, S. V.; Zenin, B. S.; Tayukin, R. V.

    2016-02-01

    The methods for activating sintering ceramics based on Al2O3 by mechanical activation in the planetary mill, by adding in the mixture of nanopowders (NP) Al, Al2O3, and submicron powder TiO2, and by applying the technology of spark plasma sintering (SPS) are developed. It has been shown that adding the nanopowder up to 20 wt. % Al2O3 in a coarse powder α-Al2O3 activates the sintering process resulting in increased density and hardness of the sintered alumina ceramics. Substantial effect of increasing density of alumina ceramics due to adding the submicron powder TiO2 in the compound of initial powder mixtures has been established.

  13. Mesoscale Modelling of the Response of Aluminas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of polycrystalline alumina to shock is not well addressed. There are several operating mechanisms that only hypothesized which results in models which are empirical. A similar state of affairs in reactive flow modelling led to the development of mesoscale representations of the flow to illuminate operating mechanisms. In this spirit, a similar effort is undergone for a polycrystalline alumina. Simulations are conducted to observe operating mechanisms at the micron scale. A method is then developed to extend the simulations to meet response at the continuum level where measurements are made. The approach is validated by comparison with continuum experiments. The method and results are presented, and some of the operating mechanisms are illuminated by the observed response

  14. Cochlear implants

    OpenAIRE

    Despotović, Adrijana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to analyze the performance of the child with cochlear implant (CI) at language, math and movement activities. For the purpose of research exercises from all three above mentioned activities are prepared. Results of the exercises constitute the ground for the comparison of a child with CI and children with no hearing disability. Testing language skills was performed with exercises that included understanding, diction and identifying syllables. Mathematic skills...

  15. Phototransferred thermoluminescence and exoemission in alpha alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iacconi, P.; Lapraz, D.; Alessandri-Fraccaro, M.F.; Addi, D. (Univ. de Nice-Sophia Antipolis (France). Lab. d' Emission Electronique et de Luminescence)

    1990-01-01

    {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, irradiated by ionising radiation and submitted to UV illumination, presents a phototransfer phenomenon that is characterised by thermoluminescence (TL) and by thermostimulated exoelectronic emission (TSEE). The TL and the TSEE glow curves of {alpha}-alumina from -196 to 700{sup 0}C are compared, to parallel one phototransfer observation with another and to draw various conclusions concerning the stability of the traps involved in dosimetric applications. (author).

  16. Selective metallization of alumina by laser

    OpenAIRE

    Shrivastva, P.B.; Boose, C.A.; Kolster, B.H.; Harteveld, C; Meinders, B.

    1991-01-01

    Nickel has been selectively deposited on an alumina substrate without any pretreatment from a flow of a nickel acetate solution using the focused beam of an excimer laser. Nickel spots as well as nickel lines were drawn and subsequently plated with an electroless Ni-B coating. Excellent adhesion of the metallized layers was achieved, since with laser irradiation, both etching and deposition took place simultaneously.

  17. Tribological behaviour of anodised alumina nanohoneycombs

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shuo; 王硕

    2012-01-01

    Anodic alumina nanohoneycombs (AAO) have been widely used because of its convenient fabrication and controllable pores’ geometry. A lot of investigations have been conducted to study its physical and chemical properties. However, the mechanical properties, especially tribological properties, of such a popular nanomaterial still remain almost unknown. In this project, a series of scratch experiments were conducted on AAO films fabricated by a two-step anodisation method. The testing system...

  18. Separation of tungsten and rhenium on alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILOVAN SM. STOILJKOVIC

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The conditions for the efficient separation of tungsten(VI and rhenium (VII on alumina were established. The distribution coefficients Kd for tungstate and perrhenate anions, as well as the separation factors a (a = KdWO42-/Kd ReO4- were determined using hydrochloric or nitric acid as the aqueous media. A solution of sodium chloride in the pH range 2–6 was also examined. Under all the tested experimental conditions, alumina is a much better adsorbent for tungsten than for rhenium. The obtained results indicated that the best separation of these two elements is achieved when 0.01– 0.1 mol dm-3 HCl or 1.0 mol dm-3 HNO3 are used as the aqueous media. If NaCl is used as the aqueous phase, the best separation is achieved with 0.20 mol dm-3 NaCl, pH 4–6. Under these experimental conditions, the breakthrough and saturation capacities of alumina for tungsten at pH 4 are 17 and 26 mg W/g Al2O3, respectively. With increasing pH, these values decrease. Thus, at pH 6 they are only 4 and 13 mg W/g Al2O3, respectively.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of single-crystalline alumina nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing; XU Xiang-yu; ZHANG Hong-zhou; CHEN Yao-feng; XU Jun; YU Da-peng

    2005-01-01

    Alumina nanowires were synthesized on large-area silicon substrate via simple thermal evaporation method of heating a mixture of aluminum and alumina powders without using any catalyst or template. The phase structure and the surface morphology of the as-grown sample were analyzed by X-ray diffractometry(XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The chemical composition and the microstructure of the as-grown alumina nanowires were characterized using transmission electron microscope(TEM). The nanowires are usually straight and the single crystalline has average diameter of 40 nm and length of 3 - 5 μm. The growth direction is along the [002] direction. Well aligned alumina nanowire arrays were observed on the surface of many large particles. The catalyst-free growth of the alumina nanowires was explained under the framework of a vapor-solid(VS)growth mechanism. This as-synthesized alumina nanowires could find potential applications in the fabrication of nanodevices.

  20. Free-standing alumina nanobottles and nanotubes pre-integrated into nanoporous alumina membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel interfacial structure consisting of long (up to 5 μm), thin (about 300 nm), highly-ordered, free-standing, highly-reproducible aluminum oxide nanobottles and long tubular nanocapsules attached to a rigid, thin (less than 1 μm) nanoporous anodic alumina membrane is fabricated by simple, fast, catalyst-free, environmentally friendly voltage-pulse anodization. A growth mechanism is proposed based on the formation of straight channels in alumina membrane by anodization, followed by neck formation due to a sophisticated voltage control during the process. This process can be used for the fabrication of alumina nanocontainers with highly controllable geometrical size and volume, vitally important for various applications such as material and energy storage, targeted drug and diagnostic agent delivery, controlled drug and active agent release, gene and biomolecule reservoirs, micro-biologically protected platforms, nano-bioreactors, tissue engineering and hydrogen storage. (paper)

  1. Combustion synthesis and effects of processing parameters on physical properties of {alpha}-alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, M.V.; Hirschfeld, D.A.; Shea, L.E.

    2000-01-04

    Fine particle porous {alpha}-alumina has been prepared by a wet chemical method of combustion synthesis using an aqueous precursor containing aluminum nitrate (oxidizer) and carbohydrazide, an organic fuel as starting materials. The aluminum nitrate and carbohydrazide were reacted exothermically at 400--600 C. The synthesis of {alpha}-alumina ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was used as a model for understanding the effects of processing parameters on physical properties such as surface area, average pore size, and residual carbon content. The porous powders were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), BET surface area analysis and elemental analysis. The decomposition of the starting materials was investigated using differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses (DTA/TGA). It has been shown that the furnace temperature, fuel/oxidizer ratio, and precursor water content can be tailored to produce powders with different physical properties.

  2. Synthesis of alumina/YAG 20 vol% composite by co-precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Lach

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Co-precipitation of alumina/YAG precursor from aluminum and yttrium nitrate solution with ammonium carbonate results in dawsonite. Its crystallographic parameters differ from the compound precipitated with no yttrium additive. It suggests that yttrium ions become incorporated into the dawsonite structure. The DSC/TG and X-ray diffraction measurements show decomposition of dawsonite at elevated temperatures resulting in γ-Al2O3 and then δ- and θ-alumina modifications. Full transformation to α-Al2O3 and YAG occurs at temperatures higher than 1230°C. Starting powder for the sintering experiments was prepared using the coprecipitated precursor calcined at 600°C. Seeding of such powder with 5 wt.% α-Al2O3 results in material of 98% density at 1500°C. Much lower densification show compacts of unseeded powder.

  3. Surface characterization of alumina reinforced with niobium carbide obtained by polymer precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Acchar

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Active filler controlled pyrolysis of polymers (AFCOP is a recent method for obtaining near-net shaped ceramic bodies. Alumina based composites have been developed for use as cutting tools, so knowledge of the surface composition is extremely important because it is directly related to the hardness and wear resistance Samples containing a fixed concentration of 60 wt. (% of polysiloxane and a mixture of metallic niobium and alumina powder were homogenized, uniaxially warm pressed at 80 °C and subsequently pyrolyzed in flowing argon at 1200, 1400 and 1500 °C. Analysis of the surface composition was carried out by X ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, X ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results have indicated that the formation of the phases on the surface depends strongly on the niobium/carbon ratio in the raw materials.

  4. Atmospheric Moisture Content Effects on Ionic Liquid Wettability of Alumina

    OpenAIRE

    Brittle, S.; Samuel, A; W. B. Zimmerman

    2014-01-01

    The contact angles or wettability of 7 Ionic Liquids, on an alumina substrate, have been measured under two different storage conditions. The first using a small amount of moisture content, the second with no moisture content. The contact angle of Ionic Liquid droplets on an alumina substrate were measured using an Attension Theta instrument with automated software. The results show that a small amount of moisture improves the wettability of the Ionic Liquid – alumina system and therefore sub...

  5. Corrosion of Refractory Alumina-Graphite and Alumina-Graphite-Zirconia in Slag Containing Titania

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yuan; LIU Qing-cai; BAI Chen-guang; CHEN Deng-fu; Joseph W Newkirk

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion of refractory alumina-graphite and alumina-graphite-zirconia in the slag containing titania was studied by immersion tests (quasi-static and dynamic tests). Combining direct observation with microscopic investigations, a mechanism for corrosion was proposed based on the oxidation of graphite and the dissolution of refractory components. During the corrosion process, there are some special phenomena and laws that can be explained by the relation between the corrosion rate and the TiO2 mass percent, the rotational refractory velocity and the morphology of the deteriorated layer.

  6. Challenges and Strategies in the Synthesis of Mesoporous Alumina Powders and Hierarchical Alumina Monoliths

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Galarneau; Alexander Sachse; Sarah Hartmann

    2012-01-01

    A new rapid, very simple and one-step sol-gel strategy for the large-scale preparation of highly porous γ-Al2O3 is presented. The resulting mesoporous alumina materials feature high surface areas (400 m2 g−1), large pore volumes (0.8 mL g−1) and the ��-Al2O3 phase is obtained at low temperature (500 °C). The main advantages and drawbacks of different preparations of mesoporous alumina materials exhibiting high specific surface areas and large pore volumes such as surfactant-nanostructured alu...

  7. Modelling the initial stage of porous alumina growth during anodization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryslanova, E. M.; Alfimov, A. V.; Chivilikhin, S. A.

    2013-05-01

    Artificially on the surface of aluminum there may be build a thick layer of Al2O3, which has a porous structure. In this paper we present a model of growth of porous alumina in the initial stage of anodizing, identifying dependencies anodizing parameters on the rate of growth of the film and the distance between the pores and as a result of the created model equations were found for changes in the disturbance of alumina for the initial stage of anodizing aluminum oxide porous border aluminum-alumina and alumina-electrolyte, with the influence of surface diffusion of aluminum oxide.

  8. Tribological and stability investigations of alkylphosphonic acids on alumina surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alumina substrates are commonly used for various micro-/nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS). For efficient and lifetime longevity of these devices, lubricant films of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with nanometer thickness are increasingly being employed. In the present paper, we report preparation, tribological and stability investigations of alkylphosphonic acids on the alumina surface. The alkylphosphonic acids were prepared on the alumina surface using the liquid phase deposition method. The effectiveness of modification of the alumina surface by alkylphosphonic acids was investigated using water contact angle measurements, secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy. Frictional behavior in milinewton load range was studied by microtribometry. It is shown that surface modification of the alumina surface by alkylphosphonic acids reduces the coefficient of friction values compared to the unmodified alumina. In comparison to the non-modified alumina surface, all tested alkylphosphonic acids cause a decrease in the friction coefficients in friction tests for counterparts made from different materials, such as steel, zirconia and silicon nitride. It is also found that the alumina surface modified by alkylphosphonic acids with longer chain has a higher degree of hydrophobicity and lower coefficient of friction. The best frictional properties are obtained for the system consisting of the alumina surface modified by n-octadecylphosphonic acid and silicon nitride counterpart. Stability tests in different environmental conditions: laboratory, acidic and alkaline solutions were also monitored.

  9. An Insertable Passive LC Pressure Sensor Based on an Alumina Ceramic for In Situ Pressure Sensing in High-Temperature Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Jijun Xiong; Chen Li; Pinggang Jia; Xiaoyong Chen; Wendong Zhang; Jun Liu; Chenyang Xue; Qiulin Tan

    2015-01-01

    Pressure measurements in high-temperature applications, including compressors, turbines, and others, have become increasingly critical. This paper proposes an implantable passive LC pressure sensor based on an alumina ceramic material for in situ pressure sensing in high-temperature environments. The inductance and capacitance elements of the sensor were designed independently and separated by a thermally insulating material, which is conducive to reducing the influence of the temperature on ...

  10. Highly conductive alumina/NCN composites electrodes fabricated by gelcasting and reduction-sintering-An electrochemical behavior study in aggressive environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel highly conductive alumina/nano-carbon network composites (alumina/NCN composites) was fabricated by gelcasting and reduction-sintering method under argon atmosphere. The electrochemical behaviors of the alumina/NCN composites were studied systematically in some aggressive solutions (HCl, H2SO4, HNO3, NaOH, and KOH), using potentiodynamic polarization and chronoamperometry and X-ray diffraction and SEM observations. The results showed that the electrochemical stability and reproducibility of the composite electrodes in these diluted acids and alkalis were very good and had, in some extent, an electro-catalytic activity toward formation of hydrogen evolution and reduction of dissolved oxygen in aqueous solutions in comparison with a commercial graphite electrode. In addition, the pyrolyzed nano-carbon contents, size, and shape in the alumina matrix, have greatly effects on the electrochemical performances and electrode reactions in these solutions. It is found that the minimal residual carbon content of 0.62 wt.% in the matrix is enough to improve electrochemical performances and avoid to loss the ceramics physical properties at the same time. When the additional potential in all the tested electrolytes was at +1700 mV (vs. SCE), alumina particles at the electrode surface were not observed to dissolve into solution in this case, indicating the material being suitable for electrodes in aggressive solutions

  11. Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Karimi

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available People with profound hearing loss are not able to use some kinds of conventional amplifiers due to the nature of their loss . In these people, hearing sense is stimulated only when the auditory nerve is activated via electrical stimulation. This stimulation is possible through cochlear implant. In fact, for the deaf people who have good mental health and can not use surgical and medical treatment and also can not benefit from air and bone conduction hearing aids, this device is used if they have normal central auditory system. The basic parts of the device included: Microphone, speech processor, transmitter, stimulator and receiver, and electrode array.

