WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon fiber-reinforced composites

  1. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for future automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, K.

    2016-05-01

    After a brief introduction to polymer composite properties and markets, the state of the art activities in the field of manufacturing of advanced composites for automotive applications are elucidated. These include (a) long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) for secondary automotive components, and (b) continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermosetting composites for car body applications. It is followed by future possibilities of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for e.g. (i) crash elements, (ii) racing car seats, and (iii) production and recycling of automotive fenders.

  2. Carbon fiber reinforcements for sheet molding composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Soydan; Paulauskas, Felix L.

    2017-11-14

    A method of processing a carbon fiber tow includes the steps of providing a carbon fiber tow made of a plurality of carbon filaments, depositing a sizing composition at spaced-apart sizing sites along a length of the tow, leaving unsized interstitial regions of the tow, and cross-cutting the tow into a plurality of segments. Each segment includes at least a portion of one of the sizing sites and at least a portion of at least one of the unsized regions of the tow, the unsized region including and end portion of the segment.

  3. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal; Argade, Shyam

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a critical review of the processing techniques for fabricating continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs for possible applications at elevated temperatures. Some of the issues affecting durability of the composite materials such as fiber coatings and cracking of the matrix because of shrinkage in PIP-process are also examined. An assessment of the potential inexpensive processes is also provided. Finally three potential routes of manufacturing C/SiC composites using a technology that NC A&T developed for carbon/carbon composites are outlined. Challenges that will be encountered are also listed.

  4. Carbon Fiber Reinforced, Zero CME Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Technical Abstract: This project proposes to develop moisture insensitive, high performance, carbon fiber laminates for future missions. Current space-qualified...

  5. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  6. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  7. Fracture morphology of carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Srinivasa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP composites have been extensively used in fabrication of primary structures for aerospace, automobile and other engineering applications. With continuous and widespread use of these composites in several advanced technology, the frequency of failures is likely to increase. Therefore, to establish the reasons for failures, the fracture modes should be understood thoroughly and unambiguously. In this paper, CFRP composite have been tested in tension, compression and flexural loadings; and microscopic study with the aid of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM has been performed on failed (fractured composite surfaces to identify the principle features of failure. Efforts have been made in correlating the fracture surface characteristics to the failure mode. The micro-mechanics analysis of failure serves as a useful guide in selecting constituent materials and designing composites from the failure behavior point of view. Also, the local failure initiation results obtained here has been reliably extended to global failure prediction.

  8. New generation fiber reinforced polymer composites incorporating carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Eslam

    The last five decades observed an increasing use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites as alternative construction materials for aerospace and infrastructure. The high specific strength of FRP attracted its use as non-corrosive reinforcement. However, FRP materials were characterized with a relatively low ductility and low shear strength compared with steel reinforcement. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced in the last decade as a material with minimal defect that is capable of increasing the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. This dissertation reports experimental investigations on the use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce a new generation of FRP composites. The experiments showed significant improvements in the flexure properties of the nanocomposite when functionalized MWCNTs were used. In addition, MWCNTs were used to produce FRP composites in order to examine static, dynamic, and creep behavior. The MWCNTs improved the off-axis tension, off-axis flexure, FRP lap shear joint responses. In addition, they reduced the creep of FRP-concrete interface, enhanced the fracture toughness, and altered the impact resistance significantly. In general, the MWCNTs are found to affect the behaviour of the FRP composites when matrix failure dominates the behaviour. The improvement in the mechanical response with the addition of low contents of MWCNTs would benefit many industrial and military applications such as strengthening structures using FRP composites, composite pipelines, aircrafts, and armoured vehicles.

  9. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats reve...

  10. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines and the like formed of continuous carbon fibers throughout the valve's stem and head is disclosed. The valve includes braided carbon fiber material over axially aligned unidirectional carbon fibers forming a valve stem; the braided and unidirectional carbon fibers being broomed out at one end of the valve stem forming the shape of the valve head; the valve-shaped structure being densified and rigidized with a matrix of carbon containing discontinuous carbon fibers: and the finished valve being treated to resist oxidation. Also disclosed is a carbon matrix plug containing continuous and discontinuous carbon fibers and forming a net-shape valve head acting as a mandrel over which the unidirectional and braided carbon fibers are formed according to textile processes. Also disclosed are various preform valves and processes for making finished and preform carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valves.

  11. Research on the melt impregnation of continuous carbon fiber reinforced nylon 66 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, M. Y.; Li, C. X.; Xue, P.; Chen, K.; Chen, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Impregnation mold of continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites was designed and built in the article. Based on the theory of fluid mechanics and Darcy's law, a model of the melt impregnation was also established. The influences of fiber bundle width and impregnation pins’ diameter on the impregnation degree were studied by numerical simulation. Continuous carbon fiber reinforced nylon 66 composites were prepared. The effects of coated angle and impregnation mold temperature on the mechanical properties of the composites were also described.The agreement between the experimental data and prediction by the model was found to be satisfactory.

  12. Processing of thermo-structural carbon-fiber reinforced carbon composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Pardini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the processes used to obtain thermostructural Carbon/Carbon composites. The processing of these materials begins with the definition of the architecture of the carbon fiber reinforcement, in the form of stacked plies or in the form of fabrics or multidirectional reinforcement. Incorporating fiber reinforcement into the carbon matrix, by filling the voids and interstices, leads to the densification of the material and a continuous increase in density. There are two principal processing routes for obtaining these materials: liquid phase processing and gas phase processing. In both cases, thermal processes lead to the formation of a carbon matrix with specific properties related to their precursor. These processes also differ in terms of yield. With liquid phase impregnation the yield is around 45 per cent, while gas phase processing yields around 15 per cent.

  13. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composites Rotary Valves for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary, sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or warp-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties, do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary, sleeve, and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  14. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Rotary Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G.Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or wrap-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary sleeve and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  15. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity.

  16. Epoxy/carbon composite resins in dentistry: mechanical properties related to fiber reinforcements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viguie, G; Malquarti, G; Vincent, B; Bourgeois, D

    1994-09-01

    Composite carbon/epoxy resin techniques for restorative dentistry have improved with the development of various composite resins classified according to fiber reinforcement, such as short fibers, woven materials, or long unidirectional fibers. This study of the mechanical properties with three-point flexion enabled comparison of the flexural strengths. The modulus of elasticity of different composite resin materials was determined so that the appropriate reinforced composite resin could be selected for specific clinical conditions.

  17. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2008-01-01

    OXIMAP is a numerical (FEA-based) solution tool capable of calculating the carbon fiber and fiber coating oxidation patterns within any arbitrarily shaped carbon silicon carbide composite structure as a function of time, temperature, and the environmental oxygen partial pressure. The mathematical formulation is derived from the mechanics of the flow of ideal gases through a chemically reacting, porous solid. The result of the formulation is a set of two coupled, non-linear differential equations written in terms of the oxidant and oxide partial pressures. The differential equations are solved simultaneously to obtain the partial vapor pressures of the oxidant and oxides as a function of the spatial location and time. The local rate of carbon oxidation is determined at each time step using the map of the local oxidant partial vapor pressure along with the Arrhenius rate equation. The non-linear differential equations are cast into matrix equations by applying the Bubnov-Galerkin weighted residual finite element method, allowing for the solution of the differential equations numerically.

  18. MECHANICAL AND THERMO–MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BI-DIRECTIONAL AND SHORT CARBON FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. AGARWAL

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper based on bidirectional and short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites reports the effect of fiber loading on physical, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties respectively. The five different fiber loading, i.e., 10wt. %, 20wt. %, 30wt. %, 40wt. % and 50wt. % were taken for evaluating the above said properties. The physical and mechanical properties, i.e., hardness, tensile strength, flexural strength, inter-laminar shear strength and impact strength are determined to represent the behaviour of composite structures with that of fiber loading. Thermo-mechanical properties of the material are measured with the help of Dynamic Mechanical Analyser to measure the damping capacity of the material that is used to reduce the vibrations. The effect of storage modulus, loss modulus and tan delta with temperature are determined. Finally, Cole–Cole analysis is performed on both bidirectional and short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites to distinguish the material properties of either homogeneous or heterogeneous materials. The results show that with the increase in fiber loading the mechanical properties of bidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites increases as compared to short carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites except in case of hardness, short carbon fiber reinforced composites shows better results. Similarly, as far as Loss modulus, storage modulus is concerned bidirectional carbon fiber shows better damping behaviour than short carbon fiber reinforced composites.

  19. Study of erosion characterization of carbon fiber reinforced composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Uttam Kumar; Chowdhury, Mohammad Asaduzzaman; Kowser, Md. Arefin; Mia, Md. Shahin

    2017-06-01

    Carbon fiber composite materials are widely used at different engineering and industrial applications there are good physical, mechanical, chemical properties and light weight. Erosion behavior of materials depends on various factors such as impact angle, particle velocity, particle size, particle shape, particle type, particle flux, temperature of the tested materials. Among these factors impact angle and particle velocity have been recognized as two parameters that noticeably influence the erosion rates of all tested materials. Irregular shaped sand (SiO2) particles of various sizes (200-300 µm, 400-500 µm, and 500-600 µm) were selected erosive element. Tested conditions such as impingement angles between 15 degree to 90 degree, impact velocities between 30-50 m/sec, and stand-off distances 15-25 mm at surrounding room temperature were maintained. The highest level of erosion of the tested composite is obtained at 60° impact angle, which signifies the semi-ductile behavior of this material. Erosion showed increasing trend with impact velocity and decreasing nature in relation to stand-off distance. Surface damage was analyzed using SEM to examine the nature of the erosive wear mechanism.

  20. Hybrid welding of carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy based composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lionetto, Francesca; De Nicolas Morillas, M.; Pappadà, Silvio; Buccoliero, Giuseppe; Fernandez Villegas, I.; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2018-01-01

    The approach for joining thermosetting matrix composites (TSCs) proposed in this study is based on the use of a low melting co-cured thermoplastic film, added as a last ply in the stacking sequence of the composite laminate. During curing, the thermoplastic film partially penetrates in the first

  1. Modal analysis of additive manufactured carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite framework: Experiment and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryginin, N. V.; Krasnoveikin, V. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.

    2016-11-01

    Additive manufacturing by 3D printing is the most advanced and promising trend for making the multicomponent composites. Polymer-based carbon fiber reinforced composites demonstrate high mechanical properties combined with low weight characteristics of the component. This paper shows the results of 3D modeling and experimental modal analysis on a polymer composite framework obtained using additive manufacturing. By the example of three oscillation modes it was shown the agreement between the results of modeling and experimental modal analysis with the use of laser Doppler vibrometry.

  2. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites for Space Based Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-31

    phase formed during ceraming was identified by x-ray diffraction as either P-quartz solid solution (LAS phase) or P- spodumene solid solution...phase is not stable at temperatures above 975-1000°C, however, and transforms to P- spodumene solid solution [20]. Therefore, SP963/HMU composites...which were crystallized at 11350 C, contained P- spodumene solid solution. B. Mechanical Properties Three-point flexural strengths of as-pressed and

  3. Non destructive evaluation of adhesively bonded carbon fiber reinforced composite lap joints with varied bond quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, R. L.; Bhat, M. R.; Murthy, C. R. L.

    2012-05-01

    Structural adhesive bonding is widely used to execute assemblies in automobile and aerospace structures. The quality and reliability of these bonded joints must be ensured during service. In this context non destructive evaluation of these bonded structures play an important role. Evaluation of adhesively bonded composite single lap shear joints has been attempted through experimental approach. Series of tests, non-destructive as well as destructive were performed on different sets of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite lap joint specimens with varied bond quality. Details of the experimental investigations carried out and the outcome are presented in this paper.

  4. Liquid composite molding-processing and characterization of fiber-reinforced composites modified with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, R.; Khalid, U.; Kuttner, C.; Kothmann, M.; Dijkstra, D. J.; Fery, A.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand in fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) necessitates economic processing of high quality, like the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. FRPs exhibit excellent in-plane properties but weaknesses in off-plane direction. The addition of nanofillers into the resinous matrix phase embodies a promising approach due to benefits of the nano-scaled size of the filler, especially its high surface and interface areas. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are preferable candidates for resin modification in regard of their excellent mechanical properties and high aspect ratios. However, especially the high aspect ratios give rise to withholding or filtering by fibrous fabrics during the impregnation process, i.e. length dependent withholding of tubes (short tubes pass through the fabric, while long tubes are restrained) and a decrease in the local CNT content in the laminate along the flow path can occur. In this study, hybrid composites containing endless glass fiber reinforcement and surface functionalized CNTs dispersed in the matrix phase were produced by VARTM. New methodologies for the quantification of the filtering of CNTs were developed and applied to test laminates. As a first step, a method to analyze the CNT length distribution before and after injection was established for thermosetting composites to characterize length dependent withholding of nanotubes. The used glass fiber fabric showed no perceptible length dependent retaining of CNTs. Afterward, the resulting test laminates were examined by Raman spectroscopy and compared to reference samples of known CNT content. This Raman based technique was developed further to assess the quality of the impregnation process and to quantitatively follow the local CNT content along the injection flow in cured composites. A local decline in CNT content of approx. 20% was observed. These methodologies allow for the quality control of the filler content and size-distribution in CNT based hybrid

  5. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard C

    2011-05-03

    Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential.

  6. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P<10−4, and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P<10−8. Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential.

  7. The effect of exfoliated graphite on carbon fiber reinforced composites for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Adam Michael

    It is desirable to lighten cryogenic fuel tanks through the use of composites for the development of a reusable single stage launch vehicle. Conventional composites fall victim to microcracking due to the cyclic loading and temperature change experienced during launch and re-entry conditions. Also, the strength of a composite is generally limited by the properties of the matrix. The introduction of the nanoplatelet, exfoliated graphite or graphene, to the matrix shows promise of increasing both the microcracking resistivity and the mechanical characteristics. Several carbon fiber composite plates were manufactured with varying concentrations of graphene and tested under both room and cryogenic conditions to characterize graphene's effect on the composite. Results from tensile and fracture testing indicate that the ideal concentration of graphene in our carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites for cryogenic applications is 0.08% mass graphene.

  8. Multifunctional fiber reinforced polymer composites using carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Behnam; Jakubinek, Michael B.; Martinez-Rubi, Yadienka; Rahmat, Meysam; Djokic, Drazen; Laqua, Kurtis; Park, Daesun; Kim, Keun-Su; Simard, Benoit; Yousefpour, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has made several nano-based materials available with the potential to address limitations of conventional fiber reinforced polymer composites, particularly in reference to multifunctional structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the most prevalent case and offer amazing properties at the individual nanotube level. There are already a few high-profile examples of the use of CNTs in space structures to provide added electrical conductivity for static dissipation and electromagnetic shielding. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), which are structurally analogous to CNTs, also present a range of attractive properties. Like the more widely explored CNTs, individual BNNTs display remarkable mechanical properties and high thermal conductivity but with contrasting functional attributes including substantially higher thermal stability, high electrical insulation, polarizability, high neutron absorption and transparency to visible light. This presents the potential of employing either or both BNNTs and CNTs to achieve a range of lightweight, functional composites for space structures. Here we present the case for application of BNNTs, in addition to CNTs, in space structures and describe recent advances in BNNT production at the National Research Council Canada (NRC) that have, for the first time, provided sufficiently large quantities to enable commercialization of high-quality BNNTs and accelerate development of chemistry, composites and applications based on BNNTs. Early demonstrations showing the fabrication and limited structural testing of polymer matrix composites, including glass fiber-reinforced composite panels containing BNNTs will be discussed.

  9. Optimal Design for Hybrid Ratio of Carbon/Basalt Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Resin Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Hong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The optimum hybrid ratio range of carbon/basalt hybrid fiber reinforced resin composites was studied. Hybrid fiber composites with nine different hybrid ratios were prepared before tensile test.According to the structural features of plain weave, the unit cell's performance parameters were calculated. Finite element model was established by using SHELL181 in ANSYS. The simulated values of the sample stiffness in the model were approximately similar to the experimental ones. The stress nephogram shows that there is a critical hybrid ratio which divides the failure mechanism of HFRP into single failure state and multiple failure state. The tensile modulus, strength and limit tensile strain of HFRP with 45% resin are simulated by finite element method. The result shows that the tensile modulus of HFRP with 60% hybrid ratio increases by 93.4% compared with basalt fiber composites (BFRP, and the limit tensile strain increases by 11.3% compared with carbon fiber composites(CFRP.

  10. [Recent development of research on the biotribology of carbon fiber reinforced poly ether ether ketone composites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Pan, Yusong

    2014-12-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced poly ether ether ketone (CF/PEEK) composite possesses excellent biocompatible, biomechanical and bioribological properties. It is one of the most promising implant materials for artificial joint. Many factors influence the bioribological properties of CF/PEEK composites. In this paper, the authors reviewed on the biotribology research progress of CF/PEEK composites. The influences of various factors such as lubricant, reinforcement surface modification, functional particles, friction counterpart and friction motion modes on the bio-tribological properties of CF/PEEK composites are discussed. Based on the recent research, the authors suggest that the further research should be focused on the synergistic effect of multiple factors on the wear and lubrication mechanism of CF/PEEK.

  11. Monitoring stress changes in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites with GHz radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemmel, Peter; Moore, Andrew J

    2017-08-01

    We performed proof of concept experiments to demonstrate that the reflected power of GHz illumination from the surface of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites is linearly related to the stress in the material. We introduce a stress coefficient to describe the change in normalized power with applied stress, analogous to the stress-optic coefficient, because the effect is attributed to changes in the refractive index of the effective medium comprising the polymer matrix and carbon fibers. Stress coefficients of -0.549±0.134/GPa and -0.154±0.024/GPa were measured for two different composite materials, both linear in the measurement range of 40 MPa and 100 Mpa, respectively. This technique opens up the possibility of non-destructive evaluation of stresses in CFRP components for quality assurance in manufacturing and in structural health monitoring of in-service aerospace and automotive parts.

  12. Nondestructive evaluation of defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Andrew C. Y.; Goh, Henry K. H.; Lin, Karen K.; Liew, W. H.

    2017-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites are increasingly used in aerospace applications due to its superior mechanical properties and reduced weight. Adhesive bonding is commonly used to join the composite parts since it is capable of joining incompatible or dissimilar components. However, insufficient adhesive or contamination in the adhesive bonds might occur and pose as threats to the integrity of the plane during service. It is thus important to look for suitable nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques to detect and characterize the sub-surface defects within the CFRP composites. Some of the common NDT techniques include ultrasonic techniques and thermography. In this work, we report the use of the abovementioned techniques for improved interpretation of the results.

  13. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Terahertz (THz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations.

  14. The Effect of Externally Retrofitted Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites on the Ductility of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-04

    conducted in accordance with the specifications on steel tensile tests in ASTM A370 11.4.1 and 11.4.3. 5.4 Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics The laminates...provided by manufacturer Tensile tests on samples of both the S512 and the S812 in accordance with ASTM D3039 . The S512 test coupon was 20 in (500mm...A TRIDENT SCHOLAR PROJECT REPORT NO. 268 The Effect of Externally Retrofitted Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites on the Ductility of

  15. Flexural properties of polyethylene, glass and carbon fiber-reinforced resin composites for prosthetic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Yukinori; Nishigawa, Goro; Irie, Masao; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Minagi, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    High flexural properties are needed for fixed partial denture or implant prosthesis to resist susceptibility to failures caused by occlusal overload. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the effects of four different kinds of fibers on the flexural properties of fiber-reinforced composites. Polyethylene fiber, glass fiber and two types of carbon fibers were used for reinforcement. Seven groups of specimens, 2 × 2 × 25 mm, were prepared (n = 10 per group). Four groups of resin composite specimens were reinforced with polyethylene, glass or one type of carbon fiber. The remaining three groups served as controls, with each group comprising one brand of resin composite without any fiber. After 24-h water storage in 37°C distilled water, the flexural properties of each specimen were examined with static three-point flexural test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Compared to the control without any fiber, glass and carbon fibers significantly increased the flexural strength (p fiber decreased the flexural strength (p fibers, carbon fiber exhibited higher flexural strength than glass fiber (p carbon and glass fibers (p > 0.05). Fibers could, therefore, improve the flexural properties of resin composite and carbon fibers in longitudinal form yielded the better effects for reinforcement.

  16. Carbon nanotube-based structural health monitoring for fiber reinforced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Liu, Kan; Mardirossian, Aris; Heider, Dirk; Thostenson, Erik

    2017-04-01

    In fiber reinforced composite materials, the modes of damage accumulation, ranging from microlevel to macro-level (matrix cracks development, fiber breakage, fiber-matrix de-bonding, delamination, etc.), are complex and hard to be detected through conventional non-destructive evaluation methods. Therefore, in order to assure the outstanding structural performance and high durability of the composites, there has been an urgent need for the design and fabrication smart composites with self-damage sensing capabilities. In recent years, the macroscopic forms of carbon nanotube materials have been maturely investigated, which provides the opportunity for structural health monitoring based on the carbon nanotubes that are integrated in the inter-laminar areas of advanced fiber composites. Here in this research, advanced fiber composites embedded with laminated carbon nanotube layers are manufactured for damage detection due to the relevant spatial electrical property changes once damage occurs. The mechanical-electrical coupling response is recorded and analyzed during impact test. The design and manufacturing of integrating the carbon nanotubes intensely affect the detecting sensitivity and repeatability of the integrated multifunctional sensors. The ultimate goal of the reported work is to develop a novel structural health monitoring method with the capability of reporting information on the damage state in a real-time way.

  17. Electrical impedance spectroscopy for measuring the impedance response of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composite laminates

    KAUST Repository

    Almuhammadi, Khaled

    2017-02-16

    Techniques that monitor the change in the electrical properties of materials are promising for both non-destructive testing and structural health monitoring of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRPs). However, achieving reliable monitoring using these techniques requires an in-depth understanding of the impedance response of these materials when subjected to an alternating electrical excitation, information that is only partially available in the literature. In this work, we investigate the electrical impedance spectroscopy response at various frequencies of laminates chosen to be representative of classical layups employed in composite structures. We clarify the relationship between the frequency of the electrical current, the conductivity of the surface ply and the probing depth for different CFRP configurations for more efficient electrical signal-based inspections. We also investigate the effect of the amplitude of the input signal.

  18. A fractal image analysis methodology for heat damage inspection in carbon fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, Aswin; Crivoi, Alexandru; Prabhathan, P.; Chan, Kelvin; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2017-06-01

    The use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite materials in the aerospace industry have far improved the load carrying properties and the design flexibility of aircraft structures. A high strength to weight ratio, low thermal conductivity, and a low thermal expansion coefficient gives it an edge for applications demanding stringent loading conditions. Specifically, this paper focuses on the behavior of CFRP composites under stringent thermal loads. The properties of composites are largely affected by external thermal loads, especially when the loads are beyond the glass temperature, Tg, of the composite. Beyond this, the composites are subject to prominent changes in mechanical and thermal properties which may further lead to material decomposition. Furthermore, thermal damage formation being chaotic, a strict dimension cannot be associated with the formed damage. In this context, this paper focuses on comparing multiple speckle image analysis algorithms to effectively characterize the formed thermal damages on the CFRP specimen. This would provide us with a fast method for quantifying the extent of heat damage in carbon composites, thus reducing the required time for inspection. The image analysis methods used for the comparison include fractal dimensional analysis of the formed speckle pattern and analysis of number and size of various connecting elements in the binary image.

  19. Mechanical properties of neat polymer matrix materials and their unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two neat resin systems for use in carbon fiber epoxy composites were characterized. This included tensile and shear stiffness and strengths, coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion, and fracture toughness. Tests were conducted on specimens in the dry and moisture-saturated states, at temperatures of 23, 82 and 121 C. The neat resins tested were American Cyanamid 1806 and Union Carbide ERX-4901B(MPDA). Results were compared to previously tested neat resins. Four unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites were mechanically characterized. Axial and transverse tension and in-plane shear strengths and stiffness were measured, as well as transverse coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion. Tests were conducted on dry specimens only at 23 and 100 C. The materials tested were AS4/3502, AS6/5245-C, T300/BP907, and C6000/1806 unidirectional composites. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental test conditions.

  20. Properties Variation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite for Marine Current Turbine in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbine blade which are generally made of composite is a core device among components of tidal current power generator that converts the flow of tidal current into a turning force. Recent years, damages of composite turbine blades have been reported due to reasons like seawater degradation, lake of strength, manufacture etc. In this paper, water absorption, tensile, bending, longitudinal transverse shearing properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CRP composite which would be applied to fabricate the marine current turbine blade has been investigated. Furthermore, the variations of properties with seawater immersion period were studied. The results indicated that the water absorption increased almost linearly at the beginning of immersion and then became stable. Tensile strength of specimen tended to decrease firstly and then recovered slightly. However, the longitudinal transverse shearing strength showed reverse variation trend comparing to tensile strength. And the bending property of specimens was depressed significantly. The properties variations in seawater shall be referenced to design and fabrication of composite marine current turbine blade.

  1. Characterization of carbon-fiber reinforced polyetherimide thermoplastic composites using mechanical and ultrasonic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALHaidri, Mohannad

    Continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastics (CFRT) have the potential for being a mass-produced material for high-performance applications. The primary challenge of using CFRT is achieving fiber wet-out due to the high viscosity of thermoplastics. This results in higher temperatures and pressures required for processing the composites. Co-mingling thermoplastic fibers with a reinforcing fiber, potentially, can enable better wetting by reducing the distance the matrix needs to flow. This could result in shorter cycle times and better consolidation at lower temperatures and pressures. In this study, a polyetherimide (PEI) fiber was comingled with carbon fibers (CF). The resultant fibers were woven into fabrics and processed through a compression-molding technique to form laminates. Control specimens were also fabricated using films of PEI layered between plies of woven carbon-fiber materials. The manufactured CFRT panels were evaluated using ultrasonic C-scans (scans in two spatial dimensions) and then characterized for mechanical properties. The specimens produced using the co-mingled fibers had the cycle time reduced significantly compared to the film CFRT, although the results from the mechanical property evaluations were mixed. The behaviors in the co-mingled laminates can be attributed to the resin- and void-content distribution and the fiber-bundle orientations in the cured composite.

  2. Durability of carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composites in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Joon Hyeok; Hong, Seok Bin; Ahn, Yong San; Kim, Jin-Gyun; Nam, Yong-Youn; Lee, Geun Ho; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory polymer (SMP) is one of smart polymers which exhibit shape memory effect upon external stimuli. Recently, shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) have been considered for space structure instead of shape memory alloys due to their deformability, lightweight and large recovery ratio, requiring characterization of their mechanical properties against harsh space environment and further prediction of the durability of SMPCs in space. As such, the durability of carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composites (CF-SMPCs) was investigated using accelerated testing method based on short-term testing of CF-SMPCs in harsh condition. CF-SMPCs were prepared using woven carbon fabrics and a thermoset SMP via vacuum assisted resin transfer molding process. Bending tests with constant strain rate of CF-SMPCs were conducted using universal tensile machine (UTM) and Storage modulus test were conducted using dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). Using the results, a master curve based on time-temperature superposition principle was then constructed, through which the mechanical properties of CF-SMPCs at harsh temperature were predicted. CF-SMPCs would be exposed to simulated space environments under ultra-violet radiations at various temperatures. The mechanical properties including flexural and tensile strength and shape memory properties of SMPCs would be measured using UTM before and after such exposures for comparison. Finally, the durability of SMPCs in space would be assessed by developing a degradation model of SMPC.

  3. Characterization of a New Fully Recycled Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Subjected to High Strain Rate Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, H.; Tamboura, S.; Fitoussi, J.; BenDaly, H.; Tcharkhtchi, A.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is the complete physicochemical characterization and strain rate effect multi-scale analysis of a new fully recycled carbon fiber reinforced composites for automotive crash application. Two composites made of 20% wt short recycled carbon fibers (CF) are obtained by injection molding. The morphology and the degree of dispersion of CF in the matrixes were examined using a new ultrasonic method and SEM. High strain tensile behavior up to 100 s-1 is investigated. In order to avoid perturbation due to inertial effect and wave propagation, the specimen geometry was optimized. The elastic properties appear to be insensitive to the strain rate. However, a high strain rate effect on the local visco-plasticity of the matrix and fiber/matrix interface visco-damageable behavior is emphasized. The predominant damage mechanisms evolve from generalized matrix local ductility at low strain rate regime to fiber/matrix interface debonding and fibers pull-out at high strain rate regime.

  4. Interlaminar fatigue crack growth behavior of MWCNT/carbon fiber reinforced hybrid composites monitored via newly developed acoustic emission method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Romhany

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was the investigation of the effect of carbon nanotube addition on the mode I interlaminar fatigue properties of carbon fiber reinforced composites. The authors developed a localization methodology to track the interlaminar fatigue crack front using the acoustic emission (AE technique. According to the test evaluation the carbon nanotube reinforcement decreased the crack propagation rate by 69% compared to the composite containing no nanotubes. Besides that, the fatigue life also increased significantly, the nanotube reinforced composite could withstand 3.8-times more cycles to failure than the unfilled matrix composite.

  5. Mechanical analysis of three dimensional woven carbon fiber-reinforced composites using fiber-based continuum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyunchul; An, Yongsan; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2016-10-01

    A new numerical method for analyzing the mechanical behavior of three-dimensional (3D) woven carbon fiber-reinforced composites was developed by considering changes in the fiber orientation and calculating the stress increments due to incremental deformations. The model consisted of four steps, starting update of the yarn orientation based on incremental deformation gradient. The stiffness matrix was then computed using the updated yarn orientation. Next, partial damage and propagation were incorporated into the stress calculation using modified ply discount method. The failure conditions were obtained by testing the unidirectional composites and formulated using Puck's criterion. This numerical model was finally implemented into commercial finite element software, ABAQUS, as a user material subroutine. As for experiment, 3D woven composite samples was manufactured using laboratory built-in system and characterized, the results of which were compared with simulated results, demonstrating that the current numerical model can properly predict the mechanical behavior of 3D fiber-reinforced composites.

  6. Optimal Electrode Selection for Electrical Resistance Tomography in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalona Galvis, Luis Waldo; Diaz-Montiel, Paulina; Venkataraman, Satchi

    2017-01-01

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) offers a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that takes advantage of the inherent electrical properties in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites for internal damage characterization. This paper investigates a method of optimum selection of sensing configurations for delamination detection in thick cross-ply laminates using ERT. Reduction in the number of sensing locations and measurements is necessary to minimize hardware and computational effort. The present work explores the use of an effective independence (EI) measure originally proposed for sensor location optimization in experimental vibration modal analysis. The EI measure is used for selecting the minimum set of resistance measurements among all possible combinations resulting from selecting sensing electrode pairs. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is applied to obtain a spectral representation of the resistance measurements in the laminate for subsequent EI based reduction to take place. The electrical potential field in a CFRP laminate is calculated using finite element analysis (FEA) applied on models for two different laminate layouts considering a set of specified delamination sizes and locations with two different sensing arrangements. The effectiveness of the EI measure in eliminating redundant electrode pairs is demonstrated by performing inverse identification of damage using the full set and the reduced set of resistance measurements. This investigation shows that the EI measure is effective for optimally selecting the electrode pairs needed for resistance measurements in ERT based damage detection. PMID:28772485

  7. Fatigue Hysteresis of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-02-01

    When the fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) are first loading to fatigue peak stress, matrix multicracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding occur. Under fatigue loading, the stress-strain hysteresis loops appear as fiber slipping relative to matrix in the interface debonded region upon unloading/reloading. Due to interface wear at room temperature or interface oxidation at elevated temperature, the interface shear stress degredes with increase of the number of applied cycles, leading to the evolution of the shape, location and area of stress-strain hysteresis loops. The evolution characteristics of fatigue hysteresis loss energy in different types of fiber-reinforced CMCs, i.e., unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D and 2.5D woven, have been investigated. The relationships between the fatigue hysteresis loss energy, stress-strain hysteresis loops, interface frictional slip, interface shear stress and interface radial thermal residual stress, matrix stochastic cracking and fatigue peak stress of fiber-reinforced CMCs have been established.

  8. Carbon fiber-reinforced cyanate ester/nano-ZrW2O8 composites with tailored thermal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Rogalski, Mark K; Kessler, Michael R

    2012-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are widely used in the design and fabrication of a variety of high performance aerospace components. The mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) between the high CTE polymer matrix and low CTE fiber reinforcements in such composite systems can lead to dimensional instability and deterioration of material lifetimes due to development of residual thermal stresses. The magnitude of thermally induced residual stresses in fiber-reinforced composite systems can be minimized by replacement of conventional polymer matrices with a low CTE, polymer nanocomposite matrix. Zirconium tungstate (ZrW(2)O(8)) is a unique ceramic material that exhibits isotropic negative thermal expansion and has excellent potential as a filler for development of low CTE polymer nanocomposites. In this paper, we report the fabrication and thermal characterization of novel, multiscale, macro-nano hybrid composite laminates comprising bisphenol E cyanate ester (BECy)/ZrW(2)O(8) nanocomposite matrices reinforced with unidirectional carbon fibers. The results reveal that incorporation of nanoparticles facilitates a reduction in CTE of the composite systems, which in turn results in a reduction in panel warpage and curvature after the cure because of mitigation of thermally induced residual stresses.

  9. An integrated computational framework for simulating the failure response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Hossein; Liang, Bowen; Soghrati, Soheil

    2017-12-01

    A new computational framework is introduced for the automated finite element (FE) modeling of fiber reinforced composites and simulating their micromechanical behavior. The proposed methodology relies on a new microstructure reconstruction algorithm that implements the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) to generate an initial uniform distribution of fibers with desired volume fraction and size distribution in a repeating unit cell of the composite. The genetic algorithm (GA) is then employed to optimize locations of fibers such that they replicate the target spatial arrangement. We also use a non-iterative mesh generation algorithm, named conforming to interface structured adaptive mesh refinement (CISAMR), to create FE models of the CFRPC. The CVT-GA-CISAMR framework is then employed to investigate the appropriate size of the composite's representative volume element. We also study the strength and failure mechanisms in the CFRPC subject to varying uniaxial and mixed-mode loadings.

  10. An integrated computational framework for simulating the failure response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Hossein; Liang, Bowen; Soghrati, Soheil

    2017-08-01

    A new computational framework is introduced for the automated finite element (FE) modeling of fiber reinforced composites and simulating their micromechanical behavior. The proposed methodology relies on a new microstructure reconstruction algorithm that implements the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) to generate an initial uniform distribution of fibers with desired volume fraction and size distribution in a repeating unit cell of the composite. The genetic algorithm (GA) is then employed to optimize locations of fibers such that they replicate the target spatial arrangement. We also use a non-iterative mesh generation algorithm, named conforming to interface structured adaptive mesh refinement (CISAMR), to create FE models of the CFRPC. The CVT-GA-CISAMR framework is then employed to investigate the appropriate size of the composite's representative volume element. We also study the strength and failure mechanisms in the CFRPC subject to varying uniaxial and mixed-mode loadings.

  11. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites from acrylic polymer matrices: Interfacial adhesion and physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kishi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic polymers have high potential as matrix polymers for carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic polymers (CFRTP due to their superior mechanical properties and the fact that they can be fabricated at relatively low temperatures. We focused on improving the interfacial adhesion between carbon fibers (CFs and acrylic polymers using several functional monomers for co-polymerization with methyl methacrylate (MMA. The copolymerized acrylic matrices showed good adhesion to the CF surfaces. In particular, an acrylic copolymer with acrylamide (AAm showed high interfacial adhesive strength with CFs compared to pure PMMA, and a hydroxyethyl acrylamide (HEAA copolymer containing both amide and hydroxyl groups showed high flexural strength of the CFRTP. A 3 mol% HEAA-copolymerized CFRTP achieved a flexural strength almost twice that of pure PMMA matrix CFRTP, and equivalent to that of an epoxy matrix CFRP.

  12. Electrical Resistance Based Damage Modeling of Multifunctional Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert James

    In the current thesis, the 4-probe electrical resistance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites is utilized as a metric for sensing low-velocity impact damage. A robust method has been developed for recovering the directionally dependent electrical resistivities using an experimental line-type 4-probe resistance method. Next, the concept of effective conducting thickness was uniquely applied in the development of a brand new point-type 4-probe method for applications with electrically anisotropic materials. An extensive experimental study was completed to characterize the 4-probe electrical resistance of CFRP specimens using both the traditional line-type and new point-type methods. Leveraging the concept of effective conducting thickness, a novel method was developed for building 4-probe electrical finite element (FE) models in COMSOL. The electrical models were validated against experimental resistance measurements and the FE models demonstrated predictive capabilities when applied to CFRP specimens with varying thickness and layup. These new models demonstrated a significant improvement in accuracy compared to previous literature and could provide a framework for future advancements in FE modeling of electrically anisotropic materials. FE models were then developed in ABAQUS for evaluating the influence of prescribed localized damage on the 4-probe resistance. Experimental data was compiled on the impact response of various CFRP laminates, and was used in the development of quasi- static FE models for predicting presence of impact-induced delamination. The simulation-based delamination predictions were then integrated into the electrical FE models for the purpose of studying the influence of realistic damage patterns on electrical resistance. When the size of the delamination damage was moderate compared to the electrode spacing, the electrical resistance increased by less than 1% due to the delamination damage. However, for a specimen with large

  13. Electrical conductivity improvement of aeronautical carbon fiber reinforced polyepoxy composites by insertion of carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Lonjon, Antoine; Demont, Philippe; Dantras, Eric; Lacabanne, Colette

    2012-01-01

    International audience; An increase and homogenization of electrical conductivity is essential in epoxy carbon fiber laminar aeronautical composites. Dynamic conductivity measurements have shown a very poor transversal conductivity. Double wall carbon nanotubes have been introduced into the epoxy matrix to increase the electrical conductivity. The conductivity and the degree of dispersion of carbon nanotubes in epoxy matrix were evaluated. The epoxy matrix was filled with 0.4 wt.% of CNTs to ...

  14. Recycling high-performance carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites using sub-critical and supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Chase C.

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are composite materials that consist of carbon fibers embedded in a polymer matrix, a combination that yields materials with properties exceeding the individual properties of each component. CFRP have several advantages over metals: they offer superior strength to weight ratios and superior resistance to corrosion and chemical attack. These advantages, along with continuing improvement in manufacturing processes, have resulted in rapid growth in the number of CFRP products and applications especially in the aerospace/aviation, wind energy, automotive, and sporting goods industries. Due to theses well-documented benefits and advancements in manufacturing capabilities, CFRP will continue to replace traditional materials of construction throughout several industries. However, some of the same properties that make CFRP outstanding materials also pose a major problem once these materials reach the end of service life. They become difficult to recycle. With composite consumption in North America growing by almost 5 times the rate of the US GDP in 2012, this lack of recyclability is a growing concern. As consumption increases, more waste will inevitably be generated. Current composite recycling technologies include mechanical recycling, thermal processing, and chemical processing. The major challenge of CFRP recycling is the ability to recover materials of high-value and preserve their properties. To this end, the most suitable technology is chemical processing, where the polymer matrix can be broken down and removed from the fiber, with limited damage to the fibers. This can be achieved using high concentration acids, but such a process is undesirable due to the toxicity of such materials. A viable alternative to acid is water in the sub-critical and supercritical region. Under these conditions, the behavior of this abundant and most environmentally friendly solvent resembles that of an organic compound, facilitating the breakdown

  15. Flame Retardancy Effects of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Membranes on Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxian Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube/graphene nanoplatelet (MWCNT/GNP hybrid membranes with lower liquid permeability and better barrier effect compared to MWCNT membranes were successfully synthesized by vacuum filtering. Their morphologies, water permeability, and pore structures were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM and nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Furthermore, MWCNT/GNP membranes were used to improve the flame retardancy of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP composites, and the influence of weight percentage of GNPs on the permeability and flame retardancy of MWCNT/GNP membranes was systematically investigated. Results show that incorporation of MWCNT/GNP membranes on CFRP composite plates can remarkably improve the flame retardancy of CFRP composites. Specifically, the incorporation of hierarchical MWCNT/GNP membrane with 7.5 wt% of GNP displays a 35% reduction in the peak heat release rate (PHRR for a CFRP composite plate with the epoxy as matrix and a 11% reduction in PHRR compared with the incorporation of MWCNT membrane only. A synergistic flame retarding mechanism is suggested to be attributed to these results, which includes controlling the pore size and penetrative network structure.

  16. A STUDY ON CARBON FIBER REINFORCED CARBON COMPOSITES FOR STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Padmayya Naik,; A.O. Surendranathan ,; Neelakantha V Londe

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the synthesizing of carbon-carbon (CC) composites by preformed yarn (PY) method and its mechanical properties, by varying the percentage of carbon fiber. The PY used is carbon fiberbundle surrounded by coke and pitch which is enclosed in nylon-6. Three types of samples with fiber weight fractions of 30%, 40% and 50% respectively, are fabricated and tested. In each case, the PY is chopped and filled into a die of required shape and hot pressed at500°C to 600°C to get the pr...

  17. Micromechanical Modeling for Tensile Behaviour of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    The stress-strain curves of fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) exhibit obvious non-linear behaviour under tensile loading. The occurrence of multiple damage mechanisms, i.e., matrix multicracking, fiber/matrix interface debonding and fibers fracture, is the mainly reason for the non-linear characteristic. The micromechanics approach has been developed to predict the tensile stress-strain curves of unidirectional, cross-ply and woven CMCs. The shear-lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite. The damage models were used to determine the evolution of micro damage parameters, i.e., matrix crack spacing, interface debonded length and broken fibers fraction. By combining the shear-lag model with damage models and considering the effect of transverse multicracking in the 90° plies or transverse yarns in cross-ply or woven CMCs, the tensile stress-strain curves of unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D and 2.5D woven CMCs have been predicted. The results agreed with experimental data.

  18. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Invernizzi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Glass (GFR and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethylphenol as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  19. Interactive Exploration and Visualization Using MetaTracts extracted from Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Arindam; Weissenbock, Johannes; Wenger, Rephael; Amirkhanov, Artem; Kastner, Johann; Heinzl, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    This work introduces a tool for interactive exploration and visualization using MetaTracts. MetaTracts is a novel method for extraction and visualization of individual fiber bundles and weaving patterns from X-ray computed tomography (XCT) scans of endless carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs). It is designed specifically to handle XCT scans of low resolutions where the individual fibers are barely visible, which makes extraction of fiber bundles a challenging problem. The proposed workflow is used to analyze unit cells of CFRP materials integrating a recurring weaving pattern. First, a coarse version of integral curves is used to trace sections of the individual fiber bundles in the woven CFRP materials. We call these sections MetaTracts. In the second step, these extracted fiber bundle sections are clustered using a two-step approach: first by orientation, then by proximity. The tool can generate volumetric representations as well as surface models of the extracted fiber bundles to be exported for further analysis. In addition a custom interactive tool for exploration and visual analysis of MetaTracts is designed. We evaluate the proposed workflow on a number of real world datasets and demonstrate that MetaTracts effectively and robustly identifies and extracts fiber bundles.

  20. Axial Collapse Characteristics of Aluminum/Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic Composite Thin-Walled Members with Different Section Shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woo Chae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Yang, In Young [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kil Sung [Humancomposites CO. Ltd, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Cheon Seok [Dongkang College, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ra, Seung Woo [SEOUL METAL CO. Ltd, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    In the present study, we aimed to obtain design data that can be used for the side members of lightweight cars by experimentally examining the types of effects that the changes in the section shape and outermost layer of an aluminum (Al)/carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite structural member have on its collapse characteristics. We have drawn the following conclusions based on the test results: The circular Al/CFRP composite impact-absorbing member in which the outermost layer angle was laminated at 0° was observed to be 52.9 and 49.93 higher than that of the square and hat-shaped members, respectively. In addition, the energy absorption characteristic of the circular Al/CFRP composite impact-absorbing member in which the outermost layer angle was laminated at 90° was observed to be 50.49 and 49.2 higher than that of the square and hat-shaped members, respectively.

  1. Interfacial toughening and consequent improvement in fracture toughness of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites: induced by diblock copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. D. Zhou

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibers chemically grafted with hydroxyl-terminated diblock copolymer poly (n-butylacrylate-b-poly (glycidyl methacrylate (OH-PnBA-b-PGMA, were used as the reinforcement for epoxy composites. The multi-filament composite specimens were prepared and measured by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA, to study the interfacial toughness of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites with the diblock copolymers. The loss modulus and loss factor peaks of β-relaxation indicated that composites with diblock copolymers could dissipate more energy at small strain and possess better interfacial toughness, whereas composites without the ductile block PnBA having the worse interfacial toughness. The glass transition temperature and the apparent activation energy calculated from the glass transition showed that the strong interfacial adhesion existed in the composites with diblock copolymers, corresponding with the value of interfacial shear strength. Therefore, a strengthening and toughening interfacial structure in carbon fiber/epoxy composites was achieved by introducing the diblock copolymer OH-PnBA-b-PGMA. The resulting impact toughness, characterized with an Izod impact tester, was better than that of composite without the ductile block PnBA.

  2. Computational modeling of the electromagnetic characteristics of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites with different weave structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, A. M.; Douglas, J. F.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites (CFRPC) are of great interest in the aerospace and automotive industries due to their exceptional mechanical properties. Carbon fibers are typically woven and inter-laced perpendicularly in warps and wefts to form a carbon fabric that can be embedded in a binding matrix. The warps and wefts can be interlaced in different patterns called weaving structures. The primary weaving structures are the plain, twill, and satin weaves, which give different mechanical composite properties. The goal of this work is to computationally investigate the dependence of CFRPC microwave and terahertz electromagnetic characteristics on weave structure. These bands are good candidates for the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of CFRPC since their wavelengths are comparable to the main weave features. 3D full wave electromagnetic simulations of several different weave models have been performed using a finite element (FEM) simulator, which is able to accurately model the complex weave structure. The computational experiments demonstrate that the reflection of electromagnetic waves from CFRPC depend sensitively on weave structure. The reflection spectra calculated in this work can be used to identify the optimal frequencies for the NDE of each weave structure.

  3. Modal analysis of additive manufactured carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite: Experiment and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoveikin, V. A.; Druzhinin, N. V.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    Additive manufacturing is a promising process to develop the multicomponent polymer-matrix composites. The carbon-reinforced versions of such composites possess a low weight and a high specific strength. Here we present the results of studies of numerical and experimental modal analyses of a framework structure made of a composite material by both aforementioned approaches. The numerical test results and those obtained from the laser Doppler vibrometry show the good agreement for several oscillation modes.

  4. Impact damage prediction in carbon fiber-reinforced laminated composite using the matrix-reinforced mixing theory

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Martínez, Marco Antonio; Martínez García, Javier; Oller Martínez, Sergio Horacio; Gil Espert, Lluís; Rastellini, Fernando G.; Flores, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The impact damage tolerance of fiber-reinforced laminated composite materials is a source of concern, mainly due to internal induced damage which causes large reductions on the strength and stability of the structure. This paper presents a procedure based on a finite element formulation that can be used to perform numerical predictions of the impact induced internal damage in composite laminates. The procedure is based on simulating the composite performance using a micro-mechanical approach ...

  5. [Fiber-reinforced composite in fixed prosthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilo, R; Abu Rass, Z; Shmidt, A

    2010-07-01

    Fiber reinforced composite (FRC) is composed of resin matrix and fibers filler. Common types of fibers: polyethylene, carbon and glass. Fibers can be continuous and aligned, discontinuous and aligned, discontinuous and randomly oriented. The architecture of the fibers is unidirectional, woven or braided. The two main types are: dry fibers or impregnated. Inclusion of fibers to resin composite increased its average flexural strength in 100-200 MPa. FRC can be utilized by the dentist in direct approach (splinting, temporary winged bridge) or indirect approach (laboratory made fixed partial denture). Laboratory fixed partial denture (FPD) is made from FRC substructure and Hybrid/Microfill particulate composite veneer. Main indications: interim temporary FPD or FPD in cases of questionable abutment teeth, in aesthetic cases where All Ceram FPD is not feasible. Retention is attained by adhesive cementation to minimally prepared teeth or to conventionally prepared teeth; other options are inlay-onlay bridges or hybrid bridges. Contraindications are: poor hygiene, inability to control humidity, parafunction habits, and more than two pontics. Survival rate of FRC FPD over 5 years is 75%, lower compared to porcelain fused to metal FPD which is 95%. Main reasons for failure are: fracture of framework and delamination of the veneer. Part of the failures is repairable.

  6. Thermal Protection of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Composites by Ceramic Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljinder Kandola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal barrier efficiency of two types of ceramic particle, glass flakes and aluminum titanate, dispersed on the surface of carbon-fiber epoxy composites, has been evaluated using a cone calorimeter at 35 and 50 kW/m2, in addition to temperature gradients through the samples’ thicknesses, measured by inserting thermocouples on the exposed and back surfaces during the cone tests. Two techniques of dispersing ceramic particles on the surface have been employed, one where particles were dispersed on semi-cured laminate and the other where their dispersion in a phenolic resin was applied on the laminate surface, using the same method as used previously for glass fiber composites. The morphology and durability of the coatings to water absorption, peeling, impact and flexural tension were also studied and compared with those previously reported for glass-fiber epoxy composites. With both methods, uniform coatings could be achieved, which were durable to peeling or water absorption with a minimal adverse effect on the mechanical properties of composites. While all these properties were comparable to those previously observed for glass fiber composites, the ceramic particles have seen to be more effective on this less flammable, carbon fiber composite substrate.

  7. Application of pulse acoustic microscopy technique for 3D imaging bulk microstructure of carbon fiber-reinforced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Songping; Guo, Enming; Levin, V M; Liu, Feifei; Petronyuk, Yu S; Zhang, Qianlin

    2006-12-22

    Impulse acoustic microscopy technique is applied for 3D imaging of bulk microstructure of composite materials. Short pulses of focused high-frequency ultrasound have been employed for layer-by-layer imaging of internal microstructure of carbon fiber-reinforced composite (CFRC) laminates. The method provides spatial resolution of 60 microm and in-depth resolution of 80 microm, approximately. Echo signals reflected from structural units--plies, fiber bundles; and microflaws form acoustic images of microstructure at different depth inside samples. The images make it possible to see ply arrays, packing of bundles in plies; binding material distribution over the specimen body. They reveal failure of interply adhesion, buckling of single plies and fiber bundles, internal defoliations and disbonds, voids in the specimen body. The series of successive images offer outstanding possibilities to reconstruct the bulk structure, to estimate local variations of properties, topological and geometrical characteristics of structural components. The imaging technique has been applied to study different types of fiber packing--unidirectional, cross-ply and woven laminates. Mechanisms of ultrasonic contrast for diverse elements in acoustic images of CFRC laminate bulk microstructure and structural defects are discussed.

  8. Fiber reinforced polymer composites for bridge structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra CANTORIU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in construction materials technology have led to the emergence of new materials with special properties, aiming at safety, economy and functionality of bridges structures. A class of structural materials which was originally developed many years ago, but recently caught the attention of engineers involved in the construction of bridges is fiber reinforced polymer composites. This paper provides an overview of fiber reinforced polymer composites used in bridge structures including types, properties, applications and future trends. The results of this study have revealed that this class of materials presents outstanding properties such as high specific strength, high fatigue and environmental resistance, lightweight, stiffness, magnetic transparency, highly cost-effective, and quick assembly, but in the same time high initial costs, lack of data on long-term field performance, low fire resistance. Fiber reinforced polymer composites were widely used in construction of different bridge structures such as: deck and tower, I-beams, tendons, cable stands and proved to be materials for future in this field.

  9. Damage Tolerance Enhancement of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites by Nanoreinforcement of Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Joel Stewart

    Nanocomposites are a relatively new class of materials which incorporate exotic, engineered nanoparticles to achieve superior material properties. Because of their extremely small size and well-ordered structure, many nanoparticles possess properties that exceed those offered by a wide range of other known materials, making them attractive candidates for novel materials engineering development. Their small size is also an impediment to their practical use, as they typically cannot be employed by themselves to realize those properties in large structures. Furthermore, nanoparticles typically possess strong self-affinity, rendering them difficult to disperse uniformly into a composite. However, contemporary research has shown that, if well-dispersed, nanoparticles have great capacity to improve the mechanical properties of composites, especially damage tolerance, in the form of fracture toughness, fatigue life, and impact damage mitigation. This research focuses on the development, manufacturing, and testing of hybrid micro/nanocomposites comprised of woven carbon fibers with a carbon nanotube reinforced epoxy matrix. Material processing consisted of dispersant-and-sonication based methods to disperse nanotubes into the matrix, and a vacuum-assisted wet lay-up process to prepare the hybrid composite laminates. Various damage tolerance properties of the hybrid composite were examined, including static strength, fracture toughness, fatigue life, fatigue crack growth rate, and impact damage behavior, and compared with similarly-processed reference material produced without nanoreinforcement. Significant improvements were obtained in interlaminar shear strength (15%), Mode-I fracture toughness (180%), shear fatigue life (order of magnitude), Mode-I fatigue crack growth rate (factor of 2), and effective impact damage toughness (40%). Observations by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and ultrasonic imaging showed significant differences in failure behavior

  10. Saccaharum Cilliare Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Singha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable resources such as natural fibers in the field of fiber reinforced materials with their new range of applications represent an important basis in order to fulfill the ecological objective of creating eco-friendly materials. In views of enormous advantages a study on green composites using Saccaharum cilliare fiber as a reinforcing material and urea-formaldehyde (UF as a novel matrix has been made. First of all urea-formaldehyde resin synthesized was reinforced withSaccaharum cilliare fiber. Reinforcement of the fiber was accomplished in three different forms particle (200 micron reinforcement, short fiber (3 mm. reinforcement and long fiber (6 mm reinforcement. Present work reveals that mechanical properties such as: tensile strength, compressive strength and wear resistance of urea -formaldehyde resin (UF increases to a significant extent when reinforced with Saccaharum cilliare fiber which is found in outsized amount in the Himalayan Region. These mechanical properties mainly depend upon the dimensions of the fiber used. Analysis of results shows that particle reinforcement is more effective as compared to short and long fiber reinforcement. Morphological and thermal studies of these composites have also been carried out.

  11. [Fiber reinforced composite posts: literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydman, G; Levatovsky, S; Pilo, R

    2013-07-01

    FRC (Fiber-reinforced composite) posts have been used since the beginning of the 90s with the introduction of carbon fiber posts. Fiber posts are widely used to restore endodontically treated teeth that have insufficient coronal tooth structure. Many in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the advantage of using FRC over prefabricated and cast metal post especially indicated in narrow root canals which are prone to vertically root fracture. The most frequent failure of FRC is debonding of a post at the resin cement/dentin interface. Bonding to dentin may be achieved by using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives. The bond strength formed by self-adhesive cements is noticeably lower in comparison to the bond strength formed with resin cements applied in combination with etch-and-rinse adhesives. In an attempt to maximize resin bonding to fiber posts, several surface treatments have been suggested. Sandblasting with alumina particles results in an increased surface roughness and surface area without affecting the integrity of the post as long as it is applied by 50 microm alumina particles at 2.5 bars for maximally 5 seconds at a distance of 30 mm. The efficiency of post salinization is controversial and its contribution to the retention is of minor importance. Hydrofluoric acid has recently been proposed for etching glass fiber posts but this technique produced substantial damage to the glass fibers and affected the integrity of the post. Delayed cementation of fiber post (at least 24h post endodontic treatment) resulted in higher retentive strengths in comparison to immediate cementation and the best results were obtained when the luting agent was brought into the post space with lentulo spirals or specific syringes. The resin cement film thickness also influences the pullout strengths of fiber-reinforced posts .The highest bond strength values were obtained when the cement layer oversized the post spaces but not larger than 0.3 mm. The use of core build

  12. Recent advances in electron-beam curing of carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coqueret, Xavier; Krzeminski, Mickael; Ponsaud, Philippe; Defoort, Brigitte

    2009-07-01

    Cross-linking polymerization initiated by high-energy radiation is a very attractive technique for the fabrication of high-performance composite materials. The method offers many advantages compared to conventional energy- and time-consuming thermal curing processes. Free radical and cationic poly-addition chemistries have been investigated in some details by various research groups along the previous years. A high degree of control over curing kinetics and material properties can be exerted by adjusting the composition of matrix precursors as well as by acting on process parameters. However, the comparison with state-of-the-art thermally cured composites revealed the lower transverse mechanical properties of radiation-cured composites and the higher brittleness of the radiation-cured matrix. Improving fiber-matrix adhesion and upgrading polymer network toughness are thus two major challenges in this area. We have investigated several points related to these issues, and particularly the reduction of the matrix shrinkage on curing, the wettability of carbon fibers, the design of fiber-matrix interface and the use of thermoplastic toughening agents. Significant improvements were achieved on transverse strain at break by applying original surface treatments on the fibers so as to induce covalent coupling with the matrix. A drastic enhancement of the K IC value exceeding 2 MPa m 1/2 was also obtained for acrylate-based matrices toughened with high T g thermoplastics.

