WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbide matrix composites

  1. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  2. Rapid Fabrication of Carbide Matrix/Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian E.; Bernander, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Composites of zirconium carbide matrix material reinforced with carbon fibers can be fabricated relatively rapidly in a process that includes a melt infiltration step. Heretofore, these and other ceramic matrix composites have been made in a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process that takes months. The finished products of the CVI process are highly porous and cannot withstand temperatures above 3,000 F (approx.1,600 C). In contrast, the melt-infiltration-based process takes only a few days, and the composite products are more nearly fully dense and have withstood temperatures as high as 4,350 F (approx.2,400 C) in a highly oxidizing thrust chamber environment. Moreover, because the melt- infiltration-based process takes much less time, the finished products are expected to cost much less. Fabrication begins with the preparation of a carbon fiber preform that, typically, is of the size and shape of a part to be fabricated. By use of low-temperature ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the carbon fibers in the preform are coated with one or more interfacial material(s), which could include oxides. The interfacial material helps to protect the fibers against chemical attack during the remainder of the fabrication process and against oxidation during subsequent use; it also enables slippage between the fibers and the matrix material, thereby helping to deflect cracks and distribute loads. Once the fibers have been coated with the interfacial material, the fiber preform is further infiltrated with a controlled amount of additional carbon, which serves as a reactant for the formation of the carbide matrix material. The next step is melt infiltration. The preform is exposed to molten zirconium, which wicks into the preform, drawn by capillary action. The molten metal fills most of the interstices of the preform and reacts with the added carbon to form the zirconium carbide matrix material. The zirconium does not react with the underlying fibers because they

  3. Modal acoustic emission source determination in silicon carbide matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, G. N.

    2000-05-01

    Modal acoustic emission has been used to monitor damage accumulation in woven silicon carbide (SiC) fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites during tensile testing. There are several potential sources of damage in these systems including transverse matrix cracking, fiber/matrix interphase debonding and sliding, longitudinal cracks in between plies, and fiber breakage. In the past, it has been shown that modal AE is excellent at detecting when damage occurs and subsides, where the damage occurs along the length of the sample, and the loss in material stiffness as a consequence of damage accumulation. The next step is to determine the extent that modal AE can be used to identify specific physical sources. This study will discuss the status of this aim for this composite system. Individual events were analyzed and correlated to specific sources based on the characteristics of the received waveforms, e.g., frequency spectrum and energy, and when the event occurred during the stress-history of the tensile test. Post-test microstructural examination of the test specimens enabled some correlation between specific types of AE events and damage sources.

  4. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  5. Ultrafine-grained Aluminm and Boron Carbide Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Rustin

    Cryomilling is a processing technique used to generate homogenously distributed boron carbide (B4C) particulate reinforcement within an ultrafine-grained aluminum matrix. The motivation behind characterizing a composite consisting of cryomilled aluminum B4C metal matrix composite is to design and develop a high-strength, lightweight aluminum composite for structural and high strain rate applications. Cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C powders were synthesized into bulk composite by various thermomechanical processing methods to form plate and extruded geometries. The effects of processing method on microstructure and mechanical behavior for the final consolidated composite were investigated. Cryomilling for extended periods of time in liquid nitrogen has shown to increase strength and thermal stability. The effects associated with cryomilling with stearic acid additions (as a process-control agent) on the degassing behavior of Al powders is investigated and results show that the liberation of compounds associated with stearic acid were suppressed in cryomilled Al powders. The effect of thermal expansion mismatch strain on strengthening due to geometrically necessary dislocations resulting from quenching is investigated and found not to occur in bulk cryomilled Al 5083 and B 4C composites. Previous cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C composites have exhibited ultrahigh strength associated with considerable strain-to-failure (>14 pct.) at high strain rates (>103/s) during mechanical testing, but only limited strain-to-failure (˜0.75 pct.) at quasi-static strain rates (10-3/s). The increased strain to failure at high strain rates is attributed to micro-flaw developments, including kinking, extensive axial splitting, and grain growth were observed after high strain rate deformation, and the significance of these mechanisms is considered.

  6. Development of a reaction-sintered silicon carbide matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayano, A.; Sutoh, C.; Suyama, S.; Itoh, Y.; Nakagawa, S.

    SiC matrix composites reinforced with continuous SiC-based fibres using reaction sintering (RS) for matrix processing were produced and their mechanical and physical properties were studied. Mechanical behaviour of SiCf/SiC (RS) composites in tension and in flexure exhibits improved toughness and a non-catastrophic failure due to fibre crack bridging and pullout from the matrix, and the composites exhibit high thermal conductivity, high Young's modulus and reduced porosity. Moreover, SiCf/SiC (RS) composites showed improved thermal shock resistance in comparison to monolithic RS-SiC. SiC matrix processing by RS leads to reduced production times and lower costs when compared with other methods such as polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) or chemical vapour infiltration (CVI). Composite prototypes were also produced for feasibility demonstration, and it was verified that the method could be applied to produce large parts and complex shapes.

  7. Evaluation of titanium carbide metal matrix composites deposited via laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Daniel Thomas

    Metal matrix composites have been widely studied in terms of abrasion resistance, but a particular material system may behave differently as particle size, morphology, composition, and distribution of the hardening phase varies. The purpose of this thesis was to understand the mechanical and microstructural effects of combining titanium carbide with 431 series stainless steel to create a unique composite via laser cladding, particularly regarding wear properties. The most predominant effect in increasing abrasion resistance, measured via ASTM G65, was confirmed to be volume fraction of titanium carbide addition. Macrohardness was directly proportional to the amount of carbide, though there was an overall reduction in individual particle microhardness after cladding. The reduction in particle hardness was obscured by the effect of volume fraction carbide and did not substantially contribute to the wear resistance changes. A model evaluating effective mean free path of the titanium carbide particles was created and correlated to the measured data. The model proved successful in linking theoretical mean free path to overall abrasion resistance. The effects of the titanium carbide particle distributions were limited, while differences in particle size were noticeable. The mean free path model did not correlate well with the particle size, but it was shown that the fine carbides were completely removed by the coarse abrasive particles in the ASTM G65 test. The particle morphology showed indications of influencing the wear mode, but no statistical reduction was observed in the volume loss figures. Future studies may more specifically focus on particle morphology or compositional effects of the carbide particles.

  8. Abrasive Performance of Chromium Carbide Reinforced Ni3Al Matrix Composite Cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shang-ping; LUO He-li; FENG Di; CAO Xu; ZHANG Xi-e

    2009-01-01

    The Microstructure and room temperature abrasive wear resistance of chromium carbide reinforced NiM3Al matrix composite cladding at different depth on nickel base alloy were investigated. The results showed that there is a great difference in microstructure and wear resistance of the Ni3 Al matrix composite at different depth. Three kinds of tests, designed for different load and abrasive size, were used to understand the wear behaviour of this material. Under all three wear conditions, the abrasion resistance of the composite cladding at the depth of 6 mm, namely NC-M2, was much higher than that of the composite cladding at the depth of 2 mm, namely NC-M1. In addition, the wear-resistant advantage of NC-M2 was more obvious when the size of the abrasive was small. The relative wear resistance of NC-M2 increased from 1.63 times to 2.05 times when the size of the abrasive decreased from 180 μm to 50μm. The mierostructure of the composite cladding showed that the size of chromium carbide particles, which was mainly influenced by cooling rate of melting pool, was a function of distance from the interface between the coating and substrate varied gradually. The chromium carbide particles near the interface were finer than that far from inter-face, which was the main reason for the different wear resistance of the composite cladding at different depth.

  9. SOLIDIFICATION CHARACTERISTIC OF TITANIUM CARBIDE PARTICULATE REINFORCED ALUMINIUM ALLOY MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. FATCHURROHMAN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research solidification characteristic of metal matrix composites consisted of titanium carbide particulate reinforced aluminium-11.8% silicon alloy matrix is performed. Vortex mixing and permanent casting method are used as the manufacturing method to produce the specimens. Temperature measurements during the casting process are captured and solidification graphs are plotted to represent the solidification characteristic. The results show, as volume fraction of particulate reinforcement is increased, solidification time is faster. Particulate reinforcement promotes rapid solidification which will support finer grain size of the casting specimen. Hardness test is performed and confirmed that hardness number increased as more particulate are added to the system.

  10. Dry Sliding Wear behaviour of Aluminium-Red mud- Tungsten Carbide Hybrid metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi Chinta, Neelima; Selvaraj, N.; Mahesh, V.

    2016-09-01

    Red mud is an industrial waste obtained during the processing of alumina by Bayer's process. An attempt has been made to utilize the solid waste by using it as the reinforcement material in metal matrix composites. Red mud received from NALCO has been subjected for sieve analysis and milled to 42 nanometers using high energy ball mill. Red mud is used as a reinforcement material in Pure Aluminium matrix composite at 2%, 4%, and 6% weight at 100 microns level as well as 42 nano meters along with 4%Tungsten carbide by weight. Micro and Nano structured red mud powders, Tungsten carbide powder and Aluminium is mixed in a V-Blender, compacted at a pressure of 40 bar and samples are prepared by conventional sintering with vacuum as medium. In this current work, dry sliding wear characteristics at normal and heat treatment conditions are investigated with optimal combination of Aluminium, Tungsten carbide and different weight fractions of micro and nano structured red mud powder.

  11. Niobium Carbide-Reinforced Al Matrix Composites Produced by High-Energy Ball Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travessa, Dilermando Nagle; Silva, Marina Judice; Cardoso, Kátia Regina

    2017-06-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are key materials for the transportation industry as they contribute to the development of lightweight structures. The dispersion of hard ceramic particles in the Al soft matrix can lead to a substantial strengthening effect, resulting in composite materials exhibiting interesting mechanical properties and inspiring their technological use in sectors like the automotive and aerospace industries. Powder metallurgy techniques are attractive to design metal matrix composites, achieving a homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement into the metal matrix. In this work, pure aluminum has been reinforced with particles of niobium carbide (NbC), an extremely hard and stable refractory ceramic. Its use as a reinforcing phase in metal matrix composites has not been deeply explored. Composite powders produced after different milling times, with 10 and 20 vol pct of NbC were produced by high-energy ball milling and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and by X-ray diffraction to establish a relationship between the milling time and size, morphology, and distribution of the particles in the composite powder. Subsequently, an Al/10 pct NbC composite powder was hot extruded into cylindrical bars. The strength of the obtained composite bars is comparable to the commercial high-strength, aeronautical-grade aluminum alloys.

  12. Au ion irradiation of various silicon carbide fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaâbane, Nihed, E-mail: nihed.chaabane@cea.fr [CEA, INSTN/UEPTN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Flem, Marion Le [CEA, DEN/DMN/SRMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tanguy, Morgane [CEA, INSTN/UEPTN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Urvoy, Stéphane [CEA, DEN/DMN/SRMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sandt, Christophe; Dumas, Paul [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Serruys, Yves [CEA, DEN/DMN/SRMP, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-08-15

    Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites are promising candidates as fuel cladding for several concepts of Generation IV reactors and as structural materials for fusion reactors. The composites used in this study were composed of a SiC matrix obtained by chemical vapor infiltration associated with various fiber types (Tyranno Type-S, Tyranno SA Grade-3 and Hi-Nicalon Type-S) and with a PyC layer as the interphase. 12 MeV Au ions were used for irradiation up to 0.05 and 1 displacement per atom (dpa) fluences at room temperature and 800 °C. Analysis of both microstructure and composition of composites were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis and Raman spectroscopy. At room temperature and low fluence, Raman spectroscopy results showed that irradiation induces a disordered/distorted state into fibers and matrix. With increasing fluence, a total amorphization of these constituents occurs. The increase in the irradiation temperature leads to a damage recovery and partial recrystallization of samples. Image analysis performed from SEM micrographs highlights no significant change in fiber diameter and shape. However, SEM analysis suggests a longitudinal shrinkage of Tyranno Type-S fibers for the composite irradiated at 1 dpa at room temperature and 800 °C. These results are in complete agreement with conclusions from neutron irradiations suggesting an appropriate relevance of irradiations with 12 MeV Au.

  13. Matrix cracking and creep behavior of monolithic zircon and zircon silicon carbide fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandakumar, Umashankar

    In this study, the first matrix cracking behavior and creep behavior of zircon matrix silicon carbide fiber composites were studied, together with the fracture and creep behavior of the monolithic zircon. These behaviors are of engineering and scientific importance, and the study was aimed at understanding the deformation mechanisms at elevated temperatures. The first matrix cracking behavior of zircon matrix uniaxially reinforced with silicon carbide fiber (SCS-6) composites and failure behavior of monolithic zircon were studied as a function of temperature (25°C, 500°C, and 1200°C) and crack length in three point bending mode. A modified vicker's indentation technique was used to vary the initial crack length in monolithic and composite samples. The interfacial shear strength was measured at these temperatures from matrix crack saturation spacing. The composites exhibited steady state and non steady state behaviors at the three different temperatures as predicted by theoretical models, while the failure stress of zircon decreased with increasing stress. The intrinsic properties of the composites were used to numerically determine the results predicted by three different matrix cracking models based on a fracture mechanics approach. The analysis showed that the model based on crack bridging analysis was valid at 25°C and 500°C, while a model based on statistical fiber failure was valid at 1200°C. Microstructural studies showed that fiber failure in the crack wake occurred at or below the matrix cracking stress at 1200°C, and no fiber failure occurred at the other two temperatures, which validated the results predicted by the theoretical models. Also, it was shown that the interfacial shear stress corresponding to debonding determined the matrix cracking stress, and not the frictional shear stress. This study showed for the first time, the steady state and non-steady state matrix cracking behavior at elevated temperatures, the difference in behavior between

  14. Additive Manufacturing of Silicon Carbide-Based Ceramic Matrix Composites: Technical Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced SiC-based ceramic matrix composites offer significant contributions toward reducing fuel burn and emissions by enabling high overall pressure ratio (OPR) of gas turbine engines and reducing or eliminating cooling air in the hot-section components, such as shrouds, combustor liners, vanes, and blades. Additive manufacturing (AM), which allows high value, custom designed parts layer by layer, has been demonstrated for metals and polymer matrix composites. However, there has been limited activity on additive manufacturing of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). In this presentation, laminated object manufacturing (LOM), binder jet process, and 3-D printing approaches for developing ceramic composite materials are presented. For the laminated object manufacturing (LOM), fiber prepreg laminates were cut into shape with a laser and stacked to form the desired part followed by high temperature heat treatments. For the binder jet, processing optimization was pursued through silicon carbide powder blending, infiltration with and without SiC nano powder loading, and integration of fibers into the powder bed. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted along with XRD, TGA, and mechanical testing. Various technical challenges and opportunities for additive manufacturing of ceramics and CMCs will be presented.

  15. Microstructure and wear properties of tungsten carbide reinforced steel matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Xian-qing; SONG Xue-feng; REN Hao; MA Jian-guo; HUANG Man-ping; ZHANG Cheng-jun

    2005-01-01

    WC(27%) reinforced steel matrix composites were produced by using an electroslag melting casting technique. The microstructure of the material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy(SEM), optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction(XRD). Energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS) and transmission electron micro-scopy were performed to investigate the interfacial composition between WC particle and steel matrix. The results reveal that the WC particles are partially melted into the steel substrate. At the same time, a reaction layer was detected along with the periphery of WC particle, which significantly enhances the bonding strength of the interface. A slipping wear (high stress abrasion) test was utilized to understand the wear behavior of this material. Abrasive experiment displays a better wear resistance than unreinforced steel matrix when coarse WC particles are dispersed into it. The coarse particles provide greater wear-resistance than the fine particles and operatively takes on the most applied loads. Additionally, the large particles have not been peeled during the wear process for a long time, which indicates the effect of interfacial reaction on wear behavior at the ambient temperature. A double carbide (Fe, W)3C is detected in the interface zone between particles and matrices using transmission electron microscopy.

  16. Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Metal-Matrix Composites Reinforced with Silicon Carbide Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia E. Ares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is focused on the study of the effect of directional heat extraction on the silicon-carbide (SiC distribution in zinc-aluminum matrix composites (MMCs and on the columnar-to-equiaxed (CET position in directionally solidified samples. To this end, a ZA-27 alloy matrix was reinforced with ceramic particles of SiC and vertically directionally solidified. The cooling rates, temperature gradients, and interphase velocities were then measured, and their influence on the solidification microstructure of the MMCs was analyzed. The recalescence detected and measured during the equiaxed transition was of the order of 3.5°C to 1.1°C. The values of the temperature gradients reached a minimum during the CET and were even negative in most cases (between −3.89 K and 0.06 K. The interphase velocities varied between 0.07 mm/s and 0.44 mm/s at the transition. Also, the presence of ceramic particles in ZA-27 alloys affected the thermodynamic local conditions and the kinetics of nucleation, producing a finer microstructure.

  17. Electrical response and functionality of polymer matrix-titanium carbide composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric response and conductivity of polymer matrix-titanium carbide composites was examined by means of Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy in the frequency range of 10–1–107 Hz and over the temperature range of 40–150°C, varying the filler content. Dielectric data were analyzed via the electric modulus formalism. Recorded relaxations were attributed to interfacial polarization, glass to rubber transition and local motions of polar side groups. Alternating current conductivity varies up to seven orders of magnitude with both frequency and temperature. Direct current conductivity increases with temperature, although the rate of its alteration does not remain constant in the examined temperature range. In the low temperature region (up to 60°C increases at a higher rate, while right afterwards approaches rather constant values. Finally, in the high temperature range (above 90°C conductivity raises again but at a lower rate. This behaviour adds functionality to the composites’ performance and could be exploited in developing self-current regulators.

  18. Microstructure of alumina-matrix composites reinforced with nanometric titanium and titanium carbide dispersions

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Refugio-García; David Hernández-Silva; Eduardo Terrés-Rojas; José Amparo Rodríguez-García; Enrique Rocha-Rangel

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of alumina (Al2O3)-composites having different amount of very fine titanium and titanium carbide reinforcement-particles has been explored. Two experimental steps have been set for the synthesis; the first step consisted of the pressureless-sintering of Al2O3-titanium powders which were thoroughly mixed under high energy ball-milling and through the second step it was induced the formation of titanium carbide during different times at 500 ºC by the cementation packing process. S...

  19. Microstructure of alumina-matrix composites reinforced with nanometric titanium and titanium carbide dispersions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Refugio-García

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of alumina (Al2O3-composites having different amount of very fine titanium and titanium carbide reinforcement-particles has been explored. Two experimental steps have been set for the synthesis; the first step consisted of the pressureless-sintering of Al2O3-titanium powders which were thoroughly mixed under high energy ball-milling and through the second step it was induced the formation of titanium carbide during different times at 500 ºC by the cementation packing process. SEM and EDS analysis of the microstructures obtained in both sintered and cemented bodies were performed in order to know the effect of the activated carbon used as cementing agent on the titanium for each studied composite. It was observed that a titanium carbide layer growth from the surface into the bulk and reaches different depth as the titanium content in the composites increases. On the other hand, the use of ductile titanium notably enhanced density level and fracture toughness of the composites.

  20. Assessment of thermal shock induced damage in silicon carbide fibre reinforced glass matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boccaccini, A. R.

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of microstructural damage in silicon carbide fibre (Nicalon™ reinforced glass matrix composite samples subjected to thermal shock was investigated by using a nondestructive forced resonance technique and fibre push out indentation tests. Thermal shock testing involved quenching samples in a water bath maintained at room temperature from a high temperature (650ºC. Changes in the Young's modulus and internal friction of the samples with increasing number of shocks were measured accurately by the forced resonance technique. Fibre push-out tests showed no significant changes in the properties of the fibre-matrix interface, indicating that damage in the composite was concentrated mainly in the development of matrix microcracking. It was also shown that the internal friction is a very sensitive parameter by which to detect the onset and development of such microcracking. A simple semi-empirical model is proposed to correlate the internal friction level with the microcracking density in the glass matrix. Finally, the relevance of detecting nondestructively the existence of microcracks in the glass matrix, before any significant interfacial degradation occurs, is emphasized, in conextion with the possibility of inducing a crack healing process by a thermal treatment (annealing, taking advantage of the viscous flow properties of the glass.

    El desarrollo de daño microestructural en materiales compuestos de matriz de vidrio reforzados con fibras de carburo de silicio (Nicalon™ sometidos a choque térmico fue investigado mediante la técnica no-destructiva de resonancia forzada y por mediciones de indentación "push-out" de fibras. Los ensayos de choque térmico involucraron el enfriamiento brusco en un baño de agua a temperatura ambiente de las piezas previamente calentadas a una temperatura elevada (650ºC. La técnica de resonancia forzada permitió medir cambios en el módulo de Young de elasticidad y en la fricci

  1. Nanoscale multilayered and porous carbide interphases prepared by pressure-pulsed reactive chemical vapor deposition for ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques, S., E-mail: jacques@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, University of Bordeaux 1, CNRS, Herakles-Safran, CEA, 3 allee de la Boetie, F-33600 Pessac (France); Jouanny, I.; Ledain, O.; Maillé, L.; Weisbecker, P. [LCTS, University of Bordeaux 1, CNRS, Herakles-Safran, CEA, 3 allee de la Boetie, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2013-06-15

    In Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) reinforced by continuous fibers, a good toughness is achieved by adding a thin film called “interphase” between the fiber and the brittle matrix, which acts as a mechanical fuse by deflecting the matrix cracks. Pyrocarbon (PyC), with or without carbide sub-layers, is typically the material of choice to fulfill this role. The aim of this work was to study PyC-free nanoscale multilayered carbide coatings as interphases for CMCs. Nanoscale multilayered (SiC–TiC){sub n} interphases were deposited by pressure-Pulsed Chemical Vapor Deposition (P-CVD) on single filament Hi-Nicalon fibers and embedded in a SiC matrix sheath. The thicknesses of the carbide interphase sub-layers could be made as low as a few nanometers as evidenced by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. By using the P-ReactiveCVD method (P-RCVD), in which the TiC growth involves consumption of SiC, it was not only possible to obtain multilayered (SiC–TiC){sub n} films but also TiC films with a porous multilayered microstructure as a result of the Kirkendall effect. The porosity in the TiC sequences was found to be enhanced when some PyC was added to SiC prior to total RCVD consumption. Because the porosity volume fraction was still not high enough, the role of mechanical fuse of the interphases could not be evidenced from the tensile curves, which remained fully linear even when chemical attack of the fiber surface was avoided.

  2. Sodium sulfate corrosion of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Sodium sulfate hot corrosion of a SiC fiber-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) glass-ceramic matrix composite was studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Changes in the microstructural chemical composition of the specimens were investigated. The samples provided by Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), Warminster, PA were grouped as follows: (1) as-received, (2) Na2SO4 salt-coated and heat-treate...

  3. Effect of stress ratio and frequency on fatigue crack growth rate of 2618 aluminium alloy silicon carbide metal matrix composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nirbhay Singh; Ram Khelawan; G N Mathur

    2001-04-01

    Effect of stress ratio and frequency on the fatigue crack propagation of 2618 aluminium alloy–silicon carbide composite were investigated at ambient temperature. With the first set of specimens, the fatigue crack growth rates were studied at three frequencies of 1 Hz, 5 Hz and 10 Hz at a stress ratio of 0.1 whereas the effects of stress ratios of 0.1, 0.25 and 0.50 were studied with the second set of specimens. The study showed that the fatigue crack propagation behaviour of this metal matrix composite was influenced to an appreciable extent by the stress ratio, but not by the fatigue frequencies used in this investigation.

  4. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of hybrid aluminum matrix composite containing boron carbide and Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahmood; Zulfaqar, Muhammad; Ali, Fahad; Subhani, Tayyab

    2017-07-01

    Hybrid aluminum matrix composites containing particles of boron carbide and quasicrystals were manufactured to explore the combined effect of reinforcements on microstructural evolution and mechanical performance of the composites. The particles were incorporated at a loading of 6 wt% each making a total of 12 wt% reinforcement in pure aluminum. For comparison, two composites containing individually reinforced 12 wt% particles were also prepared along with a reference specimen of pure aluminum. Ball milling technique was employed to mix the composite constituents. The green bodies of composite powders were prepared by uniaxial pressing at room temperature followed by consolidation by pressureless sintering under inert atmosphere. The microstructural characterization was performed using scanning electron microscopy while phase identification was carried out by X-ray diffraction. The mechanical characterization was performed by Vickers hardness and compression tests. Hybrid composites showed increased compressive properties while the composites containing solely quasicrystals demonstrated improved hardness. The increase in mechanical performance was related to the microstructural evolution due to the presence and uniform dispersion of binary particles.

  5. On the Strength of Silicon Carbide Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingjiu ZHAO; Yue LIU; Liqing CHEN; Jing BI

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the modified continuum model, quench strengthening and dislocation pile-up model was respectively used to estimate the yield strength of SiCp/Al composites. The experimental results showed that the modified shear lag model or quench strengthening model would underestimate the yield strength of SiCp/Al composites. However, the modified Hall-Petch correlation on the basis of the dislocation pile-up model, expressed as σcy = 244 + 371λ-1/2, fitted very well with the experimental data, which indicated that the strength increase of SiCp/Al composites might be due to the direct blocking of dislocation motion by the particulate-matrix interface.Namely, the dislocation pile-up is the most possible strengthening mechanism for SiCp/Al composites.