  12. Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. What Is an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator? An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is a small ... pacemakers and defibrillators. Comparison of an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator and a Pacemaker The image compares an ICD ...

  13. Nanotechnology and Dental Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Sandrine Lavenus; Guy Louarn; Pierre Layrolle

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of i...

  14. Chemical treatment and biomimetic coating evaluating in zirconia-alumina ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic materials, as alumina and zirconia have been explored along the years as biomaterials application. The bio inert nature has been stimulating the development of new alternatives, as chemical treatments to improve the biological application of these ceramics. The biomimetic process of bio inert ceramics for coating apatite is based on soaking the implant in a simulated body fluid, SBF, with ion concentrations nearly equal to those of human blood plasma. The bioactivity of the material is related with the formation of a layer constituted of hydroxyapatite low crystalline, similar to the biological apatite. The biocompatibility associated to the structural properties of the alumina and zirconia has been stimulating the clinical use of these materials, mainly in areas of larger mechanical requests, places not recommended for bioactive hydroxyapatite, for instance. In this work samples of alumina, zirconia doped with Yttria (3% mol) and composites of alumina and zirconia doped with Yttria (3% mol) were prepared by co-precipitation method, calcinate, sintered, chemically treated with solutions of acid phosphoric and sodium hydroxide and them immersed in 1.0 M and 1.5 M SBF. The calcinate powders were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), gas adsorption (BET) and laser diffraction. The XRD results indicate that the samples are low crystalline. It was observed for BET that the samples present high specific surface area. The results of laser diffraction and SEM showed that the powders are agglomerates. The sintered samples were analyzed by XRD, SEM and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The phases quantified by Rietveld method were: cubic, tetragonal and monoclinic of the zirconia, besides the phase alpha of the alumina. The chemical treatment with phosphoric acid didn't present a tendency of larger apatite formation in relation to the samples no chemically treated. The treatment with sodium hydroxide provoked accentuated transformation of

  15. Pengaruh Pemasukan Alumina Terhadap Operasi Tungku Reduksi di PT. Inalum Kuala Tanjung

    OpenAIRE

    Sudjana, Putra Eka

    2015-01-01

    Produksi aluminium cair di PT INALUM memerlukan bahan baku utama berupa alumina (Al2O3). Pemasukan alumina (Al2O3) mempunyai dua metode yaitu Regular Feeding dan Demand Feeding. Metode demand feeding yang digunakan yaitu pemasukan alumina (Al2O3) berdasarkan kebutuhan . Konsentrasi alumina (Al2O3) pada operasi tungku reduksi berkisar antara 2% - 4%. Konsentrasi alumina (Al2O3) < 1% akan menyebabkan terjadinya efek anoda atau anode effect (AE) dan konsentrasi alumina (Al2O3) ...

  16. Sulfuric Acid and Ammonium Sulfate Leaching of Alumina from Lampang Clay

    OpenAIRE

    Numluk, Paweena; Chaisena, Aphiruk

    2012-01-01

    The rapid development of the global alumina industry has led to a considerable increase in the production alumina and processing of alumina from non-bauxitic sources. Lampang clays comprise various minerals that contain about 22.70 wt% of extractable alumina. Local clay was ground, activated by calcination and treated with sulfuric acid to extract alumina. In the activation step, the effects of temperature and time on the extraction of alumina and iron were investigated. The leaching experime...

  17. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard;

    2013-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  18. IMPROVED CORROSION RESISTANCE FOR ALUMINA REFRACTORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John P. Hurley; Patty L. Kleven

    1999-04-30

    In order to increase the efficiency of advanced coal-fired power systems, higher working fluid temperatures must be reached. Some system surfaces will have to be protected by covering them with corrosion-resistant refractories. Corrosion is the degradation of the material surfaces or grain boundaries by chemical reactions with melts, liquids, or gases causing loss of material and, consequently, a decrease in the strength of the structure. In order to develop methods of reducing corrosion, the microstructure that is attacked must be identified along with the mechanism and rates of attack. Earlier tests with several commercially available high-temperature castable refractories showed that the fused-alumina aggregate grains within the materials had the highest corrosion resistance of any of the castable materials. However, the cement holding the grains was easily attacked. Therefore, to improve the corrosion resistance and thermomechanical properties of alumina-based refractories, we attempted to change the cement to a more corrosion- and erosion-resistant bonding material through the addition of rare-earth oxides (REO). Phase diagrams were used to identify stable high-melting-temperature materials within the lanthanide-alumina series that could modify the bonding phase of the alumina-based refractory. Two mechanisms of reducing corrosion were investigated. One was the formation of corrosion-resistant layers within the refractory. The other was increased sintering to increase strength and seal continuous pores that would reduce slag penetration. Garnets (Re{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) and perovskites (ReAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}), where Re is the REO, are two of the stable high-melting-temperature materials identified that were believed could be formed in the refractory matrix to help reduce corrosion rates. For the base refractory, Plicast 99 made by Plibrico was chosen. It is a 99% alumina castable composed of fused alumina aggregate and a cement made primarily from Alphabond

  19. Early detachment of titanium particles from various different surfaces of endosseous dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, M; Bacchelli, B; Martini, D; Pasquale, V De; Orsini, E; Ottani, V; Fini, M; Giavaresi, G; Giardino, R; Ruggeri, A

    2004-05-01

    Titanium (Ti) endosseous dental screws with different surfaces (smooth titanium--STi, titanium plasma-sprayed-TPS, alumina oxide sandblasted and acid-etched--Al-SLA, zirconium oxide sandblasted and acid etched--Zr-SLA) were implanted in femura and tibiae of sheep to investigate the biological evolution of the peri-implant tissues and detachment of Ti debris from the implant surfaces in early healing. Implants were not loaded. Sections of the screws and the peri-implant tissues obtained by sawing and grinding were analysed by light microscopy immediately after implantation (time 0) and after 14 days. All samples showed new bone trabeculae and vascularised medullary spaces in those areas where gaps between the implants and host bone were visible. In contrast, no osteogenesis was induced in the areas where the implants were initially positioned in close contact with the host bone. Chips of the pre-existing bone inducing new peri-implant neo-osteogenesis were surrounded by new bone trabeculae. The threads of some screws appeared to be deformed where the host bone showed fractures. Ti granules of 3-60 microm were detectable only in the peri-implant tissues of TPS implants both immediately after surgery and after 14 days, thus suggesting that this phenomenon may be related to the friction of the TPS coating during surgical insertion. PMID:14741589

  20. NMR Revealed Activated Alumina-Water Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Rui; ZHOU Yan; HU Kai; JI Zhen-ping; CHENG Gong-zhen

    2005-01-01

    Three different spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of water were obtained in activated alumina-water slurry system, which indicate that there exist three states of water: bound water, pore water and bulk water. The chemical shift (δH) decreases as the amount of water added to the system increases due to the differences in contribution of these three states of water in the samples. The δH value for adsorbed water decreases nearly linearly and T1 increases with elevating temperature, which result from the decrease in the content of bound water by the increase in thermal motion.

  1. Improved Synthesis Of Potassium Beta' '-Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Roger M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Ryan, Margaret A.; O'Connor, Dennis E.; Kisor, Adam; Underwood, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Improved formulations of precursor materials synthesize nearly-phase-pure potassium beta' '-alumina solid electrolyte (K-BASE) powder. Materials are microhomogeneous powders (or, alternatively, gels) containing K(+,) Mg(2+), and Al(3+). K-BASE powder produced used in potassium-working-fluid alkali-metal thermal-to-electric conversion (K-AMTEC), in which heat-input and heat-rejection temperatures lower than sodium-working-fluid AMTEC (Na-AMTEC). Additional potential use lies in purification of pottassium by removal of sodium and calcium.

  2. Conduction mechanism of single-crystal alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Fritz G.; Delorenzi, Horst G.; Janora, Kevin H.

    1992-01-01

    The fully guarded three-terminal technique was used to perform conductivity measurements on single-crystal alumina at temperatures of 400-1300 C. The conductivity was also determined as a function of time at various temperatures and applied fields. Further, the fractions of the current carried by Al and O ions (ionic transference numbers) were determined from long-term transference experiments in the temperature range 1100-1300 C. A mathematical model of the conduction mechanism is proposed, and model predictions are compared with experimental results.

  3. Mutagenic effects of ion implantation on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry seeds of Stevia were implanted by 75 keV nitrogen and carbon ions with various doses. The biological effects in M1 and mutation in M2 were studied. The results showed that ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with ion beam dose. The rate of cells with chromosomal aberration was lower than that induced with γ-rays. Frequency of the mutation induced by implantation of N+ and C+ ions were higher than those induced by γ-rays. The rate of cell with chromosome aberration and in M2 useful mutation induced by implantation of C+ ion was higher than those induced by implantation of N+ ion. Mutagenic effects Feng1 x Riyuan and Riyuan x Feng2 by implantation of N+ and C+ were higher than that of Jining and Feng2

  4. Mineralogy, geochemistry, and genesis of high-alumina fenites of the Mont Saint-Hilaire alkaline pluton, Québec, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, O. S.; Pekov, I. V.; Horváth, L.; Bryzgalov, I. A.; Yapaskurt, V. O.; Guseva, E. V.

    2010-12-01

    High-alumina fenites in the Mont Saint-Hilaire alkaline complex, Québec, Canada, form bodies at the contact of peralkaline nepheline syenite. Fenites are subdivided into four types: corundum-spessartine-biotite-feldspar, muscovite-corundum-hercynite-biotite-feldspar, carbonated muscovite-biotite-hercynite-feldspar, and spessartine-hercynite-feldspar. Accessory minerals of the ilmenite-pyrophanite series, columbites, zircon, thorite, pyrrhotite, Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Ba, and REE carbonates, uedaite-(Ce), etc. are identified. Three stages are suggested in the formation of these rocks. In mineralogy and geochemistry, the Mont Saint-Hilaire high-alumina fenites are similar to Al-rich fenites replacing xenoliths in the Khibiny alkaline complex, Russia. In both cases, fenites are related to peralkaline rocks and replace high-alumina protoliths: granite at Mont Saint-Hilaire and metapelites in the Khibiny Mountains. These fenites are regarded as a specific type of fenites with rock-forming Mg-depleted hercynite.

  5. X-ray photoelectron study of Si+ ion implanted polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize different polymer materials implanted with low energy Si+ ions (E=30 keV, D= 1.1017 cm-2). Two kinds of polymers were studied - ultra-high-molecular-weight poly-ethylene (UHMWPE), and poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA). The non-implanted polymer materials show the expected variety of chemical bonds: carbon-carbon, carbon being three- and fourfold coordinated, and carbon-oxygen in the case of PMMA samples. The X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectra show that Si+ ion implantation leads to the introduction of additional disorder in the polymer material. The X-ray photoelectron spectra of the implanted polymers show that, in addition to already mentioned bonds, silicon creates new bonds with the host elements - Si-C and Si-O, together with additional Si dangling bonds as revealed by the valence band study of the implanted polymer materials.

  6. 3.5. Drying of cryolite-alumina concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is devoted to drying of cryolite-alumina concentrate. The drying process of cryolite-alumina concentrate at isothermal and polythermal conditions was studied. The kinetics and mechanism of the process were studied as well. The kinetics of concentrate drying under isothermal conditions was studied in air bath and results are presented.

  7. Textural stability of titania–alumina composite membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Krishnankutty-Nair P.; Keizer, Klaas; Burggraaf, Anthonie J.

    1993-01-01

    Textural evolution (porosity reduction, pore and crystallite growth) in titania–alumina composite membranes has been studied using thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and N2 physisorption techniques. The presence of alumina in the membranes improved the t

  8. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-01

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100-1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr2O3 decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  9. Radiation dose determination by using powder Seydisehir alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) is a passive dose measurement method used for the supervision, quality control and calibration during radiation dose measurements. Nowadays TLDs, including alumina, are largely used and investigated due to high sensitivity, physical and chemical stability, and re-usefulness. In this work, powder form of Seydisehir alumina is used as a thermoluminescence material and α and β radiation doses were measured.

  10. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100–1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr2O3 decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  11. Depositing Adherent Ag Films On Ti Films On Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honecy, Frank S.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses cleaning of ceramic (principally, alumina) substrates in preparation for sputter deposition of titanium intermediate films on substrates followed by sputter deposition of outer silver films. Principal intended application, substrates sliding parts in advanced high-temperature heat engines, and outer silver films serve as solid lubricants: lubricating properties described in "Solid Lubricant for Alumina" (LEW-15495).

  12. The enhancement in wear resistance of W18Cr4V steel by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two new methods of ion implantation were adopted in comparison with nitrogen implantation: carbon monoxide was implanted directly into W18Cr4V steel, and nitrogen was implanted into a deposited titanium film about 1000 A thick. It is shown that higher surface hardness and wear resistance have been achieved. The composition and phase structure of the implanted layer was determined in detail. The wear mechanisms were discussed

  13. Methanol steam reforming promoted by molten salt-modified platinum on alumina catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusche, Matthias; Agel, Friederike; Ní Bhriain, Nollaig; Kaftan, Andre; Laurin, Mathias; Libuda, Jörg; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2014-09-01

    We herein describe a straight forward procedure to increase the performance of platinum-on-alumina catalysts in methanol steam reforming by applying an alkali hydroxide coating according to the "solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer" (SCILL) approach. We demonstrate by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) studies that potassium doping plays an important role in the catalyst activation. Moreover, the hygroscopic nature and the basicity of the salt modification contribute to the considerable enhancement in catalytic performance. During reaction, a partly liquid film of alkali hydroxides/carbonates forms on the catalyst/alumina surface, thus significantly enhancing the availability of water at the catalytically active sites. Too high catalyst pore fillings with salt introduce a considerable mass transfer barrier into the system as indicated by kinetic studies. Thus, the optimum interplay between beneficial catalyst modification and detrimental mass transfer effects had to be identified and was found on the applied platinum-on-alumina catalyst at KOH loadings around 7.5 mass%. PMID:25124120

  14. Alumina and quartz as dielectrics in a dielectric barrier discharges DBD system for CO2 hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, E. Y.; Sarmiento, A.; Vera, E.

    2016-02-01

    In this work was studied the CO2 carbon dioxide treatment, which is a pollutant gas and the main cause of global warming. For this aim, plasma was generated, through dielectric barrier discharges DBD, using hydrogen H2 together with the CO2 as reaction gases. There were used as dielectrics, alumina and quartz tubes of identical geometry. It was studied the CO2 conversion in function of mixture composition CO2+H2, of the electrical power and the operation frequency, for three different gas flows. In all cases it was achieved better conversion levels with the alumina; this is because the alumina has a relative dielectric permittivity coefficient higher than the quartz. As products of CO2 conversion in the chemical reactions, water H2O and methane gas CH4 were identified. The CO2 conversion percentage to fixed work conditions was higher with the decrease the quantity of this gas in the mixture, with increase the active electrical power, and with decrease the operation electrical frequency.