  13. Deformation behavior of carbon-fiber reinforced shape-memory-polymer composites used for deployable structures (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xin; Liu, Liwu; Li, Fengfeng; Pan, Chengtong; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2017-04-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a new type of smart material, they perform large reversible deformation with a certain external stimulus (e.g., heat and electricity). The properties (e.g., stiffness, strength and other mechanically static or quasi-static load-bearing capacity) are primarily considered for conventional resin-based composite materials which are mainly used for structural materials. By contrast, the mechanical actuating performance with finite deformation is considered for the shape memory polymers and their composites which can be used for both structural materials and functional materials. For shape memory polymers and their composites, the performance of active deformation is expected to further promote the development in smart active deformation structures, such as deployable space structures and morphing wing aircraft. The shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) are also one type of High Strain Composite (HSC). The space deployable structures based on carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) show great prospects. Considering the problems that SMPCs are difficult to meet the practical applications in space deployable structures in the recent ten years, this paper aims to research the mechanics of deformation, actuation and failure of SMPCs. In the overall view of the shape memory polymer material's nonlinearity (nonlinearity and stress softening in the process of pre-deformation and recovery, relaxation in storage process, irreversible deformation), by the multiple verifications among theory, finite element and experiments, one obtains the deformation and actuation mechanism for the process of "pre-deformation, energy storage and actuation" and its non-fracture constraint domain. Then, the parameters of SMPCs will be optimized. Theoretical analysis is realized by the strain energy function, additionally considering the interaction strain energy between the fiber and the matrix. For the common resin-based or soft

  14. Friction energy absorption in fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimhall, Thomas Jay

    Energy absorption of fiber reinforced composite structures is of interest to the automotive industry as their specific energy absorption (SEA), i.e. the energy absorption capability per unit mass, is higher than many metallic counterparts. However, the SEA of composite structures has been observed to decrease under dynamic crush loading when compared with quasi-static compression. This is different from metallic structures. For example, carbon fiber/vinyl ester composite crush tubes crushed at 2.0 m/sec were observed to have SEA of 23.8 J/gm, a decrease in SEA of 6.6 J/gm or 21.7% compared with quasi-statically loaded SEA of 30.4 J/gm. Glass fiber/vinyl ester composite crush tubes were investigated with quasi-static compression and energy-absorbing modes were identified. The observed energy absorbing modes included tube corner splitting, composite delamination, matrix damage due to bending, and sliding friction of the composite with the plug type crush trigger. These same energy absorbing modes were observed in quasi-statically compressed and dynamically crashed carbon/vinyl ester composite crush tubes. Energy absorption attributable to corner splitting at quasi-static compression was estimated using standard tensile test results. Corner splitting was estimated to absorb less that 1% of the total energy absorbed by both the glass fiber composite and the carbon fiber composite crush tubes. Energy absorption attributable to delamination was estimated using the mode II (shear mode) strain energy release rate obtained using the end notch flexure (ENF) test. Under quasi-static compression, the glass fiber composite delamination SEA was found to be 1.31 J/gm or 6.4% of the total tube SEA. For carbon fiber composite crush tubes, the delamination SEA was found to be 0.84 J/gm or 2.8%f the total tube SEA. Experiments seemed to suggest that sliding friction played an important role in the energy absorption of composite crush tubes. In an attempt to separate the sliding

  15. Carbon Nanotube (CNT) and Carbon Fiber Reinforced SiC Optical Components Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — M Cubed has developed and patented technology to make carbon fiber reinforced SiC composites and components. In addition, the feasibility of doubling the toughness...

  16. Carbon nano fibers reinforced composites origami inspired mechanical metamaterials with passive and active properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshad, Mohamed Ali E.; D'Hondt, Clement; Naguib, Hani E.

    2017-10-01

    Core panels used for compression or impact damping are designed to dissipate energy and to reduce the transferred force and energy. They are designed to have high strain and deformation with low density. The geometrical configuration of such cores plays a significant role in redistributing the applied forces to dampen the compression and impact energy. Origami structures are renowned for affording large macroscopic deformation which can be employed for force redistribution and energy damping. The material selection for the fabrication of origami structures affects the core capacity to withstand compression and impact loads. Polymers are characterized by their high compression and impact resistance; the drawback of polymers is the low stiffness and elastic moduli compared with metallic materials. This work is focused on the study of the effect of Carbon Nano Fibers (CNF) on the global mechanical properties of the origami panel cores made of polymeric blends. The base matrix materials used were Polylactic Acid (PLA) and Thermoplastic Polyurethane (TPU) blends, and the percentages of the PLA/TPU were 100/0, 20/80, 65/35, 50/50, 20/80, and 0/100 as a percentage of weight. The weight percentages of CNF added to the polymeric blends were 1%, 3%, and 5%. This paper deals with the fabrication process of the polymeric reinforced blends and the origami cores, in order to predict the best fabrication conditions. The dynamic scanning calorimetry and the dynamic mechanical analyzer were used to test the reinforced blended base material for thermomechanical and viscoelastic properties. The origami core samples were fabricated using per-molded geometrical features and then tested for compression and impact properties. The results of the study were compared with previous published results which showed that there is considerable enhancement in the mechanical properties of the origami cores compared with the pure blended polymeric origami cores. The active properties of the origami

  17. Recycling and characterization of carbon fibers from carbon fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites by a novel super-heated-steam method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwan-Woo; Lee, Hye-Min; An, Jeong-Hun; Chung, Dong-Chul; An, Kay-Hyeok; Kim, Byung-Joo

    2017-12-01

    In order to manufacture high quality recycled carbon fibers (R-CFs), carbon fiber-reinforced composite wastes were pyrolysed with super-heated steam at 550 °C in a fixed bed reactor for varying reaction times. The mechanical and surface properties of the R-CFs were characterized with a single fiber tensile test, interface shear strength (IFSS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface analysis showed that there was no matrix char residue on the fiber surfaces. The tensile strength and IFSS values of the R-CFs were 90% and 115% compared to those of virgin carbon fibers (V-CFs), respectively. The recycling efficiency of the R-CFs from the composites were strongly dependent on the pyrolysis temperature, reaction time, and super-heated steam feeding rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. ABA and ABC type thermoplastic elastomer toughening of epoxy matrices and its effect on carbon fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchiaya, Gomatheeshwar

    Epoxy-matrices have high modulus, strength, excellent creep resistance, but lacks ductility. One approach to improve the mechanical toughness is the addition of thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs). The TPEs investigated here are triblock copolymers of styrene-butadiene-methyl methacrylate (SBM) and methylmethacrylate-butylacrylate-methylmethacrylate (MAM) of the ABC and ABA type, respectively. The effect of concentration (1-12.5 wt %) of these TPEs on a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy cured with metaphenylenediamine (mPDA), has been investigated. The TPE-DGEBA epoxies were characterized by TGA, DMA, SEM and impact. The flexural modulus, flexural strength and thermal resistance remained unaffected up to 5 wt% loading of TPEs, and exhibited less than 10% decrease at higher weight percent. T g was unaffected for all concentrations. Fracture toughness was improved 250% and up to 375% (when non- stoichiometric amount of curing agent was used) with TPE addition to epoxy/mPDA matrix. A SBM(1phr)EPON system was chosen to be the matrix of choice for a fiber reinforced composite system with a 4wt% aromatic epoxy sizing on a AS4 (UV-treated) carbon fiber. The 0° and 90° flexural modulus and strength of a SBM modified system was compared with the neat and their fracture surfaces were analyzed. A 89% increase in flexural strength was observed in a 90° flexural test for the modified system when compared with the neat. Novel sizing agents were also developed to enhance interfacial shear strength (IFSS) and the fiber-matrix adhesion and their birefringence pattern were analyzed.

  19. Machining of fiber-reinforced composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Myong-Shik

    As fiber-reinforced composite laminates are becoming considerably popular in a wide range of applications, the necessity for machining such materials is increasing rapidly. Due to their microscopical inhomogeneity, anisotropy, and highly abrasive nature, composite laminates exhibit some peculiar types of machining damage. Consequently, the machining of composite laminates requires a different approach from that used for metals and offers a challenge from both an academic and application point of view. In the present work, the drilling of composite laminated plates and the edge trimming of tubular composite laminates were investigated through theoretical analyses and their experimental verification. First, a drilling process model using linear elastic fracture mechanics and classical plate bending theory was developed to predict the critical thrust value responsible for the onset of delamination during the drilling of composite laminates with pre-drilled pilot holes. Experiments using stepped drills, which can utilize the effectiveness of such pilot holes, were conducted on composite laminates. Reasonably good agreement was found between the results of the process model and the tests. Second, the development of a model-based intelligent control strategy for the efficient drilling of composite laminates was explored by experiments and analyses. In this investigation, mathematical models were created to relate the drilling forces to cutting parameters and to identify the different process stages. These models predicted the degree of thrust force regulation to prevent delamination. Third, the edge trimming of thin-walled tubular composite laminates was modeled and analyzed for estimating the critical cutting force at the initiation of longitudinal cracking. A series of full-scale edge trimming tests were conducted on tubular composite specimens to assess the current approach and to obtain basic machining data for various composite laminates. The present study provides

  20. Interaction between pulsed infrared laser and carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Chi; Wu, Chen-Wu; Song, Hong-Wei; Huang, Chen-Guang

    2016-10-01

    The Laser drilling processes, in particular the interaction between the pulsed infrared Laser and the target materials were investigated on the CFRP composite laminate. The incremental freezing method was designed to reveal experimentally the temporal patterns of the ablation profiles in the CFRP composite laminates subjected to pulsed Laser irradiation. The temperature characteristics of the specimens were analyzed with Finite Element Method (FEM) and the phase change history studied. The theoretical results match well with the experimental outcome.

  1. Investigating the acoustical properties of carbon fiber-, glass fiber-, and hemp fiber-reinforced polyester composites

    OpenAIRE

    Jalili, Mohammad Mehdi; Mousavi, Seyyed Yahya; Pirayeshfar, Amir Soheil

    2015-01-01

    Wood is one of the main materials used for making musical instruments due to its outstanding acoustical properties. Despite such unique properties, its inferior mechanical properties, moisture sensitivity, and time- and cost-consuming procedure for making instruments in comparison with other materials (e.g., composites) are always considered as its disadvantages in making musical instruments. In this study, the acoustic parameters of three different polyester composites separately reinforced ...

  2. Influence of laminate sequence and fabric type on the inherent acoustic nonlinearity in carbon fiber reinforced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel J; Dayal, Vinay

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the study of influence of laminate sequence and fabric type on the baseline acoustic nonlinearity of fiber-reinforced composites. Nonlinear elastic wave techniques are increasingly becoming popular in detecting damage in composite materials. It was earlier observed by the authors that the non-classical nonlinear response of fiber-reinforced composite is influenced by the fiber orientation [Chakrapani, Barnard, and Dayal, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 137(2), 617-624 (2015)]. The current study expands this effort to investigate the effect of laminate sequence and fabric type on the non-classical nonlinear response. Two hypotheses were developed using the previous results, and the theory of interlaminar stresses to investigate the influence of laminate sequence and fabric type. Each hypothesis was tested by capturing the nonlinear response by performing nonlinear resonance spectroscopy and measuring frequency shifts, loss factors, and higher harmonics. It was observed that the laminate sequence can either increase or decrease the nonlinear response based on the stacking sequence. Similarly, tests were performed to compare unidirectional fabric and woven fabric and it was observed that woven fabric exhibited a lower nonlinear response compared to the unidirectional fabric. Conjectures based on the matrix properties and interlaminar stresses were used in an attempt to explain the observed nonlinear responses for different configurations.

  3. Supersonic Retropulsion Surface Preparation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites for Adhesive Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Surface preparation is widely recognized as a key step to producing robust and predictable bonds in a precise and reproducible manner. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, can lack precision and reproducibility, which can lead to variation in surface properties and subsequent bonding performance. The use of a laser to ablate composite surface resin can provide an efficient, precise, and reproducible means of preparing composite surfaces for adhesive bonding. Advantages include elimination of physical waste (i.e., grit media and sacrificial peel ply layers that ultimately require disposal), reduction in process variability due to increased precision (e.g. increased reproducibility), and automation of surface preparation, all of which improve reliability and process control. This paper describes a Nd:YAG laser surface preparation technique for composite substrates and the mechanical performance and failure modes of bonded laminates thus prepared. Additionally, bonded specimens were aged in a hot, wet environment for approximately one year and subsequently mechanically tested. The results of a one year hygrothermal aging study will be presented.

  4. Multilayer Fiber Interfaces for Improved Environmental Resistance and Slip in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Jason R.; Ramachandran, Gautham; Williams, Brian E.; Effinger, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (UVCVD) has been developed to lower the required substrate temperature thereby allowing for the application of metal oxide-based coatings to carbon and ceramic fibers without causing significant fiber damage. An effort to expand this capability to other ceramic phases chosen to maximize oxidation protection in the likely event of matrix cracking and minimize possible reaction between the coating and fiber during long-term high temperature use will be presented along with studies aimed at the demonstration of these and other benefits for the next-generation interface coating systems being developed herein.

  5. Forming of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite tubes - Experimental and numerical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Bernhard; Garthaus, Christian; Lenz, Florian; Hornig, Andreas; Hübner, Michael; Gude, Maik

    2016-10-01

    Continuous-reinforced thermoplastic composites are of growing importance for series production of lightweight components in manifold industrial areas. Novel manufacturing technologies allow the production of hollow semi-finished products that are post formed to enhance functionality. To maximize efficiency in the development process of such components it is necessary to map the forming processes numerically using Finite Elements(FE)-methods. The aim is to perform feasibility studies at an early stage, reduce development time by virtual process optimization and to generate a detailed understanding of the post formed fiber architecture for further structural-mechanical analysis.

  6. Micromechanical failure in fiber-reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashouri Vajari, Danial

    Micromechanical failure mechanisms occurring in unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites are studied by means of the finite element method as well as experimental testing. This study highlights the effect of micro-scale features such as fiber/matrix interfacial debonding, matrix cracking...... and microvoids on the microscopic and macroscopic mechanical response of composite materials. To this end, first a numerical study is carried out to explore ways to stabilize interfacial crack growth under dominant Mode-I fracture using the cohesive zone model. Consequently, this study suggests a method...... composites. In the first approach, the J2 plasticity model is implemented to model the elasto-plastic behavior of the matrix while in the second strategy the modified Drucker-Prager plasticity model is utilized to account for brittle-like and pressure dependent behavior of an epoxy matrix. In addition...

  7. Effect of hybrid fiber reinforcement on the cracking process in fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Eduardo B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, Joaquim A.O.

    2012-01-01

    The simultaneous use of different types of fibers as reinforcement in cementitious matrix composites is typically motivated by the underlying principle of a multi-scale nature of the cracking processes in fiber reinforced cementitious composites. It has been hypothesized that while undergoing...... tensile deformations in the composite, the fibers with different geometrical and mechanical properties restrain the propagation and further development of cracking at different scales from the micro- to the macro-scale. The optimized design of the fiber reinforcing systems requires the objective...... materials is carried out by assessing directly their tensile stress-crack opening behavior. The efficiency of hybrid fiber reinforcements and the multi-scale nature of cracking processes are discussed based on the experimental results obtained, as well as the micro-mechanisms underlying the contribution...

  8. Preparation of three-dimensional braided carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK composites for potential load-bearing bone fixations. Part I. Mechanical properties and cytocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Honglin; Xiong, Guangyao; Yang, Zhiwei; Raman, Sudha R; Li, Qiuping; Ma, Chunying; Li, Deying; Wang, Zheren; Wan, Yizao

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we focused on fabrication and characterization of three-dimensional carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (C3-D/PEEK) composites for orthopedic applications. We found that pre-heating of 3-D fabrics before hot-pressing could eliminate pores in the composites prepared by 3-D co-braiding and hot-pressing techniques. The manufacturing process and the processing variables were studied and optimum parameters were obtained. Moreover, the carbon fibers were surface treated by the anodic oxidization and its effect on mechanical properties of the composites was determined. Preliminary cell studies with mouse osteoblast cells were also performed to examine the cytocompatibility of the composites. Feasibility of the C3-D/PEEK composites as load-bearing bone fixation materials was evaluated. Results suggest that the C3-D/PEEK composites show good promising as load-bearing bone fixations. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reusing recycled fibers in high-value fiber-reinforced polymer composites: Improving bending strength by surface cleaning

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Jian; Bao, Limin; Kobayashi, Ryouhei; Kato, Jun; Kemmochi, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites and carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites were recycled using superheated steam. Recycled glass fibers (R-GFs) and recycled carbon fibers (R-CFs) were surface treated for reuse as fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Treated R-GFs (TR-GFs) and treated R-CFs (TR-CFs) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and remanufactured by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). Most residual resin impurities were ...

  10. Initial study of new bio-based epoxy in carbon fiber reinforced composite panel manufactured by vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiezal, M. R. M.; Abdan, Khalina; Azaman, M. D.; Abidin Z., Z.; Hanafee, Z. M.

    2017-09-01

    This research paper is about carbon fiber reinforced composite panels with novel bio-based epoxy derived from Malaysian crude Jatropha oil (Epoxidized Jatropha Oil) which is mixed with synthetic epoxy as matrix. Its manufacturability performances were then verified by tensile test, flexural test and burnt off test. Two composite panels (fiber carbon with 100 wt. % of synthetic epoxy and fiber carbon with 18 wt. % bio-epoxy blend with synthetic epoxy) were fabricated by vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding. Samples were cut according to respective ASTM dimensioning and were tested. It was found that the new composite panel performed well in manufacturability aspect with fiber volume fraction achieved was around 40 - 45%. Although its tensile and flexural performances are a bit lower but comparable, we could conclude that the novel bio-epoxy as matrix in fiber carbon reinforcement could be fabricated by using this process for further research.

  11. On the Simulation of Kink Bands in Fiber Reinforced Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim Dalsten; Mikkelsen, Lars P.; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2007-01-01

    Simulations of kink band formation in fiber reinforced composites are carried out using the commercial finite element program ABAQUS. A smeared-out, plane constitutive model for fiber reinforced materials is implemented as a user subroutine, and effects of fiber misalignment on elastic and plastic...

  12. Round Robin Tests to Determine Fiber Content of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites by Combustion and Thermogravimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Funabashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To propose methods to determine the fiber content of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP for the International Organization for Standardization, the fiber contents of CFRP with polyamide-6 were measured using a combustion method based on ISO 14127 and a thermogravimetry method based on the modified ISO 9924-3 under a round robin test managed by the Polymer Subcommittee of the Industrial Technology Cooperative Promotion Committee in Japan. In the combustion method, the fiber contents of the CFRTP (~0.3 g were determined by the mass of carbon fiber remaining after burning (ISO 14127. The fiber contents in weight of the CFRTP with 8, 9, or 10 plies were determined to be 55.720%, 61.088%, or 65.326%, respectively, by 17 research institutes. In the thermogravimetry method, the fiber contents of the CFRTP (~10 mg were determined by the mass of carbon fiber remaining after heating it to 600°C in nitrogen gas using thermogravimetry apparatus (modified ISO 9924-3. The fiber contents of the CFRTP with 8, 9, or 10 plies were determined to be 56.908%, 61.579%, or 64.819%, respectively, by 8 research institutes. It was confirmed that thermogravimetry method was as accurate as the combustion method based on ISO 14127.

  13. Drastic Improvements in Bonding of Fiber Reinforced Multifunctional Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achievement of a dramatic increase in the bond strength in the composite/adhesive interfaces of existing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite material joints and...

  14. Drastic Improvements in Bonding of Fiber Reinforced Multifunctional Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achievement of a dramatic increase in the bond strength in the adhesive and composite/adhesive interfaces of existing fiber reinforced composite material joints and...

  15. Influence of Layup and Curing on the Surface Accuracy in the Manufacturing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Composite Space Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jianbao; Xie, Yongjie; Zhang, Boming; Sun, Baogang; Guo, Hongjun

    2017-03-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer, CFRP, composite materials have been used to fabricate space mirror. Usually the composite space mirror can completely replicate the high-precision surface of mould by replication process, but the actual surface accuracy of replicated space mirror is always reduced, still needed further study. We emphatically studied the error caused by layup and curing on the surface accuracy of space mirror through comparative experiments and analyses, the layup and curing influence factors include curing temperature, cooling rate of curing, method of prepreg lay-up, and area weight of fiber. Focusing on the four factors, we analyzed the error influence rule and put forward corresponding control measures to improve the surface figure of space mirror. For comparative analysis, six CFRP composite mirrors were fabricated and surface profile of mirrors were measured. Four guiding control measures were described here. Curing process of composite space mirror is our next focus.

  16. Fiber-reinforced composites materials, manufacturing, and design

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, P K

    2007-01-01

    The newly expanded and revised edition of Fiber-Reinforced Composites: Materials, Manufacturing, and Design presents the most up-to-date resource available on state-of-the-art composite materials. This book is unique in that it not only offers a current analysis of mechanics and properties, but also examines the latest advances in test methods, applications, manufacturing processes, and design aspects involving composites. This third edition presents thorough coverage of newly developed materials including nanocomposites. It also adds more emphasis on underlying theories, practical methods, and problem-solving skills employed in real-world applications of composite materials. Each chapter contains new examples drawn from diverse applications and additional problems to reinforce the practical relevance of key concepts. New in The Third Edition: Contains new sections on material substitution, cost analysis, nano- and natural fibers, fiber architecture, and carbon-carbon composites Provides a new chapter on poly...

  17. Fiber-reinforced Composite for Chairside Replacement of Anterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FRC) prosthesis could be a good alternative to conventional prosthetic techniques, chiefly as ... Fiber-reinforced composite in combination with adhesive technology appears to be a promising treatment option for replacing missing teeth. However ...

  18. Micromechanical modeling of strength and damage of fiber reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishnaevsky, L. Jr.; Broendsted, P.

    2007-03-15

    The report for the first year of the EU UpWind project includes three parts: overview of concepts and methods of modelling of mechanical behavior, deformation and damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, development of computational tools for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical models of fiber reinforced composites, and micromechanical modelling of damage in FRC, and phenomenological analysis of the effect of frequency of cyclic loading on the lifetime and damage evolution in materials. (au)

  19. Numerical simulating and experimental study on the woven carbon fiber-reinforced composite laminates under low-velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanyang; Tang, Zhanwen; Pan, Lingying; Zhao, Weidong; Sun, Baogang; Jiang, Wenge

    2016-05-01

    Impact damage has been identified as a critical form of the defects that constantly threatened the reliability of composite structures, such as those used in the aerospace structures and systems. Low energy impacts can introduce barely visible damage and cause the degradation of structural stiffness, furthermore, the flaws caused by low-velocity impact are so dangerous that they can give rise to the further extended delaminations. In order to improve the reliability and load carrying capacity of composite laminates under low-velocity impact, in this paper, the numerical simulatings and experimental studies on the woven fiber-reinforced composite laminates under low-velocity impact with impact energy 16.7J were discussed. The low velocity impact experiment was carried out through drop-weight system as the reason of inertia effect. A numerical progressive damage model was provided, in which the damages of fiber, matrix and interlamina were considered by VUMT subroutine in ABAQUS, to determine the damage modes. The Hashin failure criteria were improved to cover the failure modes of fiber failure in the directions of warp/weft and delaminations. The results of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) were compared with the experimental results of nondestructive examination including the results of ultrasonic C-scan, cross-section stereomicroscope and contact force - time history curves. It is found that the response of laminates under low-velocity impact could be divided into stages with different damage. Before the max-deformation of the laminates occurring, the matrix cracking, fiber breakage and delaminations were simulated during the impactor dropping. During the releasing and rebounding period, matrix cracking and delaminations areas kept increasing in the laminates because of the stress releasing of laminates. Finally, the simulating results showed the good agreements with the results of experiment.

  20. [Fixed angle carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite plate for treatment of distal radius fractures : Pilot study on clinical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, P; Kruse, E; Klüter, T; Fitschen-Oestern, S; Weuster, M; Menzdorf, L; Finn, J; Varoga, D; Seekamp, A; Müller, M; Lippross, S

    2017-02-01

    The clinical implementation of a new carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketon (PEEK) plate for distal radius fractures might offer advantageous properties over the conventional metallic devices. This includes similar elastic modulus to cortical bone, radiolucency, low artifacts on MRI scans and the lack of metal allergies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical results at 6-week and 12-month follow-up using either a new fixed angle (monoaxial) PEEK plate system or a fixed angle (polyaxial) titanium plate. We included 26 patients (mean age 59.3) with displaced fractures of the distal radius (all AO types). Radiological and functional outcomes were measured prospectively at a 6-week and 12 month follow-up. We documented no cases of hardware breakage or significant loss of the surgically achieved fracture reduction with the usage oft the new PEEK device. Operating time was 101.0 min using PEEK versus 109.3 min in titanium plates, recorded times were including preparation, draping, and postoperative processing (ns, p 0.156). At the 6-week follow up the PEEK plate showed a trend for better range of motion and functional results (DASH-score, Mayo-wrist score, VAS) with no statistical significance. Results of 12 month follow up with PEEK showed comparable results with corresponding studies examining titanium plate after this period. First experience with PEEK plate osteosynthesis demonstrate quick clinical implementation with good clinical outcome and the advantage of excellent postoperative radiological assessment. At early follow-up PEEK even showed a trend for improved functional results.

  1. Modeling of short fiber reinforced injection moulded composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, A.; Aswini, N.; Dandekar, C. R.; Makhe, S.

    2012-09-01

    A micromechanics based finite element model (FEM) is developed to facilitate the design of a new production quality fiber reinforced plastic injection molded part. The composite part under study is composed of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix reinforced with 30% by volume fraction of short carbon fibers. The constitutive material models are obtained by using micromechanics based homogenization theories. The analysis is carried out by successfully coupling two commercial codes, Moldflow and ANSYS. Moldflow software is used to predict the fiber orientation by considering the flow kinetics and molding parameters. Material models are inputted into the commercial software ANSYS as per the predicted fiber orientation and the structural analysis is carried out. Thus in the present approach a coupling between two commercial codes namely Moldflow and ANSYS has been established to enable the analysis of the short fiber reinforced injection moulded composite parts. The load-deflection curve is obtained based on three constitutive material model namely an isotropy, transversely isotropy and orthotropy. Average values of the predicted quantities are compared to experimental results, obtaining a good correlation. In this manner, the coupled Moldflow-ANSYS model successfully predicts the load deflection curve of a composite injection molded part.

  2. Load-bearing capacity of human incisor restored with various fiber-reinforced composite posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bell-Rönnlöf, Anna-Maria; Lassila, Lippo V J; Kangasniemi, Ilkka; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the load-bearing capacity and microstrain of incisors restored with posts of various kinds. Both prefabricated titanium posts and different fiber-reinforced composite posts were tested. The crowns of human incisors were cut and post preparation was carried out. The roots were divided into groups: (1) prefabricated serrated titanium posts, (2) prefabricated carbon fiber-reinforced composite posts, (3) individually formed glass fiber-reinforced composite posts with the canal full of fibers, and (4) individually formed "split" glass fiber-reinforced composite posts. The posts were cemented and composite crowns were made. Intact human incisors were used as reference. All roots were embedded in acrylic resin cylinders and stored at room temperature in water. Static load was applied under a loading angle of 45° using a universal testing machine. On half of the specimens microstrain was measured with strain gages and an acoustic emission analysis was carried out. Failure mode assessment was also made. The group with titanium posts showed highest number of unfavorable failures compared to the groups with fiber-reinforced composite posts. With fiber-reinforced composite posts the failures may more often be favorable compared to titanium posts, which clinically means repairable failures. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Study of Thermal, Mechanical and Shape Memory Properties of Chopped Carbon Fiber-Reinforced TPI Shape Memory Polymer Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhenqing Wang; Jingbiao Liu; Jianming Guo; Xiaoyu Sun; Lidan Xu

    2017-01-01

    Trans-l,4-polyisoprene (TPI) shape memory polymer composites with different chopped carbon fiber mass fractions were prepared to study the effects of different chopped carbon fiber mass fractions and temperatures on the TPI...

  4. Preparation of a Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composite and Increasing The Flight Performance For Radio Controlled Model Helicopters

    OpenAIRE

    BÜYÜKAKINCI, B. Yesim; ÖZKENAR, Tuğçe; GÜLBAHAR, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Composite-material technologies have matured over the past 40 years to the point where high performance composites are being used to enhance the performance of nearly every new flight vehicle [1]. Carbon fibers have been used to replace metals used in composite materials because its performance-price is changing favorably [2]. They are also lighter and stronger than metals. This is the main reason why carbon fibers are used in composite materials. They also reduce fuel consumption and provide...

  5. Fiber-reinforced composites in fixed partial dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallittu, Pekka

    2006-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC) prostheses offer the advantages of good aesthetics, minimal invasive treatment, and an ability to bond to the abutment teeth, thereby compensating for less-than-optimal abutment tooth retention and resistance form. These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: fiber composites to build the framework and hybrid or microfill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This review concentrates on the use of fiber reinforcement in the fabrication of laboratory or chairsidemade composite-fixed partial dentures of conventional preparation. Other applications of FRC in dentistry are briefly mentioned. The possibilities fiber reinforcement technology offers must be emphasized to the dental community. Rather than limiting discussion to whether FRC prostheses will replace metal-ceramic or full-ceramic prostheses, attention should be focused on the additional treatment options brought by the use of fibers. However, more clinical experience is needed. PMID:21526023

  6. Fiber-reinforced composites in fixed partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallittu P

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC prostheses offer the advantages of good esthetics, minimal invasive treatment, and an ability to bond to the abutment teeth, thereby compensating for less-than-optimal abutment tooth retention and resistance form. These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: fiber composites to build the framework and hybrid or microfill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This review concentrates on the use of fiber reinforcement in the fabrication of laboratory or chairside-made composite-fixed partial dentures of conventional preparation. Other applications of FRC in dentistry are briefly mentioned. The possibilities fiber reinforcement technology offers must be emphasized to the dental community. Rather than limiting discussion to whether FRC prostheses will replace metal-ceramic or full-ceramic prostheses, attention should be focused on the additional treatment options brought by the use of fibers. However, more clinical experience is needed.

  7. Effect of Environment on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Calomino, Anthony; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Stress-rupture tests were conducted in air, vacuum, and steam-containing environments to identify the failure modes and degradation mechanisms of a carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite at two temperatures, 600 and 1200 C. Stress-rupture lives in air and steam containing environments (50 - 80% steam with argon) are similar for a composite stress of 69 MPa at 1200 C. Lives of specimens tested in a 20% steam/argon environment were about twice as long. For tests conducted at 600 C, composite life in 20% steam/argon was 20 times longer than life in air. Thermogravimetric analysis of the carbon fibers was conducted under similar conditions to the stress-rupture tests. The oxidation rate of the fibers in the various environments correlated with the composite stress-rupture lives. Examination of the failed specimens indicated that oxidation of the carbon fibers was the primary damage mode for specimens tested in air and steam environments at both temperatures.

  8. Fiber-reinforced composites in fixed partial dentures | Garoushi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: fiber composites to build the framework and hybrid or microfill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This review concentrates on the use of fiber reinforcement in the fabrication of laboratory or chairside-made compositefixed partial ...

  9. High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites 6 HPFRCC 6

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhardt, Hans; Naaman, A

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites (HPFRCC) represent a class of cement composites whose stress-strain response in tension undergoes strain hardening behaviour accompanied by multiple cracking, leading to a high strain prior to failure. The primary objective of this International Workshop was to provide a compendium of up-to-date information on the most recent developments and research advances in the field of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites. Approximately 65 contributions from leading world experts are assembled in these proceedings and provide an authoritative perspective on the subject. Special topics include fresh and hardening state properties; self-compacting mixtures; mechanical behavior under compressive, tensile, and shear loading; structural applications; impact, earthquake and fire resistance; durability issues; ultra-high performance fiber reinforced concrete; and textile reinforced concrete. Target readers: graduate students, researchers, fiber producers, desi...

  10. Micromechanical modeling of strength and damage of fiber reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, P.

    The report for the first year of the EU UpWind project includes three parts: overview of concepts and methods of modelling of mechanical behavior, deformation and damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, development of computational tools for the automatic generation of 3D micromecha......The report for the first year of the EU UpWind project includes three parts: overview of concepts and methods of modelling of mechanical behavior, deformation and damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, development of computational tools for the automatic generation of 3D...... micromechanical models of fiber reinforced composites, and micromechanical modelling of damage in FRC, and phenomenoligical analysis of the effect of frequency of cyclic loading on the lifetime and damage evolution in materials....

  11. Quantitative damage detection and sparse sensor array optimization of carbon fiber reinforced resin composite laminates for wind turbine blade structural health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng

    2014-04-23

    The active structural health monitoring (SHM) approach for the complex composite laminate structures of wind turbine blades (WTBs), addresses the important and complicated problem of signal noise. After illustrating the wind energy industry's development perspectives and its crucial requirement for SHM, an improved redundant second generation wavelet transform (IRSGWT) pre-processing algorithm based on neighboring coefficients is introduced for feeble signal denoising. The method can avoid the drawbacks of conventional wavelet methods that lose information in transforms and the shortcomings of redundant second generation wavelet (RSGWT) denoising that can lead to error propagation. For large scale WTB composites, how to minimize the number of sensors while ensuring accuracy is also a key issue. A sparse sensor array optimization of composites for WTB applications is proposed that can reduce the number of transducers that must be used. Compared to a full sixteen transducer array, the optimized eight transducer configuration displays better accuracy in identifying the correct position of simulated damage (mass of load) on composite laminates with anisotropic characteristics than a non-optimized array. It can help to guarantee more flexible and qualified monitoring of the areas that more frequently suffer damage. The proposed methods are verified experimentally on specimens of carbon fiber reinforced resin composite laminates.

  12. Hybrid fiber reinforcement and crack formation in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, E.B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, J.A.O.

    2011-01-01

    The use of different types of fibers simultaneously for reinforcing cementitious matrices is motivated by the concept of a multi-scale nature of the crack propagation process. Fibers with different geometrical and mechanical properties are used to bridge cracks of different sizes from the micro......- to the macroscale. In this study, the performance of different fiber reinforced cementitious composites is assessed in terms of their tensile stress-crack opening behavior. The results obtained from this investigation allow a direct quantitative comparison of the behavior obtained from the different fiber...... reinforcement systems. The research described in this paper shows that the multi-scale conception of cracking and the use of hybrid fiber reinforcements do not necessarily result in an improved tensile behavior of the composite. Particular material design requirements may nevertheless justify the use of hybrid...

  13. Coir fiber reinforced polypropylene composite panel for automotive interior applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Songklod Jarusombuti; Vallayuth Fueangvivat; Piyawade Bauchongkol; Robert H. White

    2011-01-01

    In this study, physical, mechanical, and flammability properties of coconut fiber reinforced polypropylene (PP) composite panels were evaluated. Four levels of the coir fiber content (40, 50, 60, and 70 % based on the composition by weight) were mixed with the PP powder and a coupling agent, 3 wt % maleic anhydride grafted PP (MAPP) powder. The water resistance and the...

  14. Evaluation of long carbon fiber reinforced concrete to mitigate earthquake damage of infrastructure components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The proposed study involves investigating long carbon fiber reinforced concrete as a method of mitigating earthquake damage to : bridges and other infrastructure components. Long carbon fiber reinforced concrete has demonstrated significant resistanc...

  15. Comparison of Fracture Characteristics of Open-Hole-Notch Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites Subjected to Tensile and Compressive Loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, M.-U.; Chen, Z. F.; Chen, Z. H.; Li, B. B.

    2017-01-01

    Open-hole tension (OHT) and open-hole compression (OHC) tests were carried out on hot-pressed carbon-fiberreinforced composite samples with a singular open hole. The fracture surfaces of the OHT- and OHC-tested specimens were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM micrographs showed significant features on the surface of carbon fiber, matrix, and especially in the fiber/matrix interface. Interpretation of these micrographs revealed the possible failure mechanism of composite samples with an open hole under tensile and compressive loadings. Furthermore, a comparative study of these micrographs also pointed to certain specific differences between the fracture characteristics of open-hole composite samples failed under tension and compression. This information is useful in the post-failure analysis of a composite structure.

  16. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Quasi-Isotropic Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Automotive Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Corum, James [ORNL; Klett, Lynn B [ORNL; Davenport, Mike [ORNL; Battiste, Rick [ORNL; Simpson, Jr., William A [ORNL

    2006-04-01

    This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a quais-isotropic carbon-fiber thermoplastic composite for possible automotive structural applications. The composite consisted of a PolyPhenylene Sulfide (PPS) thermoplastic matrix (Fortron's PPS - Ticona 0214B1 powder) reinforced with 16 plies of carbon-fiber unidirectional tape, [0?/90?/+45?/-45?]2S. The carbon fiber was Hexcel AS-4C and was present in a fiber volume of 53% (60%, by weight). The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Freedom Car and Vehicle Technologies and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for automotive structural applications. This document is in two parts. Part 1 provides design data and correlations, while Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects of short-time, cyclic, and sustained loadings; temperature; fluid environments; and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. Guidance for design analysis, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage-tolerance design guidance are provided.

  17. Interfacial Characteristics and Fracture Toughness of Electrolytically Ni-Plated Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Phenolic Resin Matrix Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Jang, Yu-Sin

    2001-05-01

    The electrolytic plating of metallic nickel on a carbon fiber surface has been carried out in order to improve the interfacial adhesion and the mechanical properties in carbon fiber/phenolic matrix composite systems. The surface and the mechanical interfacial properties of composites are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), surface free energy, and the critical stress intensity factor (K(IC)). From the experimental results, it is clearly revealed that the oxygen functional groups and the metallic nickel on fibers largely affect the mechanical interfacial behavior of the composites, resulting in increased surface polarity, whereas the nitrogen functional groups have no effect. Also, a good correlation between surface oxygen functional groups and mechanical interfacial properties and between wettability and K(IC) is established and it is found that a 10 A m(-2) current density is the optimum condition for this system. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  18. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Prosthesis to Restore Missing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fiber-reinforced composite inlay-onlay FPD was used for a single posterior tooth replacement in a patient refusing implant for psychological reasons. The FRC-FPD was made of pre-impregnated E-glass fibers (everStick, StickTeck, Turku, Finland) embedded in a resin matrix (Stick Resin, StickTeck, Turku, Finland).

  19. Interfacial Properties of Bamboo Fiber-Reinforced High-Density Polyethylene Composites by Different Methods for Adding Nano Calcium Carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuicui Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this study was to observe the effect of nano calcium carbonate (CaCO3 modification methods on bamboo fiber (BF used in BF-reinforced high-density polyethylene (HDPE composites manufactured by extrusion molding. Two methods were used to introduce the nano CaCO3 into the BF for modification; the first was blending modification (BM and the second was impregnation modification (IM. In order to determine the effects of the modification methods, the water absorption, surface free energy and interfacial properties of the unmodified composites were compared to those of the composites made from the two modification methods. The results revealed that the percentage increase in the weight of the composite treated by nano CaCO3 decreased and that of the IMBF/HDPE composite was the lowest over the seven months of time. The results obtained by the acid-base model according to the Lewis and Owens-Wendt- Rabel-Kaelble (OWRK equations indicated that the surface energy of the composites was between 40 and 50 mJ/m2. When compared to the control sample, the maximum storage modulus (E′max of the BMBF/HDPE and IMBF/HDPE composites increased 1.43- and 1.53-fold, respectively. The values of the phase-to-phase interaction parameter B and the k value of the modified composites were higher than those of the unmodified composites, while the apparent activation energy Ea and interface parameter A were lower in the modified composites. It can be concluded that nano CaCO3 had an effect on the interfacial properties of BF-reinforced HDPE composites, and the interface bonding between IMBF and HDPE was greatest among the composites.

  20. CODIFICATION OF FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITE PIPING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawls, G.

    2012-10-10

    The goal of the overall project is to successfully adapt spoolable FRP currently used in the oil industry for use in hydrogen pipelines. The use of FRP materials for hydrogen service will rely on the demonstrated compatibility of these materials for pipeline service environments and operating conditions. The ability of the polymer piping to withstand degradation while in service, and development of the tools and data required for life management are imperative for successful implementation of these materials for hydrogen pipeline. The information and data provided in this report provides the technical basis for the codification for fiber reinforced piping (FRP) for hydrogen service. The DOE has invested in the evaluation of FRP for the delivery for gaseous hydrogen to support the development of a hydrogen infrastructure. The codification plan calls for detailed investigation of the following areas: System design and applicable codes and standards; Service degradation of FRP; Flaw tolerance and flaw detection; Integrity management plan; Leak detection and operational controls evaluation; Repair evaluation. The FRP codification process started with commercially available products that had extensive use in the oil and gas industry. These products have been evaluated to assure that sufficient structural integrity is available for a gaseous hydrogen environment.

  1. Environmental Durability of Reinforced Concrete Deck Girders Strengthened for Shear with Surface-Bonded Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    "This research investigated the durability of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) used for shear strengthening reinforced concrete deck girders. Large beams were used to avoid accounting for size effects in the data analysis. The effort...

  2. Environmental durability of reinforced concrete deck girders strengthened for shear with surface bonded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    This research investigated the durability of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) used for shear strengthening reinforced : concrete deck girders. Large beams were used to avoid accounting for size effects in the data analysis. The effor...

  3. Fiber-reinforced composites in fixed partial dentures

    OpenAIRE

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka

    2006-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC) prostheses offer the advantages of good esthetics, minimal invasive treatment, and an ability to bond to the abutment teeth, thereby compensating for less-than-optimal abutment tooth retention and resistance form. These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: fiber composites to build the framework and hybrid or microfill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This review concentrates on the use of fiber reinfo...

  4. Statistical failure properties of fiber-reinforced composites

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz Hidalgo, Raul

    2003-01-01

    A composite material or composite is a complex solid material composed of two or more constituents. On macroscopic scale, they have structural or functional properties not present in any individual component and generally they are designed to exhibit the best properties or qualities of its constituents. Nature has provided composite materials in biomatter such as seaweed, wood, and human bone and there are several artificial structures as reinforced concrete, fiber-reinforced composites a...

  5. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  6. Fiber reinforced silicon-containing arylacetylene resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A silicon-containing arylacetylene resin (SAR, a poly(dimethylsilyleneethynylene phenyleneethynylene (PMSEPE, was synthesized. The PMSEPE is a solid resin at ambient temperature with a softening temperature about 60°C and soluble in some solvents like tetrahydrofuran. The melt viscosity of the PMSEPE resin is less than 1 Pa•s. The resin could cure at the temperature of lower than 200°C. Fiber reinforced PMSEPE composites were prepared from prepregs which were made by the impregnation of fibers in PMSEPE resin solution. The composites exhibit good mechanical properties at room temperature and 250°C. The observation on fracture surfaces of the composites reinforced by glass fibers and carbon fibers demonstrates that the adhesion between the fibers and resin is good. The results from an oxyacetylene flame test show that the composites have good ablation performance and XRD analyses indicate that SiC forms in the residues during the ablation of the composites.

  7. The Effects of Fiber Orientation and Adhesives on Tensile Properties of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite with Embedded Nickel-Titanium Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, Derek J.; Jana, Sadhan C.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Kannan, Manigandan; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2017-01-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA) sections were embedded within carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite (CFRPPMC) laminates and their tensile properties were evaluated with simultaneous monitoring of modal acoustic emissions. The test specimens were fabricated in three different layup configurations and two different thin film adhesives were applied to bond the SMA with the PMC. A trio of acoustic sensors were attached to the specimens during tensile testing to monitor the modal acoustic emission (AE) as the materials experienced mechanical failure. The values of ultimate tensile strengths, strains, and moduli were obtained. Cumulative AE energy of events and specimen failure location were determined. In conjunction, optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to examine the break areas of the specimens. The analysis of AE data revealed failure locations within the specimens which were validated from the microscopic images. The placement of 90 deg plies in the outer ply gave the strongest acoustic signals during break as well as the cleanest break of the samples tested. Overlapping 0 deg ply layers surrounding the SMA was found to be the best scenario to prevent failure of the specimen itself.

  8. Scalable Fabrication of Natural-Fiber Reinforced Composites with Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Properties by Incorporating Powdered Activated Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Changlei; Zhang, Shifeng; Ren, Han; Shi, Sheldon Q; Zhang, Hualiang; Cai, Liping; Li, Jianzhang

    2015-12-25

    Kenaf fiber-polyester composites incorporated with powdered activated carbon (PAC) were prepared using the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. The product demonstrates the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding function. The kenaf fibers were retted in a pressured reactor to remove the lignin and extractives in the fiber. The PAC was loaded into the freshly retted fibers in water. The PAC loading effectiveness was determined using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area analysis. A higher BET value was obtained with a higher PAC loading. The transmission energies of the composites were measured by exposing the samples to the irradiation of electromagnetic waves with a variable frequency from 8 GHz to 12 GHz. As the PAC content increased from 0% to 10.0%, 20.5% and 28.9%, the EMI shielding effectiveness increased from 41.4% to 76.0%, 87.9% and 93.0%, respectively. Additionally, the EMI absorption increased from 21.2% to 31.7%, 44.7% and 64.0%, respectively. The ratio of EMI absorption/shielding of the composite at 28.9% of PAC loading was increased significantly by 37.1% as compared with the control sample. It was indicated that the incorporation of PAC into the composites was very effective for absorbing electromagnetic waves, which resulted in a decrease in secondary electromagnetic pollution.

  9. Scalable Fabrication of Natural-Fiber Reinforced Composites with Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Properties by Incorporating Powdered Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changlei Xia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Kenaf fiber—polyester composites incorporated with powdered activated carbon (PAC were prepared using the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM process. The product demonstrates the electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding function. The kenaf fibers were retted in a pressured reactor to remove the lignin and extractives in the fiber. The PAC was loaded into the freshly retted fibers in water. The PAC loading effectiveness was determined using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET specific surface area analysis. A higher BET value was obtained with a higher PAC loading. The transmission energies of the composites were measured by exposing the samples to the irradiation of electromagnetic waves with a variable frequency from 8 GHz to 12 GHz. As the PAC content increased from 0% to 10.0%, 20.5% and 28.9%, the EMI shielding effectiveness increased from 41.4% to 76.0%, 87.9% and 93.0%, respectively. Additionally, the EMI absorption increased from 21.2% to 31.7%, 44.7% and 64.0%, respectively. The ratio of EMI absorption/shielding of the composite at 28.9% of PAC loading was increased significantly by 37.1% as compared with the control sample. It was indicated that the incorporation of PAC into the composites was very effective for absorbing electromagnetic waves, which resulted in a decrease in secondary electromagnetic pollution.

  10. Statistical modelling of compression and fatigue damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl

    2009-01-01

    A statistical computational model of strength and damage of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites under compressive and cyclic compressive loading is presented in this paper. The model is developed on the basis of the Budiansky–Fleck fiber kinking condition, continuum damage mechanics...

  11. Mechanical analysis of carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composite for self-deployable structure in space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok Bin; Ahn, Yong San; Jang, Joon Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Gyun; Goo, Nam Seo; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory polymer (SMP) is one of smart polymers which exhibit shape memory effect upon external stimuli. Reinforcements as carbon fiber had been used for making shape memory polymer composite (CF-SMPC). This study investigated a possibility of designing self-deployable structures in harsh space condition using CF-SMPCs and analyzed their shape memory behaviors with constitutive equation model.CF-SMPCs were prepared using woven carbon fabrics and a thermoset epoxy based SMP to obtain their basic mechanical properties including actuation in harsh environment. The mechanical and shape memory properties of SMP and CF-SMPCs were characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and universal tensile machine (UTM) with an environmental chamber. The mechanical properties such as flexural strength and tensile strength of SMP and CF-SMPC were measured with simple tensile/bending test and time dependent shape memory behavior was characterized with designed shape memory bending test. For mechanical analysis of CF-SMPCs, a 3D constitutive equation of SMP, which had been developed using multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient and shape memory strains, was used with material parameters determined from CF-SMPCs. Carbon fibers in composites reinforced tensile and flexural strength of SMP and acted as strong elastic springs in rheology based equation models. The actuation behavior of SMP matrix and CF-SMPCs was then simulated as 3D shape memory bending cases. Fiber bundle property was imbued with shell model for more precise analysis and it would be used for prediction of deploying behavior in self-deployable hinge structure.

  12. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  13. Electromagnetic configurable architectures for assessment of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steigmann Rozina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics are used in most wide domains due their low density, lack of mechanical fatigue phenomena and high strength–to weight ratio. From electromagnetic point of view, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics structure represents an inhomogeneous structure of electric conductive fibers embedded into a dielectric material, thus an electromagnetic configurable architecture can be used to evaluate above mentioned defects. The paper proposes a special sensor, send receiver type and the obtaining of electromagnetic image by post-processing each coil signals in each point of scanning, using a sub-encoding image reconstruction algorithm and super-resolution procedures. The layout of fibers can be detected interrogating only diagonal reception coils.

  14. Visual classification of braided and woven fiber bundles in X-ray computed tomography scanned carbon fiber reinforced polymer specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Weissenböck, Johannes; Bhattacharya, Arindam; Plank, Bernhard; Heinzl, Christoph; Kastner, Johann

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, advanced composite materials such as carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) are used in many fields of application (e.g., automotive, aeronautic and leisure industry). These materials are characterized by their high stiffness and strength, while having low weight. Especially, woven carbon fiber reinforced materials have outstanding mechanical properties due to their fabric structure. To analyze and develop the fabrics, it is important to understand the course of the individu...

  15. STUDY THE CREEP OF TUBULAR SHAPED FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najat J. Saleh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Inpresent work tubular –shaped fiber reinforced composites were manufactured byusing two types of resins ( Epoxy and unsaturated polyester and separatelyreinforced with glass, carbon and kevlar-49 fibers (filament and woven roving,hybrid reinforcement composites of these fibers were also prepared. The fiberswere wet wound on a mandrel using a purposely designed winding machine,developed by modifying an ordinary lathe, in winding angle of 55° for filament. A creep test was made of either the fulltube or specimens taken from it. Creep was found to increase upon reinforcementin accordance to the rule of mixture and mainly decided by the type of singleor hybridized fibers. The creep behavior, showed that the observed strain tendsto appear much faster at higher temperature as compared with that exhibited atroom temperate. The creep rate also found to be depending on fiber type, matrixtype, and the fiber /matrix bonding. The creep energy calculated fromexperimental observations was found to exhibit highest value for hybridizedreinforcement.

  16. Micromechanical modeling of short-fiber reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Viktor

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical behavior of a short-fiber reinforce composite is significantly governed by its microstructure. The microstructure of short-fiber reinforced composites shows heterogeneities on different length scales concerning micro-structural properties like the fiber volume fraction and the fiber orientation distribution. This work is focused on the prediction of the elastic behavior of short-fiber reinforced composites. For this purpose, a self-consistent homogenization method, the interaction direct derivative estimate, and a two-step bounding method are considered. These mean-field approaches account for detailed microstructure data experimentally determined by micro-computed tomography and, additionally, virtually generated microstructure data. Firstly, the predictions of the elastic behavior of the homogenization methods are compared with experimental measurements. Secondly, these mean-field methods are contrasted with a full-field voxel-based homogenization approach. Thirdly, based on the class of materials with transversally isotropic fiber orientation distributions, it is investigated, whether the second-order orientation tensor delivers a sufficient microstructure description for the prediction of the elastic properties of the composite.

  17. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-06-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  18. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Matlin, W.M.; Liaw, P.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  19. Experimental study on mix proportion of fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yi; Zhao, Renda; Liao, Ping; Li, Fuhai; Yuan, Yuan; Zhou, Shuang

    2017-10-01

    To study the mechanical property of fiber reinforced cementations composites influenced by the fiber length, quartz sand diameter, matrix of water cement ratio, volume fraction of fiber and magnesium acrylate solution. Several 40×40×160 mm standard test specimens, "8" specimens and long "8" specimens and 21 groups of fiber concrete specimens were fabricated. The flexural, compressive and uniaxial tensile strength were tested by using the bending resistance, compression resistance and electronic universal testing machine. The results show that flexural and compressive strength of fiber reinforced cementations composites increases along with the increase of quartz sand diameter, with the growth of the PVA fiber length increases; When the water-binder ratio is 0.25 and powder-binder ratio is 0.3, the PVA fiber content is 1.5% of the mass of cementations materials, there is a phenomenon of strain hardening; The addition of magnesium acrylate solution reduces the tensile strength of PVA fiber reinforced cementations composites, the tensile strength of the specimens in the curing age of 7d is decreased by about 21% and the specimens in curing age of 28d is decreased by more than 50%.

  20. Optical fiber sensor-based life cycling monitoring and quality assessment of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, N.; Minakuchi, S.

    2017-04-01

    Optical fiber sensors are very useful to monitor the internal strain and temperature in composites during manufacturing and assembly as well as in practical operations. The authors have been using both multi-point and distributed strain monitoring techniques to characterize the internal state of composite structures. This paper reports some recent developments of life cycle monitoring and quality control of aerospace composite structures. Specifically, distributed sensing for large-scaled parts, through-thickness strain monitoring for complex-shaped parts, and direction-dependent cure shrinkage monitoring are described, highlighting wide applicability of embedded optical fiber sensors for intelligent process monitoring and quality assessment of composite parts.

  1. Fiber reinforced composites in prosthodontics - A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjna Nayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC, prostheses offer the potential advantages of optimized esthetics, low wear of the opposing dentition and the ability to bond the prosthesis to the abutment teeth, thereby compensating for less-than-optimal abutment tooth retention and resistance form. These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: Fiber-composites to build the substructure and hybrid or micro fill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This article reviews the various types of FRCs and its mechanical properties.

  2. Environmentally influenced degradation of fiber-reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampath, P.; Khanna, A.S. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Bombay (India); Ganti, S.S. [NMRL, Bombay (India)

    1997-05-01

    Two fiber-reinforced polymer composites were examined for susceptibility to degradation due to exposure to aggressive environments. Composites and fibers were exposed to a mixed inoculum of aerobic bacteria and also to an anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria. Fiberglass-reinforced vinyl ester and isophthalic ester composites, as well as the individual glass fibers, were extensively degraded due to the bacterial attack. Degradation from exposure to water at elevated temperatures as well as exposure to 1N sulfuric acid were studied. In both cases, the composite samples underwent degradation in the form of fiber pullout, as well as matrix cracking, leading to subsequent reduction in the mechanical properties.

  3. Thermoforming continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiang.

    1990-01-01

    In this research the forming process was first decomposed into basic deformation elements with simple geometries, and models were then developed for these elements. A series-parallel model was developed for predicting the upper and lower bounds of composite shear modulus at forming temperature based on the fiber content, fiber distribution, and matrix shear modulus. A shear-flexure model was proposed to describe the initial load-deflection behavior of thermoplastic composites in bending. A ply buckling model was developed which included the contributions from both a surface tension term and a ply buckling term.

  4. Structural Foaming at the Nano-, Micro-, and Macro-Scales of Continuous Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    moisture cycling affect nano-foamed and micro-foamed / polymeric matrix composite (“ PMC ”) laminates by examining their dynamic properties. Both...Accomplishment 4) 5 Develop constitutive models for nano- foamed and micro- foamed PMC systems from single ply prepreg to multilayer laminated...research and development activities adding formally to their collaborative work with universities from the United States and abroad ( Europe and Asia

  5. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer with Shredded Fibers: Quasi-Isotropic Material Properties and Antenna Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Gerald Artner; Gentner, Philipp K.; Johann Nicolics; Mecklenbräuker, Christoph F.

    2017-01-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminate, with the top layer consisting of shredded fibers, is proposed and manufactured. The shredded fibers are aligned randomly on the surface to achieve a more isotropic conductivity, as is desired in antenna applications. Moreover, fiber shreds can be recycled from carbon fiber composites. Conductivity, permittivity, and permeability are obtained with the Nicolson-Ross-Weir method from material samples measured inside rectangular waveguides in the...

  6. Clinical evaluation of carbon fiber reinforced carbon endodontic post, glass fiber reinforced post with cast post and core: A one year comparative clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preethi, Ga; Kala, M

    2008-10-01

    showed that none of the restorations among groups of cast post and core, carbon fiber reinforced post and glass fiber reinforced post with composite core restorations failed in terms of recurrent caries detected at the crown margin, fracture of the restoration, fracture of the root and periapical and periodontal pathology. One case of cast post and core and one case of carbon fiber reinforced post with composite core restorations showed slight mobility of crown margin under finger pressure at 12(th) month recall but all the cases of glass fiber post with composite core restorations did not show any signs of mobility of crown margin under finger pressure at all the recall periods on clinical and radiographical examination. From this 12 months clinical evaluation of all the cases in the 3 groups comprising of cast post and core; carbon fiber reinforced post with composite core and glass fiber reinforced post with composite core restored with porcelain fused to metal crowns, it is concluded that glass fiber reinforced post with composite core when used in single rooted upper anterior teeth are associated with a higher success rate in restoration of endodontically treated teeth.

  7. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  8. Fabrication of Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Setlock, John A.

    2000-01-01

    A method has been developed for the fabrication of small diameter, multifilament tow fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites. Its application has been successfully demonstrated for the Hi-Nicalon/celsian system. Strong and tough celsian matrix composites, reinforced with BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers, have been fabricated by infiltrating the fiber tows with the matrix slurry, winding the tows on a drum, cutting and stacking of the prepreg tapes in the desired orientation, and hot pressing. The monoclinic celsian phase in the matrix was produced in situ, during hot pressing, from the 0.75BaO-0.25SrO-Al2O3-2SiO2 mixed precursor synthesized by solid state reaction from metal oxides. Hot pressing resulted in almost fully dense fiber-reinforced composites. The unidirectional composites having approx. 42 vol% of fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout in three-point bend tests at room temperature. Values of yield stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01 percent, respectively, and ultimate strengths of 900 +/- 60 MPa were observed. The Young's modulus of the composites was measured to be 165 +/- 5 GPa.