  6. Study on Processing Conditions of Aluminum Matrix Composites Reinforced with Boron Carbide Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Xueying; Zhang Hong; Xi Huizhi; Yi Xiaosu

    2004-01-01

    Different pre-heating of boron carbide particles for reinforcement and different processing conditions were studied in this work. Being one of the most cost-effective industrial methods, conventional melt stir-casting route was utilized.Result showed that the boron carbide particles distributed well for a suitable pre-heating temperature and processed in air.No reaction product was found at the A1-B4C interfaces at the resolution limit of SEM used in that way.

  7. Developing scandium and zirconium containing aluminum boron carbide metal matrix composites for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jing

    The study presented in this thesis focuses on developing castable, precipitation-strengthened Al--B4C metal matrix composites (MMCs) for high temperature applications. In the first part, B4C plates were immersed in liquid aluminum alloyed with Sc, Zr and Ti to investigate the interfacial reactions between B4C and liquid aluminum The influences of Sc, Zr and Ti on the interfacial microstructure in terms of individual and combined additions were examined. Results reveal that all three elements reacted with B4C and formed interfacial layers that acted as a diffusion barrier to limit the decomposition of B4C in liquid aluminum. The interfacial reactions and the reaction products in each system were identified. With the combined addition of Sc, Zr and Ti, most of the Ti was found to enrich at the interface, which not only offered appropriate protection of the B4C but also reduced the consumption of Sc and Zr at the interface. In the second part, Sc and Zr were introduced into Al-15vol.% B 4C composites presaturated by Ti, and eight experimental composites with different Sc and Zr levels were prepared via a conventional casting technique. It was found that Sc was involved in the interfacial reactions with B 4C that partially consume Sc. The Sc addition yielded considerable precipitation strengthening in the as-cast and peak aged conditions. To achieve an equivalent strengthening effect of Sc in binary Al-Sc alloys, approximately double the amount of Sc is required in Al-B4C composites. On the contrary, no major Zr reaction products were found at the interfaces and the major part of Zr remained in the matrix for the precipitation strengthening. The combination of Sc and Zr enhanced sthe precipitation strengthening. Two kinds of nanoscale precipitates, Al3Sc and Al3(Sc, Zr), were found in the as-cast microstructure and contributed to the increase in the matrix hardness. In the third part, all the experimental composites were isothermally aged at 300, 350, 400 and 450

  8. Microstructure and Mechanical Behaviour of Stir-Cast Al-Mg-Sl Alloy Matrix Hybrid Composite Reinforced with Corn Cob Ash and Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwagbenga Babajide Fatile

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this present study, the microstructural and mechanical behaviour of Al-Mg-Si alloy matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC and Corn cob ash (An agro‑waste was investigated. This research work was aimed at assessing the suitability of developing low cost- high performance Al-Mg-Si hybrid composite. Silicon carbide (SiC particulates added with 0,1,2,3 and 4 wt% Corn cob ash (CCA were utilized to prepare 10 wt% of the reinforcing phase with Al-Mg-Si alloy as matrix using two-step stir casting method. Microstructural characterization, density measurement, estimated percent porosity, tensile testing, and micro‑hardness measurement were used to characterize the composites produced. From the results obtained, CCA has great potential to serve as a complementing reinforcement for the development of low cost‑high performance aluminum hybrid composites.

  9. Titanium Matrix Composite Pressure Vessel Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For over 15 years, FMW Composite Systems has developed Metal Matrix Composite manufacturing methodologies for fabricating silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium...

  10. Corrosion and wear behaviour of Al–Mg–Si alloy matrix hybrid composites reinforced with rice husk ash and silicon carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth Kanayo Alaneme; Tolulope Moyosore Adewale; Peter Apata Olubambi

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion and wear behaviour of Al–Mg–Si alloy matrix hybrid composites developed with the use of rice husk ash (RHA) and silicon carbide (SiC) particulates as reinforcements were investigated. RHA and SiC mixed in weight ratios 0:1, 1:3, 1:1, 3:1, and 1:0 were utilized to prepare 5, 7.5 and 10 wt% of the reinforcing phase with Al Mg Si alloy as matrix using double stir casting process. Open circuit corrosion potential (OCP) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements were used to study...

  11. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  12. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  13. Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajoure, Meloud, E-mail: Tajoore2000@yahoo.com [MechanicalEng.,HIHM,Gharian (Libya); Tajouri, Ali, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Abuzriba, Mokhtar, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com [Materials and Metallurgical Eng., UOT, Tripoli (Libya); Akreem, Mosbah, E-mail: makreem@yahoo.com [Industrial Research Centre,Tripoli (Libya)

    2013-12-16

    The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A and the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

  14. Spark Plasma Sintering of Aluminum-Magnesium-Matrix Composites with Boron Carbide and Tungsten Nano-powder Inclusions: Modeling and Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvilis, E. S.; Khasanov, O. L.; Gulbin, V. N.; Petyukevich, M. S.; Khasanov, A. O.; Olevsky, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    Spark-plasma sintering (SPS) is used to fabricate fully-dense metal-matrix (Al/Mg) composites containing hard ceramic (boron carbide) and refractory metal (tungsten) inclusions. The study objectives include the modeling (and its experimental verification) of the process of the consolidation of the composites consisted of aluminum-magnesium alloy AMg6 (65 wt.%), B4C powder (15 wt.%), and W nano-powder (20 wt.%), as well as the optimization of the composite content and of the SPS conditions to achieve higher density. Discrete element modeling of the composite particles packing based on the particle size distribution functions of real powders is utilized for the determination of the powder compositions rendering maximum mixture packing densities. Two models: a power-law creep model of the high temperature deformation of powder materials, and an empirical logarithmic pressure-temperature-relative density relationship are successfully applied for the description of the densification of the aluminum-magnesium metal matrix powder composite subjected to spark-plasma sintering. The elastoplastic properties of the sintered composite samples are assessed by nanoindentation.

  15. Corrosion and wear behaviour of Al–Mg–Si alloy matrix hybrid composites reinforced with rice husk ash and silicon carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayo Alaneme

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion and wear behaviour of Al–Mg–Si alloy matrix hybrid composites developed with the use of rice husk ash (RHA and silicon carbide (SiC particulates as reinforcements were investigated. RHA and SiC mixed in weight ratios 0:1, 1:3, 1:1, 3:1, and 1:0 were utilized to prepare 5, 7.5 and 10 wt% of the reinforcing phase with Al Mg Si alloy as matrix using double stir casting process. Open circuit corrosion potential (OCP and potentiodynamic polarization measurements were used to study the corrosion behaviour while coefficient of friction was used to assess the wear behaviour of the composites. The corrosion and wear mechanisms were established with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the effect of RHA/SiC weight ratio on the corrosion behaviour of the composites in 3.5% NaCl solution was not consistent for the different weight percent of reinforcement (5, 7.5, and 10 wt% used in developing the Al–Mg–Si based composites. It was evident that for most cases the use of hybrid reinforcement of RHA and SiC resulted in improved corrosion resistance of the composites in 3.5% NaCl solution. Preferential dissolution of the more anodic Al–Mg–Si alloy matrix around the Al–Mg–Si matrix/RHA/SiC particle interfaces was identified as the primary corrosion mechanism. The coefficient of friction and consequently the wear resistance of the hybrid composites were comparable to that of the Al–Mg–Si alloy matrix reinforced with only SiC.

  16. A Simple Model to Estimate the Yield Strength of Silicon Carbide Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, a modified Hall-Petch correlation on the basis of dislocation pile-up model was used to estimate the yield strength of SiCp/Al composites. The experimental results show that the modified Hall-Petch correlation expressed as σcy=244+371λ-1/2 fits very well with the experimental data, which indicated that the strength increase of SiCp/Al composites might be due to the direct blocking of dislocation motion by the particulate-matrix interface,namely, the dislocation pile-up is the most possible strengthening mechanism for SiCp/Al composites.

  17. Titanium Carbide-Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-08

    titanium carbide , titanium carbide with free graphite, titanium carbide /vanadium carbide alloy with free graphite, and titanium carbide with...from melts. The test pins were drawn across hot pressed titanium carbide wear plates with 5 newtons of normal force. The lowest friction coefficient at...22 C was 0.12 obtained with pure titanium carbide . The lowest friction coefficient at 900 C was 0.19 obtained with titanium carbide with boron and

  18. Method Developed for the High-Temperature Nondestructive Evaluation of Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites have emerged as candidate materials to allow higher operating temperatures (1000 to 1400 C) in gas turbine engines. A need, therefore, exists to develop nondestructive methods to evaluate material integrity at the material operating temperature by monitoring thermal and mechanical fatigue. These methods would also have potential as quality inspection tools. The goal of this investigation at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to survey and correlate the temperature-dependent damping and stiffness of advanced ceramic composite materials with imposed thermal and stress histories that simulate in-service turbine engine conditions. A typical sample size of 100 by 4 by 2 cubic millimeters, along with the specified stiffness and density, placed the fundamental vibration frequencies between 100 and 2000 Hz. A modified Forster apparatus seemed most applicable to simultaneously measure both damping and stiffness. Testing in vacuum reduced the effects of air on the measurements. In this method, a single composite sample is vibrated at its fundamental tone; then suddenly, the mechanical excitation is removed so that the sample's motion freely decays with time. Typical results are illlustrated in this paper.

  19. Automatic generation of 2D micromechanical finite element model of silicon–carbide/aluminum metal matrix composites: Effects of the boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite element (FE) simulations of the deformation and damage evolution of Silicon–Carbide (SiC) particle reinforced aluminum alloy composite including interphase are carried out for different microstructures and particle volume fractions of the composites. A program is developed...

  20. Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiegs, Terry N.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

  1. Effect of alloying elements on the composition of carbide phases and mechanical properties of the matrix of high-carbon chromium-vanadium steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V. I.; Tarasenko, L. V.; Utkina, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the results of phase physicochemical analysis of high-carbon chromium-vanadium steel, the predominant type of carbide that provides high wear resistance has been established, and its amount and amount of carbon in martensite have been determined. Data on the composition and the amount of carbide phase and on the chemical composition of the martensite of high-carbon steel have been obtained, which allows determination of the alloying-element concentration limits. The mechanical testing of heats of a chosen chemical composition has been carried out after quenching and low-temperature tempering. The tests have demonstrated benefits of new steel in wear resistance and bending strength with the fatigue strength being retained, compared to steels subjected to cementation. The mechanism of secondary strengthening of the steel upon high-temperature tempering has been revealed. High-temperature tempering can be applied to articles that are required to possess both high wear resistance and heat resistance.

  2. Thermo-Mechanical Characterization of Silicon Carbide-Silicon Carbide Composites at Elevated Temperatures Using a Unique Combustion Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-10

    F THERMO-MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SILICON CARBIDE - SILICON CARBIDE COMPOSITES AT ELEVATED...MECHANICAL CTERIZATION OF SILICON CARBIDE -SILIC BIDE COMPOSITES AT LEVATED TEMPER S USING A UNIQUE COMBUSTION FACILITY DISSERTATI N Ted T. Kim...THERMO-MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SILICON CARBIDE - SILICON CARBIDE COMPOSITES AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES USING A UNIQUE COMBUSTION FACILITY

  3. Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yusheng

    2011-06-14

    Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

  4. Thermal Properties of Polyimide Composites with Nanostructured Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyona Igorevna Wozniak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of polyimide composites reinforced with different loadings of silicon carbide (SiC nanoparticles are prepared by in-situ polymerization technique. The polyimide (PI matrix resin is derived from 4,4’-oxydianiline (4,4’-ODA and pyromelliticdianhydride (PMDA. The dispersions of SiC nanoparticles are prepared via ultrasonic irradiation or mechanical homogenization. In this method, the SiC nanoparticles are dispersed in diamine solution followed by polymerization with dianhydride. The composites obtained under sonication were found to have lower thermal properties than composites prepared under homogenization.

  5. Process for making silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salavatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  6. Dynamic consolidation of aluminum-silicon carbide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabin, B.H.; Korth, G.E.; Williamson, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic consolidation was investigated as a potential method for producing P/M metal matrix composites. In this study, 2124 aluminum powders were mixed with silicon carbide particulate and consolidated using explosives. Numerical simulations were performed to provide insight into the consolidation process and to aid in the selection of experimental conditions. The microstructure of the as-consolidated product was dependent upon processing variables. Careful control of the shock parameters allowed full density, crack free composites to be achieved in cylindrical geometries. Although full density was obtained, low fracture strengths suggested a lack of interparticle bonding, probably resulting from the limited ability to redistribute surface oxides during consolidation. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Interface coatings for Carbon and Silicon Carbide Fibers in Silicon Carbide Matrixes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Interface coatings for fiber-reinforced composites are an enabling technology for high temperature ceramic matrix composites. Because of their availability and...

  8. Study on Titanium Carbide Particulate Reinforced Iron Matrix Composite%碳化钛颗粒增强铁基表面复合材料的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓莉; 王静; 伏思静; 胡志华

    2011-01-01

    TiC particulates reinforced iron matrix surface composite was produced by cast technique and in-situ synthesis technique. The surface composite was investigated from the aspect of thermo-dynamics, microstructure, wear-resistance and oxidation-resistance. The results show that TiC particles with the content of 40% in the size of 1 ~3 μm generate in iron matrix on the surface of composite. The surface composite and gray iron exhibite excellent metallurgy-bonding. Fe-TiC surface composite shows better oxidation-resistance at 900 'C and better wear-resistance under the condition of dry sliding.%采用铸造与原位合成技术制备了TiC颗粒增强铁基表面复合材料,从热力学、微观结构、耐磨性能和抗高温氧化性方面对制备的表面复合材料进行了研究.结果表明:在表面复合材料的基体中生成了细小TiC颗粒,尺寸为1~3 μm,含量约为40vol%;表面复合材料层与灰铸铁之间有良好的冶金结合界面.在干磨损条件下,尤其在重载时,Fe-TiC表面复合材料表现出优异的耐磨性;在900℃氧化条件下,Fe-TiC表面复合材料表现出优良的抗氧化性.

  9. Low Cost Fabrication of Silicon Carbide Based Ceramics and Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Levine, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    A low cost processing technique called reaction forming for the fabrication of near-net and complex shaped components of silicon carbide based ceramics and composites is presented. This process consists of the production of a microporous carbon preform and subsequent infiltration with liquid silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. The microporous preforms are made by the pyrolysis of a polymerized resin mixture with very good control of pore volume and pore size thereby yielding materials with tailorable microstructure and composition. Mechanical properties (elastic modulus, flexural strength, and fracture toughness) of reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics are presented. This processing approach is suitable for various kinds of reinforcements such as whiskers, particulates, fibers (tows, weaves, and filaments), and 3-D architectures. This approach has also been used to fabricate continuous silicon carbide fiber reinforced ceramic composites (CFCC's) with silicon carbide based matrices. Strong and tough composites with tailorable matrix microstructure and composition have been obtained. Microstructure and thermomechanical properties of a silicon carbide (SCS-6) fiber reinforced reaction-formed silicon carbide matrix composites are discussed.

  10. Corrosion behaviour of groundnut shell ash and silicon carbide hybrid reinforced Al-Mg-Si alloy matrix composites in 3.5% NaCl and 0.3M H2SO4 solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayo ALANEME

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of Al-Mg-Si alloy based composites reinforced with groundnut shell ash (GSA and silicon carbide (SiC was investigated. The aim is to assess the corrosion properties of Al-Mg-Si alloy based hybrid reinforced composites developed using different mix ratios of GSA (a cheaply processed agro waste derivative which served as partial replacement for SiC and SiC as reinforcing materials. GSA and SiC mixed in weight ratios 0:1, 1:3, 1:1, 3:1, and 1:0 were utilized to prepare 6 and 10 wt% of the reinforcing phase with Al‐Mg‐Si alloy as matrix using two‐step stir casting method. Mass loss and corrosion rate measurement was used to study the corrosion behaviour of the produced composites in 3.5% NaCl and 0.3M H2SO4 solutions. The results show that the Al-Mg-Si alloy based composites containing 6 and 10 wt% GSA and SiC in varied weight ratios were resistant to corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution. The composites were however more susceptible to corrosion in 0.3M H2SO4 solution (in comparison with the 3.5% NaCl solution. It was noted that the Al-Mg-Si/6 wt% GSA-SiC hybrid composite grades containing GSA and SiC in weight ratio 1:3 and 3:1 respectively exhibited superior corrosion resistance in the 0.3M H2SO4 solution compared to other composites produced for this series. In the case of the Al-Mg-Si/10 wt% GSA-SiC hybrid composite grades, the corrosion resistance was relatively superior for the composites containing a greater weight ratio of GSA (75% and 100% in 0.3M H2SO4 solution.

  11. Laser deposition of Inconel 625/tungsten carbide composite coatings by powder and wire feedstock

    OpenAIRE

    Abioye, Taiwo E.

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing global demand to extend the life span of down-hole drilling tools in order to improve operation effectiveness and efficiency of oil and gas production. Laser cladding of tungsten carbide/Ni-based alloy metal matrix composite (MMC) coatings is currently being utilised for this purpose. However, the effect of tungsten carbide dissolution on the corrosion performance of the MMC coatings has not been completely understood. In this work, a study was carried out in which lase...

  12. Silicon carbide whisker composites. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). NewSearch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the manufacture and applications of silicon carbide whisker reinforced composites. Citations discuss the preparation of whiskers and the processing of composites containing the whiskers. Applications include aerospace engines, automotive components, engine components, and surgical implants. Physical properties such as bending strength, crack propagation, creep, fracture toughness, and stress strain curves are covered. Ceramic matrix, metal matrix, and carbon-carbon composites are examined. (Contains a minimum of 248 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. Investigations of Interface Properties in Copper-Silicon Carbide Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chmielewski M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the technological aspects of the interface formation in the copper-silicon carbide composite and its effect on the material’s microstructure and properties. Cu-SiC composites with two different volume content of ceramic reinforcement were fabricated by hot pressing (HP and spark plasma sintering (SPS technique. In order to protect SiC surface from its decomposition, the powder was coated with a thin tungsten layer using plasma vapour deposition (PVD method. Microstructural analyses provided by scanning electron microscopy revealed the significant differences at metal-ceramic interface. Adhesion force and fracture strength of the interface between SiC particles and copper matrix were measured. Thermal conductivity of composites was determined using laser flash method. The obtained results are discussed with reference to changes in the area of metal-ceramic boundary.

  14. Tool flank wear model and parametric optimization in end milling of metal matrix composite using carbide tool: Response surface methodology approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Arokiadass

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Highly automated CNC end milling machines in manufacturing industry requires reliable model for prediction of tool flank wear. This model later can be used to predict the tool flank wear (VBmax according to the process parameters. In this investigation an attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the tool flank wear (VBmax of carbide tools while machining LM25 Al/SiCp incorporating the process parameters such as spindle speed (N, feed rate (f, depth of cut (d and various % wt. of silicon carbide (S. Response surface methodology (RSM was applied to optimizing the end milling process parameters to attain the minimum tool flank wear. Predicted values obtained from the developed model and experimental results are compared, and error <5 percent is observed. In addition, it is concluded that the flank wear increases with the increase of SiCp percentage weight in the MMC.

  15. Stress envelope of silicon carbide composites at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozawa, Takashi, E-mail: nozawa.takashi67@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Kim, Sunghun [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ozawa, Kazumi; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    To identify a comprehensive stress envelope, i.e., strength anisotropy map, of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite (SiC/SiC composite) for practical component design, tensile and compressive tests were conducted using the small specimen test technique specifically tailored for high-temperature use. In-plane shear properties were, however, estimated using the off-axial tensile method and assuming that the mixed mode failure criterion, i.e., Tsai–Wu criterion, is valid for the composites. The preliminary test results indicate no significant degradation to either proportional limit stress (PLS) or fracture strength by tensile loading at temperatures below 1000 °C. A similarly good tolerance of compressive properties was identified at elevated temperatures, except for a slight degradation in PLS. With the high-temperature test data of tensile, compressive and in-plane shear properties, the stress envelopes at elevated temperatures were finally obtained. A slight reduction in the design limit was obvious at elevated temperatures when the compressive mode is dominant, whereas a negligibly small impact on the design is expected by considering the tensile loading case.

  16. Ceramic Matrix Composites .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mukerji

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available The present state of the knowledge of ceramic-matrix composites have been reviewed. The fracture toughness of present structural ceramics are not enough to permit design of high performance machines with ceramic parts. They also fail by catastrophic brittle fracture. It is generally believed that further improvement of fracture toughness is only possible by making composites of ceramics with ceramic fibre, particulate or platelets. Only ceramic-matrix composites capable of working above 1000 degree centigrade has been dealt with keeping reinforced plastics and metal-reinforced ceramics outside the purview. The author has discussed the basic mechanisms of toughening and fabrication of composites and the difficulties involved. Properties of available fibres and whiskers have been given. The best results obtained so far have been indicated. The limitations of improvement in properties of ceramic-matrix composites have been discussed.

  17. Non-oxidic nanoscale composites: single-crystalline titanium carbide nanocubes in hierarchical porous carbon monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenburg, Kirstin; Smarsly, Bernd M; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2009-05-07

    We report the preparation of nanoscale carbon-titanium carbide composites with carbide contents of up to 80 wt%. The synthesis yields single-crystalline TiC nanocubes 20-30 nm in diameter embedded in a hierarchical porous carbon matrix. These composites were generated in the form of cylindrical monoliths but can be produced in various shapes using modern sol-gel and nanocasting methods in conjunction with carbothermal reduction. The monolithic material is characterized by a combination of microscopy, diffraction and physisorption. Overall, the results presented in this work represent a concrete design template for the synthesis of non-oxidic nanoscale composites with high surface areas.

  18. Rheocasting Al Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girot, F. A.; Albingre, L.; Quenisset, J. M.; Naslain, R.

    1987-11-01

    Aluminum alloy matrix composites reinforced by SiC short fibers (or whiskers) can be prepared by rheocasting, a process which consists of the incorporation and homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement by stirring within a semi-solid alloy. Using this technique, composites containing fiber volume fractions in the range of 8-15%, have been obtained for various fibers lengths (i.e., 1 mm, 3 mm and 6 mm for SiC fibers). This paper attempts to delineate the best compocasting conditions for aluminum matrix composites reinforced by short SiC (e.g Nicalon) or SiC whiskers (e.g., Tokamax) and characterize the resulting microstructures.

  19. Metal matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep K. Rohatgi

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the world wide upsurge in metal matrix composite research and development activities with particular emphasis on cast metal-matrix particulate composites. Extensive applications of cast aluminium alloy MMCs in day-to-day use in transportation as well as durable good industries are expected to advance rapidly in the next decade. The potential for extensive application of cast composites is very large in India, especially in the areas of transportation, energy and electromechanical machinery; the extensive use of composites can lead to large savings in materials and energy, and in several instances, reduce environmental pollution. It is important that engineering education and short-term courses be organized to bring MMCs to the attention of students and engineering industry leaders. India already has excellent infrastructure for development of composites, and has a long track record of world class research in cast metal matrix particulate composites. It is now necessary to catalyze prototype and regular production of selected composite components, and get them used in different sectors, especially railways, cars, trucks, buses, scooters and other electromechanical machinery. This will require suitable policies backed up by funding to bring together the first rate talent in cast composites which already exists in India, to form viable development groups followed by setting up of production plants involving the process engineering capability already available within the country. On the longer term, cast composites should be developed for use in energy generation equipment, electronic packaging aerospace systems, and smart structures.

  20. Manufacturing Titanium Metal Matrix Composites by Consolidating Matrix Coated Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Xin PENG

    2005-01-01

    Titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) reinforced by continuous silicon carbide fibres are being developed for aerospace applications. TiMMCs manufactured by the consolidation of matrix-coated fibre (MCF) method offer optimum properties because of the resulting uniform fibre distribution, minimum fibre damage and fibre volume fraction control. In this paper, the consolidation of Ti-6Al-4V matrix-coated SiC fibres during vacuum hot pressing has been investigated. Experiments were carried out on multi-ply MCFs under vacuum hot pressing (VHP). In contrast to most of existing studies, the fibre arrangement has been carefully controlled either in square or hexagonal arraysthroughout the consolidated sample. This has enabled the dynamic consolidation behaviour of MCFs to be demonstrated by eliminating the fibre re-arrangement during the VHP process. The microstructural evolution of the matrix coating was reported and the deformation mechanisms involved were discussed.

  1. Rheocasting Al matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girot, F.A.; Albingre, L.; Quenisset, J.M.; Naslain, R.