  15. Complete Oxidation of Methane over Palladium Supported on Alumina Modified with Calcium, Lanthanum, and Cerium Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beata Stasinska; Wojciech Gac; Theophilos Ioannides; Andrzej Machocki

    2007-01-01

    The activity and thermal stability of Pd/Al2O3 and Pd/(Al2O3+MOx) (M=Ca, La, Ce) palladium catalysts in the reaction of complete oxidation of methane are presented in this study. The catalyst supports were prepared by sol-gel method and they were dried either conventionally or with supercritical carbon dioxide. Then they were impregnated with palladium nitrate solution. The catalysts with unmodified alumina had a high surface area. The activity and thermal stability of the alumina-supported catalyst was also very high. The introduction of calcium, lanthanum, or cerium oxide into alumina support caused a decrease of the surface area in the way dependent on the support precursor drying method. These modifiers decreased the activity of palladium catalysts, and they required higher temperatures for the complete oxidation of methane than unmodified Pd/Al2O3. The improvement of the palladium activity by lanthanum and cerium support modifier was observed only at low temperatures of the reaction.

  16. Microscale tribological behavior and in vitro biocompatibility of graphene nanoplatelet reinforced alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Andy; Zhao, Jing Ming; Han, Young-Hwan; Hwang, Kyu Hong; Schoenung, Julie M

    2016-08-01

    Graphene nanoplatelets were added as reinforcement to alumina ceramics in order to enhance microscale tribological behavior, which would be beneficial for ceramic-on-ceramic hip implant applications. The reduction in microscale wear is critical to hip implant applications where small amounts of wear debris can be detrimental to patients and to implant performance. The addition of the GNPs lead to improvements in fracture toughness and wear (scratch) resistance of 21% and 39%, respectively. The improved wear resistance was attributed to GNP-induced toughening, which generates fine (~100nm) microcracks on the scratch surface. In addition, active participation of GNPs was observed in the scratch subsurface of GNP-reinforced samples through focused ion beam sectioning. Friction coefficients are not significantly influenced by the addition of GNPs, and hence GNPs do not act as solid state lubricants. In vitro biocompatibility with human osteoblasts was assessed to evaluate any possible cytotoxic effects induced by GNPs. Osteoblast cells were observed to survive and proliferate robustly in the GNP-reinforced samples, particularly those with high (10-15vol%) GNP content. PMID:26854935

  17. Protein-releasing conductive anodized alumina membranes for nerve-interface materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntas, Sevde; Buyukserin, Fatih; Haider, Ali; Altinok, Buket; Biyikli, Necmi; Aslim, Belma

    2016-10-01

    Nanoporous anodized alumina membranes (AAMs) have numerous biomedical applications spanning from biosensors to controlled drug delivery and implant coatings. Although the use of AAM as an alternative bone implant surface has been successful, its potential as a neural implant coating remains unclear. Here, we introduce conductive and nerve growth factor-releasing AAM substrates that not only provide the native nanoporous morphology for cell adhesion, but also induce neural differentiation. We recently reported the fabrication of such conductive membranes by coating AAMs with a thin C layer. In this study, we investigated the influence of electrical stimulus, surface topography, and chemistry on cell adhesion, neurite extension, and density by using PC 12 pheochromocytoma cells in a custom-made glass microwell setup. The conductive AAMs showed enhanced neurite extension and generation with the electrical stimulus, but cell adhesion on these substrates was poorer compared to the naked AAMs. The latter nanoporous material presents chemical and topographical features for superior neuronal cell adhesion, but, more importantly, when loaded with nerve growth factor, it can provide neurite extension similar to an electrically stimulated CAAM counterpart. PMID:27287158

  18. Comparison of deep desulfurization methods in alumina production process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘战伟; 李旺兴; 马文会; 尹中林; 武国宝

    2015-01-01

    Several methods of deep desulfurization in alumina production process were studied, and the costs of these methods were compared. It is found that most of the S2− in sodium aluminate solution can be removed by adding sodium nitrate or hydrogen peroxide in digestion process, and in this way the effect of S2− on alumina product quality is eliminated. However, the removal efficiency of2-23SOin sodium aluminate solution is very low by this method. Both S2− and2-23SO in sodium aluminate solution can be removed completely by wet oxidation method in digestion process. The cost of desulfurization by wet oxidation is lower than by adding sodium nitrate or hydrogen peroxide. The results of this research reveal that wet oxidation is an economical and feasible method for the removal of sulfur in alumina production process to improve alumina quality, and provide valuable guidelines for alumina production by high-sulfur bauxite.

  19. Morphology and transmittance of porous alumina on glass substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Peitao, E-mail: guopeitao@hotmail.com [Wuhan University of Technology. Wuhan (China); Xia Zhilin [Wuhan University of Technology. Wuhan (China); Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials and Application Technology, Xiangtan University, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan (China); Xue Yiyu [Wuhan University of Technology. Wuhan (China); Huang Caihua [China Three Gorges University, Yichang (China); Zhao Lixin [Wuhan University of Technology. Wuhan (China)

    2011-02-01

    The porous optical film has higher threshold of laser-induced damage than densified films, for the study of mechanism of laser-induced damage of porous optical film with ordered pore structure. Porous anodic alumina (PAA) film with high transmittance on glass substrate has been prepared. Aluminum film was deposited on glass substrate by means of resistance and electron beam heat (EBH) evaporation. Porous alumina was prepared in oxalic acid solution under different anodizing conditions. At normal incidence, the optical transmittance spectrum over 300-1000 nm spectra region was obtained by spectrophotometer. SEM was introduced to analysis the morphology of the porous alumina film. The pore aperture increased with the increase of anodizing voltage, which resulted in a rapid decrease of the pore concentration and the optical thickness of porous alumina film. Damage morphology of porous alumina film is found to be typically defects initiated, and the defect is the pore presented on the film.

  20. Batteries used to power implantable biomedical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battery systems have been developed that provide years of service for implantable medical devices. The primary systems utilize lithium metal anodes with cathode systems including iodine, manganese oxide, carbon monofluoride, silver vanadium oxide and hybrid cathodes. Secondary lithium ion batteries have also been developed for medical applications where the batteries are charged while remaining implanted. While the specific performance requirements of the devices vary, some general requirements are common. These include high safety, reliability and volumetric energy density, long service life, and state of discharge indication. Successful development and implementation of these battery types has helped enable implanted biomedical devices and their treatment of human disease.

  1. Efeito da adição de polímero precursor cerâmico na sinterização de alumina Effect of the addition of ceramic polymeric precursor on alumina sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. E Godoy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados os efeitos da adição de polímero precursor na sinterização, microestrutura e dureza da alumina. O polímero inorgânico polifenilmetilvinilhidrogenosilsesquioxano (PPS foi utilizado como aditivo em cerâmicas de alumina sinterizadas a 1650 ºC. Os materiais sinterizados foram caracterizados por dilatometria, determinando-se a densidade aparente por picnometria de hélio, pela análise de carbono total, por difração de raios X, por microscopia eletrônica de varredura, espectrometria de energia dispersiva de raios X e por análise de indentação Vickers para determinação de dureza e tenacidade a fratura. Foram obtidas fases heterogêneas de Si2Al4O4N4 nas amostras com PPS. Dentre as amostras analisadas, a que contém 5% de PPS apresentou dureza e tenacidade à fratura superiores à da alumina pura. A preparação de compósitos cerâmicos com pequenas quantidades de polímero precursor mostrou-se um processo adequado para cerâmicas à base de alumina, sendo uma rota simples de conformação com grande potencial para a obtenção de peças com geometria complexa.The effects of the addition of precursor polymer on sintering, microstructure and hardness of alumina ceramics were studied. The linear shrinkage of cold-pressed specimens was studied by dilatometry. Polyphenylmethylvinylhidrogensilsesquioxane (PPS polymer sintering aid was used for alumina based ceramics sintered at 1650 ºC. The sintered materials were characterized by determination of apparent density by helium picnometry, by evaluation of total carbon content, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and by Vickers indentation analysis for determining hardness and fracture toughness. Heterogeneous Si2Al4O4 phases were obtained in specimens with PPS. The specimens with 5% of PPS presented hardness and toughness greater than the obtained for pure alumina. The preparation of ceramic composites using small amounts of

  2. In vivo transformation of a calcium carbonate (aragonite based implant's biomaterial to bone. A histological, chemical and FT-IR study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón González

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la respuesta del tejido óseo a implantes de carbonato de calcio aragonito (CCA. Se utilizaron implantes de Hidroxiapatita Coralina (HA en la misma forma y proceder quirúrgico como biomaterial de control comparativo. Se investigó el efecto de la composición química sobre la capacidad de curación y la velocidad de reabsorción de ambos biomateriales implantados en el fémur de ratas. Los animales fueron sacrificados a los 3, 7, 15, 21 y 60 d y los implantes fueron recuperados para los análisis posteriores. La evaluación se realiz ó mediante técnicas de microscopia óptica, estudios histológicos y radiográficos, análisis químico cuantitativo de calcio y fósforo y espectroscopia IR de Transformada de Fourier (FT-IR. Se encontró que ambos biomateriales fueron bien asimilados y se integraron al tejido óseo circundante. En el caso de la Hidroxiapatita se observó que a los 60 d el defecto óseo fue reparado, pero el biomaterial mantuvo la misma apariencia inicial. Por el contrario, en ese mismo período, el implante de coral (CCA disminuyó su tamaño y su apariencia resultó más parecida a la del tejido circundante. Los estudios histológicos mostraron la misma capacidad osteogénica en ambos biomateriales en los primeros 7 d de implantados, pero a los 15 d se aprecia una mayor velocidad de sustitución del tejido fibrovascular por hueso en el caso del CCA. La cinética de biodegradación calculada a partir de los análisis químicos (relación Ca/P y de los espectros IR coincide con las observaciones histológicas y muestra una mayor velocidad de reabsorción de los implantes de carbonato de calcio (CCA. Se encontró que la transformación del CCA produce una fase similar a la del hueso debido a la pérdida paulatina del anión carbonato y la incorporación del fosfato correspondiente. El CCA también presentó una mayor capacidad osteogénica en comparación con la HA. A los 60 d el (42,5 ± 3,2 % del CCA originalmente

  3. Friction and wear study of diamond-like carbon gradient coatings on Ti6Al4V substrate prepared by plasma source ion implant-ion beam enhanced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DLC gradient coatings had been deposited on Ti6Al4V alloy substrate by plasma source ion implantation-ion beam enhanced deposition method and their friction and wear behavior sliding against ultra high molecular weight polyethylene counterpart were investigated. The results showed that DLC gradient coated Ti6Al4V had low friction coefficient, which reduced 24, 14 and 10% compared with non-coated Ti6Al4V alloy under dry sliding, lubrication of bovine serum and 0.9% NaCl solution, respectively. DLC gradient coated Ti6Al4V showed significantly improved wear resistance, the wear rate was about half of non-coated Ti6Al4V alloy. The wear of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene counterpart was also reduced. High adhesion to Ti6Al4V substrate of DLC gradient coatings and surface structure played important roles in improved tribological performance, serious oxidative wear was eliminated when DLC gradient coating was applied to the Ti6Al4V alloy

  4. Friction and wear study of diamond-like carbon gradient coatings on Ti6Al4V substrate prepared by plasma source ion implant-ion beam enhanced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Shuwen; Jiang Bin; Li Yan; Li Yanrong; Yin Guangfu; Zheng Changqiong

    2004-09-15

    DLC gradient coatings had been deposited on Ti6Al4V alloy substrate by plasma source ion implantation-ion beam enhanced deposition method and their friction and wear behavior sliding against ultra high molecular weight polyethylene counterpart were investigated. The results showed that DLC gradient coated Ti6Al4V had low friction coefficient, which reduced 24, 14 and 10% compared with non-coated Ti6Al4V alloy under dry sliding, lubrication of bovine serum and 0.9% NaCl solution, respectively. DLC gradient coated Ti6Al4V showed significantly improved wear resistance, the wear rate was about half of non-coated Ti6Al4V alloy. The wear of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene counterpart was also reduced. High adhesion to Ti6Al4V substrate of DLC gradient coatings and surface structure played important roles in improved tribological performance, serious oxidative wear was eliminated when DLC gradient coating was applied to the Ti6Al4V alloy.

  5. Modified-starch Consolidation of Alumina Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Chenhui; WANG Yanmin; YE Jiandong; HUANG Yun

    2008-01-01

    The alumina ceramics with the homogeneous microstructure and the higher density were fabricated via the modified-starch consolidation process by 1.0 wt%of a modified starch as a consolidator/binder.The swelling behavior of the modified oxidized tapioca starch was analyzed by optical microscope,and two other corn starches(common corn starch and high amylose COrn starch)were also analyzed for comparison.The modified starch used as a binder for the consolidation swelled at about 55℃.began to gelatinize at 65℃ and then was completely gelatinized at 75℃.But the corn starches could not be completely gelatinized even at 80℃for 1 h.The high-strength green bodies(10.6 MPa)with the complex shapes were produced.The green bodies were sintered without any binder burnout procedure at 1700℃and a relative density of 95.3% was obtained for the sintered bodies,which is similar to that of the sintered sample formed by conventional slip casting.In addition,the effect of temperature on the apparent viscosity of the starch/alumina slurry in the process was investigated,and the corresponding mechanism for the starch consolidation was discussed.

  6. Properties of Transition Metal Doped Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykwest, Erik; Limmer, Krista; Brennan, Ray; Blair, Victoria; Ramprasad, Rampi

    Crystallographic texture can have profound effects on the properties of a material. One method of texturing is through the application of an external magnetic field during processing. While this method works with highly magnetic systems, doping is required to couple non-magnetic systems with the external field. Experiments have shown that low concentrations of rare earth (RE) dopants in alumina powders have enabled this kind of texturing. The magnetic properties of RE elements are directly related to their f orbital, which can have as many as 7 unpaired electrons. Since d-block elements can have as many as 5 unpaired electrons the effects of substitutional doping of 3d transition metals (TM) for Al in alpha (stable) and theta (metastable) alumina on the local structure and magnetic properties, in addition to the energetic cost, have been calculated by performing first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. This study has led to the development of general guidelines for the magnetic moment distribution at and around the dopant atom, and the dependence of this distribution on the dopant atom type and its coordination environment. It is anticipated that these findings can aid in the selection of suitable dopants help to guide parallel experimental efforts. This project was supported in part by an internship at the Army Research Laboratory, administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, along with a grant of computer time from the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program.

  7. Lightweight alumina refractory aggregate. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swansiger, T.G.; Pearson, A.