  9. Fabrication Routes for Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites (CFCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    1998-01-01

    The primary approaches used for fabrication of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) components have been reviewed. The CFCC fabrication issues related to fiber, interface, and matrix have been analyzed. The capabilities, advantages and limitations of the five matrix-infiltration routes have been compared and discussed. Today, the best fabrication route for the CFCC end-user is not clear and compromises need to be made depending on the details of the CFCC application. However, with time, this problem should be reduced as research continues to develop advanced CFCC constituents and fabrication routes.

  10. Mechanical properties of woven glass fiber-reinforced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanie, Takahito; Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Koichi; Ban, Seiji

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to measure the flexural and compressive strengths and the corresponding moduli of cylindrical composite specimens reinforced with woven glass fiber. Test specimens were made by light-curing urethane dimethacrylate oligomer with woven glass fiber of 0.18-mm standard thickness. Tests were conducted using four reinforcement methods and two specimen diameters. Flexural strength and modulus of woven glass fiber-reinforced specimens were significantly greater than those without woven glass fiber (p 0.05). In terms of comparison between the two specimen diameters, no statistically significant differences in flexural strength and compressive strength (p > 0.05) were observed.

  11. Design and analysis of a novel latch system implementing fiber-reinforced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara Arreola, Francisco Javier

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite materials have increased in the last four decades in high technology applications due to their exceptional mechanical properties and low weight. In the automotive industry carbon fiber have become popular exclusively in luxury cars because of its high cost. However, Carbon-glass hybrid composites offer an effective alternative to designers to implement fiber-reinforced composites into several conventional applications without a considerable price increase maintaining most of their mechanical properties. A door latch system is a complex mechanism that is under high loading conditions during car accidents such as side impacts and rollovers. Therefore, the Department of Transportation in The United States developed a series of tests that every door latch system comply in order to be installed in a vehicle. The implementation of fiber-reinforced composite materials in a door latch system was studied by analyzing the material behavior during the FMVSS No. 206 transverse test using computational efforts and experimental testing. Firstly, a computational model of the current forkbolt and detent structure was developed. Several efforts were conducted in order to create an effective and time efficient model. Two simplified models were implemented with two different contact interaction approaches. 9 composite materials were studied in forkbolt and 5 in detent including woven carbon fiber, unidirectional carbon fiber, woven carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites and unidirectional carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites. The computational model results showed that woven fiber-reinforced composite materials were stiffer than the unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite materials. For instance, a forkbolt made of woven carbon fibers was 20% stiffer than a forkbolt made of unidirectional fibers symmetrically stacked in 0° and 90° alternating directions. Furthermore, Hybrid composite materials behaved as expected in forkbolt noticing a decline

  12. Topology Optimization of Bonnet-like Plate Using Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics Subjected to Different Criteria

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Sang-Won

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of fiber composites has resulted in a new paradigm of material selection for automotive industries. In specific, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics (CFRTP) has shown its advantages in the feasibility of mass production as well as its high strength to weight ratio; allowing significant weight reduction compared to conventional steel largely in dominance today. In automotive sectors where weight saving is a major factor in operation, material shift from steel to CFRTP could be...

  13. Self-healing in single and multiple fiber(s reinforced polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woldesenbet E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available You Polymer composites have been attractive medium to introduce the autonomic healing concept into modern day engineering materials. To date, there has been significant research in self-healing polymeric materials including several studies specifically in fiber reinforced polymers. Even though several methods have been suggested in autonomic healing materials, the concept of repair by bleeding of enclosed functional agents has garnered wide attention by the scientific community. A self-healing fiber reinforced polymer composite has been developed. Tensile tests are carried out on specimens that are fabricated by using the following components: hollow and solid glass fibers, healing agent, catalysts, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and a polymer resin matrix. The test results have demonstrated that single fiber polymer composites and multiple fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites with healing agents and catalysts have provided 90.7% and 76.55% restoration of the original tensile strength, respectively. Incorporation of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the healing medium of the single fiber polymer composite has provided additional efficiency. Healing is found to be localized, allowing multiple healing in the presence of several cracks.

  14. Manufacturing Energy Intensity and Opportunity Analysis for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites and Other Lightweight Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liddell, Heather; Brueske, Sabine; Carpenter, Alberta; Cresko, Joseph

    2016-09-22

    With their high strength-to-weight ratios, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are important materials for lightweighting in structural applications; however, manufacturing challenges such as low process throughput and poor quality control can lead to high costs and variable performance, limiting their use in commercial applications. One of the most significant challenges for advanced composite materials is their high manufacturing energy intensity. This study explored the energy intensities of two lightweight FRP composite materials (glass- and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers), with three lightweight metals (aluminum, magnesium, and titanium) and structural steel (as a reference material) included for comparison. Energy consumption for current typical and state-of-the-art manufacturing processes were estimated for each material, deconstructing manufacturing process energy use by sub-process and manufacturing pathway in order to better understand the most energy intensive steps. Energy saving opportunities were identified and quantified for each production step based on a review of applied R&D technologies currently under development in order to estimate the practical minimum energy intensity. Results demonstrate that while carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites have the highest current manufacturing energy intensity of all materials considered, the large differences between current typical and state-of-the-art energy intensity levels (the 'current opportunity') and between state-of-the-art and practical minimum energy intensity levels (the 'R&D opportunity') suggest that large-scale energy savings are within reach.

  15. Micromechanisms of damage in unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl

    2009-01-01

    Numerical micromechanical investigations of the mechanical behavior and damage evolution of glass fiber reinforced composites are presented. A program code for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical unit cell models of composites with damageable elements is developed, and used...... in the numerical experiments. The effect of the statistical variability of fiber strengths, viscosity of the polymer matrix as well as the interaction between the damage processes in matrix, fibers and interface are investigated numerically. It is demonstrated that fibers with constant strength ensure higher...... strength of a composite at the pre-critical load, while the fibers with randomly distributed strengths lead to the higher strength of the composite at post-critical loads. In the case of randomly distributed fiber strengths, the damage growth in fibers seems to be almost independent from the crack length...

  16. Three-dimensional printing fiber reinforced hydrogel composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakarich, Shannon E; Gorkin, Robert; in het Panhuis, Marc; Spinks, Geoffrey M

    2014-09-24

    An additive manufacturing process that combines digital modeling and 3D printing was used to prepare fiber reinforced hydrogels in a single-step process. The composite materials were fabricated by selectively pattering a combination of alginate/acrylamide gel precursor solution and an epoxy based UV-curable adhesive (Emax 904 Gel-SC) with an extrusion printer. UV irradiation was used to cure the two inks into a single composite material. Spatial control of fiber distribution within the digital models allowed for the fabrication of a series of materials with a spectrum of swelling behavior and mechanical properties with physical characteristics ranging from soft and wet to hard and dry. A comparison with the "rule of mixtures" was used to show that the swollen composite materials adhere to standard composite theory. A prototype meniscus cartilage was prepared to illustrate the potential application in bioengineering.

  17. Chairside fabricated fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufyan Garoushi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in the materials and techniques for adhesive dentistry have allowed the development of non-invasive or minimally invasive approaches for replacing a missing tooth in those clinical situations when conservation of adjacent teeth is needed. Good mechanical and cosmetic/aesthetic properties of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC, with good bonding properties with composite resin cement and veneering composite are needed in FRC devices. Some recent studies have shown that adhesives of composite resins and luting cements allow diffusion of the adhesives to the FRC framework of the bridges. By this so-called interdiffusion bonding is formed [1]. FRC bridges can be made in dental laboratories or chairside. This article describes a clinical case of chairside (directly made FRC Bridge, which was used according to the principles of minimal invasive approach. Treatment was performed by Professor Vallittu from the University of Turku, Finland.

  18. Evaluation of opacity in polyethylene fiber reinforced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasani Tabatabaie M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: The main objective of this study was to determine the effect of polyethylene fibers and veneering composites in fiber-reinforced resin systems on the opacity (contrast ratio. "nMaterials and Methods: The specimens were divided into four groups. Two groups were used as the control groups, with no reinforcement. The fibers of polyethylene (Fibre-Braid with special basement composites were used as the reinforced framework materials. Filtek Z250 and GRADIA (shade A2 were used as veneering materials. The total thickness of samples was 3 mm with 13 mm diameter. Specimens were prepared in disk shaped metal mold. The composite materials were light-cured according to their manufacturers' instructions. The contrast ratio (CR of each specimen was determined on black and white backgrounds using reflection spectrophotometer. Reflectance was measured at intervals of 10 nm between 400 nm and 750 nm. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. "nResults: When contrast ratio were compared among the different types of materials statistically significant differences were observed in both veneering composites (P<0.05. The Z250 resin composite had the lowest CR. It was shown that CR tended to decrease as the wavelength of incident light increased from 400 nm to 750 nm. On the other hand, the most differences in CR between groups were found in longer wavelengths. "nConclusion: It was found that polyethylene fibers reduced the amount of the translucency in FRC samples. The results of this study indicate that light reflectance characteristics, including the wavelength dependence, play an important role for the CR of a fiber-reinforced composite.

  19. Surface Crack Detection for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic Materials Using Pulsed Eddy Current Based on Rectangular Differential Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialong Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the surface defect inspection of carbon fiber reinforced composite, the differential and the direct measurement finite element simulation models of pulsed eddy current flaw detection were built. The principle of differential pulsed eddy current detection was analyzed and the sensitivity of defect detection was compared through two kinds of measurements. The validity of simulation results was demonstrated by experiments. The simulation and experimental results show that the pulsed eddy current detection method based on rectangular differential probe can effectively improve the sensitivity of surface defect detection of carbon fiber reinforced composite material.

  20. Interlaminar crack growth in fiber reinforced composites during fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.; Wang, H. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of interlaminar crack growth behavior in fiber-reinforced composites subjected to fatigue loading. In the experimental phase of the study, interlaminar crack propagation rates and mechanisms were determined for the cases of various geometries, laminate parameters and cyclic stress levels. An advanced singular hybrid-stress finite element method was used in conjunction with the experimental results to examine the local crack-tip behavior and to characterize the crack propagation during fatigue. Results elucidate the basic nature of the cyclic delamination damage and relate the interlaminar crack growth rate to the range of mixed-mode crack-tip stress intensity factors. The study provides fundamental insight into the problem, reveals several important features of the interlaminar fatigue failure, and should be of practical importance in selection, testing and design of composite materials.

  1. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows...... to maintain the kinematics of the two material phases independent from the assumed constitutive models, so that stress-deformation relationships, can be expressed in the framework of hyper-elasticity and hyper-elastoplasticity for the fiber and the matrix materials respectively. The bending stiffness...... of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization...

  2. Fracture mechanics in fiber reinforced composite materials, taking as examples B/A1 and CRFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, P. W. M.

    1982-01-01

    The validity of linear elastic fracture mechanics and other fracture criteria was investigated with laminates of boron fiber reinforced aluminum (R/A1) and of carbon fiber reinforced epoxide (CFRP). Cracks are assessed by fracture strength Kc or Kmax (critical or maximum value of the stress intensity factor). The Whitney and Nuismer point stress criterion and average stress criterion often show that Kmax of fiber composite materials increases with increasing crack length; however, for R/A1 and CFRP the curve showing fracture strength as a function of crack length is only applicable in a small domain. For R/A1, the reason is clearly the extension of the plastic zone (or the damage zone n the case of CFRP) which cannot be described with a stress intensity factor.

  3. Mechanical properties of long carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic (LFT) at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) possess high specific modulus and strength, superior damage tolerance and fracture toughness and have found increasing use in transportation, military, and aerospace applications. However, one of the impediments to utilizing these materials is the lack of performance data in harsh conditions, especially at elevated temperature. In order to quantify the effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites, carbon fiber PAA composite plates containing 20% and 30% carbon fiber were produced using extrusion/compression molding process and tested at three representative temperatures, room temperature (RT 26°C), middle temperature (MID 60°C) and glass transition temperature (Tg 80°C). A heating chamber was designed and fabricated for the testing at elevated temperature. As temperature increases, flexural modulus, flexural strength, tensile modulus and tensile strength decrease. The highest reduction observed in stiffness (modulus) values of 30% CF/PAA at Tg in the 00 orientation is 75%. The reduction values were larger for the transverse (perpendicular to flow direction) samples than the longitudinal (flow direction) samples. The property reduction in 30% CF/PAA is larger than 20% CF/PAA. Furthermore, an innovative method was developed to calculate the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced composites by burning off the neat resin and sample in a tube furnace. This method was proved to be accurate (within 1.5 wt. % deviation) by using burning off data obtained from CF/Epoxy and CF/Vinyl Ester samples. 20% and 30% carbon/PAA samples were burned off and carbon fiber content was obtained using this method. The results of the present study will be helpful in determining the end-user applications of these composite materials. Keywords: Long Carbon Fibers, Elevated Temperature, Mechanical Properties, Burn off Test.

  4. Effects of moisture on glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alzamora Guzman, Vladimir Joel; Brøndsted, Povl

    2015-01-01

    Glass fiber polymer composites are used in wind turbine blades because of their high-specific strength and stiffness, good fatigue properties, and low cost. The wind industry is moving offshore to satisfy economies of scale with larger turbines. High humidity in this environment degrades mechanical...... performance of wind turbine blades over their lifetime. Here, environmental moisture conditions were simulated by immersing glass fiber-reinforced polymer specimens in salt water for a period of up to 8 years. The mechanical properties of specimens were analyzed before and after immersion to evaluate...... the degradation mechanisms. Single-fiber tensile testing was also performed at different moisture conditions. The water-diffusion mechanism was studied to quantify the diffusion coefficients as a function of salt concentration, sample geometry, and fiber direction. Three degradation mechanisms were observed...

  5. Neutron stress measurement of W-fiber reinforced Cu composite

    CERN Document Server

    Nishida, M; Ikeuchi, Y; Minakawa, N

    2003-01-01

    Stress measurement methods using neutron and X-ray diffraction were examined by comparing the surface stresses with internal stresses in the continuous tungsten-fiber reinforced copper-matrix composite. Surface stresses were measured by X-ray stress measurement with the sin sup 2 psi method. Furthermore, the sin sup 2 psi method and the most common triaxal measurement method using Hooke's equation were employed for internal stress measurement by neutron diffraction. On the other hand, microstress distributions developed by the difference in the thermal expansion coefficients between these two phases were calculated by FEM. The weighted average strains and stresses were compared with the experimental results. The FEM results agreed with the experimental results qualitatively and confirmed the importance of the triaxial stress analysis in the neutron stress measurement. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Placement protocol for an anterior fiber-reinforced composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbrook, D S

    1997-01-01

    The new classification of metal-free restorative materials provides the clinician with a durable, flexible, and aesthetic laboratory-fabricated alternative to conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) full-coverage crowns, inlay and onlay restorations, and single pontic bridges. With exceptional physical and optical characteristics, restorations fabricated utilizing the new ceramic optimized polymer (Ceromer) (Targis, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY) and fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) framework (Vectris, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY) materials can also be utilized predictably in the anterior segment. The success of metal-free restorations can be achieved by following conventional prosthodontic principles for preparation, cementation, and finishing. This article demonstrates the appropriate treatment protocol in order to achieve aesthetically acceptable and durable anterior results utilizing a metal-free restorative system for "Maryland-like" bridge restorations.

  7. Environmental durability of reinforced concrete deck girders strengthened for shear with surface-bonded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    This research investigated the durability of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) used for shear strengthening reinforced concrete deck girders. Large beams were used to avoid accounting for size effects in the data analysis. The effort ...

  8. Polishing and coating carbon fiber-reinforced carbon composites with a carbon-titanium layer enhances adhesion and growth of osteoblast-like MG63 cells and vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacáková, L; Starý, V; Kofronová, O; Lisá, V

    2001-03-15

    Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon composites (CFRC) are considered to be promising materials for orthopedic and dental surgery. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to be similar to those of bone, and their chemical composition (close to pure carbon) promises that they will be tolerated well by the surrounding tissue. In this study, CFRC composites were fabricated from phenolic resin and unidirectionally oriented Torayca carbon fibers by carbonization (1000 degrees C) and graphitization (2500 degrees C). The material then was cut with a diamond saw into sheets of 8 x 10 x 3 mm, and the upper surface was polished by colloidal SiO2 and/or covered with a carbon-titanium (C:Ti) layer (3.3 microm) using the plasma-enhanced physical vapor deposition method. Three different kinds of modified samples were prepared: polished only, covered only, and polished + covered. Untreated samples served as a control. The surface roughness of these samples, measured by a Talysurf profilometer, decreased significantly after polishing but usually did not decrease after coating with a C:Ti layer. On all three modified surfaces, human osteoblast-like cells of the MG63 line and rat vascular smooth muscle cells (both cultured in a Dulbecco's minimum essential medium with 10% fetal bovine serum) adhered at higher numbers (by 21-87% on day 1 after seeding) and exhibited a shorter population doubling time (by 13-40%). On day 4 after seeding, these cells attained higher population densities (by 61-378%), volume (by 18-37%), and protein content (by 16-120%). These results were more pronounced in VSMC than in MG63 cells and in both groups of C:Ti-covered samples than in the polished only samples. The release of carbon particles from the CFRC composites was significantly decreased--by 8 times in the polished only, 24 times in the covered only, and 42 times in the polished + covered samples. These results show that both polishing and carbon-titanium covering significantly improve the

  9. Natural Curaua Fiber-Reinforced Composites in Multilayered Ballistic Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Trindade, Willian; Elias, Carlos Nelson; Ferreira, Carlos Luiz; de Sousa Lima, Eduardo; Weber, Ricardo Pondé; Miguez Suarez, João Carlos; da Silva Figueiredo, André Ben-Hur; Pinheiro, Wagner Anacleto; da Silva, Luis Carlos; Lima, Édio Pereira

    2015-10-01

    The performance of a novel multilayered armor in which the commonly used plies of aramid fabric layer were replaced by an equal thickness layer of distinct curaua fiber-reinforced composites with epoxy or polyester matrices was assessed. The investigated armor, in addition to its polymeric layer (aramid fabric or curaua composite), was also composed of a front Al2O3 ceramic tile and backed by an aluminum alloy sheet. Ballistic impact tests were performed with actual 7.62 caliber ammunitions. Indentation in a clay witness, simulating human body behind the back layer, attested the efficacy of the curaua-reinforced composite as an armor component. The conventional aramid fabric display a similar indentation as the curaua/polyester composite but was less efficient (deeper indentation) than the curaua/epoxy composite. This advantage is shown to be significant, especially in favor of the lighter and cheaper epoxy composite reinforced with 30 vol pct of curaua fiber, as possible substitute for aramid fabric in multilayered ballistic armor for individual protection. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the mechanism associated with the curaua composite ballistic performance.

  10. Flax fiber reinforced PLA composites: studies on types of PLA and different methods of fabrication

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available in the last decade. It is well known that natural fiber reinforced PLA composites can be prepared by solution casting cum compression molding and injection molding methods. The authors have prepared flax fiber reinforced PLA (procured from Cereplast Ltd...

  11. Considerations regarding the volume fraction influence on the wear behavior of the fiber reinforced composite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliman, R.

    2017-08-01

    This paper contains an analysis of the factors that have an influence on the tribological characteristics of the composite material sintered with metal matrix reinforced with carbon fibers. These composites are used generally if it’s needed the wear resistant materials, whereas these composites have high specific strength in conjunction with a good corrosion resistance at low densities and some self-lubricating properties. Through the knowledge of the better tribological properties of the materials and their behavior to wear, can be generated by dry and the wet friction. Thus, where necessary the use of high temperature resistant material with low friction between the elements, carbon fiber composite materials are very suitable because they have: mechanical strength and good ductility, melting temperature on the higher values, higher electrical and thermal conductivity, lower wear speed and lower friction forces. For this purpose, this paper also contains an experimental program based on the evidence of formaldehyde resin made from fiber reinforced Cu-carbon with the aim to specifically determine the volume of fibers fraction for the consolidation of the composite material. In order to determine the friction coefficient and the wear rates of the various fiber reinforced polymer mixtures of carbon have been used special devices with needle-type with steel disc. These tests were conducted in the atmosphere at the room temperature without external lubrication study taking into consideration the sliding different speeds with constant loading task.

  12. Effect of anodic surface treatment on PAN-based carbon fiber and its relationship to the fracture toughness of the carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarraf, Hamid; Skarpova, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    The effect of anodic surface treatment on the polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers surface properties and the mechanical behavior of the resulting carbon fiber-polymer composites has been studied in terms of the contact angle measurements of fibers and the fracture toughness of composites....... Results from contact angle measurements revealed that the angle of electrolyte solution largely decreases with increasing current densities of treatments up to 0.4-0.5 A m(-2). The results obtained from the evolution of K-IC with flexure of the composites as a function of electric current density shown...... that the K-IC of the composite continually increases with increased current densities of the treatments up to 0.5 A m(-2), and a maximum strength value is found about 294 MPa cm(1/2) at the anodic treatment of 0.5 A m(-2). It can be concluded that the anodic surface treatment is largely influenced...

  13. Mechanical Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Using Composite Binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Fediuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the creation of high-density impermeable concrete. The effect of the “cement, fly ash, and limestone” composite binders obtained by joint grinding with superplasticizer in the varioplanetary mill on the process of structure formation was studied. Compaction of structure on micro- and nanoscale levels was characterized by different techniques: X-ray diffraction, DTA-TGA, and electron microscopy. Results showed that the grinding of active mineral supplements allows crystallization centers to be created by ash particles as a result of the binding of Ca(OH2 during hardening alite, which intensifies the clinker minerals hydration process; the presence of fine grains limestone also leads to the hydrocarboaluminates calcium formation. The relation between cement stone neoplasms composition as well as fibrous concrete porosity and permeability of composite at nanoscale level for use of composite binders with polydispersed mineral supplements was revealed. The results are of potential importance in developing the wide range of fine-grained fiber-reinforced concrete with a compressive strength more than 100 MPa, with low permeability under actual operating conditions.

  14. Rapid Prototyping of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, R.; Green, C.; Phillips, T.; Cipriani, R.; Yarlagadda, S.; Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Effinger, M.; Cooper, K. C.

    2003-01-01

    For ceramics to be used as structural components in high temperature applications, their fracture toughness is improved by embedding continuous ceramic fibers. Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials allow increasing the overall operating temperature, raising the temperature safety margins, avoiding the need for cooling, and improving the damping capacity, while reducing the weight at the same time. They also need to be reliable and available in large quantities as well. In this paper, an innovative rapid prototyping technique to fabricate continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. The process is simple, robust and will be widely applicable to a number of high temperature material systems. This technique was originally developed at the University of Delaware Center for Composite Materials (UD-CCM) for rapid fabrication of polymer matrix composites by a technique called automated tow placement or ATP. The results of mechanical properties and microstructural characterization are presented, together with examples of complex shapes and parts. It is believed that the process will be able to create complex shaped parts at an order of magnitude lower cost than current chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) processes.

  15. Mussel-inspired catecholamine polymers as new sizing agents for fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonoh; Lee, Jea Uk; Byun, Joon-Hyung

    2015-04-01

    Mussel-inspired catecholamine polymers (polydopamine and polynorepinephrine) were coated on the surface of carbon and glass fibers in order to increase the interfacial shear strength between fibers and polymer matrix, and consequently the interlaminar shear strength of fiber-reinforced composites. By utilizing adhesive characteristic of the catecholamine polymer, fiber-reinforced composites can become mechanically stronger than conventional composites. Since the catecholamine polymer is easily constructed on the surface by the simultaneous polymerization of its monomer under a weak basic circumstance, it can be readily coated on micro-fibers by a simple dipping process without any complex chemical treatments. Also, catecholamines can increase the surface free energy of micro-fibers and therefore, can give better wettability to epoxy resin. Therefore, catecholamine polymers can be used as versatile and effective surface modifiers for both carbon and glass fibers. Here, catecholamine-coated carbon and glass fibers exhibited higher interfacial shear strength (37 and 27% increases, respectively) and their plain woven composites showed improved interlaminar shear strength (13 and 9% increases, respectively) compared to non-coated fibers and composites.

  16. Fiber-reinforced onlay composite resin restoration: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan K; Shinya, Akikazu; Shinya, Akiyoshi; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe the clinical procedure for fabricating fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) onlay composite resin restorations using a FRC as the substructure. A variety of therapeutic modalities are available to restore teeth with moderate coronal defects in the posterior region of the mouth. For patients who refuse complete crown restorations or when minimal tooth reduction is preferred, a FRC restoration can be a good alternative to conventional restorative techniques. A 42-year-old female patient presented with an endodontically treated mandibular right first molar with extensive destruction of the coronal tooth structure. To conserve the remaining tooth structure a FRC resin core substructure was fabricated and veneered with Ceramage dentin and enamel hybrid composite to create the final restoration. FRC restorations using adhesive technology appears to be a promising restorative option. However, further clinical investigation will be required to provide additional information on this technique. Based on the clinical and radiographic findings in the present case, the fabrication of a conventional crown was avoided in order to conserve the remaining tooth structure. The restoration of badly damaged teeth is a challenge for clinicians when cast crown restorations are not an option for the patient. The use of FRC restorations along with adhesive technology may be a rational restorative alternative in the near future.

  17. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  18. Measurement of defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer drilled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascual Víctor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, fiber-reinforced materials are more widely used because of their good mechanical properties. It is usual to join pieces of these materials through screws and rivets, for which it is necessary to make a hole in the piece, usually by drilling. One of the problems of use CFRP resides in the appearance of defects due to the machining. The main defect to be taken into account is the delamination. Delamination implies poor tolerance when assembling parts, reducing the structural integrity of the part, and areas with high wear, as a series of stresses arise when mounting the screws. Much has been published about delamination and the factors that influence its appearance, so we are not going to focus on it. The present study aims to quantify and measure the defects associated with the drilling of compounds reinforced with carbon fibers, in relation to the cutting parameters used in each case. For this purpose, an optical measurement system and a posterior digital image processing will be used through Deltec Vision software.

  19. Guided wave propagation in porous unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobmann, Nicolas; Bach, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Networks of piezoelectric transducers mounted on aircraft structures for Acousto Ultrasonics (AU) purposes are designed to be applied during the service life of the aircraft. The approach to integrate these sensor networks already during the manufacture of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) host structures prompts ideas to achieve an additional benefit by their application for cure monitoring, thus extending their use to the manufacturing chain. This benefit could be extended even further if guided waves generated by AU sensor networks could be used for porosity testing extensively applied for CFRP aircraft structures. In light of this, an experimental study was conducted to investigate effects of porosity on the propagation of guided waves in a basic configuration of unidirectional CFRP. Several samples were manufactured at different porosity levels by variation of the processing pressure. Wave fields were acquired using an ultrasonic scanning device. In the present work, phase velocities are chosen as best measurable and quantifiable propagation feature and the approach for the analysis of phase velocities in porosity samples is outlined. First results are presented and discussed regarding the influence of porosity on guided wave phase velocity and basic applicability for porosity testing of aircraft structures.

  20. Thermal diffusivity measurements on porous carbon fiber reinforced polymer tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Jürgen; Gresslehner, Karl Heinz; Mayr, Günther; Hendorfer, Günther

    2017-02-01

    This work presents the application of methods for the determination of the thermal diffusivity well suited for flat bodies adapted to cylindrical bodies. Green's functions were used to get the temperature time history for small and large times, for the approach of intersecting these two straight lines. To verify the theoretical considerations noise free data are generated by finite element simulations. Furthermore effects of inhomogeneous excitation and the anisotropic heat conduction of carbon fiber reinforced polymers were taken into account in these numerical simulations. It could be shown that the intersection of the two straight lines is suitable for the determination of the thermal diffusivity, although the results have to be corrected depending on the ratio of the cylinders inner and outer radii. Inhomogeneous excitation affects the results of this approach as it lead to multidimensional heat flux. However, based on the numerical simulations a range of the azimuthal angle exists, where the thermal diffusivity is nearly independent of the angle. The method to determine the thermal diffusivity for curved geometries by the well suited Thermographic Signal Reconstruction method and taking into account deviations from the slab by a single correction factor has great advantages from an industrial point of view, just like an easy implementation into evaluation software and the Thermographic Signal Reconstruction methods rather short processing time.

  1. Closed-loop performance of an actuated deformable carbon fiber reinforced polymer mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Christopher C.; Jungwirth, Matthew E. L.; Wick, David V.; Baker, Michael S.; Hobart, Clinton G.; Romeo, Robert C.; Martin, Robert N.

    2012-06-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories have been actively researching the use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer material as optical elements in many optical systems. Active optical elements can be used to build an optical system capable of changing is optical zoom. We have developed a two-element optical system that uses a large diameter, thin-shelled carbon fiber reinforced polymer mirror, actuated with micro-positioning motors, and a high actuator density micro-electro-mechanical deformable mirror. Combined with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, we have optimized this actuated carbon fiber reinforced polymer deformable mirror's surface for use with a forthcoming reflective adaptive optical zoom system. In this paper, we present the preliminary results of the carbon fiber reinforced polymer deformable mirror's surface quality and the development of the actuation of it.

  2. Use of fiber reinforced polymer composite cable for post-tensioning application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The primary objective of this research project was to assess the feasibility of the use of innovative carbon fiber reinforced : polymer (CFRP) tendons and to develop guidelines for CFRP in post-tensioned bridge applications, including segmental : bri...

  3. Nondestructive Evaluation of Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites: A Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolken, H. Thomas; Matzkanin, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their increasing utilization in structural applications, the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites continues to receive considerable research and development attention. Due to the heterogeneous nature of composites, the form of defects is often very different from a metal and fracture mechanisms are more complex. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview and technology assessment of the current state-of-the-art with respect to NDE of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  4. Mechanical properties of ramie fiber reinforced epoxy lamina composite for socket prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Tresna Soemardi; Widjajalaksmi Kusumaningsih; Agustinus Irawan

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the application of natural fiber composite especially ramie fiber reinforced epoxy lamina composite for socket prosthesis. The research focuses on the tensile and shear strength from ramie fiber reinforced epoxy lamina composite which will be applied as alternative material for socket prosthesis. The research based on American Society for Testing Material (ASTM) standard D 3039/D 3039M for tensile strength and ASTM D 4255/D 42...

  5. Low Velocity Impact Behavior of Basalt Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishevan, Farzin Azimpour; Akbulut, Hamid; Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.

    2017-06-01

    In this research, we studied low velocity impact response of homogenous basalt fiber-reinforced polymer (BFRP) composites and then compared the impact key parameters with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) homogenous composites. BFRPs and CFRPs were fabricated by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) method. Fabricated composites included 60% fiber and 40% epoxy matrix. Basalt and carbon fibers used as reinforcement materials were weaved in 2/2 twill textile tip in the structures of BFRP and CFRP composites. We also utilized the energy profile method to determine penetration and perforation threshold energies. The low velocity impact tests were carried out in 30, 60, 80, 100, 120 and 160 J energy magnitudes, and impact response of BFRPs was investigated by related force-deflection, force-time, deflection-time and absorbed energy-time graphics. The related impact key parameters such as maximum contact force, absorbed energy, deflection and duration time were compared with CFRPs for various impact energy levels. As a result, due to the higher toughness of basalt fibers, a better low velocity impact performance of BFRP than that of CFRP was observed. The effects of fabrication parameters, such as curing process, were studied on the low velocity impact behavior of BFRP. The results of tested new fabricated materials show that the change of fabrication process and curing conditions improves the impact behavior of BFRPs up to 13%.

  6. Low Cost Fabrication of Silicon Carbide Based Ceramics and Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Levine, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    A low cost processing technique called reaction forming for the fabrication of near-net and complex shaped components of silicon carbide based ceramics and composites is presented. This process consists of the production of a microporous carbon preform and subsequent infiltration with liquid silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. The microporous preforms are made by the pyrolysis of a polymerized resin mixture with very good control of pore volume and pore size thereby yielding materials with tailorable microstructure and composition. Mechanical properties (elastic modulus, flexural strength, and fracture toughness) of reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics are presented. This processing approach is suitable for various kinds of reinforcements such as whiskers, particulates, fibers (tows, weaves, and filaments), and 3-D architectures. This approach has also been used to fabricate continuous silicon carbide fiber reinforced ceramic composites (CFCC's) with silicon carbide based matrices. Strong and tough composites with tailorable matrix microstructure and composition have been obtained. Microstructure and thermomechanical properties of a silicon carbide (SCS-6) fiber reinforced reaction-formed silicon carbide matrix composites are discussed.

  7. R&D on glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites for superconducting Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Nannan; Wang, Ke; Ma, Hongming; Pan, Wanjiang; Chen, Qingqing

    2016-01-01

    The glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites play an important role in superconducting Tokamak, which are used to insulate the metal components, such as superconducting winding, cooling pipes, metal electrodes and so on. For the components made of metal and glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites, thermal shrinkage leads to non-ignorable thermal stress, therefore, much attention should be paid on the thermal shrinkage rate of glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites. The structural design of glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites should aim at reducing thermal stress. In this paper, the density, glass fiber content and thermal shrinkage rate of five insulation tubes were tested. The testing results will be applied in structural design and mechanical analysis of isolators for superconducting Tokamak.

  8. Guidelines for using fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials to extend bridge life : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    With a high strength-to-weight ratio, fiber-reinforced polymer : (FRP) composite fabrics have become a promising technology for : strengthening concrete bridge elements that are starting to deteriorate. : To take full advantage of the benefits of the...

  9. Retrofit of existing reinforced concrete bridges with fiber reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    A two-part research was focused on examining various issues related to the use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites for strengthening of existing reinforced concrete bridges. A summary of each phase is presented separately.

  10. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Probst, K.J.; Anderson, T.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Starr, T.L. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    Silicon carbide-based heat exchanger tubes are of interest to energy production and conversion systems due to their excellent high temperature properties. Fiber-reinforced SiC is of particular importance for these applications since it is substantially tougher than monolithic SiC, and therefore more damage and thermal shock tolerant. This paper reviews a program to develop a scaled-up system for the chemical vapor infiltration of tubular shapes of fiber-reinforced SiC. The efforts include producing a unique furnace design, extensive process and system modeling, and experimental efforts to demonstrate tube fabrication.

  11. Micromechanical Modeling of Fiber-Reinforced Composites with Statistically Equivalent Random Fiber Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhi Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the random fiber distribution of a fiber-reinforced composite is of great importance for studying the progressive failure behavior of the material on the micro scale. In this paper, we develop a new algorithm for generating random representative volume elements (RVEs with statistical equivalent fiber distribution against the actual material microstructure. The realistic statistical data is utilized as inputs of the new method, which is archived through implementation of the probability equations. Extensive statistical analysis is conducted to examine the capability of the proposed method and to compare it with existing methods. It is found that the proposed method presents a good match with experimental results in all aspects including the nearest neighbor distance, nearest neighbor orientation, Ripley’s K function, and the radial distribution function. Finite element analysis is presented to predict the effective elastic properties of a carbon/epoxy composite, to validate the generated random representative volume elements, and to provide insights of the effect of fiber distribution on the elastic properties. The present algorithm is shown to be highly accurate and can be used to generate statistically equivalent RVEs for not only fiber-reinforced composites but also other materials such as foam materials and particle-reinforced composites.

  12. In-Situ Nondestructive Evaluation of Kevlar(Registered Trademark)and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Micromechanics for Improved Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess; Saulsberry, Regor

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been faced with recertification and life extension issues for epoxy-impregnated Kevlar 49 (K/Ep) and carbon (C/Ep) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) used in various systems on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station, respectively. Each COPV has varying criticality, damage and repair histories, time at pressure, and pressure cycles. COPVs are of particular concern due to the insidious and catastrophic burst-before-leak failure mode caused by stress rupture (SR) of the composite overwrap. SR life has been defined [1] as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress level(s), time at stress level(s), and associated environment. SR has none of the features of predictability associated with metal pressure vessels, such as crack geometry, growth rate and size, or other features that lend themselves to nondestructive evaluation (NDE). In essence, the variability or surprise factor associated with SR cannot be eliminated. C/Ep COPVs are also susceptible to impact damage that can lead to reduced burst pressure even when the amount of damage to the COPV is below the visual detection threshold [2], thus necessitating implementation of a mechanical damage control plan [1]. Last, COPVs can also fail prematurely due to material or design noncompliance. In each case (SR, impact or noncompliance), out-of-family behavior is expected leading to a higher probability of failure at a given stress, hence, greater uncertainty in performance. For these reasons, NASA has been actively engaged in research to develop NDE methods that can be used during post-manufacture qualification, in-service inspection, and in-situ structural health monitoring. Acoustic emission (AE) is one of the more promising NDE techniques for detecting and monitoring, in real-time, the strain energy release and corresponding stress-wave propagation produced by actively growing flaws and defects in composite

  13. Multi Scale Modeling of Continuous Aramid Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites Used in Ballistic Protection Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-16

    Pandurangan, B., Yen, C-.F., Cheeseman, B. A., Wang, Y., Miao, Y. & Zheng, J. Q. “ Fiber -level Modeling of Dynamic Strength of Kevlar ® KM2 Ballistic...A. “Multi-Length Scale Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar ®- Fiber Reinforced Polymer- Matrix Composites” Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance 22 (2013): 681-695. ... Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites Used in Ballistic Protection Applications Clemson University Clemson SC 242 Army Research Laboratory

  14. Perawatan Satu Kunjungan Restorasi Pasak Fiber Reinforced Composite Pada Gigi Insisivus Atas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Ariani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Perawatan saluran akar satu kali kunjungan memberikan keuntungan antara lain memperkecil resiko kontaminasi mikroorganisme dan menghemat waktu perawatan. Pasak fiber reinforced composite memiliki ikatan yang baik dengan dentin menggunakan semen resin dan inti dari resin. Penggunaan pasak bisa mengurangi risiko fraktur. Tujuan penulisan laporan kasus ini adalah untuk mengevaluasi hasil restorasi gigi 11 nekrosis pulpa pasca perawatan saluran akar disertai restorasi dengan pasak fiber reinforced composite. Pasien wanita, 22 tahun datang ke Klinik Konservasi RSGM FKG UGM untuk merawat gigi depan atas kanan yang berlubang. Berdasarkan pemeriksaan subjektif, objektif dan radiografis diperoleh diagnosis gigi 11 nekrosis pulpa. pasca perawatan saluran akar gigi Gigi direstorasi dengan resin komposit dan pasak fiber reinforced composite. Kesimpula dari hasil evaluasi klinis saat kontrol tidak ada keluhan rasa sakit dan pasien merasa puas. One Visit Treatment of Fiber Reinforced Compositerestoration in Maxillary Right First Incisivus. One visit root canal treatment is advantageous to minimize the risk of microorganism contamination. It saves time and more tolerable for the patients. Fiber reinforced composite post is fabricated, and it has been known to have a good bond with dentinal wall of root space, resin cement and composite resin core. The use of this post could decrease the risk of fracture. The purpose of this paper is to report the results of dental restoration 11 pulp necrosis after root canal treatment with resin composite restorations and post fiber reinforced composite. A 22 year-old female patient who came to Faculty of Dentistry UGM complained about her maxillary right incisor teeth which decayed and needed a treatment. Based on the subjective, objective and radiograph examinations, it was diagnosed that the pulp was necrotic. After one visit root canal treatment and based on clinical evaluation, it is concluded that the right upper

  15. Mechanical Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Beams Bonded with External Carbon Fiber Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribniak, Viktor; Tamulenas, Vytautas; Ng, Pui-Lam; Arnautov, Aleksandr K; Gudonis, Eugenijus; Misiunaite, Ieva

    2017-06-17

    This study investigates the mechanical behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams internally reinforced with steel bars and externally bonded with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets fixed by adhesive and hybrid jointing techniques. In particular, attention is paid to the load resistance and failure modes of composite beams. The steel fibers were used to avoiding the rip-off failure of the concrete cover. The CFRP sheets were fixed to the concrete surface by epoxy adhesive as well as combined with various configurations of small-diameter steel pins for mechanical fastening to form a hybrid connection. Such hybrid jointing techniques were found to be particularly advantageous in avoiding brittle debonding failure, by promoting progressive failure within the hybrid joints. The use of CFRP sheets was also effective in suppressing the localization of the discrete cracks. The development of the crack pattern was monitored using the digital image correlation method. As revealed from the image analyses, with an appropriate layout of the steel pins, brittle failure of the concrete-carbon fiber interface could be effectively prevented. Inverse analysis of the moment-curvature diagrams was conducted, and it was found that a simplified tension-stiffening model with a constant residual stress level at 90% of the strength of the SFRC is adequate for numerically simulating the deformation behavior of beams up to the debonding of the CFRP sheets.

  16. Method for Forming Fiber Reinforced Composite Bodies with Graded Composition and Stress Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Smialek, James A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A near-net, complex shaped ceramic fiber reinforced silicon carbide based composite bodies with graded compositions and stress zones is disclosed. To provide the composite a fiber preform is first fabricated and an interphase is applied by chemical vapor infiltration, sol-gel or polymer processes. This first body is further infiltrated with a polymer mixture containing carbon, and/or silicon carbide, and additional oxide, carbide, or nitride phases forming a second body. One side of the second body is spray coated or infiltrated with slurries containing high thermal expansion and oxidation resistant. crack sealant phases and the other side of this second body is coated with low expansion phase materials to form a third body. This third body consisting of porous carbonaceous matrix surrounding the previously applied interphase materials, is then infiltrated with molten silicon or molten silicon-refractory metal alloys to form a fourth body. The resulting fourth body comprises dense composites consisting of fibers with the desired interphase which are surrounded by silicon carbide and other second phases materials at the outer and inner surfaces comprising material of silicon, germanium, refractory metal suicides, borides, carbides, oxides, and combinations thereof The resulting composite fourth body has different compositional patterns from one side to the other.

  17. Development of the experimental procedure to examine the response of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert J; Zhupanska, Olesya I

    2016-01-01

    A new fully automated experimental setup has been developed to study the response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact. The experimental setup allows for real-time measurements of the pulsed electric current, voltage, impact load, and displacements on the CFRP composite specimens. The setup includes a new custom-built current pulse generator that utilizes a bank of capacitor modules capable of producing a 20 ms current pulse with an amplitude of up to 2500 A. The setup enabled application of the pulsed current and impact load and successfully achieved coordination between the peak of the current pulse and the peak of the impact load. A series of electrical, impact, and coordinated electrical-impact characterization tests were performed on 32-ply IM7/977-3 unidirectional CFRP composites to assess their ability to withstand application of a pulsed electric current and determine the effects of the pulsed current on the impact response. Experimental results revealed that the electrical resistance of CFRP composites decreased with an increase in the electric current magnitude. It was also found that the electrified CFRP specimens withstood higher average impact loads compared to the non-electrified specimens.

  18. Effect of Sisal Fiber Surface Treatment on Properties of Sisal Fiber Reinforced Polylactide Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoqian Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of composites are strongly influenced by the quality of the fiber/matrix interface. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of polylactide (PLA composites as a function of modification of sisal fiber with two different macromolecular coupling agents. Sisal fiber reinforced polylactide composites were prepared by injection molding, and the properties of composites were studied by static/dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. The results from mechanical testing revealed that surface-treated sisal fiber reinforced composite offered superior mechanical properties compared to untreated fiber reinforced polylactide composite, which indicated that better adhesion between sisal fiber and PLA matrix was achieved. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM investigations also showed that surface modifications improved the adhesion of the sisal fiber/polylactide matrix.

  19. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer with Shredded Fibers: Quasi-Isotropic Material Properties and Antenna Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Artner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP laminate, with the top layer consisting of shredded fibers, is proposed and manufactured. The shredded fibers are aligned randomly on the surface to achieve a more isotropic conductivity, as is desired in antenna applications. Moreover, fiber shreds can be recycled from carbon fiber composites. Conductivity, permittivity, and permeability are obtained with the Nicolson-Ross-Weir method from material samples measured inside rectangular waveguides in the frequency range of 4 to 6 GHz. The decrease in material anisotropy results in negligible influence on antennas. This is shown by measuring the proposed CFRP as ground plane material for both a narrowband wire monopole antenna for 5.9 GHz and an ultrawideband conical monopole antenna for 1–10 GHz. For comparison, all measurements are repeated with a twill-weave CFRP.

  20. Static and dynamic behavior of carbon fiber reinforced aluminum (CARALL) laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Gurpinder Singh

    The main aim of this research work was to investigate the static and dynamic properties of carbon fiber reinforced aluminum laminates cured without using any external adhesive and acid treatment of aluminum layers. A comprehensive study was undertaken to study the effect of adding epoxy resin rich polyester synthetic surface veil cloth layers on the failure modes and flexural and tensile response of these fiber metal laminates (FMLs). The main purpose of adding veil cloth layers was to prevent the occurrence of galvanic corrosion by avoiding direct contact between aluminum and carbon fiber layers. The addition of veil cloth layers leads to the combined failure of all layers in carbon fiber reinforced aluminum laminates at the same time, whereas the carbon fiber/ epoxy layers break before the failure of aluminum layers in samples cured without using veil cloth layers under tensile loading. The delamination was found to be reduced to a great extent in these laminate configurations due to the addition of veil cloth layers. Thermal residual stress developed during the curing of fiber metal laminates were predicted by utilizing analytical equations and finite element modeling. It was found out that the veil cloth layer does not affect much in reducing the thermal residual stress. Low-velocity impact tests were carried out using a drop-weight impact tower by impacting these fiber metal laminates at the center with three different energy levels to address energy absorption characteristics of these composites. Results showed that these laminates give higher forces and smaller displacement with the addition of polyester veil cloth layers due to reduced delaminated area across all interfaces of aluminum and carbon fiber layers, thus increasing slightly the energy absorption capabilities of these laminates. Primary failure modes observed during impact tests in these FMLs were cracks in the non-impacted aluminum layer, carbon fiber (CFRP) layer breakage and delamination b

  1. Investigations of sewn preform characteristics and quality aspects for the manufacturing of fiber reinforced polymer composites

    OpenAIRE

    Ogale, Amol

    2017-01-01

    Sewn net-shape preform based composite manufacturing technology is widely accepted in combination with liquid composite molding technologies for the manufacturing of fiber reinforced polymer composites. The development of threedimensional dry fibrous reinforcement structures containing desired fiber orientation and volume fraction before the resin infusion is based on the predefined preforming processes. Various preform manufacturing aspects influence the overall composite m...

  2. Corrosion of steel members strengthenened with carbon fiber reinforced polymer sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumadian, Ibrahim

    Due to many years of service at several cases of exposure at various environments there are many of steel bridges which are in need of rehabilitation. The infrastructure needs upgrading, repair or maintenance, and also strengthening, but by using an alternative as retrofits methods. The alternative retrofit method, which used fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials which their strength materials comes largely from the fiber such as carbon, glass, and aramid fiber. Of the most important materials used in the rehabilitation of infrastructure is a composite material newly developed in bonded externally carbon fiber and polymer (CFRP) sheets, which has achieved remarkable success in the rehabilitation and upgrading of structural members. This technique has many disadvantages one of them is galvanic corrosion. This study presents the effect of galvanic corrosion on the interfacial strength between carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets and a steel substrate. A total of 35 double-lap joint specimens and 19 beams specimens are prepared and exposed to an aggressive service environment in conjunction with an electrical potential method accelerating corrosion damage. Six test categories are planned at a typical exposure interval of 12 hours, including five specimens per category for double-lap joint specimens. And six test categories are planned at a typical exposure interval of 12 hours, including three specimens per category for Beam section specimens. In addition one beam section specimen is control. The degree of corrosion is measured. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been used to monitor and confirm the proposed corrosion mechanisms on the surface of CFRP. In this study we are using FTIR-spectroscopic measurement systems in the mid infrared (MIR) wavelength region (4000 - 400) cm-1 to monitor characteristic spectral features. Upon completion of corrosion processes, all specimens are monotonically loaded until failure

  3. Identification of Damage Types in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic Laminates by a Novel Optical Fiber Acoustic Emission Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Fengming; Wu, Qi; Okabe, Yoji; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Saito, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In this research, phase-shifted FBG (PS-FBG) sensor was employed to practical AE detection for carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite laminate. Firstly, we evaluated the characteristics of AE signals detected by this kind of sensor. Secondly, through the experiment and simulation concerning AE source orientation, quantitative information about the standard for discriminating the AE signals due to transverse cracks and delaminations was obtained. Finally, acco...

  4. Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites and Methods of Making Same Without the Use of Oven or Autoclave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Stienecker, Rick D. (Inventor); Nickerson, David M. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Method embodiments for producing a fiber-reinforced epoxy composite comprise providing a mold defining a shape for a composite, applying a fiber reinforcement over the mold, covering the mold and fiber reinforcement thereon in a vacuum enclosure, performing a vacuum on the vacuum enclosure to produce a pressure gradient, insulating at least a portion of the vacuum enclosure with thermal insulation, infusing the fiber reinforcement with a reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent under vacuum conditions, wherein the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent generates exothermic heat, and producing the fiber-reinforced epoxy composite having a glass transition temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. by curing the fiber reinforcement infused with the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent by utilizing the exothermically generated heat, wherein the curing is conducted inside the thermally insulated vacuum enclosure without utilization of an external heat source or an external radiation source.

  5. Self-diagnosis function of fiber-reinforced composite with conductive particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuhara, Yoshiki; Shin, Soon-Gi; Matsubara, Hideaki; Yanagida, Hiroaki; Takeda, Nobuo

    2001-04-01

    The electrically conductive fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) and ceramics matrix composites (CMC) have been designed and fabricated in order to introduce the self-diagnosis function which means the combination of reinforcement and damage diagnosis function into structural materials. The electrical conductivity was achieved by adding conductive fiber or particles into these composites. The composites with percolation structure consisting of carbon particles were found to have the advantages in response of conductivity to a small strain and in detectable strain range, comparing to the composites containing carbon fiber. A part of resistance change in the elongated composites with carbon particles remained after unloading despite its elastic deformation. The residual resistance increased with increasing applied maximum strain, showing that the composite possesses the function to memorize the previous maximum strain. The CMC materials containing TiN particles as a conductive phase indicated not only the fine response of resistance to slight deformation but also the increase in residual resistance during cyclic deformation at a constant load, suggesting that the composite have the ability to diagnose a cumulative damage through measurements of the residual resistance. These results suggest that the self-diagnosis functions peculiar to these composites are suitable for health monitoring techniques for many structural materials.

  6. Mechanical Behavior of Stainless Steel Fiber-Reinforced Composites Exposed to Accelerated Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Caitlin; McBride, Amanda; E Zaghi, Arash; Burke, Kelly A; Hill, Alex

    2017-07-08

    Recent advancements in metal fibers have introduced a promising new type of stainless steel fiber with high stiffness, high failure strain, and a thickness steel fiber-reinforced polymer. However, stainless steel is known to be susceptible to pitting corrosion. The main goal of this study is to compare the impact of corrosion on the mechanical properties of steel fiber-reinforced composites with those of conventional types of stainless steel. By providing experimental evidences, this study may promote the application of steel fiber-reinforced composite as a viable alternative to conventional metals. Samples of steel fiber-reinforced polymer and four different types of stainless steel were subjected to 144 and 288 h of corrosion in ferric chloride solution to simulate accelerated corrosion conditions. The weight losses due to corrosion were recorded. The corroded and control samples were tested under monotonic tensile loading to measure the ultimate stresses and strains. The effect of corrosion on the mechanical properties of the different materials was evaluated. The digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to investigate the failure mechanism of the corrosion-damaged specimens. Overall, steel fiber-reinforced composites had the greatest corrosion resistance.

  7. Low-velocity impact damage characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yin; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Zheng-wei; Zhang, Jin-yu; Tao, Sheng-jie

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) after low-velocity impact is detected using infrared thermography, and different damages in the impacted composites are analyzed in the thermal maps. The thermal conductivity under pulse stimulation, frictional heating and thermal conductivity under ultrasonic stimulation of CFRP containing low-velocity impact damage are simulated using numerical simulation method. Then, the specimens successively exposed to the low-velocity impact are respectively detected using the pulse infrared thermography and ultrasonic infrared thermography. Through the numerical simulation and experimental investigation, the results obtained show that the combination of the above two detection methods can greatly improve the capability for detecting and evaluating the impact damage in CFRP. Different damages correspond to different infrared thermal images. The delamination damage, matrix cracking and fiber breakage are characterized as the block-shape hot spot, line-shape hot spot, and

  8. Influence of attenuation on acoustic emission signals in carbon fiber reinforced polymer panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamene, Kassahun; Hudson, Larry; Sundaresan, Mannur

    2015-05-01

    Influence of attenuation on acoustic emission (AE) signals in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) crossply and quasi-isotropic panels is examined in this paper. Attenuation coefficients of the fundamental antisymmetric (A0) and symmetric (S0) wave modes were determined experimentally along different directions for the two types of CFRP panels. In the frequency range from 100 kHz to 500 kHz, the A0 mode undergoes significantly greater changes due to material related attenuation compared to the S0 mode. Moderate to strong changes in the attenuation levels were noted with propagation directions. Such mode and frequency dependent attenuation introduces major changes in the characteristics of AE signals depending on the position of the AE sensor relative to the source. Results from finite element simulations of a microscopic damage event in the composite laminates are used to illustrate attenuation related changes in modal and frequency components of AE signals. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. NDE of Fiber Reinforced Foam Composite Structures for Future Aerospace Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, james; Roth, Don; Hopkins, Dale

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the complexities of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of fiber reinforced foam composite structures to be used for aerospace vehicles in the future.Various views of fiber reinforced foam materials are shown and described. Conventional methods of NDE for composites are reviewed such as Micro-computed X-Ray Tomography, Thermography, Shearography, and Phased Array Ultrasonics (PAUT). These meth0ods appear to work well on the face sheet and face sheet ot core bond, they do not provide adequate coverage for the webs. There is a need for additional methods that will examine the webs and web to foam core bond.

  10. Influence of the curing cycles on the fatigue performance of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüther, Jonas; Brøndsted, Povl

    2016-01-01

    During the manufacturing process of fiber reinforced polymers the curing reaction of the resin results in shrinkage of the resin and introduces internal stresses in the composites. When curing at higher temperatures in order to shorten up the processing time, higher curing stresses and thermal...... stresses are built up and frozen, as residual stresses occur. In the present work, a glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminate with an unidirectional architecture based on non-crimp fabrics with backing fibers is investigated. Three different curing cycles (time-temperature cycles) are used, leading...

  11. Effect of SiC Nano powder on Multiaxial Woven and Chopped Randomly Oriented Flax/Sisal Fiber Reinforced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalagi Ganesh R.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A study has been carried out to investigate effect of SiC Nano powder on tensile and impact properties of Multiaxial layers of Flax and Sisal fiber reinforced composites and randomly oriented chopped Flax and Sisal fiber reinforced composites. It has been observed that tensile strength and impact strength were improved using 6% of SiC Nanopowder into Multiaxial layer (+45º/-45º, 0º/90º of Flax and Sisal where as randomly oriented chopped Flax and Sisal fiber reinforced composites are improved in its stiffnes for the same composition of fiber, epoxy and SiC Nano powder. SEM Analysis are done to analyse the distribution of SiC in both Multiaxial layers of Flax and Sisal fiber reinforced composites and randomly oriented chopped Flax and Sisal fiber reinforced composites.

  12. Numerical investigation of friction joint between Basalt Fiber Reinforced Composites and aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costache, Andrei; Berggreen, Christian; Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2016-01-01

    Flexible risers are used in the offshore oil industry for exporting hydrocarbons from subsea equipment to floatingproduction and storage vessels. The latest research in unbonded flexible pipes aims to reduce weight by replacing metal components with composite materials. This would result in lighter...... and stiffer flexible risers, which would be well suited for ultra deep water applications. This paper develops a new finite element model used for evaluating the efficiency of anchoring flat unidirectional fiber reinforced tendons in a mechanical grip. It consists two flat grips with the fiber reinforced...

  13. Fracture resistance of abutment screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone, and carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Eduardo Aloisio Fleck; Villar, Cristina Cunha; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Fractured abutment screws may be replaced; however, sometimes, the screw cannot be removed and the entire implant must be surgically removed and replaced. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of abutment retention screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK, using an external hexagonal implant/UCLA-type abutment interface assembly. UCLA-type abutments were fixed to implants using titanium screws (Group 1), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) screws (Group 2), and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (Group 3). The assemblies were placed on a stainless steel holding apparatus to allow for loading at 45o off-axis, in a universal testing machine. A 200 N load (static load) was applied at the central point of the abutment extremity, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute, until failure. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's range test. The titanium screws had higher fracture resistance, compared with PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (p carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (p> 0.05). Finally, visual analysis of the fractions revealed that 100% of them occurred at the neck of the abutment screw, suggesting that this is the weakest point of this unit. PEEK abutment screws have lower fracture resistance, in comparison with titanium abutment screws.