    1987-11-01

    A development status account is given for the rheocasting method of Al-alloy matrix/SiC-whisker composites, which involves the incorporation and homogeneous distribution of 8-15 vol pct of whiskers through the stirring of the semisolid matrix melt while retaining sufficient fluidity for casting. Both 1-, 3-, and 6-mm fibers of Nicalon SiC and and SiC whisker reinforcements have been experimentally investigated, with attention to the characterization of the resulting microstructures and the effects of fiber-matrix interactions. A thin silica layer is found at the whisker surface. 7 references.

  2. ELASTO-PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF COMPOSITE POWDERS WITH LAYERED CARBON AND CARBIDE-FORMING ELEMENT COATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kovalevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coating structure formation under magnetron spraying of titanium and carbon cathodes and combined cathodes, namely cobalt (EP 131 – nickel, tungsten – carbon have been investigated under conditions of carbide separate synthesis within the temperature range of 650–1200 °C. Usage of cobalt and nickel particles as matrix material leads to their rapid thermal expansion under heating during sintering process in the dilatometer. Subsequent plastic deformation of sintered samples provides obtaining a composite powder material that is a composite with framing structure of cobalt, titanium and tungsten carbides in the coatings.

  3. Spark plasma sintering of tantalum carbide and graphene reinforced tantalum carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Ajith Kumar

    Tantalum carbide (TaC), an ultra-high temperature ceramic (UHTC), is well known for its exceptional properties such as high hardness (15-19 GPa), melting point (3950 °C), elastic modulus (537 GPa), chemical resistance, and thermal shock resistance. To make TaC to be the future material for hypersonic vehicles, it is required to improve its thermal conductivity, strength, and fracture toughness. Researchers have previously reinforced TaC ceramic with carbides of silicon and boron as well as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), however, these reinforcements either undergo chemical changes or induce defects in the matrix during processing. In addition, these reinforcements exhibit a very minimal improvement in the properties. In the present work, we attempted to improve TaC fracture toughness by reinforcing with graphene nano-platelets (GNPs) and processing through spark plasma sintering at high temperature of 2000 °C, pressure of 70 MPa, and soaking time of 10 min. In addition, we investigated the active densification mechanism during SPS of TaC powder and the effect of ball milling time on mechanical properties of sintered TaC. A relative density of >96% was achieved using SPS of monolithic TaC (<3 μm). Ball milling improved the sintering kinetics and improved the mechanical properties (microhardness, bi-axial flexural strength, and indentation fracture toughness). Activation energy (100 kJ/mol) and stress exponent (1.2) were obtained using the analytical model developed for power-law creep. Grain boundary sliding is proposed as active densification mechanism based on these calculations. Reinforcing GNPs (2-6 vol.% ) in the TaC matrix improved relative density (99.8% for TaC-6 vol.% GNP). Also ˜150% and ˜180% increase in flexural strength and fracture toughness, respectively, was observed for TaC-6 vol.% GNP composite. The significant improvement in these properties is attributed to improved densification and toughening mechanisms such as sheet pull-out and crack

  4. Effect of thermomechanical treatments on the aging response of centrifugally cast silicon carbide/aluminum composites

    OpenAIRE

    May, Christopher William

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Differential scanning calorimetry was conducted using centrifugally cast monolithic A3356 aluminum material and 26 volume present silicon carbide (SiC) particle reinforced A356 aluminum matrix composite material in as-cast, cast and rolled, and cast and extruded conditions. Electrical resistivity and matrix micro-hardness measurements during isothermal aging treatments were also conducted. The effects of thermo-mechanical processing ...

  5. Effect of thermomechanical treatments on the aging response of centrifugally cast silicon carbide/aluminum composites

    OpenAIRE

    May, Christopher William

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Differential scanning calorimetry was conducted using centrifugally cast monolithic A3356 aluminum material and 26 volume present silicon carbide (SiC) particle reinforced A356 aluminum matrix composite material in as-cast, cast and rolled, and cast and extruded conditions. Electrical resistivity and matrix micro-hardness measurements during isothermal aging treatments were also conducted. The effects of thermo-mechanical processing ...

  6. Characterization of silicon-silicon carbide ceramic derived from carbon-carbon silicon carbide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vijay K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Varanasi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Krenkel, Walter [Univ. of Bayreuth (Germany). Dept. of Ceramic Materials Engineering

    2013-04-15

    The main objective of the present work is to process porous silicon - silicon carbide (Si - SiC) ceramic by the oxidation of carboncarbon silicon carbide (C/C - SiC) composites. Phase studies are performed on the oxidized porous composite to examine the changes due to the high temperature oxidation. Further, various characterization techniques are performed on Si- SiC ceramics in order to study the material's microstructure. The effects of various parameters such as fiber alignment (twill weave and short/chopped fiber) and phenolic resin type (resol and novolak) are characterized.

  7. Silicon carbide whisker composites. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the manufacture and applications of silicon carbide whisker reinforced composites. Citations discuss the preparation of whiskers and the processing of composites containing the whiskers. Applications include aerospace engines, automotive components, engine components, and surgical implants. Physical properties such as bending strength, crack propagation, creep, fracture toughness, and stress strain curves are covered. Ceramic matrix, metal matrix, and carbon-carbon composites are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  8. Experimental investigations on mechanical behavior of aluminium metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, A. M.; Kaleemulla, Mohammed

    2016-09-01

    Today we are widely using aluminium based metal matrix composite for structural, aerospace, marine and automobile applications for its light weight, high strength and low production cost. The purpose of designing metal matrix composite is to add the desirable attributes of metals and ceramics to the base metal. In this study we developed aluminium metal matrix hybrid composite by reinforced Aluminium7075 alloy with silicon carbide (SiC) and aluminium oxide (alumina) by method of stir casting. This technique is less expensive and very effective. The Hardness test and Wear test were performed on the specimens which are prepared by stir casting techniques. The result reveals that the addition of silicon carbide and alumina particles in aluminium matrix improves the mechanical properties.

  9. Machining studies of die cast aluminum alloy-silicon carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornakumar, Thambu; Kathiresan, Marimuthu

    2010-10-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) with high specific stiffness, high strength, improved wear resistance, and thermal properties are being increasingly used in advanced structural, aerospace, automotive, electronics, and wear applications. Aluminum alloy-silicon carbide composites were developed using a new combination of the vortex method and the pressure die-casting technique in the present work. Machining studies were conducted on the aluminum alloy-silicon carbide (SiC) composite work pieces using high speed steel (HSS) end-mill tools in a milling machine at different speeds and feeds. The quantitative studies on the machined work piece show that the surface finish is better for higher speeds and lower feeds. The surface roughness of the plain aluminum alloy is better than that of the aluminum alloy-silicon carbide composites. The studies on tool wear show that flank wear increases with speed and feed. The end-mill tool wear is higher on machining the aluminum alloy-silicon carbide composites than on machining the plain aluminum alloy.

  10. In situ production of tantalum carbide nanodispersoids in a copper matrix by reactive milling and hot extrusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manotas-Albor, Milton, E-mail: manotasm@uninorte.edu.co [Grupo de Investigación en Física Aplicada, Departamento de Física, Universidad del Norte, Km. 5 vía a Puerto Colombia, Barranquilla (Colombia); Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile); Vargas-Uscategui, Alejandro [Laboratorio de Materiales a Nanoescala, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Tupper Av. 2069, Santiago (Chile); Palma, Rodrigo [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile); Mosquera, Edgar [Laboratorio de Materiales a Nanoescala, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Tupper Av. 2069, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-06-15

    Highlights: • Tantalum carbide nanodispersoids were obtained in a copper matrix. • Nanodispersoids were obtained by means of reactive milling followed by hot extrusion. • Hexane was used as the liquid medium for the reactive mechanical alloying process. • Hexane provides the carbon (C) needed for the process. • The reaction of tantalum carbide formation takes place in the hot extrusion. - Abstract: This paper presents a study of the in situ production of tantalum carbide nanodispersoids in a copper matrix. The copper matrix composites were produced by means of reactive milling in hexane (C{sub 6}H{sub 14}) followed by hot extrusion. The composite materials were characterized by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Vickers micro-hardness. The effect of milling time was analyzed in 10, 20 and 30 h in a composite with a nominal composition Cu–5 vol.% TaC. A systematic increase of the dislocations density and the carbon concentration were observed when the milling time was increased, whereas the crystallite size of the composite matrix decreased. The material milled for 30 h and hot-extruded showed a density of 9037 kg m{sup −3} (98.2% densification) and a softening resistance of 204 HV; however the latter value showed an abrupt drop after an annealing treatment at 923 K for 1 h. Finally, the TEM analysis showed the presence of tantalum carbide (Ta{sub 4}C{sub 3}) nanodispersoids.

  11. Multi-band silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Geng-rong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Da-yan; Xu, Ke-wei

    2010-11-01

    Silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide were realized by a magnetron co-sputtering process and post-annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, glancing x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the chemical composition and the microstructural properties. The results show that the sizes and size distribution of silicon quantum dots can be tuned by changing the annealing atmosphere and the atom ratio of silicon and carbon in the matrix. A physicochemical mechanism is proposed to demonstrate this formation process. Photoluminescence measurements indicate a multi-band configuration due to the quantum confinement effect of silicon quantum dots with different sizes. The PL spectra are further widened as a result of the existence of amorphous silicon quantum dots. This multi-band configuration would be extremely advantageous in improving the photoelectric conversion efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells.

  12. Nanosized Borides and Carbides for Electroplating. Metal-Matrix Coatings: Specifications, Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Galevskiy, S. G.; Il'yashchenko, D. P.; Kartsev, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper summarizes experience of application of nano-sized carbides and borides of titanium and chromium, silicon carbide as components of electro-depositable coating compositions based on nickel, zinc, and chromium. Basic physical and mechanical properties of the coatings are determined. Technological and economic evaluation is completed; practicability of high-cost nano-diamonds substitution for nano-sized borides and carbides is justified.

  13. Nanosized Borides and Carbides for Electroplating. Metal-Matrix Coatings: Specifications, Performance Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Galevskiy, S. G.; Ilyashchenko, Dmitry Pavlovich; Karthev, Dmitry Sergeevich

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes experience of application of nano-sized carbides and borides of titanium and chromium, silicon carbide as components of electro-depositable coating compositions based on nickel, zinc, and chromium. Basic physical and mechanical properties of the coatings are determined. Technological and economic evaluation is completed; practicability of high-cost nano-diamonds substitution for nano-sized borides and carbides is justified.

  14. Ceramic Matrix Composites Performances Under High Gamma Radiation Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cemmi, A.; Baccaro, S.; Fiore, S.; Gislon, P.; Serra, E.; Fassina, S.; Ferrari, E.; Ghisolfi, E.

    2014-06-01

    Ceramic matrix composites reinforced by continuous ceramic fibers (CMCs) represent a class of advanced materials developed for applications in automotive, aerospace, nuclear fusion reactors and in other specific systems for harsh environments. In the present work, the silicon carbide/silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites, manufactured by Chemical Vapour Infiltration process at FN S.p.A. plant, have been evaluated in term of gamma radiation hardness at three different absorbed doses (up to around 3MGy). Samples behavior has been investigated before and after irradiation by means of mechanical tests (flexural strength) and by surface and structural analyses (X-ray diffraction, SEM, FTIR-ATR, EPR).

  15. Production and mechanical properties of Al-SiC metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvanis, K.; Fasnakis, D.; Maropoulos, A.; Papanikolaou, S.

    2016-11-01

    The usage of Al-SiC Metal Matrix Composites is constantly increasing in the last years due to their unique properties such as light weight, high strength, high specific modulus, high fatigue strength, high hardness and low density. Al-SiC composites of various carbide compositions were produced using a centrifugal casting machine. The mechanical properties, tensile and compression strength, hardness and drop-weight impact strength were studied in order to determine the optimum carbide % in the metal matrix composites. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure-property correlation. It was observed that the tensile and the compressive strength of the composites increased as the proportion of silicon carbide became higher in the composites. Also with increasing proportion of silicon carbide in the composite, the material became harder and appeared to have smaller values for total displacement and total energy during impact testing.

  16. Cast microstructure and tribological properties of particulate TiC-reinforced Ni-base or stainless steel matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skolianos, S. (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristoteles University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece)); Kattamis, T.Z. (Department of Metallurgy, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States)); Chen, M. (Department of Metallurgy, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States)); Chambers, B.V. (Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States))

    1994-06-15

    Particulate TiC-reinforced nickel, 304 stainless steel and IN-100 nickel-base superalloy matrix composites were processed by precipitating the carbide during solidification of a melt of appropriate composition at various cooling rates. The microstructure and tribological properties of prepared specimens were evaluated. The microstructures of these composites can be controlled by controlling melt composition and homogeneity, as well as cooling rate. The specific wear rate decreased with increasing volume fraction of carbide and decreasing carbide particle size and spacing. For given volume fraction of carbide and carbide particle size composites with a softer matrix exhibited a higher wear rate and vice versa. The difference in wear rate among the three types of composites slightly decreased with increasing volume fraction carbide. Microhardness increased with increasing volume fraction of carbide. The friction coefficient between a diamond stylus and the polished specimen surface decreased with increasing volume fraction of carbide and decreasing particle size and spacing. For given volume fraction of carbide and carbide particle size the friction coefficient decreased with increasing matrix microhardness. For all composites a lower friction coefficient corresponded to a higher wear resistance. ((orig.))

  17. In situ synthesis tungsten carbide reinforced ferrous matrix surface composites by laser cladding%激光熔覆原位合成碳化钨增强铁基表面复合材料的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈莹莹; 李文戈; 吴培桂

    2011-01-01

    利用激光熔覆原位合成技术,在预置Ni涂层的45钢表面原位自生碳化钨陶瓷.通过X射线衍射仪(XRD)、扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、能谱仪(EDS)、显微硬度计等分析测试手段对碳化钨陶瓷增强相的组织形貌、物相组成、化学成分及力学性能等方面进行了研究.结果表明,熔覆区内的碳化物由过饱和固溶体共晶析出;涂层与基体问的结合为冶金结合;制备的表面复合材料的硬度高于基体,改性效果极为明显.%Multiphase tungsten carbide on 45 steel was fabricated by laser cladding cooperated with combustion synthesis. The microstructure,phase composition, element distribution and mechanical properties of tungsten carbide ceramic reinforcement phase were analyzed by XRD,SEM, EDS and microhardness tester, respectively. The results show that the laser cladding region supersaturated solid solution by eutectic precipitation. The coating and the substrate is metallurgical bonding. The hardness of composite is superior to substrate. In a word, the modification effect is remarkable.

  18. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube - Chromium Carbide Composite Through Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze; Gao, Yibo; Liang, Fei; Wu, Benxin; Gou, Jihua; Detrois, Martin; Tin, Sammy; Yin, Ming; Nash, Philip; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-03-01

    Ceramics often have high hardness and strength, and good wear and corrosion resistance, and hence have many important applications, which, however, are often limited by their poor fracture toughness. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may enhance ceramic fracture toughness, but hot pressing (which is one typical approach of fabricating CNT-ceramic composites) is difficult to apply for applications that require localized heat input, such as fabricating composites as surface coatings. Laser beam may realize localized material sintering with little thermal effect on the surrounding regions. However, for the typical ceramics for hard coating applications (as listed in Ref.[1]), previous work on laser sintering of CNT-ceramic composites with mechanical property characterizations has been very limited. In this paper, research work has been reported on the fabrication and characterization of CNT-ceramic composites through laser sintering of mixtures of CNTs and chromium carbide powders. Under the studied conditions, it has been found that laser-sintered composites have a much higher hardness than that for plasma-sprayed composites reported in the literature. It has also been found that the composites obtained by laser sintering of CNTs and chromium carbide powder mixtures have a fracture toughness that is ~23 % higher than the material obtained by laser sintering of chromium carbide powders without CNTs.

  19. Effect of the Carbides and Matrix on the Wear Resistance of Nodular Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gumienny

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the abrasive wear resistance of selected types of nodular cast iron, including ADI, cooperating with quartz sand and 100 grit abrasive paper. It has been shown that carbides in nodular cast iron cause an increase in wear resistance of 6 to 12% depending on the surface fraction of the carbides and type of the matrix. For the same unit pressure the mass loss of the cast iron cooperating with quartz sand is many times larger than the cast iron cooperating with abrasive paper. For both abrasives the highest wear resistance showed nodular cast iron with upper and lower bainite and carbides.

  20. Effect of the Carbides and Matrix on the Wear Resistance of Nodular Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gumienny G.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the abrasive wear resistance of selected types of nodular cast iron, including ADI, cooperating with quartz sand and 100 grit abrasive paper. It has been shown that carbides in nodular cast iron cause an increase in wear resistance of 6 to 12% depending on the surface fraction of the carbides and type of the matrix. For the same unit pressure the mass loss of the cast iron cooperating with quartz sand is many times larger than the cast iron cooperating with abrasive paper. For both abrasives the highest wear resistance showed nodular cast iron with upper and lower bainite and carbides.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of In-situ Copper-Niobium Carbide Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhailawati, H.; Othman, R.; Bui, D. L.; Umemoto, M.

    2008-03-01

    In this work, synthesis of copper matrix composite powder reinforced by in situ niobium carbide particle was prepared by mechanical alloying of elemental powder and subsequent heat treatment. Elemental powders of Cu-Nb-C correspond to Cu-40wt%Nb-10%wtC composition was milled for 54 hours at room temperature in a planetary ball mill. The effect of heat treatment temperature on the formation of niobium carbide was analyzed. Characterization by X-ray diffraction was done on the milled powder and heat-treated powder in order to investigate NbC formation. Results indicate that NbC began to precipitate after mechanical alloying for about 54h with heat treatment temperature of 900 °C and 1000 °C.

  2. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Machining of Metal Matrix Composites provides the fundamentals and recent advances in the study of machining of metal matrix composites (MMCs). Each chapter is written by an international expert in this important field of research. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites gives the reader information on machining of MMCs with a special emphasis on aluminium matrix composites. Chapter 1 provides the mechanics and modelling of chip formation for traditional machining processes. Chapter 2 is dedicated to surface integrity when machining MMCs. Chapter 3 describes the machinability aspects of MMCs. Chapter 4 contains information on traditional machining processes and Chapter 5 is dedicated to the grinding of MMCs. Chapter 6 describes the dry cutting of MMCs with SiC particulate reinforcement. Finally, Chapter 7 is dedicated to computational methods and optimization in the machining of MMCs. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites can serve as a useful reference for academics, manufacturing and materials researchers, manu...

  3. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GEORGE PELIN; CRISTINA-ELISABETA PELIN; ADRIANA STEFAN; ION DINC\\u{A}; ANTON FICAI; ECATERINA ANDRONESCU; ROXANA TRUSC\\u{A}

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on obtaining and characterization of phenolic resin-based composites modified with nanometric silicon carbide. The nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating nanometric silicon carbide (nSiC) into phenolic resin at 0.5, 1 and 2 wt% contents using ultrasonication to ensure uniform dispersion of the nanopowder, followed by heat curing of the phenolic-based materials at controlled temperature profile up to 120$^{\\circ}$C. The obtained nanocomposites were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis and evaluated in terms of mechanical, tribological and thermal stability under load. The results highlight the positive effect of the nanometric silicon carbide addition in phenolic resin on mechanical, thermo-mechanical and tribological performance, improving their strength, stiffness and abrasive properties. The best results were obtained for 1 wt% nSiC, proving that this value is the optimum nanometric silicon carbide content. The results indicate that these materials could be effectively used to obtain ablative or carbon–carbon composites in future studies.

  4. Characterizing damage in ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baker, Christopher; Morscher, Gregory

    2014-04-01

    With the upcoming implementation of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) within aerospace systems (e.g., aviation turbine engines), an in-depth understanding of the failure process due to mechanical loads is required. This includes developing a basic understanding of the complex, multi-mechanism failure process as well as the associated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that are capable of recognizing and quantifying the damage. Various NDE techniques have been successfully utilized for assessing the damage state of woven CMCs, in particular, consisting of silicon carbide fibers and silicon carbide matrices (SiC/SiC). The multiple NDE techniques, studied by the authors of this paper, included acousto-ultrasonics, modal acoustic emissions, electrical resistance, impedance based structural health monitoring, pulsed thermography as well as thermoelastic stress analysis. The observed damage within the composites was introduced using multiple experimental tactics including uniaxial tensile tests, creep tests, and most recently, ballistic impact. This paper offers a brief review and summary of results for each of the applied NDE tools.

  5. Studies of the composition and reactivity of carbon species generated through laser vaporization of graphite, tantalum carbide and tungsten carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortman, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    Vapor compositions above graphite, tantalum carbide, and tungsten carbide together with the chemical reactions of C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/ and C/sub 3/ were studied by the techniques of CW laser vaporization, matrix isolation, and FTIR spectroscopy. The carbon species were scavenged by cocondensing reactive gases (N/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, CO and H/sub 2/O) with the vapors of graphitic samples in argon or nitrogen matrices. Products were identified from their infrared spectra. Photolysis and annealing studies were also conducted to detect reaction intermediates, formation of carbon clusters, and metastable C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/, and C/sub 3/ adducts with the added reactants. From these experiments, CO was shown to be potentially the most useful scavenger molecule, since it reacted with both C/sub 1/ and C/sub 2/ to form C/sub 2/O and C/sub 3/O, respectively. CO also reacted with C/sub 3/ to form an adduct, which rearranges upon photolysis to form C/sub 4/O, a previously unknown molecule. Its identity was confirmed by isotopic studies and comparison of its vibrations to those of related molecules, C/sub 3/O, C/sub 2/O, and CO.

  6. Research on rare earth and iron-rich diamond-enhanced tungsten carbide composite button

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiaoliang; SHAO Gangqin; DUAN Longchen; YUAN Runzhang

    2004-01-01

    At the present time in china, the binder used in tungsten carbide composite button is mainly cobalt, which is very expensive. In order to solve the problems, a new type of rare earth and iron-rich diamond-enhanced tungsten carbide with high abrasive resistance and high toughness against impact, which realizes to substitute ferrum for cobalt, has been developed. The key problems in making the button are to improve the mechanical properties of matrix and increase the welding strength between the diamond and the matrix. All these problems have been solved effectively by low temperature activation hot-press sintering, doping rare earth lanthanum in matrix and high sintering pressure. The properties of the button have been determined under laboratory conditions. The test results show that its hardness is more than 90 HRA, its abrasive resistance is 39 times more than that of conventional cemented tungsten carbide, and its toughness against impact is more than 200 J. All these data show the button has very good mechanical properties.

  7. Feasibility of Electrochemical Deposition of Nickel/Silicon Carbide Fibers Composites over Nickel Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, E. P.; Abdul Karim, M. R.; Pavese, M.; Biamino, S.; Badini, C.; Fino, P.

    2017-02-01

    Nickel superalloys are typical materials used for the hot parts of engines in aircraft and space vehicles. They are very important in this field as they offer high-temperature mechanical strength together with a good resistance to oxidation and corrosion. Due to high-temperature buckling phenomena, reinforcement of the nickel superalloy might be needed to increase stiffness. For this reason, it was thought to investigate the possibility of producing composite materials that might improve properties of the metal at high temperature. The composite material was produced by using electrochemical deposition method in which a composite with nickel matrix and long silicon carbide fibers was deposited over the nickel superalloy. The substrate was Inconel 718, and monofilament continuous silicon carbide fibers were chosen as reinforcement. Chemical compatibility was studied between Inconel 718 and the reinforcing fibers, with fibers both in an uncoated condition, and coated with carbon or carbon/titanium diboride. Both theoretical calculations and experiments were conducted, which suggested the use of a carbon coating over the fibers and a buffer layer of nickel to avoid unwanted reactions between the substrate and silicon carbide. Deposition was then performed, and this demonstrated the practical feasibility of the process. Yield strength was measured to detect the onset of interface debonding between the substrate and the composite layer.

  8. Dry sliding wear of heat treated hybrid metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveed, Mohammed; Khan, A. R. Anwar

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, there has been an ever-increasing demand for enhancing mechanical properties of Aluminum Matrix Composites (AMCs), which are finding wide applications in the field of aerospace, automobile, defence etc,. Among all available aluminium alloys, Al6061 is extensively used owing to its excellent wear resistance and ease of processing. Newer techniques of improving the hardness and wear resistance of Al6061 by dispersing an appropriate mixture of hard ceramic powder and whiskers in the aluminium alloy are gaining popularity. The conventional aluminium based composites possess only one type of reinforcements. Addition of hard reinforcements such as silicon carbide, alumina, titanium carbide, improves hardness, strength and wear resistance of the composites. However, these composites possessing hard reinforcement do posses several problems during their machining operation. AMCs reinforced with particles of Gr have been reported to be possessing better wear characteristics owing to the reduced wear because of formation of a thin layer of Gr particles, which prevents metal to metal contact of the sliding surfaces. Further, heat treatment has a profound influence on mechanical properties of heat treatable aluminium alloys and its composites. For a solutionising temperature of 5500C, solutionising duration of 1hr, ageing temperature of 1750C, quenching media and ageing duration significantly alters mechanical properties of both aluminium alloy and its composites. In the light of the above, the present paper aims at developing aluminium based hybrid metal matrix composites containing both silicon carbide and graphite and characterize their mechanical properties by subjecting it to heat treatment. Results indicate that increase of graphite content increases wear resistance of hybrid composites reinforced with constant SiC reinforcement. Further heat treatment has a profound influence on the wear resistance of the matrix alloy as well as its hybrid composites

  9. Effect of Powder-Feeding Modes During Plasma Spray on the Properties of Tungsten Carbide Composite Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yi-ming; Du, Xiao-dong; Wu, Gang

    2017-05-01

    A WC-reinforced composite coating was fabricated on the surface of 45 steel samples by plasma, cladding process with WC powder added to the molten pool synchronously or in the tail of the molten pool. The microstructure, phase composition, and element distribution in the coating were analyzed. The results show that the undissolved WC particles and crystallized carbide (WC, W2C) were distributed uniformly in the sub-eutectic matrix in both cases. Fewer of the WC particles are dissolved in the matrix when they are injected into the tail of the molten pool. There are fewer needle-like tungsten carbide formations seen in the composite coating fabricated by back-feeding process than in that formed by synchronous feeding. The former results in a finer microstructure and a higher concentration gradient of elements near the interface between the WC particles and the coating matrix.