    1996-07-16

    Objective was to develop a lightweight, high alumina refractory aggregate for use in various high performance insulating (low thermal conductivity) refractory applications (e.g., in the aluminium, glass, cement, and iron and steel industries). A new aggregate process was developed through bench and pilot-scale experiments involving extrusion of a blend of calcined and activated alumina powders and organic extrusion aids and binders. The aggregate, with a bulk density approaching 2.5 g/cc, exhibited reduced thermal conductivity and adequate fired strength compared to dense tabular aggregate. Refractory manufacturers were moderately enthusiastic over the results. Alcoa prepared an economic analysis for producing lightweight aggregate, based on a retrofit of this process into existing Alcoa production facilities. However, a new, competing lightweight aggregate material was developed by another company; this material (Plasmal{trademark})had a significantly more favorable cost base than the Alcoa/DOE material, due to cheap raw materials and fewer processing steps. In late 1995, Alcoa became a distributor of Plasmal. Alcoa estimated that {ge}75% of the market originally envisioned for the Alcoa/DOE aggregate would be taken by Plasmal. Hence, it was decided to terminate the contract without the full- scale demonstration.

  8. Ultrasonic analysis of sintered alumina pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium dioxide pellets are used as fuel in Pressurized Water Reactors. These pellets require some degree of porosity to accommodate fission products generated during the burning of fuel. It is usual to utilize the Archimedes method to determine the sintered pellet porosity. For the determination of closed pores, samples of pellets need to be analyzed using micrography to calculate the distribution of the pores. The ultrasonic group of the Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN) is developing a nondestructive characterization through ultrasonic technique in the frequency domain, this technique will permit to minimize the time for determination of porosity and increase the accuracy of measurement using only one technique, taking into account pores open and closed, and to be capable to analyze 100% of the pellets. Several studies have been conducted in order to validate this method. In this work, the frequency spectrum from alumina pellets were obtained by a 5MHz frequency transducer and by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), it was possible to investigate the interior of the material and to associate its structure to the behavior of the ultrasonic wave. Each sintering temperature showed a characteristic ultrasonic signal that could be associated with the Alumina porosity. This result showed that this method is very sensitive to the pore distribution in the material because, even within the same temperature group, variations occurred according to distribution of pore sizes. (author)

  9. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Over the next hour you'll see the implantation of an automated implantable cardiac defibrillator. The surgery ... evening we're going to be discussing the implantation of a defibrillator. It’s a battery-powered implantable ...

  10. Retrograde peri-implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Jumshad B; Shivakumar, B; Sudarsan, Sabitha; Arun, K V; Kumar, T S S

    2010-01-01

    Retrograde peri-implantitis constitutes an important cause for implant failure. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove difficult to identify and hence institution of early treatment may not be possible. This paper presents a report of four cases of (the implant placed developing to) retrograde peri-implantitis. Three of these implants were successfully restored to their fully functional state while one was lost due to extensive damage. The paper highlights the importance of recognizing the etiopathogenic mechanisms, preoperative assessment, and a strong postoperative maintenance protocol to avoid retrograde peri-implant inflammation. PMID:20922082

  11. Implant success!!!.....simplified

    OpenAIRE

    Luthra Kaushal

    2009-01-01

    The endeavor towards life-like restoration has helped nurture new vistas in the art and science of implant dentistry. The protocol of “restoration-driven implant placement” ensures that the implant is an apical extension of the ideal future restoration and not the opposite. Meticulous pre-implant evaluation of soft and hard tissues, diagnostic cast and use of aesthetic wax-up and radiographic template combined with surgical template can simplify the intricate roadmap for appropriate implant t...

  12. Surface modification by metal ion implantation forming metallic nanoparticles in an insulating matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvadori, M.C., E-mail: mcsalvadori@if.usp.br [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo, S.P. (Brazil); Teixeira, F.S.; Sgubin, L.G.; Cattani, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo, S.P. (Brazil); Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Metal nanoparticles can be produced through metallic ion implantation in insulating substrate, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. • The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile, that can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN. • Nanocomposites, obtained by this way, can be produced in different insulator materials. More specifically we have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. • The nanocomposites were characterized by measuring the resistivity of the composite layer as function of the dose implanted, reaching the percolation threshold. • Excellent agreement was found between the experimental results and the predictions of the theory. - Abstract: There is special interest in the incorporation of metallic nanoparticles in a surrounding dielectric matrix for obtaining composites with desirable characteristics such as for surface plasmon resonance, which can be used in photonics and sensing, and controlled surface electrical conductivity. We have investigated nanocomposites produced by metal ion implantation into insulating substrates, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile (projected range), which can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN code. TRIDYN is a Monte Carlo simulation program based on the TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter) code that takes into account compositional changes in the substrate due to two factors: previously implanted dopant atoms, and sputtering of the substrate surface. Our study show that the nanoparticles form a bidimentional array buried a few nanometers below the substrate surface. We have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted samples show that metallic nanoparticles form in

  13. 5.5. Obtaining of cryolite-alumina concentrate from the production wastes and local aluminium-fluorine containing raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flowsheet of complex reprocessing of solid carbon containing wastes was elaborated. The flowsheet is presented in this article. The flowsheet including three methods: flotation, burning and sintering was considered. The flowsheet of obtaining of cryolite-alumina concentrate from the flotation tails of aluminium production was considered and presented in this article as well.

  14. Effect of Al content on the gas-phase dehydration of glycerol over silica-alumina-supported silicotungstic acid catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas-phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was carried out over silicotungstic acid (H4SiW12O40·xH2O, HSiW) catalysts supported on SiO2, η-Al2O3, and silica-alumina with different Al contents. The HSiW catalysts supported on silica-alumina showed higher glycerol conversions and acrolein yields during the initial 2 h at 315.deg.C than did SiO2- and η-Al2O3-supported HSiW catalysts. Among the tested catalysts, HSiW/Si0.9Al0.1Ox exhibited the highest space-time yield during the initial 2 h. The loaded HSiW species can change the acid types and suppress the formation of carbonaceous species on Al-rich silica-alumina. The deactivated HSiW supported on silica-alumina can be fully regenerated after calcination in air at 500.deg.C. As long as the molar ratio between water and glycerol was in the range of 2-11, the acrolein selectivity increased significantly with increasing water content in the feed, while the surface carbon content decreased owing to the suppression of heavy compounds

  15. Effect of Al content on the gas-phase dehydration of glycerol over silica-alumina-supported silicotungstic acid catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Tae; You, Su Jin; Park, Eun Duck [Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kwangdeog [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    The gas-phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was carried out over silicotungstic acid (H{sub 4}SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O, HSiW) catalysts supported on SiO{sub 2}, {eta}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and silica-alumina with different Al contents. The HSiW catalysts supported on silica-alumina showed higher glycerol conversions and acrolein yields during the initial 2 h at 315.deg.C than did SiO{sub 2}- and {eta}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported HSiW catalysts. Among the tested catalysts, HSiW/Si{sub 0.9}Al{sub 0.1Ox} exhibited the highest space-time yield during the initial 2 h. The loaded HSiW species can change the acid types and suppress the formation of carbonaceous species on Al-rich silica-alumina. The deactivated HSiW supported on silica-alumina can be fully regenerated after calcination in air at 500.deg.C. As long as the molar ratio between water and glycerol was in the range of 2-11, the acrolein selectivity increased significantly with increasing water content in the feed, while the surface carbon content decreased owing to the suppression of heavy compounds.

  16. Terbium luminescence in alumina xerogel fabricated in porous anodic alumina matrix under various excitation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terbium-doped alumina xerogel layers are synthesized by the sol-gel method in pores of a porous anodic alumina film 1 μm thick with a pore diameter of 150–180 nm; the film is grown on a silicon substrate. The fabricated structures exhibit terbium photoluminescence with bands typical of trivalent terbium terms. Terbium X-ray luminescence with the most intense band at 542 nm is observed for the first time for such a structure. Morphological analysis of the structure by scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of xerogel clusters in pore channels, while the main pore volume remains unfilled and pore mouths remain open. The data obtained confirm the promising applications of fabricated structures for developing matrix converters of X-rays and other ionizing radiations into visible light. The possibilities of increasing luminescence intensity in the matrix converter are discussed.

  17. Microstructural evolution of alumina-zirconia nanocomposites; Evolucao microestrutural de nanocompositos alumina-zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojaimi, C.L.; Chinelatto, A.S.A.; Chinelatto, A.L. [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa (UEPG), PR (Brazil); Pallone, E.M.J.A., E-mail: christianelago@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Pirassununga, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Zootecnia e Engenharia de Alimentos

    2012-07-01

    Ceramic materials have limited use due to their brittleness. The inclusion of nanosized particles in a ceramic matrix, which are called nanocomposites, and ceramic processing control by controlling the grain size and densification can aid in obtaining ceramic products of greater strength and toughness. Studies showed that the zirconia nano inclusions in the matrix of alumina favors an increase in mechanical properties by inhibiting the grain growth of the matrix and not by the mechanism of the transformation toughening phase of zirconia. In this work, the microstructural evolution of alumina nanocomposites containing 15% by volume of nanometric zirconia was studied. From the results it was possible to understand the sintering process of these nanocomposites. (author)

  18. Isolation and characterization of biogenic calcium carbonate/phosphate from oral bacteria and their adhesion studies on YSZ-coated titanium substrate for dental implant application

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GOBI SARAVANAN KALIARAJ; KAMALAN KIRUBAHARAN; G PRADHABAN; P KUPPUSAMI; VINITA VISHWAKARMA

    2016-04-01

    Biogenic calcium carbonate/phosphate were isolated and characterized from oral bacteria (CPOB). The crystalline nature and morphology of calcium carbonate/phosphate were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD)and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), respectively. XRD analysis revealed the cubic phase of YSZ coating as well as biogenic calcium carbonate (rhombohedral) and calcium phosphate oxide (hexagonal) wasobserved from CPOB. FESEM confirmed the extracellular synthesis of calcium compounds. Bacterial adhesion result reveals that YSZ coating drastically reduce bacterial invasion than titanium substrate.

  19. Dissolution kinetics for alumina in cryolite melts. Distribution of alumina in the electrolyte of industrial aluminium cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobbeltvedt, Ove

    1997-12-31

    This thesis contributes to the understanding of which factors determine the rate of dissolution of alumina added to the bath in alumina reduction cells. Knowing this may help reduce the occurrences of operation interruptions and thus make it possible to produce aluminium using less energy. When alumina powder was added to a stirred cryolite melt, the alumina dissolved in two distinct main stages. In the first stage, the dissolution rate was very high, which reflects dissolution of single alumina grains that are being dispersed in the bath upon addition. In the second stage, lumps of alumina infiltrated with bath dissolved at a rate considerably slower than that of the first stage. The formation of these alumina agglomerates is the most important contributor to slow dissolution. The parameters varied in the experiments were convection, batch size, and temperature of the bath and of the added alumina. Increased gas stirring of the bath speeded up dissolution in both stages but the size of the batch was of little significance. Increasing the bath temperature had no effect in the first stage but speeded up dissolution considerably in the second stage. Compared to adding alumina at room temperature, preheating it to a high temperature (600 {sup o}C) increased the dissolution rate in the first stage while preheating to lower temperatures (100-300 {sup o}C) decreased the dissolution rate. In the second stage, preheating slowed the dissolution. The two latter phenomena of reduced dissolution rates are ascribed to the removal of moisture from the alumina upon preheating. The bath flow and the distribution of alumina in the bath were measured in four different types of cells. It was found that if a certain asymmetry of the magnetic field traverse to the cell was present, due to the presence of risers, then loops of high velocity bath flow occurred near the short ends of the cell. Thus, alumina added near the short ends is effectively transferred away from the feeding

  20. Scattering and absorption coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tairan; Tang, Jiaqi; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Fan

    2016-02-01

    Alumina-based aerogels are especially useful in many applications due to their excellent stability at high temperatures. This study experimentally analyzed the radiative properties of silica-doped alumina aerogels through spectral directional-hemispherical measurements for wavelengths of 0.38-25 μm. The silica-doped alumina aerogel samples were prepared with a 1.4∶1 molar ratio of silica to alumina. A two-flux model was used to describe the radiation propagation in a 1D scattering absorbing sample to derive expressions for the normal-hemispherical transmittances and reflectances based on the transport approximation. The normal-hemispherical transmittances and reflectances were measured at various spectral wavelengths and sample thicknesses using the integrating sphere method. The spectral absorption and transport scattering coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels were then determined from the measured normal-hemispherical data. The absorption and transport scattering coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels are (0.1  cm-1, 36  cm-1) and (0.1  cm-1, 112  cm-1) for wavelengths of 0.38-8.0 μm. The spectral transport scattering coefficient varies in the opposite direction from the spectral absorption coefficient for various wavelengths. The radiative properties for silica and alumina aerogels were quite different for the absorption coefficient for wavelengths of 2.5-8.0 μm and for the transport scattering coefficient for wavelengths of 0.38-2.5 and 3.5-6.0 μm. The measured radiative properties were used to predict the spectral normal-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance of the silica-doped alumina aerogels for various sample thicknesses and wavelengths. The predicted values do not change for the sample thicknesses greater than a critical value. The analysis provides valuable reference data for alumina aerogels for high-temperature applications. PMID:26836071

  1. Ballistic Performance of Alumina and Zirconia-toughened Alumina Against 7.62 Armour Piercing Projectile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S G. Savio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to compare the ballistic performance of high purity alumina and zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA using depth of penetration (DoP test configuration against 7.62 mm armour piercing (AP ammunition. The effect of tile thickness on the differential efficiency factor (DEF was studied for tile thickness in the range of 3 mm to 6 mm for alumina tiles and 3 mm to 5 mm for ZTA tiles. The DEF is found to increase as tile thickness increases. An analysis on the failed shots showed that the residual shot weight does not follow a single linear relationship with ceramic tile thickness unlike the residual DoP for all thicknesses of tiles. Post-ballistic analysis on ceramic powder for particle size distribution was carried out and the results are presented.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 64, No. 5, September 2014, pp.477-483, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.64.6745

  2. Mechanical behavior of alumina and alumina-feldspar based ceramics in an acetic acid (4%) environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the mechanical properties of alumina-feldspar based ceramics when exposed to an aggressive environment (acetic acid 4%). Alumina ceramics containing different concentrations of feldspar (0%, 1%, 5%, 10%, or 40%) were sintered at either 1300, 1600, or 1700 oC. Flaws (of width 0%, 30%, or 50%) were introduced into the specimens using a saw. Half of these ceramic bodies were exposed to acetic acid. Their flexural strength, KIC, and porosity were measured and the fractured samples were evaluated using scanning electronic- and optical microscopy. It was found that in the ceramic bodies sintered at 1600 oC, feldspar content up to 10% improved flexural strength and KIC, and reduced porosities. Generally, it was found that acetic acid had a weakening effect on the flexural strength of samples sintered at 1700 oC but a beneficial effect on KIC of ceramics sintered at 1600 oC. It was concluded that alumina-based ceramics with feldspar content up to 10% and sintered at higher temperatures would perform better in an aggressive environment similar to oral cavity.