  14. Solid Free-Form Fabrication of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites for Propulsion Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, R.; Walish, J.; Fox, M.; Rigali, M.; Sutaria, M.; Gillespie, John W., Jr.; Yarlagadda, Shridhar; Effinger, Mike; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For propulsion related applications, materials must be able to demonstrate excellent ablation and oxidation resistance at temperature approaching 3500 C, adequate load bearing capabilities, non-catastrophic failure modes, and ability to withstand transient thermal shock. A potential list of propulsion-material property requirements includes, low density, high elastic modulus, low thermal-expansion coefficient, high thermal conductivity, excellent erosion and oxidation/corrosion resistance, and flaw-insensitivity. In many cases, they will also need to be able to be joined, survive thermal cycling and multi-axial stress states, and for reusable applications, the materials must maintain the above attributes after prolonged exposure to extremely harsh chemical environments. The final and possibly most important attribute for these materials are the need to be lower cost and readily available in large quantities. Recently, Advanced Ceramics Research, Inc. (ACR) has developed low cost, flexible-manufacturing processes for Zr & Hf-based carbon fiber reinforced composites, materials with good oxidation and ablation resistance up to 3500 C. This process, called Continuous Composite Co-extrusion (C(sup 3)), incorporates carbon fibers to fabricate 'in-situ' carbide and boride-matrix/carbon fiber composites. M is a variation of ACR's manufacturing process for low-cost structural ceramic materials called Fibrous Monoliths with carbon fiber reinforcements. Fibrous Monolithic materials have a distinct fibrous texture, consist of intertwined cells of a primary phase, separated by cell boundaries of a tailored secondary phase and show very high fracture energies, damage tolerance, and graceful failure. Since they are monolithic powder based composites; they can be manufactured by conventional powder processing techniques using inexpensive raw materials. This combination of high performance and low cost is a breakthrough that could enable wider application of ceramics in high

  15. Solid Freeform Fabrication of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites for Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, R.; Walish, J.; Fox, M.; Rigali, M.; Sutaria, M.; Gillespie, John W., Jr.; Yarlagadda, Shridhar; Effinger, Mike

    2000-01-01

    For propulsion related applications, materials must be able to demonstrate excellent ablation and oxidation resistance at temperature approaching 3500'C, adequate load bearing capabilities, non-catastrophic failure modes, and ability to withstand transient thermal shock. A potential list of propulsion-material property requirements includes, low density, high elastic modulus, low thermal-expansion coefficient, high thermal conductivity, excellent erosion and oxidation/corrosion resistance, and flaw-insensitivity. In many cases, they will also need to be able to be joined, survive thermal cycling and multi-axial stress states, and for reusable applications, the materials must maintain the above attributes after prolonged exposure to extremely harsh chemical environments. The final and possibly most important attribute for these materials are the need to be lower cost and readily available in large quantities. Recently, Advanced Ceramics Research, Inc. (ACR) has developed low cost, flexible- manufacturing processes for Zr & Hf-based carbon fiber reinforced composites, materials with good oxidation and ablation resistance up to 3500 C. This process, called Continuous Composite Co-extrusion (C(sup 3)), incorporates carbon fibers to fabricate 'in-situ' carbide and boride-matrix/carbon fiber composites. This is a variation of ACR's manufacturing process for low-cost structural ceramic materials called Fibrous Monoliths With carbon fiber reinforcements. Fibrous Monolithic materials have a distinct fibrous texture, consist of intertwined cells of a primary phase, separated by cell boundaries of a tailored secondary phase and show very high fracture energies, damage tolerance, and graceful failure. Since they are monolithic powder based composites-, they can be manufactured by conventional powder processing techniques using inexpensive raw materials. This combination of high performance and low cost is a breakthrough that could enable wider application of ceramics in high

  16. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  17. Micromechanical modeling of damage and fracture of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl

    2009-01-01

    An overview of methods of the mathematical modeling of deformation, damage and fracture in fiber reinforced composites is presented. The models are classified into five main groups: shear lag-based, analytical models, fiber bundle model and its generalizations, fracture mechanics based and contin...

  18. Residual stress measurements in an SiC continuous fiber reinforced Ti matrix composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, P.F.; Mulder, F.M.; Wei, W.; Rekveldt, M.Th.; Knight, K.S.

    2000-01-01

    During the fabrication of ceramic fiber reinforced metal matrix composites mismatch stresses will be introduced due to differences in thermal expansion coefficients between the matrix and the fibers. Calculations, based on a coaxial cylinder model, [1 and 2] predict that, for a Ti matrix SiC

  19. In vitro fracture resistance of fiber reinforced cusp-replacing composite restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Tezvergil, A.; Kuijs, R.H.; Lassila, L.V.; Kreulen, C.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Vallittu, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the fracture resistance and failure mode of fiber reinforced composite (FRC) cusp-replacing restorations in premolars. METHODS: Forty-five extracted sound upper premolars were randomly divided into three groups. Identical MOD cavities with simulated buccal cusp fracture and

  20. Micro-mechanical Analysis of Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites using Cohesive Crack Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Lars; Stang, Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2006-01-01

    are implemented. It is shown that the cohesive law for a unidirectional fiber reinforced cementitious composite can be found through superposition of the cohesive law for mortar and the fiber bridging curve. A comparison between the numerical and an analytical model for fiber pull-out is performed....

  1. Adhesive Properties of Bonded Orthodontic Retainers to Enamel : Stainless Steel Wire vs Fiber-reinforced Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Krebs, Eliza; Sandham, John; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to compare the bond strength of a stainless steel orthodontic wire vs various fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) used as orthodontic retainers on enamel, analyze the failure types after debonding, and investigate the influence of different application

  2. Fiber-Reinforced Phthalonitrile Composite Cured with Low-Reactivity Aromatic Amine Curing Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-02

    nonvolatile at temperatures up to about 375 aC as described above. 2 In preparing the fiber-reinforced composite according to the present invention, the 3...any form including woven fabrics, nonwoven mats, 15 or tow. 16 The steps of impregnating or coating the fibrous material to create a fiber-containing

  3. Enhancement of mechanical and electrical properties of continuous-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with stacked graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepelev, Olga; Kenig, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Impregnation of expandable graphite (EG) after thermal treatment with an epoxy resin containing surface-active agents (SAAs) enhanced the intercalation of epoxy monomer between EG layers and led to further exfoliation of the graphite, resulting in stacks of few graphene layers, so-called “stacked” graphene (SG). This process enabled electrical conductivity of cured epoxy/SG composites at lower percolation thresholds, and improved thermo-mechanical properties were measured with either Kevlar, carbon or glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Several compositions with SAA-modified SG led to higher dynamic moduli especially at high temperatures, reflecting the better wetting ability of the modified nanoparticles. The hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of the SAA dictates the surface energy balance. More hydrophilic SAAs promoted localization of the SG at the Kevlar/epoxy interface, and morphology seems to be driven by thermodynamics, rather than the kinetic effect of viscosity. This effect was less obvious with carbon or glass fibers, due to the lower surface energy of the carbon fibers or some incompatibility with the glass-fiber sizing. Proper choice of the surfactant and fine-tuning of the crosslink density at the interphase may provide further enhancements in thermo-mechanical behavior. PMID:29046838

  4. Enhancement of mechanical and electrical properties of continuous-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with stacked graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveh, Naum; Shepelev, Olga; Kenig, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Impregnation of expandable graphite (EG) after thermal treatment with an epoxy resin containing surface-active agents (SAAs) enhanced the intercalation of epoxy monomer between EG layers and led to further exfoliation of the graphite, resulting in stacks of few graphene layers, so-called "stacked" graphene (SG). This process enabled electrical conductivity of cured epoxy/SG composites at lower percolation thresholds, and improved thermo-mechanical properties were measured with either Kevlar, carbon or glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Several compositions with SAA-modified SG led to higher dynamic moduli especially at high temperatures, reflecting the better wetting ability of the modified nanoparticles. The hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of the SAA dictates the surface energy balance. More hydrophilic SAAs promoted localization of the SG at the Kevlar/epoxy interface, and morphology seems to be driven by thermodynamics, rather than the kinetic effect of viscosity. This effect was less obvious with carbon or glass fibers, due to the lower surface energy of the carbon fibers or some incompatibility with the glass-fiber sizing. Proper choice of the surfactant and fine-tuning of the crosslink density at the interphase may provide further enhancements in thermo-mechanical behavior.

  5. Enhancement of mechanical and electrical properties of continuous-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with stacked graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naum Naveh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Impregnation of expandable graphite (EG after thermal treatment with an epoxy resin containing surface-active agents (SAAs enhanced the intercalation of epoxy monomer between EG layers and led to further exfoliation of the graphite, resulting in stacks of few graphene layers, so-called “stacked” graphene (SG. This process enabled electrical conductivity of cured epoxy/SG composites at lower percolation thresholds, and improved thermo-mechanical properties were measured with either Kevlar, carbon or glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Several compositions with SAA-modified SG led to higher dynamic moduli especially at high temperatures, reflecting the better wetting ability of the modified nanoparticles. The hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of the SAA dictates the surface energy balance. More hydrophilic SAAs promoted localization of the SG at the Kevlar/epoxy interface, and morphology seems to be driven by thermodynamics, rather than the kinetic effect of viscosity. This effect was less obvious with carbon or glass fibers, due to the lower surface energy of the carbon fibers or some incompatibility with the glass-fiber sizing. Proper choice of the surfactant and fine-tuning of the crosslink density at the interphase may provide further enhancements in thermo-mechanical behavior.

  6. Reinforcement of timber beams with carbon fibers reinforced plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugutsidze, G.; Draškovič, F.

    2010-06-01

    Wood is a polymeric material with many valuable features and which also lacks some negative features. In order to keep up with high construction rates and the minimization of negative effects, wood has become one of the most valuable materials in modern engineering. But the use of timber material economically is also an actual problem in order to protect the environment and improve natural surroundings. A panel of scientists is interested in solving these problems and in creating rational structures, where timber can be used efficiently. These constructions are as follows: glue-laminated (gluelam), composed and reinforced wooden constructions. Composed and reinforced wooden constructions are examined less, but according to researches already carried out, it is clear that significant work can be accomplished in creating rational, highly effective and economic timber constructions. The paper deals with research on the formation of composed fiber-reinforced beams (CFRP) made of timber and provide evidence of their effectiveness. The aim of the paper is to investigate cross-bending of CFRP-reinforced gluelaminated timber beams. According to the results we were able to determine the additional effectiveness of reinforcement with CFRP (which depends on the CFRP material's quality, quantity and module of elasticity) on the mechanical features of timber and a whole beam.

  7. Natural tooth pontic with splinting of periodontally weakened teeth using fiber-reinforced composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Srinidhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of missing anterior teeth due to periodontal reasons is challenging due to the poor support of abutment teeth. This prevents the use of fixed partial dentures (FPDs. Fiber-reinforced splinting provides a viable alternative to the dentist while choosing a treatment plan in replacing missing anterior teeth in periodontally compromised patients as opposed to conventional modalities like FPDs or removable partial dentures. Replacing missing teeth using either patient′s own tooth or a denture tooth as pontic can be done by splinting adjacent teeth with fiber reinforced composite. The splinting has an additional advantage of stabilizing adjacent mobile teeth. This case report details the case selection, procedure with follow-up of a case where the natural extracted tooth of the patient was used as pontic to replace a missing anterior tooth. The splinting was done with fiber reinforced composite resin. Fiber-reinforced composite resin splinting of patient′s extracted natural tooth is economical, fast, and easy to use chairside technique with the added benefit of periodontal stabilization.

  8. Impact absorption properties of carbon fiber reinforced bucky sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevamaran, Ramathasan; Saini, Deepika; Karakaya, Mehmet; Zhu, Jingyi; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao M.; Daraio, Chiara

    2017-05-01

    We describe the super compressible and highly recoverable response of bucky sponges as they are struck by a heavy flat-punch striker. The bucky sponges studied here are structurally stable, self-assembled mixtures of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon fibers (CFs). We engineered the microstructure of the sponges by controlling their porosity using different CF contents. Their mechanical properties and energy dissipation characteristics during impact loading are presented as a function of their composition. The inclusion of CFs improves the impact force damping by up to 50% and the specific damping capacity by up to 7% compared to bucky sponges without CFs. The sponges also exhibit significantly better stress mitigation characteristics compared to vertically aligned CNT foams of similar densities. We show that delamination occurs at the MWCNT-CF interfaces during unloading, and it arises from the heterogeneous fibrous microstructure of the bucky sponges.

  9. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200C, beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  10. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Wang, Xin; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000 deg C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200 deg C, Beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  11. Fiber-Reinforced Reactive Nano-Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene/ matrix interface based on the fabrication of a reactive nano-epoxy matrix with lower surface energy has been improved. Enhanced mechanical properties versus pure epoxy on a three-point bend test include: strength (25 percent), modulus (20 percent), and toughness (30 percent). Increased thermal properties include higher Tg (glass transition temperature) and stable CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion). Improved processability for manufacturing composites includes faster wetting rates on macro-fiber surfaces, lower viscosity, better resin infusion rates, and improved rheological properties. Improved interfacial adhesion properties with Spectra fibers by pullout tests include initial debonding force of 35 percent, a maximum pullout force of 25 percent, and energy to debond at 65 percent. Improved mechanical properties of Spectra fiber composites (tensile) aging resistance properties include hygrothermal effects. With this innovation, high-performance composites have been created, including carbon fibers/nano-epoxy, glass fibers/nano-epoxy, aramid fibers/ nano-epoxy, and ultra-high-molecularweight polyethylene fiber (UHMWPE).

  12. Short fiber reinforced thermoplastic blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchev, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    The present thesis investigates the potential of short fiber reinforced thermoplastic blends, a combination of an immiscible polymer blend and a short fiber reinforced composite, to integrate the easy processing solutions available for short fiber reinforced composites with the high mechanical

  13. A carbon fiber reinforced polymer cage for vertebral body replacement: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappetta, P; Boriani, S; Fava, G P

    1997-11-01

    We analyzed the surgical technique used for the replacement of damaged vertebral bodies of the thoracolumbar spine and the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) cages that are used to replace the pathological vertebral bodies. We also evaluated the biomechanical properties of carbon composite materials used in spinal surgery. The surgical technique of CFRP implants may be divided into two distinct steps, i.e., assembling the components that will replace the pathological vertebral bodies and connecting the cage to an osteosynthetic system to immobilize the cage. The CFRP cages, made of Ultrapek polymer and AS-4 pyrolytic carbon fiber (AcroMed, Rotterdam, The Netherlands), are of different sizes and may be placed one on top of the other and fixed together with a titanium rod. These components are hollow to allow fragments of bone to be pressed manually into them and present threaded holes at 15, 30, and 90 degrees on the external surface, permitting the insertion of screws to connect the cage to an anterior or posterior osteosynthetic system. To date, we have used CFRP cages in 13 patients undergoing corporectomies and 10 patients undergoing spondylectomies. None of our patients have reported complications. CFRP implants offer several advantages compared with titanium or surgical grade stainless steel implants, demonstrating high versatility and outstanding biological and mechanical properties. Furthermore, CFRP implants are radiolucent and do not hinder radiographic evaluation of bone fusion, allowing for better follow-up studies.

  14. Fatigue Life Prediction of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures. Part I: Experimental Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental analysis on the fatigue behavior in C/SiC ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) with different fiber preforms, i.e., unidirectional, cross-ply and 2.5D woven, at room and elevated temperatures in air atmosphere. The experimental fatigue life S - N curves of C/SiC composites corresponding to different stress levels and test conditions have been obtained. The damage evolution processes under fatigue loading have been analyzed using fatigue hysteresis modulus and fatigue hysteresis loss energy. By comparing the experimental fatigue hysteresis loss energy with theoretical computational values, the interface shear stress corresponding to different peak stress, fiber preforms and test conditions have been estimated. It was found that the degradation of interface shear stress and fibres strength caused by oxidation markedly decreases the fatigue life of C/SiC composites at elevated temperature.

  15. Study of delamination in fiber reinforced composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Mary Jacob

    The primary goal of this work was to characterize the fracture toughness of laminated composite materials using a combination of experiments and analyses. This goal was achieved by several contributions that improved the state-of-the-art of numerical analysis techniques for evaluating crack propagation in composite structures. It is shown that currently available finite element techniques do not provide accurate results when nonuniform elements are used to model the structure in the vicinity of the cracks. A new method is proposed in this dissertation to more accurately predict the material toughness in such circumstances. Delamination in composites is often complicated by mixed-mode fractures. Both interlaminar tensile and shear stresses can be present at the delamination front under mixed mode conditions. Although finite element analysis is widely used to calculate energy release rates (ERR), the individual mode I and mode II ERR do not converge when the delamination is at a bimaterial interface. This problem was solved by enclosing the delamination in a homogeneous layer that removes the difficulties associated with the interface cracks. The effect of the additional resin layer is minimized by evaluating the fracture toughness at the limit as the thickness of the interface layer goes to zero. Interlaminar fracture toughness of AS4/3501-6 (carbon/epoxy) composite laminates was measured using single mode and mixed mode bending tests. The results show that the critical mode I ERR for delamination decrease monotonically with increasing mode II loading. Failure loci are developed in this dissertation using the test data and new parameters are established for different failure criteria. An acoustic emission study was performed with the toughness characterization tests. The results indicate that passive emissions can be used as a nondestructive evaluation tool to predict the onset of delamination and other fractures in composites. The final contribution of this

  16. Application of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al alloy matrix composite on piston for internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shenqing

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and properties of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite and it’s application on the piston for internal combustion engines are presented. Alumina or aluminosilicate fibers reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite has more excellent synthetical properties at elevated temperature than the matrix alloys. A partially reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite piston produced by squeeze casting technique has a firm interface between reinforced and unreinforced areas, low reject rate and good technical tolerance. As a new kind of piston material, it has been used for mass production of about 400,000 pieces of automobile engines piston. China has become one of a few countries in which aluminum alloy matrix composite materials have been used in automobile industry and attained industrialization.

  17. Analysis of the Behaviour of Composite Steel and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Petkevičius

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available There was a pending influence of steel fiber on the strength and stiffness of composite steel–concrete slabs under statical short–time load. Steel profiled sheeting and steel fiber reinforced concrete were used for specimens. Four composite slabs were made. Experimental investigations into the behaviour and influence of steel fiber reinforced concrete in composite slabs were conducted. Transverse, longitudinal, shear deformation and deflection of the slab were measured. The results indicated that the use of steel fiber in composite slabs was effective: strength was 20–24 % higher and the meanings of deflections under the action of the bending moment were 0,6MR (where MR is the bending moment at failure of the slabs and were 16–18 % lower for slabs with usual concrete. Article in Lithuanian

  18. Numerical simulation of progressive debonding in fiber reinforced composite under transverse loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kushch, V.; Shmegera, S.V.; Brøndsted, Povl

    2011-01-01

    The finite element model of progressive debonding in fiber reinforced composite is developed based on the cohesive-zone model of interface. An interface crack nucleation, onset and growth have been studied in detail for a single fiber and comparison is made with the linear fracture mechanics model....... Then, the effect on debonding progress of local stress redistribution due to interaction between the fibers was studied in the framework of two-inclusion model. Simulation of progressive debonding in fiber reinforced composite using the many-fiber models of composite has been performed. It has been...... shown that the developed model provides detailed analysis of the progressive debonding phenomenon including the interface crack cluster formation, overall stiffness reduction and induced anisotropy of the effective elastic moduli of composite....

  19. Development of multifunctional fiber reinforced polymer composites through ZnO nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakooti, Mohammad H.; Patterson, Brendan A.; Hwang, Hyun-Sik; Sodano, Henry A.

    2016-04-01

    Piezoelectric nanowires, in particular zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, have been vastly used in the fabrication of electromechanical devices to convert wasted mechanical energy into useful electrical energy. Over recent years, the growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanowires on various structural fibers has led to the development of fiber-based nanostructured energy harvesting devices. However, the development of more realistic energy harvesters that are capable of continuous power generation requires a sufficient mechanical strength to withstand typical structural loading conditions. Yet, a durable, multifunctional material system has not been developed thoroughly enough to generate electrical power without deteriorating the mechanical performance. Here, a hybrid composite energy harvester is fabricated in a hierarchical design that provides both efficient power generating capabilities while enhancing the structural properties of the fiber reinforced polymer composite. Through a simple and low-cost process, a modified aramid fabric with vertically aligned ZnO nanowires grown on the fiber surface is embedded between woven carbon fabrics, which serve as the structural reinforcement as well as the top and the bottom electrodes of the nanowire arrays. The performance of the developed multifunctional composite is characterized through direct vibration excitation and tensile strength examination.

  20. Relationship between mechanical properties and bond durability of short fiber-reinforced resin composite with universal adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between mechanical properties and bond durability of short fiber-reinforced resin composite with universal adhesive. As controls, micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites were tested. The universal adhesives used were Scotchbond Universal, Adhese Universal, and G-Premio Bond. The fracture toughness and flexural properties of resin composites, and shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of universal adhesive with resin composite using both total-etch and self-etch modes were determined. In the results, short fiber-reinforced resin composite showed significantly higher fracture toughness than did micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites. The flexural strength and modulus of short fiber-reinforced and nano-hybrid resin composites were significantly lower than were those of micro-hybrid resin composites. Regardless of etching mode, the shear bond strength of universal adhesives with short fiber-reinforced resin composite did not show any significant differences from micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites. The shear fatigue strength of universal adhesives with short fiber-reinforced resin composite and micro-hybrid resin composites were significantly higher than that of nano-hybrid resin composites. The results of this study suggest that the mechanical properties of short fiber-reinforced resin composite improve their bond durability with universal adhesive. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  1. Anisotropy of conductivity in carbon fiber-reinforced plastics with continuous fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, Anatoliy T.; Shevchenko, Vitaliy G.; Letyagin, Sergey V.; Klason, Carl

    1995-05-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP), as high strength advanced materials are often used as media for embedding sensors and actuators. Due to the properties of components and processing conditions they are electrically anisotropic, with coefficient of anisotropy sometimes exceeding several thousands. This may prevent elimination of static electricity and cause erosion of material due to micro discharges at contacts with fastenings and embedded sensors and actuators, causing their malfunction. For this reason, the investigation of electrical properties of CFRP may provide the solution to this problem. Distribution of electric current field in CFRP and related with it possible errors in measurements of longitudinal conductivity and anisotropy are analyzed. CFRP have been prepared from PAN or cellulose fibers with different heat treatment temperatures and conductivity anisotropy was measured as a function of filler volume fraction and processing conditions. With increasing loading coefficient of anisotropy (alpha) decreases. Lower values of (alpha) were observed when curing agents containing ionic complexes of metals were used. Modifications of fiber surface with hydrophobic agents results in increased anisotropy. Composites prepared with carbon fabrics are isotropic in the fabric plane. Coefficient of anisotropy decreases with increasing molding pressure and depends on the type of weaving of fabric. In hybrid composites with alternating layers of carbon fabric and complex fiber fabric anisotropy is higher due to partial decomposition of conducting layer on top of complex fibers. A method for reducing anisotropy by introducing conducting `jumpers', shorting individual fibers or layers of fabric is proposed. The change of anisotropy in the process of fabrication of carbon-carbon composite by passing electric current through fibers has been investigated. In conclusion, alternative uses of CFRP with reduced anisotropy for contact elements of electric current through

  2. Statistical Analysis of the Progressive Failure Behavior for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites under Tensile Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical approach with the help of numerical simulations based on the equivalent constraint model (ECM was proposed to investigate the progressive failure behavior of symmetric fiber-reinforced composite laminates damaged by transverse ply cracking. A fracture criterion was developed to describe the initiation and propagation of the transverse ply cracking. This work was also concerned with a statistical distributions of the critical fracture toughness values with due consideration given to the scale size effect. The Monte Carlo simulation technique coupled with statistical analysis was applied to study the progressive cracking behaviors of composite structures, by considering the effects of lamina properties and lay-up configurations. The results deduced from the numerical procedure were in good agreement with the experimental results obtained for laminated composites formed by unidirectional fiber reinforced laminae with different orientations.

  3. Fiber-reinforced Composite for Chairside Replacement of Anterior Teeth: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garoushi S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available the replacement of a missing anterior tooth. Whenever a minimal tooth reduction is preferred, a fiber reinforced composite (FRC prosthesis could be a good alternative to conventional prosthetic techniques, chiefly as temporary restoration before making a final decision on the treatment. The purpose of this case report is to describe the clinical procedure of fabricating anterior chairside FRC prosthesis with pre-impregnated unidirectional E-glass fibers and veneered particulate filler composite. Fiber-reinforced composite in combination with adhesive technology appears to be a promising treatment option for replacing missing teeth. However, further and long-term clinical investigation will be required to provide additional information on the survival of directly-bonded anterior fixed prosthesis made with FRC systems.

  4. Experiment-Based Sensitivity Analysis of Scaled Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Elastomeric Isolators in Bonded Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Hedayati Dezfuli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-reinforced elastomeric isolators (FREIs are a new type of elastomeric base isolation systems. Producing FREIs in the form of long laminated pads and cutting them to the required size significantly reduces the time and cost of the manufacturing process. Due to the lack of adequate information on the performance of FREIs in bonded applications, the goal of this study is to assess the performance sensitivity of 1/4-scale carbon-FREIs based on the experimental tests. The scaled carbon-FREIs are manufactured using a fast cold-vulcanization process. The effect of several factors including the vertical pressure, the lateral cyclic rate, the number of rubber layers, and the thickness of carbon fiber-reinforced layers are explored on the cyclic behavior of rubber bearings. Results show that the effect of vertical pressure on the lateral response of base isolators is negligible. However, decreasing the cyclic loading rate increases the lateral flexibility and the damping capacity. Additionally, carbon fiber-reinforced layers can be considered as a minor source of energy dissipation.

  5. The influence of different dispersion methods on the size of the aggregate of CNTs in epoxy resin for the manufacturing of carbon fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Giuseppina; Guadagno, Liberata; Simonet, Bartolome; Santos, Bricio

    2016-05-01

    Different industrial mixing methods and some of their combinations (1) ultrasound; (2) stirring; (3) (4) by roller machine, (5) by gears machine (6) Ultrasound radiation + high stirring were investigated for incorporating Multi walled Carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) into a resin based on an aeronautical epoxy precursor, cured with 4,4' diamine-dibenzylsulfone (DDS). The effect of different parameters, ultrasound intensity, number of cycles, type of blade, gears speed on the nanofiller dispersion were analyzed. The inclusion of the nanofiller in the resin causes a drastic increase in the viscosity, preventing the homogenization of the resin and a drastic increase in temperature in the zones closest to the ultrasound probe. To overcome these challenges, the application of high speed agitation simultaneously with the application of ultrasonic radiation was used. This allows on the one hand a homogeneous dispersion, on the other hand an improvement of the dissipation of heat generated by ultrasonic radiation. A comprehensive study with parameters like viscosity and temperature was performed. It is necessary a balance between viscosity and temperature. Viscosity must be low enough to facilitate the dispersion and homogenization of the nanofillers, whereas the temperature cannot be too high because of re-agglomerations

  6. The influence of different dispersion methods on the size of the aggregate of CNTs in epoxy resin for the manufacturing of carbon fiber reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barra, Giuseppina; Guadagno, Liberata [Department of Industrial Engineering DIIn, University of Salerno via Giovanni Paolo II, 132 – 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Simonet, Bartolome; Santos, Bricio [Carbures Europe SA Tecnoparque “Bahía de Cádiz”-Road El Puert-Sanlucar km 5.5 N4 Ingeniería Street El Puerto de Santa María PC 11500 Cadiz (Spain)

    2016-05-18

    Different industrial mixing methods and some of their combinations (1) ultrasound; (2) stirring; (3) (4) by roller machine, (5) by gears machine (6) Ultrasound radiation + high stirring were investigated for incorporating Multi walled Carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) into a resin based on an aeronautical epoxy precursor, cured with 4,4′ diamine-dibenzylsulfone (DDS). The effect of different parameters, ultrasound intensity, number of cycles, type of blade, gears speed on the nanofiller dispersion were analyzed. The inclusion of the nanofiller in the resin causes a drastic increase in the viscosity, preventing the homogenization of the resin and a drastic increase in temperature in the zones closest to the ultrasound probe. To overcome these challenges, the application of high speed agitation simultaneously with the application of ultrasonic radiation was used. This allows on the one hand a homogeneous dispersion, on the other hand an improvement of the dissipation of heat generated by ultrasonic radiation. A comprehensive study with parameters like viscosity and temperature was performed. It is necessary a balance between viscosity and temperature. Viscosity must be low enough to facilitate the dispersion and homogenization of the nanofillers, whereas the temperature cannot be too high because of re-agglomerations.

  7. Culvert rehabilitation & invert lining using fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    As part of the state of Maine bridge funding initiative, MaineDOT has partnered with the University of : Maines AEWC Advanced Structures and Composite Center and the Maine composites industry to : incorporate composite technologies into bridge con...

  8. Nonlinear Finite Elements Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Columns Strengthened With Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Dewan Abdulla

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study to have better understanding of structural behavior of the reinforced concrete (RC column wrapped by carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP sheets. In this study, 3D F.E model has been presented using ANSYS computer program (Release 16.0 to analyze reinforced concrete columns strengthened with CFRP composites , to evaluate the gain in performance (strength and ductility due to strengthening, and to study the effect of the most important parameters such as: compressive strength of concrete, modulus of elasticity of CFRP and corner radius of square columns. Three dimensional eight-node brick element (SOLID65 was used to represent the concrete, three dimensional spar element (LINK180 represented the steel and using a three dimensional shell element (SHELL41 to represent the CFRP composites. The present study has a comparison between the analytical results from the ANSYS finite element analysis with experimental data. The results of the study show that, external bonded CFRP sheets are very effective in enhancing the axial strength and ductility of the concrete columns. Inspection of

  9. Assessment of carbon fiber-reinforced polyphenylene sulfide by means of laser ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalms, Michael; Peters, Christian; Wierbos, Ronald

    2011-04-01

    From automobile industry to aerospace, thermoformed composites are more and more in use. Thermoplastics offer a number of attractive applications in commercial use like short production times, tailored solutions, recyclability and lower cost. The thermoforming process allows for producing carbon fiber-reinforced parts in a wide range of different geometric shapes. On the other hand this benefit requires a demanding nondestructive testing procedure especially for security relevant parts. A contactless method which is able to fulfil this requirement is the extension of the ultrasound technique with laser technology. It opens up new opportunities for quality assessment during manufacturing like inspection of complex surfaces including small radii, remote observation and nondestructive testing of hot items directly after the thermal forming process. We describe the successful application of laser-based ultrasound on small complex thermoformed composite parts (Cetex® PPS). Cetex consists of semicrystalline polyphenylene sulfide thermoplastics providing outstanding toughness and excellent chemical and solvent resistance. It is qualified in aircraft industry for multiple structural applications. For instance, Cetex is used in the Airbus A380 engine air intakes and the wing fixed leading edge (J-Nose). We investigated several test samples with intentionally introduced defects. The smallest flaw size detected was 2 mm in diameter for delaminations and 6 mm in diameter for porosity.

  10. Evaluation of Mechanical Performance of a New Glass Fiber Reinforced Mineral Matrix Composite

    OpenAIRE

    Ţăranu, George; Toma, Ionuţ-Ovidiu; Pleşu, Raluca; Budescu, Mihai

    2012-01-01

    The use of fibers in different combinations with mineral matrices has started since Biblical times. Clay with different natural fibers like straw or horse hair where combined and obtained strengthened building materials. In the past decades synthetic fibers e.g. glass fibers, carbon fibers, were used with polymeric resins and cement matrices also. Finding an appropriate material and structural system made of fiber reinforced mineral matrix which has adequate mechanical performance, possibilit...

  11. Nondestructive testing of externally reinforced structures for seismic retrofitting using flax fiber reinforced polymer (FFRP) composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Sfarra, S.; Paoletti, D.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.

    2013-05-01

    Natural fibers constitute an interesting alternative to synthetic fibers, e.g. glass and carbon, for the production of composites due to their environmental and economic advantages. The strength of natural fiber composites is on average lower compared to their synthetic counterparts. Nevertheless, natural fibers such as flax, among other bast fibers (jute, kenaf, ramie and hemp), are serious candidates for seismic retrofitting applications given that their mechanical properties are more suitable for dynamic loads. Strengthening of structures is performed by impregnating flax fiber reinforced polymers (FFRP) fabrics with epoxy resin and applying them to the component of interest, increasing in this way the load and deformation capacities of the building, while preserving its stiffness and dynamic properties. The reinforced areas are however prompt to debonding if the fabrics are not mounted properly. Nondestructive testing is therefore required to verify that the fabric is uniformly installed and that there are no air gaps or foreign materials that could instigate debonding. In this work, the use of active infrared thermography was investigated for the assessment of (1) a laboratory specimen reinforced with FFRP and containing several artificial defects; and (2) an actual FFRP retrofitted masonry wall in the Faculty of Engineering of the University of L'Aquila (Italy) that was seriously affected by the 2009 earthquake. Thermographic data was processed by advanced signal processing techniques, and post-processed by computing the watershed lines to locate suspected areas. Results coming from the academic specimen were compared to digital speckle photography and holographic interferometry images.

  12. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Jen

    Long fibers are generally preferred for reinforcing foams for performance reasons. However, uniform dispersion is difficult to achieve because they must be mixed with liquid resin prior to foam expansion. New approaches aiming to overcome such problem have been developed at USC's Composites Center. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams with long fibers (over 6 mm in length) manufactured at USC's Composites Center have achieved promising mechanical properties and demonstrated lower density relative to conventional composite foams. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were synthesized from thermosetting polymeric microspheres (amino and phenolic microspheres), as well as thermoplastic PVC heat expandable microspheres (HEMs). Carbon and/or aramid fibers were used to reinforce the syntactic foams. Basic mechanical properties, including shear, tensile, and compression, were measured in syntactic foams and fiber-reinforced syntactic foams. Microstructure and crack propagation behavior were investigated by scanning electron microscope and light microscopy. Failure mechanisms and reinforcing mechanisms of fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were also analyzed. As expected, additions of fiber reinforcements to foams enhanced both tensile and shear properties. However, only limited enhancement in compression properties was observed, and fiber reinforcement was of limited benefit in this regard. Therefore, a hybrid foam design was explored and evaluated in an attempt to enhance compression properties. HEMs were blended with glass microspheres to produce hybrid foams, and hybrid foams were subsequently reinforced with continuous aramid fibers to produce fiber-reinforced hybrid foams. Mechanical properties of these foams were evaluated. Findings indicated that the production of hybrid foams was an effective way to enhance the compressive properties of syntactic foams, while the addition of fiber reinforcements enhanced the shear and tensile performance of syntactic foams. Another approach

  13. Strength and thermal stability of fiber reinforced plastic composites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rattans have been used for various purposes ranging from furniture and art works to cement composites. Plastic composites are however more dimensionally stable than cement composites because plastic creates a moisture barrier against water ingress. There is paucity of information on properties of plastic composites ...

  14. Evaluation of standardized test methods to characterize fiber reinforced cement composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of standardized test methods to characterize fiber reinforced cementitious composites in terms of their behavior under flexural loading and its relation to their tensile stress-deformation response. Flexural testing and derivation of the tensile stress......-deformation response are preferred in standardized testing of Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites (FRCC) over the direct assessment of the tensile behavior because of the more convenient test setup and ease of specimen preparation. Four-point bending tests were carried out to evaluate the flexural response of FRCC...... and their results are compared to data obtained from direct tensile testing. The details of the formation of cracking are an important underlying assumption in the standardized evaluation procedures as well as in the established correlation models between flexural and tensile behavior. This detail has been...

  15. A fiber-reinforced composite prosthesis restoring a lateral midfacial defect: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurunmäki, Hemmo; Kantola, Rosita; Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Watts, David C; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2008-11-01

    This clinical report describes the use of a glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) substructure to reinforce the silicone elastomer of a large facial prosthesis. The FRC substructure was shaped into a framework and embedded into the silicone elastomer to form a reinforced facial prosthesis. The prosthesis is designed to overcome the disadvantages associated with traditionally fabricated prostheses; namely, delamination of the silicone of the acrylic base, poor marginal adaptation over time, and poor simulation of facial expressions.

  16. Fracture behavior of single-structure fiber-reinforced composite restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Kohji; Garoushi, Sufyan K.; Vallittu, Pekka K; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Lassila, Lippo V.J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The applications of single-structure fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) in restorative dentistry have not been well reported. This study aimed to clarify the static mechanical properties of anterior crown restorations prepared using two types of single-structure FRC. Materials and methods : An experimental crown restoration was designed for an upper anterior incisor. The restorations were made from IPS Empress CAD for CEREC (Emp), IPS e.max? CAD (eMx), experimental single-st...

  17. Feasibility study of prestressed natural fiber-reinforced polylactic acid (pla) composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchcliffe, Sean A.

    The feasibility of manufacturing prestressed natural-fiber reinforced biopolymer composites is demonstrated in this work. The objective of this study was to illustrate that the specific mechanical properties of biopolymers can be enhanced by leveraging a combination of additive manufacturing (3D printing) and post-tensioning of continuous natural fiber reinforcement. Tensile and flexural PLA specimens were 3D-printed with and without post-tensioning ducts. The mechanical properties of reinforcing fibers jute and flax were characterized prior to post-tensioning. The effect of matrix cross-sectional geometry and post-tensioning on the specific mechanical properties of PLA were investigated using mechanical testing. Numerical and analytical models were developed to predict the experimental results, which confirm that 3D-printed matrices improve the specific mechanical properties of PLA composites and are further improved via initial fiber prestressing. The results suggest that both additive manufacturing and fiber prestressing represent viable new methods for improving the mechanical performance of natural fiber-reinforced polymeric composites.

  18. Fracture resistance of class IV fiber-reinforced composite resin restorations: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Praveen Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate fracture resistance of incisal edge fractures (Class IV restored with a Glass Fiber-reinforced Composite (FRC. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four extracted sound maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into two groups. Group I (control contained untreated teeth. Samples in experimental groups II were prepared by cutting the incisal (one-third part of the crown horizontally and was subjected to enamel preparations, then restored with a Glass FRC. Fracture resistance was evaluated as Newton's for samples tested in a Hounsfield universal testing machine. Failure modes were examined microscopically. Results: Mean peak failure load (Newton's observed in Glass Fiber-reinforced Nanocomposite was 863.50 ± 76.12. The experimental group showed similar types of failure modes with the majority occurring as cohesive and mixed type. 58% of the teeth in Glass FRC group fractured below the cementoenamel junction. Conclusion: Using Fiber reinforced composite substructure under conventional composites in Class IV restorations, the fracture resistance of the restored incisal edge could be increased.

  19. Putty Index: An Important Aid for the Direct Fabrication of Fiber Reinforced Composite Resin FPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nidhi; Singh, Kunwarjeet

    2014-12-01

    Fiber reinforced composite resin fixed partial dentures (FRCFPD) with composite resin, PFM or all ceramic pontic can be used as a short term or long term alternative to conventional fixed partial dentures or implant supported crown in young patients where conventional FPD is contraindicated (large pulp chambers) or in patient's unwilling to invasive implant placement surgical procedure and those who do not want to allow preparation of natural sound abutments for placement of retainers for FPD. FRCFPD can be successfully used for replacing missing anterior tooth (Turker and Sener, J Prosthet Dent 100:254-258, 2008), in conditions which allows minimum occlusal loading of pontic, over jet and overbite not greater than 3 mm (Ricketts, Provocations and perceptions in craniofacial orthopedics: dental science and facial art/parts 1 and 2. Rocky Mountain Orthodontics, Denver, p 7023, 1990) and structurally sound and intact abutments for the fiber reinforced matrix (Rose et al., Quintessence Int 33:579-583, 2002). The successful esthetic and functional rehabilitation of missing tooth with fiber reinforced composite resin FPD depends on accurate positioning of pontic in patient's mouth. It is difficult to hold the pontic in proper position with instrument or fingers while direct fabrication in mouth. For accurate positioning, stabilization of pontic is very important which can be achieved with putty index. Putty index maintain pontic in accurate mesiodistal, labiolingual and cervicoincisal position while fabricating FRCFPD directly.

  20. Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Smart Soft Composite Actuators According to Material Composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Min-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Il; Song, Sung-Hyuk; Ahn, Sung-Hoon [Seoul Nat’l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Fiber-reinforced polymer composites, which are made by combining a continuous fiber that acts as reinforcement and a homogeneous polymeric material that acts as a host, are engineering materials with high strength and stiffness and a lightweight structure. In this study, a shape memory alloy(SMA) reinforced composite actuator is presented. This actuator is used to generate large deformations in single lightweight structures and can be used in applications requiring a high degree of adaptability to various external conditions. The proposed actuator consists of numerous individual laminas of the glass-fiber fabric that are embedded in a polymeric matrix. To characterize its deformation behavior, the composition of the actuator was changed by changing the matrix material and the number of the glass-fiber fabric layers. In addition, current of various magnitudes were applied to each actuator to study the effect of the heating of SMA wires on applying current.

  1. Fiber reinforced shape-memory polymer composite and its application in a deployable hinge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xin; Liu, Yanju; Lv, Haibao; Wang, Xiaohua; Leng, Jinsong; Du, Shanyi

    2009-02-01

    This paper investigates the shape recovery behavior of thermoset styrene-based shape-memory polymer composite (SMPC) reinforced by carbon fiber fabrics, and demonstrates the feasibility of using an SMPC hinge as a deployable structure. The major advantages of shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are their extremely high recovery strain, low density and low cost. However, relatively low modulus and low strength are their intrinsic drawbacks. A fiber reinforced SMPC which may overcome the above-mentioned disadvantages is studied here. The investigation was conducted by three types of test, namely dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), a shape recovery test, and optical microscopic observations of the deformation mechanism for an SMPC specimen. Results reveal that the SMPC exhibits a higher storage modulus than that of a pure SMP. At/above Tg, the shape recovery ratio of the SMPC upon bending is above 90%. The shape recovery properties of the SMPC become relatively stable after some packaging/deployment cycles. Additionally, fiber microbuckling is the primary mechanism for obtaining a large strain in the bending of the SMPC. Moreover, an SMPC hinge has been fabricated, and a prototype of a solar array actuated by the SMPC hinge has been successfully deployed.

  2. SERIAL SECTIONS THROUGH A CONTINUOUS FIBER-REINFORCED POLYMER COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Bizet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of a unidirectional glass-fiber composite material is described seeking especially for the influence of the stitching perpendicular to the reinforcement. Serial cuts are performed through the composite and the microstructure is quantified using global parameters and linear morphological analysis. A key result is that the stitching induces variations in fibers spacing within the yarns and in the matrix volume between the yarns. This can affect noticeably the flow of the resin during the manufacturing process and also the mechanical properties of the composite.

  3. Fracture failure analysis of Fiber Reinforced Composites T-joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Kong, De-zhi; Liu, Ren-huai; Huang, Shi-qing

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses staple FRP T-joints on the project based on the classical beam theory of Euler-Bernoulli and a theoretical model of energy release rate is set up to discuss fracture propagation of composite T-joints. The paper is further analysis on fracture failure affected by composite pane depth and joints chamfer dimension parameters and so on. The conclusion benefit for extensive use of projects is also summarized.

  4. A REVIEW ON SISAL FIBER REINFORCED POLYMER COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuruvilla Joseph

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The global demand for wood as a building material is steadily growing, while the availability of this natural resource is diminishing. This situation has led to the development of alternative materials. Of the various synthetic materials that have been explored and advocated, polymer composites claim a major participation as building materials. There has been a growing interest in utilizing natural fibres as reinforcement in polymer composite for making low cost construction materials in recent years. Natural fibres are prospective reinforcing materials and their use until now has been more traditional than technical. They have long served many useful purposes but the application of the material technology for the utilization of natural fibres as reinforcement in polymer matrix took place in comparatively recent years. Economic and other related factors in many developing countries where natural fibres are abundant, demand that scientists and engineers apply appropriate technology to utilize these natural fibres as effectively and economically as possible to produce good quality fibre reinforced polymer composites for housing and other needs. Among the various natural fibres, sisal is of particular interest in that its composites have high impact strength besides having moderate tensile and flexural properties compared to other lignocellulosic fibres. The present paper surveys the research work published in the field of sisal fibre reinforced polymer composites with special reference to the structure and properties of sisal fibre, processing techniques, and the physical and mechanical properties of the composites.

  5. Nano-Fiber Reinforced Enhancements in Composite Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    Nano-fibers are used to reinforce polymer matrices to enhance the matrix dependent properties that are subsequently used in conventional structural composites. A quasi isotropic configuration is used in arranging like nano-fibers through the thickness to ascertain equiaxial enhanced matrix behavior. The nano-fiber volume ratios are used to obtain the enhanced matrix strength properties for 0.01,0.03, and 0.05 nano-fiber volume rates. These enhanced nano-fiber matrices are used with conventional fiber volume ratios of 0.3 and 0.5 to obtain the composite properties. Results show that nano-fiber enhanced matrices of higher than 0.3 nano-fiber volume ratio are degrading the composite properties.

  6. Machinability of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper deals with the study of machinability of GFRP composite tubes of different fiber orientation angle vary from 300 to 900. Machining studies were carried out on an all geared lathe using three different cutting tools: namely Carbide (K-20), Cubic Boron Nitride (CBN) and Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD). Experiments ...

  7. Flexural analysis of palm fiber reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Raghav, Dasarath; Santhosh Kiran, R.; Mahesh, Bhargav; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainty in availability of fossil fuels in the future and global warming increased the need for more environment friendly materials. In this work, an attempt is made to fabricate a hybrid polymer matrix composite. The blend is a mixture of General Purpose Resin and Cashew Nut Shell Liquid, a natural resin extracted from cashew plant. Palm fiber, which has high strength, is used as reinforcement material. The fiber is treated with alkali (NaOH) solution to increase its strength and adhesiveness. Parametric study of flexure strength is carried out by varying alkali concentration, duration of alkali treatment and fiber volume. Taguchi L9 Orthogonal array is followed in the design of experiments procedure for simplification. With the help of ANOVA technique, regression equations are obtained which gives the level of influence of each parameter on the flexure strength of the composite.

  8. Mechanics and Durability of Fiber Reinforced Porous Ceramic Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xinyu

    2001-01-01

    Porous ceramics and porous ceramic composites are emerging functional materials that have found numerous industrial applications, especially in energy conversion processes. They are characterized by random microstructure and high porosity. Examples are ceramic candle filters used in coal-fired power plants, gas-fired infrared burners, anode and cathode materials of solid oxide fuel cells, etc. In this research, both experimental and theoretical work have been conducted t...

  9. Research on Sliding Wear Behavior of TiO2 Filled Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite

    OpenAIRE

    S. Srinivasa Moorthy; K. Manonmani

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Titanium Oxide (TiO2) particulate filled e-glass fiber reinforced composites in the unsaturated polyester resin matrix were prepared and its dry sliding wear behavior was optimized. Composites of varying fiber lengths of 1, 2 and 3 cm, respectively with different fiber content of 30, 40 and 50 wt. %, respectively were made. The particulate was varied with 2, 5 and 9 wt. %, respectively. The hybrid reinforced composites were prepared by hand layup method and the wear was measure...

  10. Porosity characterization of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, C.; Marrow, T. J.; Reinhard, C.; Li, B.; Zhang, C.; Wang, S.

    2016-03-01

    The pore structure and porosity of a continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite has been characterized using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Segmentation of the reconstructed tomograph images reveals different types of pores within the composite, the inter-fiber bundle open pores displaying a "node-bond" geometry, and the intra-fiber bundle isolated micropores showing a piping shape. The 3D morphology of the pores is resolved and each pore is labeled. The quantitative filtering of the pores measures a total porosity 8.9% for the composite, amid which there is about 7.1~ 9.3% closed micropores.

  11. Impacts of Temperature Disparity on Surface Modification of Short Jute Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Reshmi; Choudhury, P. L.; Pandey, K. M.

    2017-08-01

    Chase for manufacturing composite materials without negotiating on the physio-mechanical performance has been prevailing since long. Short jute fiber-reinforced epoxy based composites are prepared and their mechanical properties have been analyzed. The fibers are peroxide-silane treated under varying conditions of temperature from low to high. Results display that the jute composites set at higher temperature values indicate higher values of mechanical properties compared to those synthesized under lower temperature range. The same can be cited for liquid retaining capacity.

  12. Impact test on natural fiber reinforced polymer composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chandramohan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, natural fibers like Sisal (Agave sisalana, Banana (Musa sepientum & Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa , Sisal and banana (hybrid , Roselle and banana (hybrid and Roselle and sisal (hybrid are fabricated with bio epoxy resin using molding method. In this work, impact strength of Sisal and banana (hybrid, Roselle and banana (hybridand Roselle and sisal (hybrid composite at dry and wet conditions were studied. Impact test were conducted izod impact testing machine. In this work micro structure of the specimens are scanned by the Scanning Electron Microscope.

  13. Geometrical Effect on Thermal Conductivity of Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite along Different In-plane Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zenong; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Li, Yanxia; Wang, Xiaolei; Gu, Yizhuo; Liu, Qianli; Tian, Jie; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2017-11-01

    This paper focuses on the anisotropic characteristics of the in-plane thermal conductivity of fiber-reinforced polymer composite based on experiment and simulation. Thermal conductivity along different in-plane orientations was measured by laser flash analysis (LFA) and steady-state heat flow method. Their heat transfer processes were simulated to reveal the geometrical effect on thermal conduction. The results show that the in-plane thermal conduction of unidirectional carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composite is greatly influenced by the sample geometry at an in-plane orientation angle between 0° to 90°. By defining radius-to-thickness as a dimensionless shape factor for the LFA sample, the apparent thermal conductivity shows a dramatic change when the shape factor is close to the tangent of the orientation angle (tanθ). Based on finite element analysis, this phenomenon was revealed to correlate with the change of the heat transfer process. When the shape factor is larger than tanθ, the apparent thermal conductivity is consistent with the estimated value according to the theoretical model. For a sample with a shape factor smaller than tanθ, the apparent thermal conductivity shows a slow growth around a low value, which seriously deviates from the theory estimation. This phenomenon was revealed to correlate with the change of the heat transfer process from a continuous path to a zigzag path. These results will be helpful in optimizing the ply scheme of composite laminates for thermal management applications.

  14. Fabrication and Characterization of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNT) and Ni-Coated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (Ni-MWCNT) Repair Patches for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brienne; Caraccio, Anne; Tate, LaNetra; Jackson, Dionne

    2011-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/epoxy and nickel-coated multi-walled carbon nanotube (Ni-MWCNT)/epoxy systems were fabricated into carbon fiber composite repair patches via vacuum resin infusion. Two 4 ply patches were manufactured with fiber orientations of [90/ 90/ 4590] and [0/90/ +45/ -45]. Prior to resin infusion, the MWCNT/Epoxy system and NiMWCNT/ epoxy systems were optimized for dispersion quality. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to determine the presence ofcarbon nanotubes and assess dispersion quality. Decomposition temperatures were determined via thermogravametric analysis (TGA). SEM and TGA were also used to evaluate the composite repair patches.

  15. Surface characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymers by picosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Rodolfo; Palmieri, Frank; Connell, John; Yost, William; Fitz-Gerald, James

    2018-02-01

    Adhesive bonding of composite materials requires reliable monitoring and detection of surface contaminants as part of a vigorous quality control process to assure robust and durable bonded structures. Surface treatment and effective monitoring prior to bonding are essential in order to obtain a surface which is free from contaminants that may lead to inferior bond quality. In this study, the focus is to advance the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique by using pulse energies below 100 μJ (μLIBS) for the detection of low levels of silicone contaminants in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. Various CFRP surface conditions were investigated by LIBS using ∼10 ps, 355 nm laser pulses with pulse energies below 30 μJ. Time-resolved analysis was conducted to optimize the gate delay and gate width for the detection of the C I emission line at 247.9 nm to monitor the epoxy resin matrix of CFRP composites and the Si I emission line at 288.2 nm for detection of silicone contaminants in CFRP. To study the surface sensitivity to silicone contamination, CFRP surfaces were coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), the active ingredient in many mold release agents. The presence of PDMS was studied by inspecting the Si I emission lines at 251.6 nm and 288.2 nm. The measured PDMS areal densities ranged from 0.15 to 2 μg/cm2. LIBS measurements were performed before and after laser surface ablation. The results demonstrate the successful detection of PDMS thin layers on CFRP using picosecond μLIBS.

  16. Effects of Fiber Reinforcement on Clay Aerogel Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Finlay

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Novel, low density structures which combine biologically-based fibers with clay aerogels are produced in an environmentally benign manner using water as solvent, and no additional processing chemicals. Three different reinforcing fibers, silk, soy silk, and hemp, are evaluated in combination with poly(vinyl alcohol matrix polymer combined with montmorillonite clay. The mechanical properties of the aerogels are demonstrated to increase with reinforcing fiber length, in each case limited by a critical fiber length, beyond which mechanical properties decline due to maldistribution of filler, and disruption of the aerogel structure. Rather than the classical model for reinforced composite properties, the chemical compatibility of reinforcing fibers with the polymer/clay matrix dominated mechanical performance, along with the tendencies of the fibers to kink under compression.

  17. Effects of Fiber Reinforcement on Clay Aerogel Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Katherine A.; Gawryla, Matthew D.; Schiraldi, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Novel, low density structures which combine biologically-based fibers with clay aerogels are produced in an environmentally benign manner using water as solvent, and no additional processing chemicals. Three different reinforcing fibers, silk, soy silk, and hemp, are evaluated in combination with poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix polymer combined with montmorillonite clay. The mechanical properties of the aerogels are demonstrated to increase with reinforcing fiber length, in each case limited by a critical fiber length, beyond which mechanical properties decline due to maldistribution of filler, and disruption of the aerogel structure. Rather than the classical model for reinforced composite properties, the chemical compatibility of reinforcing fibers with the polymer/clay matrix dominated mechanical performance, along with the tendencies of the fibers to kink under compression. PMID:28793515

  18. Buckling of Fiber Reinforced Composite Plates with Nanofiber Reinforced Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2010-01-01

    Anisotropic composite plates were evaluated with nanofiber reinforced matrices (NFRM). The nanofiber reinforcement volumes ratio in the matrix was 0.01. The plate dimensions were 20 by 10 by 1.0 in. (508 by 254 by 25.4 mm). Seven different loading condition cases were evaluated: three for uniaxial loading, three for pairs of combined loading, and one with three combined loadings. The anisotropy arose from the unidirectional plates having been at 30 from the structural axis. The anisotropy had a full 6 by 6 rigidities matrix which were satisfied and solved by a Galerkin buckling algorithm. The buckling results showed that the NFRM plates buckled at about twice those with conventional matrix.

  19. Characterization of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeffrey M.

    This Dissertation investigates a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping. Numerous techniques exist for the repair of high-pressure steel piping. One repair technology that is widely gaining acceptance is composite over-wraps. Thermal analytical evaluations of the epoxy matrix material produced glass transition temperature results, a cure kinetic model, and a workability chart. These results indicate a maximum glass transition temperature of 80°C (176°F) when cured in ambient conditions. Post-curing the epoxy, however, resulted in higher glass-transition temperatures. The accuracy of cure kinetic model presented is temperature dependent; its accuracy improves with increased cure temperatures. Cathodic disbondment evaluations of the composite over-wrap show the epoxy does not breakdown when subjected to a constant voltage of -1.5V and the epoxy does not allow corrosion to form under the wrap from permeation. Combustion analysis of the composite over-wrap system revealed the epoxy is flammable when in direct contact with fire. To prevent combustion, an intumescent coating was developed to be applied on the composite over-wrap. Results indicate that damaged pipes repaired with the carbon fiber composite over-wrap withstand substantially higher static pressures and exhibit better fatigue characteristics than pipes lacking repair. For loss up to 80 percent of the original pipe wall thickness, the composite over-wrap achieved failure pressures above the pipe's specified minimum yield stress during monotonic evaluations and reached the pipe's practical fatigue limit during cyclical pressure testing. Numerous repairs were made to circular, thru-wall defects and monotonic pressure tests revealed containment up to the pipe's specified minimum yield strength for small diameter defects. The energy release rate of the composite over-wrap/steel interface was obtained from these full-scale, leaking pipe evaluations and results

  20. Solvent-based self-healing approaches for fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amanda R.

    Damage in composite materials spans many length scales and is often difficult to detect or costly to repair. The incorporation of self-healing functionality in composite materials has the potential to greatly extend material lifetime and reliability. Although there has been remarkable progress in self-healing polymers over the past decade, self-repair in fiber-reinforced composite materials presents significant technical challenges due to stringent manufacturing and performance requirements. For high performance, fiber-reinforced composites, the self-healing components need to survive high temperature processing, reside in matrix interstitial regions to retain a high fiber volume fraction, and have minimal impact on the mechanical properties of the host material. This dissertation explores several microencapsulated solvent-based self-healing approaches for fiber-reinforced composites at the fiber/ matrix interface size scale as well as matrix cracking. Systems are initially developed for room temperature cured epoxies/ glass fiber interfaces and successfully transitioned to carbon fibers and high temperature-cured, thermoplastic-toughened matrices. Full recovery of interfacial bond strength after complete fiber/matrix debonding is achieved with a microencapsulated solvent-based healing chemistry. The surface of a glass fiber is functionalized with microcapsules containing varying concentrations of reactive epoxy resin and ethyl phenyl acetate (EPA) solvent. Microbond specimens consisting of a single fiber and a microdroplet of epoxy are cured at 35°C, tested, and the interfacial shear strengths (IFSS) during the initial (virgin) debonding and subsequent healing events are measured. Debonding of the fiber/matrix interface ruptures the capsules, releasing resin and solvent into the crack plane. The solvent swells the matrix, initiating transport of residual amine functionality for further curing with the epoxy resin delivered to the crack plane. Using a resin

  1. Mechanical Behavior of Hybrid Glass/Steel Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K. McBride

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available While conventional fiber-reinforced polymer composites offer high strength and stiffness, they lack ductility and the ability to absorb energy before failure. This work investigates hybrid fiber composites for structural applications comprised of polymer, steel fiber, and glass fibers to address this shortcoming. Varying volume fractions of thin, ductile steel fibers were introduced into glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites. Non-hybrid and hybrid composite specimens were prepared and subjected to monolithic and half-cyclic tensile testing to obtain stress-strain relationships, hysteresis behavior, and insight into failure mechanisms. Open-hole testing was used to assess the vulnerability of the composites to stress concentration. Incorporating steel fibers into glass/epoxy composites offered a significant improvement in energy absorption prior to failure and material re-centering capabilities. It was found that a lower percentage of steel fibers (8.2% in the hybrid composite outperformed those with higher percentages (15.7% and 22.8% in terms of energy absorption and re-centering, as the glass reinforcement distributed the plasticity over a larger area. A bilinear hysteresis model was developed to predict cyclic behavior of the hybrid composite.