  10. Thermal properties of wood-derived silicon carbide and copper-silicon carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappecena, Kristen E.

    Wood-derived ceramics and composites have been of interest in recent years due to their unique microstructures, which lead to tailorable properties. The porosity and pore size distribution of each wood type is different, which yields variations in properties in the resultant materials. The thermal properties of silicon carbide ceramics and copper-silicon carbide composites derived from wood were studied as a function of their pore structures. Wood was pyrolyzed at temperatures ranging from 300-2400°C to yield porous carbon. The progression toward long-range order was studied as a function of pyrolyzation temperature. Biomorphic silicon carbide (bioSiC) is a porous ceramic material resulting from silicon melt infiltration of these porous carbon materials. BioSiC has potential applicability in many high temperature environments, particularly those in which rapid temperature changes occur. To understand the behavior of bioSiC at elevated temperatures, the thermal and thermo-mechanical properties were studied. The thermal conductivity of bioSiC from five precursors was determined using flash diffusivity at temperatures up to 1100°C. Thermal conductivity results varied with porosity, temperature and orientation, and decreased from 42-13 W/mK for porosities of 43-69%, respectively, at room temperature. The results were compared with to object-oriented finite-element analysis (OOF). OOF was also used to model and understand the heat-flow paths through the complex bioSiC microstructures. The thermal shock resistance of bioSiC was also studied, and no bioSiC sample was found to fail catastrophically after up to five thermal shock cycles from 1400°C to room temperature oil. Copper-silicon carbide composites have potential uses in thermal management applications due to the high thermal conductivity of each phase. Cu-bioSiC composites were created by electrodeposition of copper into bioSiC pores. The detrimental Cu-SiC reaction was avoided by using this room temperature

  11. Status of silicon carbide composites for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Jones, R.H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    An effort is now underway to design an irradiation creep experiment involving SiC composites and SiC fibers. In order to successfully design such an experiment, it is necessary to review and assess the available data for monolithic SiC to establish the possible bounds of creep behavior for the composite. The data available show that monolithic SiC will indeed creep at a higher rate under irradiation compared to that of thermal creep, and surprisingly, it will do so in a temperature-dependant manner that is typical of metals.

  12. Investigation on the Effects of Titanium Diboride Particle Size on Radiation Shielding Properties of Titanium Diboride Reinforced Boron Carbide-Silicon Carbide Composites

    OpenAIRE

    A.O. Addemir; A.C. Akarsu; A.B. Tugrul; B. Buyuk

    2012-01-01

    Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion power plants. Titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites which were produced from different titanium diboride particle sizes and ratios were studied for searching of the behaviour against the gamma ray. Cs-137 gamma radioisotope was used as gamma source in the expe...

  13. High temperature polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Tito T. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) Characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  14. Electric Heating Property from Butyl Rubber-Loaded Boron Carbide Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Dechuan; WANG Ninghui; LI Guofeng

    2014-01-01

    We researched the electric heating property from butyl rubber-loaded boron carbide composite. The effects of boron carbide content on bulk resistivity, voltage-current characteristic, thermal conductivity and thermal stability of boron carbide/butyl rubber (IIR) polymer composite were introduced. The analysis results indicated that the bulk resistivity decreased greatly with increasing boron carbide content, and when boron carbide content reached to 60%, the bulk resistivity achieved the minimum. Accordingly, electric heating behavior of the composite is strongly dependent on boron carbide content as well as applied voltage. The content of boron carbide was found to be effective in achieving high thermal conductivity in composite systems. The thermal conductivity of the composite material with added boron carbide was improved nearly 20 times than that of the pure IIR. The thermal stability test showed that, compared with pure IIR, the thermal stable time of composites was markedly extended, which indicated that the boron carbide can significantly improve the thermal stability of boron carbide/IIR composite.

  15. The effect of fiber microstructure on evolution of residual stresses in silicon carbide/titanium aluminide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Freed, Alan D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of the morphology of the SCS6 silicon carbide fiber on the evolution of residual stresses in SiC/Ti composites. A micromechanics model based on the concentric cylinder concept is presented which is used to calculate residual stresses in a SiC/Ti composite during axisymmetric cooling by a spatially uniform temperature change. The silicon carbide fiber is modeled as a layered material with five distinct transversely isotropic and orthotropic, elastic layers, whereas the titanium matrix is taken to be isotropic, with temperature-dependent elastoplastic properties. The results arc compared with those obtained based on the assumption that the silicon carbide fiber is isotropic and homogeneous.

  16. Microstructural Evolution of Chloride-Cleaned Silicon Carbide Aluminum Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeosun, S. O.; Akpan, E. I.; Gbenebor, O. P.; Balogun, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    This study examines the synergy between reinforcement surface modifications on the evolution of microstructures of AA6011-silicon carbide particle (SiCp) composites in multidirectional solidification. Silicon carbide particles (SiCp) were cleaned with ammonium chloride, tin(II) chloride, sodium chloride, and palladium(II) chloride and used as reinforcement to cast AA6011-SiCp composites by applying the stir casting method. A scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffractometer were used to investigate the morphology and phases present, respectively, in the composite material. Results show that wetting agents were effective as they inhibited the formation of Al4C3 in all modified composites. The modified SiCp was found to have varying effects on the morphology, dendrite arm size and direction, size and configuration of AlFeSi, and the amount of eutectic silicon depending on the concentration of the reagent and cleaning time. The highest effect was shown by the use of 40 g/L of tin(II) chloride. The composites had short dendritic arms, good interfacial interaction, and only a few crystals of AlFeSi.

  17. Laser cladding in-situ carbide particle reinforced Fe-based composite coatings with rare earth oxide addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴朝锋; 马明星; 刘文今; 钟敏霖; 张红军; 张伟明

    2009-01-01

    Particulate reinforced metal matrix composite(PR-MMC) has excellent properties such as good wear resistance,corrosion resistance and high temperature properties.Laser cladding is usually used to form PR-MMC on metal surface with various volume fractions of ceramic particles.Recent literatures showed that laser melting of powder mixture containing carbon and carbide-forming elements,was favorable for the formation of in-situ synthesized carbide particles.In this paper,rare earth oxide(RE2O3) was added into t...

  18. Aluminum nitride-silicon carbide whisker composites: Processing, properties, and microstructural stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    Aluminum nitride -- silicon carbide whisker composites with up to 20 vol % whiskers were fabricated by pressureless sintering (1750{degree}--1800{degree}C) and by hot-pressing (1700{degree}--1800{degree}C). Silicon carbide whiskers were found to degrade depending on the type of protective powder bed used during sintering. Whiskers were found to degraded in high oxygen containing samples by reaction with sintering additives. Whisker degradation was also due to the formation of silicon carbide -- aluminum nitride solid solution. No whisker degradation was observed in hot-pressed samples. For these samples Young's modulus and fracture toughness were measured. A 33% increase in the fracture toughness was measured by the indentation technique for a 20 vol % whisker composite. Operative toughening mechanisms were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Crack deflection and whisker bridging were the dominant mechanisms. It was also shown that load transfer from matrix to whiskers can be a contributing factor to toughening. 88 refs., 34 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  20. Research on Diamond Enhanced Tungsten Carbide Composite Button

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    At the present, the cutters used in button bits and rock bits are mainly cobalt tungsten carbide in our country. Because of its low abrasive resistance, the bit service life and drilling efficiency was very low when the hard and extremely hard formations were being drilled. Owing to its high abrasive resistance, the diamond composite material is widely used in drilling operations. However, its toughness against impact is too low to be used in percussion drilling, only can it be used in rotary drilling. In ...

  1. FORMATION MECHANISM OF TITANIUM CARBIDE CRYSTAL IN LASER SYNTHESIZED METAL-CERAMIC COMPOSITE COATING

    OpenAIRE

    BAOSHUAI DU; ZHONGWEN. ZHANG; XINHONG WANG; ZENGDA ZOU

    2011-01-01

    In situ titanium carbide reinforced iron-based composite coating was deposited on mild carbon steel using laser surface engineering (LSE) with ferrotitanium and graphite as precursor. The microstructure and phase constituents of the deposited coating were characterized. Formation mechanism of titanium carbide crystal in the composite coating was elucidated by correlating the morphology of titanium carbide and the thermal cycle experienced by the precursor during the laser treatment. It was de...

  2. Analysis of Surface Integrity in Drilling Metal Matrix and Hybrid Metal Matrix Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Rajmohan; K. Palanikumar; J. Paulo Davim

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid metal matrix composites consist of at least three constituents-a metal or an alloy matrix and two reinforcements in various forms, bonded together at the atomic level in the composite. Despite their higher specific properties of strength and stiffness, the non homogeneous and anisotropic nature combined with the abrasive reinforcements render their machining difficult. In this paper, the surface integrity of machining in drilling hybrid composites has been discussed. Drilling tests are carried out at different spindle speed, feed rates, and different drill tool materials to investigate the effect of the various cutting parameters on the surface quality and the extent of the deformation of drilled surface due to drilling. Materials used for the present investigation are A1356/IOSIC (wt%) metal matrix and A1356/10SiC-3mica (wt%) hybrid composites. The composites are fabricated using stir casting route. The drilling tests are conducted on vertical computer numeric control (CNC) machining center using carbide, coated carbide and polycrystalline diamond (PCD) drills. The surface roughness decreases with increasing spindle speed and increases with increasing feed rate. The machined surface is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM images of the machined surfaces indicate the presence of grooves and pits. Microhardness depth profiles indicate that the subsurface damage is limited to the top of 100-250 μm.

  3. Low-temperature synthesis of silicon carbide inert matrix fuel through a polymer precursor route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Chunghao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Tulenko, James S. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Baney, Ronald H., E-mail: rbane@mse.ufl.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2011-02-28

    A low temperature process of mixing different sizes of silicon carbide (SiC) particles with a polymer precursor was utilized to synthesize SiC pellets for potential use as inert matrix fuels (IMF) for light water reactors. The lower temperature process is required to prevent the reactions between SiC and the dispersed PuO{sub 2} fuel material. The effect of the polymer content and the cold pressing pressure on the packing of SiC particles was investigated. The effect of mixing coarse and fine SiC particles on the density and the pore size distribution was also investigated. It was found that the density and pore size distribution can be tailored by controlling the SiC size compositions, polymer content and pressing pressure at room temperature. A possible mechanism has been proposed to explain the forming of the pores with respect to the geometric arrangement between SiC particles and the polymer precursor. SEM images showed that ceria (cerium oxide) which is a PuO{sub 2} surrogate in this study, was well distributed in the pellet.

  4. Low-temperature synthesis of silicon carbide inert matrix fuel through a polymer precursor route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chunghao; Tulenko, James S.; Baney, Ronald H.

    2011-02-01

    A low temperature process of mixing different sizes of silicon carbide (SiC) particles with a polymer precursor was utilized to synthesize SiC pellets for potential use as inert matrix fuels (IMF) for light water reactors. The lower temperature process is required to prevent the reactions between SiC and the dispersed PuO 2 fuel material. The effect of the polymer content and the cold pressing pressure on the packing of SiC particles was investigated. The effect of mixing coarse and fine SiC particles on the density and the pore size distribution was also investigated. It was found that the density and pore size distribution can be tailored by controlling the SiC size compositions, polymer content and pressing pressure at room temperature. A possible mechanism has been proposed to explain the forming of the pores with respect to the geometric arrangement between SiC particles and the polymer precursor. SEM images showed that ceria (cerium oxide) which is a PuO 2 surrogate in this study, was well distributed in the pellet.

  5. Investigation on the Effects of Titanium Diboride Particle Size on Radiation Shielding Properties of Titanium Diboride Reinforced Boron Carbide-Silicon Carbide Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Addemir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion power plants. Titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites which were produced from different titanium diboride particle sizes and ratios were studied for searching of the behaviour against the gamma ray. Cs-137 gamma radioisotope was used as gamma source in the experiments which has a single gamma-peak at 0.662 MeV. Gamma transmission technique was used for the measurements. The effects of titanium diboride particle size on radiation attenuation of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were evaluated in related with gamma transmission and the results of the experiments were interpreted and compared with each other. Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion power plants. Titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites which were produced from different titanium diboride particle sizes and ratios were studied for searching of the behaviour against the gamma ray. Cs-137 gamma radioisotope was used as gamma source in the experiments which has a single gamma-peak at 0.662 MeV. Gamma transmission technique was used for the measurements. The effects of titanium diboride particle size on radiation attenuation of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were evaluated in related with gamma transmission and the results of the experiments were interpreted and compared with each other. Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion

  6. Time-Dependent Stress Rupture Strength Degradation of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites at Intermediate Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    The stress rupture strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites with a boron nitride fiber coating decreases with time within the intermediate temperature range of 700 to 950 degree Celsius. Various theories have been proposed to explain the cause of the time-dependent stress rupture strength. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relative significance of the various theories for the time-dependent strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites. This is achieved through the development of a numerically based progressive failure analysis routine and through the application of the routine to simulate the composite stress rupture tests. The progressive failure routine is a time-marching routine with an iterative loop between a probability of fiber survival equation and a force equilibrium equation within each time step. Failure of the composite is assumed to initiate near a matrix crack and the progression of fiber failures occurs by global load sharing. The probability of survival equation is derived from consideration of the strength of ceramic fibers with randomly occurring and slow growing flaws as well as the mechanical interaction between the fibers and matrix near a matrix crack. The force equilibrium equation follows from the global load sharing presumption. The results of progressive failure analyses of the composite tests suggest that the relationship between time and stress-rupture strength is attributed almost entirely to the slow flaw growth within the fibers. Although other mechanisms may be present, they appear to have only a minor influence on the observed time-dependent behavior.

  7. Enhanced Sintering of Boron Carbide-Silicon Composites by Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaojun; Liu, Weiliang

    2016-09-01

    Boron carbide (B4C)-silicon (Si) composites have been prepared by aqueous tape casting, laminating, and spark plasma sintering (SPS). The influences of silicon (Si) content on the phases, microstructure, sintering properties, and mechanical properties of the obtained B4C-Si composites are studied. The results indicate that the addition of Si powder can act as a sintering aid and contribute to the sintering densification. The addition of Si powder can also act as a second phase and contribute to the toughening for composites. The relative density of B4C-Si composites samples with adding 10 wt.% Si powder prepared by SPS at 1600 °C and 50 MPa for 8 min is up to 98.3%. The bending strength, fracture toughness, and Vickers hardness of the sintered samples are 518.5 MPa, 5.87 MPa m1/2, and 38.9 GPa, respectively. The testing temperature-dependent high-temperature bending strength and fracture toughness can reach a maximum value at 1350 °C. The B4C-Si composites prepared at 1600, 1650, and 1700 °C have good high-temperature mechanical properties. This paper provides a facile low-temperature sintering route for B4C ceramics with improved properties.

  8. Enhanced Sintering of Boron Carbide-Silicon Composites by Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaojun; Liu, Weiliang

    2016-11-01

    Boron carbide (B4C)-silicon (Si) composites have been prepared by aqueous tape casting, laminating, and spark plasma sintering (SPS). The influences of silicon (Si) content on the phases, microstructure, sintering properties, and mechanical properties of the obtained B4C-Si composites are studied. The results indicate that the addition of Si powder can act as a sintering aid and contribute to the sintering densification. The addition of Si powder can also act as a second phase and contribute to the toughening for composites. The relative density of B4C-Si composites samples with adding 10 wt.% Si powder prepared by SPS at 1600 °C and 50 MPa for 8 min is up to 98.3%. The bending strength, fracture toughness, and Vickers hardness of the sintered samples are 518.5 MPa, 5.87 MPa m1/2, and 38.9 GPa, respectively. The testing temperature-dependent high-temperature bending strength and fracture toughness can reach a maximum value at 1350 °C. The B4C-Si composites prepared at 1600, 1650, and 1700 °C have good high-temperature mechanical properties. This paper provides a facile low-temperature sintering route for B4C ceramics with improved properties.

  9. Coating effects on thermal properties of carbon carbon and carbon silicon carbide composites for space thermal protection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, M.; Morles, R. B.; Cioeta, F.; Marchetti, M.

    2014-06-01

    Many are the materials for hot structures, but the most promising one are the carbon based composites nowadays. This is because they have good characteristics with a high stability at high temperatures, preserving their mechanical properties. Unfortunately, carbon reacts rapidly with oxygen and the composites are subjected to oxidation degradation. From this point of view CC has to be modified in order to improve its thermal and oxidative resistance. The most common solutions are the use of silicon carbide into the carbon composites matrix (SiC composites) to make the thermal properties increase and the use of coating on the surface in order to protect the composite from the space plasma effects. Here is presented an experimental study on coating effects on these composites. Thermal properties of coated and non coated materials have been studied and the thermal impact on the matrix and surface degradation is analyzed by a SEM analysis.

  10. Wear and Reactivity Studies of Melt infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmon, David C.; Ojard, Greg; Brewer, David N.

    2013-01-01

    As interest grows in the use of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for critical gas turbine engine components, the effects of the CMCs interaction with the adjoining structure needs to be understood. A series of CMC/material couples were wear tested in a custom elevated temperature test rig and tested as diffusion couples, to identify interactions. Specifically, melt infiltrated silicon carbide/silicon carbide (MI SiC/SiC) CMC was tested in combination with a nickel-based super alloy, Waspaloy, a thermal barrier coating, Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ), and a monolithic ceramic, silicon nitride (Si3N4). To make the tests more representative of actual hardware, the surface of the CMC was kept in the as-received state (not machined) with the full surface features/roughness present. Test results include: scanning electron microscope characterization of the surfaces, micro-structural characterization, and microprobe analysis.

  11. Porous Silicon Carbide/Carbon Composite Microspherules for Methane Storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengbo Li; Qingli Qian; Shufeng Zhang; Fang Yan; Guoqing Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide/carbon (SiC/C) microspherules were prepared by the controlled heating treatment of polymer and silica hybrid precursors over 1000 ℃ in Ar/H2 stream. The resultant SiC/C composite shows improved physical properties such as excellent mechanical strength, regular physical form, and high packing density. Such improvement overcomes the main inherent problems encountered when using activated carbons as absorbents without sacrificing porosity properties. N2 sorption analysis shows that the SiC/C composite has a BET surface area of 1793 m2/g and a pore volume of 0.92 ml/g. Methane adsorption isotherm is determined by the conventional volumetric method at 25 ℃ and up to 7.0 MPa. On volumetric basis, the SiC/C composite microspherules show methane storage of 145 (V/V) at 3.5 MPa and 25 ℃. The combination of excellent physical properties and porosity properties in this SiC/C composite lends a great possibility to develop a competitive storage system for natural gas.

  12. Metal Matrix Composites Reinforced by Nano-Particles—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Casati

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composites reinforced by nano-particles are very promising materials, suitable for a large number of applications. These composites consist of a metal matrix filled with nano-particles featuring physical and mechanical properties very different from those of the matrix. The nano-particles can improve the base material in terms of wear resistance, damping properties and mechanical strength. Different kinds of metals, predominantly Al, Mg and Cu, have been employed for the production of composites reinforced by nano-ceramic particles such as carbides, nitrides, oxides as well as carbon nanotubes. The main issue of concern for the synthesis of these materials consists in the low wettability of the reinforcement phase by the molten metal, which does not allow the synthesis by conventional casting methods. Several alternative routes have been presented in literature for the production of nano-composites. This work is aimed at reviewing the most important manufacturing techniques used for the synthesis of bulk metal matrix nanocomposites. Moreover, the strengthening mechanisms responsible for the improvement of mechanical properties of nano-reinforced metal matrix composites have been reviewed and the main potential applications of this new class of materials are envisaged.

  13. Probing Structure and Composition of Nickel/Titanium Carbide Hybrid Interfaces at the Atomic Scale (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The transition in structure and composition across the titanium carbide /nickel hybrid interface has been determined at near atomic resolution by...coupling high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with three-dimensional atom probe tomography. The titanium carbide phase adopts a rocksalt-type

  14. Analytical Micromechanics Modeling Technique Developed for Ceramic Matrix Composites Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, James B.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) promise many advantages for next-generation aerospace propulsion systems. Specifically, carbon-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) CMCs enable higher operational temperatures and provide potential component weight savings by virtue of their high specific strength. These attributes may provide systemwide benefits. Higher operating temperatures lessen or eliminate the need for cooling, thereby reducing both fuel consumption and the complex hardware and plumbing required for heat management. This, in turn, lowers system weight, size, and complexity, while improving efficiency, reliability, and service life, resulting in overall lower operating costs.

  15. Standardisation of ceramic matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The standardisation on ceramic matrix composite (CMCs test methods occurred in the 1980's as these materials began to display interesting properties for aeronautical applications. Since the French Office of standardisation B43C has participated in establishing more than 40 standards and guides dealing with their thermal mechanical properties, their reinforcement and their fibre/matrix interface. As their maturity has been demonstrated through several technological development programmes (plugs, flaps, blades …, the air framers and engine manufacturers are now thinking of develop industrial parts which require a certification from airworthiness authorities. Now the standardisation of CMCs has to turn toward documents completing the certification requirement for civil and military applications. The news standards will allow being more confident with CMCs in taking into account their specificity.

  16. Processing and characterization of in-situ aluminum bronze titanium carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Balathandan S.

    The present study was carried out to develop a process for manufacturing in-situ aluminum bronze titanium carbide (TiC) friction drums using the centrifugal casting method and to characterize the material under optimum performance. The in-situ method of manufacturing is based on the reactive gas injection technique (RGI). The gas used in this study is high purity methane (CH 4). It was found that the methane gas injection time into the molten bath of aluminum bronze alloyed with titanium promotes the formation of titanium carbide (TiC) in the bronze matrix. The maximum amount of TiC incorporated in the matrix was 3.1 wt.%. This lead to 11.5 wt.% incorporation of TiC in the inner diameter of centrifugal castings as carbide particles drifted towards this region due to the centrifugal forces and their relatively low density. The hardness and strength of these composites when compared with the as cast condition was improved by heat treatment. However, the alloy ductility was decreased at the expense of the strength. It was found that the wear resistance properties of the composites were superior to those of pure cast and heat treated aluminum bronze currently in use. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy indicated that the composite surfaces did not scratch deeply when wearing against a hardened 4340 steel. The wear resistance of the as cast aluminum bronze was inferior to that of heat treated one. Moreover, the heat treated aluminum bronze showed a lack of high abrasion resistance. The frictional coefficient was relatively low for the as cast aluminum bronze as a result of adhesive wear behavior for the load and speed chosen in this present investigation. The corrosion studies showed that these composites do not lead to improved corrosion resistance in marine water environments. Apparently, there is a galvanic corrosion of TiC to bronze. In addition, pitting was observed on the corroded surfaces and increased with the volume fraction of TiC. Model validation was

  17. Surface modification of ceramic matrix composites induced by laser treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costil, S.; Lukat, S.; Langlade, C.; Coddet, C.

    2008-12-01

    Ceramics or ceramic composites present many advantages (hardness, chemical resistance, low density, etc.) which induce some more and more important applications particularly from the industrial point of view. The evolution of technology can also be beneficial to enlarge their global application areas. This is particularly the aim of this work which consists in applying a laser beam on the ceramic in order to clean its surface. A Nd:YAG laser has been used to study the basic mechanism roughening the surface of silicon carbide composite (ceramic matrix composite (CMC)). Investigations on different surfaces (two chemical compositions) show a strong influence of the nature of the material on the development of a characteristic conic structure. Microscopic studies (SEM) and elementary analyses (EDS and RMS) demonstrated the formation of a regular cone-like structure with a kinetic and a chemical modification specific to each material.