  3. Physical and Tribological Characteristics of Ion-Implanted Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Heidger, S.; Korenyi-Both, A. L.; Jayne, D. T.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Shogrin, B.; Wilbur, P. J.; Wu, R. L. C.; Garscadden, A.; Barnes, P. N.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural, polished diamond pin in contact with both as-deposited and carbon-ion-implanted diamond films in ultrahigh vacuum. Diamond films were deposited on silicon, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The as-deposited diamond films were impacted with carbon ions at an accelerating energy of 60 keV and a current density of 50 micron A/cm(exp 2) for approximately 6 min, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions/cm(exp 2). The results indicate that the carbon ion implantation produced a thin surface layer of amorphous, nondiamond carbon. The nondiamond carbon greatly decreased both friction and wear of the diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films were less than 0.1, factors of 20 to 30 lower than those for the as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, coarse-grain diamond films were approximately 0.35, a factor of five lower than those for the as-deposited, coarse-grain diamond films. The wear rates for the carbon-ion-implanted, diamond films were on the order of 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/Nm, factors of 30 to 80 lower than that for the as-deposited diamond films, regardless of grain size. The friction of the carbon-ion-implanted diamond films was greatly reduced because the amorphous, nondiamond carbon, which had a low shear strength, was restricted to the surface layers (less than 0.1 micron thick) and because the underlying diamond materials retained their high hardness. In conclusion, the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films can be used effectively as wear resistant, self-lubricating coatings for ceramics, such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide, in ultrahigh vacuum.

  4. Physical understanding of cryogenic implant benefits for electrical junction stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeni Khaja, Fareen; Colombeau, Benjamin; Thanigaivelan, Thirumal; Ramappa, Deepak; Henry, Todd [Applied Materials-Varian Semiconductor Equipment, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)

    2012-03-12

    We investigate the effect of cryogenic temperature implants on electrical junction stability for ultra shallow junction applications for sub-32 nm technology nodes and beyond. A comprehensive study was conducted to gain physical understanding of the impact of cryogenic temperature implants on dopant-defect interactions. Carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) molecule, a potential alternative to monomer boron was implanted in carbon preamorphized silicon substrates at cryogenic implant temperatures. Results indicate implants at cryogenic temperatures increase dopant activation with reduced diffusion, resulting in lower sheet resistance for a lower junction depth. Further, this study emphasizes the benefits of co-implants performed at cryogenic temperatures as alternative to traditional preamorphizing implants.

  5. Aluminum matrix composites reinforced with alumina nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Casati, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the latest efforts to develop aluminum nanocomposites with enhanced damping and mechanical properties and good workability. The nanocomposites exhibited high strength, improved damping behavior and good ductility, making them suitable for use as wires. Since the production of metal matrix nanocomposites by conventional melting processes is considered extremely problematic (because of the poor wettability of the nanoparticles), different powder metallurgy routes were investigated, including high-energy ball milling and unconventional compaction methods. Special attention was paid to the structural characterization at the micro- and nanoscale, as uniform nanoparticle dispersion in metal matrix is of prime importance. The aluminum nanocomposites displayed an ultrafine microstructure reinforced with alumina nanoparticles produced in situ or added ex situ. The physical, mechanical and functional characteristics of the materials produced were evaluated using different mechanical tests and micros...

  6. Crystallography of Alumina-YAG-Eutectic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali; Dickerson, Robert M.; Matson, Lawrence E.

    2000-01-01

    Multiple descriptions of the alumina-YAG eutectic crystallography appear in the ceramic literature. The orientation between two phases in a eutectic system has direct impact on residual stress, morphology, microstructural stability, and high temperature mechanical properties. A study to demonstrate that the different crystallographic relationships can be correlated with different growth constraints was undertaken. Fibers produced by Laser-Heated Float Zone (LHFZ) and Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EFG) were examined. A map of the orientation relationship between Al2O3 and Y3Al5O12 and their relationship to the fiber growth axis as a function of pull rate are presented. Regions in which a single orientation predominates are identified.

  7. Fracture simulation for zirconia toughened alumina microstructure

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyungmok; Forest, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to describe finite element modelling for fracture and fatigue behaviour of zirconia toughened alumina microstructures. Design/methodology/approach - A two-dimensional finite element model is developed with an actual $Al{_2}O{_3}$ - 10 vol% $ZrO{_2}$ microstructure. A bilinear, time-independent cohesive zone law is implemented for describing fracture behaviour of grain boundaries. Simulation conditions are similar to those found at contact between a head and a cup of hip prosthesis. Residual stresses arisen from the mismatch of thermal coefficient between grains are determined. Then, effects of a micro-void and contact stress magnitude are investigated with models containing residual stresses. For the purpose of simulating fatigue behaviour, cyclic loadings are applied to the models. Findings - Results show that crack density is gradually increased with increasing magnitude of contact stress or number of fatigue cycles. It is also identified that a micro-void brings about...

  8. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  9. Optimized alumina coagulants for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, May D.; Stewart, Thomas A.

    2012-02-21

    Substitution of a single Ga-atom or single Ge-atom (GaAl.sub.12 and GeAl.sub.12 respectively) into the center of an aluminum Keggin polycation (Al.sub.13) produces an optimal water-treatment product for neutralization and coagulation of anionic contaminants in water. GaAl.sub.12 consistently shows .about.1 order of magnitude increase in pathogen reduction, compared to Al.sub.13. At a concentration of 2 ppm, GaAl.sub.12 performs equivalently to 40 ppm alum, removing .about.90% of the dissolved organic material. The substituted GaAl.sub.12 product also offers extended shelf-life and consistent performance. We also synthesized a related polyaluminum chloride compound made of pre-hydrolyzed dissolved alumina clusters of [GaO.sub.4Al.sub.12(OH).sub.24(H.sub.2O).sub.12].sup.7+.

  10. Processing of silicon nitride and alumina nanosize powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E.J.; Piermarini, G.; Hockey, B.; Malghan, S.G. [National Inst. of Standard and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The effects of pressure on the compaction and subsequent processing of nanosize {gamma} alumina powders were studied. A 3 mm diameter piston/cylinder die was used to compact the nanosize powders to pressures of 1 and 2.5 GPa. The green bodies were sintered at temperatures up to 1600{degrees}C. Results show that green body density can be increased by higher compaction pressures. It appears that as a result of the {gamma}-to-{alpha} transformation in alumina, higher green density does not necessarily produce a higher density sintered alumina body. The microstructures of the sintered bodies are described in terms of porosity and phase content.

  11. Reaction of Sillimnite with Alumina at Elevated Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENYang-yun; SHENYi

    1996-01-01

    The reaction of sillimanite with alumina at temperatures 1650℃ an 1750℃ has been investigated.The results have shown that,in the laboratory test conditions,the higher the alumina content,the lower will be the amounts of glass-phse of the fired body and the higher will be the formation of mullite .In the present tests,however,the reaction in concern has not been completed,the reaction in concern has not been completed.Some uncombined residual alumina still exist in the form of corundum.

  12. Blister formation in alumina thin films bombarded with xenon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blisters have been observed in evaporated alumina thin films after xenon irradiation. The aim of this study is to further understand the mechanisms responsible for such a process. Surface blistering dependence on the thickness of the alumina films as well as irradiation fluence, temperature and post-irradiation thermal annealing have been investigated. From our experimental results, it has been proved that the substrate-alumina interface is not responsible for blistering. The application of a gas pressure model and a lateral compressive stress model shows that the latter seems to be more adequate in explaining blister formation. (author)

  13. Wenshan’s 800,000-ton Alumina Project Completed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>On September 26,2012,the completion ceremony of the 800,000-ton alumina project was held at the alumina factory in Matang Industrial Park, Wenshan city,Yunnan.Wenshan’s 800,000-ton alumina project and its supporting mining construction projects have been listed as one of 20 major industrial construction projects of Yunnan. The project covers an area of approximately 5,500 mu,with an estimated total investment of RMB 4,987 million. It is invested and built

  14. 3.6. Chlorination of alumina containing waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination of alumina containing waste products is considered in this article. Based on conducted studies following optimal conditions of chlorination of alumina containing waste products with reducer - coal were found: temperature - 750-850 deg C, chlorination duration -1-1,5 hours, quantity of reducer - 30% and size of particles - 0,1 mm. Based on conducted studies following optimal conditions of chlorination of alumina containing waste products with reducer - natural gas were found: temperature - 650-750 deg C, chlorination duration - 2 hours, chlorine to methane ratio is 4:1 and size of particles - 0,2-0,3 mm.

  15. Porous alumina based ordered nanocomposite coating for wear resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Arti; Muthukumar, M.; Bobji, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    Uniformly dispersed nanocomposite coating of aligned metallic nanowires in a matrix of amorphous alumina is fabricated by pulsed electrodeposition of copper into the pores of porous anodic alumina. Uniform deposition is obtained by controlling the geometry of the dendritic structure at the bottom of pores through stepwise voltage reduction followed by mild etching. The tribological behaviour of this nanocomposite coating is evaluated using a ball on flat reciprocating tribometer under the dry contact conditions. The nanocomposite coating has higher wear resistance compared to corresponding porous alumina coating. Wear resistant nanocomposite coating has wide applications especially in protecting the internal surfaces of aluminium internal combustion engines.

  16. Alumina Paste Sublimation Suppression Barrier for Thermoelectric Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Jong-Ah (Inventor); Caillat, Thierry (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Alumina as a sublimation suppression barrier for a Zintl thermoelectric material in a thermoelectric power generation device operating at high temperature, e.g. at or above 1000K, is disclosed. The Zintl thermoelectric material may comprise Yb.sub.14MnSb.sub.11. The alumina may be applied as an adhesive paste dried and cured on a substantially oxide free surface of the Zintl thermoelectric material and polished to a final thickness. The sublimation suppression barrier may be finalized by baking out the alumina layer on the Zintl thermoelectric material until it becomes substantially clogged with ytterbia.

  17. Characterization of Glasses in One Type of Alumina Rich Fly Ash by Chemical Digestion Methods: Implications for Alumina Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, one type of alumina rich fly ash (ARFA with about 50 wt% of alumina has been extensively investigated for alumina extraction in China. Due to the silica in ARFA, alumina extraction would have to generate a huge amount of solid waste. There is a growing interest in the glasses in ARFA, because they are composed mainly of silica and could be removed prior to alumina extraction. In this work, the glasses in ARFA have been investigated by chemical methods, that is, acid and base digestions. The chemical compositions have been measured by XRF for ARFA from the digestion processes. The K2O standard, XRD, and FTIR spectroscopies were successfully used to define the digestions processes, and size analysis and SEM-EDX provided rich information on particle transformations. As a result, acid and base digestion methods were found to produce very similar results for the glasses in ARFA. The K2O standard was attributed to the formation of glasses by illites, and TiO2 and Fe2O3 were proposed to originate from ilmenite in alumina rich coals (ARC. Some implications of the results were also discussed for the alumina extraction from ARFA.

  18. Diagnostic possibilities following implantation of carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP) total hip arthroplasty; Moeglichkeiten der bildgebenden Darstellung eines Hueftendoprothesenschaftes aus Kohlenstofffaserverbundwerkstoff (CFK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, T.; Reichel, H.; Birke, A.; Hein, W. [Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie; Alter, C.; Spielmann, R.P. [Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    1998-03-01

    Introduction: There are many problems in the radiological diagnosis of aseptic loosening in total hip arthroplasty. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) are not usable for metallic implants (stainless steel, cobalt alloy, titanium alloy). Material and Methods: From April 1993 to December 1993 15 CFRP non-cemented hip prostheses have been implanted. In a prospective clinical study plane radiographs, CT and MRT have been analysed. Results: Three stems were revised (1 femoral fracture, 1 severe thigh pain, 1 aseptic loosening). CFRP are not visible in plane radiographs. There was a complete (two-third of the cases) or nearly complete (one-third of the cases) small sclerotic interface between the prosthesis and the bone, these were apparent in CT and MRT in stable implant cases and did not have any clinical correlations. Discussion: The small sclerotic interface is quite different in comparison to so called `Reactive lines`. In one case of aseptic loosening there was an interposition of soft tissue between prothesis and bone in MRT and CT. CFRP inaugurates new diagnostic possibilities in aseptic loosening of hip prosthesis and in tumour surgery too. (orig.) [Deutsch] Einleitung: Die Diagnostik der aseptischen Endoprothesenlockerung bereitet mitunter im Routineroentgenbild erhebliche Probleme. Bei den zumeist verwendeten Implantaten (Material: rostfreier Stahl, Titan- oder Kobaltbasislegierungen) sind Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) und Computertomographie (CT) wegen grenzschichtnaher Artefakte nicht einsetzbar. Material und Methode: Im Rahmen einer klinischen Studie wurden zwischen April 1993 und Dezember 1993 15 Hueftendoprothesenschaefte aus Kohlenstofffaserverbundwerkstoff (CFK) zementfrei implantiert und prospektiv klinisch, radiologisch und mit MRT/CT untersucht. Ergebnisse: Drei Schaefte mussten im Untersuchungszeitraum entfernt werden (1 Femurfraktur, 1 Oberschenkelschmerz, 1 aseptische Lockerung). Radiologisch imponiert die

  19. Surface analysis of antithrombogenic ion-implanted silicone rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical and physical structure of ion-implanted silicone rubbers has been studied with regard to blood compatibility such as the reduction of platelet accumulation owing to ion implantation. In particular, the accumulation ratio of platelets in the superior vena cava revealed that O2+ (1x1017 ions/cm2) implantation was most effective in reducing platelet accumulation. H2+, He+, C+, O+, O2+, N+, N2+, Ne+, Na+, Ar+, K+, and Kr+ ion implantations were performed at an energy of 150 keV with fluences between 1x1017 and 2x1017 ions/cm2 at room temperature. Results of FT-IR-ATR showed that ion implantation broke the original chemical bond to form new radicals such as OH, ....C=O, SiH, and CH2. The formation of these radicals depended on the ion species employed: ....C=O formation by O+ or O2+ implantation and formation of amines by N+ or N2+ implantation. The results of Raman spectroscopy showed that ion implantation always produced a peak at near 1500 cm-1, although the intensity of this peak was dependent on the ion species. The light ions like H2+ and He+ were more effective than heavy ions in producing this peak, and O2+ implantation was the most effective at producing amorphous carbon. These results indicated that ....C=O and amorphous carbon, generated by O2+ implantation, may improve the antithrombogenicity. (orig.)

  20. Catalytic depolymerisation of isolated lignins to fine chemicals using a Pt/alumina catalyst: part 1—impact of the lignin structure

    OpenAIRE

    Bouxin, Florent P.; McVeigh, Ashley; Tran, Fanny; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Jarvis, Michael C.; Jackson, S. David

    2015-01-01

    Four lignin preparations with different contents of alkyl–aryl ether bonds were depolymerised using an alumina supported platinum catalyst. The results showed that the proportion of β-O-4 linkages is the crucial factor for both the yield and the nature of the monomeric products. Highly condensed lignin generated mainly non-alkylated phenolic products while uncondensed lignin generated mainly phenolic products retaining the 3-carbon side-chain. These phenolic products with the 3-carbon chain s...