  2. Visual classification of braided and woven fiber bundles in X-ray computed tomography scanned carbon fiber reinforced polymer specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Weissenböck

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, advanced composite materials such as carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP are used in many fields of application (e.g., automotive, aeronautic and leisure industry. These materials are characterized by their high stiffness and strength, while having low weight. Especially, woven carbon fiber reinforced materials have outstanding mechanical properties due to their fabric structure. To analyze and develop the fabrics, it is important to understand the course of the individual fiber bundles. Industrial 3D X-ray computed tomography (XCT as a nondestructive testing method allows resolving these individual fiber bundles. In this paper, we show our findings when applying the method of Bhattacharya et al. [6] for extracting fiber bundles on two new types of CFRP specimens. One specimen contains triaxial braided plies in an RTM6 resin and another specimen woven bi-diagonal layers. Furthermore, we show the required steps to separate the individual bundles and the calculation of the individual fiber bundles characteristics which are essential for the posterior visual analysis and exploration. We further demonstrate the classification of the individual fiber bundles within the fabrics to support the domain experts in perceiving the weaving structure of XCT scanned specimens.

  3. EFFECT OF WATER ABSORPTION ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES \\OF FLAX FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Umit Huner

    2015-01-01

    Flax fiber reinforced epoxy composites were subjected to water immersion tests in order to study the effects of water absorption on the mechanical properties. Epoxy composites specimens containing 0, 1, 5 and 10% fiber weight were prepared. Water absorption tests were conducted by immersing specimens in a de-ionized water bath at 25 ­°C and 90 °C for different time durations. The tensile and flexural properties of water immersed specimens subjected to both aging conditions were evaluated and ...

  4. Statistics of Microstructure, Peak Stress and Interface Damage in Fiber Reinforced Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kushch, Volodymyr I.; Shmegera, Sergii V.; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses an effect of the fiber arrangement and interactions on the peak interface stress statistics in a fiber reinforced composite material (FRC). The method we apply combines the multipole expansion technique with the representative unit cell model of composite bulk, which is able...... sensitive to the fiber arrangement, particularly cluster formation. An explicit correspondence between them has been established and an analytical formula linking the microstructure and peak stress statistics in FRCs has been suggested. Application of the statistical theory of extreme values to the local...

  5. A Smart Eddy Current Sensor Dedicated to the Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fibers Reinforced Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidjate, Mohammed; Helifa, Bachir; Feliachi, Mouloud; Lefkaier, Iben-Khaldoun; Heuer, Henning; Schulze, Martin

    2017-08-31

    This paper propose a new concept of an eddy current (EC) multi-element sensor for the characterization of carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP) to evaluate the orientations of plies in CFRP and the order of their stacking. The main advantage of the new sensors is the flexible parametrization by electronical switching that reduces the effort for mechanical manipulation. The sensor response was calculated and proved by 3D finite element (FE) modeling. This sensor is dedicated to nondestructive testing (NDT) and can be an alternative for conventional mechanical rotating and rectangular sensors.

  6. Highly Conductive Carbon Fiber Reinforced Concrete for Icing Prevention and Curing

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar Galao; Luis Bañón; Francisco Javier Baeza; Jesús Carmona; Pedro Garcés

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to study the feasibility of highly conductive carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) as a self-heating material for ice formation prevention and curing in pavements. Tests were carried out in lab ambient conditions at different fixed voltages and then introduced in a freezer at −15 °C. The specimens inside the freezer were exposed to different fixed voltages when reaching +5 °C for prevention of icing and when reaching the temperature inside the freezer, i.e., −15 °C, for cur...

  7. Hybrid Effect Evaluation of Steel Fiber and Carbon Fiber on the Performance of the Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weimin; Yin, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Fiber reinforcement is an important method to enhance the performance of concrete. In this study, the compressive test and impact test were conducted, and then the hybrid effect between steel fiber (SF) and carbon fiber (CF) was evaluated by employing the hybrid effect index. Compressive toughness and impact toughness of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC), carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) and hybrid fiber reinforced concrete (HFRC) were explored at steel fiber volume fraction 0.5%, 1%, 1.5% and carbon fiber 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%. Results showed that the addition of steel fiber and carbon fiber can increase the compressive strength. SF, CF and the hybridization between them could increase the compressive toughness significantly. The impact test results showed that as the volume of fiber increased, the impact number of the first visible crack and the ultimate failure also increased. The improvement of toughness mainly lay in improving the crack resistance after the first crack. Based on the test results, the positive hybrid effect of steel fiber and carbon fiber existed in hybrid fiber reinforced concrete. The relationship between the compressive toughness and impact toughness was also explored. PMID:28773824

  8. Hybrid Effect Evaluation of Steel Fiber and Carbon Fiber on the Performance of the Fiber Reinforced Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weimin; Yin, Jian

    2016-08-18

    Fiber reinforcement is an important method to enhance the performance of concrete. In this study, the compressive test and impact test were conducted, and then the hybrid effect between steel fiber (SF) and carbon fiber (CF) was evaluated by employing the hybrid effect index. Compressive toughness and impact toughness of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC), carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) and hybrid fiber reinforced concrete (HFRC) were explored at steel fiber volume fraction 0.5%, 1%, 1.5% and carbon fiber 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%. Results showed that the addition of steel fiber and carbon fiber can increase the compressive strength. SF, CF and the hybridization between them could increase the compressive toughness significantly. The impact test results showed that as the volume of fiber increased, the impact number of the first visible crack and the ultimate failure also increased. The improvement of toughness mainly lay in improving the crack resistance after the first crack. Based on the test results, the positive hybrid effect of steel fiber and carbon fiber existed in hybrid fiber reinforced concrete. The relationship between the compressive toughness and impact toughness was also explored.

  9. The Vibration Based Fatigue Damage Assessment of Steel and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete (SFRC Composite Girder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The steel-concrete composite girder has been usually applied in the bridge and building structures, mostly consisting of concrete slab, steel girder, and shear connector. The current fatigue damage assessment for the composite girder is largely based on the strain values and concrete crack features, which is time consuming and not stable. Hence the vibration-based fatigue damage assessment has been considered in this study. In detail, a steel-steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC composite girder was tested. The steel fiber reinforced concrete is usually considered for dealing with the concrete cracks in engineering practice. The composite girder was 3.3m long and 0.45m high. The fatigue load and impact excitation were applied on the specimen sequentially. According to the test results, the concrete crack development and global stiffness degradation during the fatigue test were relatively slow due to the favourable performance of SFRC in tension. But on the other hand, the vibration features varied significantly during the fatigue damage development. Generally, it confirmed the feasibility of executing fatigue damage assessment of composite bridge based on vibration method.

  10. Esthetic rehabilitation of severely decayed primary incisors using glass fiber reinforced composite: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metha, Deepak; Gulati, Akanksha; Basappa, N; Raju, O S

    2012-01-01

    Restoration of primary maxillary incisors severely damaged by caries or trauma is a clinical challenge in pediatric dental clinics. Early childhood caries is observed in approximately half the child population. In the past, the only treatment option would have been to extract the affected teeth and replace them with prosthetic substitutes. With the introduction of new adhesive systems and restorative materials, alternative approaches in treating these teeth have been proposed. The purpose of this paper was to describe the rehabilitation of primary anterior teeth in a 5-year-old patient using glass fiber reinforced composite resin as an intracanal post.

  11. Fiber-reinforced plastic composites. Possibilities and limitations of applications as machine-construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophey, Lothar

    1988-01-01

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite structural materials in engineering applications is discussed in a survey of currently available technology and future prospects. The ongoing rapid growth in the use of these materials is described, and the criteria to be applied in selecting base materials, lamination schemes, fasteners, and processing methods are examined in detail and illustrated with graphs, diagrams, flow charts, and drawings. A description of a sample application (comparing the properties of steel, CFRP, SiC-reinforced Al, CFRP/steel, and CFRP/Al automobile piston rods) is included.

  12. Structure and properties of short fiber reinforced polymer composite and hybrid composite fabricated by injection molding process

    OpenAIRE

    Uawongsuwan, Putinun

    2015-01-01

    Short fiber reinforced polymer composites have found extensive applications in many fields due to their low cost, easy processing and superior mechanical properties over the neat thermoplastics. For interpreting the mechanical properties of composite by several variable parameters, additional measurements are required when changes occur in the composite system variables. Thus, experiments may be time consuming and cost prohibitive. Therefore, theoretical models of determining composite proper...

  13. Coating of carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone implants with titanium to improve bone apposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Declan M; Hahn, Joachim; Richards, R Geoffery; Gruner, Heiko; Wieling, Ronald; Pearce, Simon G

    2013-05-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CF/PEEK) is a thermoplastic composite biomaterial exhibiting properties suitable for load-bearing orthopedic implants. However, the hydrophobic surface of CF/PEEK implants induces the deposition of a peri-implant fibrous tissue capsule preventing bone apposition. However, if bone apposition was improved, the use of CF/PEEK in orthopedics could be increased as it has many advantages compared with metallic implants. In this study, CF/PEEK screws were coated with titanium (Ti) using two different techniques, namely vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) with uncoated screws as controls. These coatings were characterized and implanted in a loaded sheep tibia model. In the characterization of the screw surfaces using microscopy techniques, the uncoated screws were seen to have an irregular surface. The PVD coating appeared smooth and consistent, whereas the VPS coating appeared to be a rough coating with some inhomogeneities, which did not cover the entire surface area. Nevertheless, in the ex vivo analysis the VPS-coated screws had a screw removal torque which was statistically greater than uncoated and PVD-coated screws (p ≤ 0.002 for both comparisons). Additionally, the VPS-coated screws had a statistically higher bone contact area than the uncoated screws (p = 0.006), whereas no statistical difference was detected between VPS and PVD coating types (p = 0.11). Thereby illustrating that Ti coating of CF/PEEK screws significantly improve bone apposition and removal torque compared with uncoated CF/PEEK screws. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Experimental analysis of reinforced concrete beams strengthened in bending with carbon fiber reinforced polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. VIEIRA

    Full Text Available The use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP has been widely used for the reinforcement of concrete structures due to its practicality and versatility in application, low weight, high tensile strength and corrosion resistance. Some construction companies use CFRP in flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete beams, but without anchor systems. Therefore, the aim of this study is analyze, through an experimental program, the structural behavior of reinforced concrete beams flexural strengthened by CFRP without anchor fibers, varying steel reinforcement and the amount of carbon fibers reinforcement layers. Thus, two groups of reinforced concrete beams were produced with the same geometric feature but with different steel reinforcement. Each group had five beams: one that is not reinforced with CFRP (reference and other reinforced with two, three, four and five layers of carbon fibers. Beams were designed using a computational routine developed in MAPLE software and subsequently tested in 4-point points flexural test up to collapse. Experimental tests have confirmed the effectiveness of the reinforcement, ratifying that beams collapse at higher loads and lower deformation as the amount of fibers in the reinforcing layers increased. However, the increase in the number of layers did not provide a significant increase in the performance of strengthened beams, indicating that it was not possible to take full advantage of strengthening applied due to the occurrence of premature failure mode in the strengthened beams for pullout of the cover that could have been avoided through the use of a suitable anchoring system for CFRP.

  15. Suitability of carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone cages for use as anterior struts following corpectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heary, Robert F; Parvathreddy, Naresh K; Qayumi, Zainab S; Ali, Naiim S; Agarwal, Nitin

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Fibular allograft remains a widely used strut for corpectomy surgeries. The amount of graft material that can be packed into an allograft strut has not been quantified. Cages are an alternative to fibular allograft for fusion surgeries. The authors of this study assessed the suitability of carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRP) cages for anterior corpectomy surgeries. They further explored the parameters known to affect fusion rates in clinical practice. METHODS Six fibular allografts were tested at standard lengths. Three sets of carbon fiber cages (Bengal, DePuy Spine), each with a different footprint size but the same lengths, were tested. The allografts and cages were wrapped in adhesive, fluid-tight transparent barriers and filled with oil. The volume and weight of the oil instilled as well as the implant footprints were measured. The fibular allografts and cages were tested at 20-, 40-, and 50-mm lengths. Two investigators independently performed all measurements 5 times. Five CFRP cubes (1 × 1 × 1 cm) were tested under pure compression, and load versus displacement curves were plotted to determine the modulus of elasticity. RESULTS Significantly more oil fit in the CFRP cages than in the fibular allografts (p Carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone cages can accommodate much more graft material than can fibular allografts. In clinical practice, the ability to deliver greater amounts of graft material following a corpectomy may improve fusion rates.

  16. Short Jute Fiber Reinforced Polypropylene Composites: Effect of Nonhalogenated Fire Retardants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sk. Sharfuddin Chestee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Short jute fiber reinforced polypropylene (PP composites were prepared using a single screw extrusion moulding. Jute fiber content in the composites is optimized with the extent of mechanical properties, and composites with 20% jute show higher mechanical properties. Dissimilar concentrations of several fire retardants (FRs, such as magnesium oxide (MO, aluminum oxide (AO, and phosphoric acid (PA, were used in the composites. The addition of MO, AO, and PA improved the fire retardancy properties (ignition time, flame height, and total firing time of the composites. Ignition time for 30% MO, flame height for 30% PA, and total firing time for 20% MO content composites showed good results which were 8 sec, 1 inch, and 268 sec, respectively. Mechanical properties (tensile strength, tensile modulus, bending strength, bending modulus, and elongation at break, degradation properties (soil test, weathering test, and percentage of weight loss, and water uptake were studied.

  17. Effects of postcuring on mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced epoxy composites and the neat resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Funk, Joan G.; Collins, William D.; Gray, Stephanie L.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of postcuring on mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced epoxy-resin composites have been investigated. Composites with carbon, glass, and aramid reinforcement fibers were individually studied. The epoxy was a commercially-available resin that was especially developed for pultrusion fabrication. The pultrusions were conducted at 400 F with postcures at 400, 450, 500, and 550 F. Measurements of the flexural, shear, and interlaminar fracture-toughness properties showed that significant postcuring can occur during the pultrusion process. All three mechanical properties were degraded by the higher (500 and 550 F) temperatures; photomicrographs suggest that the degradation was caused at the fiber-resin interface for all three fiber types.

  18. A Review on Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layth Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers are getting attention from researchers and academician to utilize in polymer composites due to their ecofriendly nature and sustainability. The aim of this review article is to provide a comprehensive review of the foremost appropriate as well as widely used natural fiber reinforced polymer composites (NFPCs and their applications. In addition, it presents summary of various surface treatments applied to natural fibers and their effect on NFPCs properties. The properties of NFPCs vary with fiber type and fiber source as well as fiber structure. The effects of various chemical treatments on the mechanical and thermal properties of natural fibers reinforcements thermosetting and thermoplastics composites were studied. A number of drawbacks of NFPCs like higher water absorption, inferior fire resistance, and lower mechanical properties limited its applications. Impacts of chemical treatment on the water absorption, tribology, viscoelastic behavior, relaxation behavior, energy absorption flames retardancy, and biodegradability properties of NFPCs were also highlighted. The applications of NFPCs in automobile and construction industry and other applications are demonstrated. It concluded that chemical treatment of the natural fiber improved adhesion between the fiber surface and the polymer matrix which ultimately enhanced physicomechanical and thermochemical properties of the NFPCs.

  19. Manufacture of and environmental effects on carbon fiber-reinforced phenylethynyl-terminated poly(etherimide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullions, Todd Aaron

    The initial objective of this research project was to determine the feasibility of manufacturing carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR) composites with a matrix consisting of a phenylethynyl-terminated version of a thermoplastic poly(etherimide) termed PETU. Successful composite manufacture with 3,000 g/mol (3k) PETU led to a survey of CFR 3kPETU mechanical properties for comparison with other high-performance composites. Encouraging results led to a study of moisture sorption effects on CFR 3kPETU properties. The success of these initial studies spawned the large scale production of 2,500 g/mol (2.5k) PETU. Thermal characterization of neat and CFR 2.5kPETU via differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, and parallel plate rheometry resulted in an understanding of the influence of cure time and temperature on reaction progress via both reaction kinetics and monitoring of the glass transition temperature. From the rheological characterization, a two-stage, dual-Arrhenius model was developed to successfully model isothermal complex viscosity over the range of processing temperatures. Neat 2.5kPETU and CFR 2.5kPETU specimens were exposed separately to elevated temperature environments of different moisture and different oxygen concentrations to evaluate the effects of moisture absorption, moisture desorption, and thermal oxidation on material properties. Moisture absorption took place in a 90°C/85% relative humidity environment followed by moisture desorption in a 90°C/10% relative humidity environment. Thermal-oxidative aging for up to 5000 hours took place at 204°C in environments of four different oxygen partial pressures: 0.0 kPa, 2.84 kPa, 20.2 kPa, and 40.4 kPa. Following exposure to the different aging environments, the specimens were tested for retention of mechanical properties. In addition, moisture sorption properties were measured. Results from the moisture sorption studies on CFR 3kPETU and CFR 2.5kPETU suggest that fully cured

  20. Enhancement of osteogenesis on micro/nano-topographical carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone-nanohydroxyapatite biocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Anxiu; Liu, Xiaochen; Gao, Xiang; Deng, Feng; Deng, Yi; Wei, Shicheng

    2015-03-01

    As an FDA-approved implantable material, carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) possesses excellent mechanical properties similar to those of human cortical bone and is a prime candidate to replace conventional metallic implants. The bioinertness and inferior osteogenic properties of CFRPEEK, however, limit its clinical application as orthopedic/dental implants. The present work aimed at developing a novel carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone-nanohydroxyapatite (PEEK/CF/n-HA) ternary biocomposite with micro/nano-topographical surface for the enhancement of the osteogenesis as a potential bioactive material for bone grafting and bone tissue-engineering applications. The combined modification of oxygen plasma and sand-blasting could improve the hydrophily and generate micro/nano-topographical structures on the surface of the CFRPEEK-based ternary biocomposite. The results clearly showcased that the micro-/nano-topographical PEEK/n-HA/CF ternary biocomposite demonstrated the outstanding ability to promote the proliferation and differentiation of MG-63 cells in vitro as well as to boost the osseointegration between implant and bone in vivo, thereby boding well application to bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterizing the self-sensing performance of carbon nanotube-enhanced fiber-reinforced polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola, Bryan R.; La Saponara, Valeria; Loh, Kenneth J.

    2010-04-01

    The increased usage of fiber-reinforced polymers (FRP) in recent decades has created a need to monitor the unique response of these materials to impact and fatigue damage. As most traditional nondestructive evaluation methods are illsuited to detecting damage in FRPs, new methods must be created without compromising the high strength-to-weight aspects of FRPs. This paper describes the characterization of carbon nanotube-polyelectrolyte thin films applied to glass fiber substrates as a means for in situ strain sensing in glass fiber-reinforced polymers (GFRP). The layer-by-layer deposition process employed is capable of depositing individual and small bundles of carbon nanotubes within a polyelectrolyte matrix and directly onto glass fiber matrices. Upon film fabrication, the nanocomposite-coated GFRP specimens are mounted in a load frame for characterizing their electromechanical performance. This preliminary results obtained from this study has shown that these thin films exhibit bilinear piezoresistivity. Time- and frequency-domain techniques are utilized to characterize the nanocomposite strain sensing response. An equivalent circuit is also derived from electrical impedance spectroscopic analysis of thin film specimens.

  2. Enhancement of osteogenesis on micro/nano-topographical carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone–nanohydroxyapatite biocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Anxiu [College of Stomatology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases and Biomedical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China); Liu, Xiaochen [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gao, Xiang; Deng, Feng [College of Stomatology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases and Biomedical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China); Deng, Yi, E-mail: 18210357357@163.com [College of Stomatology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases and Biomedical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China); Wei, Shicheng, E-mail: weishicheng99@163.com [College of Stomatology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases and Biomedical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 401147 (China)

    2015-03-01

    As an FDA-approved implantable material, carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) possesses excellent mechanical properties similar to those of human cortical bone and is a prime candidate to replace conventional metallic implants. The bioinertness and inferior osteogenic properties of CFRPEEK, however, limit its clinical application as orthopedic/dental implants. The present work aimed at developing a novel carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone–nanohydroxyapatite (PEEK/CF/n-HA) ternary biocomposite with micro/nano-topographical surface for the enhancement of the osteogenesis as a potential bioactive material for bone grafting and bone tissue-engineering applications. The combined modification of oxygen plasma and sand-blasting could improve the hydrophily and generate micro/nano-topographical structures on the surface of the CFRPEEK-based ternary biocomposite. The results clearly showcased that the micro-/nano-topographical PEEK/n-HA/CF ternary biocomposite demonstrated the outstanding ability to promote the proliferation and differentiation of MG-63 cells in vitro as well as to boost the osseointegration between implant and bone in vivo, thereby boding well application to bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel micro/nano-topographical PEEK/n-HA/CF ternary biocomposite was developed. • The modified PEEK biocomposite promotes proliferation and differentiation of cells. • In vivo osseointegration of the micro/nano-topographical PEEK/n-HA/CF was enhanced.

  3. Dynamic mechanical analysis and crystalline analysis of hemp fiber reinforced cellulose filled epoxy composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Palanivel

    Full Text Available Abstract The Dynamic mechanical behavior of chemically treated and untreated hemp fiber reinforced composites was investigated. The morphology of the composites was studied to understand the interaction between the filler and polymer. A series of dynamic mechanical tests were performed by varying the fiber loading and test frequencies over a range of testing temperatures. It was found that the storage modulus (E’ recorded above the glass transition temperature (Tg decrease with increasing temperature. The loss modulus (E” and damping peaks (Tan δ values were found to be reduced with increasing matrix loading and temperature. Morphological changes and crystallinity of Composites were investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM and XRD techniques. The composites with Alkali and Benzoyl treated fibers has attributed enhanced DMA Results. In case of XRD studies, the composites with treated fibers with higher filler content show enhanced crystallinity.

  4. Pembuatan Adhesive Bridge dengan Fiber Reinforced Composite untuk Perawatan Kehilangan dan Kegoyahan Gigi Anterior Rahang Bawah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demmy Wijaya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu perawatan kehilangan gigi anterior untuk tujuan estetis adalah dengan adhesive bridge. Fiber Reinforced Composite (FRC adalah bahan struktural yang terdiri dari 2 konstituen yang berbeda. Komponen penguat (fiber memberikan kekuatan dan kekakuan, sedangkan matriks (resin komposit mendukung penguatan. Bahan FRC dapat digunakan untuk pembuatan adhesive bridge dan juga dapat digunakan sebagai stabilisasi gigi yang mengalami kegoyahan. Adanya gigi pendukung yang sehat juga sangat membantu keberhasilan perawatan ini. Laporan kasus ini bertujuan untuk memberikan informasi tentang penatalaksanaan perawatan kehilangan dan kegoyahan gigi anterior rahang bawah menggunakan FRC. Seorang pasien laki-laki berusia 33 tahun datang ke klinik Prostodonsia RSGM Prof. Soedomo ingin dibuatkan gigi tiruan. Pasien kehilangan gigi 31, gigi 32, gigi 41 dan mengalami kegoyahan derajat 2 disertai resesi gingiva. Kondisi tersebut akibat pasca pembuatan gigi tiruan di tukang gigi. Pasien tidak ingin giginya yang goyah dilakukan pencabutan. Tatalaksana kasus: pencetakan rahang untuk model diagnostik, pembuatan mock-up pontik gigi 31 pada model diagnostik, pembuatan index dengan mencetak bagian lingual dan 1/3 incisal menggunakan putty, preparasi gigi penyangga (gigi 32, 33, 41, 42, 43, pemasangan fiber dengan bantuan index putty, pembentukan bagian labial pontik dengan komposit, finishing dan polishing. Kesimpulan: Fiber reinforced composite dapat dipakai untuk pengelolaan pasien yang mengalami kehilangan dan kegoyahan gigi anterior rahang bawah. Adhesive Bridge of Fiber Reinforced Composite to Treat Tooth Missing and Luxation of Lower Anterior Teeth. One of the anterior tooth loss treatments for esthetic purposes is the adhesive bridge. Fiber Reinforced Composite (FRC is a structural material that consists of two different constituencies. Amplifier components (fiber provide strength and stiffness, while matrix (resin composite support reinforcement. FRC materials

  5. Modeling of Stress Development During Thermal Damage Healing in Fiber-reinforced Composite Materials Containing Embedded Shape Memory Alloy Wires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Warnet, Laurent; Akkerman, Remko; de Boer, Andries

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite materials are susceptible to damage development through matrix cracking and delamination. This article concerns the use of shape memory alloy (SMA) wires embedded in a composite material to support healing of damage through a local heat treatment. The composite material

  6. Shear Bond Strength between Fiber-Reinforced Composite and Veneering Resin Composites with Various Adhesive Resin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different laboratory resin composites bonded to a fiber-reinforced composite substrate with some intermediate adhesive resins. Mounted test specimens of a bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate (StickNet) were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Three types of commercially available veneering resin composites - BelleGlass®, Sinfony®, and GC Gradia® were bonded to these specimens using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group were stored for 24 hours; the remaining were stored for 30 days. There were 10 specimens in the test group (n). The shear bond strengths were calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed statistically, and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Shear bond values of those composites are influenced by the different bonding resins and different indirect composites. There was a significant difference in the shear bond strengths using different types of adhesive resins (p = 0.02) and using different veneering composites (p veneering composite to bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate is influenced by the brand of the adhesive resin and veneering composite. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  7. Bending Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composites Retainers Bonded with Spot-Composite Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francesca Sfondrini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic and periodontal splints are prepared with round or flat metallic wires. As these devices cannot be used in patients with allergy to metals or with aesthetic demands, fiber-reinforced composite (FRC retainers have been introduced. Stiffness of FRC materials could reduce physiologic tooth movement. In order to lower rigidity of conventional FRC retainers, a modified construction technique that provided a partial (spot composite coverage of the fiber has been tested and compared with metallic splints and full-bonded FRCs. Flat (Bond-a-Braid, Reliance Orthodontic Products and round (Penta-one 0155, Masel Orthodontics stainless steel splints, conventional FRC splints, and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers (Everstick Ortho, StickTech were investigated. The strength to bend the retainers at 0.1 mm deflection and at maximum load was measured with a modified Frasaco model. No significant differences were reported among load values of stainless steel wires and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers at 0.1 mm deflection. Higher strength values were recoded for conventional full-bonded FRCs. At maximum load no significant differences were reported between metallic splints (flat and round and experimental spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were reported between spot- and full-bonded FRC splints. These results encourage further tests in order to evaluate clinical applications of experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers.

  8. Solid Particle Erosion of Date Palm Leaf Fiber Reinforced Polyvinyl Alcohol Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti R. Mohanty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particle erosion behavior of short date palm leaf (DPL fiber reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA composite has been studied using silica sand particles (200 ± 50 μm as an erodent at different impingement angles (15–90° and impact velocities (48–109 m/s. The influence of fiber content (wt% of DPL fiber on erosion rate of PVA/DPL composite has also been investigated. The neat PVA shows maximum erosion rate at 30° impingement angle whereas PVA/DPL composites exhibit maximum erosion rate at 45° impingement angle irrespective of fiber loading showing semiductile behavior. The erosion efficiency of PVA and its composites varies from 0.735 to 16.289% for different impact velocities studied. The eroded surfaces were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM to understand the erosion mechanism.

  9. EFFECT OF WATER ABSORPTION ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES \\OF FLAX FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Huner

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Flax fiber reinforced epoxy composites were subjected to water immersion tests in order to study the effects of water absorption on the mechanical properties. Epoxy composites specimens containing 0, 1, 5 and 10% fiber weight were prepared. Water absorption tests were conducted by immersing specimens in a de-ionized water bath at 25 ­°C and 90 °C for different time durations. The tensile and flexural properties of water immersed specimens subjected to both aging conditions were evaluated and compared alongside dry composite specimens. The percentage of moisture uptake increased as the fiber volume fraction increased due to the high cellulose content. The tensile and flexural properties of reinforced epoxy specimens were found to decrease with increase in percentage moisture uptake. Moisture induced degradation of composite samples was significant at elevated temperature.

  10. Matrix free fiber reinforced polymeric composites via high-temperature high-pressure sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao

    2004-11-01

    A novel manufacturing process called high-temperature high-pressure sintering was studied and explored. Solid fiber reinforced composites are produced by consolidating and compacting layers of polymeric fabrics near their melting temperature under high pressure. There is no need to use an additional matrix as a bonding material. Partial melting and recrystallization of the fibers effectively fuse the material together. The product is called a "matrix free" fiber reinforced composite and essentially a one-polymer composite in which the fiber and the matrix have the same chemical composition. Since the matrix is eliminated in the process, it is possible to achieve a high fiber volume fraction and light weight composite. Interfacial adhesion between fibers and matrix is very good due to the molecular continuity throughout the system and the material is thermally shapeable. Plain woven Spectra RTM cloth made of SpectraRTM fiber was used to comprehensively study the process. The intrinsic properties of the material demonstrate that matrix free SpectraRTM fiber reinforced composites have the potential to make ballistic shields such as body armor and helmets. The properties and structure of the original fiber and the cloth were carefully examined. Optimization of the processing conditions started with the probing of sintering temperatures by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Coupled with the information from structural, morphological and mechanical investigations on the samples sintered at different processing conditions, the optimal processing windows were determined to ensure that the outstanding original properties of the fibers translate into high ballistic performance of the composites. Matrix free SpectraRTM composites exhibit excellent ballistic resistance in the V50 tests conducted by the US Army. In the research, process-structure-property relationship is established and correlations between various properties and structures are understood. Thorough knowledge is

  11. Multi-response parametric optimization in drilling of bamboo/Kevlar fiber reinforced sandwich composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Thingujam Jackson; Samanta, Sutanu

    2016-09-01

    In the present work an attempt was made towards parametric optimization of drilling bamboo/Kevlar K29 fiber reinforced sandwich composite to minimize the delamination occurred during the drilling process and also to maximize the tensile strength of the drilled composite. The spindle speed and the feed rate of the drilling operation are taken as the input parameters. The influence of these parameters on delamination and tensile strength of the drilled composite studied and analysed using Taguchi GRA and ANOVA technique. The results show that both the response parameters i.e. delamination and tensile strength are more influenced by feed rate than spindle speed. The percentage contribution of feed rate and spindle speed on response parameters are 13.88% and 81.74% respectively.

  12. Modeling of the mechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites using finite element method (FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of the mechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC is presented by the example of Al2O3 fibers in an alumina based matrix. The starting point of the modeling is a substructure (elementary cell which includes on a micromechanical scale the statistical properties of the fiber, matrix and fiber-matrix interface and their interactions. The numerical evaluation of the model is accomplished by means of the finite element method. The numerical results of calculating the elastic modulus of the composite dependance on the quantity of the fibers added and porosity was compared to experimental values of specimens having the same composition. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON174004 i TVH to project III45012

  13. Prediction of Tensile Strength of Nano-short-fiber-reinforced Rubber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Da Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tensile strength of nano-short-fiber-reinforced rubber composites (NFRC was studied. A new model for predicting the tensile strength of NFRC was put forward based on the mixture law. The influences of the volume content and mechanical performances of main components, short fiber critical aspect ratio, short fiber length and orientation distributions on the tensile strength of composites were investigated. The tensile strengths predicted by the model in this paper are in good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the mechanism of tensile fracture of SFRE was discussed. It is found that the tensile fracture of the composites depends largely on the bonding strength of fiber-matrix interface and the length of reinforcing short fibers.

  14. Esthetic treatment of a periodontal patient with prefabricated composite veneers and fiber-reinforced composite: clinical considerations and technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The advances in periodontal therapy and the clinical success of adhesive dentistry have changed the way dentists treat periodontal patients. As more teeth are saved, the demand for functional and esthetic restoration of periodontally involved teeth grows. Once, these teeth were restored with full-coverage splinted restorations, whereas today, adhesive techniques provide less invasive and less complicated treatment options. This paper presents a novel adhesive combination of fiber-reinforced composite and prefabricated composite veneers to restore function and esthetics in a periodontal patient with severe bone and attachment loss. After successful completion of the periodontal treatment, fiber-reinforced composite has been bonded to the buccal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth in order to control teeth mobility. At the same appointment, prefabricated composite veneers have been bonded to the splinted teeth in order to restore esthetics. The final result shows full integration of contemporary adhesive techniques for single-appointment, minimally invasive treatment of a periodontal patient. This paper describes the use of fiber-reinforced composite and prefabricated composite veneers for the treatment of severe periodontal patients with a minimally invasive, single-appointment technique. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. An in vitro comparative evaluation of fracture resistance of custom made, metal, glass fiber reinforced and carbon reinforced posts in endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkesriya, Subhash; Olekar, Santosh T; Saravanan, V; Somasunderam, P; Chauhan, Rashmi Singh; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap

    2015-05-01

    Posts are used to enhance crown buildup in pulpless teeth with destructed crown portion. Different types of post are used in endodontically treated teeth. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate fracture resistance of custom made, metal, glass fiber reinforced and carbon reinforced posts in endodontically treated teeth. An in vitro study was carried out on extracted 40 human maxillary central incisor teeth, which was divided into four groups with 10 samples in each group with custom made, metal post, glass fiber reinforced, and carbon reinforced posts. The samples were decoronated at cemento-enamel junction and endodontically treated. Post space was prepared and selected posts were cemented. The composite cores were prepared at the height of 5 mm and samples mounted on acrylic blocks. Later fracture resistance to the compressive force of samples was measured using Universal Testing Machine. The maximum resistance to the compressive force was observed in carbon reinforced and glass fiber reinforced posts compared others which is statistically significant (P > 0.001) and least was seen in custom fabricated post. It is concluded that carbon reinforced fiber post and glass fiber posts showed good fracture resistance compared to custom made and metal posts.

  16. On complexities of impact simulation of fiber reinforced polymer composites: a simplified modeling framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi-Ardakani, M; Milani, A S; Yannacopoulos, S

    2014-01-01

    Impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites is a complex and challenging task, in particular for practitioners with less experience in advanced coding and user-defined subroutines. Different numerical algorithms have been developed over the past decades for impact modeling of composites, yet a considerable gap often exists between predicted and experimental observations. In this paper, after a review of reported sources of complexities in impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites, two simplified approaches are presented for fast simulation of out-of-plane impact response of these materials considering four main effects: (a) strain rate dependency of the mechanical properties, (b) difference between tensile and flexural bending responses, (c) delamination, and (d) the geometry of fixture (clamping conditions). In the first approach, it is shown that by applying correction factors to the quasistatic material properties, which are often readily available from material datasheets, the role of these four sources in modeling impact response of a given composite may be accounted for. As a result a rough estimation of the dynamic force response of the composite can be attained. To show the application of the approach, a twill woven polypropylene/glass reinforced thermoplastic composite laminate has been tested under 200 J impact energy and was modeled in Abaqus/Explicit via the built-in Hashin damage criteria. X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the presence of delamination inside the impacted sample. Finally, as a second and much simpler modeling approach it is shown that applying only a single correction factor over all material properties at once can still yield a reasonable prediction. Both advantages and limitations of the simplified modeling framework are addressed in the performed case study.

  17. On Complexities of Impact Simulation of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites: A Simplified Modeling Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi-Ardakani, M.; Milani, A. S.; Yannacopoulos, S.

    2014-01-01

    Impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites is a complex and challenging task, in particular for practitioners with less experience in advanced coding and user-defined subroutines. Different numerical algorithms have been developed over the past decades for impact modeling of composites, yet a considerable gap often exists between predicted and experimental observations. In this paper, after a review of reported sources of complexities in impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites, two simplified approaches are presented for fast simulation of out-of-plane impact response of these materials considering four main effects: (a) strain rate dependency of the mechanical properties, (b) difference between tensile and flexural bending responses, (c) delamination, and (d) the geometry of fixture (clamping conditions). In the first approach, it is shown that by applying correction factors to the quasistatic material properties, which are often readily available from material datasheets, the role of these four sources in modeling impact response of a given composite may be accounted for. As a result a rough estimation of the dynamic force response of the composite can be attained. To show the application of the approach, a twill woven polypropylene/glass reinforced thermoplastic composite laminate has been tested under 200 J impact energy and was modeled in Abaqus/Explicit via the built-in Hashin damage criteria. X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the presence of delamination inside the impacted sample. Finally, as a second and much simpler modeling approach it is shown that applying only a single correction factor over all material properties at once can still yield a reasonable prediction. Both advantages and limitations of the simplified modeling framework are addressed in the performed case study. PMID:25431787

  18. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Lippo V J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-12-04

    OBJECTIVES.: The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS.: Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37 degrees C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS.: Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (pmaterials (pComposite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (pcomposite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion than commercial restorative materials.

  19. An analysis of delamination in angle-ply fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the mechanics and failure modes of delamination initiated from a surface flaw in angle-ply fiber-reinforced composites is presented. The analysis employs a hybrid-stress finite-element method including a crack-tip singular element with its field variables expressed by Muskhelishvili's complex stress functions. Solutions are obtained for the delaminated composites with various laminate parameters. The results elucidate unique and important characteristics of delamination crack-tip response and interlaminar stress transfer mechanisms. Of particular interest are the mixed-mode stress-intensity factors associated with the delamination crack. The influence of ply orientation on KI and KII and their effects on subsequent crack extension are discussed.

  20. An analysis of delamination in angle-ply fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical investigation of the mechanics and failure modes of delamination initiated from a service-induced surface flaw in angle-ply fiber reinforced composites is presented. The analysis employs a hybrid-stress finite element method including a crack-tip singular element with its field variables expressed by Muskhelishvili's complex stress functions. Solutions are obtained for delaminated composites with various laminate parameters. The results elucidate unique and important characteristics of delamination crack-tip response and interlaminar stress transfer mechanisms. Of particular interest are the mixed-mode stress intensity factors associated with the delamination crack. The influence of ply orientation on KI and KII and their effects on subsequent crack extension are discussed.

  1. A cell model for homogenization of fiber-reinforced composites: General theory and nonlinear elasticity effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aidun, J.B.; Addessio, F.L.

    1995-11-01

    The theoretical basis of the homogenization technique developed by Aboudi is presented and assessed. Given the constitutive relations of the constituents, this technique provides an equivalent, homogeneous, constitutive model of unidirectional, continuous-fiber-reinforced composites. The expressions that comprise the first-order version of the technique are given special attention as this treatment has considerable practical value. Nonlinear elasticity effects are added to it. This extension increases the accuracy of numerical simulations of high strain-rate loadings. It is particularly important for any dynamic loading in which shock waves might be produced, including crash safety, armor, and munitions applications. Examples illustrate that elastic nonlinearity can make substantial contributions at strains of only a few per cent. These contributions are greatest during post-yield inelastic deformation. The micromechanics-based homogenization technique is shown to facilitate use of an efficient approximate treatment of elastic nonlinearity in composites with isotropic matrix materials.

  2. Glass fiber reinforced composite resin as an intracanal post--a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Priya; Babu, K L Girish; Sunny, Raju

    2008-01-01

    Restoration of primary incisors, which have been severely damaged by early childhood caries or trauma, is a difficult task for the pediatric dentist. With the introduction of new adhesive systems and restorative materials, alternative approaches for treating these teeth have been proposed. Ten healthy children aged between 3-4 years who had 28 grossly destructed primary maxillary incisors requiring intra canal retention were selected for the study. Following root canal treatment, either a Glass Fiber Reinforced Composite Resin (GFRCR everStick,, Finland) or an omega shaped stainless steel wire were placed as intracanal posts in these teeth. Flowable composite was used for cementation of posts and also to build up the coronal structure using celluloid strip crowns. Both types of intracanal posts were evaluated for retention and marginal adaptation at 1, 6 and 12 months. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. GFRCR intracanal posts showed better retention and marginal adaptation than omega shaped stainless steel wire posts.

  3. Esthetic rehabilitation of single anterior edentulous space using fiber-reinforced composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Kim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A fiber-reinforced composite (FRC fixed prosthesis is an innovative alternative to a traditional metal restoration, as it is a conservative treatment method. This case report demonstrates a detailed procedure for restoring a missing anterior tooth with an FRC. A 44-year-old woman visited our department with an avulsed tooth that had fallen out on the previous day and was completely dry. This tooth was replanted, but it failed after one year. A semi-direct technique was used to fabricate a FRC fixed partial prosthesis for its replacement. The FRC framework and the pontic were fabricated using a duplicated cast model and nanofilled composite resin. Later on, interproximal contact, tooth shape, and shade were adjusted at chairside. This technique not only enables the clinician to replace a missing tooth immediately after extraction for minimizing esthetic problems, but it also decreases both tooth reduction and cost.

  4. Development of Rapid Pipe Moulding Process for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics by Direct Resistance Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazuto; Harada, Ryuki; Uemura, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutao; Kuwahara, Hideyuki

    To deal with environmental issues, the gasoline mileage of passenger cars can be improved by reduction of the car weight. The use of car components made of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) is increasing because of its superior mechanical properties and relatively low density. Many vehicle structural parts are pipe-shaped, such as suspension arms, torsion beams, door guard bars and impact beams. A reduction of the car weight is expected by using CFRP for these parts. Especially, when considering the recyclability and ease of production, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics are a prime candidate. On the other hand, the moulding process of CFRTP pipes for mass production has not been well established yet. For this pipe moulding process an induction heating method has been investigated already, however, this method requires a complicated coil system. To reduce the production cost, another system without such complicated equipment is to be developed. In this study, the pipe moulding process of CFRTP using direct resistance heating was developed. This heating method heats up the mould by Joule heating using skin effect of high-frequency current. The direct resistance heating method is desirable from a cost perspective, because this method can heat the mould directly without using any coils. Formerly developed Non-woven Stitched Multi-axial Cloth (NSMC) was used as semi-product material. NSMC is very suitable for the lamination process due to the fact that non-crimp stitched carbon fiber of [0°/+45°/90°/-45°] and polyamide 6 non-woven fabric are stitched to one sheet, resulting in a short production cycle time. The use of the pipe moulding process with the direct resistance heating method in combination with the NSMC, has resulted in the successful moulding of a CFRTP pipe of 300 mm in length, 40 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness.

  5. Reactive processing of textile-natural fiber reinforced anionic polyamide-6 composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Ze; Chen, Peng; Liu, Zhengying; Feng, Jianmin; Yang, Mingbo [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China)

    2015-05-22

    Nowadays natural fiber, used in reinforced composites, is widely concerned. However, no natural fiber reinforced reactive thermoplastic polymer grades had been prepared so far. Through our studies, it was demonstrated that there was a severe retardation and discoloration occurred in the reactive processing between anionic polyamide-6 (APA-6) and natural fiber, which result in incomplete polymerization when put together. In order to solve the problem, two methods were adopted in this paper, which are fiber pretreatment and usage of a new-style initiator called caprolactam magnesium bromide. The former is to remove sizing agent and impurities on the surface of fiber, and the latter is to weaken the side reactions between APA-6 and natural fiber by the nature of its lower reactivity and weaker alkaline. In cooperation with both methods, the severe retardation and discoloration had been improved significantly, so that the polymerization of APA-6 in natural fiber was occurred smoothly. Following textile-natural fiber reinforced APA-6 composites with an average thickness of 2.5 mm and a fiber volume content of 50% was prepared by vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). The soxhlet extraction, dilute solution viscometry and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) measurements respectively suggested the degree of conversion, viscosity-average molar mass and crystallization of composites was up to 94%, 11.3×104 and 50%. Remarkable improvement of mechanical properties were achieved through dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), tensile and three-point bending test. Favorable interfacial adhesion and wettability were revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. Therefore, all of the above good performance make this new-style and environmentally friendly composites have broad application prospects.

  6. Fracture strength of direct surface-retained fixed partial dentures : Effect of fiber reinforcement versus the use of particulate filler composites only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumbuloglu, Ovul; Ozcan, Mutlu; User, Atilla

    This study compared the fracture strengths and analyzed the failure types of direct, surface-retained, anterior fixed-partial-dentures (FPD), reinforced with four types of fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) versus non-fiber-reinforced FPDs made of three particulate filler composites (PFC). To this

  7. Effects of Interface Modification on Mechanical Behavior of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1997-01-01

    Unidirectional celsian matrix composites having approx. 42 volume percent of uncoated or BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers were tested in three-point bend at room temperature. The uncoated fiber-reinforced composites showed catastrophic failure with strength of 210 +/- 35 MPa and a flat fracture surface. In contrast, composites reinforced with BN/SiC-coated fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout. Values of first matrix cracking stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01 %, respectively, with ultimate strength as high as 960 MPa. The elastic Young's modulus of the uncoated and BN/SiC-coated fiber-reinforced composites were measured as 184 q 4 GPa and 165 +/- 5 GPa, respectively. Fiber push-through tests and microscopic examination indicated no chemical reaction at the uncoated or coated fiber-matrix interface. The low strength of the uncoated fiber-reinforced composite is probably due to degradation of the fibers from mechanical surface damage during processing. Because both the coated and uncoated fiber reinforced composites exhibited weak interfaces, the beneficial effect of the BN-SiC dual layer is primarily the protection of fibers from mechanical damage during processing.

  8. Highly Conductive Carbon Fiber Reinforced Concrete for Icing Prevention and Curing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Galao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the feasibility of highly conductive carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC as a self-heating material for ice formation prevention and curing in pavements. Tests were carried out in lab ambient conditions at different fixed voltages and then introduced in a freezer at −15 °C. The specimens inside the freezer were exposed to different fixed voltages when reaching +5 °C for prevention of icing and when reaching the temperature inside the freezer, i.e., −15 °C, for curing of icing. Results show that this concrete could act as a heating element in pavements with risk of ice formation, consuming a reasonable amount of energy for both anti-icing (prevention and deicing (curing, which could turn into an environmentally friendly and cost-effective deicing method.

  9. Strength Analysis of the Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Polymer Impeller Based on Fluid Solid Coupling Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbao Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-fiber reinforced polymer material impeller is designed for the centrifugal pump to deliver corrosive, toxic, and abrasive media in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The pressure-velocity coupling fields in the pump are obtained from the CFD simulation. The stress distribution of the impeller couple caused by the flow water pressure and rotation centrifugal force of the blade is analyzed using one-way fluid-solid coupling method. Results show that the strength of the impeller can meet the requirement of the centrifugal pumps, and the largest stress occurred around the blades root on a pressure side of blade surface. Due to the existence of stress concentration at the blades root, the fatigue limit of the impeller would be reduced greatly. In the further structure optimal design, the blade root should be strengthened.

  10. Oxygen-assisted multipass cutting of carbon fiber reinforced plastics with ultra-short laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Komlenok, M. S.; Konov, V. I. [Natural Sciences Center, General Physics Institute, Vavilov str. 38, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University, “MEPhI,” Kashirskoye shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Freitag, C. [Universität Stuttgart, Institut für Strahlwerkzeuge (IFSW), Pfaffenwaldring 43, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); GSaME Graduate School of Excellence Advanced Manufacturing Engineering, Nobelstrasse 12, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Onuseit, V.; Weber, R.; Graf, T. [Universität Stuttgart, Institut für Strahlwerkzeuge (IFSW), Pfaffenwaldring 43, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-03-14

    Deep multipass cutting of bidirectional and unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) with picosecond laser pulses was investigated in different static atmospheres as well as with the assistance of an oxygen or nitrogen gas flow. The ablation rate was determined as a function of the kerf depth and the resulting heat affected zone was measured. An assisting oxygen gas flow is found to significantly increase the cutting productivity, but only in deep kerfs where the diminished evaporative ablation due to the reduced laser fluence reaching the bottom of the kerf does not dominate the contribution of reactive etching anymore. Oxygen-supported cutting was shown to also solve the problem that occurs when cutting the CFRP parallel to the fiber orientation where a strong deformation and widening of the kerf, which temporarily slows down the process speed, is revealed to be typical for processing in standard air atmospheres.

  11. Comparison and Analysis on Mechanical Property and Machinability about Polyetheretherketone and Carbon-Fibers Reinforced Polyetheretherketone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijun Ji

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to compare the mechanical property and machinability of Polyetheretherketone (PEEK and 30 wt% carbon-fibers reinforced Polyetheretherketone (PEEK CF 30. The method of nano-indentation is used to investigate the microscopic mechanical property. The evolution of load with displacement, Young’s modulus curves and hardness curves are analyzed. The results illustrate that the load-displacement curves of PEEK present better uniformity, and the variation of Young’s modulus and hardness of PEEK both change smaller at the experimental depth. The machinability between PEEK and PEEK CF 30 are also compared by the method of single-point diamond turning (SPDT, and the peak-to-valley value (PV and surface roughness (Ra are obtained to evaluate machinability of the materials after machining. The machining results show that PEEK has smaller PV and Ra, which means PEEK has superior machinability.

  12. Highly Conductive Carbon Fiber Reinforced Concrete for Icing Prevention and Curing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galao, Oscar; Bañón, Luis; Baeza, Francisco Javier; Carmona, Jesús; Garcés, Pedro

    2016-04-12

    This paper aims to study the feasibility of highly conductive carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) as a self-heating material for ice formation prevention and curing in pavements. Tests were carried out in lab ambient conditions at different fixed voltages and then introduced in a freezer at -15 °C. The specimens inside the freezer were exposed to different fixed voltages when reaching +5 °C for prevention of icing and when reaching the temperature inside the freezer, i.e., -15 °C, for curing of icing. Results show that this concrete could act as a heating element in pavements with risk of ice formation, consuming a reasonable amount of energy for both anti-icing (prevention) and deicing (curing), which could turn into an environmentally friendly and cost-effective deicing method.

  13. Investigation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics Machining Using 355 nm Picosecond Pulsed Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Zhu, Dezhi

    2017-08-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) has been widely used in the aircraft industry and automobile industry owing to its superior properties. In this paper, a Nd:YVO4 picosecond pulsed system emitting at 355 nm has been used for CFRP machining experiments to determine optimum milling conditions. Milling parameters including laser power, milling speed and hatch distance were optimized by using box-behnken design of response surface methodology (RSM). Material removal rate was influenced by laser beam overlap ratio which affects mechanical denudation. The results in heat affected zones (HAZ) and milling quality were discussed through the machined surface observed with scanning electron microscope. A re-focusing technique based on the experiment with different focal planes was proposed and milling mechanism was also analyzed in details.

  14. Flexural properties of three kinds of experimental fiber-reinforced composite posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Joo; Jung, Won-Chang; Oh, Seunghan; Hattori, Masayuki; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka; Bae, Ji-Myung

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the flexural properties of three kinds of experimental fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts and to evaluate their potential use as posts. Experimental FRC posts were fabricated with glass, aramid, and UHMWP fibers. Commercial FRC posts were used for comparison. A three-point bending test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Experimental glass fiber posts showed significantly higher flexural strengths and moduli than aramid and UHMWP posts. Experimental UHMWP posts demonstrated superior toughness to the commercial posts. The glass fiber posts displayed stiff, strong and brittle features, while the UHMWP posts were flexible, weak and ductile. The flexural properties of the aramid posts fell between those of the glass and UHMWP posts. In conclusion, the glass fiber posts proved excellent in flexural strengths and moduli. However, the superior toughness of UHMWP fibers suggests the possibility of their use as posts in combination with glass fibers.

  15. Simulation of a Novel Joining Process for Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites and Metallic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, M.; Freund, A.; Vogel, C.; Kupfer, R.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a new joining technology to produce hybrid structures with continuous-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics and metallic components is presented adapting the concept of classical clinching for thermoplastic composites. To demonstrate the capability of the thermoclinching process, prototypic joints were manufactured using an experimental joining installation developed. Nondestructive and destructive analyses of the thermoclinched joints showed that a relocation of the reinforcement into the neck and head area of the joining zone could be achieved. For a first estimation of the maximum load-carrying capacity of the joints, single-lap specimens with both reinforced and nonreinforced thermoplastics were manufactured and tested, revealing up to 50% higher failure loads of the reinforced joints. To understand the local material configuration and to achieve a defined and adjustable fabric structure in the head area of the joint, further analyses with regard to material- and tool-side conditions of the joining zone are necessary.

  16. Interlaminar crack growth in fiber reinforced composites during fatigue, part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.; Wang, H. T.

    1981-01-01

    Interlaminar crack growth behavior in fiber-reinforced composites subjected to fatigue loading was investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the experimental phase, inter-laminar crack propagation rates and mechanisms were determined for the cases of various geometries, laminate parameters and cyclic stress levels. A singular hybrid-stress finite element method was used in conjuction with the experimental results to examine the local crack-tip behavior and to characterize the crack propagation during fatigue. Results elucidate the basic nature of the cyclic delamination damage, and relate the interlaminar crack growth rate to the range of mixed-mode crack-tip stress intensity factors. The results show that crack growth rates are directly related to the range of the mixed-mode cyclic stress intensity factors by a power law relationship.

  17. Glass-fiber reinforced composite in management of avulsed central incisor: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, M Yalçin; Kargül, Betül

    2004-01-01

    Reimplantation failure of avulsed anterior tooth in an adolescent patient requires removal of the failed tooth and consideration of restorative options. These options may include a removable partial denture, conventional 3-unit fixed partial denture, implant, or a resin-bonded appliance with a metal substructure (Maryland bridge). The glass-fiber reinforced composite material (everSTICK, StickTech Ltd, Turku, Finland) offers a restorative solution that is conservative and esthetic when compared to other restorations. Advantages include reduction of cost compared to conventional bridges, saving of time, elimination of second visit, ease of application, absence of metal allergy, ease of cleaning, and naturalness of feel. Its limitations include occlusal factors, and the presence of unsuitable abutment teeth. Another traditional contraindication is the presence of diastemas, which may limit the potential esthetic gains. This case of an 11-year-old girl, addresses the indications, preparation guidelines, and restorative procedures for an everSTICK bridge.

  18. Effects of metal- and fiber-reinforced composite root canal posts on flexural properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Hyeon; Oh, Tack-Oon; Kim, Ju-Young; Park, Chun-Woong; Baek, Seung-Ho; Park, Eun-Seok

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effects of different test conditions on the flexural properties of root canal post. Metal- and fiber-reinforced composite root canal posts of various diameters were measured to determine flexural properties using a threepoint bending test at different conditions. In this study, the span length/post diameter ratio of root canal posts varied from 3.0 to 10.0. Multiple regression models for maximum load as a dependent variable were statistically significant. The models for flexural properties as dependent variables were statistically significant, but linear regression models could not be fitted to data sets. At a low span length/post diameter ratio, the flexural properties were distorted by occurrence of shear stress in short samples. It was impossible to obtain high span length/post diameter ratio with root canal posts. The addition of parameters or coefficients is necessary to appropriately represent the flexural properties of root canal posts.

  19. Progressive Fracture of Laminated Fiber-Reinforced Composite Stiffened Plate Under Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsis, Pascalis K.; Abdi, Frank; Chamis, Christos C.; Tsouros, Konstantinos

    2007-01-01

    S-Glass/epoxy laminated fiber-reinforced composite stiffened plate structure with laminate configuration (0/90)5 was simulated to investigate damage and fracture progression, under uniform pressure. For comparison reasons a simple plate was examined, in addition with the stiffened plate. An integrated computer code was used for the simulation. The damage initiation began with matrix failure in tension, continuous with damage and/or fracture progression as a result of additional matrix failure and fiber fracture and followed by additional interply delamination. Fracture through the thickness began when the damage accumulation was 90%. After that stage, the cracks propagate rapidly and the structures collapse. The collapse load for the simple plate is 21.57 MPa (3120 psi) and for the stiffened plate 25.24 MPa (3660 psi).

  20. Apeksifikasi Menggunakan Mineral Trioxide Aggregate dan Restorasi Resin Komposit dengan Pasak Fiber Reinforced Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Ayu Tribumiana

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penulisan laporan kasus ini adalah untuk mengevaluasi penggunaan MTA (Mineral Trioxide Aggregate sebagai bahan apeksifikasi dan bleaching intrakoronal serta restorasi resin komposit dengan FRC (Fiber Reinforced Composite pada gigi insisivus sentralis kiri maksila, sehingga dapat mempertahankan dan mengembalikan fungsi gigi. Seorang pasien wan ita muda datang ke RSGM Prof. Soedomo untuk merawatkan gigi depan atas kiri yang patah ketika berusia 10 tahun. Diagnosa gigi insisivus sentralis kiri maksila fraktur Kelas III Ellis, pulpa nekrosis dengan lesi periapikal, apeks terbuka, dan diskolorasi. Prosedur perawatan diawali dengan preparasi saluran akar teknik konvensional, apeksifikasi menggunakan MTA dan bleaching intrakoronal teknik walking bleach. Restorasi resin komposit aktivasi sinar kavitas kelas IV dengan pasak FRC. Hasil evaluasi klinis dan radiografis setelah 3 bulan menunjukkan perbaikan lesi periapikal, warna restorasi resin komposit tidak berubah, bentuk dan kontur gigi baik, kerapatan tepi baik, dan pasien merasa puas dengan perawatan yang telah dilakukan. Fungsi gigi juga telah dapat dikembalikan, antara lain fungsi estetik dan fonetik.