  18. Phase diagram of boron carbide with variable carbon composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sanxi; Gao, Qin; Widom, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Boron carbide exhibits intrinsic substitutional disorder over a broad composition range. The structure consists of 12-atom icosahedra placed at the vertices of a rhombohedral lattice, together with a 3-atom chain along the threefold axis. In the high-carbon limit, one or two carbon atoms can replace boron atoms on the icosahedra while the chains are primarily of type C-B-C. We fit an interatomic pair interaction model to density-functional-theory total energies to investigate the substitutional carbon disorder. Monte Carlo simulations with sampling improved by replica exchange and augmented by two-dimensional multiple histogram analysis predict three phases. The low-temperature, high-carbon-composition monoclinic C m structure disorders through a pair of phase transitions, first via an Ising-like transition to a monoclinic centrosymmetric state with space group C 2 /m , then via a first-order three-state Potts-like transition to the experimentally observed rhombohedral R 3 ¯m symmetry.

  19. Synthesis of copper-niobium carbide composite powder by in situ processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Zuhailawati [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)], E-mail: zuhaila@eng.usm.my; Othman, Radzali; Long, Bui Duc [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Umemoto, Minoru [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan)

    2008-09-22

    The in situ formation of niobium carbide (NbC) particles was investigated during mechanical alloying process as well as subsequent heat-treatment. Initial starting powders of Cu, Nb and C were used with a composition of Cu-40 wt% Nb-10 wt% C which was corresponding to Cu-40 vol% NbC. A mixture of this powder system was milled in an argon atmosphere for four different durations, i.e., 15 h, 31 h, 42 h and 54 h. X-ray diffraction was used to verify the formation of NbC. No NbC was formed after the milling process. The in situ formation of NbC in a copper matrix only took place after heat-treatment at 900 deg. C. Longer milling time resulted in the formation of NbC phase with more intense X-ray diffraction peaks due to powder refinement.

  20. Priority compositions of boron carbide crystals obtained by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, V. I.; Konovalikhin, S. V.; Kovalev, I. D.; Vershinnikov, V. I.

    2015-09-01

    Splitting of reflections from boron carbide has been found for the first time by an X-ray diffraction study of polycrystalline mixture of boron carbide В15- х С х , (1.5 ≤ x ≤ 3) and its magnesium derivative C4B25Mg1.42. An analysis of reflection profiles shows that this splitting is due to the presence of boron carbide phases of different compositions in the sample, which are formed during crystal growth. The composition changes from В12.9С2.1 to В12.4С2.6.

  1. Mechanical properties of silver matrix composites reinfroced with ceramic particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Śleziona

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Silver, silver alloys, as well as silver matrix based composites have been well known and applied in the electrotechnical and electronics industry for several decades. For many applications in electrotechnology, including electric contacts and brushes, unreinforced sliver alloys do not meet the requirements concerning mainly durability and wear resistance, first of all to tribological and electroerosive wear. These wear processes may be prevented by introducing to silver reinforcement particles and alloys. The target of the research included basic mechanical properties determination of the silver matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particles, manufactured with the use of suspension methods.Design/methodology/approach: In the presented paper the authors demonstrate possibilities of manufacturing of silver matrix composites on the way of casting technology utilization.Findings: The results of the research prove that applied suspension technology, based on introducing of agglomerated foundry alloy which is the carrier for reinforcement particles (SiC lub Al2O3 allows to produce in an effective and, what is important, in an economically attractive way, sliver alloys based composites.Research limitations/implications: The researches on the structure of manufactured composites and their mechanical properties that are presented in the paper prove the possibilities of mechanical mixing technology application for producing mechanical and stable connection between silver matrix and ceramic particles of aluminium oxide and silicon carbide.Originality/value: The manufacturing of this type of composites is based most of all on the utilization of powder metallurgy techniques. However the obtained results of the research prove that there is a possibility of silver matrix composites forming in the casting and plastic working processes. Extrusion process carried out in the hydraulic press KOBO has its favourably influence on ceramic reinforcement

  2. Micromechanical Evaluation of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    Materials Sciences Corporation AD-A236 756 M.hM. 9 1 0513 IEIN HIfINU IIl- DTIC JUN 06 1991 MICROMECHANICAL EVALUATION OF S 0 CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITES C...Classification) \\() Micromechanical Evaluation of Ceramic Matrix Composites ) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) C-F. Yen, Z. Hashin, C. Laird, B.W. Rosen, Z. Wang 13a. TYPE...and strengthen the ceramic composites. In this task, various possibilities of crack propagation in unidirectional ceramic matrix composites under

  3. Synthesis of carbon fibre-reinforced, silicon carbide composites by soft-solution approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Padmavathi; P Ghosal; N Eswara Prasad; J Subramanyam; K K Ray

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present work centers on synthesizing and characterizing carbon fibre (Cf) reinforced, silicon carbide matrix composites which are considered to have potential applications in aerospace and automobile industry. A series of composites, namely the Cf-SiC, Cf-(SiC+ZrC), Cf-(SiC+ZrB2), and Cf-(SiC+ZrO2), have been prepared by a proposed soft-solution approach. This approach involves the use of water-soluble precursors of colloidal silica, sucrose, zirconium oxychloride, and boric acid as sources of silica, carbon, zirconia, and boron oxide, respectively to achieve the desired matrices through drying, carbonization and carbothermal reduction. The prepared powders and the composites were characterized by thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analyses to assess the phase formation and microstructure of the materials, apart from assessment of their tensile properties. The study shows that the soft-solution process yields matrices with finer crystallite sizes, having homogeneous distribution of the constituent phases of either the powders or of the composite matrices. The role of the additional phases on the tensile properties of the composites has been discussed using consideration of thermal stresses at fibre-matrix interface; whereas the role of the carbothermal reduction temperature in determining these properties has been explained using the interfacial characteristics of the fibre-matrix. Addition of ZrO2 in the matrix of SiC has shown to improve the properties of Cf-SiC composites considerably. The results of this investigation unambiguously demonstrate that aqueous solution-based processing can be used for fabrication of these composites in relatively shorter time in an environmental friendly manner without using any expensive equipment. The approach is capable of yielding composites with different phases in the matrix by simple variation of

  4. Reducing chemical vapour infiltration time for ceramic matrix composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timms, L. A.; Westby, W.; Prentice, C.; Jaglin, D.; Shatwell, R. A.; Binner, J. G. P.

    2001-02-01

    Conventional routes to producing ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require the use of high temperatures to sinter the individual ceramic particles of the matrix together. Sintering temperatures are typically much higher than the upper temperature limits of the fibres. This paper details preliminary work carried out on producing a CMC via chemical vapour infiltration (CVI), a process that involves lower processing temperatures, thus avoiding fibre degradation. The CVI process has been modified and supplemented in an attempt to reduce the CVI process time and to lower the cost of this typically expensive process. To this end microwave-enhanced CVI (MECVI) has been chosen, along with two alternative pre-infiltration steps: electrophoretic infiltration and vacuum bagging. The system under investigation is based on silicon carbide fibres within a silicon carbide matrix (SiCf/SiC). The results demonstrate that both approaches result in an enhanced initial density and a consequent significant reduction in the time required for the MECVI processing step. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used as a non-destructive, density evaluation technique. Initial results indicate that the presence of the SiC powder in the pre-form changes the deposition profile during the MECVI process.

  5. Mechanical Behaviour ofAl2014 Reinforced with Boron Carbide and Short Basalt Fiber Based Hybrid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganatha S R

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at evaluating the effect of short Basalt Fiber and B4Con hardness and impact strength of Al 2014 Composites. These AMCs with individual and multiple reinforcement (hybrid MMCs are finding increased applications in aerospace, automobile, space, underwater and transportation applications. An effort is made to enhance the Hardness and Impact properties of AMCs by reinforcing Al2014 matrix with Varying Proportion of Short basalt fiber and Boron carbide by stir casting method. Aluminum alloy matrix varying proportions of boron carbide particulates and Short Basalt fibers were fabricated. The microstructure,hardness and impact strength properties of the fabricated AMCs were analyzed. The optical microstructure study revealed the homogeneous dispersion of B4C particles and Short Basalt fiber in the matrix. Based on the results obtained from the Hardness and Impact of the metal matrix composites it is observed that, the hardness and impact strength increases with increase in the amount of reinforcement‘s.

  6. Heat and Mass Transfer in the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Carbide in a Porous Carbon-Carbon Composite Material for a Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, S. V.; Mikhailovskii, K. V.; Prosuntsov, P. V.

    2017-03-01

    Physical and mathematical simulations of the chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide in a porous carbon-carbon composite material in a chemical vapor deposition reactor for formation of a matrix of a carbon-ceramic composite material for a heat shield of an aerospace aircraft have been performed. Results of parametric calculations of the heat and mass transfer at the macro- and microlevels in representative elements of the microstructure of carbon-carbon composite materials different in residual porosity at different temperatures in the reaction zone of the reactor are presented. Features of compaction of the pore space of a carbon-carbon composite material by a silicon-carbide matrix depending on the technological parameters of the reaction medium were analyzed.

  7. [Effects of silicon carbide on the cure depth, hardness and compressive strength of composite resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Lin, Yi'na; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2009-08-01

    The hardness, compressive strength and cure depth are important indices of the composite resin. This investigation was made with regard to the effects of silicon carbide on the cure depth, hardness and compressive strength of the light-curing composite resin. Different amounts of silicon carbide were added to the light-curing composite resin, which accounted for 0 wt%, 1 wt%, 0.6 wt%, 0.3 wt%, 0.1 wt%, 0.05 wt% and 0.005 wt% of the composite resin, respectively. The hardness, compressive strength and cure depth of the six afore-mentioned groups of composite resin were measured by the vernier caliper, the vickers hardness tester and the tensile strength of machine, respectively. The results showed that silicon carbide improved the hardness and compressive strength of the light-curing composite resin,when the concentration was 0.05 wt%. And the cure depth was close to that of control.

  8. Cellular Magnesium Matrix Foam Composites for Mechanical Damping Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunmugasamy, Vasanth Chakravarthy; Mansoor, Bilal; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    The damping characteristics of metal alloys and metal matrix composites are relevant to the automotive, aerospace, and marine structures. Use of lightweight materials can help in increasing payload capacity and in decreasing fuel consumption. Lightweight composite materials possessing high damping capabilities that can be designed as structural members can greatly benefit in addressing these needs. In this context, the damping properties of lightweight metals such as aluminum and magnesium and their respective composites have been studied in the existing literature. This review focuses on analyzing the damping properties of aluminum and magnesium alloys and their cellular composites. The damping properties of various lightweight alloys and composites are compared on the basis of their density to understand the potential for weight saving in structural applications. Magnesium alloys are observed to possess better damping properties in comparison to aluminum. However, aluminum matrix syntactic foams reinforced with silicon carbide hollow particles possess a damping capacity and density comparable to magnesium alloy. By using the data presented in the study, composites with specific compositions and properties can be selected for a given application. In addition, the comparison of the results helps in identifying the areas where attention needs to be focused to address the future needs.

  9. Novel Manufacturing Process for Unique Mixed Carbide Refractory Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR Phase I project will establish the feasibility of an innovative manufacturing process to fabricate a range of unique hafnium/silicon based carbide...

  10. Rapid thermal annealing and crystallization mechanisms study of silicon nanocrystal in silicon carbide matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Zhenyu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, a positive effect of rapid thermal annealing (RTA technique has been researched and compared with conventional furnace annealing for Si nanocrystalline in silicon carbide (SiC matrix system. Amorphous Si-rich SiC layer has been deposited by co-sputtering in different Si concentrations (50 to approximately 80 v%. Si nanocrystals (Si-NC containing different grain sizes have been fabricated within the SiC matrix under two different annealing conditions: furnace annealing and RTA both at 1,100°C. HRTEM image clearly reveals both Si and SiC-NC formed in the films. Much better "degree of crystallization" of Si-NC can be achieved in RTA than furnace annealing from the research of GIXRD and Raman analysis, especially in high-Si-concentration situation. Differences from the two annealing procedures and the crystallization mechanism have been discussed based on the experimental results.

  11. Silicon carbide whisker reinforced composites and method for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-02-09

    The present invention is directed to the fabrication of ceramic composites which possess improved mechanical properties, especially increased fracture toughness. In the formation of these ceramic composites, the single-crystal SiC whiskers are mixed with fine ceramic powders of a ceramic material such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, mullite, or B/sub 4/C. The mixtures which contain a homogeneous dispersion of the SiC whiskers are hot pressed at pressures in a range of about 28 to 70 MPa and temperatures in the range of about 1600 to 1950/sup 0/C with pressing times varying from about 0.75 to 2.5 hours. The resulting ceramic composites show an increase in fracture toughness of up to about 9 MPa.m/sup 1/2/ which represents as much as a two-fold increase over that of the matrix material.

  12. Economical Fabrication of Thick-Section Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Jason; Ramachandran, Gautham; Williams, Brian; Benander, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for producing thick-section [>2 in. (approx.5 cm)], continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Ultramet-modified fiber interface coating and melt infiltration processing, developed previously for thin-section components, were used for the fabrication of CMCs that were an order of magnitude greater in thickness [up to 2.5 in. (approx.6.4 cm)]. Melt processing first involves infiltration of a fiber preform with the desired interface coating, and then with carbon to partially densify the preform. A molten refractory metal is then infiltrated and reacts with the excess carbon to form the carbide matrix without damaging the fiber reinforcement. Infiltration occurs from the inside out as the molten metal fills virtually all the available void space. Densification to 41 ksi (approx. 283 MPa) flexural strength.

  13. Electrical Resistivity, Tribological Behaviour of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Nanoboron Carbide Particles Reinforced Copper Hybrid Composites for Pantograph Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Selvakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the influence and contribution of multiwalled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT–boron carbide (B4C to the mechanical and tribological properties of copper matrix composites. Different weight fractions of nano- B4C-containing fixed-weight fractions of MWCNT-reinforced copper composites were prepared using the entrenched cold-press sintering method of powder metallurgy. The wear losses of sintered Cu–MWCNT–B4C composites were investigated by conducting sliding tests in a pin-on-disc apparatus. The addition of reinforcements showed enhancements in the hardness and wear properties of the composites due to the uniform dispersion of the secondary reinforcement in the copper matrix and the self-lubricating effect of the MWCNTs. The effects of the nanoparticle distribution in the matrix, the worn surface morphology, and the elemental composition of the composites were characterized using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The electrical resistivity of the fabricated copper hybrid composite preforms was evaluated using a four-point probe tester. Our results highlight the use of experiential reinforcing limits of B4C on the wear and electrical and mechanical behaviour of copper composites.

  14. Multiscale Modeling of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Mital, Subodh K.; Pineda, Evan J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Results of multiscale modeling simulations of the nonlinear response of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites are reported, wherein the microstructure of the ceramic matrix is captured. This micro scale architecture, which contains free Si material as well as the SiC ceramic, is responsible for residual stresses that play an important role in the subsequent thermo-mechanical behavior of the SiC/SiC composite. Using the novel Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells recursive micromechanics theory, the microstructure of the matrix, as well as the microstructure of the composite (fiber and matrix) can be captured.

  15. Experimental & Theoretical Analysis of Composite (Polyester & Silicon-Carbide Cantilever Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif K. Yousif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A cantilever beam is made from composite material which is consist of (matrix: polyester and (particles: Silicon-Carbide with different volume fraction of particles. A force is applied at the free end of beam with different values. The experimental maximum deflection of beam which occurs at the point of the applied load is recorded. The deflection and slope of beam are analyzed by using FEM modeling. MATLAB paltform is built to assemble the equations, vector and matrix of FEM and solving the unknown variables (deflection and slope at each node. Also ANSYS platform is used to modeling beam in finite element and solve the problem. The numerical methods are used to compare the results with the theoretical and experimental data. A good agreement is observed between the above methods. The Increase in volume fraction of particles results in increasing the modulus of elasticity and decreasing the deflection of beam. An equation is suggested for modulus of elasticity as functions of volume fraction.

  16. Microstructural evolution in laser deposited nickel-titanium-carbon in situ metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopagoni, S. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Hwang, J.Y., E-mail: Junyeon.Hwang@unt.edu [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Singh, A.R.P.; Mensah, B.A.; Bunce, N. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Tiley, J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Scharf, T.W.; Banerjee, R. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: > Laser deposition of Ni-TiC composites with a relatively low volume fraction of refined homogeneously distributed carbide precipitates resulting from an in situ reaction between elemental titanium and carbon (graphite) within the molten nickel pool. > Detailed characterization of the Ni/TiC interface using high resolution TEM. > Evaluation of the microhardness and tribological properties of this novel in situ composite with comparisons to laser deposited pure Ni. - Abstract: Laser deposition of a mixture of elemental nickel, titanium, and carbon (graphite) powders via the laser engineered net shaping (LENS) process results in an in situ titanium carbide reinforced nickel metal matrix composites. The composites have been characterized in detail using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (including energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping), Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission (including high resolution) electron microscopy. Both primary and eutectic titanium carbides, observed in this composite, exhibited the FCC-TiC structure (NaCl-type). Detailed characterization of the nickel/titanium carbide interface was carried out using high resolution TEM with the orientation relationship between the phases being <1 0 0> TiC//<1 1 0> Ni and (0 0 2) TiC//(1-bar 11) Ni. Mechanical and tribological testing determined that the composites exhibited a relatively high hardness of 370 VHN and a steady-state friction coefficient of {approx}0.5, both improvements in comparison to LENS deposited pure Ni.

  17. Quantitative evaluation of carbides in nickel-base superalloy MAR-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczotok, A.

    2011-05-01

    It has been established that carbides in superalloys serve three functions. Fine carbides precipitated in the matrix give strengthening results. Carbides also can tie up certain elements that would otherwise promote phase instability during service. Grain boundary carbides prevent or retard grain-boundary sliding and strengthen the grain boundary, which depends significantly on carbide shape, size and distribution. Various types of carbides are possible, depending on superalloy composition and processing. In the paper optical and scanning electron microscopy investigations of carbides occurring in specimens of the polycrystalline nickel-base superalloy MAR-M247 were carried out. Conditions of carbides revealing and microstructure images acquisition have been described. Taking into consideration distribution and morphology of the carbides in matrix a method of quantitative description of Chinese script-like and blocky primary carbides on the basis of image analysis was proposed.

  18. Separate Evaluation of the Kinetics of Carbide Precipitation Occurring at the Interface of Preexisting Particles and Within the Austenitic Matrix in a Microalloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Gil; Shin, Eunjoo; Lee, Young-Kook

    2017-01-01

    The isothermal kinetics of carbide precipitation occurring at the interface of preexisting (Ti,Nb)(N,C) particles and within the deformed γ-austenite matrix were separately evaluated using a Nb-Ti-V microalloyed steel through small-angle neutron scattering and transmission electron microscopy. While the specimen was isothermally held after deformation at 1223 K (950 °C), (Nb,Ti)(C,N) particles were precipitated at the interface of coarse (Ti,Nb)(N,C) particles preexisting in the recrystallized γ matrix. This resulted in a single size distribution curve, which was converted from the measured magnetic scattering cross section. However, during isothermal holding after deformation at 1123 K (850 °C), fine (Nb,Ti,V)(C,N) particles formed mainly within the deformed γ matrix, although some of them were precipitated at the interface of preexisting coarse (Ti,Nb)(N,C) particles. Accordingly, the specimens held at 1123 K (850 °C) exhibited double size distribution curves. The separate evaluation between matrix and interface precipitation kinetics was successfully performed using the size distribution curves due to the difference in particle size according to the nucleation site. The reliability of carbide precipitation kinetics was confirmed by comparing the measured ratio between magnetic and nuclear scattering cross sections with the ratio calculated based on the measured chemical composition of precipitates.

  19. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  20. Titanium carbide/carbon composite nanofibers prepared by a plasma process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Mel, A A; Gautron, E; Angleraud, B; Granier, A; Tessier, P Y [Universite de Nantes, CNRS, Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel, UMR 6502, 2 rue de la Houssiniere BP 32229-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Choi, C H [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States)

    2010-10-29

    The incorporation of metal or metal carbide nanoparticles into carbon nanofibers modifies their properties and enlarges their field of application. The purpose of this work is to report a new non-catalytic and easy method to prepare organized metal carbide-carbon composite nanofibers on nanopatterned silicon substrates prepared by laser interference lithography coupled with deep reactive ion etching. Titanium carbide-carbon composite nanofibers were grown on the top of the silicon lines parallel to the substrate by a hybrid plasma process combining physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The prepared nanofibers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the shape, microstructure and the chemical composition of the as-grown nanofibers can be tuned by changing the plasma conditions.

  1. Titanium carbide/carbon composite nanofibers prepared by a plasma process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mel, A A; Gautron, E; Choi, C H; Angleraud, B; Granier, A; Tessier, P Y

    2010-10-29

    The incorporation of metal or metal carbide nanoparticles into carbon nanofibers modifies their properties and enlarges their field of application. The purpose of this work is to report a new non-catalytic and easy method to prepare organized metal carbide-carbon composite nanofibers on nanopatterned silicon substrates prepared by laser interference lithography coupled with deep reactive ion etching. Titanium carbide-carbon composite nanofibers were grown on the top of the silicon lines parallel to the substrate by a hybrid plasma process combining physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The prepared nanofibers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the shape, microstructure and the chemical composition of the as-grown nanofibers can be tuned by changing the plasma conditions.

  2. Structural Evaluation and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum/Tungsten Carbide Composites Fabricated by Continual Annealing and Press Bonding (CAPB) Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkhanlou, Sajjad; Ketabchi, Mostafa; Parvin, Nader; Drummen, G. P. C.

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, a novel technique is introduced called continual annealing and press bonding (CAPB) for the manufacturing of a bulk aluminum matrix composite dispersed with 10 vol pct tungsten carbide particles (Al/WCp composite). The microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of the Al/WCp composite during various CAPB cycles were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDX), and tensile testing. The microstructure of the fabricated composite after fourteen cycles of CAPB showed homogenous distribution of the WC particles in the aluminum matrix and strong bonding between the various layers. According to WDX analysis, the manufactured Al/WCp composite did not evidence the presence of additional elements. The results indicated that the tensile strength of the composites increased with the number of CAPB cycles, and reached a maximum value of 140 MPa at the end of the fourteenth cycle, which was 1.6 times higher than the obtained value for annealed aluminum (raw material, 88 MPa). Even though the elongation of the Al/WCp composite was reduced during the initial cycles of CAPB process, it increased significantly during the final cycles. SEM observation of fracture surfaces showed that the rupture mode in the CAPB-processed Al/WCp composite was of the shear ductile rupture type.

  3. The Effects of Carbide Characteristics on the Performance of Tungsten Carbide-Based Composite Overlays, Deposited by Plasma-Transferred Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, G.; Wolfe, T.; Meszaros, K.

    2013-06-01

    In Alberta, there are huge quantities of ore processed to remove bitumen from oil sands deposits. The scale of production generates very aggressive tribocorrosive conditions during the mining, extraction, and upgrading processes. It is common to apply tungsten carbide-based composite overlays to improve the reliability and extend service lives of equipment and components. The performance of the applied overlays is largely dependent on the selection of the carbide type and the wear environment. This paper will evaluate overlays containing macrocrystalline, angular eutectic, and spherical eutectic tungsten carbides and discuss the performance of the overlays with a focus on carbide properties and the interactions between the service conditions and the composite material. This discussion will demonstrate how effective selection of protective materials can improve the reliability of oil sands equipment.

  4. Electrocatalytic Activity of Tungsten Trioxide Micro-spheres, Tungsten Carbide Microspheres and Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube-tungsten Carbide Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hongzhi; YAN Taining

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide micropheres were prepared by spray pyrolysis, and tungsten carbidemicrospheres were produced by spray pyrolysis-low temperature reduction and carbonization technology.Multi-walled carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide composites were prepared by the continuous reductionand carbonization process using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and WO_3 precursor by mo-lecular level mixing and calcination. The morphology and structure of the samples were characterized byscanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. Furthermore, the crystal phase was identified by X-ray diffraction. The electrocatalytic activity of the sample was analyzed by means of me-thanol oxidation. Tungsten carbide microspheres were catalytic active for methanol oxidation reaction.Nevertheless tungsten trioxide microspheres and multi-walled carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide compos-ites were not catalytic active for methanol oxidation reaction. These results indicate that tungsten carbide micropheres are promising catalyst for methanol oxidation.

  5. Photons transport through ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene based composite containing tungsten and boron carbide fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, S.M. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, S.A. [Russian State Technological University “MATI”, Moscow 121552 (Russian Federation); Volkov, A.E.; Terekhin, P.N.; Dmitriev, S.V. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Tcherdyntsev, V.V.; Gorshenkov, M.V. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Boykov, A.A., E-mail: kink03@gmail.com [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • The developed method for predicting X-ray properties of the polymer. • Higher content of the fillers results in an increase of mechanical properties. • X-ray defensive properties of the samples were investigated experimentally. -- Abstract: Polymers are a base for creating of composite materials with high mechanical and chemical properties. Using the heavy metals as filler in these composites can give them X-ray protective properties. These materials have high deactivation rates and can be used to create Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) used in aggressive environments. It was proposed a model for calculation of X-ray protection properties of the polymer-based nanocomposite materials with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) matrix, filled with tungsten and boron carbide particles. X-ray protective properties were calculated in a wide range of filler content using the developed model. Results of calculations allow selecting most effective compounds of X-ray protective UHMWPE based composites.