  1. Direct spray pyrolysis of aluminum chloride solution for alumina preparation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕国志; 张廷安; 王龙; 马思达; 豆志河; 刘燕

    2014-01-01

    The effects of pyrolysis mode and pyrolysis parameters on Cl content in alumina were investigated, and the alumina products were characterized by XRD, SEM and ASAP. The experimental results indicate that the spray pyrolysis efficiency is higher than that of static pyrolysis process, and the reaction and evaporation process lead to a multi-plot state of the alumina products by spray pyrolysis. Aluminum phase starts to transform intoγ-Al2O3 at spray pyrolysis temperature of 600 °C, which is about 200 °C lower than that of static pyrolysis process. The primary particle size of γ-Al2O3 product is 27.62 nm, and Cl content in alumina products is 0.38%at 800 °C for 20 min.

  2. Structure and surface properties of praseodymium modified alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixed PrO2-Al2O3 oxides with different PrO2 content (1-20 wt.%) were prepared by wetness impregnation of γ-alumina with aqueous solution of praseodymium nitrate. The samples were characterized by different techniques, using surface adsorption-desorption of N2 (SBET), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and temperature-programmed desorption of CO2 (TPD-CO2). TGA and XRD showed the presence of small praseodymium oxide species on the alumina surface. XPS and DRS detected electron deficient interaction between deposited praseodymium oxide and alumina. It was observed a lower reduction temperature for supported Pr oxide species compared to that of the bulk Pr6O11. TPD-CO2 studies suggested that the deposition of Pr oxide on alumina leaded to increase of the basicity of mixed oxides.

  3. Fused Cast Alumina Refractory Products for Glass Tank Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Keyin

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1 Subject and Scope The standard specifies the requirement, testing method, inspection rule and requirements for the labeling, packing, shipping and storing of the fused cast alumina refractory products for glass tanks.

  4. Aluminum microstructures on anodic alumina for aluminum wiring boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Himendra; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Sakairi, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Hideaki

    2010-03-01

    The paper demonstrates simple methods for the fabrication of aluminum microstructures on the anodic oxide film of aluminum. The aluminum sheets were first engraved (patterned) either by laser beam or by embossing to form deep grooves on the surface. One side of the sheet was then anodized, blocking the other side by using polymer mask to form the anodic alumina. Because of the lower thickness at the bottom part of the grooves, the part was completely anodized before the complete oxidation of the other parts. Such selectively complete anodizing resulted in the patterns of metallic aluminum on anodic alumina. Using the technique, we fabricated microstructures such as line patterns and a simple wiring circuit-board-like structure on the anodic alumina. The aluminum microstructures fabricated by the techniques were embedded in anodic alumina/aluminum sheet, and this technique is promising for applications in electronic packaging and devices. PMID:20356280

  5. High Alumina Refractory Bricks for Electric Arc Furnace Roofs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the sort, technical requirement, test method, inspection rules, marking, packing, transportation, storage and quality certification of high alumina refractory bricks for electric arc furnace roofs.

  6. Superhydrophobic alumina surface based on stearic acid modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel superhydrophobic alumina surface is fabricated by grafting stearic acid layer onto the porous and roughened aluminum film. The chemical and phase structure, morphology, and the chemical state of the atoms at the superhydrophobic surface were investigated by techniques as FTIR, XRD, FE-SEM, and XPS, respectively. Results show that a super water-repellent surface with a contact angle of 154.2o is generated. The superhydrophobic alumina surface takes on an uneven flowerlike structure with many nanometer-scale hollows distribute in the nipple-shaped protrusions, and which is composed of boehmite crystal and γ-Al2O3. Furthermore, the roughened and porous alumina surface is coated with a layer of hydrophobic alkyl chains which come from stearic acid molecules. Therefore, both the roughened structure and the hydrophobic layer endue the alumina surface with the superhydrophobic behavior.

  7. Removing Fluoride Ions with Continously Fed Activated Alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yeun C.; Itemaking, Isara Cholapranee

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the mathematical basis for determining fluoride removal during water treatment with activated alumina. The study indicates that decreasing particle size decreases the pore diffusion effect and increases fluoride removal. (AS)

  8. Ion implantation into concave polymer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique for ion implantation into concave surface of insulating materials is proposed and experimentally studied. The principle is roughly described by referring to modifying inner surface of a PET (polyethylene terephthalate) bottle. An electrode that is supplied with positive high-voltage pulses is inserted into the bottle. Both plasma formation and ion implantation are simultaneously realized by the same high-voltage pulses. Ion sheath with a certain thickness that depends on plasma parameters is formed just on the inner surface of the bottle. Since the plasma potential is very close to that of the electrode, ions from the plasma are accelerated in the sheath and implanted perpendicularly into the bottle's inner surface. Laser Raman spectroscopy shows that the inner surface of an ion-implanted PET bottle is modified into DLC (diamond-like carbon). Gas permeation measurement shows that gas-barrier property enhances due to the modification

  9. Ion implantation into concave polymer surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudo, N.; Shinohara, T.; Amaya, S.; Endo, H.; Okuji, S.; Ikenaga, N.

    2006-01-01

    A new technique for ion implantation into concave surface of insulating materials is proposed and experimentally studied. The principle is roughly described by referring to modifying inner surface of a PET (polyethylene terephthalate) bottle. An electrode that is supplied with positive high-voltage pulses is inserted into the bottle. Both plasma formation and ion implantation are simultaneously realized by the same high-voltage pulses. Ion sheath with a certain thickness that depends on plasma parameters is formed just on the inner surface of the bottle. Since the plasma potential is very close to that of the electrode, ions from the plasma are accelerated in the sheath and implanted perpendicularly into the bottle's inner surface. Laser Raman spectroscopy shows that the inner surface of an ion-implanted PET bottle is modified into DLC (diamond-like carbon). Gas permeation measurement shows that gas-barrier property enhances due to the modification.

  10. Cell growing on ion implanted polytetrafluorethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondyurina, I., E-mail: i.kondyurina@gmail.com [School of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Shardakov, I. [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics, Russian Academy of Science, Perm (Russian Federation); Nechitailo, G. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation); Terpugov, V. [Perm State University, Perm (Russian Federation); Kondyurin, A. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • PTFE surface becomes rough, carbonized and oxidized after ion implantation. • Ion implanted PTFE contains chemically active free radicals. • Cells adherence on ion implanted PTFE is improved. - Abstract: Polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE and ePTFE) substrates were treated by ion implantation with nitrogen ions of 20 keV energies and 10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} ion fluences. The modification of the polymer surface was analyzed by FTIR and XPS spectroscopy, water wetting angle measurements and AFM images. The surface morphology, wettability and chemical activity were changed due to surface modification. The growing of endothelial cells of modified surfaces was improved in comparison with untreated PTFE and ePTFE substrates. The improved cell adherence on the modified surface is based on the improved adhesion of cell proteins.

  11. Recent advances in silica-alumina refractory: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaouki Sadik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the elaboration and the characterization of silica-alumina refractory have been reviewed. Refractory oxides encompass a broad range of unary, binary, and ternary ceramic compounds that can be used in structural, insulating, and other applications. This paper provides a historical perspective on the elaboration and the use of silica-alumina refractory, reviews applications for refractory oxides, describes typical processing routes, overviews fundamental structure–property relations, and summarizes the properties of these materials.

  12. Adsorption of textile dye onto modified immobilized activated alumina

    OpenAIRE

    Wasti, A.; Ali, Awan M.

    2015-01-01

    The study describes the synthesis of modified immobilized activated alumina (MIAA) and its application for the removal of textile dye from aqueous media. Immobilization was carried out by using the sol–gel method while modifications were made during the synthesis by adding powder activated alumina. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out at 20 ± 1 °C to see the effect of different parameters like contact time, stirring rate, initial concentration of the dye and dose of MIAA. The removal...

  13. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... discussing the implantation of a defibrillator. It’s a battery-powered implantable device that saves patients from deadly ... next doctor or whoever come to replace the battery and then to change the generator, they cannot -- ...

  14. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000108.htm Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... chest wall. A device called an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) was inserted under your skin and muscle. ...

  15. Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need a cardiac pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). They are devices that are implanted in ... can act as both a pacemaker and a defibrillator. Many ICDs also record the heart's electrical patterns ...

  16. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007370.htm Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is a device that detects any life- ...

  17. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injectable implants are injections of material into the urethra to help control urine leakage ( urinary incontinence ) caused by a ... into the tissue next to the sphincter. The implant procedure is usually done in the hospital. Or ...

  18. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... quality healthcare for all patients. "OR Live" makes it easy for you to learn more. Just click ... to be discussing the implantation of a defibrillator. It’s a battery-powered implantable device that saves patients ...

  19. Preparation of spherical hollow alumina particles by thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spherical hollow particles were prepared from solid alumina powders using DC arc thermal plasma, and then spray coating was performed with the as-prepared particles. Operating variables for the hollow particle preparation process were additional plasma gas, input power, and carrier gas flow rate. The spherical hollow alumina particles were produced in the case of using additive gas of H2 or N2, while alumina surface was hardly molten in the pure argon thermal plasma. In addition, the hollow particles were well produced in high power and low carrier gas conditions due to high melting point of alumina. Hollow structure was confirmed by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy analysis. Morphology and size distribution of the prepared particles that were examined by field emission-scanning electron microscopy and phase composition of the particles was characterized by X-ray diffraction. In the spray coating process, the as-prepared hollow particles showed higher deposition rate. - Highlights: ► Spherical hollow alumina powder was prepared by non-transferred DC arc plasma. ► Diatomic gasses were added in Ar plasma for high power. ► Prepared hollow alumina powder was efficient for the plasma spray coating

  20. High toughness alumina ceramics with elongated grains developed from seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Zhipeng; (谢志鹏); GAO; Lichun; (高立春); LI; Wenchao; (李文超); XU; Lihua; (徐利华); WANG; Xidong; (王习东)

    2003-01-01

    In the present paper, the influence of α-Al2O3 seeds and sintering methods on elongated grain growth and fracture toughness is investigated. The preparation of alumina ceramics started with commercial aluminum hydroxide. Abrasives were introduced to the starting materials by wet-grinding of high-purity alumina milling balls. Abrasives, playing the role of seeds, lowered the transformation temperature of aluminum hydroxide to alumina. Microstructures with elongated grains were developed by hot-pressing for the above calcined powders containing α-Al2O3 seeds, and alumina grain shapes changed with the amount of seeds introduced. However, only equiaxed grains were observed for the samples pressureless sintered. Fracture toughness of the alumina ceramics was dramatically improved by elongated grains. For the sample hot-pressed at 1600℃ for 2 h under 40 MPa pressure, fracture toughness reached 7.1 MPa·m1/2, which is much higher than that of normal alumina ceramics without elongated grains. In addition, high flexural strength of 630 MPa for the hot-pressed samples was also obtained.

  1. Characterization and performance of alumina inserts reinforced with zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alumina-based ceramics reinforced with zirconia were produced as inserts to be used as cutting tools. The objective of this work was to characterize and to evaluate the inserts as well as their performance in service. Additions of zirconia varying from 0.05 up to 0.20 wt% were done in alumina in order to select that composition presenting the best mechanical behavior. To do this, four-point bending mechanical strength, hardness and fracture toughness measurements were carried out. The best performance was found for alumina processing 0.010 wt.% of zirconia addition. The addition of zirconia was made with the objective of giving higher toughness to the insert throughout the microcracking reinforcing mechanism. The alumina reinforced inserts were compared with inserts of alumina without zirconia. It was accomplished by performing machining tests onto a SAE 1045 steel. The obtained results indicated that the zirconia reinforcement was able to improve the performance of the alumina cutting tools considerably. (author)

  2. Adsorption of itaconic acid from aqueous solutions onto alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA J. GULICOVSKI

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Itaconic acid, IA (C5H6O4, was investigated as a potential flocculant for the aqueous processing of alumina powders. The adsorption of IA, as a function of its concentration and pH value of the solution, onto the alumina surface was studied by the solution depletion method. The stability of the suspensions in the presence of itaconic acid was evaluated in light of the surface charge of the alumina powder used, the degree of dissociation of IA, as well as the sedimentation behavior and rheology of the suspensions. It was found that the adsorption process is extremely pH dependent; the maximum adsorption of IA onto alumina surface occurring at a pH close to the value of the first IA dissociation constant, pKa1. Also, IA does not influence the value of the point of zero charge of alumina. It was shown that IA represents an efficient flocculant for concentrated acidic alumina suspensions.

  3. Antibacterial activity of zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Atomic layer deposition was used to deposit ZnO on nanoporous alumina membranes. ► Scanning electron microscopy showed continuous coatings of zinc oxide nanocrystals. ► Activity against B. subtilis, E. coli, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis was shown. - Abstract: Nanoporous alumina membranes, also known as anodized aluminum oxide membranes, are being investigated for use in treatment of burn injuries and other skin wounds. In this study, atomic layer deposition was used for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes with zinc oxide. Agar diffusion assays were used to show activity of zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes against several bacteria found on the skin surface, including Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. On the other hand, zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes did not show activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, and Candida albicans. These results suggest that zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes have activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that are associated with skin colonization and skin infection.

  4. Dynamic yield and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fully dense alumina samples with 0.6 μm grain size were produced from alumina powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two types of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the tests of the first type the samples of 0.28 to 6-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors accelerated up to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed to study the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of the SPS-processed alumina and the decay of the elastic precursor wave with propagation distance. In the second type of test the samples of ∼3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated up to velocities 100-1000 m/s. These tests were aimed to study the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina. The data on tensile fracture of the alumina demonstrate a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. The data on the decay of the elastic precursor wave allows for determining the rates of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of shock-induced inelastic deformation and, thus, to derive some conclusions concerning the mechanisms responsible of the deformation.

  5. Antibacterial activity of zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoog, S.A. [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Box 7115, Raleigh, NC 27695-7115 (United States); Bayati, M.R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Box 7907, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States); Petrochenko, P.E. [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Box 7115, Raleigh, NC 27695-7115 (United States); Division of Biology, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Stafslien, S.; Daniels, J.; Cilz, N. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, 1805 Research Park Drive, Fargo, ND 58102 (United States); Comstock, D.J.; Elam, J.W. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Narayan, R.J., E-mail: roger_narayan@msn.com [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Box 7115, Raleigh, NC 27695-7115 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Box 7907, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States)

    2012-07-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atomic layer deposition was used to deposit ZnO on nanoporous alumina membranes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scanning electron microscopy showed continuous coatings of zinc oxide nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activity against B. subtilis, E. coli, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis was shown. - Abstract: Nanoporous alumina membranes, also known as anodized aluminum oxide membranes, are being investigated for use in treatment of burn injuries and other skin wounds. In this study, atomic layer deposition was used for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes with zinc oxide. Agar diffusion assays were used to show activity of zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes against several bacteria found on the skin surface, including Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. On the other hand, zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes did not show activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, and Candida albicans. These results suggest that zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes have activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that are associated with skin colonization and skin infection.