  1. Fracture resistance of short, randomly oriented, glass fiber-reinforced composite premolar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the static load-bearing capacity of posterior composite crowns made of experimental composite resin (FC) with short fiber fillers and a semi-interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) matrix. In addition, we wanted to investigate how load-bearing capacity of surface composite resins was affected by substructures of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) and FC, and by different curing systems. Five groups of crowns were fabricated (n=6). The crowns were either polymerized with a hand-light curing unit (LCU) or cured in a vacuum curing device (VLC) before they were statically loaded at a speed of 1mm min(-1) until fracture. Failure modes were visually examined. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. ANOVA revealed that crowns made from the FC had a statistically significant higher load-bearing capacity than the control PFC composite. Crowns with FRC substructure and PFC covering gave force values of 348N (LCU) and 1199N (VLC), respectively, which were lower than the values of FC composite. No statistically significant difference was found between crowns made from plain FC composite and those made from FC composite with a surface layer of PFC (P=0.892 and 1.00). Restorations made from short glass fiber-containing composite resin with IPN-polymer matrix showed better load bearing capacity than those made with either plain PFC or PFC reinforced with FRC substructure.

  2. Effect of fiber volume fraction and length on the wear characteristics of glass fiber-reinforced dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, David J; Vaziri, Ashkan; Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the wear characteristics of fiber-reinforced dental composites. Variables under investigation include the fiber weight percent added to the matrix as well as fiber length. Dental specimens with glass fiber content of 2, 5.1, 5.7, and 7.6 wt% with fiber length of either 1.5 or 3 mm, were prepared by mixing an activated dental resin with commercial glass fibers. The specimens were then tested on a pin on disc setup, where the antagonist disc was manufactured of a similar fiber-reinforced composite with 5.1 wt% fiber and fiber length of 3 mm. The volume loss and coefficient of friction of the specimens was monitored periodically throughout testing. In addition, the wear surfaces of all specimens were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope. The specimens with 5.7 wt% fibers and fiber length of 3 mm performed better in this study compared to all other fiber-reinforced specimens under all load conditions. In fact, this specimen had a comparable wear rate to a particle-filled dental composite. For the fiber lengths considered, increasing the length of the fibers increased the wear resistance of the specimen. The coefficient of friction showed a good correlation with the wear resistance of specimens. Fiber-reinforced composites demonstrated a high resistance to wear and may therefore be advantageous for dental applications, where high wear resistance is essential to functionality.

  3. Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite piles used on pier rehabilitation, Little Diamond Island, Casco Bay, Portland, Maine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite piles were used on a pier rehabilitation project at : Little Diamond Island in Casco Bay near Portland Maine. The project was the replacement : of an aging wooden pier at the ferry berthing terminal. The FRP p...

  4. Fracture behavior of structurally compromised non-vital maxillary premolars restored using experimental fiber reinforced composite crowns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Kreulen, C.M.; Bell-Ronnlof, A.M. Le; Lassila, L.V.; Vallittu, P.K.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the fracture behavior of direct resin composite crowns with or without experimental fiber reinforcement. METHODS: Clinical crowns of single-rooted maxillary premolars were cut off at the cemento-enamel junction. Canals were prepared with Gates Glidden drills up to size 4. No

  5. Five-year survival of 3-unit fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures in the anterior area.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heumen, C.C.M. van; Dijken, J.W.V. van; Tanner, J.; Pikaar, R.; Lassila, L.V.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Vallittu, P.K.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of 3-unit anterior fixed partial dentures (FPDs) made of fiber-reinforced resin composite (FRC), and to identify design factors influencing the survival rate. METHODS: 52 patients (26 females, 26 males) received 60

  6. Fracture strength and bending of all-ceramic and fiber-reinforced composites in inlay-retained fixed partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Saridag

    2012-06-01

    Conclusions: Zirconia-based ceramic inlay-retained fixed partial dentures demonstrated the highest fracture strength. The fiber-reinforced composite inlay-retained fixed partial dentures demonstrated higher bending values than did the all-ceramic inlay-retained fixed partial dentures.

  7. Blood and fibroblast responses to thermoset BisGMA-TEGDMA/glass fiber-reinforced composite implants in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdulmajeed, A.A.; Walboomers, X.F.; Massera, J.; Kokkari, A.K.; Vallittu, P.K.; Narhi, T.O.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This in vitro study was designed to evaluate both blood and human gingival fibroblast responses on fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) aimed to be used as oral implant abutment material. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two different types of substrates were investigated: (a) Plain polymer (BisGMA

  8. Curaua fiber reinforced high-density polyethylene composites: effect of impact modifier and fiber loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Albano de Morais

    Full Text Available Abstract Short fibers are used in thermoplastic composites to increase their tensile and flexural resistance; however, it often decreases impact resistance. Composites with short vegetal fibers are not an exception to this behavior. The purpose of this work is to produce a vegetal fiber reinforced composite with improved tensile and impact resistance in relation to the polymer matrix. We used poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate, EVA, to recover the impact resistance of high density polyethylene, HDPE, reinforced with Curauá fibers, CF. Blends and composites were processed in a corotating twin screw extruder. The pure polymers, blends and composites were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, tensile mechanical properties and Izod impact resistance. EVA used as impact modifier in the HDPE matrix exhibited a co-continuous phase and in the composites the fibers were homogeneously dispersed. The best combination of mechanical properties, tensile, flexural and impact, were obtained for the formulations of composites with 20 wt. % of CF and 20 to 40 wt. % of EVA. The composite prepared with 20 wt. % EVA and containing 30 wt. % of CF showed impact resistance comparable to pure HDPE and improved tensile and flexural mechanical properties.

  9. Experimental Investigation on the Durability of Glass Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites Containing Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwen Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoclay layers incorporated into polymer/clay nanocomposites can inhibit the harmful penetration of water and chemicals into the material, and thus the durability of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP composites should be enhanced by using polymer/clay nanocomposite as the matrix material. In this study, 1.5 wt% vinyl ester (VE/organoclay and 2 wt% epoxy (EP/organoclay nanocomposites were prepared by an in situ polymerization method. The dispersion states of clay in the nanocomposites were studied by performing XRD analysis. GFRP composites were then fabricated with the prepared 1.5 wt% VE/clay and 2.0 wt% EP/clay nanocomposites to investigate the effects of a nanocomposite matrix on the durability of GFRP composites. The durability of the two kinds of GFRP composites was characterized by monitoring tensile properties following degradation of GFRP specimens aged in water and alkaline solution at 60°C, and SEM was employed to study fracture behaviors of aged GFRP composites under tension. The results show that tensile properties of the two types of GFRP composites with and without clay degrade significantly with aging time. However, the GFRP composites with nanoclay show a lower degradation rate compared with those without nanoclay, supporting the aforementioned hypothesis. And the modification of EP/GFRP enhanced the durability more effectively.

  10. THE EFFECT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE ON THE POROSITY AND COMPRESSiVE STRENGTH ON THE CARBON FIBER REINFORCED LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    DEMİREL, Bahar; GÖNEN, Tahir

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the effect of high temperature on the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber reinforced lightweight concrete with silica fume was investigated. With this aim, lightweight concrete samples were produced by using basaltic pumice (scoria) obtained from Elazig region. In addition, the samples produced with and without silica fume and carbon fiber. Silica fume was replaced 10 % by weight of cement and carbon fiber was added 0.5 % by weight of cement. Four different series of samp...

  11. Vibration and Damping Analysis of Composite Fiber Reinforced Wind Blade with Viscoelastic Damping Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Hong Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials are increasingly used in wind blade because of their superior mechanical properties such as high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratio. This paper presents vibration and damping analysis of fiberreinforced composite wind turbine blade with viscoelastic damping treatment. The finite element method based on full layerwise displacement theory was employed to analyze the damping, natural frequency, and modal loss factor of composite shell structure. The lamination angle was considered in mathematical modeling. The curved geometry, transverse shear, and normal strains were exactly considered in present layerwise shell model, which can depict the zig-zag in-plane and out-of-plane displacements. The frequency response functions of curved composite shell structure and wind blade were calculated. The results show that the damping ratio of viscoelastic layer is found to be very sensitive to determination of magnitude of composite structures. The frequency response functions with variety of thickness of damping layer were investigated. Moreover, the natural frequency, modal loss factor, and mode shapes of composite fiber reinforced wind blade with viscoelastic damping control were calculated.

  12. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  13. Fabrication and evaluation of mechanical properties of alkaline treated sisal/hemp fiber reinforced hybrid composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesha Gupta, N. S.; Akash; Sreenivasa Rao, K. V.; kumar, D. S. Arun

    2016-09-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite have acquired a dominant place in variety of applications because of higher specific strength and modulus, the plant based natural fiber are partially replacing currently used synthetic fiber as reinforcement for polymer composites. In this research work going to develop a new material which posses a strength to weight ratio that for exceed any of the present material. The hybrid composite sisal/hemp reinforced with epoxy matrix has been developed by compression moulding technique according to ASTM standards. Sodium hydroxide (NAOH) was used as alkali for treating the fibers. The amount of reinforcement was varied from 10% to 50% in steps of 10%. Prepared specimens were examined for mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength, and hardness. Hybrid composite with 40wt% sisal/hemp fiber were found to posses higher strength (tensile strength = 53.13Mpa and flexural strength = 82.07Mpa) among the fabricated hybrid composite specimens. Hardness value increases with increasing the fiber volume. Morphological examinations are carried out to analyze the interfacial characteristics, internal structure and fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope.

  14. Au ion irradiation of various silicon carbide fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaâbane, Nihed, E-mail: nihed.chaabane@cea.fr [CEA, INSTN/UEPTN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Flem, Marion Le [CEA, DEN/DMN/SRMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tanguy, Morgane [CEA, INSTN/UEPTN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Urvoy, Stéphane [CEA, DEN/DMN/SRMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sandt, Christophe; Dumas, Paul [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Serruys, Yves [CEA, DEN/DMN/SRMP, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-08-15

    Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites are promising candidates as fuel cladding for several concepts of Generation IV reactors and as structural materials for fusion reactors. The composites used in this study were composed of a SiC matrix obtained by chemical vapor infiltration associated with various fiber types (Tyranno Type-S, Tyranno SA Grade-3 and Hi-Nicalon Type-S) and with a PyC layer as the interphase. 12 MeV Au ions were used for irradiation up to 0.05 and 1 displacement per atom (dpa) fluences at room temperature and 800 °C. Analysis of both microstructure and composition of composites were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis and Raman spectroscopy. At room temperature and low fluence, Raman spectroscopy results showed that irradiation induces a disordered/distorted state into fibers and matrix. With increasing fluence, a total amorphization of these constituents occurs. The increase in the irradiation temperature leads to a damage recovery and partial recrystallization of samples. Image analysis performed from SEM micrographs highlights no significant change in fiber diameter and shape. However, SEM analysis suggests a longitudinal shrinkage of Tyranno Type-S fibers for the composite irradiated at 1 dpa at room temperature and 800 °C. These results are in complete agreement with conclusions from neutron irradiations suggesting an appropriate relevance of irradiations with 12 MeV Au.

  15. Effect of fiber reinforcement on thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated the thermooxidative behavior of polymer matrix composites. Two significant observations have been made from these research efforts: (1) fiber reinforcement has a significant effect on composite thermal stability; and (2) geometric effects must be considered when evaluating thermal aging data. The polyimide PMR-15 was the matrix material used in these studies. The control composite material was reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fiber. T-4OR graphite fibers, along with some very stable ceramic fibers were selected as reinforcing fibers because of their high thermal stability. The ceramic fibers were Nicalon (silicon carbide) and Nextel 312 (alumina-silica-boron oxide). The mechanical properties of the two graphite fiber composites were significantly different, probably owing to variations in interfacial bonding between the fibers and the polyimide matrix. Three oxidation mechanisms were observed: (1) the preferential oxidation of the Celion 6000 fiber ends at cut surfaces, leaving a surface of matrix material with holes where the fiber ends were originally situated; (2) preferential oxidation of the composite matrix; and (3) interfacial degradation by oxidation. The latter two mechanisms were also observed on fiber end cut surfaces. The fiber and interface attacks appeared to initiate interfiber cracking along these surfaces.

  16. Optimization and Static Stress Analysis of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Composite Leaf Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luay Muhammed Ali Ismaeel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A monofiber reinforced composite leaf spring is proposed as an alternative to the typical steel one as it is characterized by high strength-to-weight ratio. Different reinforcing schemes are suggested to fabricate the leaf spring. The composite and the typical steel leaf springs are subjected to the same working conditions. A weight saving of about more than 60% can be achieved while maintaining the strength for the structures under consideration. The objective of the present study was to replace material for leaf spring. This study suggests various materials of hybrid fiber reinforced plastics (HFRP. Also the effects of shear moduli of the fibers, matrices, and the composites on the composites performance and responses are discussed. The results and behaviors of each are compared with each other and verified by comparison with analytical solution; a good convergence is found between them. The elastic properties of the hybrid composites are calculated using rules of mixtures and Halpin-Tsi equation through the software of MATLAB v-7. The problem is also analyzed by the technique of finite element analysis (FEA through the software of ANSYS v-14. An element modeling was done for every leaf with eight-node 3D brick element (SOLID185 3D 8-Node Structural Solid.

  17. Fiber Reinforced Polymer and Polypropylene Composite Retrofitting Technique for Masonry Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Muhammad Umair

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the current research work, an attempt is made to increase the seismic capacity of unreinforced masonry (URM structures by proposing a new composite material which can improve shear strength and deformation capacity of URM wall systems. Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP having high tensile and shear stiffness can significantly increase in-plane and out-of-plane strength of masonry walls, but, inherently, FRP strengthened wall systems exhibit brittle failure under extreme seismic loading. Polypropylene (PP-band is a low cost material with sufficient ductility and deformation capacity. Keeping in view the behavior of FRP and PP-band, a composite of FRP and PP-band is proposed for retrofitting of URM walls. Mechanical behavior of the proposed composite material is assessed by carrying out an in-plane diagonal compression test and an out-of-plane bending test on twenty-five 1/4-scaled masonry wall panels. Experimental plan for each panel, URM, PP-band retrofitted, FRP retrofitted and FRP + PP-band retrofitted masonry, is diagonal compression test and three-point bending test. Experimental results have determined that FRP + PP-band composite increased, not only the initial peak strength, but also the ductility, deformation capacity and residual strength of URM wall systems.

  18. Effect of Home Bleaching on Microleakage of Fiber-reinforced and Particle-filled Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Sharafeddin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching may exert some negative effects on existing composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of home bleaching on microleakage of fiber-reinforced and particle-filled composite resins. Materials and methods. Ninety class V cavities (1.5×2×3 mm were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 90 bovine teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=15 and restored as follows: Groups 1 and 2 with Z100, groups 3 and 4 with Z250, and groups 5 and 6 with Nulite F composite resins. All the specimens were thermocycled. Groups 1, 3 and 5 were selected as control groups (without bleaching and the experimental groups 2, 4 and 6 were bleached with 22% carbamide peroxide gel. All the samples were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours and then sectioned longitudinally. Dye penetration was evaluated under a stereomicroscope (×25, at both the gingival and incisal margins. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (α=0.05. Results. Statistical analyses revealed that bleaching gel increased microleakage only at gingival margins with Z250 (P=0.007. Moreover, the control groups showed a statistically significant difference in microleakage at their gingival margins. Nulite F had the maximum microleakage while Z250 showed the minimum (P=0.006. Conclusion. Microleakage of home-bleached restorations might be related to the type of composite resin used.

  19. The Impact Resistance of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Mehrdad Shokrieh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced composites are widely used instead of traditional materials in various technological applications. Therefore, by considering the extensive applications of these materials, a proper knowledge of their impact behavior (from low- to high-velocity as well as their static behavior is necessary. In order to study the effects of strain rates on the behavior of these materials, special testing machines are needed. Most of the research efforts in this feld are focused on application of real loading and gripping boundary conditions on the testing specimens. In this paper, a detailed review of different types of impact testing techniques and the strain rate dependence of mechanical and strength properties of polymer composite materials  are presented. In this respect, an attempt is made to present and summarize the methods of impact tests and the strain rate effects on the tensile, compressive, shear and bending properties of the fber-reinforced polymer composite materials. Moreover, a classifcation of the state-of-the-art of the testing techniques to characterize composite material properties in a wide range of strain rates are also given.

  20. Standard Test Method for Tensile Properties of Fiber Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1996-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the tensile properties of metal matrix composites reinforced by continuous and discontinuous high-modulus fibers. Nontraditional metal matrix composites as stated in also are covered in this test method. This test method applies to specimens loaded in a uniaxial manner tested in laboratory air at either room temperature or elevated temperatures. The types of metal matrix composites covered are: 1.1.1 Unidirectional - Any fiber-reinforced composite with all fibers aligned in a single direction. Continuous or discontinuous reinforcing fibers, longitudinal and transverse properties. 1.1.2 0/90 Balanced Crossply - A laminate composed of only 0 and 90 plies. This is not necessarily symmetric, continuous, or discontinuous reinforcing fibers. 1.1.3 Angleply Laminate - Any balanced laminate consisting of theta plies where theta is an acute angle with respect to a reference direction. Continuous reinforcing fibers without 0 reinforcing fibers (that is, (±45)ns, (±3...

  1. Radiation damage and thermal shock response of carbon-fiber-reinforced materials to intense high-energy proton beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Simos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study on the effects of energetic protons on carbon-fiber composites and compounds under consideration for use as low-Z pion production targets in future high-power accelerators and low-impedance collimating elements for intercepting TeV-level protons at the Large Hadron Collider has been undertaken addressing two key areas, namely, thermal shock absorption and resistance to irradiation damage. Carbon-fiber composites of various fiber weaves have been widely used in aerospace industries due to their unique combination of high temperature stability, low density, and high strength. The performance of carbon-carbon composites and compounds under intense proton beams and long-term irradiation have been studied in a series of experiments and compared with the performance of graphite. The 24-GeV proton beam experiments confirmed the inherent ability of a 3D C/C fiber composite to withstand a thermal shock. A series of irradiation damage campaigns explored the response of different C/C structures as a function of the proton fluence and irradiating environment. Radiolytic oxidation resulting from the interaction of oxygen molecules, the result of beam-induced radiolysis encountered during some of the irradiation campaigns, with carbon atoms during irradiation with the presence of a water coolant emerged as a dominant contributor to the observed structural integrity loss at proton fluences ≥5×10^{20}  p/cm^{2}. The carbon-fiber composites were shown to exhibit significant anisotropy in their dimensional stability driven by the fiber weave and the microstructural behavior of the fiber and carbon matrix accompanied by the presence of manufacturing porosity and defects. Carbon-fiber-reinforced molybdenum-graphite compounds (MoGRCF selected for their impedance properties in the Large Hadron Collider beam collimation exhibited significant decrease in postirradiation load-displacement behavior even after low dose levels (∼5×10^{18}

  2. Effect of the interfacial adhesion on the tensile and impact properties of carbon fiber reinforced polypropylene matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Leal Nogueira

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic composites have been applied in a wide variety of industrial products, showing recently a great potential to be used in aeronautical field. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the fiber/matrix interface of carbon fiber reinforced polypropylene-based matrices after tensile and impact tests and also to compare the mechanical test results of the manufactured laminates. The laminates were prepared by stacking carbon fiber fabric style Plain Weave (CF and films of four different polypropylene matrices, described as (a polypropylene-PP, (b polypropylene-polyethylene copolymer-PP-PE, (c PP-PE with an interfacial compatibilizer-AM1 and (d PP-PE containing an elastomeric modifier-AM2. The composites were processed using hot compression molding. The mechanical testing results showed that the CF-AM1 laminate family presented the lowest impact strength and the highest tensile strength values when compared to the other laminates. SEM analysis observations of both tensile and impact fractured specimens of the CF-PP/PE-AM1 specimens revealed a stronger fiber/matrix interface. The CF-PP/PE-AM2 laminate showed a lower tensile strength and higher impact strength values when compared to the CF-PP/PE-AM1 one. PP-PE and PP laminates presented the lowest impact strength values.

  3. Physical and Mechanical Characteristics of Kevlar Fiber-Reinforced PC/ABS Composites

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    Kuljira Sujirote

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the composites between polycarbonate (PC and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS alloy and Kevlar fiber were prepared. The flexural and tensile properties of PC/ABS alloy and its composites were determined using a universal testing machine. The synergistic behavior of flexural modulus was observed for all regions of PC contents, while the synergism of flexural strength and tensile strength were found in some PC contents. It was found that the optimum weight ratio of PC:ABS was 60:40. In the Kevlar Fiber-reinforced PC/ABS composite system at PC:ABS of 60:40, both flexural modulus and strength were increased with matrix contents. Additionally, the flexural strength drastically increased with the matrix content and then reached the maximum value of 167 MPa at the matrix content of 33.4 wt%. The results from peel test, water contact measurement, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM reveal that the interfacial adhesion between the Kevlar fiber and the polymer matrix could be improved by increasing the PC content in the matrix.

  4. High temperature deformation behavior of a stainless steel fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, A.S., E-mail: atef.hamada@suezuniv.edu.eg [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Metallurgy and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum & Mining Engineering, Suez University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Khosravifard, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz Branch, IAU, Box 71993-1, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kisko, A.P. [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Ahmed, E. [Metallurgy and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum & Mining Engineering, Suez University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Porter, D.A. [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2016-07-04

    Hot deformation behavior of stainless steel fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite and the associated microstructural changes have been investigated using compression tests in the temperature range 700–1000 °C and strain rate range 0.001–1 s{sup −1}. The metallographic observations by electron-backscattered diffraction revealed that dynamic recrystallization of stainless steel fibers is the dominant mechanism with inducing ultrafine-grained structures. Deformation bending and cracking through stainless steel fibers and the interfaces were observed to be the hot deformation-induced microstructural features in the concerned composite. The hot deformation behavior was modeled using the dislocation density based Bergstrom's equation which could be applied up to the peak strain. After the peak strain, Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation could successfully predict the hot flow stresses of the studied composite. At different test conditions (temperatures and strain rates), slight variations in Avrami exponent were observed which could be related to transition from cyclic to single peak recrystallization.

  5. Mechanical, Thermal Degradation, and Flammability Studies on Surface Modified Sisal Fiber Reinforced Recycled Polypropylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of surface treated sisal fiber on the mechanical, thermal, flammability, and morphological properties of sisal fiber (SF reinforced recycled polypropylene (RPP composites was investigated. The surface of sisal fiber was modified with different chemical reagent such as silane, glycidyl methacrylate (GMA, and O-hydroxybenzene diazonium chloride (OBDC to improve the compatibility with the matrix polymer. The experimental results revealed an improvement in the tensile strength to 11%, 20%, and 31.36% and impact strength to 78.72%, 77%, and 81% for silane, GMA, and OBDC treated sisal fiber reinforced recycled Polypropylene (RPP/SF composites, respectively, as compared to RPP. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC, and heat deflection temperature (HDT results revealed improved thermal stability as compared with RPP. The flammability behaviour of silane, GMA, and OBDC treated SF/RPP composites was studied by the horizontal burning rate by UL-94. The morphological analysis through scanning electron micrograph (SEM supports improves surface interaction between fiber surface and polymer matrix.

  6. Spot-Bonding and Full-Bonding Techniques for Fiber Reinforced Composite (FRC) and Metallic Retainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, Paola; Tessera, Paola; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Lassila, Lippo; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Fiber reinforced Composite (FRC) retainers have been introduced as an aesthetic alternative to conventional metallic splints, but present high rigidity. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate bending and fracture loads of FRC splints bonded with conventional full-coverage of the FRC with a composite compared with an experimental bonding technique with a partial (spot-) resin composite cover. Stainless steel rectangular flat, stainless steel round, and FRC retainers were tested at 0.2 and 0.3 mm deflections and at a maximum load. Both at 0.2 and 0.3 mm deflections, the lowest load required to bend the retainer was recorded for spot-bonded stainless steel flat and round wires and for spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were identified among them. Higher force levels were reported for full-bonded metallic flat and round splints and the highest loads were recorded for full-bonded FRCs. At the maximum load, no significant differences were reported among spot- and full-bonded metallic splints and spot-bonded FRCs. The highest loads were reported for full bonded FRCs. The significant decrease in the rigidity of spot-bonded FRC splints if compared with full-bonded retainers suggests further tests in order to propose this technique for clinical use, as they allow physiologic tooth movement, thus presumably reducing the risk of ankylosis. PMID:28976936

  7. Effect of Accelerated Aging on Color Change of Direct and Indirect Fiber-Reinforced Composite Restorations

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    Masomeh Hasani Tabatabaei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of artificial accelerated aging (AAA on color change of direct and indirect fiber-reinforced composite (FRC restorations.Materials and Methods: Direct (Z250 and indirect (Gradia composite resins were reinforced with glass (GF and polyethylene fibers (PF based on the manufacturers’ instructions. Forty samples were fabricated and divided into eight groups (n=5. Four groups served as experimental groups and the remaining four served as controls. Color change (∆E and color parameters (∆L*, ∆a*, ∆b* were read at baseline and after AAA based on the CIELAB system. Three-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used for statistical analysis.Results: Significant differences were found in ΔE, ΔL*, Δa* and Δb* among the groups after AAA (P<0.05. Most of the studied samples demonstrated an increase in lightness and a red-yellow shift after AAA.Conclusions: The obtained ∆E values were unacceptable after AAA (∆E≥ 3.3. All indirect samples showed a green-blue shift with a reduction in lightness except for Gradia/PF+ NuliteF.Keywords: Aging; Composite Resins; Color

  8. AE analysis of delamination crack propagation in carbon fiber-reinforced polymer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Jae; Arakawa, Kazuo [Kyushu University, kasuga (Japan); Chen, Dingding [National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China); Han, Seung Wook; Choi, Nak Sam [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Delamination fracture behavior was investigated using acoustic emission (AE) analysis on carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) samples manufactured using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). CFRP plate was fabricated using unidirectional carbon fiber fabric with a lay-up of six plies [+30/-30]6 , and a Teflon film was inserted as a starter crack. Test pieces were sectioned from the inlet and vent of the mold, and packed between two rectangular epoxy plates to load using a universal testing machine. The AE signals were monitored during tensile loading using two sensors. The average tensile load of the inlet specimens was slightly larger than that of the vent specimens; however, the data exhibited significant scattering due to non-uniform resin distribution, and there was no statistically significant different between the strength of the samples sectioned from the inlet or outlet of the mold. Each of the specimens exhibited similar AE characteristics, regardless of whether they were from the inlet or vent of the mold. Four kinds of damage mechanism were observed: micro-cracking, fiber-resin matrix debonding, fiber pull-out, and fiber failure; and three stages of the crack propagation process were identified.

  9. Definition of key sustainability performance indicators and multicriteria evaluation of recycling sector for carbon fiber reinforced polymers from the aerospace industry

    OpenAIRE

    Pillain, Baptiste

    2017-01-01

    The global consumption of carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) is constantly growing since the last decade, leading to the need to create a recycling sector able to manage the amount of carbon fibers currently consumed and representing the amount of waste to be treated in the future. This thesis focus on the creation of a methodology for evaluating the sustainability potential for the implementation of a carbon fiber reinforced plastics recycling (CFRP) sector. CFRP coming from the aeronaut...

  10. Modification of carbon fabrics by radio-frequency capacitive discharge at low pressure to regulate mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastics based on it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garifullin, A. R.; Krasina, I. V.; Skidchenko, E. A.; Shaekhov, M. F.; Tikhonova, N. V.

    2017-01-01

    To increase the values of mechanical properties of carbon fiber (CF) composite materials used in sports equipment production the method of radio-frequency capacitive (RFC) low-pressure plasma treatment in air was proposed. Previously it was found that this type of modification allows to effectively regulate the surface properties of fibers of different nature. This treatment method differs from the traditional ones by efficiency and environmental friendliness as it does not require the use of aggressive, environmentally hazardous chemicals. In this paper it was established that RFC low-pressure air plasma treatment of carbon fabrics enhances the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). As a result of experimental studies of CF by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy method it was proved that after radio-frequency capacitive plasma treatment at low pressure in air the oxygen-containing functional groups is grafted on the surface. These groups improve adhesion at the interface “matrix-fiber”.

  11. Technical features and criteria in designing fiber-reinforced composite materials: from the aerospace and aeronautical field to biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Antonio; Ronca, Dante; Russo, Teresa; D'Amora, Ugo; Chierchia, Marianna; De Santis, Roberto; Nicolais, Luigi; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Polymer-based composite materials are ideal for applications where high stiffness-to-weight and strength-to-weight ratios are required. From aerospace and aeronautical field to biomedical applications, fiber-reinforced polymers have replaced metals, thus emerging as an interesting alternative. As widely reported, the mechanical behavior of the composite materials involves investigation on micro- and macro-scale, taking into consideration micromechanics, macromechanics and lamination theory. Clinical situations often require repairing connective tissues and the use of composite materials may be suitable for these applications because of the possibility to design tissue substitutes or implants with the required mechanical properties. Accordingly, this review aims at stressing the importance of fiber-reinforced composite materials to make advanced and biomimetic prostheses with tailored mechanical properties, starting from the basic principle design, technologies, and a brief overview of composites applications in several fields. Fiber-reinforced composite materials for artificial tendons, ligaments, and intervertebral discs, as well as for hip stems and mandible models will be reviewed, highlighting the possibility to mimic the mechanical properties of the soft and hard tissues that they replace.

  12. Investigating the influence of alkalization on the mechanical and water absorption properties of coconut and sponge fibers reinforced polypropylene composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okikiola Ganiu AGBABIAKA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers are products made from renewable agricultural and forestry feedstock, which can include wood, grasses, and crops, as well as wastes and residues. There are two primary ways these fibers are used: to create polymers or as reinforcement and filler. Thermoplastic polymer may be reinforced or filled using natural fibers such as coir, sponge, hemp, flax, or sisal. This paper focused on the influence of alkalization (NaOH treatment on the mechanical and water absorption properties of selected natural fibers (coconut and sponge fibers reinforced polypropylene composites. In this study, coconut and sponge fiber were extracted from its husk by soaking them in water and was dried before it was cut into 10mm length. Those fibers were chemically treated with sodium hydroxide (NaOH in a shaking water bath before it was used as reinforcement in polypropylene composite. The reinforced polypropylene composite was produced by dispersing the coconut fibers randomly in the polypropylene before it was fabricated in a compression molding machine where the composite was produced. The fiber content used were; 2%wt, 4%wt, 6%wt, 8%wt and 10%wt. Tensile and flexural properties was observed from universal testing machine while water absorption test was carried out on the samples for seven (7 days. It was observed that the influence of NaOH treatment highly enhanced the Flexural and water absorption properties of sponge fiber reinforced polypropylene composites than coconut fiber reinforced composite samples.

  13. A Constitutive Formulation for the Linear Thermoelastic Behavior of Arbitrary Fiber-Reinforced Composites

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    Melek Usal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The linear thermoelastic behavior of a composite material reinforced by two independent and inextensible fiber families has been analyzed theoretically. The composite material is assumed to be anisotropic, compressible, dependent on temperature gradient, and showing linear elastic behavior. Basic principles and axioms of modern continuum mechanics and equations belonging to kinematics and deformation geometries of fibers have provided guidance and have been determining in the process of this study. The matrix material is supposed to be made of elastic material involving an artificial anisotropy due to fibers reinforcing by arbitrary distributions. As a result of thermodynamic constraints, it has been determined that the free energy function is dependent on a symmetric tensor and two vectors whereas the heat flux vector function is dependent on a symmetric tensor and three vectors. The free energy and heat flux vector functions have been represented by a power series expansion, and the type and the number of terms taken into consideration in this series expansion have determined the linearity of the medium. The linear constitutive equations of the stress and heat flux vector are substituted in the Cauchy equation of motion and in the equation of conservation of energy to obtain the field equations.

  14. Longitudinal and shear wave velocities in pure tungsten and tungsten fiber-reinforced tungsten composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. T.; Ando, S.; Coenen, J. W.; Mao, Y.; Riesch, J.; Gietl, H.; Kasada, R.; Hamaji, Y.; Ibano, K.; Ueda, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Longitudinal and shear wave velocities in pure tungsten and tungsten fiber-reinforced tungsten (Wf/W) composites were studied by laser ultrasonic measurements. The samples were produced from powders or powder/fiber mixtures by spark plasma sintering process. It was found that sintering temperature, as a processing parameter, has the largest effect. Higher sintering temperatures result in faster wave velocities. For example, longitudinal wave velocities and their standard deviations in sintered W at 1800 °C and 2000 °C were 4834 ± 53 m s-1 and 5043 ± 47 m s-1. In comparison, the average longitudinal wave velocity for a polycrystalline reference W was 5227 ± 5 m s-1. The values for Wf/W composites fall between the two sintered samples. However, the thicker Yttria (Y2O3) fiber/matrix interface resulted in faster wave velocities. The elastic moduli were calculated from the sound velocities using average density measurements. The standard relations for isotropic, homogeneous material were used. It was found that the shear, bulk, Young’s modulus are 80%-90% of the values for polycrystalline tungsten, while the temperature dependency from 25 °C to 450 °C is similar.

  15. Pengaruh komposisi beberapa glass fiber non dental terhadap kelarutan komponen fiber reinforced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariyani Faizah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of composition glass fiber non dental on water solubility of fiber reinforced composites. E glass fiber dental is one of the most used dental fibers in several applications in the dental  field. However, the available of E glass fiber dental in Indonesia is very limited. A variety of types of non-dental glass fiber material is easily found as the materials engineering. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of composition non dental glass fiber on the component solubility of FRC. The materials used in the research was E glass fiber dental (Fiber splint, Polydentia SA, Switzerland, composition A non-dental glass fiber (LT, China, composition B (CMAX, China, composition C (HJ, China, flowable composite (Charmfill Flow, Denkist, Korea and silane coupling agent (Monobond S, Ivoclair Vivadent, Liechtenstein. The subject was divided into 4 groups. Component solubility test was based on the ISO 4049. The result was then analyzed with one way ANOVA (α=0,05. The result of the research showed that on the average percentage of the solubility (%, the lowest was on the group of E glass fiber dental (0.476±0.03 and the highest was on the non dental glass fiber C (0.600±0.01. The result of the one way ANOVA test showed a significant difference between the compositiom fiber on the component solubility. The conclusion the research was that low content of Na2O K2O, CaO and MgO decreased the component solubility of FRC.

  16. Development and Evaluation of Novel Coupling Agents for Kenaf-Fiber-Reinforced Unsaturated Polyester Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaofeng

    Natural fibers are gaining popularity as reinforcement materials for thermoset resins over the last two decades. Natural fibers are inexpensive, abundant, renewable and environmentally friendly. Kenaf fibers are one of the natural fibers that can potentially be used for reinforcing unsaturated polyester (UPE). As a polymer matrix, UPE enjoys a 40% market share of all the thermoset composites. This widespread application is due to many favorable characteristics including low cost, ease of cure at room temperature, ease of molding, a good balance of mechanical, electrical and chemical properties. One of the barriers for the full utilization of the kenaf fiber reinforced UPE composites, however, is the poor interfacial adhesion between the natural fibers and the UPE resins. The good interfacial adhesion between kenaf fibers and UPE matrix is essential for generating the desired properties of kenaf-UPE composites for most of the end applications. Use of a coupling agent is one of the most effective ways of improving the interfacial adhesion. In this study, six novel effective coupling agents were developed and investigated for kenaf-UPE composites: DIH-HEA, MFA, NMA, AESO-DIH, AESO-MDI, and AESO-PMDI. All the coupling agents were able to improve the interfacial adhesion between kanaf and UPE resins. The coupling agents were found to significantly enhance the flexural properties and water resistance of the kenaf-UPE composites. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed all the coupling agents were covalently bonded onto kenaf fibers. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the composites revealed the improved interfacial adhesion between kanaf fibers and UPE resins.

  17. Development of a Staggered PCD End Mill for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjun Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a PCD (polycrystalline diamond end mill with a new staggered structure for the milling of CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastic. The magnitude and direction of cutting force is decreased and changed by side-edge re-configuration of the structure. The flute and insert pocket of the staggered PCD end mill are designed considering the tool’s stiffness and welding process. The milling process and machining defects of the staggered PCD end mill are analyzed, and the structural parameters of the staggered PCD end mill are determined. The staggered PCD end mill is fabricated by the process of wire cutting, NC (Numerical Control machining, high-frequency induction brazing, welding, grinding and passivation. Milling tests of multidirectional CFRP with the staggered PCD end mill is conducted on CNC (Computerized Numerical Control milling machine. The milling force is measured by a dynamometer. A range analysis of the numerical results of milling force is conducted after milling test, and the influence of milling parameters on milling force is analyzed. A regression model of the milling force is built and verified by experiment. The effects of fiber cutting angle on milling force are obtained through milling CFRP with different fiber orientation angles.

  18. Dual Function Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer in Simulated Pore Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hua Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical and electrochemical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP were investigated regarding a novel improvement in the load-carrying capacity and durability of reinforced concrete structures by adopting CFRP as both a structural strengthener and an anode of the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP system. The mechanical and anode performance of CFRP were investigated in an aqueous pore solution in which the electrolytes were available to the anode in a cured concrete structure. Accelerated polarization tests were designed with different test durations and various levels of applied currents in accordance with the international standard. The CFRP specimens were mechanically characterized after polarization. The measured feeding voltage and potential during the test period indicates CFRP have stable anode performance in a simulated pore solution. Two failure modes were observed through tensile testing. The tensile properties of the post-polarization CFRP specimens declined with an increased charge density. The CFRP demonstrated success as a structural strengthener and ICCP anode. We propose a mathematic model predicting the tensile strengths of CFRP with varied impressed charge densities.

  19. Hysteretic Behavior of Tubular Steel Braces Having Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Reinforcement Around End Net Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Haydaroğlu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an experimental investigation into the seismic retrofit of tubular steel braces using carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP members. CFRP retrofitting of net sections for compact tubes are proposed for delaying potential local net section failure. A total of almost full-scale three (TB-1, TB-2, and TB-3 compact steel tubular specimens were designed per AISC specifications, constructed, and cyclically tested to fracture. Retrofitted braces, when compared to the reference specimen, developed fuller hysteretic curves. Increase in cumulative hysteretic energy dissipation and the elongation in fracture life in the specimen retrofitted with CFRP plates and CFRP sheet wraps at net sections are observed during testing. This resulted in a maximum of 82.5% more dissipated energy for compact tube specimens. Also, this retrofit provided a longer experimental fracture life (maximum 59% more. Due to fracture initiation during the last cycles, significant reductions in strength and stiffness have been obtained. No significant change (maximum 10% in the brace stiffness was observed, which could be desirable in seismic retrofit applications. Pushover analysis per FEMA 356 for the bare specimen shows that FEMA does not represent actual brace behavior in the compression side although pushover and experimental results are in good agreement in the tension side.

  20. Influence of Tool Shape on Hole Clinching for Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Plastic and SPRC440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hun Lee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP is a lightweight material that can potentially replace structural steel components in automobiles. The hole-clinching process is a mechanical clinching technique for joining brittle or low-ductility materials, such as CFRP, with ductile materials. In this study, the influence of tool shape on the hole-clinching process for CFRP and SPRC440 was investigated using FE-analysis and experiments. The parameters of the tool shape investigated were the punch corner radius and the punch diameter. The geometrical interlocking shapes of hole-clinched joints were characterized by neck thickness and undercut. Based on the desired joint strength of 2.5 kN, hole-clinching tools were designed on the basis of the relationship between joint strength and geometrical interlocking. FE-analysis and hole-clinching experiments were performed with the designed hole-clinching tools to investigate the geometrical interlocking shape as well as joinability, including neck fracture, undercut, and hole expansion, resulting from changes in tool parameters. Joint strength was evaluated to verify the effectiveness of hole clinching by a single lap shear test.

  1. Flexural Strength of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Repaired Cracked Rectangular Hollow Section Steel Beams

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    Tao Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The flexural behavior of rectangular hollow section (RHS steel beams with initial crack strengthened externally with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP plates was studied. Eight specimens were tested under three-point loading to failure. The experimental program included three beams as control specimens and five beams strengthened with CFRP plates with or without prestressing. The load deflection curves were graphed and failure patterns were observed. The yield loads and ultimate loads with or without repairing were compared together with the strain distributions of the CFRP plate. It was concluded that yield loads of cracked beams could be enhanced with repairing. Meanwhile, the ultimate loads were increased to some extent. The effect of repair became significant with the increase of the initial crack depth. The failure patterns of the repaired specimens were similar to those of the control ones. Mechanical clamping at the CFRP plate ends was necessary to avoid premature peeling between the CFRP plate and the steel beam. The stress levels in CFRP plates were relatively low during the tests. The use of prestressing could improve the utilization efficiency of CFRP plates. It could be concluded that the patching repair could be used to restore the load bearing capacity of the deficient steel beams.

  2. Surface Quality of Staggered PCD End Mill in Milling of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjun Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Machined surface quality determines the reliability, wear resistance and service life of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP workpieces. In this work, the formation mechanism of the surface topography and the machining defects of CFRPs are proposed, and the influence of milling parameters and fiber cutting angles on the surface quality of CFRPs is obtained, which can provide a reference for extended tool life and good surface quality. Trimming and slot milling tests of unidirectional CFRP laminates are performed. The surface roughness of the machined surface is measured, and the influence of milling parameters on the surface roughness is analyzed. A regression model for the surface roughness of CFRP milling is established. A significance test of the regression model is conducted. The machined surface topography of milling CFRP unidirectional laminates with different fiber orientations is analyzed, and the effect of fiber cutting angle on the surface topography of the machined surface is presented by using a digital super depth-of-field microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM. To study the influence of fiber cutting angle on machining defects, the machined topography under different fiber orientations is analyzed. The slot milling defects and their formation mechanism under different fiber cutting angles are investigated.

  3. Detection of Bond Defects in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Strengthened Concrete Using Pulse Phase Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabry, Nehemiah James

    As externally bonded fiber-reinforced polymers (FRP) are finding regular use in the strengthening of existing concrete structures, common installation practices still allow for the likelihood of defects forming at the interface of these bond-critical systems. Though published guidelines exist to provide recommendations for handling this issue in the field, significant research is still needed to determine critical defects, their identification using rapid methods of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, and the effect of such defects on the overall performance. This dissertation examines the use of pulsed phase infrared thermography (PPT) as a method to determine the location, size and depth of bond defects in wet lay-up carbon FRP (CFRP) systems. A series of small scale, single lap shear pull-tests were also performed to examine the effect detectable defects have on the strength of the CFRP strengthened concrete joints. Environmental conditioning protocols, namely submersion and freeze-thaw cycles, were also subjected to a subsample of specimens in order to observe durability effects on ultimate loads and strains. Results from PPT inspection and structural tests were then compared to present an effective approach for monitoring and evaluation. Finally a set of conclusions were presented regarding PPT inspection and the criticality of defects found in CFRP strengthened concrete governed by the common debonding mechanism.

  4. Dual Function Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer in Simulated Pore Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Guo, Guanping; Wei, Liangliang; Zhu, Miaochang; Chen, Xianchuan

    2016-02-06

    The mechanical and electrochemical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) were investigated regarding a novel improvement in the load-carrying capacity and durability of reinforced concrete structures by adopting CFRP as both a structural strengthener and an anode of the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system. The mechanical and anode performance of CFRP were investigated in an aqueous pore solution in which the electrolytes were available to the anode in a cured concrete structure. Accelerated polarization tests were designed with different test durations and various levels of applied currents in accordance with the international standard. The CFRP specimens were mechanically characterized after polarization. The measured feeding voltage and potential during the test period indicates CFRP have stable anode performance in a simulated pore solution. Two failure modes were observed through tensile testing. The tensile properties of the post-polarization CFRP specimens declined with an increased charge density. The CFRP demonstrated success as a structural strengthener and ICCP anode. We propose a mathematic model predicting the tensile strengths of CFRP with varied impressed charge densities.

  5. Multilevel surface engineering of nanostructured TiO2 on carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Liu, Xuanyong; Qian, Shi; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Yuqin; Mei, Yongfeng; Chu, Paul K; Ding, Chuanxian

    2014-07-01

    As an implantable material, carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) possesses an adjustable elastic modulus similar to that of cortical bone and is a prime candidate to replace metallic surgical implants. However, the bioinertness and poor osteogenic properties of CFRPEEK limit its clinical application as orthopedic implants. In this work, titanium ions are introduced energetically into CFRPEEK by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal the formation of nanopores with the side wall and bottom embedded with ∼20 nm TiO2 nanoparticles on the CFRPEEK surface. Nanoindentation measurements confirm the stability and improved elastic resistance of the structured surfaces. In vitro cell adhesion, viability assay, and real-time PCR analyses disclose enhanced adhesion, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs). The multilevel structures on CFRPEEK also exhibit partial antibacterial activity to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Our results indicate that a surface with multifunctional biological properties can be produced by multilevel surface engineering and application of CFRPEEK to orthopedic and dental implants can be broadened and expedited based on this scheme. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Failure of a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer implant used for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Zeeshan; Jarzem, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Lumbar interbody fusion is a common procedure owing to the high prevalence of degenerative spinal disorders. During such procedures, carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) cages are frequently utilized to fill the void created between adjacent vertebral bodies, to provide mechanical stability, and to carry graft material. Failure of such implants can lead to significant morbidity. We discuss the possible causes leading to the failure of a CFRP cage in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Review of a 49-year-old woman who underwent revision anterior lumbar interbody fusion 2 years after posterior instrumentation and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at L4-L5 and L5-S1. The patient developed pseudarthrosis at the two previously fused levels with failure of the posterior instrumentation. Revision surgery reveled failure with fragmentation of the CFRP cage at the L5-S1 level. CFRP implants can break if mechanical instability or nonunion occurs in the spinal segments, thus emphasizing the need for optimizing medical management and meticulous surgical technique in achieving stability.

  7. Mechanical properties and fracture behavior of flowable fiber reinforced composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Lippo; Keulemans, Filip; Säilynoja, Eija; Vallittu, Pekka K; Garoushi, Sufyan

    2018-01-20

    The aim was to evaluate the effect of short glass-fiber/filler particles proportion on fracture toughness (FT) and flexural strength (FS) of an experimental flowable fiber-reinforced composite (Exp-SFRC) with two methacrylate resin formulations. In addition, we wanted to investigate how the fracture-behavior of composite restorations affected by FT values of SFRC-substructure. Exp-SFRC was prepared by mixing 50wt% of dimethacrylate based resin matrix (bisGMA or UDMA based) to 50wt% of various weight fractions of glass-fiber/particulate filler (0:50, 10:40, 20:30, 30:20, 40:10, 50:0wt%, respectively). FT and FS were determined for each experimental material following standards. Specimens (n=8) were dry stored (37°C for 2 days) before they were tested. Four groups of posterior composite crowns (n=6) composed of different Exp-SFRCs as substructure and surface layer of commercial particulate filler composite were fabricated. Crowns were statically loaded until fracture. Failure modes were visually examined. The results were statistically analysed using ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey's test. ANOVA revealed that ratio of glass-fiber/particulate filler had significant effect (p<0.05) on tested mechanical properties of the Exp-SFRC with both monomer systems. Exp-SFRC (50wt%) had significantly higher FT (2.6MPam1/2) and FS (175.5MPa) (p<0.05) compared to non-reinforced material (1.3MPam1/2, 123MPa). Failure mode analysis of crown restorations revealed that FT value of the substructure directly influenced the failure mode. This study shows that short glass-fibers can significantly reinforce flowable composite resin and the FT value of SFRC-substructure has prior importance, as it influences the crack arresting mechanism. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fracture Strength and Bending of Fiber-Reinforced Composites and Metal Frameworks in Fixed Partial Dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sadeghi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This in vitro study evaluated the fracture strength and bending amount of twotypes of fiber reinforced composite (FRC and cast metal frameworks used for fabrication of inlay fixed partial dentures (IFPDs.Materials and Methods: Seventy-two extracted first maxillary premolars and molars (36 each were embedded in acrylic resin to represent a missing of second maxillary premolar. FRC IFPDs were fabricated using Stick and Fiber-Braid fiber bundles and IFPDs using cast metal alloy (12 for each group. The specimens were stored for 2 weeks at 37°C(SD=1 in distilled water, thermocycled (5-55°C, x 2500 and statically loaded to fracture. The initial bending prior to fracture was evaluated. The data were analyzed using paired t-test and ANOVA test.Results: The fracture strength was significantly higher in the FRC groups (P<0.05; also, the fracture strength was significantly higher in Stick group than Fiber-Braid group (P<0.05. The amount of bending was significantly greater in the FRC groups (P<0.05. The amount of difference in bending between the two groups of FRC was not statistically significant.Conclusion: Within the limits of this in vitrostudy, the results suggest that the FRC IFPDs can be used as a conservative, esthetic alternative to the IFPDs with cast metal frameworks. The results of this study should be confirmed by long-term clinical investigations.

  9. Restorasi Resin Komposit dengan Pasak Fiber Reinforced Composite untuk Perbaikan Gigi Insisivus Sentralis Maksila Pasca Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mella Synthya Dewi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Latar belakang. Trauma pada gigi dapat menyebabkan injuri pulpa dengan atau tanpa kerusakan mahkota atau akar. Pulpektomi menjadi pilihan perawatan pada fraktur mahkota yang membutuhkan restorasi kompleks. Gigi pasca perawatan saluran akar biasanya telah kehilangan struktur jaringan keras yang cukup banyak sehingga membutuhkan retensi intrakanal berupa pasak untuk mendukung restorasi akhir. Pasak Fiber Reinforced Composite (FRG memiliki flexure dan fatigue strength yang lebih besar, modulus elastisitas yang mendekati dentin, kemampuan untuk membentuk monoblok (kompleks akar-pasak dalam saluran akar, dan meningkatkan estetik jika dibandingkan dengan pasak logam. Resin komposit memiliki warna dan translusensi yang menyerupai dentin dan email sehingga mampu menghasilkan estetik yang baik pada gigi anterior. Tujuan. Melaporkan restorasi resin komposit dengan pasak FRG untuk memperbaiki gigi insisivus sentralis maksila yang mengalami fraktur mahkota kompleks pasca trauma. Kasus dan penanganan. Perempuan 20 tahun, gigi insisivus sentralis kanan dan kiri maksila mengalami Fraktur Ellis klas III akibat kecelakaan. Gigi 11 pulpitis ireversibel dan gigi 21 nekrosis pulpa. Kedua gigi malposisi. Dilakukan pulpektomi atau perawatan saluran akar multi kunjungan. Resin komposit dengan pasak FRG customized digunakan sebagai restorasi akhir. Kesimpulan. Restorasi resin komposit dengan pasak FRG customized memberikan hasil yang memuaskan secara estetik dan fungsional untuk merestorasi gigi insisivus sentralis pasca trauma dan perawatan saluran akar.

  10. Parametric Study on Dynamic Response of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woraphot Prachasaree

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of high strength and stiffness to low self-weight ratio and ease of field installation, fiber reinforced polymer (FRP composite materials are gaining popularity as the materials of choice to replace deteriorated concrete bridge decks. FRP bridge deck systems with lower damping compared to conventional bridge decks can lead to higher amplitudes of vibration causing dynamically active bridge deck leading serviceability problems. The FRP bridge models with different bridge configurations and loading patterns were simulated using finite element method. The dynamic response results under varying FRP deck system parameters were discussed and compared with standard specifications of bridge deck designs under dynamic loads. In addition, the dynamic load allowance equation as a function of natural frequency, span length, and vehicle speed was proposed in this study. The proposed dynamic load allowance related to the first flexural frequency was presented herein. The upper and lower bounds’ limits were established to provide design guidance in selecting suitable dynamic load allowance for FRP bridge systems.

  11. Mechanical properties related to the microstructure of seven different fiber reinforced composite posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de la Peña, Víctor; Darriba, Iria L; Caserío Valea, Martín; Guitián Rivera, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the mechanical properties (bending strength and hardness) of seven different fiber reinforced composite posts, in relation to their microstructural characteristics. Two hundred eighty posts were divided into seven groups of 40, one group for each type of post analyzed. Within each group, 15 posts were subjected to three-point bending strength test, 15 to a microhardess meter for the Knoop hardness, and 10 to Scanning Electron Microscope in order to determine the diameter of the fibers and the percentage of fibers embedded in the matrix. To compare the flexural strength in relation to the type of fiber, matrix, and the hardness of the posts, a Kruskal-Wallis H test was used. The Jonckheere-Terpstra test was used to determine if the volume percent of fibers in the post influenced the bending strength. The flexural strength and the hardness depended on the type of fibers that formed the post. The lower flexural strength of a post could be due to deficient bonding between the fiber and the resin matrix. According to the results, other factors, besides the microstructural characteristics, may also influence the mechanical properties of the post. The feature that has more influence on the mechanical properties of the posts is the type of fiber.

  12. Can cement film thickness influence bond strength and fracture resistance of fiber reinforced composite posts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penelas, Alice Gonçalves; Piedade, Valery Martins; Borges, Ana Carolina Oliveira da Silva; Poskus, Laiza Tatiana; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes

    2016-05-01

    This study compared the influence of cement film thickness (CFT) on bond strength (BS) and fracture resistance (FR) of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts to root canal. One hundred bovine incisors were used for BS and FR analysis (n = 10) and distributed into five experimental groups according to FRC post diameters (WhitePost DC no. 0.5, no. 1, no. 2, no. 3, no. 4), leading to five different CFTs. The canals were prepared using drill no. 4 provided by the post manufacturer and irrigated with 2.5% NaOCl. After conditioning (24% H2O2/5 min) and silanization, posts were cemented with resin cement. BS was evaluated using push-out test and FR using the compression test at 45°. A stereomicroscope was used to measure CFT and to analyze failure pattern. BS data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Scheffé test for contrast (α = 0.05); FR data were subjected to one-way ANOVA. BS was significantly affected by CFT, as the most well-adapted post achieved the highest values (p post well adapted to the root canal results in higher BS values. Different CFTs did not influence the FR of teeth restored with FRC posts. The results indicate that post retention is improved when a well-adapted post is used, although this has not been critical to fracture resistance.

  13. Preparasi Minimal pada Pembuatan Gigi Tiruan Cekat dengan Fiber Reinforced Composite (FRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Ayat Santiko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dalam praktek sering kali dokter gigi dihadapkan pada pasien yang kehilangan gigi anterior dan ingin segera dibuatkan gigi tiruan karena alasan estetik. Gigi tiruan yang dibuat bisa berupa gigi tiruan sebagian lepasan (GTSL atau gigi tiruan cekat (GTC. Pada GTSL, adanya plat pada palatum menyebabkan rasa tidak nyaman, selain itu pasien setiap kali harus buka pasang gigi tiruan kembali sehingga cukup merepotkan. Oleh karena itu pada umumnya pasien ingin dibuatkan GTC dan hal ini memang sesuai dengan indikasi GTC. Hal yang menjadi pertimbangan pada pembuatan GTC adalah pengasahan permukaan gigi secara keseluruhan bila akan dibuat desain full crown. Pada perkembangan desain GTC ada desain yang disebut resin bonded bridge atau adhesive bridge yaitu GTC yang dibuat pada gigi abutment yang dipreparasi minimal pada bagian palatal saja dan dilekatkan secara mikromekanikal antara retainer sayap logam dan gigi yang telah dipreparasi. Pasien wan ita usia 22 tahun datang ke klinik Prostodonsia RSGM Prof Soedomo UGM karena kehilangan gigi insisif sentral kiri atas. Pada kasus ini dilakukan pembuatan GTC dengan bahan fiber reinforced composite (FRC. Pembuatan bridge dengan bahan FRC dapat dilakukan secara langsung dan tidak langsung. Pada makalah ini akan dibahas pembuatan bridge FRC secara tidak langsung yaitu dengan menggunakan gigi artlfisial komposit. Hasil menunjukkan estetis yang baik, kontrol setelah 2 bulan tidak ada perubahan warna dan pasien merasa puas dengan penampilannya, jaringan gingiva di sekitarnya normal.

  14. Clinical Success of Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin as a Space Maintainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirzioğlu, Zuhal; Çiftçi, Z Zahit; Yetiş, Ceylan Ç

    2017-03-01

    The early loss of deciduous molars is a frequently encountered problem in dentistry. Various space maintainer designs were developed to prevent the loss of the space. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term clinical performance and survival rates of fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRCR) as a space maintainer clinically. This study was designed on 44 children who had early missed deciduous molars. Space maintainers were prepared on plaster models of patients and fixed directly to the adjacent teeth. Survival rate and whether it causes any damage to adjacent teeth were examined clinically and radio-graphically for 24 months or until failure. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used for the statistical analyses. Overall, 16.2% of space maintainers were dislodged and accepted to be failed at the end of 12 months. At the 24-month control, 52.2% success was stated with the FRCR space maintainer and because of permanent tooth eruption, 31.8% of space maintainer were taken out. The mean duration of space maintainers was measured to be 14.8 ± 3.48 months. There was no statistical significance between survival time and gender, tooth number, localization, and measured space (p > 0.05). After all 24 months follow-up, as well as esthetic properties of FRCR space maintainer, their applicability in a single seance and strength against the forces are determined as the advantages of the technique. The FRCR space maintainers can be thought of as alternatives to metal space maintainers.

  15. Pasak Customized Fiber Reinforced Composite Indirect pada Gigi Incisivus Lateralis Kiri Atas dengan Dinding Saluran Akar yang Tipis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Prima Dewi Ayuningtyas Subroto

    2015-06-01

    restoration of a non vital post root canal treatment tooth with thin root canal walls using indirect customized fiber-reinforced composite post. A 27-year-old female patient with over instrumentation in root canal of the upper left lateral incisor was referred to the Department of Conservative Dentistry. The radiograph examination finds that there was a very thin wall of the remaining root canal structure. The restoration was carried out in 3 visits. In the first visit, post canal impression was obtained using double impression technique. Indirect customized fiber reinforced composite post was made in the mold using composite resin Premise Indirect (Kerr reinforced with fiber band (Construct, Kerr. The formed post and core were light cured for 20 seconds, and then refined by oven polymerization for 20 minutes. In the second visit, the post was inserted and crown impression was obtained using double impression technique. In the third visit, the jacket crown was inserted. The root canal treated tooth with remaining thin post canal wall could be restored with indirect customized fiber reinforced composite.