  6. Priority compositions of boron carbide crystals obtained by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponomarev, V. I., E-mail: ksv17@ism.ac.ru; Konovalikhin, S. V.; Kovalev, I. D.; Vershinnikov, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Splitting of reflections from boron carbide has been found for the first time by an X-ray diffraction study of polycrystalline mixture of boron carbide B{sub 15–x}C{sub x}, (1.5 ≤ x ≤ 3) and its magnesium derivative C{sub 4}B{sub 25}Mg{sub 1.42}. An analysis of reflection profiles shows that this splitting is due to the presence of boron carbide phases of different compositions in the sample, which are formed during crystal growth. The composition changes from B{sub 12.9}C{sub 2.1} to B{sub 12.4}C{sub 2.6}.

  7. Carbide Transformations in Tempering of Complexly Alloyed White Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, K. N.; Gorlenko, D. A.; Zavalishchin, A. N.

    2015-07-01

    Variation of the chemical composition of all phases and structural components (metallic matrix, eutectic and secondary carbides) in complexly alloyed cast iron is studied after crystallization and different variants of tempering. It is shown that several groups of secondary carbides may be distinguished according to their morphology and chemical composition.

  8. Material parameter identification on metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jansen van Rensburg, GJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tests were done on the compressive behaviour of different metal matrix composite materials. These extremely hard engineering materials consist of ceramic particles embedded in a metal alloy binder. Due to the high stiffness and brittle nature...

  9. Microwave Processed Multifunctional Polymer Matrix Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has identified polymer matrix composites (PMCs) as a critical need for launch and in-space vehicles, but the significant costs of such materials limits their...

  10. Wear and impact resistance of HVOF sprayedceramic matrix composites coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawara, B.; Martides, E.; Priyono, B.; Ardy, H.; Rikardo, N.

    2016-02-01

    Ceramic coating has the mechanical properties of high hardness and it is well known for application on wear resistance, but on the other hand the resistance to impact load is low. Therefore its use is limited to applications that have no impact loading. The aim of this research was to obtain ceramic-metallic composite coating which has improved impact resistance compared to conventional ceramic coating. The high impact resistance of ceramic-metallic composite coating is obtained from dispersed metallic alloy phase in ceramic matrix. Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) powder with chrome carbide (Cr3C2) base and ceramic-metal NiAl-Al2O3 with various particle sizes as reinforced particle was deposited on mild steel substrate with High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coating. Repeated impact test showed that reinforced metallic phase size influenced impact resistance of CMC coating. The ability of CMC coating to absorb impact energy has improved eight times and ten times compared with original Cr3C2 and hard chrome plating respectively. On the other hand the high temperature corrosion resistance of CMC coating showed up to 31 cycles of heating at 800°C and water quenching cooling.

  11. Polymer Matrix Composite Material Oxygen Compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Tom

    2001-01-01

    Carbon fiber/polymer matrix composite materials look promising as a material to construct liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks. Based on mechanical impact tests the risk will be greater than aluminum, however, the risk can probably be managed to an acceptable level. Proper tank design and operation can minimize risk. A risk assessment (hazard analysis) will be used to determine the overall acceptability for using polymer matrix composite materials.

  12. Research on Vibration Cutting Performance of Particle Reinforced Metallic Matrix Composites SiC_p/Al

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The cutting performance of particle reinforced meta ll ic matrix composites (PRMMCs) SiC p/Al in ultrasonic vibration cutting and comm on cutting with carbide tools and PCD tools was experimentally researched in the paper. The changing rules of chip shape, deformation coefficient, shear angle a nd surface residual stress were presented by ultrasonic vibration cutting. Resul ts show: when adopting common cutting, spiral chip with smaller curl radius will be obtained. The chip with zigzag contour is short ...

  13. Sol-gel coatings as active barriers to protect ceramic reinforcement in aluminum matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rams, J.; Urena, A.; Campo, M. [Departamento de Tecnologia Quimica, Ambiental y de los Materiales, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos C/ Tulipan s/nMostoles 28933 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-02-01

    Silica obtained through a sol-gel process is used as a coating for ceramic reinforcements (SiC) in aluminium matrix composite materials. The interaction between molten aluminium and the coated particles during material casting can be controlled by means of the thermal treatment given to the coating. Wettability is increased because the coating reacts with molten aluminium, and the formation of the degrading aluminium carbide is inhibited. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Two-Dimensional Titanium Carbide/RGO Composite for High-Performance Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chongjun; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Huang; Passerini, Stefano; Qian, Xiuzhen

    2016-06-22

    Ti3C2Tx, a 2D titanium carbide in the MXenes family, is obtained from Ti3AlC2 through selective etching of the Al layer. Due to its good conductivity and high volumetric capacitance, Ti3C2Tx is regarded as a promising candidate for supercapacitors. In this paper, the fabrication of Ti3C2Tx/RGO composites with different proportions of Ti3C2Tx and RGO is reported, in which RGO acts as a conductive "bridge" to connect different Ti3C2Tx blocks and a matrix to alleviate the volume change during charge/discharge process. In addition, RGO nanosheets can serve as a second nanoscale current collector and support as well for the electrode. The electrochemical performance of the as-fabricated Ti3C2Tx/RGO electrodes, characterized by CV, GCD, and EIS, are also reported. A highest specific capacitance (Cs) of 154.3 F/g at 2 A/g is obtained at the Ti3C2Tx: RGO weight ratio of 7:1 combined with an outstanding capacity retention (124.7 F/g) after 6000 cycles at 4 A/g.

  15. Aluminum-titanium hydride-boron carbide composite provides lightweight neutron shield material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, A. M.

    1967-01-01

    Inexpensive lightweight neutron shield material has high strength and ductility and withstands high internal heat generation rates without excessive thermal stress. This composite material combines structural and thermal properties of aluminum, neutron moderating properties of titanium hydride, and neutron absorbing characteristics of boron carbide.

  16. Fabrication of fiber composites with a MAX phase matrix by reactive melt infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, F; Krenkel, W, E-mail: Franziska.Lenz@uni-bayreuth.de [University of Bayreuth, Chair of Ceramic Materials Engineering, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, 95447 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2011-10-29

    Due to the inherent brittleness of ceramics it is very desirable to increase the damage tolerance of ceramics. The ternary MAX phases are a promising group of materials with high fracture toughness. The topic of this study is the development of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) with a matrix containing MAX phases, to achieve a damage tolerant structural composite material. For this purpose carbon fiber reinforced preforms with a carbon-titanium carbide matrix (C/C-TiC) were developed and infiltrated with silicon by a pressureless reactive melt infiltration. Finally liquid silicon caused the formation of SiC, TiSi{sub 2} and Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} in the matrix of the composite.

  17. Molybdenum isotopic composition of single silicon carbides from supernovae.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amari, S.; Clayton, R. N.; Davis, A. M.; Lewis, R. S.; Pellin, M. J.

    1999-02-03

    Presolar silicon carbide grains form in a variety of types of stars, including asymptotic giant branch red giant stars and supernovae. The dominant mechanisms of heavy element nucleosynthesis, the s-process and r-process, are thought to occur in AGB stars and supernovae, respectively. We have previously reported that mainstream SiC grains have strong enrichments in the s-process isotopes of Sr, Zr and Mo. We report here the first measurements of Mo isotopes in X-type SiC grains, which have previously been identified as having formed from supernova ejecta.

  18. Monitoring Damage Accumulation in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig E.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai H.

    2008-01-01

    The electric resistance of woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites were measured under tensile loading conditions. The results show that the electrical resistance is closely related to damage and that real-time information about the damage state can be obtained through monitoring of the resistance. Such self-sensing capability provides the possibility of on-board/in-situ damage detection and accurate life prediction for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites. Woven silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) ceramic matrix composites (CMC) possess unique properties such as high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, improved toughness, and good environmental stability (oxidation resistance), making them particularly suitable for hot structure applications. In specific, CMCs could be applied to hot section components of gas turbines [1], aerojet engines [2], thermal protection systems [3], and hot control surfaces [4]. The benefits of implementing these materials include reduced cooling air requirements, lower weight, simpler component design, longer service life, and higher thrust [5]. It has been identified in NASA High Speed Research (HSR) program that the SiC/SiC CMC has the most promise for high temperature, high oxidation applications [6]. One of the critical issues in the successful application of CMCs is on-board or insitu assessment of the damage state and an accurate prediction of the remaining service life of a particular component. This is of great concern, since most CMC components envisioned for aerospace applications will be exposed to harsh environments and play a key role in the vehicle s safety. On-line health monitoring can enable prediction of remaining life; thus resulting in improved safety and reliability of structural components. Monitoring can also allow for appropriate corrections to be made in real time, therefore leading to the prevention of catastrophic failures. Most conventional nondestructive

  19. High-dose neutron irradiation of Hi-Nicalon Type S silicon carbide composites. Part 2: Mechanical and physical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai, E-mail: katohy@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nozawa, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori-ken (Japan); Shih, Chunghao [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ozawa, Kazumi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori-ken (Japan); Koyanagi, Takaaki; Porter, Wally; Snead, Lance L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Nuclear-grade silicon carbide (SiC) composite material was examined for mechanical and thermophysical properties following high-dose neutron irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at a temperature range of 573–1073 K. The material was chemical vapor-infiltrated SiC-matrix composite with a two-dimensional satin weave Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC fiber reinforcement and a multilayered pyrocarbon/SiC interphase. Moderate (1073 K) to very severe (573 K) degradation in mechanical properties was found after irradiation to >70 dpa, whereas no evidence was found for progressive evolution in swelling and thermal conductivity. The swelling was found to recover upon annealing beyond the irradiation temperature, indicating the irradiation temperature, but only to a limited extent. The observed strength degradation is attributed primarily to fiber damage for all irradiation temperatures, particularly a combination of severe fiber degradation and likely interphase damage at relatively low irradiation temperatures.

  20. Silver Matrix Composites - Structure and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase compositions of composite materials determine their performance as well as physical and mechanical properties. Depending on the type of applied matrix and the kind, amount and morphology of the matrix reinforcement, it is possible to shape the material properties so that they meet specific operational requirements. In the paper, results of investigations on silver alloy matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particles are presented. The investigations enabled evaluation of hardness, tribological and mechanical properties as well as the structure of produced materials. The matrix of composite material was an alloy of silver and aluminium, magnesium and silicon. As the reinforcing phase, 20-60 μm ceramic particles (SiC, SiO2, Al2O3 and Cs were applied. The volume fraction of the reinforcing phase in the composites was 10%. The composites were produced using the liquid phase (casting technology, followed by plastic work (the KOBO method. The mechanical and tribological properties were analysed for plastic work-subjected composites. The mechanical properties were assessed based on a static tensile and hardness tests. The tribological properties were investigated under dry sliding conditions. The analysis of results led to determination of effects of the composite production technology on their performance. Moreover, a relationship between the type of reinforcing phase and the mechanical and tribological properties was established.

  1. Development of new metal matrix composite electrodes for electrical discharge machining through powder metallurgy process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mathalai Sundaram

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrical discharge machining (EDM is one of the widely used nontraditional machining methods to produce die cavities by the erosive effect of electrical discharges. This method is popular due to the fact that a relatively soft electrically conductive tool electrode can machine hard work piece. Copper electrode is normally used for machining process. Electrode wear rate is the major drawback for EDM researchers. This research focus on fabrication of metal matrix composite (MMC electrode by mixing copper powder with titanium carbide (TiC and Tungsten carbide (WC powder through powder metallurgy process, Copper powder is the major amount of mixing proportion with TiC and WC. However, this paper focus on the early stage of the project where powder metallurgy route was used to determine suitable mixing time, compaction pressure and sintering and compacting process in producing EDM electrode. The newly prepared composite electrodes in different composition are tested in EDM for OHNS steel.

  2. Intermetallic and titanium matrix composite materials for hypersonic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berton, B.; Surdon, G.; Colin, C. [Dassault Aviation, Saint-Cloud (France)]|[Aersopatiale Space & Defence, St Medard en Jalles (France)

    1995-09-01

    As part of the French Program of Research and Technology for Advanced Hypersonic Propulsion (PREPHA) which was launched in 1992 between Aerospatiale, Dassault Aviation, ONERA, SNECMA and SEP, an important work is specially devoted to the development of titanium and intermetallic composite materials for large airframe structures. At Dassault Aviation, starting from a long experience in Superplastic Forming - Diffusion Bonding (SPF-DB) of titanium parts, the effort is brought on the manufacturing and characterization of composites made from Timet beta 21S or IMI 834 foils and Textron SCS6 fiber fabrics. At `Aersopatiale Espace & Defence`, associated since a long time about intermetallic composite materials with university research laboratories, the principal effort is brought on plasma technology to develop the gamma titanium aluminide TiAl matrix composite reinforced by protected silicon carbide fibers (BP SM 1240 or TEXTRON SCS6). The objective, is to achieve, after 3 years of time, to elaborate a medium size integrally stiffened panel (300 x 600 sq mm).

  3. Phase Stability and Thermal Conductivity of Composite Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkel, Samantha; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coatings are being developed to protect SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites in harsh combustion environments. The current coating development emphasis has been placed on the significantly improved cyclic durability and combustion environment stability in high-heat-flux and high velocity gas turbine engine environments. Environmental barrier coating systems based on hafnia (HfO2) and ytterbium silicate, HfO2-Si nano-composite bond coat systems have been processed and their stability and thermal conductivity behavior have been evaluated in simulated turbine environments. The incorporation of Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNT) into high stability (HfO2) and/or HfO2-silicon composite bond coats, along with ZrO2, HfO2 and rare earth silicate composite top coat systems, showed promise as excellent environmental barriers to protect the SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites.

  4. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  5. Mechanical and Corrosion Behaviour of Zn-27Al Based Composites Reinforced with Groundnut Shell Ash and Silicon Carbide

    OpenAIRE

    K.K. Alaneme; B.O. Fatile; J.O. Borode

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical and corrosion behaviour of Zn-27Al alloy based composites reinforced with groundnut shell ash and silicon carbide was investigated. Experimental test composite samples were prepared by melting Zn-27Al alloy with pre-determined proportions of groundnut ash and silicon carbide as reinforcements using double stir casting. Microstructural examination, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour were used to characterize the composites produced. The results show that hardness and ...

  6. Texture and residual strain in SiC/Ti-6-2-4-2 titanium matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaswamy, P.; Bennett, K.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Dreele, R. von; Roberts, J.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center; Jayaraman, N. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-11-01

    Residual strain and texture variations were measured in two Titanium matrix composites reinforced with Silicon Carbide fibers (Ti/SiC) having the same composition but fabricated by dramatically different processing routes. In both specimens the Titanium matrix comprised an {alpha}/{beta} alloy (Ti-6242) containing approximately 35% by volume of continuous SiC fibers. In one case the matrix was produced by a plasma spray (PS) route and the other by a wire drawing (WD) process. The resulting textures in the matrix differ significantly, from approximately random for the PS matrix to 6.25X random in the WD matrix. No significant differences in matrix residual strains between the composites prepared by the two procedures were noted. Plane-specific elastic moduli, measured in load tests on the unreinforced matrices also showed little difference.

  7. On the Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Aluminium 7075 Matrix Composite Material Reinforced with SiC and TiC Produced by Powder Metallurgy Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pradeep Devaneyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composites are widely used in components of various components of industrial equipment because of their superior material properties like high stiffness to weight ratio and high impact strength and fracture toughness while compared to the conventional material. Due to the concepts of high strength to low weight ratio, Al 7075 was extensively applied in aircraft engine and wings. Even if Al 7075 has higher hardness, higher strength, excellent wear resistance, and high-temperature corrosion protection, it is in need of further enhancement of properties for increasing its applicability. This paper presents the mechanical behavior of aluminium 7075 reinforced with Silicon Carbide (SiC and Titanium Carbide (TiC through powder metallurgy route. These specimens were produced by powder metallurgy method. The hybrid composite was made by Al 7075 alloy as the matrix with Silicon Carbide and Titanium Carbide as reinforcement. Silicon Carbide and Titanium Carbide are mixed in different weight ratio based on the design matrix formulated through a statistical tool, namely, Response Surface Methodology (RSM. Enhanced mechanical properties have been obtained with 90% of Al 7075, 4% of TiC, and 8% of SiC composition in the composite. Coefficient of friction appears to be more which has been determined by ring compression test.

  8. Structure and abrasive wear resistance of R6M5 steel-tungsten carbide composite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnyusov, S. F.

    2012-09-01

    Features of the structure formation, composition, and abrasive wear resistance of R6M5 steel-tungsten carbide (R6M5-WC) composite coatings have been studied as dependent on the WC content. The introduction of ˜20 wt % WC into the hardening composition leads to an increase in the fraction of M6C carbide (in the form of eutectic inclusions with average size ˜5.9 μm at grain boundaries and dispersed ˜0.25 μm particles in the volume of grains), while a large proportion of metastable austenite (˜88 vol %) is still retained. The R6M5-WC coatings exhibit high abrasive wear resistance, which is ensured by the γ → α' martensite transformation during friction and a muiltimodal size distribution of hardening particles.

  9. High Temperature Joining and Characterization of Joint Properties in Silicon Carbide-Based Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    Advanced silicon carbide-based ceramics and composites are being developed for a wide variety of high temperature extreme environment applications. Robust high temperature joining and integration technologies are enabling for the fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped components. The development of a new joining approach called SET (Single-step Elevated Temperature) joining will be described along with the overview of previously developed joining approaches including high temperature brazing, ARCJoinT (Affordable, Robust Ceramic Joining Technology), diffusion bonding, and REABOND (Refractory Eutectic Assisted Bonding). Unlike other approaches, SET joining does not have any lower temperature phases and will therefore have a use temperature above 1315C. Optimization of the composition for full conversion to silicon carbide will be discussed. The goal is to find a composition with no remaining carbon or free silicon. Green tape interlayers were developed for joining. Microstructural analysis and preliminary mechanical tests of the joints will be presented.

  10. Spark plasma sintering of silicon carbide and multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced zirconium diboride ceramic composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadhukulakrishnan, Govindaraajan B.; Rahman, Arif; Karumuri, Sriharsha [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Stackpoole, Margaret M. [ELORET Corporation, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kalkan, A. Kaan; Singh, Raman P. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Harimkar, Sandip P., E-mail: sandip.harimkar@okstate.edu [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

    2012-08-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dense SiC and carbon nanotube reinforced ZrB{sub 2} composites were spark plasma sintered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiC and carbon nanotube reinforcement favored the densification of ZrB{sub 2} composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiC and carbon nanotube reinforcement resulted in toughening of ZrB{sub 2} composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon nanotubes were retained in the spark plasma sintered ZrB{sub 2} composites. - Abstract: In this paper spark plasma sintering (SPS) of silicon carbide and multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced zirconium diboride ultra-high temperature ceramic matrix composites is reported. Systematic investigations on the effect of reinforcement type (SiC and CNTs) and content (10-40 vol.% SiC and 2-6 vol.% CNTs) on densification behavior, microstructure development, and mechanical properties (microhardness, bi-axial flexural strength, and indentation fracture toughness) are presented. With the similar SPS processing parameters (1900 Degree-Sign C, 70 MPa pressure, and 15 min soaking time), near-full densification (>99% relative density) was achieved with 10-40% SiC (in ZrB{sub 2}-SiC) and 4-6% CNT (in ZrB{sub 2}-CNT) reinforced composites. The SiC and CNT reinforcement further improved the indentation fracture toughness of the composites through a range of toughening mechanisms, including particle shearing, crack deflection at the particle-matrix interface, and grain pull-outs for ZrB{sub 2}-SiC composites, and CNT pull-outs and crack deflection in ZrB{sub 2}-CNT composites.

  11. Residual strain gradient determination in metal matrix composites by synchrotron X-ray energy dispersive diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Todd A.; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Black, David R.

    1993-01-01

    An X-ray technique for the measurement of internal residual strain gradients near the continuous reinforcements of metal matrix composites has been investigated. The technique utilizes high intensity white X-ray radiation from a synchrotron radiation source to obtain energy spectra from small (0.001 cu mm) volumes deep within composite samples. The viability of the technique was tested using a model system with 800 micron Al203 fibers and a commercial purity titanium matrix. Good agreement was observed between the measured residual radial and hoop strain gradients and those estimated from a simple elastic concentric cylinders model. The technique was then used to assess the strains near (SCS-6) silicon carbide fibers in a Ti-14Al-21Nb matrix after consolidation processing. Reasonable agreement between measured and calculated strains was seen provided the probe volume was located 50 microns or more from the fiber/matrix interface.

  12. Drilling of polymer-matrix composites

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnaraj, Vijayan; Davim, J Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric composites are recognised as good candidates for structural components due to their inherent properties. However, they present several kinds of damages while creating holes for assembly. Delamination is considered the most serious damage since it reduces service life of the component. Thrust and delamination can be controlled by proper drill point geometry. Drilling at high speed is also a current requirement of the aerospace industry. This book focus on drilling of polymer matrix composites for aerospace and defence applications. The book presents introduction to machining of polymer composites and discusses drilling as a processing of composites.

  13. Polymer Matrix Composites for Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    The Access-to-Space study identified the requirement for lightweight structures to achieve orbit with a single-stage vehicle. Thus a task was undertaken to examine the use of polymer matrix composites for propulsion components. It was determined that the effort of this task would be to extend previous efforts with polymer matrix composite feedlines and demonstrate the feasibility of manufacturing large diameter feedlines with a complex shape and integral flanges, (i.e. all one piece with a 90 deg bend), and assess their performance under a cryogenic atmosphere.

  14. Corrosion control of cement-matrix and aluminum-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiangyuan

    Corrosion control of composite materials, particularly aluminum-matrix and cement-matrix composites, was addressed by surface treatment, composite formulation and cathodic protection. Surface treatment methods studied include anodization in the case of aluminum-matrix composites and oxidation treatment (using water) in the case of steel rebar for reinforcing concrete. The effects of reinforcement species (aluminum nitride (AIN) versus silicon carbide (SiC) particles) in the aluminum-matrix composites and of admixtures (carbon fibers, silica fume, latex and methylcellulose) in concrete on the corrosion resistance of composites were addressed. Moreover, the effect of admixtures in concrete and of admixtures in mortar overlay (as anode on concrete) on the efficiency of cathodic protection of steel reinforced concrete was studied. For SiC particle filled aluminum, anodization was performed successfully in an acid electrolyte, as for most aluminum alloys. However, for AlN particle filled aluminum, anodization needs to be performed in an alkaline (0.7 N NaOH) electrolyte instead. The concentration of NaOH in the electrolyte was critical. It was found that both silica fume and latex improved the corrosion resistance of rebar in concrete in both Ca(OH)sb2 and NaCl solutions, mainly because these admixtures decreased the water absorptivity. Silica fume was more effective than latex. Methylcellulose improved the corrosion resistance of rebar in concrete a little in Ca(OH)sb2 solution. Carbon fibers decreased the corrosion resistance of rebar in concrete, but this effect could be made up for by either silica fume or latex, such that silica fume was more effective than latex. Surface treatment in the form of water immersion for two days was found to improve the corrosion resistance of rebar in concrete. This treatment resulted in a thin uniform layer of black iron oxide (containing Fesp{2+}) on the entire rebar surface except on the cross-sectional surface. Prior to the

  15. CNTs Modified and Enhanced Cu Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Wen-zhong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The composite powders of 2%-CNTs were prepared by wet ball milling and hydrogen annealing treatment-cold pressing sintering was used to consolidate the ball milled composite powders with different modifications of the CNTs. The results show that the length of the CNTs is shortened, ports are open, and amorphous carbon content is increased by ball milling. And after a mixed acid purification, the impurity on the surface of the CNTs is completely removed,and a large number of oxygen-containing reactive groups are introduced; the most of CNTs can be embedded in the Cu matrix and the CNTs have a close bonding with the Cu matrix, forming the lamellar composite structure, then, ultrafine-grained composite powders can be obtained by hydrogen annealing treatment. Shortening and purification of the CNTs are both good for dispersion and bonding of CNTs in the Cu matrix, and the tensile strength and hardness of the composites after shortening and purification reaches the highest, and is 296MPa and 139.8HV respectively, compared to the matrix, up to 123.6% in tensile strength and 42.9% in hardness, attributed to the fine grain strengthening and load transferring.

  16. Fatigue damage mechanisms in polymer matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites are finding increased use in structural applications, in particular for aerospace and automotive purposes. Mechanical fatigue is the most common type of failure of structures in service. The relative importance of fatigue has yet to be reflected in design where static conditions still prevail. The fatigue behavior of composite materials is conventionally characterized by a Wöhler or S-N curve. For every new material with a new lay-up, altered constituents or differen...