  6. Implantable electronic medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Electronic Medical Devices provides a thorough review of the application of implantable devices, illustrating the techniques currently being used together with overviews of the latest commercially available medical devices. This book provides an overview of the design of medical devices and is a reference on existing medical devices. The book groups devices with similar functionality into distinct chapters, looking at the latest design ideas and techniques in each area, including retinal implants, glucose biosensors, cochlear implants, pacemakers, electrical stimulation t

  7. Novel Carbon Nanotubes-supported NiB Amorphors Alloy Catalyst for Benzene Hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Hua YANG; Rong Bin ZHANG; Feng Yi LI

    2004-01-01

    The NiB amorphous alloy catalysts supported on CNTs and alumina were prepared by impregnation and chemical reduction. The gas-phase benzene hydrogenation was used as a probe reaction to evaluate the catalytic activity. The result showed that the NiB amorphous alloy catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes exhibited higher activity than that supported on alumina.

  8. HA-Coated Implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Henrik; Søballe, Kjeld; Bechtold, Joan E

    2014-01-01

    The goal of osseointegration of orthopedic and dental implants is the rapid achievement of a mechanically stable and long lasting fixation between living bone and the implant surface. In total joint replacements of cementless designs, coatings of calcium phosphates were introduced as a means of...... evaluating bone-implant fixation with HA coatings....

  9. Mechanical assessment of grit blasting surface treatments of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D; Dorogoy, A

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the influence of surface preparation treatments of dental implants on their potential (mechanical) fatigue failure, with emphasis on grit-blasting. The investigation includes limited fatigue testing of implants, showing the relationship between fatigue life and surface damage condition. Those observations are corroborated by a detailed failure analysis of retrieved fracture dental implants. In both cases, the negative effect of embedded alumina particles related to the grit-blasting process is identified. The study also comprises a numerical simulation part of the grit blasting process that reveals, for a given implant material and particle size, the existence of a velocity threshold, below which the rough surface is obtained without damage, and beyond which the creation of significant surface damage will severely reduce the fatigue life, thus increasing fracture probability. The main outcome of this work is that the overall performance of dental implants comprises, in addition to the biological considerations, mechanical reliability aspects. Fatigue fracture is a central issue, and this study shows that uncontrolled surface roughening grit-blasting treatments can induce significant surface damage which accelerate fatigue fracture under certain conditions, even if those treatments are beneficial to the osseointegration process. PMID:25173238

  10. THE ALUMINA-SILICATES IN STABILIZATION PROCESSES IN FLUIDIZED-BED ASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANA PERNA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Presented study of coal fluidized-bed ash solidification was accompanied with specific studies of alumino-silicates residues in ashes. The specific technology of fluid coal burning and its relatively low temperature combustion combines coal burning and decomposition of calcium carbonate added to the fluid layer in the main endeavor to capture all sulfur oxides. The burning temperature seems be decisive to the behavior of clayed residues and calcium carbonate decomposition in connection for the future solidification of fluidized bed ash. The calcareous substances in combination with alumino-silicate residues form solid bodies where silicates play decisive role of long-term stability and insolubility of obtained solids. The position of aluminum ions in clayed residues of burned coal were studied by MAS-NMR with attention on aluminum ion coordination to oxygen and formation of roentgen amorphous phase of poly-condensed calcium alumina-silicate.

  11. Adsorption of textile dyes on alumina. equilibrium studies and contact time effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOREIRA R.F.P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of nonconventional adsorbents, particularly those that can be easily regenerated, to replace activated carbon in the removal of color from dye wastewaters has been recently proposed. This work shows a thermodynamic and kinetic study of the adsorption of reactive dyes (yellow monochlorotriazine and yellow dichlorotriazine, in liquid phase, on commercial alumina. The basic thermodynamic data were obtained using the static method, with a thermostatic bath at four different temperatures (30, 40, 50 and 60oC and different pH values. The kinetic data were obtained by adding a known quantity of adsorbent to a dye solution at a constant temperature and under controlled stirring conditions. It was possible to draw the uptake curves, using the effects of the stirring on the adsorption rate. The intraparticle effective diffusivity was estimated using the film and pore diffusion model. The results were compared with the data obtained using a commercial activated carbon.

  12. Annealing Would Improve beta" - Alumina Solid Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Roger; Homer, Margie; Ryan, Margaret; Cortez, Roger; Shields, Virgil; Kisor, Adam

    2003-01-01

    A pre-operational annealing process is under investigation as a potential means of preventing a sudden reduction of ionic conductivity in a Beta"-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) during use. On the basis of tests, the sudden reduction of ionic conductivity, followed by a slow recovery, has been found to occur during testing of the solid electrolyte and electrode components of an alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC) cell. At this time, high-temperature tests of limited duration have indicated the superiority of the treated BASE, but reproducible tests over thousands of hours are necessary to confirm that microcracking has been eliminated. The ionic conductivity of the treated BASE is also measured to be higher than untreated BASE at 1,073 K in low-pressure sodium vapor. Microcracking resulting in loss of conductivity was not observed with treated BASE in one high-temperature experiment, but this result must be duplicated over very long testing times to be sure of the effect. Shorter annealing times (10 to 20 hours) were found to result in significantly less loss of mass; it may be necessary for the packed powder mixture to evolve some Na2O before the Na2O can leave the ceramic.

  13. Microstructure Analysis of Thermally Etched Alumina Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fudurić Jelača, M.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ceramography is the art and science of preparation, examination, and evaluation of ceramic microstructures. Microstructure is the structure level approximately 0.1 to 100 μ m between the wavelength of visible light and the resolution limit of the naked eye. The microstructure includes most grains, secondary phases, grain boundaries, pores, microcracks, hardness microindentations. Investigation and evaluation of ceramic microstructure is very important because a number of mechanical, optical, thermal, electrical and other properties of ceramics are significantly affected by the microstructure. The techniques for ceramographic preparation are divided into five parts: sawing, mounting, grinding, polishing and etching.In this paper a method for preparation of a cold isostatically pressed high purity alumina ceramics (α-Al2O3 is described. Microstructure analysis of prepared ceramics was performed by means of optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Porosity is determined on the polished sample; grain size is measured after thermal etching. The mean grain diameter is determined by means of lineal-intercept method, circular-intercept method and image analysis.

  14. Coprecipitated nickel-alumina methanation catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last few years there has been a renewed interest in the methanation reaction CO+3H2=CH4+H2O. The investigations described in this thesis were performed in relation to the application of this reaction, within the framework of the so-called 'NFE' project, also called 'ADAM' and 'EVA' project. This project, which has been under investigation in West Germany for some years, aims at the investigation of the feasibility of transporting heat from a nuclear high temperature reactor by means of a chemical cycle. A promising possibility to realize such a cycle exists in applying the combination of the endothermic steam reforming of methane and the exothermic methanation reaction. This thesis describes the investigations into a certain type of methanation catalyst, viz. a coprecipitated nickel-alumina catalyst, with the aim to give more insight into the interrelationship between the preparation conditions on the one hand and catalyst properties such as activity and stability on the other hand. (Auth.)

  15. Thermal Conductivity of Alumina and Silica Nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Julian G. Bernal

    This thesis studies the effects of the base fluid, particle type/size, and volumetric concentration on the thermal conductivity of Alumina and Silica nanofluids. The effects of base fluid were observed by preparing samples using ethylene glycol (EG), water, and mixtures of EG/water as the base fluid and Al2O3 (10 nm) nanoparticles. The particles type/size and volumetric concentration effects were tested by preparing samples of nanofluids using Al2O3 (10nm), Al2O3 (150nm), SiO2 (15 nm), and SiO2 (80 nm) nanoparticles and ionized water as base fluid at different volumetric concentrations. All samples were mixed using a sonicator for 30 minutes and a water circulator to maintain the sample at room temperature. The thermal conductivity was measured using a Thermtest Transient Plane Source TPS 500S. The effects of gravity, Brownian motion and thermophoresis were also studied. EG produced the highest thermal conductivity enhancement out of all base fluids tested. Smaller particle size produced a higher enhancement of thermal conductivity, while the volumetric concentration did not have a significant effect in the thermal conductivity enhancement. Finally, gravity, Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis effects played a role in the total enhancement of the thermal conductivity. The nanoparticles were observed to settle rapidly after sonication suggesting gravity effects may play a significant role.

  16. Implantation of Energetic D+ Ions into Carbon Dioxide Ices and Implications for our Solar System: Formation of D2O and D2CO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Chris J.; Ennis, Courtney P.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2014-10-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) ices were irradiated with energetic D+ ions to simulate the exposure of oxygen-bearing solar system ices to energetic protons from the solar wind and magnetospheric sources. The formation of species was observed online and in situ by exploiting FTIR spectroscopy. Molecular products include ozone (O3), carbon oxides (CO3(C 2v , D 3h ), CO4, CO5, CO6), D2-water (D2O), and D2-carbonic acid (D2CO3). Species released into the gas phase were sampled via a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and possible minor contributions from D2-formaldehyde (D2CO), D4-methanol (CD3OD), and D2-formic acid (DCOOD) were additionally identified. The feasibility of several reaction networks was investigated by determining their ability to fit the observed temporal column densities of 10 key species that were quantified during the irradiation period. Directly relevant to the CO2-bearing ices of comets, icy satellites in the outer solar system, and the ice caps on Mars, this work illustrates for the first time that D2-water is formed as a product of the exposure of CO2 ices to D+ ions. These findings provide strong support for water formation from oxygen-bearing materials via non-thermal hydrogen atoms, and predict reaction pathways that are likely to be unfolding on the surfaces of asteroids and the Moon.

  17. Implantation of energetic D+ ions into carbon dioxide ices and implications for our solar system: formation of D2O and D2CO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) ices were irradiated with energetic D+ ions to simulate the exposure of oxygen-bearing solar system ices to energetic protons from the solar wind and magnetospheric sources. The formation of species was observed online and in situ by exploiting FTIR spectroscopy. Molecular products include ozone (O3), carbon oxides (CO3(C 2v, D 3h), CO4, CO5, CO6), D2-water (D2O), and D2-carbonic acid (D2CO3). Species released into the gas phase were sampled via a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and possible minor contributions from D2-formaldehyde (D2CO), D4-methanol (CD3OD), and D2-formic acid (DCOOD) were additionally identified. The feasibility of several reaction networks was investigated by determining their ability to fit the observed temporal column densities of 10 key species that were quantified during the irradiation period. Directly relevant to the CO2-bearing ices of comets, icy satellites in the outer solar system, and the ice caps on Mars, this work illustrates for the first time that D2-water is formed as a product of the exposure of CO2 ices to D+ ions. These findings provide strong support for water formation from oxygen-bearing materials via non-thermal hydrogen atoms, and predict reaction pathways that are likely to be unfolding on the surfaces of asteroids and the Moon.

  18. COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION: MY EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is a small, surgically implanted complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound to a person with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. This type of hearing loss, typically involves damage to hair cells in the cochlea, as a result sound cannot reach the auditory nerve which usually receives information from hair cells. A cochlear implant skips the damaged hair cells and to stimulate the auditory nerve directly. An implant does not restore normal hearing, instead it can give a deaf person a useful representation of sounds in the environment and help him or her to understand speech. I am here presenting this article in relation to the indications, intraoperative and postoperative complications of cochlear implantation in our institute since January 2013. Children who receive implants at earlier age, outperform their peers who are implanted at a later age. This is reflected in all the areas of speech and language development.

  19. EFFECT OF SPINEL ADDITION ON THE SINTERING BEHAVIOR AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF ALUMINA-SPINEL CERAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    Emre Yalamac

    2014-01-01

    Sintering behaviors of alumina-spinel powder mixtures were investigated up to 1600oC using a vertical dilatometer. Final density and microstructure of pure alumina, magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) ceramics and ceramic composites with different alumina-spinel ratio were examined. As a result, the densification and final density of alumina-spinel composites were affected by addition of 10 wt. % and 20 wt. % spinel into alumina. Non-stoichiometric alumina-rich spinel phase was d...

  20. Ion polarization behavior in alumina under pulsed gate bias stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkali metal ion incorporation in alumina significantly increases alumina capacitance by ion polarization. With high capacitance, ion-incorporated aluminas become promising high dielectric constant (high-k) gate dielectric materials in field-effect transistors (FETs) to enable reduced operating voltage, using oxide or organic semiconductors. Alumina capacitance can be manipulated by incorporation of alkali metal ions, including potassium (K+), sodium (Na+), and lithium (Li+), having different bond strengths with oxygen. To investigate the electrical stability of zinc tin oxide-based transistors using ion incorporated alumina as gate dielectrics, pulsed biases at different duty cycles (20%, 10%, and 2% representing 5 ms, 10 ms, and 50 ms periods, respectively) were applied to the gate electrode, sweeping the gate voltage over series of these cycles. We observed a particular bias stress-induced decrease of saturation field-effect mobility accompanied by threshold voltage shifts (ΔVth) in potassium and sodium-incorporated alumina (abbreviated as PA and SA)-based FETs at high duty cycle that persisted over multiple gate voltage sweeps, suggesting a possible creation of new defects in the semiconductor. This conclusion is also supported by the greater change in the mobility-capacitance (μC) product than in capacitance itself. Moreover, a more pronounced ΔVth over shorter times was observed in lithium-incorporated alumina (abbreviated as LA)-based transistors, suggesting trapping of electrons in existing interfacial states. ΔVth from multiple gate voltage sweeps over time were fit to stretched exponential forms. All three dielectrics show good stability using 50-ms intervals (20-Hz frequencies), corresponding to 2% duty cycles

  1. Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Cochlear Implants Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants Share Tweet Linkedin ... the Use of Cochlear Implants What are the Benefits of Cochlear Implants? For people with implants: Hearing ...

  2. Modification of mechanical properties through ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatigue, internal friction, and cavitation-erosion properties of plain steel, containing 0.18 wt.% carbon (AISI 1018), have been modified by implantation with nitrogen molecules of 150 KeV energy. It is suggested that these phenomena are related to the interactions of the implant with dislocations. Specifically, room temperature, high-cycle fatigue-lifetime can be significantly extended when the implanted specimens are aged for times sufficiently long to enable interstitial migration to and association with near-surface dislocations. Acoustically-induced cavitation-erosion behavior in distilled water at ambient temperature is also found to be improved by implantation. The role played by interstitial-dislocation association in improving these properties is examined with ultra-high sensitive internal friction and with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Such experiments are aiding in an elucidation of the fate of the implanted nitrogen in body-centered cubic steels. These preliminary results indicate the potential applications of ion implantation for the improvement of surface-related mechanical properties. (author)

  3. The mechanical reliability of alumina scales and coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, K.B.; Pruebner, K.; Tortorelli, P.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The mechanical integrity of oxide scales ultimately determines their ability to protect materials from corrosion and other environmental effects arising from deleterious reactions with gases and condensable products. The microstructure and mechanical behavior of alumina products thermally grown or deposited on Fe-28 at.% Al intermetallic alloys are being characterized in order to develop the knowledge and means to control the mechanical reliability of alumina scales by microstructural manipulation through design and processing. Mechanical characterization involved gravimetric data from cyclic oxidation experiments, in-situ observation of oxidized specimens undergoing flexural loading in a scanning electron microscope, and measurements of hardness, elastic modulus and cracking resistance by nanoindentation. Values of cracking thresholds for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales were consistent with other measurements for surface and bulk alumina. The oxidation behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys coated with a thin (0.5 - 1 {mu}m) alumina film deposited by plasma synthesis has been studied. During exposure in the oxidizing environment, new oxide was formed between the coating and the substrate. The presence of the deposited amorphous oxide inhibited the subsequent thermal oxidation of the metal. Because the thermally grown alumina forms under the deposit, the adherence of the coating is controlled by the strength of the metal/oxide interface that develops during oxidation.