  16. Investigation of degradation products produced by recycling the solvent during chemical degradation of fiber-reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ucar, Hülya; Simonsen, Morten Enggrob; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2017-01-01

    Recycling of fiber-reinforced thermoset composites using chemical solvolysis has been investigated thoroughly in recent years, where solvents such as water, alcohols and ketones have been used. However, high costs are related to the use of organic solvents, decreasing the sustainability of the pr......Recycling of fiber-reinforced thermoset composites using chemical solvolysis has been investigated thoroughly in recent years, where solvents such as water, alcohols and ketones have been used. However, high costs are related to the use of organic solvents, decreasing the sustainability...... of the process. In this study, acetone has been used as the organic solvent. To increase the sustainability of the process, the solvent was recycled in eight consecutive batches using new glass fiber-reinforced composites in each recycling. No additional amount of acetone was added, resulting in a reduction...... of solvent consumption by 88%. It was found that the recycled solvent became increasingly more concentrated with degradation products from the epoxy resin and compounds produced by acetone aldol reactions. These degradation products promoted and enhanced the degradation of the composite. Among the compounds...

  17. Investigations on Void Formation in Composite Molding Processes and Structural Damping in Fiber-Reinforced Composites with Nanoscale Reinforcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeValve, Caleb Joshua

    Fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) offer a stronger and lighter weight alternative to traditional materials used in engineering components such as wind turbine blades and rotorcraft structures. Composites for these applications are often fabricated using liquid molding techniques, such as injection molding or resin transfer molding. One significant issue during these processing methods is void formation due to incomplete wet-out of the resin within the fiber preform, resulting in discontinuous material properties and localized failure zones in the material. A fundamental understanding of the resin evolution during processing is essential to designing processing conditions for void-free filling, which is the first objective of the dissertation. Secondly, FRCs used in rotorcraft experience severe vibrational loads during service, and improved damping characteristics of the composite structure are desirable. To this end, a second goal is to explore the use of matrix-embedded nanoscale reinforcements to augment the inherent damping capabilities in FRCs. The first objective is addressed through a computational modeling and simulation of the infiltrating dual-scale resin flow through the micro-architectures of woven fibrous preforms, accounting for the capillary effects within the fiber bundles. An analytical model is developed for the longitudinal permeability of flow through fibrous bundles and applied to simulations which provide detailed predictions of local air entrapment locations as the resin permeates the preform. Generalized design plots are presented for predicting the void content and processing time in terms of the Capillary and Reynolds Numbers governing the molding process. The second portion of the research investigates the damping enhancement provided to FRCs in static and rotational configurations by different types and weight fractions of matrix-embedded carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in high fiber volume fraction composites. The damping is measured using

  18. Polyethylene fiber-reinforced composite resin used as a short post in severely decayed primary anterior teeth: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrak, Sule; Tunc, Emine Sen; Tuloglu, Nuray

    2009-05-01

    The case report presented here is of a 4-year-old girl with severely decayed maxillary anterior teeth. After root canal treatment, the primary maxillary central and lateral incisors were reinforced using polyethylene fiber-reinforced composite resin short posts and restored using celluloid strip crowns. The technique described here offers a simple and effective method for restoring severely decayed primary anterior teeth that reestablishes function, shape, and esthetics.

  19. Biomechanical evaluation of a fiber-reinforced composite prosthesis supported by implants with and without a microthread collar design

    OpenAIRE

    Meriç, Gökçe; Erkmen, Erkan; Kurt, Ahmet; Eser, Atilim; Çelik, Gökhan

    2010-01-01

    Background/purpose: A fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) resin system was introduced as an alternative for implant-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDPs); however, the stress distribution in the bone around the implants which support the FRC-FDP has so far not been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the biomechanical behavior of FRC-FDPs supported by implants with different collar geometries. Materials and methods: A 3-dimensional finite element analysis method was selected ...

  20. Analytical and Numerical Modeling of Delamination Evolution in Fiber Reinforced Laminated Composites Subject to Flexural Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiawen

    Delamination is a common failure mode in composite (fiber reinforced and layered) structures subject to low-velocity impacts by foreign objects. To maximize the design capacity, it is important to have reliable tools to predict delamination evolution in laminated composites. The focus of this research is to analyze flexural responses and delamination evolution in laminated composites subject to flexural loading. Analytical solutions were derived from linear elasticity theory and structural mechanics of beam and plate configurations. Formulations and evaluations of the proposed analytical approaches were validated by comparing with results of finite element (FE) simulations in similar settings and published experiment data. Two-dimensional (2D) elasticity theory for laminated panels was extended to analyze elastodynamic responses of pristine panels and quasi-static responses of pre-delaminated panels. A highlight of the approach is exact solutions of displacement and stress fields it provides. Further investigations showed that the 2D elasticity theory is not amenable to a closed-form solution for laminates containing off-axis angle plies due to three-dimensional (3D) states of stress. Closed-form solutions of cohesive zone modeling (CZM) were developed for popular delamination toughness tests of laminated beams. A laminate was modeled as an assembly of two sub-laminates connected by a virtual deformable layer with infinitesimal thickness. Comprehensive parametric studies were performed, offering a deeper understanding of CZM. The studies were further simplified so that closed-form expressions can be obtained, serving as a quick estimation of the flexural responses and the process zone lengths. Analytical CZM solutions were extended analyze quasi-static impact tests of laminated composite plates with arbitrary stacking sequences, aiming to predict critical load, critical interfaces and extent of delamination at that interface. The Rayleigh-Ritz method was used to

  1. Use of Nanoparticles for Enhancing the Interlaminar Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composites and Adhesively Bonded Joints—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide De Cicco

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This review paper aims at reporting some of the notable works carried out concerning the use of nanoparticles (NPs as a means of improving the resistance of fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials (FRPs and adhesively bonded joints (ABJs to delamination initiation and propagation. Applications of various nanoparticles, such as carbon-based, ceramic-based and mineral-based are discussed. The main properties that have been considered for improving the delamination and fatigue resistance of FRPs are the interlaminar shear strength, fracture toughness, and fracture energy. On the other hand, cohesive and interfacial strengths have been the focused parameters in the works that considered enhancement of ABJs. The reported results indicate that inclusion of NPs in polymeric matrices leads to improvement of various material properties, even though some discrepancies in the results have been noted. Notwithstanding, additional research is required to address some of the issues that have not yet been tackled, some of which will be identified throughout this review article.

  2. Use of Nanoparticles for Enhancing the Interlaminar Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composites and Adhesively Bonded Joints-A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cicco, Davide; Asaee, Zohreh; Taheri, Farid

    2017-11-01

    This review paper aims at reporting some of the notable works carried out concerning the use of nanoparticles (NPs) as a means of improving the resistance of fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials (FRPs) and adhesively bonded joints (ABJs) to delamination initiation and propagation. Applications of various nanoparticles, such as carbon-based, ceramic-based and mineral-based are discussed. The main properties that have been considered for improving the delamination and fatigue resistance of FRPs are the interlaminar shear strength, fracture toughness, and fracture energy. On the other hand, cohesive and interfacial strengths have been the focused parameters in the works that considered enhancement of ABJs. The reported results indicate that inclusion of NPs in polymeric matrices leads to improvement of various material properties, even though some discrepancies in the results have been noted. Notwithstanding, additional research is required to address some of the issues that have not yet been tackled, some of which will be identified throughout this review article.

  3. In vitro evaluation of veneering composites and fibers on the color of fiber-reinforced composite restorations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Hasani Tabatabaei

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Color match between fiber-reinforced composite (FRC restorations and teeth is an imperative factor in esthetic dentistry. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of veneering composites and fibers on the color change of FRC restorations.Glass and polyethylene fibers were used to reinforce a direct microhybrid composite (Z250, 3M ESPE and a microfilled composite (Gradia Indirect, GC. There were eight experimental groups (n=5 disks per group. Four groups were used as the controls (non-FRC control and the others were used as experimental groups. CIELAB parameters (L*, a* and b* of specimens were evaluated against a white background using a spectrophotometer to assess the color change. The color difference (ΔE* and color coordinates were (L*, a* and b* analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test.Both types of composite and fiber influenced the color parameters (ΔL*, Δa*. The incorporation of fibers into the composite in the experimental groups made them darker than the control groups, except in the Gradia Indirect+ glass fibers group. Δb* is affected by types of fibers only in direct fiber reinforced composite. No statistically significant differences were recognized in ΔE* among the groups (p>0.05.The findings of the present study suggest that the tested FRC restorations exhibited no difference in color in comparison with non-FRC restoration. Hence, the types of veneering composites and fibers did not influence the color change (ΔE* of FRC restorations.

  4. In Vitro Evaluation of Veneering Composites and Fibers on the Color of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoomeh; Hasani, Zahra; Ahmadi, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Color match between fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) restorations and teeth is an imperative factor in esthetic dentistry. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of veneering composites and fibers on the color change of FRC restorations. Materials and Methods: Glass and polyethylene fibers were used to reinforce a direct microhybrid composite (Z250, 3M ESPE) and a microfilled composite (Gradia Indirect, GC). There were eight experimental groups (n=5 disks per group). Four groups were used as the controls (non-FRC control) and the others were used as experimental groups. CIELAB parameters (L*, a* and b*) of specimens were evaluated against a white background using a spectrophotometer to assess the color change. The color difference (ΔE*) and color coordinates were (L*, a* and b*) analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: Both types of composite and fiber influenced the color parameters (ΔL*, Δa*). The incorporation of fibers into the composite in the experimental groups made them darker than the control groups, except in the Gradia Indirect+ glass fibers group. Δb* is affected by types of fibers only in direct fiber reinforced composite. No statistically significant differences were recognized in ΔE* among the groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that the tested FRC restorations exhibited no difference in color in comparison with non-FRC restoration. Hence, the types of veneering composites and fibers did not influence the color change (ΔE*) of FRC restorations. PMID:25584060

  5. The effect of nanoclay filler loading on the flexural strength of fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Vajihesadat; Atai, Mohammad; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Keshavarzi, Solmaz; Khalighinejad, Navid; Badrian, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Background: Flexural strength of prosthesis made with dental composite resin materials plays an important role in their survival. The aim of this study was investigating the effect of nanoclay fillers and Poly (methyl methacrylate)-grafted (PMMA-grafted) nanoclay fillers loading on the flexural strength of fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs). Materials and Methods: Standard FRC bars (2 × 2 × 25 mm) for flexural strength testing were prepared with E-glass fibers and a synthetic resin loaded with different quantities of unmodified nanoclay and PMMA-grafted nanoclay filler particles (0% as control group, 0.2%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5%). Flexural strength and flexural modulus were determined. The data were analyzed using 2-way, 1-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The fracture surfaces were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Results: For groups with the same concentration of nanoparticles, PMMA-grafted filler-loaded group showed significantly higher flexural strength, except for 0.2% wt. For groups that contain PMMA-grafted nanoclay fillers, the 2% wt had the highest flexural strength value with significant difference to other subgroups. 1% wt and 2% wt showed significantly higher values compared to control (P 0.05). Flexural modulus of 2%, 5% wt PMMA-grafted and 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5% wt unmodified nanoclay particles-loaded subgroups decreased significantly compared to control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: PMMA-grafted nanoclay filler loading may enhance the flexural strength of FRCs. Addition of unmodified nanoparticles cannot significantly improve the flexural strength of FRCs. Addition of both unmodified and PMMA-grafted nanoclay particles in some concentrations decreased the flexural modulus. PMID:23087731

  6. The correlation of low-velocity impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with matrix properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Summarized are basic studies that were conducted to correlate the impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with polymer matrix properties. Three crosslinked epoxy resins and a linear polysulfone were selected as composite matrices. As a group, these resins possess a significantly large range of mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the resins and their respective composites were measured. Neat resin specimens and unidirectional and crossply composite specimens were impact tested with an instrumented dropweight tester. Impact resistances of the specimens were assesseed on the basis of loading capability, energy absorption, and extent of damage.

  7. Proposed Methodology for Design of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Spike Anchors into Reinforced Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacFarlane, Eric Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-26

    The included methodology, calculations, and drawings support design of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) spike anchors for securing U-wrap CFRP onto reinforced concrete Tbeams. This content pertains to an installation in one of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s facilities. The anchors are part of a seismic rehabilitation to the subject facility. The information contained here is for information purposes only. The reader is encouraged to verify all equations, details, and methodology prior to usage in future projects. However, development of the content contained here complied with Los Alamos National Laboratory’s NQA-1 quality assurance program for nuclear structures. Furthermore, the formulations and details came from the referenced published literature. This literature represents the current state of the art for FRP anchor design. Construction personnel tested the subject anchor design to the required demand level demonstrated in the calculation. The testing demonstrated the ability of the anchors noted to carry loads in excess of 15 kips in direct tension. The anchors were not tested to failure in part because of the hazards associated with testing large-capacity tensile systems to failure. The calculation, methodology, and drawing originator was Eric MacFarlane of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s (LANL) Office of Seismic Hazards and Risk Mitigation (OSHRM). The checker for all components was Mike Salmon of the LANL OSHRM. The independent reviewers of all components were Insung Kim and Loring Wyllie of Degenkolb Engineers. Note that Insung Kim contributed to the initial formulations in the calculations that pertained directly to his Doctoral research.

  8. Review of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Reinforced Material in Concrete Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayuddin Ayuddin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP is a material that is lightweight, strong, anti-magnetic and corrosion resistant. This material can be used as an option to replace the steel material in concrete construction or as material to improve the strength of existing construction. CFRP is quite easy to be attached to the concrete structure and proved economically used as a material for repairing damaged structures and increase the resilience of structural beams, columns, bridges and other parts of the structure against earthquakes. CFRP materials can be shaped sheet to be attached to the concrete surface. Another reason is due to the use of CFRP has a higher ultimate strength and lower weight compared to steel reinforcement so that the handling is significantly easier. Through this paper suggests that CFRP materials can be applied to concrete structures, especially on concrete columns. Through the results of experiments conducted proved that the concrete columns externally wrapped with CFRP materials can increase the strength. This treatment is obtained after testing experiments on 130 mm diameter column with a height of 700 mm with concentric loading method to collapse. The experimental results indicate that a column is wrapped externally with CFRP materials can achieve a load capacity of 250 kN compared to the concrete columns externally without CFRP material which only reached 150 kN. If the column is given internally reinforcing steel and given externally CFRP materials can reach 270 kN. It shows that CFRP materials can be used for concrete structures can even replace reinforcing steel that has been widely used in building construction in Indonesia.

  9. Exposure Assessment of a High-energy Tensile Test With Large Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Michel, Silvain; Terrasi, Giovanni; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the particle and fiber release from two carbon fiber reinforced polymer cables that underwent high-energy tensile tests until rupture. The failing event was the source of a large amount of dust whereof a part was suspected to be containing possibly respirable fibers that could cause adverse health effects. The released fibers were suspected to migrate through small openings to the experiment control room and also to an adjacent machine hall where workers were active. To investigate the fiber release and exposure risk of the affected workers, the generated particles were measured with aerosol devices to obtain the particle size and particle concentrations. Furthermore, particles were collected on filter samples to investigate the particle shape and the fiber concentration. Three situations were monitored for the control room and the machine hall: the background concentrations, the impact of the cable failure, and the venting of the exposed rooms afterward. The results showed four important findings: The cable failure caused the release of respirable fibers with diameters below 3 μm and an average length of 13.9 μm; the released particles did migrate to the control room and to the machine hall; the measured peak fiber concentration of 0.76 fibers/cm(3) and the overall fiber concentration of 0.07 fibers/cm(3) in the control room were below the Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) for fibers without indication of carcinogenicity; and the venting of the rooms was fast and effective. Even though respirable fibers were released, the low fiber concentration and effective venting indicated that the suspected health risks from the experiment on the affected workers was low. However, the effect of long-term exposure is not known therefore additional control measures are recommended.

  10. Tensile Properties of Unsaturated Polyester and Epoxy Resin Reinforced with Recycled Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Kondo, Yuta

    2017-08-01

    To better understand the mechanical properties of recycled carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (rCFRP), CFRP crushed into small pieces was mixed randomly in different proportions (0-30 wt%) with two different resins: unsaturated polyester and epoxy resin. Two different sizes of crushed CFRP were used: 0.1 mm × 0.007 mm (milled CFRP) and 30 mm × 2 mm (chopped CFRP). The tensile strength of rCFRP was found to depend on both the proportion and the size of the CFRP pieces. It increased with increasing proportion of chopped CFRP, but decreased with increasing proportion of milled CFRP. There was no clear dependence of the tensile strength on the resin that was used. A low fracture strain was found for rCFRP samples made with chopped CFRP, in contrast to those made with milled CFRP. The fracture strain was found to increase with increasing content of milled CFRP up to 20 wt%, at which point, coalescence of existing microvoids occurred. However, there was a reduction in fracture strain for rCFRP with 30 wt% of milled CFRP, owing to the formation of defects (blow holes). Overall, the fracture strain was higher for rCFRPs based on epoxy resin than for those based on unsaturated polyester with the same CFRP content, because of the high ductility of the epoxy resin. The different tensile properties reflected different failure characteristics, with the use of chopped CFRP leading to a complicated rough fracture surface and with milled CFRP causing ductile failure through the presence of tiny dimple-like fractures. However, for a high content of milled CFRP (30 wt%), large blow holes were observed, leading to low ductility.

  11. In vivo implant fixation of carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK hip prostheses in an ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Ichiro; Takao, Masaki; Bandoh, Shunichi; Bertollo, Nicky; Walsh, William R; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR/PEEK) is theoretically suitable as a material for use in hip prostheses, offering excellent biocompatibility, mechanical properties, and the absence of metal ions. To evaluate in vivo fixation methods of CFR/PEEK hip prostheses in bone, we examined radiographic and histological results for cementless or cemented CFR/PEEK hip prostheses in an ovine model with implantation up to 52 weeks. CFR/PEEK cups and stems with rough-textured surfaces plus hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings for cementless fixation and CFR/PEEK cups and stems without HA coating for cement fixation were manufactured based on ovine computed tomography (CT) data. Unilateral total hip arthroplasty was performed using cementless or cemented CFR/PEEK hip prostheses. Five cementless cups and stems and six cemented cups and stems were evaluated. On the femoral side, all cementless stems demonstrated bony ongrowth fixation and all cemented stems demonstrated stable fixation without any gaps at both the bone-cement and cement-stem interfaces. All cementless cases and four of the six cemented cases showed minimal stress shielding. On the acetabular side, two of the five cementless cups demonstrated bony ongrowth fixation. Our results suggest that both cementless and cemented CFR/PEEK stems work well for fixation. Cup fixation may be difficult for both cementless and cemented types in this ovine model, but bone ongrowth fixation on the cup was first seen in two cementless cases. Cementless fixation can be achieved using HA-coated CFR/PEEK implants, even under load-bearing conditions. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  12. Numerical Simulation of the Curing Process of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Amir Haji

    2013-01-01

    The curing process of Fiber reinforced polymer rebars using a two phase curing process is investigated in this work. These rebars are developed as an alternative reinforcing material in reinforced concrete. The chemical resistance and high specific strength and stiffness of these rebars make them an important subject for research

  13. Shear Performance of Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites Beam-Column Joint Using Various Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faizal Hanif

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demands of reinforcement in the joint panel are now requiring more effective system to reduce the complicated fabrication by widely used precast system. The joint panel is responsible to keep the load transfer through beam and column as a crucial part in a structural frame that ensures the main feature of the whole structure during earthquake. Since precast system might reduce the joint panel monolithic integrity and stiffness, an innovation by adding fiber into the grouting system will give a breakthrough. The loading test of precast concrete beam-column joints using FRCC (Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites in joint panel was conducted to evaluate the influences of fiber towards shear performance. The experimental factor is fiber types with same volume fraction in mortar matrix of joint panel. Two specimens with Aramid-fiber and PP-fiber by two percent of volume fraction are designed to fail by shear failure in joint panel by reversed cyclic testing method. The comparison amongst those experiment results by various parameters for the shear performance of FRCC beam-column joints using various fibers are discussed. Preceding specimens was using no fiber, PVA fiber, and steel fiber has been carried out. Through the current experimental results and the comparison with previous experiment results, it can be recognized that by using fibers in joint panel was observed qualitatively could prevent crack widening with equitable and smaller crack width, improved the shear capacity by widening the hysteretic area, increased maximum load in positive loading and negative loading, and decreased the deformation rate. Elastic modulus properties of fiber are observed to give the most impact towards shear performance.

  14. Load-bearing capacity and fracture behavior of glass fiber-reinforced composite cranioplasty implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piitulainen, Jaakko M; Mattila, Riina; Moritz, Niko; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2017-11-10

    Glass fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) have been adapted for routine clinical use in various dental restorations and are presently also used in cranial implants. The aim of this study was to measure the load-bearing capacity and failure type of glass FRC implants during static loading with and without interconnective bars and with different fixation modes. Load-bearing capacities of 2 types of FRC implants with 4 different fixation modes were experimentally tested. The sandwich-like FRC implants were made of 2 sheets of woven FRC fabric, which consisted of silanized, woven E-glass fiber fabrics impregnated in BisGMA-TEGDMA monomer resin matrix. The space between the outer and inner surfaces was filled with glass particles. All FRC implants were tested up to a 10-mm deflection with load-bearing capacity determined at 6-mm deflection. The experimental groups were compared using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis analysis with Steel-Dwass post hoc test. FRC implants underwent elastic and plastic deformation until 6-mm deflection. The loading test did not demonstrate any protrusions of glass fibers or cut fiber even at 10-mm deflection. An elastic and plastic deformation of the implant occurred until the FRC sheets were separated from each other. In the cases of the free-standing setup (no fixation) and the fixation with 6 screws, the FRC implants with 2 interconnective bars showed a significantly higher load-bearing capacity compared with the implant without interconnective bars. FRC implants used in this study showed a load-bearing capacity which may provide protection for the brain after cranial bone defect reconstruction.

  15. Fracture Resistance of Roots Restored with Four Different Fiber-Reinforced Composite Posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adanir, Necdet; Ureyen Kaya, Buglem; Kececi, Ayse Diljin

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the resistance to vertical root fracture of root-filled teeth restored with four different fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) post systems and two types of dual-cured resin luting agents. Materials and Methods Ninety extracted human maxillary central incisors were selected and decoronated to obtain a standardized root length of 14 mm. After root canal obturation, post spaces were prepared to a depth of 10 mm with a No. 3 post drill. The specimens (n = 80) were divided into two groups (n = 40) according to the resin luting agents used: group 1, Variolink II + ExciTE DSC; group 2, RelyX Unicem. These groups were subdivided into four subgroups (n = 10) and restored with one of the following post systems: (a) DT Light, (b) DT Light SL, (c) FRC Postec and (d) Everstick, while the remaining 10 teeth served as controls. The roots were subjected to axial compressive loading using a 2.2-mm-diameter metal sphere in a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). A factorial experiment with a single control group (analysis of variance) was used to test the resistance of the specimens. Results Groups 2a (DT Light + RelyX Unicem; 398.5 N) and 1b (DT Light SL + Variolink II + ExciTE DSC; 431.1 N) had significantly higher resistance to fracture than the control group (334.1 N; p fiber posts (DT Light and DT Light SL) with an adhesive luting cement in root-filled teeth may reinforce the root to some extent. PMID:26111557

  16. Acoustic emission analysis of fiber-reinforced composite in flexural testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alander, Pasi; Lassila, Lippo V J; Tezvergil, Arzu; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the emission of acoustic signals from six commercially available fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) used in the frameworks of fixed partial dentures in material bending. FRC test specimens were made of six commercially available fiber products of polyethylene or glass and five light-curing resins. FRC test specimens were polymerized with a hand light-curing unit or with a light-curing oven. The flexural test for determination of ultimate flexural strength of test specimens (n = 6) was based on the ISO 10477 standard after the specimens were stored in air or in water for two weeks. The acoustic emission (AE) signals were monitored during three-point loading test of the test specimens using a test with increasing loading levels until the specimens fractured. Generally, stress level required for the AE activity initiation ranged from 107 MPa (Ribbond) to 579 MPa (everStick). The ultimate flexural strength of FRC specimens were higher, ranging from 132 to 764 MPa, being highest with everStick and Vectris FRC, and lowest with Ribbond FRC. ANOVA showed a statistically significant difference between the initiation of AE activity and the ultimate flexural strength according to the brand (p < 0.001) storing conditions (p < 0.001) and polymerization procedure (p < 0.001). AE activity and ultimate flexural strength correlated significantly (p < 0.010, r = 0.887). The result of this study suggested that AE activity in FRC specimens started at a 19-32% lower stress level than occurred at final fracture.

  17. Fracture behavior of single-structure fiber-reinforced composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Kohji; Garoushi, Sufyan K.; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Lassila, Lippo V. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The applications of single-structure fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) in restorative dentistry have not been well reported. This study aimed to clarify the static mechanical properties of anterior crown restorations prepared using two types of single-structure FRC. Materials and methods : An experimental crown restoration was designed for an upper anterior incisor. The restorations were made from IPS Empress CAD for CEREC (Emp), IPS e.max® CAD (eMx), experimental single-structure all-FRC (a-FRC), Filtek™ Supreme XTE (XTE), and commercially available single-structure short-FRC (everX Posterior™) (n = 8 for each material) (s-FRC). The a-FRC restorations were prepared from an experimental FRC blank using a computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) device. A fracture test was performed to assess the fracture load, toughness, and failure mode. The fracture loads were vertically applied on the restorations. The surface micromorphology of the FRC restorations was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The data were analyzed by analysis of variance (p = .05) followed by Tukey's test. Results : s-FRC showed the highest mean fracture load (1145.0 ± 89.6 N) and toughness (26.2 ± 5.8 Ncm) among all the groups tested. With regard to the micromorphology of the prosthetic surface, local crushing of the fiberglass was observed in s-FRC, whereas chopped fiberglass was observed in a-FRC. Conclusions : The restorations made of short-FRC showed a higher load-bearing capacity than those made of the experimental all-FRC blanks for CAD/CAM. The brittle-like fractures were exhibited in the recent dental esthetic materials, while local crushing fractures were shown for single-structure FRC restorations. PMID:28642921

  18. Influence of Cutting Temperature on the Tensile Strength of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Delahaigue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP have seen a significant increase in use over the years thanks to their specific properties. Despite continuous improvements in the production methods of laminated parts, a trimming operation is still necessary to achieve the functional dimensions required by engineering specifications. Laminates made of carbon fibers are very abrasive and cause rapid tool wear, and require high cutting temperatures. This creates damage to the epoxy matrix, whose glass-transition temperature is often recognized to be about 180 °C. This study aims to highlight the influence of the cutting temperature generated by tool wear on the surface finish and mechanical properties obtained from tensile tests. Trimming operations were performed on a quasi-isotropic 24-ply carbon/epoxy laminate, of 3.6 mm thickness, with a 6 flutes diamond-coated (CVD cutter. The test specimens of 6 mm and 12 mm wide were obtained by trimming. The reduced width of the coupons allowed amplification of the effect of defects on the measured properties by increasing the proportion of coupon cross-section occupied by the defects. A new tool and a tool in an advanced state of wear were used to generate different cutting temperatures. Results showed a cutting temperature of 300 °C for the new tool and 475 °C for the worn tool. The analysis revealed that the specimens machined with the new tool have no thermal damage and the cut is clean. The plies oriented at −45° presented the worst surface finish according to the failure mode of the fiber. For the worn tool, the surface was degraded and the matrix was carbonized. After cutting, observations showed a degraded resin spread on the machined surface, which reduced the surface roughness and hid the cutting defects. In support of these observations, the tensile tests showed no variation of the mechanical properties for the 12 mm-wide specimens, but did show a 10% loss in mechanical properties for the 6 mm

  19. Carbon Fiber Reinforced/Silicon Carbide Turbine Blisk Testing in the SIMPLEX Turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genge, Gary G.; Marsh, Matthew W.

    1999-01-01

    A program designed to implement a ceramic matrix composite integrally bladed disk (blisk) into rocket engine style turbomachinery has successfully completed testing. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) program, utilizing the MSFC turbomachinery design, analysis, and testing capabilities along with materials development capabilities from both Glenn Research Center (GRC) and MSFC, has tested two carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide blisks in the Simplex Turbopump at MSFC's Test Stand 500. One blisk contained a polar woven fiber preform, while the second blisk tested utilized a quasi-isotropic preform. Vhile earlier papers have chronicled the program's design, material testing, and torque testing efforts, this paper focuses on the testing of the blisks in the Simplex turbopump. Emphasis will be placed on the actual condition of the blisks before and after the testing test program design methodology, and conclusions that can be drawn from the test data and blisk final conditions. The program performed three separate test series. The first series was needed to validate that the Simplex turbopump was correctly re-built following a major incident to the turbopump. The turbopump had two major differences from the original design. The most obvious difference was the sleeve required throughout the bore of the main housing. The second major difference was modifications to the pump diffuser to improve performance. Several areas were burnt during the incident and were either repaired by weld repair (pump inlet housing) or simply smoothed out (turbine nozzle discharge). The test series was designed to weed out any turbopump design and manufacturing flaws or fatigue issues prior to putting the C/SiC blisks into it. The second and third series were the C/SiC blisk test series. The primary goal of these series was to expose the blisks to as much fatigue causing dynamic stress as possible to examine the material's capability. Initially, the test plan was to put equal time on

  20. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Fiber Reinforced Laminated Composites Subject to Low-Velocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsson, Solver I.

    Foreign object impact on composite materials continues to be an active field due to its importance in the design of load bearing composite aerostructures. The problem has been studied by many through the decades. Extensive experimental studies have been performed to characterize the impact damage and failure mechanisms. Leaders in aerospace industry are pushing for reliable, robust and efficient computational methods for predicting impact response of composite structures. Experimental and numerical investigations on the impact response of fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite (FRPC) laminates are presented. A detailed face-on and edge-on impact experimental study is presented. A novel method for conducting coupon-level edge-on impact experiments is introduced. The research is focused on impact energy levels that are in the vicinity of the barely visible impact damage (BVID) limit of the material system. A detailed post-impact damage study is presented where non-destructive inspection (NDI) methods such as ultrasound scanning and computed tomography (CT) are used. Detailed fractography studies are presented for further investigation of the through-the-thickness damage due to the impact event. Following the impact study, specimens are subjected to compression after impact (CAI) to establish the effect of BVID on the compressive strength after impact (CSAI). A modified combined loading compression (CLC) test method is proposed for compression testing following an edge-on impact. Experimental work on the rate sensitivity of the mode I and mode II inter-laminar fracture toughness is also investigated. An improved wedge-insert fracture (WIF) method for conducting mode I inter-laminar fracture at elevated loading rates is introduced. Based on the experimental results, a computational modeling approach for capturing face-on impact and CAI is developed. The model is then extended to edge-on impact and CAI. Enhanced Schapery Theory (EST) is utilized for modeling the full

  1. Field assisted sintering of refractory carbide ceramics and fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gephart, Sean

    materials. While FAST sintered materials showed higher average values, in general they also showed consistently larger variation in the scattered data and consequently larger standard deviation for the resulting material properties. In addition, dynamic impact testing (V50 test) was conducted on the resulting materials and it was determined that there was no discernable correlation between observed mechanical properties of the ceramic materials and the resulting dynamic testing. Another study was conducted on the sintering of SiC and carbon fiber reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMC) using FAST. There has been much interest recently in fabricating high strength, low porosity SiC CMC.s for high temperature structural applications, but the current methods of production, namely chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), melt infiltration (MI), and polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP), are considered time consuming and involve material related shortcomings associated with their respective methodologies. In this study, SiC CMC.s were produced using the 25 ton laboratory unit with a target sample size of 40 mm diameter and 3 mm thickness, as well as on the larger 250 ton industrial FAST system targeting a sample size of 101.6 x 101.6 x 3 mm3 to investigate issues associated with scaling. Several sintering conditions were explored including: pressure of 35-65 MPa, temperature of 1700-1900°C, and heating rates between 50-400°C/min. The SiC fibers used in this study were coated using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with boron nitride (BN) and pyrolytic carbon to act as a barrier layer and preserve the integrity of the fibers during sintering. Then the barrier coating was coated by an outer layer of SiC to enhance the bonding between the fibers and the SiC matrix. Microstructures of the sintered samples were examined by FE-SEM. Mechanical properties including flexural strength-deflection and stress-strain were characterized using 4-point bend testing. Tensile testing was

  2. A procedure to estimate the dynamic damped behavior of fiber reinforced composite beams submitted to flexural vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volnei Tita

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes a procedure to estimate the dynamic damped behavior of fiber reinforced composite beams in flexural vibrations. A set of experimental dynamic tests were carried out in order to investigate the natural frequencies and modal shapes. These results are used to evaluate the damping factors by the program FREQ. These damping factors are then used as input to a damped dynamic analysis by the Finite Element Method, using Rayleigh Model. A good agreement between theoretical and experimental results was obtained. Thus, it became possible to validate the proposed procedure to evaluate dynamic damped behavior of composite beams.

  3. Electrical and Mechanical Performance of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Used as the Impressed Current Anode Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Zhu, Miaochang; Han, Ningxu; Liu, Wei; Xing, Feng

    2014-07-24

    An investigation was performed by using carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) as the anode material in the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system of steel reinforced concrete structures. The service life and performance of CFRP were investigated in simulated ICCP systems with various configurations. Constant current densities were maintained during the tests. No significant degradation in electrical and mechanical properties was found for CFRP subjected to anodic polarization with the selected applied current densities. The service life of the CFRP-based ICCP system was discussed based on the practical reinforced concrete structure layout.

  4. Electrical and Mechanical Performance of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Used as the Impressed Current Anode Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hua Zhu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was performed by using carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP as the anode material in the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP system of steel reinforced concrete structures. The service life and performance of CFRP were investigated in simulated ICCP systems with various configurations. Constant current densities were maintained during the tests. No significant degradation in electrical and mechanical properties was found for CFRP subjected to anodic polarization with the selected applied current densities. The service life of the CFRP-based ICCP system was discussed based on the practical reinforced concrete structure layout.

  5. Effect of cross-sectional design on the modulus of elasticity and toughness of fiber-reinforced composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Scott R; Lassila, Lippo V J; Jokinen, Mikko; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2005-09-01

    Many current fabrication protocols for dental fiber-reinforced composites use hand lay-up techniques and technician design input. Little information exists regarding how the manipulation of the cross-sectional design of a prosthesis might affect the modulus of elasticity and toughness. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of simple and complex cross-sectional designs on the modulus of elasticity and toughness of fiber-reinforced composite used for dental prostheses. Two particulate composites (BelleGlass HP and Targis) were reinforced with ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene fiber ribbon (Connect), woven E-glass fibers (Vectris Frame), or unidirectional R-glass fibers (Vectris Pontic). A range of fiber positions, orientations, or geometries were incorporated into the rhombic specimens (2 x 2 x 25 mm(3)) to achieve simple and complex experimental cross-sectional designs. The control specimen did not contain fiber reinforcement. Specimens (n=6) were stored 1 week in distilled water at 37 degrees C prior to 3-point load testing to determine the modulus of elasticity (GPa) and toughness (MPa). The data within each main fiber group were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance and a Tukey post hoc test (alpha=.05). Cross-sections of randomly selected test specimens (n=2) were made for scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of the fiber distribution. The mean modulus of elasticity varied from 8.7 +/- 2.0 GPa (Targis control) to 21.6 +/- 1.4 GPa (2 unidirectional glass fiber reinforcements, 1 each at the tension side and the compression side). Mean toughness varied from 0.07 +/- 0.02 MPa (unidirectional glass fiber positioned at the compression side) as the lowest mean, to 4.53 +/- 0.89 MPa (unidirectional glass fiber positioned at the tension side) as the highest. Significant differences were identified between specimen groups in each main category (all groups Pmodulus of elasticity of the woven E-glass groups, where P=.003). SEM micrographs showed

  6. Comparison of push-out bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin posts according to cement thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Seong; Lee, Jeong-Sub; Park, Jeong-Won; Chung, Won-Gyun; Choi, Eun-Hee; Lee, Yoon

    2017-09-01

    Post space size and cement thickness can differ because of variations in root canal morphology, such as an oval shape, and because the entire canal space cannot be included in the post space preparation. As a result, increased cement thickness around the post may affect the bond strength between the post and the dentin. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin posts to root dentin with cement layers of varying thickness. Thirty human premolars were endodontically treated and restored with fiber-reinforced composite resin posts. Post space was prepared using a drill with a 1.5-mm diameter and diameters of 1.25 mm (small [S] group), 1.375 mm (medium [M] group), and 1.5 mm (large [L] group) were cemented. The specimens were sectioned horizontally into 1-mm-thick slices, and the push-out bond strengths of the apical and coronal fragments were evaluated. Bond strength was compared using analysis of variance and 2-sample t tests (α=.05). No significant differences were found in the debonding force and push-out bond strength among fiber-reinforced composite posts of different sizes (P>.05). The mean debonding force and standard deviation of the posts were 25.05 ±9.52 N for the S group, 28.17 ±11.38 N for the M group, and 33.78 ±12.47 N for the L group. The corresponding push-out bond strength values were 3.11 ±1.54 MPa, 3.39 ±1.4 MPa, and 4.15 ±1.75 MPa. The differences in debonding force between the apical (26.43 ±10.72 N) and coronal (31.57 ±12.03 N) areas were not significant (P>.05). However, the differences in push-out bond strength between the apical (4.27 ±1.73 MPa) and coronal areas (2.83 ±1.08 MPa) were significant (Ppost spaces and, consequently, the increased cement thickness do not significantly affect the bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin posts to root dentin. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc

  7. Comparative Studies on Friction and Wear Performance between Glass-fiber Reinforced Polyamide 66 Composite and Ductile Irons on Ceramic Al2O3 Counterface in Sucker Rod Centralizer Application

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, X; Su, Z. G; Liu, S. Y; Shen, Y. S; An, J

    2010-01-01

    The tribological behaviors of three materials for sucker rod centralizer application including glass-fiber reinforced polyamide 66 composite, ductile iron and quenched ductile iron were investigated...

  8. Finite-Element Analysis of Crack Arrest Properties of Fiber Reinforced Composites Application in Semi-Elliptical Cracked Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linyuan; Song, Shulei; Deng, Hongbo; Zhong, Kai

    2017-07-01

    In nowadays, repair method using fiber reinforced composites as the mainstream pipe repair technology, it can provide security for X100 high-grade steel energy long-distance pipelines in engineering. In this paper, analysis of cracked X100 high-grade steel pipe was conducted, simulation analysis was made on structure of pipes and crack arresters (CAs) to obtain the J-integral value in virtue of ANSYS Workbench finite element software and evaluation on crack arrest effects was done through measured elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameter J-integral and the crack arrest coefficient K, in a bid to summarize effect laws of composite CAs and size of pipes and cracks for repairing CAs. The results indicate that the K value is correlated with laying angle λ, laying length L2/D1, laying thickness T1/T2of CAs, crack depth c/T1 and crack length a/c, and calculate recommended parameters for repairing fiber reinforced composite CAs in terms of two different crack forms.

  9. A note on the effect of the fiber curvature on the micromechanical behavior of natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Escalante-Solis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the role of the fiber curvature on the tensile properties of short-natural-fiber reinforced composites, a photoelastic model and a finite element analysis were performed in a well characterized henequen fiber-high density polyethylene composite material. It was hypothesized that the angle of orientation of the inclusion and the principal material orientation with respect to the applied load was very important in the reinforcement mechanics. From the photoelastic and finite element analysis it was found that the stress distribution around the fiber inclusion was different on the concave side from that observed on the convex side and an efficient length of stress transfer was estimated to be approximately equal to one third the average fiber length. This approach was used to predict the short-natural-fiber reinforced composite mechanical properties using probabilistic functions modifications of the rule of mixtures models developed by Fukuda-Chow and the Fukuda-Kawata. Recognizing the inherent flexibility that curves the natural fibers during processing, the consideration of a length of one third of the average length l should improve the accuracy of the calculations of the mechanical properties using theoretical models.

  10. Marginal accuracy and fracture strength of ceromer/fiber-reinforced composite crowns: effect of variations in preparation design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, LeeRa; Song, HoYong; Koak, JaiYoung; Heo, SeongJoo

    2002-10-01

    Targis/Vectris restorations provide excellent esthetics and clinical success; however, the relationship of their marginal accuracy and fracture strength to the tooth preparation design requires further investigation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of variations in tooth preparation design on the marginal accuracy before and after cementation and on the fracture strength of the ceromer/fiber reinforced composite crown. Three metal dies with varying total occlusal convergence angles (6 degrees, 10 degrees, 15 degrees) were prepared. A total of 30 (10 for each angle) Targis/Vectris crowns were fabricated. The restorations were evaluated at 48 points on the entire circumferential margin with a stereomicroscope measuring in micrometers for margin adaptation before and after cementation. The specimens then were compressively loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. Marginal adaptation was analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis test and post-hoc Dunnett test (alpha=0.05). The fracture strength was analyzed with analysis of variance and the Scheffe adjustment at the 95% significance level. Fracture surfaces of the crowns were examined with a scanning electron microscope to determine the mode of fracture. The smallest marginal gap was recorded in angled crowns with a 6-degree convergence (47 microm mean). The marginal gap of most (95.6%) of the crowns was within a clinically acceptable level (established as ceromer/fiber-reinforced composite crowns diminished their marginal gap and increased their fracture strength.

  11. Theory of fiber reinforced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashin, Z.

    1972-01-01

    A unified and rational treatment of the theory of fiber reinforced composite materials is presented. Fundamental geometric and elasticity considerations are throughly covered, and detailed derivations of the effective elastic moduli for these materials are presented. Biaxially reinforced materials which take the form of laminates are then discussed. Based on the fundamentals presented in the first portion of this volume, the theory of fiber-reinforced composite materials is extended to include viscoelastic and thermoelastic properties. Thermal and electrical conduction, electrostatics and magnetostatics behavior of these materials are discussed. Finally, a brief statement of the very difficult subject of physical strength is included.

  12. Self-Healing Capability of Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites for Recovery of Watertightness and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Nishiwaki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Various types of fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCCs were experimentally studied to evaluate their self-healing capabilities regarding their watertightness and mechanical properties. Cracks were induced in the FRCC specimens during a tensile loading test, and the specimens were then immersed in static water for self-healing. By water permeability and reloading tests, it was determined that the FRCCs containing synthetic fiber and cracks of width within a certain range (<0.1 mm exhibited good self-healing capabilities regarding their watertightness. Particularly, the high polarity of the synthetic fiber (polyvinyl alcohol (PVA series and hybrid fiber reinforcing (polyethylene (PE and steel code (SC series showed high recovery ratio. Moreover, these series also showed high potential of self-healing of mechanical properties. It was confirmed that recovery of mechanical property could be obtained only in case when crack width was sufficiently narrow, both the visible surface cracks and the very fine cracks around the bridging of the SC fibers. Recovery of the bond strength by filling of the very fine cracks around the bridging fibers enhanced the recovery of the mechanical property.

  13. Application of Ultrasound on Monitoring the Evolution of the Collagen Fiber Reinforced nHAC/CS Composites In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, fiber reinforce scaffolds have been largely applied to repair hard and soft tissues. Meanwhile, monitoring the scaffolds for long periods in vivo is recognized as a crucial issue before its wide use. As a consequence, there is a growing need for noninvasive and convenient methods to analyze the implantation remolding process in situ and in real time. In this paper, diagnostic medical ultrasound was used to monitor the in vivo bone formation and degradation process of the novel mineralized collagen fiber reinforced composite which is synthesized by chitosan (CS, nanohydroxyapatite (nHA, and collagen fiber (Col. To observe the impact of cells on bone remodeling process, the scaffolds were planted into the back of the SD rats with and without rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs. Systematic data of scaffolds in vivo was extracted from ultrasound images. Significant consistency between the data from the ultrasound and DXA could be observed P<0.05. This indicated that ultrasound may serve as a feasible alternative for noninvasive monitoring the evolution of scaffolds in situ during cell growth.

  14. Acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic signature analysis of failure mechanisms in carbon fiber reinforced polymer materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Shawn Allen

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials, particularly carbon (CFRPs), are being used for primary structural applications, particularly in the aerospace and naval industries. Advantages of CFRP materials, compared to traditional materials such as steel and aluminum, include: light weight, high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and long life expectancy. A concern with CFRPs is that despite quality control during fabrication, the material can contain many hidden internal flaws. These flaws in combination with unseen damage due to fatigue and low velocity impact have led to catastrophic failure of structures and components. Therefore a large amount of research has been conducted regarding nondestructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of CFRP materials. The principal objective of this research program was to develop methods to characterize failure mechanisms in CFRP materials used by the U.S. Army using acoustic emission (AE) and/or acousto-ultrasonic (AU) data. Failure mechanisms addressed include fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination due to shear between layers. CFRP specimens were fabricated and tested in uniaxial tension to obtain AE and AU data. The specimens were designed with carbon fibers in different orientations to produce the different failure mechanisms. Some specimens were impacted with a blunt indenter prior to testing to simulate low-velocity impact. A signature analysis program was developed to characterize the AE data based on data examination using visual pattern recognition techniques. It was determined that it was important to characterize the AE event , using the location of the event as a parameter, rather than just the AE hit (signal recorded by an AE sensor). A back propagation neural network was also trained based on the results of the signature analysis program. Damage observed on the specimens visually with the aid of a scanning electron microscope agreed with the damage type assigned by the

  15. Model-aided fabrication of fiber-reinforced ceramic composite tubes using forced-flow chemical vapor infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Kent Joseph

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites possess high thermal conductivity, high fracture toughness, and corrosion resistance, having potential for use in fossil-energy steam plants, where corrosive environments at high temperature and pressure exist. The utilization of fiber-reinforced ceramic composite tubes may enable plant operation at higher temperatures, and may extend the lifetime of specific plant operations, improving overall efficiencies and reducing down-time. Dense, fiber-reinforced ceramic composite tubes were fabricated using forced-flow, chemical vapor infiltration. This process involved gaseous ceramic precursor infiltration throughout a fibrous preform, where a temperature gradient was applied and a ceramic precursor was forced through its surface at lower temperature. The application of a suitable temperature gradient and total flow enabled the ceramic matrix deposition to preferentially translate from the preform hot-surface to the cold-surface, resulting in a dense, ceramic composite in a reasonable total process time. Fibrous tube preforms were fabricated with Nextel(TM) 312 fiber. Silicon carbide was the reinforced ceramic matrix, which was deposited throughout the tube preform using methyltrichlorosilane. A standard set of process conditions was attempted to evaluate the feasibility in achieving dense composites. Tube preform infiltrations with variation in temperature and total flow were performed to determine effects on final density and total process time. Density characterization was performed on tube preforms infiltrated with the same process conditions for various time lengths to study the transient tube densification. Tube density profiles were characterized using X-ray computed tomography and digital image analysis, and the results from both were compared for their effectiveness in the prediction of the transient tube densification. A comprehensive process model simulated the transient tube infiltration using multiple, steady

  16. Effect of fabric structure and polymer matrix on flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress, and energy dissipation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the effect of glass fiber structure and the epoxy polymer system on the flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress (ILSS), and energy absorption properties of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. Four different GFRP composites were fabricated from two glass fiber textiles of...

  17. PENGGUNAAN CARBON FIBER-REINFORCED POLYMER SEBAGAI PERKUATAN KOLOM BETON BERTULANG AKIBAT BEBAN SIKLIK UNTUK MENINGKATKAN DAKTILITAS PERPINDAHAN STRUKTUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmila Achmad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP as a concrete column re­inforcement in order to improve the structure displacement ductility caused by a cyclic load. The aim of this research is to improve the displacement ductility of a column specimen by giving CFRP strengthener (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer. Two full-scale specimens are used, C-1 (original column and C-1C (column with CFRP strengthener 1 layer. The tests on C-1 and C-1C are respectively shown on the following results: Pmax is 278.9 kN and 432.2 kN, dmax is 53.24 mm and 96.46 mm, and Mmax is 328.04 kNm and 509.63 kNm. The displacement ductility of C-1 are 6.70, 6.11 and 5.44, and the displacement ductility of C-1C are 11.02, 12.75, and 11.89. The percentages of the increase of displacement ductility in column C-1C compared to C-1 are 64.48%, 108.74% and 118.68%  respectivelyfor plastic hinge zone, half high of the column effectiveness and as high as the column effectiveness.   Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk meningkatkan daktilitas perpindahan pada spe­simen kolom yang diberi perkuatan CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer. Ada dua spesimen kolom skala penuh yang digunakan, yaitu C-1 (kolom original dan C-1C (kolom dengan perkuatan CFRP 1 lapis. Hasil penelitian untuk masing-masing C-1 dan C-1C adalah Pmax sebesar 278,9 kN dan 432,2 kN, dmax sebesar 53,24 mm dan 96,46 mm, serta Mmax sebesar 328,04 kNm dan 509,63 kNm. Hasil daktilitas perpindahan untuk C-1 adalah 6,70; 6,11 dan 5,44, sedang C-1C adalah 11,02; 12,75 dan 11,89. Peningkatan persentase daktilitas per­pindahan kolom C-1C terhadap C-1 adalah 64,48%, 108,74% dan 118,68% masing-masing untuk zona sendi plastis, setengah tinggi efektif kolom dan setinggi efektif kolom.

  18. Time-Dependent Stress Rupture Strength Degradation of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites at Intermediate Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    The stress rupture strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites with a boron nitride fiber coating decreases with time within the intermediate temperature range of 700 to 950 degree Celsius. Various theories have been proposed to explain the cause of the time-dependent stress rupture strength. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relative significance of the various theories for the time-dependent strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites. This is achieved through the development of a numerically based progressive failure analysis routine and through the application of the routine to simulate the composite stress rupture tests. The progressive failure routine is a time-marching routine with an iterative loop between a probability of fiber survival equation and a force equilibrium equation within each time step. Failure of the composite is assumed to initiate near a matrix crack and the progression of fiber failures occurs by global load sharing. The probability of survival equation is derived from consideration of the strength of ceramic fibers with randomly occurring and slow growing flaws as well as the mechanical interaction between the fibers and matrix near a matrix crack. The force equilibrium equation follows from the global load sharing presumption. The results of progressive failure analyses of the composite tests suggest that the relationship between time and stress-rupture strength is attributed almost entirely to the slow flaw growth within the fibers. Although other mechanisms may be present, they appear to have only a minor influence on the observed time-dependent behavior.

  19. Study on acoustic emission of carbon fiber reinforced polymer fracture under noisy environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Deng; Jianhui, Lin; Yan, Huang

    2017-05-01

    A new method of High Speed Train Fiber Reinforced Polymer AE signal extraction based on Modified Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (MEEMD) was presented here. Because EMD acts as a dyadic filter bank, in this method, amplitude of the added noise in accordance with a Linear-Sinusoidal (L-S) spectrum, and expound how to assemble the noise. The sifting number was set by frequency from high to low. Calculate IMF's Segment sample entropy along the timeline, which take a larger proportion was identified as an AE events. The experimental result shows that the L-S noise spectrum and sifting number could restrain the mode mixing and the little wave vanish. MEEMD obtains a tangible physical meaning and improved results compared with the original EEMD. Segment sample entropy could captured the AE events in a continuous monitoring data. The AE signals was intuitive reflect in the Hilbert spectrogram.

  20. Axial shear modulus of a fiber-reinforced composite with random fiber cross-sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Bose

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available A study is made of the effective axial shear modulus of a fiber reinforced material with random fiber cross-sections so that the micromechanics is governed by stochastic differential equations. A coarse-graining procedure is adopted to investigate the macroscopic behavior of the material. This analysis leads to the formula for the effective axial shear modulus μ∗=μ1/{1−2c(μ2−μ1/(μ2+μ1},where μ1 and μ2 are the shear modulus of the matrix and fibers respectively and c is the concentration of the fibers less that 0.5. For c>0.5, the fiber and matrix moduli are to be interchanged and c is to be replaced by 1−c. The results of this study are compared with those of the theory of fibre reinforced materials. Finally, a numerical example is presented with graphical representation.

  1. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with 2 Different Fiber-reinforced Composite and 2 Conventional Composite Resin Core Buildup Materials: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Ashly Mary; Amirtharaj, L Vijay; Sanjeev, Kavitha; Mahalaxmi, Sekar

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with 2 fiber-reinforced composite resins and 2 conventional composite resin core buildup materials. Sixty noncarious unrestored human maxillary premolars were collected, endodontically treated (except group 1, negative control), and randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 10). Group 2 was the positive control. The remaining 40 prepared teeth were restored with various direct core buildup materials as follows: group 3 teeth were restored with dual-cure composite resin, group 4 with posterior composite resin, group 5 with fiber-reinforced composite resin, and group 6 with short fiber-reinforced composite resin. Fracture strength testing was performed using a universal testing machine. The results were statistically analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey test. Fracture patterns for each sample were also examined under a light microscope to determine the level of fractures. The mean fracture resistance values (in newtons) were obtained as group 1 > group 6 > group 4 > group 3 > group 5 > group 2. Group 6 showed the highest mean fracture resistance value, which was significantly higher than the other experimental groups, and all the fractures occurred at the level of enamel. Within the limitations of this study, a short fiber-reinforced composite can be used as a direct core buildup material that can effectively resist heavy occlusal forces against fracture and may reinforce the remaining tooth structure in endodontically treated teeth. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of components and surface treatments of fiber-reinforced composite posts on bond strength to composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Yuya; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Naohiko

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of the components and surface treatments of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts on the durable bonding to core build-up resin evaluated using the pull-out and microtensile tests. Four types of experimental FRC posts, combinations of two types of matrix resins (polymethyl methacrylate and urethane dimethacrylate) and two types of fiberglass (E-glass and zirconia-containing glass) were examined. The FRC posts were subjected to one of three surface treatments (cleaned with ethanol, dichloromethane, or sandblasting). The bond strength between the FRC posts and core build-up resin were measured using the pull-out and microtensile tests before and after thermal cycling. The bond strengths obtained by each test before and after thermal cycling were statistically analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons test (pposts by the pull-out test, but not by the microtensile test. Sandblasting was effective for both PMMA- and UDMA-based FRC posts, regardless of the test method. The bond strengths were influenced by the matrix resin of the FRC post and the surface treatment. The bond strengths of the pull-out test showed a similar tendency of those of the microtensile test, but the value obtained by these test were different. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of airborne-particle abrasion on mechanical properties and bond strength of carbon/epoxy and glass/bis-GMA fiber-reinforced resin posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos Jose; Santana, Fernanda Ribeiro; Pereira, Janaina Carla; Araujo, Tatiana Santos; Menezes, Murilo Souza

    2008-06-01

    Controversy exists concerning the use of fiber-reinforced posts to improve bond strength to resin cement because some precementation treatments can compromise the mechanical properties of the posts. The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of airborne-particle abrasion on the mechanical properties and microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of carbon/epoxy and glass/bis-GMA fiber-reinforced resin posts. Flexural strength (delta(f)), flexural modulus (E(f)), and stiffness (S) were assessed using a 3-point bending test for glass fiber-reinforced and carbon fiber-reinforced resin posts submitted to airborne-particle abrasion (AB) with 50-microm Al(2)O(3), and for posts without any surface treatment (controls) (n=10). Forty glass fiber (GF) and 40 carbon fiber (CF) posts were submitted to 1 of 4 surface treatments (n=10) prior to MTBS testing: silane (S); silane and adhesive (SA); airborne-particle abrasion with 50-microm Al(2)O(3) and silane (ABS); airborne-particle abrasion, silane, and adhesive (ABSA). Two composite resin restorations (Filtek Z250) with rounded depressions in the lateral face were bilaterally fixed to the post with resin cement (RelyX ARC). Next, the specimen was sectioned with a precision saw running perpendicular to the bonded surface to obtain 10 bonded beam specimens with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2). Each beam specimen was tested in a mechanical testing machine (EMIC 2,000 DL), under stress, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD test (alpha=.05). Failure patterns of tested specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The 3-point bending test demonstrated significant differences among groups only for the post type factor for flexural strength, flexural modulus, and stiffness. The carbon fiber posts exhibited significantly higher mean flexural strength (P=.001), flexural modulus (P=.003), and stiffness (P=.001) values when compared with glass

  4. Prestressing Effects on the Performance of Concrete Beams with Near-surface-mounted Carbon-fiber-reinforced Polymer Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungnam; Park, Sun-Kyu

    2016-07-01

    The effects of various prestressing levels on the flexural behavior of concrete beams strengthened with prestressed near-surface-mounted (NSM) carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) bars were investigated in this study. Four-point flexural tests up to failure were performed using a total of six strengthened prestressed and nonprestressed concrete beams. The nonprestressed strengthened beam failed by premature debonding at the interface of concrete and the epoxy adhesive, but the prestressed one failed owing due to rupture of the CFRP bar. As the prestressing level of the CFRP bar increased, the cracking and yield loads of the prestressed beams increased, but its effect on their deflections was insignificant. The ultimate load was constant regardless of prestressing level, but the ultimate deflection was almost inversely proportional to the level.