  17. Polymerization kinetics of boron carbide/epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abenojar, J., E-mail: abenojar@ing.uc3m.es [Materials Performance Group, Materials Science and Engineering Department, IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Av. Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganés (Spain); Encinas, N. [Materials Performance Group, Materials Science and Engineering Department, IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Av. Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganés (Spain); Real, J.C. del [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universidad Pontificia Comillas, C/ Alberto Aguilera 23, 28015 Madrid (Spain); Martínez, M.A. [Materials Performance Group, Materials Science and Engineering Department, IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Av. Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganés (Spain)

    2014-01-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Conversion degree and rate reaction of the curing reaction increase with temperature. • At low temperature, the particles exhibit catalytic effect, similar to the OH groups. • At high temperature, B{sub 4}C micro-particles increase the n-order rate reaction. • The diffusion constant diminishes with temperature for all the studied materials. • The autocatalytic reaction is favored by the effect of 6% nanoparticles. - Abstract: This study employs Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) technique and focuses on the curing kinetics and the activation energy of the commercial epoxy resin (which cures at room temperature for 12 h) filled with boron carbide particles (B{sub 4}C) in different amount (6 and 12 wt%) and particle size (60 nm, 7 and 23 μm). An isothermal dwell at different temperatures (25, 35 and 50 °C) was used for 180 min. Thereafter, the temperature is increased by 5 °C min{sup −1} up to 200 °C to complete the curing process. Conversion degree is calculated by combining both methods. The kinetic constant and the reaction order are calculated using Kamal's equation with diffusion control. Consequently, the activation energy is computed assuming Arrhenius’ equation.The results show a significant influence of the temperature on the reaction mechanism. Furthermore, polymerization kinetics is affected by B{sub 4}C additions depending on the amount and size of the added particles.

  18. Research of Boron Carbide-Aluminum Composites%碳化硼-铝复合材料的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明朗; 韩增尧; 郎静; 马南钢; 吴骁行

    2011-01-01

    Boron carbide ceramics have the properties of high hardness, high melting point and low density, they will be more widely used if they can combine with Al to overcome their faults. Boron carbide-aluminum composites can be divided into aluminum matrix and boron carbide matrix according to the different matrix. The preparation process,interface reaction and wettability are presented in this paper, and the developing tendency of this materials is pointed out Finally, it is pointed out that this materails will be widely used in the fields of large area protection with the deepening of the research.%碳化硼陶瓷具有高硬度、高熔点、低密度的特点,将其与金属铝复合能克服自身缺陷,使其得到更广泛的应用.碳化硼-铝复合材料按照基体的不同可分为铝基和碳化硼基两大类,分别综述了其制备工艺、界面反应以及润湿性,并展望了其发展方向,最后指出,随着研究的深入该复合材料将在大面积防护领域得到广泛应用.

  19. Assessment of Silicon Carbide Composites for Advanced Salt-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

    2007-09-01

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a new reactor concept that uses a liquid fluoride salt coolant and a solid high-temperature fuel. Several alternative fuel types are being considered for this reactor. One set of fuel options is the use of pin-type fuel assemblies with silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. This report provides (1) an initial viability assessment of using SiC as fuel cladding and other in-core components of the AHTR, (2) the current status of SiC technology, and (3) recommendations on the path forward. Based on the analysis of requirements, continuous SiC fiber-reinforced, chemically vapor-infiltrated SiC matrix (CVI SiC/SiC) composites are recommended as the primary option for further study on AHTR fuel cladding among various industrially available forms of SiC. Critical feasibility issues for the SiC-based AHTR fuel cladding are identified to be (1) corrosion of SiC in the candidate liquid salts, (2) high dose neutron radiation effects, (3) static fatigue failure of SiC/SiC, (4) long-term radiation effects including irradiation creep and radiation-enhanced static fatigue, and (5) fabrication technology of hermetic wall and sealing end caps. Considering the results of the issues analysis and the prospects of ongoing SiC research and development in other nuclear programs, recommendations on the path forward is provided in the order or priority as: (1) thermodynamic analysis and experimental examination of SiC corrosion in the candidate liquid salts, (2) assessment of long-term mechanical integrity issues using prototypical component sections, and (3) assessment of high dose radiation effects relevant to the anticipated operating condition.

  20. Versatile Boron Carbide-Based Visual Obscurant Compositions for Smoke Munitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-17

    ignition and are safe to handle. KEYWORDS: Smoke, Obscurants, Pyrotechnics, Boron carbide, Sustainable chemistry ■ INTRODUCTION Visible obscuration...laced with soot and chlorinated organic compounds. Smoke grenades containing these “HC” compositions have been responsible for several smoke...Robert A. Gilbert, Jr. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army

  1. Thermoforming of thermoplastic matrix composites. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, R.C.

    1992-03-01

    Long-fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites find widespread use in a variety of commercial applications requiring properties that cannot be provided by unreinforced plastics or other common materials of construction. However, thermosetting matrix resins have long been plagued by production processes that are slow and difficult to automate. This has limited the use of long-fiber-reinforced composites to relatively low productivity applications in which higher production costs can be justified. Unreinforced thermoplastics, by their very nature, can easily be made into sheet form and processed into a variety of formed shapes by various pressure assisted thermoforming means. It is possible to incorporate various types of fiber reinforcement to suit the end use of the thermoformed shape. Recently developed thermoplastic resins can also sometimes correct physical property deficiencies in a thermoset matrix composite. Many forms of thermoplastic composite material now exist that meet all the requirements of present day automotive and aerospace parts. Some of these are presently in production, while others are still in the development stage. This opens the possibility that long-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics might break the barrier that has long limited the applications for fiber-reinforced composites. 37 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Role of friction stir processing parameters on microstructure and microhardness of boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Sathiskumar; N Murugan; I Dinaharan; S J Vijay

    2013-12-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was applied to fabricate boron carbide (B4C) particulate reinforced copper surface composites. The effect of FSP parameters such as tool rotational speed, processing speed and groove width on microstructure and microhardness was investigated. A groove was contrived on the 6mm thick copper plates and packed with B4C particles. FSP was carried out using five various tool rotational speeds, processing speeds and groove widths. Optical and scanning electron microscopies were employed to study the microstructure of the fabricated surface composites. The results indicated that the selected FSP parameters significantly influenced the area of surface composite, distribution of B4C particles and microhardness of the surface composites. Higher tool rotational speed and lower processing speed produced an excellent distribution of B4C particles and higher area of surface composite due to higher frictional heat, increased stirring and material tranportation. The B4C particles were bonded well to the copper matrix and refined the grains of copper due to the pinning effect of B4C particles. B4C particles retained the original size and morphology because of its small size and minimum sharp corners in the morphology.

  3. CMH-17 Volume 5 Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulonis, Rachael; Kiser, J. Douglas; David, Kaia E.; Davies, Curtis; Ashforth, Cindy

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of issues must be addressed during the process of certifying CMC (ceramic matrix composite) components for use in commercial aircraft. The Composite Materials Handbook-17, Volume 5, Revision A on ceramic matrix composites has just been revised to help support FAA certification of CMCs for elevated temperature applications. The handbook supports the development and use of CMCs through publishing and maintaining proven, reliable engineering information and standards that have been thoroughly reviewed. Volume 5 contains detailed sections describing CMC materials processing, design analysis guidelines, testing procedures, and data analysis and acceptance. A review of the content of this latest revision will be presented along with a description of how CMH-17, Volume 5 could be used by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and others in the future.

  4. Emerging Trends in Polymer Matrix Composites .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas M. Nadkarni

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available The performance characteristics of PMC products are determined by the microstructure developed during the processing of composite materials. The structure development in processing is the result of integration of process parameters and inherent material characteristics. The properties of PMCs can thus be manipulated through both changes in the materials composition and process conditions. The present article illustrates the scientific approach followed in engineering of matrix materials and optimization of the processing conditions with specific reference to case studies on toughening of thermosetting resins and structure development in injection molding of thermoplastic composites. A novel approach is demonstrated for toughening of unsaturated polyester resins that involves the use of reactive liquid polymers chemically bonded to the matrix. The use of processing science is demonstrated by the significant effect of the mold temperature on the crystallinity and properties of molded poly (phenylene sulfide, a high performance engineering thermoplastic. An interactive approach is proposed for specific product and applications development.

  5. Micromechanical analysis of a hybrid composite—effect of boron carbide particles on the elastic properties of basalt fiber reinforced polymer composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Golla, Sai; Prasanthi, P.

    2016-11-01

    A fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite is an important material for structural application. The diversified application of FRP composites has become the center of attention for interdisciplinary research. However, improvements in the mechanical properties of this class of materials are still under research for different applications. The reinforcement of inorganic particles in a composite improves its structural properties due to their high stiffness. The present research work is focused on the prediction of the mechanical properties of the hybrid composites where continuous fibers are reinforced in a micro boron carbide particle mixed polypropylene matrix. The effectiveness of the addition of 30 wt. % of boron carbide (B4C) particle contributions regarding the longitudinal and transverse properties of the basalt fiber reinforced polymer composite at various fiber volume fractions is examined by finite element analysis (FEA). The experimental approach is the best way to determine the properties of the composite but it is expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, the finite element method (FEM) and analytical methods are the viable methods for the determination of the composite properties. The FEM results were obtained by adopting a micromechanics approach with the support of FEM. Assuming a uniform distribution of reinforcement and considering one unit-cell of the whole array, the properties of the composite materials are determined. The predicted elastic properties from FEA are compared with the analytical results. The results suggest that B4C particles are a good reinforcement for the enhancement of the transverse properties of basalt fiber reinforced polypropylene.

  6. Titanium carbide nanoparticles reinforcing nickel matrix for improving nanohardness and fretting wear properties in wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dănăilă, Eliza; Benea, Lidia; Caron, Nadège; Raquet, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    In this study Ni/nano-TiC functional composite coatings were produced by electro-codeposition of TiC nanoparticles (50 nm mean diameter) with nickel on 304L stainless steel support. Coatings were obtained from a Watts classical solution in which TiC nanoparticles were added. The surface morphology, chemical composition, structure, roughness and thickness, were evaluated in relation to the effect of TiC nanoparticles incorporation into Ni matrix. It was found that incorporation of TiC nanoparticles into the nickel matrix produces morphological changes in the deposit and increases the roughness. The fretting wear behavior in wet conditions of the obtained coatings was evaluated on a ball-on-plate configuration. To evaluate the wet fretting wear (tribocorrosion) behavior the open circuit potential was measured before, during and after the fretting tests at room temperature in the solution that simulates the primary water circuit of Pressurized Water Reactors. The results show that Ni/nano-TiC composite coatings exhibited a low friction coefficient, high nanohardness and fretting wear resistance in wet conditions compared with pure Ni coatings.

  7. Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Fibrous Composites: an Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naslain, R, E-mail: naslain@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [University of Bordeaux 3, Allee de La Boetie, 33600 Pessac (France)

    2011-10-29

    Ceramic-Matrix Composites (CMCs) consist of a ceramic fiber architecture in a ceramic matrix, bonded together through a thin interphase. The present contribution is limited to non-oxide CMCs. Their constituents being oxidation-prone, they are protected by external coatings. We state here that CMCs display a hybrid feature, when at least one of their components is not homogeneous from a chemical or microstructural standpoint. Hybrid fiber architectures are used to tailor the mechanical or thermal CMC-properties whereas hybrid interphases, matrices and coatings to improve CMC resistance to aggressive environments.

  8. Polypropylene matrix composites reinforced with coconut fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Virginia Gelfuso

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene matrix composites reinforced with treated coconut fibers were produced. Fibers chemically treated (alkalization-CCUV samples or mechanically treated (ultrasonic shockwave-CMUV samples were dried using UV radiation. The goal was to combine low cost and eco-friendly treatments to improve fiber-matrix adhesion. Composite samples containing up to 20 vol. (% of untreated and treated coconut fibers were taken from boxes fabricated by injection molding. Water absorption and mechanical properties were investigated according to ASTM D570-98 and ASTM D638-03, respectively. Electrical characterizations were carried out to identify applications of these composites in the electrical sector. NBR 10296-Electrical Tracking Standard (specific to industry applications and conductivity measurements were obtained applying 5 kV DC to the samples. CMUV samples containing 5 vol. (% fiber presented superior tensile strength values (σ~28 MPa compared to the untreated fibers composite (σ~22 MPa or alkali treatment (σ~24 MPa. However, CMUV composites containing 10 vol. (% fiber presented best results for the electrical tracking test and electrical resistivity (3 × 10(7 Ω.m. The results suggest that composites reinforced with mechanically treated coconut fibers are suitable for electrical applications.

  9. Study of brazeability of aluminum matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urena, A.; Salazar, J.M.G. de; Escalera, M.D.; Fernandez, M.I. [Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica

    1997-02-01

    The brazeability of several aluminum matrix composites has been evaluated in the present paper. Tested materials were two different 6061 aluminum alloys, reinforced with 10 and 20% alumina particles, respectively, and a 7005 aluminum alloy containing 10% alumina also in the form of discrete particles. A drop formation test was selected to evaluate the brazeability of the studied composites, using a commercial filler metal (BAlSi4) generally used for brazing of aluminum alloys. Wettability of molten braze on the metal matrix composites (MMCs) was determined by measurement of the solidified contact angle i n sessile drop tests and determination of the spread area. The wettability and spreading increase with the brazing temperature in the studied range (550--625 C, 1,022--1,157 F), and decrease when the reinforcement proportion is increased. Both properties are also influenced by the type of the composite aluminum matrix being enhanced in the Al-Zn-Mg reinforced alloy. This study was completed with the microstructural characterization of the drop test specimens and of real brazed joints made on T-shaped specimens.

  10. Heat-Resistant Composite Materials Based on Polyimide Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Sergeyevich Ivanov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Heat-resistant composite materials with a polyimide-based binder were obtained in this paper. Composites were prepared with different content of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT and nanostructured silicon carbide, and polyimides coated carbon fibers woven into the cloth. Composite materials showed high values of thermostability and resistance to thermo-oxidative degradation, as well as good mechanical properties.

  11. Spin Forming of Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An exploratory effort between NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and SpinCraft, Inc., to experimentally spin form cylinders and concentric parts from small and thin sheets of aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (MMC), successfully yielded good microstructure data and forming parameters. MSFC and SpinCraft will collaborate on the recent technical findings and develop strategy to implement this technology for NASA's advanced propulsion and airframe applications such as pressure bulkheads, combustion liner assemblies, propellant tank domes, and nose cone assemblies.

  12. Composition and microstructure of beryllium carbide films prepared by thermal MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yu-dan; Luo, Jiang-shan; Li, Jia; Meng, Ling-biao; Luo, Bing-chi; Zhang, Ji-qiang; Zeng, Yong; Wu, Wei-dong, E-mail: wuweidongding@163.com

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Non-columnar-crystal Be{sub 2}C films were firstly prepared by thermal MOCVD. • Beryllium carbide was always the dominant phase in the films. • α-Be and carbon existed in films deposited below and beyond 400 °C, respectively. • Morphology evolved with temperatures and no columnar grains were characterized. • The preferred substrate temperature for depositing high quality Be{sub 2}C films was 400 °C. - Abstract: Beryllium carbide films without columnar-crystal microstructures were prepared on the Si (1 0 0) substrate by thermal metal organic chemical vapor deposition using diethylberyllium as precursor. The influence of the substrate temperature on composition and microstructure of beryllium carbide films was systematically studied. Crystalline beryllium carbide is always the dominant phase according to XRD analysis. Meanwhile, a small amount of α-Be phase exists in films when the substrate temperature is below 400 °C, and hydrocarbon or amorphous carbon exists when the temperature is beyond 400 °C. Surfaces morphology shows transition from domes to cylinders, to humps, and to tetraquetrous crystalline needles with the increase of substrate temperature. No columnar grains are characterized throughout the thickness as revealed from the cross-section views. The average densities of these films are determined to be 2.04–2.17 g/cm{sup 3}. The findings indicate the substrate temperature has great influences on the composition and microstructure of the Be{sub 2}C films grown by thermal MOCVD.

  13. Characterization on C/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites with Novel Fiber Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petko, Jeanne; Kiser, J. Douglas; McCue, Terry; Verrilli, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are attractive candidate materials in the aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, low density and higher temperature capabilities. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is pursuing the use of CMC components in advanced Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) propulsion applications. Carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) is the primary material of interest for a variety of RLV propulsion applications. These composites offer high- strength carbon fibers and a high modulus, oxidation-resistant matrix. For comparison, two types of carbon fibers were processed with novel types of interface coatings (multilayer and pseudoporous). For RLV propulsion applications, environmental durability will be critical. The coatings show promise of protecting the carbon fibers from the oxidizing environment. The strengths and microstructures of these composite materials are presented.

  14. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, Denis [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Dajie [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiation damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.

  15. Lightweight graphene nanoplatelet/boron carbide composite with high EMI shielding effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yongqiang; Luo, Heng; Zhang, Haibin; Zhou, Xiaosong; Peng, Shuming

    2016-03-01

    Lightweight graphene nanoplatelet (GNP)/boron carbide (B4C) composites were prepared and the effect of GNPs loading on the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) has been evaluated in the X-band frequency range. Results have shown that the EMI SE of GNP/B4C composite increases with increasing the GNPs loading. An EMI SE as high as 37 ˜ 39 dB has been achieved in composite with 5 vol% GNPs. The high EMI SE is mainly attributed to the high electrical conductivity, high dielectric loss as well as multiple reflections by aligned GNPs inside the composite. The GNP/B4C composite is demonstrated to be promising candidate of high-temperature microwave EMI shielding material.

  16. Lightweight graphene nanoplatelet/boron carbide composite with high EMI shielding effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Tan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight graphene nanoplatelet (GNP/boron carbide (B4C composites were prepared and the effect of GNPs loading on the electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding effectiveness (SE has been evaluated in the X-band frequency range. Results have shown that the EMI SE of GNP/B4C composite increases with increasing the GNPs loading. An EMI SE as high as 37 ∼ 39 dB has been achieved in composite with 5 vol% GNPs. The high EMI SE is mainly attributed to the high electrical conductivity, high dielectric loss as well as multiple reflections by aligned GNPs inside the composite. The GNP/B4C composite is demonstrated to be promising candidate of high-temperature microwave EMI shielding material.

  17. Silicon carbide composite for light water reactor fuel assembly applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Ken; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2014-05-01

    The feasibility of using SiCf-SiCm composites in light water reactor (LWR) fuel designs was evaluated. The evaluation was motivated by the desire to improve fuel performance under normal and accident conditions. The Fukushima accident once again highlighted the need for improved fuel materials that can maintain fuel integrity to higher temperatures for longer periods of time. The review identified many benefits as well as issues in using the material. Issues perceived as presenting the biggest challenges to the concept were identified to be flux gradient induced differential volumetric swelling, fragmentation and thermal shock resistance. The oxidation of silicon and its release into the coolant as silica has been identified as an issue because existing plant systems have limited ability for its removal. Detailed evaluation using available literature data and testing as part of this evaluation effort have eliminated most of the major concerns. The evaluation identified Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) channel, BWR fuel water tube, and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) guide tube as feasible applications for SiC composite. A program has been initiated to resolve some of the remaining issues and to generate physical property data to support the design of commercial fuel components.

  18. Silicon carbide composite for light water reactor fuel assembly applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yueh, Ken, E-mail: kyueh@epri.com [Fuel Reliability Program, EPRI, 1300 West WT Harris Blvd, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States); Terrani, Kurt A., E-mail: terranika@ornl.gov [Fusion and Materials for Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd. MS 6093, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The feasibility of using SiC{sub f}–SiC{sub m} composites in light water reactor (LWR) fuel designs was evaluated. The evaluation was motivated by the desire to improve fuel performance under normal and accident conditions. The Fukushima accident once again highlighted the need for improved fuel materials that can maintain fuel integrity to higher temperatures for longer periods of time. The review identified many benefits as well as issues in using the material. Issues perceived as presenting the biggest challenges to the concept were identified to be flux gradient induced differential volumetric swelling, fragmentation and thermal shock resistance. The oxidation of silicon and its release into the coolant as silica has been identified as an issue because existing plant systems have limited ability for its removal. Detailed evaluation using available literature data and testing as part of this evaluation effort have eliminated most of the major concerns. The evaluation identified Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) channel, BWR fuel water tube, and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) guide tube as feasible applications for SiC composite. A program has been initiated to resolve some of the remaining issues and to generate physical property data to support the design of commercial fuel components.

  19. Allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS) as matrix resin for C/SiC ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreeja, R. [Ceramic Matrix Products Division, Propellants and Special Chemicals Group, PCM Entity, Vikram Sarabhai Space Center, Thiruvananthapuram 695022 (India); Swaminathan, B., E-mail: swami1423@gmail.co [Ceramic Matrix Products Division, Propellants and Special Chemicals Group, PCM Entity, Vikram Sarabhai Space Center, Thiruvananthapuram 695022 (India); Painuly, Anil; Sebastian, T.V.; Packirisamy, S. [Ceramic Matrix Products Division, Propellants and Special Chemicals Group, PCM Entity, Vikram Sarabhai Space Center, Thiruvananthapuram 695022 (India)

    2010-04-15

    In present study, partially allyl-substituted hydridopolycarbosilane (5 mol% allyl) [AHPCS] has been characterized by spectral techniques and thermal analysis. The DSC studies show that, the polymer is self-cross-linking at lower temperatures without any incorporation of cross-linking agents. The spectral and thermal characterizations carried out at different processing stages indicate the possibility of extensive structural rearrangement accompanied by the loss of hydrogen and other reactions of C and Si containing species resulting in the conversion of the branched chain segment into a 3D SiC network structure. AHPCS gave ceramic residue of 72% and 70% at 900 and 1500 deg. C respectively in argon atmosphere. XRD pattern of 1500 deg. C heat-treated AHPCS, indicates the formation of silicon carbide with the particle size of 3-4 nm. AHPCS was used as matrix resin for the preparation of C/SiC composite without any interfacial coating over the T-300 carbon fabric reinforcement. Flexural strength value of 74-86 MPa for C/SiC specimen with density of 1.7 g/cm{sup 3} was obtained after four infiltration and pyrolysis cycles.

  20. Creep of plain weave polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abhishek

    Polymer matrix composites are increasingly used in various industrial sectors to reduce structural weight and improve performance. Woven (also known as textile) composites are one class of polymer matrix composites with increasing market share mostly due to their lightweight, their flexibility to form into desired shape, their mechanical properties and toughness. Due to the viscoelasticity of the polymer matrix, time-dependent degradation in modulus (creep) and strength (creep rupture) are two of the major mechanical properties required by engineers to design a structure reliably when using these materials. Unfortunately, creep and creep rupture of woven composites have received little attention by the research community and thus, there is a dire need to generate additional knowledge and prediction models, given the increasing market share of woven composites in load bearing structural applications. Currently, available creep models are limited in scope and have not been validated for any loading orientation and time period beyond the experimental time window. In this thesis, an analytical creep model, namely the Modified Equivalent Laminate Model (MELM), was developed to predict tensile creep of plain weave composites for any orientation of the load with respect to the orientation of the fill and warp fibers, using creep of unidirectional composites. The ability of the model to predict creep for any orientation of the load is a "first" in this area. The model was validated using an extensive experimental involving the tensile creep of plain weave composites under varying loading orientation and service conditions. Plain weave epoxy (F263)/ carbon fiber (T300) composite, currently used in aerospace applications, was procured as fabrics from Hexcel Corporation. Creep tests were conducted under two loading conditions: on-axis loading (0°) and off-axis loading (45°). Constant load creep, in the temperature range of 80-240°C and stress range of 1-70% UTS of the

  1. Study of multi-carbide B4C-SiC/(Al, Si) reaction infiltrated composites by SEM with EBSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, B. A.; Ferro, M. C.; Ravanan, A.; Grave, P. M. F.; Wu, H.-Y.; Gao, M.-X.; Pan, Y.; Oliveira, F. J.; Lopes, A. B.; Vieira, J. M.

    2014-03-01

    In the definition of conceptual developments and design of new materials with singular or unique properties, characterisation takes a key role in clarifying the relationships of composition, properties and processing that define the new material. B4C has a rare combination of properties that makes it suitable for a wide range of applications in engineering: high refractoriness, thermal stability, high hardness and abrasion resistance coupled to low density. However, the low self-diffusion coefficient of B4C limits full densification by sintering. A way to overturn this constraint is by using an alloy, for example Al-Si, forming composites with B4C. Multi-carbide B4C-SiC/(Al, Si) composites were produced by the reactive melt infiltration technique at 1200 - 1350 °C with up to 1 hour of isothermal temperature holds. Pressed preforms made from C-containing B4C were spontaneously infiltrated with Al-Si alloys of composition varying from 25 to 50 wt% Si. The present study involves the characterisation of the microstructure and crystalline phases in the alloys and in the composites by X-ray diffraction and SEM/EDS with EBSD. Electron backscatter diffraction is used in detail to look for segregation and spatial distribution of Si and Al containing phases during solidification of the metallic infiltrate inside the channels of the ceramic matrix when the composite cools down to the eutectic temperature (577 °C). It complements elemental maps of the SEM/EDS. The production of a flat surface by polishing is intrinsically difficult and the problems inherent to the preparation of EBSD qualified finishing in polished samples of such type of composites are further discussed.