  4. Plasma Processes : Plasma sprayed alumina coatings for radiation detector development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mary Alex; V Balagi; K R Prasad; K P Sreekumar; P V Ananthapadmanabhan

    2000-11-01

    Conventional design of radiation detectors uses sintered ceramic insulating modules. The major drawback of these ceramic components is their inherent brittleness. Ion chambers, in which these ceramic spacers are replaced by metallic components with plasma spray coated alumina, have been developed in our Research Centre. These components act as thin spacers that have good mechanical strength as well as high electrical insulation and replace alumina insulators with the same dimensions. As a result, the design of the beam loss monitor ion chamber for CAT could be simplified by coating the outer surface of the HT electrode with alumina. One of the chambers developed for isotope calibrator for brachytherapy gamma sources has its outer aluminium electrode (60 mm dia × 220 mm long) coated with 250 thick alumina (97%) + titania (3%). In view of potential applications in neutron-sensitive ion chambers used in reactor control instrumentation, studies were carried out on alumina 100 to 500 thick coatings on copper, aluminium and SS components. The electrical insulation varied from 108 ohms to 1012 ohms for coating thicknesses above 200 . The porosity in the coating resulted in some fall in electrical insulation due to moisture absorption. An improvement could be achieved by providing the ceramic surface with moisture-repellent silicone oil coating. Irradiation at Apsara reactor core location showed that the coating on aluminium was found to be unaffected after exposure to 1017 nvt fluence.

  5. Aluminas with dispersoids. Tribologic properties and in vivo aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrino, A; Moyen, B; Ben Abdallah, A; Treheux, D; Orange, D

    1990-07-01

    Three base alumina ceramics with dispersoids: monoclinic zirconia alumina (A5Z), tetragonal zirconia alumina (A20Z) and aluminalon (Aa20) have been investigated because of their improved mechanical properties with reference to pure alumina (AI203). Bending strength and fracture toughness are twice higher than alumina for the most toughened. These two parameters were measured by four-points bending tests after 1 week, 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 months of non loaded in vivo aging in wistar rats. They showed a little decrease for AI203 and Aa20 and a total stability for A5Z and A20Z even after one year. For tribologic study of the ceramic/polyethylene combination, cylinder against plane and pin on flat tests were conducted on an alternative movement with hip parameters of speed and load in presence of ringer solution. For the most representative test (pin on disk), the friction coefficients were nearly the same for all materials but UHMWPE wear volume was twice lower against A20Z than against AI203. A20Z/UHMWPE combination would be very interesting as new friction couple for total hip arthroplasty. Further studies are currently conducted. PMID:2397268

  6. Enriched fluoride sorption using alumina/chitosan composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alumina possesses an appreciable defluoridation capacity (DC) of 1566 mg F-/kg. In order to improve its DC, it is aimed to prepare alumina polymeric composites using the chitosan. Alumina/chitosan (AlCs) composite was prepared by incorporating alumina particles in the chitosan polymeric matrix, which can be made into any desired form viz., beads, candles and membranes. AlCs composite displayed a maximum DC of 3809 mg F-/kg than the alumina and chitosan (52 mg F-/kg). The fluoride removal studies were carried out in batch mode to optimize the equilibrium parameters viz., contact time, pH, co-anions and temperature. The equilibrium data was fitted with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms to find the best fit for the sorption process. The calculated values of thermodynamic parameters indicate the nature of sorption. The surface characterisation of the sorbent was performed by FTIR, AFM and SEM with EDAX analysis. A possible mechanism of fluoride sorption by AlCs composite has been proposed. Suitability of AlCs composite at field conditions was tested with a field sample taken from a nearby fluoride-endemic village. This work provides a potential platform for the development of defluoridation technology.

  7. The nature of hydrogen in γ-alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs free energy models are derived from the calculated electronic and phonon structure of two possible models of γ-alumina, a defective spinel phase and a hydrogenated spinel phase. The intrinsic vacancies and hydrogen in the two structural models give rise to a considerable configurational (residual) entropy and significantly contribute to thermodynamic stability and physical-chemical properties of γ-alumina, which was neglected in previous studies but considered in this work. The electronic densities of states, calculated using a hybrid functional for the two structural models of γ-alumina, are presented. The dynamic stability of the two phases is confirmed by full-spectrum phonon calculations. The two phases share many similarities in their electronic structure, but can be distinguished by their vibrational spectra and specific heat. The defective spinel is found to be the ground state of γ-alumina, while the hydrogenated spinel to be a metastable phase. However, dehydration of the metastable phase into the ground state is expected to be slow due to the low diffusion rate of H, which leaves hydrogen as a locked-in impurity in γ-alumina.

  8. Synthesis of alumina powder with seeds by Pechini Method using O2 as calcination atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alumina is a very investigated material due to its excellent refractory characteristics and mechanical properties. Its alpha phase, the most stable one, has a formation temperature of about 1200 ° C. Due to its high temperature of formation, many researches have been trying to reduce it through addition of seeds of alpha phase in chemical processes of synthesis. This work aims to synthesize ultrafine powders of alpha-alumina by the Pechini method with seeding, and using an O2 atmosphere in the pre-calcination (500 ° C) and calcination (1000 ° C and 1100° C) steps. The resulting powders were characterized through X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results were compared with samples calcined on ai. It was verified that the presence of oxygen in the calcination atmosphere favored the elimination of residual carbon from the precursor powders, forthcoming from the great amount of organic material used on the synthesis, modifying its morphology and favoring reduction of particle size. (author)

  9. Alumina/silica aerogel with zinc chloride as an alkylation catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEJAN U. SKALA

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The alumina/silica with zinc chloride aerogel alkylation catalyst was obtained using a one step sol-gel synthesis, and subsequent drying with supercritical carbon dioxide. The aerogel catalyst activity was found to be higher compared to the corresponding xerogel catalyst, as a result of the higher aerogel surface area, total pore volume and favourable pore size distribution. Mixed Al–O–Si bonds were present in both gel catalyst types. Activation by thermal treatment in air was needed prior to catalytic alkylation, due to the presence of residual organic groups on the aerogel surface. The optimal activation temperature was found to be in the range 185–225°C, while higher temperatures resulted in the removal of zinc chloride from the surface of the aerogel catalyst with a consequential decrease in the catalytic activity. On varying the zinc chloride content, the catalytic activity of the aerogel catalyst exhibited a maximum. High zinc chloride contents decreased the catalytic activity of the aerogel catalyst as the result of the pores of the catalyst being plugged with this compound, and the separation of the alumina/silica support into Al-rich and Si-rich phases. The surface area, total pore volume, pore size distribution and zinc chloride content had a similar influence on the activity of the aerogel catalyst as was the case of xerogel catalyst and supported zinc chloride catalysts.

  10. Modifying alumina red mud to support a revegetation cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenidis, A.; Harokopou, A. D.; Mylona, E.; Brofas, G.

    2005-02-01

    Alumina red mud, a fine-textured, iron-rich, alkaline residue, is the major waste product of bauxite digestion with caustic soda to remove alumina. The high alkalinity and salinity as well as the poor nutrient status are considered to be the major constraints of red mud revegetation. This research was conducted to evaluate the ameliorating effect of gypsum, sewage sludge, ferrous sulfate, ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, and calcium phosphate on alumina red mud. The effectiveness of the mixtures was evaluated by applying extraction tests and performing experiments using six plant species. Gypsum amendment significantly reduced the pH, electrical conductivity, and sodium and aluminum content of red mud. Sewage sludge application had an extended effect in improving both the soil structure and the nutrient status of the gypsum-amended red mud. Together with the gypsum and sewage sludge, calcium phosphate application into red mud enhanced plant growth and gave the most promising results.

  11. New adsorbent, silver-alumina for radioactive iodine filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver-alumina adsorbent has been developed for the iodine filter installed in the off-gas treatment system of a radioactive waste tank vent. In order to improve the removal efficiency under a highly humid atmosphere and to reduce susceptibility to contaminants in the air, the optimum average pore size of alumina was determined to be about 600 A when the impregnated silver compound was silver nitrate. The holding capability of impregnated silver was also improved by developing a double pore structure alumina. The effects of chemical forms and contaminants on the removal efficiency were explained by an ionic reaction mechanism at high relative humidity, which involves water vapor adsorption in micropores by capillary condensation followed by formation of a silver iodide compound

  12. Studies on synthesis of alumina nanopowder from synthetic Bayer liquor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedure for synthesis of alumina nanopowder from Bayer liquor (synthetic sodium aluminate solution) is investigated. Cooling, ageing and then addition of 3 ml/l Tiron (1,2-dihydroxy-3,5-benzene disulfonic acid disodium salt) to the supersaturated liquor affect purity and fineness of the nanopowder product. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) analyses indicate that purity of the alumina nanopowder increases with the aging time. Experimental observations show that highly pure alumina nanopowders could be produced by direct calcination of cold gelatinous sodium aluminate solution followed by careful washing at a Tiron concentration of 3 ml/l NaOH

  13. Calculation of the effective emissivity of blackbodies made of alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackbodies are sources of temperature radiation that are used for calibration of radiation thermometers. Their effective emissivity should be close to the value of 1 to approximate an ideal Planckian radiator. Their effective emissivity depends on the geometry of their cavity and the used material. It can be estimated by measurements, but often it is calculated by numerical methods. For typical graphite blackbodies, it was shown in the past that high effective emissivities better than 0.999 can be reached. In this paper, calculations of the effective emissivity of a alumina blackbody are presented. Alumina is a new material for blackbodies, with different radiation properties. Using two calculation methods (integrative cavity method and Monte Carlo method), the effective cavity emissivity for blank and coated alumina is estimated. It is shown that effective spectral emissivities up to 0.999 87 can be reached. (paper)

  14. Origin of High-Alumina Basalt, Andesite, and Dacite Magmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W

    1964-10-30

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it. PMID:17794034

  15. Thermal and Electrical Characterization of Alumina Substrate for Microelectronic Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the effect of sintering temperature on thermal and electrical properties of alumina material as substrate for microelectronic devices. Alumina materials in the form of green sheet with 1 mm thickness were sintered at 1100 deg. C, 1300 deg. C and 1500 deg. C for about 20 hours using heating and cooling rates of 2 deg. C/min. The densities were measured using densitometer and the microstructures of the samples were analyzed using SEM micrographs. Meanwhile thermal and electrical properties of the samples were measured using flash method and impedance analyzer respectively. It was found that thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the substrate increases as sintering temperature increases. It was found also that the dielectric constant of alumina substrate increases as the sintering temperature increases.

  16. Pressureless sintering behavior of injection molded alumina ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu W.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pressureless sintering behaviors of two widely used submicron alumina (MgOdoped and undoped with different solid loadings produced by injection molding have been studied systematically. Regardless of the sinterability of different powders depending on their inherent properties, solid loading plays a critical role on the sintering behavior of injection molded alumina, which greatly determines the densification and grain size, and leads to its full densification at low temperatures. As compared to the MgO-doped alumina powder, the undoped specimens exhibit a higher sinterability for its smaller particle size and larger surface area. While full densification could be achieved for MgO-doped powders with only a lower solid loading, due to the fact that MgO addition can reduce the detrimental effect of the large pore space on the pore-boundary separation.

  17. Alumina Template-Dependant Growth of Cobalt Nanowire Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Malferrari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Different electrochemical regimes and porous alumina were applied for template synthesis of cobalt nanowire (nw arrays, revealing several peculiar cases. In contrast to quite uniform filling of sulfuric acid alumina templates by alternating current deposition, nonuniform growth of the Co nw tufts and mushrooms was obtained for the case of oxalic acid templates. We showed herein for the first time that such configurations arise from the spontaneous growth of cobalt nw groups evolving from the cobalt balls at the Al/alumina interface. Nevertheless, the uniform growth of densely packed cobalt nw arrays, up to tens of micrometers in length, was obtained via long-term direct current galvanostatic deposition at low current density using oxalic acid templates one-side coated by conducting layer. The unique point of this regime is the formation of hexagonal lattice Co nws with a preferred (100 growth direction.

  18. Fabrication of alumina films with laminated structures by ac anodization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anodization techniques by alternating current (ac) are introduced in this review. By using ac anodization, laminated alumina films are fabricated. Different types of alumina films consisting of 50–200 nm layers were obtained by varying both the ac power supply and the electrolyte. The total film thickness increased with an increase in the total charge transferred. The thickness of the individual layers increased with the ac voltage; however, the anodization time had little effect on the film thickness. The laminated alumina films resembled the nacre structure of shells, and the different morphologies exhibited by bivalves and spiral shells could be replicated by controlling the rate of increase of the applied potentials. (paper)

  19. Intrinsic and extrinsic luminescence of nanosize transition alumina powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminescence spectroscopy in the VUV-visible range under electron-beam excitation and synchrotron radiation was applied to investigate electronic properties of alumina nanopowders, which were prepared using the combustion synthesis method. By varying reaction and post treatment conditions we were able to prepare phase pure samples and powders with mixtures of α- and γ-phases mainly. In addition to the well-known 7.6 eV luminescence of STE of α-alumina, all samples possessed complex emission bands in UV range (3–5 eV) which originate from intrinsic excitonic emissions and extrinsic electronic excitations. -- Highlights: ► Luminescent spectroscopy of nanosized alumina powders was studied at 8 K. ► The crystalline structure of samples was analysed. ► Luminescent spectra, lifetimes and absorption onsets were discussed

  20. Plastic deformation and sintering of alumina under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plastic deformation of alumina (Al2O3) under high pressure was investigated by observing the shape changes of spherical particles, and the near fully dense transparent bulks were prepared at around 5.5 GPa and 900 °C. Through analyzing the deformation features, densities, and residual micro-strain of the Al2O3 compacts prepared under high pressures and temperatures (2.0–5.5 GPa and 600–1200 °C), the effects of plastic deformation on the sintering behavior of alumina have been demonstrated. Under compression, the microscopic deviatoric stress caused by grain-to-grain contact could initiate the plastic deformation of individual particles, eliminate pores of the polycrystalline samples, and enhance the local atomic diffusion at the grain boundaries, thus produced transparent alumina bulks