  5. RETROVIT KOLOM PENDEK BETON BERTULANG PERSEGI DENGAN PERKUATAN EKSTERNAL CARBON FIBER-REINFORCED POLYMER DI BAWAH PENGARUH PEMBEBANAN SIKLIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Sulistiawan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The retrofit of non-slender square concrete column with an external strength­ener of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP under the influence of cyclic load. The purpose of this study is to know the increase of strength and ductility of a column structure element that has an initial damage, then it is fixed and strengthened by CFRP external strengthening. The column structure element is tested by giving a constant axial load and varying the cyclic load using a displacement control. In this research, two specimens t are used, C-1 column (original column and C-1RC column (retrofit column. The results of the study show that (1 the effectiveness of the C-1CR’s restraint and moment of force are increased by 1.58 times and 52.78% compared to the C-1’s ones, and (2 the installation of CFRP reinforcement increases the strength in accepting lateral load by 52.15% and decreases of ductility by 52.12%.   Tujuan penelitian ini mengetahui peningkatan kekuatan dan daktilitas ele­men struktur kolom yang mengalami kerusakan awal, kemudian diperbaiki, dan diperkuat dengan perkuatan eksternal carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP. Pengujian ter­hadap elemen struktur kolom dilakukan dengan memberikan beban aksial yang konstan dan memvariasikan beban siklik dengan kontrol perpindahan. Dalam penelitian ini digunakan dua spesimen yaitu kolom C-1 (kolom original dan kolom C-1RC (kolom retrofit. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan (1 efektifitas pengekangan C-1CR meningkat 1,58 kali dan kekuatan terhadap momen meningkat sebesar 52,78% dibanding kolom C-1, dan (2  pemasangan perkuatan CFRP memberikan peningkatan kekuatan dalam menerima beban lateral sebesar 52,15% dan penurunan daktilitas sebesar -52,12%.

  6. Fracture behavior of block copolymer and graphene nanoplatelet modified epoxy and fiber reinforced/epoxy polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamar, Nicholas T.

    Glass and carbon fiber reinforced/epoxy polymer composites (GFRPs and CFRPs) have high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios. Thus, GFRPs and CFRPs are used to lightweight aircraft, marine and ground vehicles to reduce transportation energy utilization and cost. However, GFRP and CFRP matrices have a low resistance to crack initiation and propagation; i.e. they have low fracture toughness. Current methods to increase fracture toughness of epoxy and corresponding GFRP and CFRPs often reduce composite mechanical and thermomechanical properties. With the advent of nanotechnology, new methods to improve the fracture toughness and impact properties of composites are now available. The goal of this research is to identify the fracture behavior and toughening mechanisms of nanoparticle modified epoxy, GFRPs and CFRPs utilizing the triblock copolymer poly(styrene)-block-poly(butadiene)-block-poly(methylmethacrylate) (SBM) and graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) as toughening agents. The triblock copolymer SBM was used to toughen the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) resin cured with m-phenylenediamine (mPDA) and corresponding AS4-12k CFRPs. SBM self assembled in epoxy to form nanostructured domains leading to larger increases in fracture toughness, KQ (MPa*m 1/2) than the traditional, phase separating carboxyl-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (CTBN) rubber. Additionally, SBM increased the mode-I fracture toughness, GIc (J/m2) of CFRPs without corresponding reductions in composite three-point flexural properties and glass transition temperature (Tg). Fractography of SBM modified epoxy and CFRPs via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that sub 100 nm spherical micelles cavitated to induce void growth and matrix shear yielding toughening mechanisms. Furthermore, SBM did not suppress epoxy Tg, while CTBN decreased Tg with both increasing concentration and acrylonitrile content. Graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) consist of a few layers of graphene sheets, which

  7. Three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation for injection molding flow of short fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liping; Lu, Gang; Chen, Dachuan; Li, Wenjun; Lu, Chunsheng

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates the three-dimensional (3D) injection molding flow of short fiber-reinforced polymer composites using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation method. The polymer melt was modeled as a power law fluid and the fibers were considered as rigid cylindrical bodies. The filling details and fiber orientation in the injection-molding process were studied. The results indicated that the SPH method could effectively predict the order of filling, fiber accumulation, and heterogeneous distribution of fibers. The SPH simulation also showed that fibers were mainly aligned to the flow direction in the skin layer and inclined to the flow direction in the core layer. Additionally, the fiber-orientation state in the simulation was quantitatively analyzed and found to be consistent with the results calculated by conventional tensor methods.

  8. A new system for posterior restorations: a combination of ceramic optimized polymer and fiber-reinforced composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, L; Trinkner, T; Pescatore, C

    1997-01-01

    Due to the need for increased strength characteristics and enhanced aesthetic expectations of the patients, metal-free, aesthetic restorative systems for the anterior and posterior dentition are currently available. A new "space-age" restorative material has been developed that is a combination of a ceramic optimized polymer (Ceromer) (Targis/Vectris, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY) and a fiber-reinforced composite framework material. The purpose of this article is to discuss the qualities that render this material particularly suitable for a variety of indications, including laboratory-fabricated restorations for the stress-bearing posterior regions. The material lends itself to diversification. Its indication for inlays, onlays, full-coverage crown restorations, and conservative single pontic inlay bridges is presented.

  9. On the Theory and Numerical Simulation of Cohesive Crack Propagation with Application to Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudraraju, Siva Shankar; Garikipati, Krishna; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of crack propagation is among the predominant modes of failure in many natural and engineering structures, often leading to severe loss of structural integrity and catastrophic failure. Thus, the ability to understand and a priori simulate the evolution of this failure mode has been one of the cornerstones of applied mechanics and structural engineering and is broadly referred to as "fracture mechanics." The work reported herein focuses on extending this understanding, in the context of through-thickness crack propagation in cohesive materials, through the development of a continuum-level multiscale numerical framework, which represents cracks as displacement discontinuities across a surface of zero measure. This report presents the relevant theory, mathematical framework, numerical modeling, and experimental investigations of through-thickness crack propagation in fiber-reinforced composites using the Variational Multiscale Cohesive Method (VMCM) developed by the authors.

  10. Impact toughness of cellulose-fiber reinforced polypropylene : influence of microstructure in laminates and injection molded composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Clemons; Daniel Caulfield; A. Jeffrey Giacomin

    2003-01-01

    Unlike their glass reinforced counterparts, microstructure and dynamic fracture behavior of natural fiber-reinforced thermoplastics have hardly been investigated. Here, we characterize the microstructure of cellulose fiber-reinforced polypropylene and determined its effect on impact toughness. Fiber lengths were reduced by one-half when compounded in a high-intensity...

  11. Experimental Research Into the Effect Of External Actions and Polluting Environments on the Serviceablity of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, D. S.; Vildeman, V. E.; Babin, A. D.; Grinev, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    The results of mechanical tests of fiberglass and CFRP specimens in transverse bending and interlaminar shear (the short-beam method) and of sandwich panels in tension and compression are presented. The effect of external polluting environments on the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials and structures is estimated. Stress-strain diagrams are constructed.

  12. Fatigue resistance, debonding force, and failure type of fiber-reinforced composite, polyethylene ribbon-reinforced, and braided stainless steel wire lingual retainers in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Yetkiner, Enver; Ozcan, Mutlu

    Objective: To analyze the fatigue resistance, debonding force, and failure type of fiber-reinforced composite, polyethylene ribbon-reinforced, and braided stainless steel wire lingual retainers in vitro. Methods: Roots of human mandibular central incisors were covered with silicone, mimicking the

  13. Influence of retainer design on two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses: An in vitro and finite element analysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, F.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strenght of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Conclusion: A dual-wing retainer is the optimal design for replacement of a single

  14. The effect of a fiber reinforced cavity configuration on load bearing capacity and failure mode of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM resin composite overlay restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocca, G.T.; Saratti, C.M.; Cattani-Lorente, M.; Feilzer, A.J.; Scherrer, S.; Krecji, I.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the fracture strength and the mode of failure of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM overlays with fiber reinforced composite build-up of the pulp chamber. Methods 40 Devitalized molars were cut over the CEJ and divided into five groups (n = 8). The pulp

  15. Effect of fabrication processes on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced polymer composites for 49 meter (160 foot recreational yachts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave (Dae-Wook Kim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymer composite materials offer high strength and stiffness to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and total life cost reductions that appeal to the marine industry. The advantages of composite construction have led to their incorporation in U.S. yacht hull structures over 46 meters (150 feet in length. In order to construct even larger hull structures, higher quality composites with lower cost production techniques need to be developed. In this study, the effect of composite hull fabrication processes on mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP composites is presented. Fabrication techniques investigated during this study are hand lay-up (HL, vacuum infusion (VI, and hybrid (HL + VI processes. Mechanical property testing includes: tensile, compressive, and ignition loss sample analysis. Results demonstrate that the vacuum pressure implemented during composite fabrication has an effect on mechanical properties. The VI processed GFRP yields improved mechanical properties in tension/compression strengths and tensile modulus. The hybrid GFRP composites, however, failed in a sequential manor, due to dissimilar failure modes in the HL and VI processed sides. Fractography analysis was conducted to validate the mechanical property testing results.

  16. Evaluating the mechanical properties of E-Glass fiber/carbon fiber reinforced interpenetrating polymer networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Suresh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of vinyl ester and polyurethane interpenetrating polymer networks were prepared by changing the component ratios of VER (Vinyl ester and PU (Polyurethane and the polymerization process was confirmed with Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy. IPN (Inter Penetrating Polymer Network - VER/PU reinforced Glass and carbon fiber composite laminates were made using the Hand lay up technique. The Mechanical properties of the E-glass and carbon fiber specimens were compared from tests including Tensile, Compressive, Flexural, ILSS (Inter Laminar Shear Strength, Impact & Head Deflection Test (HDT. The IPN Reinforced Carbon fiber specimen showed better results in all the tests than E-Glass fibre reinforced IPN laminate with same thickness of the specimen, according to ASTM standards. It was found that the combination of 60%VER and 40%PU IPN exhibits better impact strength and maximum elongation at break, but at the slight expense of mechanical properties such as tensile, compressive, flexural, ILSS properties. The morphology of the unreinforced and reinforced composites was analyzed with help of scanning electron microscopy.

  17. Study of the strength and erosive behavior of CaCO3/glass fiber reinforced polyester composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the strength and erosive characteristics of CaCO3 filled unsaturated polyester/glass fiber (UPR/GFR composite are evaluated. Samples of UPR with 40, 50 and 60 wt% content of CaCO3 and different CaCO3 particle sizes of 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 micron were prepared and tested under tensile loading, indentation and erosion conditions. The tensile strength, hardness and erosion wear rate of unsaturated polyester/glass fiber (UPR composite/CaCO3 composite were obtained and evaluated. The results showed that the higher is the percentage of CaCO3 in the composite and the smaller is the CaCO3 particle size, the higher is the strength and the erosive resistance of the glass fiber reinforced/unsaturated polyester composite (UPR-GFR. Furthermore, the highest erosion wear rate is at 90° impingement angle. Finally the results show that the erosive wear of CaCO3 content UPR/GFR composite in a brittle manner.

  18. Fiber reinforced engineering plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Rodney E. Jacobson; Karl D. Sears; John H. Underwood

    2001-01-01

    Although natural fiber reinforced commodity thermoplastics have a wide range of nonstructural applications in the automotive and decking industries, there have been few reports of cellulosic fiber-reinforced engineering thermoplastics. The commonly held belief has been that the only thermoplastics amenable to natural-fibre reinforcement are limited to low-melting (...

  19. THE EFFECT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE ON THE POROSITY AND COMPRESSiVE STRENGTH ON THE CARBON FIBER REINFORCED LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar DEMİREL

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of high temperature on the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber reinforced lightweight concrete with silica fume was investigated. With this aim, lightweight concrete samples were produced by using basaltic pumice (scoria obtained from Elazig region. In addition, the samples produced with and without silica fume and carbon fiber. Silica fume was replaced 10 % by weight of cement and carbon fiber was added 0.5 % by weight of cement. Four different series of samples were prepared in order to observe the effect of high temperature on the physical and mechanical properties of both the lightweight concrete with and without silica fume and the lightweight concrete with and without carbon fiber. The specimens completed the 365 days curing period were exposed to 250, 500, 750 and 1000 °C for 1 hour. Porosity and compressive strength were determined and recorded after the specimens were cooled at the room temperature. In conclusion, it is determined that the losing of compressive strength in the specimens with silica fume is higher than the others. Relation of compressive strength-porosity is high out of 500-750 °C.

  20. Machinability study of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer in the longitudinal and transverse direction and optimization of process parameters using PSO–GSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shunmugesh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP composites are widely used in aerospace industry in lieu of its high strength to weight ratio. This study is an attempt to evaluate the machinability of Bi-Directional Carbon Fiber–Epoxy composite and optimize the process parameters of cutting speed, feed rate and drill tool material. Machining trials were carried using drill bits made of high speed steel, TiN and TiAlN at different cutting speeds and feed rates. Output parameters of thrust force and torque were monitored using Kistler multicomponent dynamometer 9257B and vibrations occurring during machining normal to the work surface were measured by a vibration sensor (Dytran 3055B. Linear regression analysis was carried out by using Response Surface Methodology (RSM, to correlate the input and output parameters in drilling of the composite in the longitudinal and transverse directions. The optimization of process parameters were attempted using Genetic Algorithm (GA and Particle Swarm Optimization–Gravitational Search Algorithm (PSO–GSA techniques.

  1. Impact of long-term thermal exposure on a SiC fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmig, S.; Elgeti, S.; You, Jeong-Ha

    2013-11-01

    Silicon carbide long fiber-reinforced copper matrix composites offer huge potential as a heat sink material of divertor for applications at temperatures above 300 °C thanks to the beneficial combination of strong ceramic fibers and highly conductive copper. For applications at higher operation temperatures, long term thermal stability is an issue, as thermal exposure may cause a detrimental change in microstructure in terms of chemistry and integrity of the constituents leading to overall deterioration of composite strength. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of long term thermal exposure at an elevated temperature on a Cu/SiCf composite material. To this end, composite samples were fabricated and subjected to a heat treatment at 550 °C for 400 h. Extensive tensile tests were conducted for a wide range of fibers volume fractions to evaluate the strength before and after the heat treatment. Acoustic emission was detected in situ during tensile tests for tracking the failure events. Microscopic analysis was carried out to capture the chemical change and damage. It turned out that the applied heat treatment caused significant reduction of strength. Microanalysis revealed that infiltration and diffusion of copper into the fibers via the cracks of the damaged fibers are the direct cause of the embrittlement.

  2. [Comparison of fracture resistance of pulpless teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts and three kinds of resin core material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-yun; Chen, Ji-hua; Shi, Chang-xi; Jia, An-qi; Yang, Li-dou

    2004-10-01

    To compare the fracture resistances of pulpless teeth restored with FRC (Fiber Reinforced Composite) posts and three kinds of resin core material. A total of 42 recently extracted upper incisors were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group A was restored with prefabricated glass-fiber posts and Artglass polymer core; group B with prefabricated glass-fiber posts and Charisma composite resin core; and group C with prefabricated glass-fiber posts and AB composite resin core. In every group, the core material was processed by hot-press and non hot-press respectively. The posts size and shape were identical in the 3 groups. All teeth were fully covered with polycarbonate resin crowns. Fracture resistance was measured by applying point force at 130 degrees to the long axis of the teeth on an universal testing machine. Mean fracture threshold was 505.4 N +/- 42.0 N and 564.1 N +/- 41.7 N in group A, 411.3 N +/- 23.3 N and 315.3 N +/- 19.1 N in group B and 358.4 N +/- 36.1 N and 423.4 N +/- 47.5 N in group C. In all groups, there was no posts fracture and polycarbonate resin crowns fragmentation. The composite restoration of FRC posts combined with resin core and resin crown can improve the fracture resistance of the pulpless roots. The strength of resin core material can be increased by hot-press methods.

  3. Effects of Thermal and Humidity Aging on the Interfacial Adhesion of Polyketone Fiber Reinforced Natural Rubber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ki Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyketone fiber is considered as a reinforcement of the mechanical rubber goods (MRG such as tires, automobile hoses, and belts because of its high strength and modulus. In order to apply it to those purposes, the high adhesion of fiber/rubber interface and good sustainability to aging conditions are very important. In this study, polyketone fiber reinforced natural rubber composites were prepared and they were subjected to thermal and humidity aging, to assess the changes of the interfacial adhesion and material properties. Also, the effect of adhesive primer treatment, based on the resorcinol formaldehyde resin and latex (RFL, of polyketone fiber for high interfacial adhesion was evaluated. Morphological and property changes of the rubber composites were analyzed by using various instrumental analyses. As a result, the rubber composite was aged largely by thermal aging at high temperature rather than humidity aging condition. Interfacial adhesion of the polyketone/NR composites was improved by the primer treatment and its effect was maintained in aging conditions.

  4. An investigation into minimising total energy consumption and total completion time in a flexible job shop for recycling carbon fiber reinforced polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ying; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) in industry coupled with European Union restrictions on landfill disposal has resulted in a need to develop relevant recycling technologies. Several methods, such as mechanical grinding, thermolysis and solvolysis, have been tried to recover the carbon fibers. Optimisation techniques for reducing energy consumed by above processes have also been developed. However, the energy efficiency of recycling CFRP at the workshop leve...

  5. The effect of water storage on the bending properties of esthetic, fiber-reinforced composite orthodontic archwires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ju-Han; Berzins, David W; Pruszynski, Jessica E; Ballard, Richard W

    2014-05-01

    To study the effect of water storage on the bending properties of fiber-reinforced composite archwires and compare it to nickel-titanium (NiTi), stainless steel (SS), and beta-titanium archwires. Align A, B, and C and TorQ A and B composite wires from BioMers Products, 0.014-, 0.016, and 0.018-inch, and 0.019×0.025-inch NiTi, 0.016-inch SS, and 0.019×0.025-inch beta-titanium archwires were tested (n=10/type/size/condition). A 20-mm segment was cut from each end of the archwire; one end was then stored in water at 37°C for 30 days, while the other was stored dry. The segments were tested using three-point bending to a maximum deflection of 3.1 mm with force monitored during loading (activation) and unloading (deactivation). Statistical analysis was completed via two-way analysis of variance with wire and condition (dry and water-stored) as factors. In terms of stiffness and force delivery during activation, in general: beta-titanium was >TorQ B>TorQ A>0.019×0.025-inch NiTi and 0.016-inch SS>Align C>0.018-inch NiTi>Align B>0.016-inch NiTi>Align A>0.014-inch NiTi. Water exposure was detrimental to the larger translucent wires (Align B and C, TorQ A and B) because they were more likely to craze during bending, resulting in decreased forces applied at a given deflection. Align A and the alloy wires were not significantly (P>.05) affected by water storage. Overall, the alloy wires possessed more consistent force values compared to the composite wires. Environmental conditions are more likely to affect fiber-reinforced composite archwires compared to alloy wires.

  6. Strength and fatigue of three glass fiber reinforced composite bridge decks with mechanical deck to stringer connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Replacement of the steel grating deck on the lift span of the Morrison Bridge in Portland, OR, will utilize glass : fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) panels to address ongoing maintenance issues of the deteriorated existing deck, improve driver : safety...

  7. Joining of polypropylene/polypropylene and glass fiber reinforced polypropylene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguang

    Joining behavior of polypropylene (PP) to PP and long glass fiber reinforced polypropylene (LFT) to LFT were investigated. Adhesive bonding was used to join PP/PP. Both adhesive bonding and ultrasonic welding were used to join LFT/LFT. Single-lap shear testing and low velocity impact (LVI) testing were used to evaluate the performance of bonded structures. The two-part acrylic adhesive DP8005 was determined to be the best among the three adhesive candidates, which was attributed to its low surface energy. The impact resistance of LFT/LFT joints, normalized with respect to thickness, was higher than that of PP/PP joints because of higher stiffness of LFT/LFT joints. The stress states in the adhesive layer of adhesively bonded structures were analyzed using ANSYS and LS-DYNA to simulate the single-lap shear testing and LVI testing, respectively. The shear and peel stresses peaked at the edges of the adhesive layer. Compared to LFT/LFT joints, higher peel stress occurred in the adhesive layer in the PP/PP joints in tension. Impact response of adhesively bonded structures as evaluated by LS-DYNA showed good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of weld time and weld pressure on the shear strength of ultrasonically welded LFT/LFT was evaluated. With higher weld pressure, less time was required to obtain a complete weld. At longer weld times, lower weld pressure was required. From the 15 weld conditions studied, a weld map was obtained that provides conditions to achieve a complete weld. Nanoindentation was used to evaluate the effect of ultrasonic weld on the modulus and hardness of the PP matrix. Modulus and hardness of the PP matrix were slightly decreased by ultrasonic welding possibly due to the decrease in the molecular weight. The temperature profile in LFT/LFT in the transverse direction during ultrasonic welding was analyzed by two ANSYS-based thermal models: (a) one in which heat generated by interfacial friction was treated as a heat flux and (b

  8. Fabrication of novel fiber reinforced aluminum composites by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arab, Seyyed Mohammad; Karimi, Saeed; Jahromi, Seyyed Ahmad Jenabali, E-mail: jahromi@shirazu.ac.ir; Javadpour, Sirus; Zebarjad, Seyyed Mojtaba

    2015-04-24

    In this study, chopped and attrition milled high strength carbon, E-glass, and S-glass fibers have been used as the reinforcing agents in an aluminum alloy (Al1100) considered as the matrix. The Surface Metal Matrix Composites (SMMCs) then are produced by Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Tensile and micro-hardness examinations represent a magnificent improvement in the hardness, strength, ductility and toughness for all of the processed samples. Scanning Electron Micrographs reveal a proper distribution of the reinforcements in the matrix and a change in the fracture behavior of the FSPed specimens. The synergetic effects of reinforcing by fibers and Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) lead to an extra ordinary improvement in the mechanical properties.

  9. Study of stinging nettle (urtica dioica l.) Fibers reinforced green composite materials : a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agus Suryawan, I. G. P.; Suardana, N. P. G.; Suprapta Winaya, I. N.; Budiarsa Suyasa, I. W.; Tirta Nindhia, T. G.

    2017-05-01

    Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica L., latin) is a wild plant that grows in Indonesia, Asia, and Europe. Nettle in Bali, Indonesia is called as Lateng, Jelatang. Nettle plant has a very strong fiber and high fixed carbon. Nettle plants are covered with fine hairs, especially in the leaves and stems. When it is touched, it will release chemicals, sting and trigger inflammation that causes redness, itching, bumps and irritation to the skin. Nettle plants grow in the wild, regarded as a weed in the agricultural industry, easy to grow and snatch food from the parent plant. The main objective of this paper is to review of the potential nettle fibers and then explain about the potential of local nettle plant in Indonesia. Nettle is a plant group at the end of bast. Its plant fibers taken from the bark, as reinforcement in composite materials. Nettle fibers have three main advantages such as strong, lightweight and low environmental impact.

  10. Comparative evaluation of fracture resistance of glass fiber reinforced, carbon, and quartz post in endodontically treated teeth: An in-vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shweta; Attokaran, George; Singh, Kunwar S.; Jerry, Jeethu J.; Ahmed, Naima; Mitra, Nirban

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: Use of posts improves the physical properties of endodontically-treated teeth. Different post types are developed such as metal, custom-made, carbon, and quartz. The present study was conducted to evaluate the fracture resistance of glass fiber-reinforced, carbon, and quartz post in endodontically-treated teeth. Materials and Methods: Forty extracted human maxillary incisor teeth were decoronated and endodontically treated and equally divided into 4 groups; control, glass fiber-reinforced, carbon, and quartz posts. No post was used in the control group. Post space was prepared and cemented with different posts and subjected to universal testing machine to check fracture resistance. The data were statistically analyzed using t-test and analysis of variance to compare the mean difference between groups (SPSS version 20, IBM). Results: Quartz type of endodontic post showed good fracture resistance compared to carbon and resin-reinforced post. Least resistance was observed in the control group without post. Conclusion: Quartz, carbon, and glass fiber-reinforced posts show good resistance to fracture, and hence can be used in endodontically-treated teeth to enhance their strength. PMID:27583227

  11. Comparative evaluation of fracture resistance of glass fiber reinforced, carbon, and quartz post in endodontically treated teeth: An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shweta; Attokaran, George; Singh, Kunwar S; Jerry, Jeethu J; Ahmed, Naima; Mitra, Nirban

    2016-01-01

    Use of posts improves the physical properties of endodontically-treated teeth. Different post types are developed such as metal, custom-made, carbon, and quartz. The present study was conducted to evaluate the fracture resistance of glass fiber-reinforced, carbon, and quartz post in endodontically-treated teeth. Forty extracted human maxillary incisor teeth were decoronated and endodontically treated and equally divided into 4 groups; control, glass fiber-reinforced, carbon, and quartz posts. No post was used in the control group. Post space was prepared and cemented with different posts and subjected to universal testing machine to check fracture resistance. The data were statistically analyzed using t-test and analysis of variance to compare the mean difference between groups (SPSS version 20, IBM). Quartz type of endodontic post showed good fracture resistance compared to carbon and resin-reinforced post. Least resistance was observed in the control group without post. Quartz, carbon, and glass fiber-reinforced posts show good resistance to fracture, and hence can be used in endodontically-treated teeth to enhance their strength.

  12. EFFECT OF LAYERING PATTERN ON THE DYNAMIC MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND THERMAL DEGRADATION OF OIL PALM-JUTE FIBERS REINFORCED EPOXY HYBRID COMPOSITE

    OpenAIRE

    M. Jawaid; H. P. S. Abdul Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical and thermal analysis of oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB)/jute fiber reinforced epoxy hybrid composites were carried out. The effect of layering pattern on dynamic mechanical properties (storage modulus (E’), loss modulus (E”), and tan δ) was investigated as a function of temperature. The storage modulus (E’) was found to be decreased with temperature in all cases, and hybrid composites had almost the same values of E’ at glass transition temperature (Tg). The tan δ peak h...

  13. Effect of Expansive Admixtures on the Shrinkage and Mechanical Properties of High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Chang Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-performance fiber-reinforced cement composites (HPFRCCs are characterized by strain-hardening and multiple cracking during the inelastic deformation process, but they also develop high shrinkage strain. This study investigates the effects of replacing Portland cement with calcium sulfoaluminate-based expansive admixtures (CSA EXAs to compensate for the shrinkage and associated mechanical behavior of HPFRCCs. Two types of CSA EXA (CSA-K and CSA-J, each with a different chemical composition, are used in this study. Various replacement ratios (0%, 8%, 10%, 12%, and 14% by weight of cement of CSA EXA are considered for the design of HPFRCC mixtures reinforced with 1.5% polyethylene (PE fibers by volume. Mechanical properties, such as shrinkage compensation, compressive strength, flexural strength, and direct tensile strength, of the HPFRCC mixtures are examined. Also, crack width and development are investigated to determine the effects of the EXAs on the performance of the HPFRCC mixtures, and a performance index is used to quantify the performance of mixture. The results indicate that replacements of 10% CSA-K (Type 1 and 8% CSA-J (Type 2 considerably enhance the mechanical properties and reduce shrinkage of HPFRCCs.

  14. Combined Effects of Sustained Loads and Wet-Dry Cycles on Durability of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengting Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with durability of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP composites under the combined effects of sustained tensile loads and wet-dry (WD cycles. Two different solutions (distilled water and saltwater were used to imitate the freshwater and marine environments, respectively. Tensile properties of the unconditioned and conditioned specimens were measured to study the durability of GFRP composites under these 2 effects. The response indicated that both tensile strength and elastic modulus increased initially upon WD cycles, which was attributed to both the postcuring of resin and the sustained tensile stress allowing for fastec cure. Further exposure to WD cycles in distilled water or saltwater led to a steady decrease in tensile strength and modulus. WD cycles of saltwater and distilled water have similar effects on the degradation of the tensile properties for unstressed specimens. However, the elastic modulus and elongation at rupture of stressed specimens under WD cycles of saltwater decreased more than those specimens under WD cycles of distilled water. Moreover, increase of sustained loads led to a decrease in tensile strength. Based on Arrhenius method, a prediction model which accounted for the effects of postcure processes was developed. The predicted results of tensile strength and elastic modulus agree well with those obtained from the experiments.

  15. Short glass fiber-reinforced composite with a semi-interpenetrating polymer network matrix for temporary crowns and bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan K; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reinforcement effect of short E-glass fiber fillers on some mechanical properties of temporary crown and bridge (TCB) composite resin with a semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN). Experimental temporary fiber reinforced (TFC) composite resin was prepared by mixing 15 wt% of short E-glass fibers (3 mm in length) with a 35 wt% of semi-IPN-resin (dual or chemical cure) with 50 wt% of silane treated particulate silica fillers using a high speed mixing device. Temporary crowns (n=6) and test specimens (2 x 2 x 25 mm3) (n=6) were made from the experimental TFC and conventional TCB composite (control, Protemp Garant, 3M-ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). A three-point bending test was done according to ISO standard 10477, and a compression loading test was carried out using a steel ball (Ø 3.0 mm) with a speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture occurred. The degree of monomer conversion (DC%) of both composites was determined by Fourier transfer infrared (FTIR) spectrometry. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed both dual and chemical cure experimental TFC composite resins had statistically significant (p<0.05) higher flexural strengths (117 and 99 MPa, respectively) and compressive load-bearing capacity (730 and 623 N, respectively) compared to the control TCB composite resin (72 MPa, 549 N). The use of short fiber fillers with semi-IPN polymer matrix yielded an improved mechanical performance compared to a conventional TCB composite resin.

  16. Electrical and Self-Sensing Properties of Ultra-High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhwan You

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the electrical and self-sensing capacities of ultra-high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC with and without carbon nanotubes (CNTs. For this, the effects of steel fiber content, orientation, and pore water content on the electrical and piezoresistive properties of UHPFRC without CNTs were first evaluated. Then, the effect of CNT content on the self-sensing capacities of UHPFRC under compression and flexure was investigated. Test results indicated that higher steel fiber content, better fiber orientation, and higher amount of pore water led to higher electrical conductivity of UHPFRC. The effects of fiber orientation and drying condition on the electrical conductivity became minor as sufficiently high amount of steel fibers, 3% by volume, was added. Including only steel fibers did not impart UHPFRC with piezoresistive properties. Addition of CNTs substantially improved the electrical conductivity of UHPFRC. Under compression, UHPFRC with a CNT content of 0.3% or greater had a self-sensing ability that was activated by the formation of cracks, and better sensing capacity was achieved by including greater amount of CNTs. Furthermore, the pre-peak flexural behavior of UHPFRC was precisely simulated with a fractional change in resistivity when 0.3% CNTs were incorporated. The pre-cracking self-sensing capacity of UHPFRC with CNTs was more effective under tensile stress state than under compressive stress state.

  17. Effect of Cooling Rate on the Mechanical Strength of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Sheets in Press Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuno, D.; Yoneyama, T.; Kawamoto, K.; Okamoto, M.

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the effect of the cooling rate of the carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic (CFRTP) sheets on the mechanical property in the press forming within 1 min cycle time. In order to pay attention only to the compression stage after the deformation stage in press forming, a flat sheet of dimensions 200 mm × 100 mm × 3 mm was produced. It was fabricated by stacking 15 CFRTP sheets of 0.2-mm-thick plain woven fabric impregnated with PA6, preheating them to 280 °C and pressing them at 5 MPa using a die cooled from near the melting temperature of PA6 with various cooling rates. Cooling rate of -26 °C/s with pressure holding time (defined in this study as the period that the pressure sensor detects high pressure) of 7 s and that of -4.4 °C/s with pressure holding time of 18 s gave a flexural strength of 536 and 733 MPa, respectively. It was found that the cooling rate during pressure holding is related to the mechanical property of press-formed CFRTP part.

  18. Quick Preparation of Moisture-Saturated Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Plastics and Their Accelerated Ageing Tests Using Heat and Moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Kunioka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A quick method involving the control of heat and water vapor pressure for preparing moisture-saturated carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP, 8 unidirectional prepreg layers, 1.5 mm thickness, epoxy resin has been developed. The moisture-saturated CFRP sample was obtained at 120 °C and 0.2 MPa water vapor in 72 h by this method using a sterilizer (autoclave. The bending strength and viscoelastic properties measured by a dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA remained unchanged during repetitive saturation and drying steps. No degradation and molecular structural change occurred. Furthermore an accelerated ageing test with two ageing factors, i.e., heat and moisture was developed and performed at 140–160 °C and 0.36–0.62 MPa water vapor pressure by using a sealed pressure-proof stainless steel vessel (autoclave. The bending strength of the sample decreased from 1107 to 319 MPa at 160 °C and 0.63 MPa water vapor pressure in 9 days. Degraded samples were analyzed by DMA. The degree of degradation for samples was analyzed by DMA. CFRP and degraded CFRP samples were analyzed by using a surface and interfacial cutting analysis system (SAICAS and an electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA equipped in a scanning electron microscope.

  19. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer dimensional stability investigations for use on the laser interferometer space antenna mission telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuán, J; Preston, A; Korytov, D; Spector, A; Freise, A; Dixon, G; Livas, J; Mueller, G

    2011-12-01

    The laser interferometer space antenna (LISA) is a mission designed to detect low frequency gravitational waves. In order for LISA to succeed in its goal of direct measurement of gravitational waves, many subsystems must work together to measure the distance between proof masses on adjacent spacecraft. One such subsystem, the telescope, plays a critical role as it is the laser transmission and reception link between spacecraft. Not only must the material that makes up the telescope support structure be strong, stiff, and light, but it must have a dimensional stability of better than 1 pm Hz(-1/2) at 3 mHz and the distance between the primary and the secondary mirrors must change by less than 2.5 μm over the mission lifetime. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer is the current baseline material; however, it has not been tested to the pico meter level as required by the LISA mission. In this paper, we present dimensional stability results, outgassing effects occurring in the cavity and discuss its feasibility for use as the telescope spacer for the LISA spacecraft.

  20. Selective responses of human gingival fibroblasts and bacteria on carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone with multilevel nanostructured TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Lu, Tao; Wen, Jin; Xu, Lianyi; Zeng, Deliang; Wu, Qianju; Cao, Lingyan; Lin, Shuxian; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-03-01

    The long-term success of dental implants relies not only on stable osseointegration but also on the integration of implant surfaces with surrounding soft tissues. In our previous work, titanium plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique was applied to modify the carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) surface, constructing a unique multilevel TiO2 nanostructure thus enhancing certain osteogenic properties. However, the interactions between the modified surface and soft-tissue cells are still not clear. Here, we fully investigate the biological behaviors of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and oral pathogens on the structured surface, which determine the early peri-implant soft tissue integration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows the formation of nanopores with TiO2 nanoparticles embedded on both the sidewall and bottom. In vitro studies including cell adhesion, viability assay, wound healing assay, real-time PCR, western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) disclose improved adhesion, migration, proliferation, and collagen secretion ability of HGFs on the modified CFRPEEK. Moreover, the structured surface exhibits sustainable antibacterial properties towards Streptococcus mutans, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Our results reveal that the multilevel TiO2 nanostructures can selectively enhance soft tissue integration and inhibit bacterial reproduction, which will further support and broaden the adoption of CFRPEEK materials in dental fields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A new volar plate made of carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketon for distal radius fracture: analysis of 40 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarallo, Luigi; Mugnai, Raffaele; Adani, Roberto; Zambianchi, Francesco; Catani, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    Implants based on the polyetheretherketon (PEEK) polymer have been developed in the last decade as an alternative to conventional metallic devices. PEEK devices may provide several advantages over the use of conventional orthopedic materials, including the lack of metal allergies, radiolucency, low artifacts on magnetic resonance imaging scans and the possibility of tailoring mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical results at 12-month follow-up using a new plate made of carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketon for the treatment of distal radius fractures. We included 40 consecutive fractures of AO types B and C that remained displaced after an initial attempt at reduction. The fractures were classified according to the AO classification: 21 fractures were type C1, 9 were type C2, 2 were type C3, 2 were type B1 and 6 were type B2. At a 12-month follow-up no cases of hardware breakage or loss of the surgically achieved fracture reduction were documented. All fractures healed, and radiographic union was observed at an average of 6 weeks. The final Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand score was 6.0 points. The average grip strength, expressed as a percentage of the contralateral limb, was 92 %. Hardware removal was performed only in one case, for the occurrence of extensor tenosynovitis. At early follow-up this device showed good clinical results and allowed maintenance of reduction in complex, AO fractures. Therapeutic IV.

  2. Evaluation of push-out bond strength of two fiber-reinforced composite posts systems using two luting cements in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Kadam; Madhu Pujar; Chetan Patil

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The concept of using a "post" for the restoration of teeth has been practiced to restore the endodontically treated tooth. Metallic posts have been commonly used, but their delirious effects have led to the development of fiber-reinforced materials that have overcome the limitations of metallic posts. The use of glass and quartz fibers was proposed as an alternative to the dark color of carbon fiber posts as far as esthetics was concerned. "Debonding" is the most common failure ...

  3. Numerical and experimental investigation of the structural behavior of a carbon fiber reinforced ankle-foot orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stier, Bertram; Simon, Jaan-Willem; Reese, Stefanie

    2015-05-01

    Ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) are designed to enhance the gait function of individuals with motor impairments. Recent AFOs are often made of laminated composites due to their high stiffness and low density. Since the performance of AFO is primarily influenced by their structural stiffness, the investigation of the mechanical response is very important for the design. The aim of this paper is to present a three dimensional multi-scale structural analysis methodology to speed up the design process of AFO. The multi-scale modeling procedure was applied such that the intrinsic micro-structure of the fiber reinforced laminates could be taken into account. In particular, representative volume elements were used on the micro-scale, where fiber and matrix were treated separately, and on the textile scale of the woven structure. For the validation of this methodology, experimental data were generated using digital image correlation (DIC) measurements. Finally, the structural behavior of the whole AFO was predicted numerically for a specific loading scenario and compared with experimental results. It was shown that the proposed numerical multi-scale scheme is well suited for the prediction of the structural behavior of AFOs, validated by the comparison of local strain fields as well as the global force-displacement curves. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Coconut Fillers on Hybrid Coconut Kevlar Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    OpenAIRE

    S. P. Jani; Senthil Kumar, A.; A. Adamkhan; Nithin; Rajakumar

    2015-01-01

    This project focuses on the conversion of naturally available coconut fibers and shells into a useful composite. In addition to it, some mechanical properties of the resultant composite is determined and also the effect of coconut shell fillers on the composite is also investigated. The few portion of the composite is incorporated with synthetic Kevlar fiber, thus the coconut fiber is hybridized to enhance the mechanical properties of coconut. In this work two types of composite is fabricate,...

  5. A Testing Platform for Durability Studies of Polymers and Fiber-reinforced Polymer Composites under Concurrent Hygrothermo-mechanical Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Antonio; Pires, Robert; Yambao, Alyssa; La Saponara, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    The durability of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under service condition is a critical aspect to be addressed for their robust designs and condition-based maintenance. These materials are adopted in a wide range of engineering applications, from aircraft and ship structures, to bridges, wind turbine blades, biomaterials and biomedical implants. Polymers are viscoelastic materials, and their response may be highly nonlinear and thus make it challenging to predict and monitor their in-service performance. The laboratory-scale testing platform presented herein assists the investigation of the influence of concurrent mechanical loadings and environmental conditions on these materials. The platform was designed to be low-cost and user-friendly. Its chemically resistant materials make the platform adaptable to studies of chemical degradation due to in-service exposure to fluids. An example of experiment was conducted at RT on closed-cell polyurethane foam samples loaded with a weight corresponding to ~50% of their ultimate static and dry load. Results show that the testing apparatus is appropriate for these studies. Results also highlight the larger vulnerability of the polymer under concurrent loading, based on the higher mid-point displacements and lower residual failure loads. Recommendations are made for additional improvements to the testing apparatus. PMID:25548950

  6. A testing platform for durability studies of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under concurrent hygrothermo-mechanical stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Antonio; Pires, Robert; Yambao, Alyssa; La Saponara, Valeria

    2014-12-11

    The durability of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under service condition is a critical aspect to be addressed for their robust designs and condition-based maintenance. These materials are adopted in a wide range of engineering applications, from aircraft and ship structures, to bridges, wind turbine blades, biomaterials and biomedical implants. Polymers are viscoelastic materials, and their response may be highly nonlinear and thus make it challenging to predict and monitor their in-service performance. The laboratory-scale testing platform presented herein assists the investigation of the influence of concurrent mechanical loadings and environmental conditions on these materials. The platform was designed to be low-cost and user-friendly. Its chemically resistant materials make the platform adaptable to studies of chemical degradation due to in-service exposure to fluids. An example of experiment was conducted at RT on closed-cell polyurethane foam samples loaded with a weight corresponding to ~50% of their ultimate static and dry load. Results show that the testing apparatus is appropriate for these studies. Results also highlight the larger vulnerability of the polymer under concurrent loading, based on the higher mid-point displacements and lower residual failure loads. Recommendations are made for additional improvements to the testing apparatus.

  7. Five-year survival of 3-unit fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures in the posterior area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heumen, Céleste C M; Tanner, Johanna; van Dijken, Jan W V; Pikaar, Ronald; Lassila, Lippo V J; Creugers, Nico H J; Vallittu, Pekka K; Kreulen, Cees M

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of three-unit posterior fixed partial dentures (FPDs) made of fiber-reinforced resin composite (FRC), and to identify design factors influencing the survival rate. 77 patients (52 females, 25 males) received 96 indirectly made FRC FPDs, using pre-impregnated unidirectional glass-fibers, requiring manual wetting, as framework material. FPDs were surface (n=31) inlay (n=45) or hybrid (n=20) retained and mainly located in the upper jaw. Hybrid FPDs consisted of a wing retainer at canine and an inlay retainer at distal abutment tooth. Surface FPDs consisted of uplay and wing combinations. Follow-up period was at minimum 4.5 years, with checkups at every 1-2 years. The study was carried out by six operators in three centers in the Netherlands, Finland and Sweden. Survival rates, including reparable defects of FPDs, and success rates were determined. Kaplan-Meier survival rate at 5 years was 71.2% (SE 4.8%) for success and 77.5% (SE 4.4%) for survival. Differences were not significantly different. Main failure modes were delamination and fracture of the FPD. Only FPDs with surface retainers showed debonding. A success rate of 71% and a survival rate of 78% after 5 years was found. Survival rates of inlay, hybrid and surface retained FPDs did not significantly differ. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical evaluation of fiber-reinforced composite crowns in pulp-treated primary molars: 12-month results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Zahra; Parisay, Iman; Mehrabkhani, Maryam; Madani, Azam Sadat; Mazhari, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of tooth-colored fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) crowns in pulp-treated second primary mandibular teeth. This split-mouth randomized, clinical trial performed on 67 children between 3 and 6 years with two primary mandibular second molars requiring pulp treatment. After pulp therapy, the teeth were randomly assigned to stainless steel crown (SSC) or FRC crown groups. Modified United States Public Health Service criteria were used to evaluate marginal integrity, marginal discoloration, and secondary caries in FRC crowns at intervals of 3, 6, and 12 months. Retention rate and gingival health were also compared between the two groups. The data were analyzed using Friedman, Cochran, and McNemar's tests at a significance level of 0.05. Intact marginal integrity in FRC crowns at 3, 6, and 12 months were 93.2%, 94.8%, and 94.2%, respectively. Marginal discoloration and secondary caries were not found at any of the FRC crowns. The retention rates of the FRC crowns were 100%, 98.3%, and 89.7% at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively, whereas all the SSCs were found to be present and intact after 12 months (P = 0.016). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in gingival health. According to the results of this study, it seems that when esthetics is a concern, in cooperative patients with good oral hygiene, FRC crowns can be considered as a valuable procedure.

  9. Effect of Length and Diameter of Fiber Reinforced Composite Post on Fracture Resistance of Remaining Tooth Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Ebrahimzadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Post and core has been considered for endodontically treated tooth, especially in cases with severe damage crowns. Recently fiber reinforced composite posts (FRC post have been used in the treatment of endodontically treated teeth. Because the length and diameter of posts are effective in stress distribution, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of length and diameter of FRC post on fracture resistance. Methods: In this experimental study, 36 glass fiber posts with combination of 7mm, 9mm, and 12mm length and 1.1mm, 1.3mm and 1.5mm diameter were divided into 9 groups of 4. These posts were cemented in root canals by Panavia. Samples were tested with 45° compressive forces for the evaluation of fracture resistance. Datas were analyzed using SPSS soft ware and One- way and Two-way ANOVA analyses. Results: Fracture resistance did not increase significantly with the effect of length and diameter simultaneously (P=0.85. Samples with 12mm length and 1.5mm diameter had the greatest fracture resistance (1023/33N±239/22. The minimum fracture resistance had occurred in post with 7mm length and 1.5mm diameter (503/13N ±69/18. Fracture resistance increased significantly by increasing the length and the same diameter. Conclusion: It can be concluded that fracture resistance is affected by the length and not the diameter of FRC post.

  10. Effect of length and diameter of fiber reinforced composite post (FRC on fracture resistance of remaining tooth structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdiyeh seifi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Post and core has been considered for endodontically treated tooth, especially in cases with severe damage crowns. Recently fiber reinforced composite posts (FRC post have been used in the treatment of endodontically treated teeth. Because the length and diameter of posts are effective in stress distribution, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of length and diameter of FRC post on fracture resistance. Methods: In this experimental study, 36 glass fiber posts with combination of 7mm, 9mm, and 12mm length and 1.1mm, 1.3mm and 1.5mm diameter were divided into 9 groups of 4. These posts were cemented in root canals by Panavia. Samples were tested with 45° compressive forces for the evaluation of fracture resistance. Datas were analyzed using SPSS soft ware and One- way and Two-way ANOVA analyses. Results: Fracture resistance did not increase significantly with the effect of length and diameter simultaneously (P=0.85. Samples with 12mm length and 1.5mm diameter had the greatest fracture resistance (1023/33N±239/22. The minimum fracture resistance had occurred in post with 7mm length and 1.5mm diameter (503/13N ±69/18. Fracture resistance increased significantly by increasing the length and the same diameter. Conclusion: It can be concluded that fracture resistance is affected by the length and not the diameter of FRC post.

  11. Monotonic and cyclic responses of impact polypropylene and continuous glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene composites at different strain rates

    KAUST Repository

    Yudhanto, Arief

    2016-03-08

    Impact copolymer polypropylene (IPP), a blend of isotactic polypropylene and ethylene-propylene rubber, and its continuous glass fiber composite form (glass fiber-reinforced impact polypropylene, GFIPP) are promising materials for impact-prone automotive structures. However, basic mechanical properties and corresponding damage of IPP and GFIPP at different rates, which are of keen interest in the material development stage and numerical tool validation, have not been reported. Here, we applied monotonic and cyclic tensile loads to IPP and GFIPP at different strain rates (0.001/s, 0.01/s and 0.1/s) to study the mechanical properties, failure modes and the damage parameters. We used monotonic and cyclic tests to obtain mechanical properties and define damage parameters, respectively. We also used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images to visualize the failure mode. We found that IPP generally exhibits brittle fracture (with relatively low failure strain of 2.69-3.74%) and viscoelastic-viscoplastic behavior. GFIPP [90]8 is generally insensitive to strain rate due to localized damage initiation mostly in the matrix phase leading to catastrophic transverse failure. In contrast, GFIPP [±45]s is sensitive to the strain rate as indicated by the change in shear modulus, shear strength and failure mode.

  12. The effect of high fiber fraction on some mechanical properties of unidirectional glass fiber-reinforced composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmajeed, Aous A; Närhi, Timo O; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V

    2011-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of an increase of fiber-density on some mechanical properties of higher volume fiber-reinforced composite (FRC). Five groups of FRC with increased fiber-density were fabricated and two additional groups were prepared by adding silanated barium-silicate glass fillers (0.7 μm) to the FRC. The unidirectional E-glass fiber rovings were impregnated with light-polymerizable bisGMA-TEGDMA (50-50%) resin. The fibers were pulled through a cylindrical mold with an opening diameter of 4.2mm, light cured for 40s and post-cured at elevated temperature. The cylindrical specimens (n=12) were conditioned at room temperature for 2 days before testing with the three-point bending test (Lloyd Instruments Ltd.) adapted to ISO 10477. Fiber-density was analyzed by combustion and gravimetric analyzes. ANOVA analysis revealed that by increasing the vol.% fraction of E-glass fibers from 51.7% to 61.7% there was a change of 27% (pfibers and volume of the polymer matrix more precisely than flexural strength when high fiber-density is used. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Coir Rope-Glass Fibers Reinforced Polymer Hybrid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakri Bakri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber composites have been developed and taken more attention in the last decades. Coir fiber is the natural fiber which has been used as reinforcement of composites. This fiber is hybridized with glass fiber for reinforcement composite. In this paper, coir rope and glass fibers were combined as reinforcement into hybrid composites with unsaturated polyester resin as matrix. The composition of fibers and matrix into hybrid composites are used 30:70 (volume fraction with unsaturated polyester. Volume fractions of coir rope mat and glass fiber mat in hybrid composites are 10:20, 15:15 and 20:10 respectively. The mechanical properties of the coir rope-glass fiber composite hybrid were described in this paper. Their properties include tensile strength, tensile modulus, flexural strength, flexural modulus, impact energy and impact strength. Fractography of tensile composite hybrid is also analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscope

  14. Mechanical Properties of Coir Rope-Glass Fibers Reinforced Polymer Hybrid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Bakri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber composites have been developed and taken more attention in the last decades. Coir fiber is the natural fiber which has been used as reinforcement of composites. This fiber is hybridized with glass fiber for reinforcement composite. In this paper, coir rope and glass fibers were combined as reinforcement into hybrid composites with unsaturated polyester resin as matrix. The composition of fibers and matrix into hybrid composites are used 30:70 (volume fraction with unsaturated polyester. Volume fractions of coir rope mat and glass fiber mat in hybrid composites are 10:20, 15:15 and 20:10 respectively. The mechanical properties of the coir rope-glass fiber composite hybrid were described in this paper. Their properties include tensile strength, tensile modulus, flexural strength, flexural modulus, impact energy and impact strength. Fractography of tensile composite hybrid is also analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscope.

  15. A glass fiber-reinforced composite - bioactive glass cranioplasty implant: A case study of an early development stage implant removed due to a late infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posti, Jussi P; Piitulainen, Jaakko M; Hupa, Leena; Fagerlund, Susanne; Frantzén, Janek; Aitasalo, Kalle M J; Vuorinen, Ville; Serlo, Willy; Syrjänen, Stina; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-03-01

    This case study describes the properties of an early development stage bioactive glass containing fiber-reinforced composite calvarial implant with histology that has been in function for two years and three months. The patient is a 33-year old woman with a history of substance abuse, who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury later unsuccessfully treated with an autologous bone flap and a custom-made porous polyethylene implant. She was thereafter treated with developmental stage glass fiber-reinforced composite - bioactive glass implant. After two years and three months, the implant was removed due to an implant site infection. The implant was analyzed histologically, mechanically, and in terms of chemistry and dissolution of bioactive glass. Mechanical integrity of the load bearing fiber-reinforced composite part of the implant was not affected by the in vivo period. Bioactive glass particles demonstrated surface layers of hydroxyapatite like mineral and dissolution, and related increase of pH was considerably less after two and three months period than that for fresh bioactive glass. There was a difference in the histology of the tissues inside the implant areas near to the margin of the implant that absorbed blood during implant installation surgery, showed fibrous tissue with blood vessels, osteoblasts, collagenous fibers with osteoid formation, and tiny clusters of more mature hard tissue. In the center of the implant, where there was less absorbed blood, only fibrous tissue was observed. This finding is in line with the combined positron emission tomography - computed tomography examination with (18F)-fluoride marker, which demonstrated activity of the mineralizing bone by osteoblasts especially at the area near to the margin of the implant 10 months after implantation. Based on these promising reactions found in the bioactive glass containing fiber-reinforced composite implant that has been implanted for two years and three months, calvarial

  16. Assessment of Tensile Bond Strength of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resin to Enamel Using Two Types of Resin Cements and Three Surface Treatment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghaffari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-bonded bridgework with a metal framework is one of the most conservative ways to replace a tooth with intact abutments. Visibility of metal substructure and debonding are the complications of these bridgeworks. Today, with the introduction of fiber-reinforced composite resins, it is possible to overcome these complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin materials (FRC to enamel. Methods: Seventy-two labial cross-sections were prepared from intact extracted teeth. Seventy-two rectangular samples of cured Vectris were prepared and their thickness was increased by adding Targis. The samples were divided into 3 groups for three different surface treatments: sandblasting, etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid, and roughening with a round tapered diamond bur. Each group was then divided into two subgroups for bonding to etched enamel by Enforce and Variolink II resin cements. Instron universal testing machine was used to apply a tensile force. The fracture force was recorded and the mode of failure was identified under a reflective microscope. Results: There were no significant differences in bond strength between the three surface treatment groups (P=0.53. The mean bond strength of Variolink II cement was greater than that of Enforce (P=0.04. There was no relationship between the failure modes (cohesive and adhesive and the two cement types. There was some association between surface treatment and failure mode. There were adhesive failures in sandblasted and diamond-roughened groups and the cohesive failure was dominant in the etched group. Conclusion: It is recommended that restorations made of fiber-reinforced composite resin be cemented with VariolinkII and surface-treated by hydrofluoric acid.   Keywords: Tensile bond strength; surface treatment methods; fiber-reinforced composite resin

  17. Feasibility of fiber reinforced composite materials used in highway bridge superstructures

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Shih-Yung

    1988-01-01

    Composite materials are considered here as structural materials of highway bridge superstructures. Bridge deck designs can be done according to AASHTO1 specification and elastic design concepts. In order to evaluate the feasibility of composites as structural materials of highway bridge superstructures, composite materials are compared not only to composite materials themselves but also to the most popular bridge structural materials, which are reinforced concrete and struc...

  18. Mechanical properties of abaca fiber reinforced polypropylene composites: Effect of chemical treatment by benzenediazonium chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadevi Punyamurthy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Untreated abaca fibers and benzenediazonium chloride treated abaca strands were employed as reinforcements for fabricating polypropylene composites by injection molding method. Various composites were fabricated with different fiber loadings of 30%, 35%, 40%, 45% and 50% with and without coupling agents. Abaca composites without coupling agents with 40% fiber loadings were found to have optimum properties when mechanical characterization was done and the investigation also revealed that untreated and treated composites with coupling agents were found to have improved tensile strength, flexural strength and impact strength when correlated to composites without coupling agents. Among various surface modifications performed, benzenediazonium chloride treated abaca strands reinforced polypropylene composites with coupling agents showed superior properties. For composites including coupling agents, surge in tensile strength and flexural strength was observed with hike in fiber content up to 50% whereas optimum impact properties were shown at 40% fiber loading. Between untreated composites with coupling agent and without coupling agent, composites with coupling agent showed 77.50% hike in tensile strength for 50% fiber loading. Benzenediazonium chloride treated composites with coupling agent showed 70.07% increase in tensile strength when compared to benzenediazonium chloride treated composites without coupling agent for 50% fiber loading. Untreated composites with coupling agent showed 64.91% increase in flexural strength when compared to untreated composites without coupling agent for 50% fiber loading. Benzenediazonium chloride treated composites with coupling agent showed 36.84% increase in flexural strength when compared to benzenediazonium chloride treated composites without coupling agent for 50% fiber loading. However, in case of impact strength, addition of coupling agent increased the impact strength up to 35% fiber loading and beyond 35

  19. Effect of Short Fiber Reinforcement on Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Phenolic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sembian Manoharan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber plays an important role in determining the hardness, strength, and dynamic mechanical properties of composite material. In the present work, enhancement of viscoelastic behaviour of hybrid phenolic composites has been synergistically investigated. Five different phenolic composites, namely, C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5, were fabricated by varying the weight percentage of basalt and aramid fiber, namely, 25, 20, 15, 10, and 5% by compensating with barium sulphate (BaSO4 to keep the combined reinforcement concentration at 25 wt%. Hardness was measured to examine the resistance of composites to indentation. The hardness of phenolic composites increased from 72.2 to 85.2 with increase in basalt fiber loading. Composite C1 (25 wt% fiber is 1.2 times harder than composite C5. Compression test was conducted to find out compressive strength of phenolic composites and compressive strength increased with increase in fiber content. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA was carried out to assess the temperature dependence mechanical properties in terms of storage modulus (E′, loss modulus (E′′, and damping factor (tan δ. The results indicate great improvement of E′ values and decrease in damping behaviour of composite upon fiber addition. Further X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis were employed to characterize the friction composites.

  20. Effect of Coconut Fillers on Hybrid Coconut Kevlar Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Jani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This project focuses on the conversion of naturally available coconut fibers and shells into a useful composite. In addition to it, some mechanical properties of the resultant composite is determined and also the effect of coconut shell fillers on the composite is also investigated. The few portion of the composite is incorporated with synthetic Kevlar fiber, thus the coconut fiber is hybridized to enhance the mechanical properties of coconut. In this work two types of composite is fabricate, kevelar coconut fibre (kc composite and kevelarcoco nut fibre coconut shell filler (kccsf composite. Coconut fibers have low weight and considerable properties among the natural fibers, while coconut fillers have a good ductile and impact property. The natural fibers and fillers are treated with Na-OH to make it free of organic impurities. Epoxy resin is used as the polymer matrix. Two composite are produced one with fillers and the other without the fillers using compression molding method. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and water absorption tests are done with ASTM standard. It is observed that that the addition of filler materials improves the adhesiveness of the fibers leading to the increase in the above mentioned properties. The density of the composite is also low hence the strength to weight ratio is very high. The water absorption test also showed that the resultant composite had a small adhesion to water and absorption of water.