  2. Methods for Producing High-Performance Silicon Carbide Fibers, Architectural Preforms, and High-Temperature Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A. (Inventor); Yun, Hee-Mann (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for producing architectural preforms and high-temperature composite structures containing high-strength ceramic fibers with reduced preforming stresses within each fiber, with an in-situ grown coating on each fiber surface, with reduced boron within the bulk of each fiber, and with improved tensile creep and rupture resistance properties tier each fiber. The methods include the steps of preparing an original sample of a preform formed from a pre-selected high-strength silicon carbide ceramic fiber type, placing the original sample in a processing furnace under a pre-selected preforming stress state and thermally treating the sample in the processing furnace at a pre-selected processing temperature and hold time in a processing gas having a pre-selected composition, pressure, and flow rate. For the high-temperature composite structures, the method includes additional steps of depositing a thin interphase coating on the surface of each fiber and forming a ceramic or carbon-based matrix within the sample.

  3. Influence of yttrium oxide doping on the microstructures of alumina-niobium carbide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumbao, A.H.; Bressiani, J.C.; Bressiani, A.H.A. [IPEN - Inst. de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Cidade Univ. - Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Ceramic cutting tools have been developed as an alternative material to cemented carbides based ones with the goal of improving cutting speeds and productivity. Among the vast variety of ceramics considered for prospective use as cutting tools materials the preference is given to the composites containing carbides as a second component, i.e., such materials as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiC. In the present work, the influence of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additives on microstructure of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NbC composite is studied in order to evaluate the applicability of this material for as ceramic cutting tools manufacturing. The amount of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additives varied in the ranged, 0-3 wt% in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NbC 20 wt% composition. Specimens were produced by consequent uniaxial and isostatic pressing followed by pressureless sintering in the flowing argon at 1750 C for 15 min in a graphite resistance furnace. The achieved densities were up to 99% TD. Microstructure evaluation in terms of grain size distribution were achieved by mean of QUANTIKOV software applied to scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs. Optimization of the materials composition in regard of achieving the high densities without compromising the microstructure formation are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Curing of epoxy matrix composite in stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Kondyurina, Irina; Bilek, Marcela

    Large structures for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories are needed for next stage of space exploitation. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the polymerization technology of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment. The polymerisation process is proposed for the material exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, space plasma, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The stratospheric flight experiments are directed to an investigation of the curing polymer matrix under the stratospheric conditions on. The unique combination of low atmospheric pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short wavelength UV and diurnal temperature variations associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. The first flight experiment with uncured composites was a part of the NASA scientific balloon flight program realised at the NASA stratospheric balloon station in Alice Springs, Australia. A flight cassette installed on payload was lifted with a “zero-pressure” stratospheric balloon filled with Helium. Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) provided the launch, flight telemetry and landing of the balloon and payload. A cassette of uncured composite materials with an epoxy resin matrix was exposed 3 days in the stratosphere (40 km altitude). The second flight experiment was realised in South Australia in 2012, when the cassette was exposed in 27 km altitude. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the space irradiations are responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The first prepreg in the world was cured successfully in stratosphere. The investigations were supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, NASA and RFBR (12-08-00970) grants.

  5. Polymer Matrix Composite Lines and Ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T.

    2001-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, a task was undertaken to assess the feasibility of making cryogenic feedlines with integral flanges from polymer matrix composite materials. An additional level of complexity was added by having the feedlines be elbow shaped. Four materials, each with a unique manufacturing method, were chosen for this program. Feedlines were to be made by hand layup (HLU) with standard autoclave cure, HLU with electron beam cure, solvent-assisted resin transfer molding (SARTM), and thermoplastic tape laying (TTL). A test matrix of fill and drain cycles with both liquid nitrogen and liquid helium, along with a heat up to 250 F, was planned for each of the feedlines. A pressurization to failure was performed on any feedlines that passed the cryogenic cycling testing. A damage tolerance subtask was also undertaken in this study. The effects of foreign object impact to the materials used was assessed by cross-sectional examination and by permeability after impact testing. At the end of the program, the manufacture of the electron beam-cured feedlines never came to fruition. All of the TTL feedlines leaked heavily before any cryogenic testing, all of the SARTM feedlines leaked heavily after one cryogenic cycle. Thus, only the HLU with autoclave cure feedlines underwent the complete test matrix. They passed the cyclic testing and were pressurized to failure.

  6. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensor Development for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Zhu, Dongming; Laster, Kimala L.; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Gregory, Otto J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has an on-going effort for developing high temperature thin film sensors for advanced turbine engine components. Stable, high temperature thin film ceramic thermocouples have been demonstrated in the lab, and novel methods of fabricating sensors have been developed. To fabricate thin film heat flux sensors for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems, the rough and porous nature of the CMC system posed a significant challenge for patterning the fine features required. The status of the effort to develop thin film heat flux sensors specifically for use on silicon carbide (SiC) CMC systems with these new technologies is described.

  7. Superficial roughness on composite surface, composite enamel and composite dentin junctions after different finishing and polishing procedures. Part I: roughness after treatments with tungsten carbide vs diamond burs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Federico; Conti, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate different instruments for finishing composite restorations, as well as examining different surfaces and interfaces of the same restoration. The null hypothesis is represented by the fact that there are no significant differences on roughness of composite restorations finishing between tungsten carbide and diamond burs, furthermore the null hypothesis is that there are no significant differences on roughness between finishing on composite surfaces (C), compositeenamel (CE) and composite-dentin (CD) interfaces. The study was performed on 28 teeth, and class V cavities were prepared on the extracted teeth. Restorations were done in Filtek XTE nanofilled composite (3M Espe) in a standardized method, to then be finished. A comparison was made in the phase 1 between tungsten carbide burs (16 blades), diamond burs (46 μm), with a similar shape by the same manufacturer (Komet). Each surface received 5 bur applications. Consequently, an analysis with a profilometer was performed. Phase 2 involved further confrontation of ulterior finishing with ultrafine tungsten carbide burs (30 blades) and with extra and ultrafine diamond burs (25 and 8 μm) (the same shape as previously mentioned). A second analysis was then performed with a profilometer. All measurements were taken on C surfaces, CE and CD interfaces. Statistical analyses were carried out with c2 test (a = 0.05). The finishing procedures with fine grit or toothing burs gave a better smoothness with tungsten carbide burs compared to diamond burs. While with the ultrafine grit no significant differences were noted between tungsten carbide and diamond burs on the CE and CD interfaces, the diamond bur left less superficial roughness on the C surfaces. With regards to the superficial roughness of the different areas of restoration, it can be concluded that: minor roughness was detected on C surfaces, while the CD interface had the most superficial roughness, regardless of whether the

  8. Reliability analysis of ceramic matrix composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David J.; Wetherhold, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    At a macroscopic level, a composite lamina may be considered as a homogeneous orthotropic solid whose directional strengths are random variables. Incorporation of these random variable strengths into failure models, either interactive or non-interactive, allows for the evaluation of the lamina reliability under a given stress state. Using a non-interactive criterion for demonstration purposes, laminate reliabilities are calculated assuming previously established load sharing rules for the redistribution of load as the failure of laminae occur. The matrix cracking predicted by ACK theory is modeled to allow a loss of stiffness in the fiber direction. The subsequent failure in the fiber direction is controlled by a modified bundle theory. Results using this modified bundle model are compared with previous models which did not permit separate consideration of matrix cracking, as well as to results obtained from experimental data.

  9. Nanofiber reinforcement of a geopolymer matrix for improved composite materials mechanical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, AKM Samsur

    Geopolymers have the potential to cross the process performance gap between polymer matrix and ceramic matrix composites (CMC), enabling high temperature capable composites that are manufactured at relatively low temperatures. Unfortunately, the inherently low toughness of these geopolymers limits the performance of the resulting fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites. Toughness improvements in composites can be addressed through the adjustments in the fiber/matrix interfacial strength and through the improvements in the inherent toughness of the constituent materials. This study investigates the potential to improve the inherent toughness of the geopolymer matrix material through the addition of nanofillers, by considering physical dimensions, mechanical properties, reinforcing capability and interfacial bond strength effects. A process optimization study was first undertaken to develop the ability to produce consistent, neat geopolymer samples, a critical precursor to producing nano-filled geopolymer for toughness evaluation. After that, single edge notched bend beam fracture toughness and un-notched beam flexural strength were evaluated for silicon carbide, alumina and carbon nanofillers reinforced geopolymer samples treated at various temperatures in reactive and inert environments. Toughness results of silicon carbide and carbon nanofillers reinforced geopolymers suggested that with the improved baseline properties, high aspect ratio nanofillers with high interfacial bond strength are the most capable in further improving the toughness of geopolymers. Among the high aspect ratio nanofillers i.e. nanofibers, 2vol% silicon carbide whicker (SCW) showed the highest improvement in fracture toughness and flexural strength of ~164% & ~185%, respectively. After heat treatment at 650 °C, SCW reinforcement was found to be effective, with little reduction in the performance, while the performance of alumina nanofiber (ANF) reinforced geopolymer significantly

  10. Shock wave profiles in polymer matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boteler, J. Michael; Rajendran, A. M.; Grove, David

    2000-04-01

    The promise of lightweight armor which is also structurally robust is of particular importance to the Army for future combat vehicles. Fiber reinforced organic matrix composites such as Polymer Matrix Composite (PMC) are being considered for this purpose due to their lower density and promising dynamic response. The work discussed here extends the prior work of Boteler who studied the delamination strength of PMC and Dandekar and Beaulieu who investigated the compressive and tensile strengths of PMC. In a series of shock wave experiments, the wave profile was examined as a function of propagation distance in PMC. Uniaxial strain was achieved by symmetric plate impact in the ARL 102 mm bore single-stage light gas gun. Embedded polyvinylidene flouride (PVDF) stress-rate gauges provided a stress history at three unique locations in the PMC and particle velocity history was recorded with VISAR. All stress data was compared to a Lagrangian hydrocode (EPIC) employing a model to describe the viscoelastic response of the composite material in one-dimension. The experimental stress histories displayed attenuation and loading properties in good agreement with model predictions. However, the unloading was observed to be markedly different than the hydrocode simulations. These results are discussed.

  11. Research on the Surface Micro-configuration in Vibration Cutting Particle Reinforced Metallic Matrix Composites SiC_p/Al

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The cutting performance of particulate reinforced me tallic matrix composites(PRMMCs) SiC p/Al in ultrasonic vibration cutting and c ommon cutting with carbide tools and PCD tools was researched in the paper. Mic rostructure of machined surface was described, the relation between cutting para meters and surface roughness was presented, and characteristic of the surface re mained stress was also presented. Furthermore, wear regularity and abrasion resi stance ability of tools in ultrasonic vibration cut...

  12. Tool wear during high speed turning in situ TiCp/TiBw hybrid reinforced Ti-6Al-4V matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Yingfei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chipping, adhesive wear, abrasive wear and crater wear are prevalent for both the polycrystalline diamond (PCD and the carbide tools during high speed turning of TiCp/TiBw hybrid reinforced Ti-6Al-4V (TC4 matrix composite (TMCs. The combined effects of abrasive wear and diffusion wear caused the big crater on PCD and carbide tool rake face. Compared to the PCD, bigger size of crater was found on the carbide tool due to much higher cutting temperature and the violent chemical reaction between the Ti element in the workpiece and the WC in the tool. However, the marks of the abrasive wear looked much slighter or even could not be observed on the carbide tool especially when low levels of cutting parameters were used, which attributes to much lower hardness and smaller size of WC combined with more significant chemical degradation of carbide. When cutting TC4 using PCD tool, notch wear was the most significant wear pattern which was not found when cutting the TMCs. However, chipping, adhesive wear and crater wear were much milder when compared to the cutting of titanium matrix composite. Due to the absence of abrasive wear when cutting TC4, the generated titanium carbide on the PCD protected the tool from fast wear, which caused that the tool life for TC4 was 6–10 times longer than that for TMCs.

  13. Tool wear during high speed turning in situ TiCp/TiBw hybrid reinforced Ti-6Al-4V matrix composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Yingfei; Xu Jiuhua; Huan Haixiang

    2016-01-01

    Chipping, adhesive wear, abrasive wear and crater wear are prevalent for both the poly-crystalline diamond (PCD) and the carbide tools during high speed turning of TiCp/TiBw hybrid reinforced Ti-6Al-4V (TC4) matrix composite (TMCs). The combined effects of abrasive wear and diffusion wear caused the big crater on PCD and carbide tool rake face. Compared to the PCD, bigger size of crater was found on the carbide tool due to much higher cutting temperature and the violent chemical reaction between the Ti element in the workpiece and the WC in the tool. However, the marks of the abrasive wear looked much slighter or even could not be observed on the carbide tool especially when low levels of cutting parameters were used, which attributes to much lower hardness and smaller size of WC combined with more significant chemical degradation of car-bide. When cutting TC4 using PCD tool, notch wear was the most significant wear pattern which was not found when cutting the TMCs. However, chipping, adhesive wear and crater wear were much milder when compared to the cutting of titanium matrix composite. Due to the absence of abrasive wear when cutting TC4, the generated titanium carbide on the PCD protected the tool from fast wear, which caused that the tool life for TC4 was 6–10 times longer than that for TMCs.

  14. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  15. Mechanism and optimization of titanium carbide-reinforced iron composite formation through carbothermal reduction of hematite and anatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasniyati, Md Razi; Zuhailawati, Hussain, E-mail: zuhaila@eng.usm.my; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul

    2014-02-25

    Highlights: • Reduction mechanism of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} mixture in formation Fe–TiC composite was discovered. • Factorial design is used to define interaction between calcination temperature and FeCl{sub 3} content. • Increasing FeCl{sub 3} content and calcination temperature increased the formation of Fe and TiC phases. • Microhardness and density of the sintered composite improved noticeably. -- Abstract: This study investigated an optimization of titanium carbide-reinforced iron composite fabricated using a combination of powder metallurgy and carbothermal reduction of hematite-anatase mixture using 2{sup k} factorial design. The composite formation mechanism is described as well. Powders of hematite, anatase and graphite with mole ratio of 1:1:6 were mixed for 1 h together with 0 wt%, 1 wt% and 5 wt% FeCl{sub 3}. The mixture was pressed at 5 MPa, calcined for 1 h at 1000 °C, 1100 °C or 1200 °C and sintered at 1200 °C. X-ray diffraction of the calcined powder showed that with increasing temperature TiO{sub 2} was reduced to TiC through formation of various suboxides (Ti{sub 3}O{sub 5} and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Scanning electron microscope observation of the sintered composite indicated that addition of FeCl{sub 3} enhanced the formation of TiC in iron matrix. Consequently, microhardness and density of the sintered composite improved noticeably. Based on microhardness, green density and sintered density measurements, design of experiment analysis suggested that an increase in both FeCl{sub 3} content and calcination temperature increased the percentage of hematite and anatase reduction.

  16. Metal-Matrix/Hollow-Ceramic-Sphere Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dean M.

    2011-01-01

    A family of metal/ceramic composite materials has been developed that are relatively inexpensive, lightweight alternatives to structural materials that are typified by beryllium, aluminum, and graphite/epoxy composites. These metal/ceramic composites were originally intended to replace beryllium (which is toxic and expensive) as a structural material for lightweight mirrors for aerospace applications. These materials also have potential utility in automotive and many other terrestrial applications in which there are requirements for lightweight materials that have high strengths and other tailorable properties as described below. The ceramic component of a material in this family consists of hollow ceramic spheres that have been formulated to be lightweight (0.5 g/cm3) and have high crush strength [40.80 ksi (.276.552 MPa)]. The hollow spheres are coated with a metal to enhance a specific performance . such as shielding against radiation (cosmic rays or x rays) or against electromagnetic interference at radio and lower frequencies, or a material to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the final composite material, and/or materials to mitigate any mismatch between the spheres and the matrix metal. Because of the high crush strength of the spheres, the initial composite workpiece can be forged or extruded into a high-strength part. The total time taken in processing from the raw ingredients to a finished part is typically 10 to 14 days depending on machining required.

  17. Corrosion Protection of Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    2, 162 (1986). 8. B. R. W. Hinton, D. R. Arnott, and N. E. Ryan, Metals Forum, Z, 211,(1984) 9. Ullmann , Fritz, "Ullmann’s Encyclopedia of Industrial ... Chemistry ", (1985). 10. F. Keller, M. S . Hunter, and 0. L. Robinson, J. Electrochem Soc., IM0, 411 0 (1953) 11. F. Mansfeld, S . Lin, S . Kim, and H...OIC FILE COPY "/9° * AD-A222 951 CORROSION PROTECTION OF METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES 0 FINAL REPORT F. MANSFELD, S . LIN AND H. SHIN APRIL 1990 0 U. S

  18. Engineering a novel material: Nanometric titanium carbide particles in a matrix of carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    BADIE, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    New physics studies at ISOLDE are motivated by new beams available, especially beams of exotic nuclei located at the frontier of the nuclear chart. Such beams are often short lived (in the order of milliseconds) and decay before they can be extracted from the target material, where typical diffusion times are in the order of seconds or more. Novel nanostructured and nanocomposite target materials have been developed to increase the release efficiency by reducing the diffusion paths and so the diffusion times, allowing ISOLDE to deliver new and more intense beams of exotic nuclei. 35Ca (25 ms half-life) was attempted by developing a titanium carbide and carbon black nanocomposite, but such isotope could not be extracted. A different production method with different precursors - titanium oxide and multiwall carbon nanotubes - is here proposed and expected to yield a target material which will increase the release rates of such isotope. A novel material, very porous, consisting of titanium carbide particles disp...

  19. Graphene-reinforced aluminum matrix composites prepared by spark plasma sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-ming Tian; Song-mei Li; Bo Wang; Xin Chen; Jian-hua Liu; Mei Yu

    2016-01-01

    Graphene-reinforced 7055 aluminum alloy composites with different contents of graphene were prepared by spark plasma sinter-ing (SPS). The structure and mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Testing results show that the hardness, compressive strength, and yield strength of the composites are improved with the addition of 1wt% graphene. A clean, strong interface is formed between the metal matrix and graphene via metallurgical bonding on atomic scale. Harmful aluminum carbide (Al4C3) is not formed during SPS processing. Further addition of graphene (above 1wt%) results in the deterioration in mechanical properties of the composites. The agglomeration of graphene plates is exacerbated with increasing graphene content, which is the main reason for this deterioration.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of TiB2 Reinforced Aluminium Matrix Composites: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narendra; Gautam, Gaurav; Gautam, Rakesh Kumar; Mohan, Anita; Mohan, Sunil

    2016-10-01

    Aluminium-matrix composites (AMCs) are developed to meet the demands of light weight high performance materials in aerospace, automotive, marine and other applications. The properties of AMCs can be tailored suitably by combinations of matrix, reinforcement and processing route. AMCs are one of the most attractive alternatives for the manufacturing of light weight and high strength parts due to their low density and high specific strength. There are various techniques for preparing the AMCs with different reinforcement particles. In AMCs, the reinforcements are usually in the form of metal oxides, carbides, borides, nitrides and their combination. Among the various reinforcements titanium di-boride (TiB2) is of much interest due to its excellent stiffness, hardness, and wear resistance. This paper attempts to provide an overview to explore the possibilities of synthesizing titanium di-boride reinforced AMCs with different techniques. The mechanical and tribological properties of these composites have been emphasized to project these as tribo-materials.

  1. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide - cobalt chromium, chromium carbide - nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the MMC aligns with the improved dispersion of reinforcing particles throughout the aluminium matrix.

  2. Characterization of Hybrid CNT Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Kinney, Megan C.; Pressley, James; Sauti, Godfrey; Czabaj, Michael W.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been studied extensively since their discovery and demonstrated at the nanoscale superior mechanical, electrical and thermal properties in comparison to micro and macro scale properties of conventional engineering materials. This combination of properties suggests their potential to enhance multi-functionality of composites in regions of primary structures on aerospace vehicles where lightweight materials with improved thermal and electrical conductivity are desirable. In this study, hybrid multifunctional polymer matrix composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets into Hexcel® IM7/8552 prepreg, a well-characterized toughened epoxy carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite. The resin content of these interleaved CNT sheets, as well as ply stacking location were varied to determine the effects on the electrical, thermal, and mechanical performance of the composites. The direct-current electrical conductivity of the hybrid CNT composites was characterized by in-line and Montgomery four-probe methods. For [0](sub 20) laminates containing a single layer of CNT sheet between each ply of IM7/8552, in-plane electrical conductivity of the hybrid laminate increased significantly, while in-plane thermal conductivity increased only slightly in comparison to the control IM7/8552 laminates. Photo-microscopy and short beam shear (SBS) strength tests were used to characterize the consolidation quality of the fabricated laminates. Hybrid panels fabricated without any pretreatment of the CNT sheets resulted in a SBS strength reduction of 70 percent. Aligning the tubes and pre-infusing the CNT sheets with resin significantly improved the SBS strength of the hybrid composite To determine the cause of this performance reduction, Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness of the CNT sheet to CFRP interface was characterized by double cantilever beam (DCB) and end notch flexure (ENF) testing, respectively. Results are compared to the

  3. Study on fragmentation and dissolution behavior of carbide in a hot-rolled hypereutectic high chromium cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fei; Jiang, Yehua, E-mail: jiangyehua@kmust.edu.cn; Xiao, Han; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • The method to prepare Carbon steel/High chromium iron is totally new. • High chromium iron can achieve small plastic deformation during hot rolling process. • Carbides in high chromium irons are crushed, refined obviously and becoming isolated, which is benefit to improve the impact toughness. • The carbide fragmentation and dissolution behavior of the hot-rolled HCCI were analyzed. - Abstract: A sandwich-structured composite containing a hypereutectic high chromium cast iron (HCCI) and low carbon steel (LCS) claddings was newly fabricated by centrifugal casting, then the blank was hot-rolled into composite plate. The carbide fragmentation and dissolution behavior of the hot-rolled HCCI were analyzed. During hot rolling, significant refinement of carbides was discovered in hot-rolled HCCI specimens. The carbides were broken and partly dissolved into the austenite matrix. The results show that carbides are firstly dissolved under the action of stress. There are grooves appeared at the boundaries of the carbides. The grooves reduce the cross section of the carbide. When the cross section of the carbide reaches to the required minimum critical cross section, the carbide breaks through the tensile force. After break, carbides continue to dissolve since more interfaces between the matrix and carbides are generated. The secondary carbides precipitated due to the dissolution are index as fcc and stacking faults parallel to the {1 1 1} are observed.

  4. Nano and hybrid aluminum based metal matrix composites: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muley Aniruddha V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium matrix composites (AMCs are potential light weight engineering materials with excellent properties. AMCs find application in many areas including automobile, mining, aerospace and defence, etc. Due to technological advancements, it is possible to use nano sized reinforcement in Al matrix. Nano sized reinforcements enhance the properties of Al matrix compared to micro sized reinforcements. Hybrid reinforcement imbibe superior properties to aluminium matrix composites as compared with Al composites having single reinforcement. This paper is focused on overview of development in the field of Al based metal matrix with nano and hybrid aluminium based composites.

  5. Development of high temperature materials for solid propellant rocket nozzle applications. [tantalum carbides-tungsten fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, C. R., Jr.; Honeycutt, L., III

    1974-01-01

    Evaluation of tantalum carbide-tungsten fiber composites has been completed as far as weight percent carbon additions and weight percent additions of tungsten fiber. Extensive studies were undertaken concerning Young's Modulus and fracture strength of this material. Also, in-depth analysis of the embrittling effects of the extra carbon additions on the tungsten fibers has been completed. The complete fabrication procedure for the tantalum carbide-tungsten fiber composites with extra carbon additions is given. Microprobe and metallographic studies showed the effect of extra carbon on the tungsten fibers, and evaluation of the thermal shock parameter fracture strength/Young's Modulus is included.

  6. Creep Behavior in Interlaminar Shear of a SiC/SiC Ceramic Composite with a Self-healing Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles-Wrenn, M. B.; Pope, M. T.

    2014-02-01

    Creep behavior in interlaminar shear of a non-oxide ceramic composite with a multilayered matrix was investigated at 1,200 °C in laboratory air and in steam environment. The composite was produced via chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). The composite had an oxidation inhibited matrix, which consisted of alternating layers of silicon carbide and boron carbide and was reinforced with laminated Hi-Nicalon™ fibers woven in a five-harness-satin weave. Fiber preforms had pyrolytic carbon fiber coating with boron carbide overlay applied. The interlaminar shear properties were measured. The creep behavior was examined for interlaminar shear stresses in the 16-22 MPa range. Primary and secondary creep regimes were observed in all tests conducted in air and in steam. In air and in steam, creep run-out defined as 100 h at creep stress was achieved at 16 MPa. Larger creep strains were accumulated in steam. However, creep strain rates and creep lifetimes were only moderately affected by the presence of steam. The retained properties of all specimens that achieved run-out were characterized. Composite microstructure, as well as damage and failure mechanisms were investigated.

  7. Microstructure and wear behaviour of FeAl-based composites containing in-situ carbides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAVI KANT; UJJWAL PRAKASH; VIJAYA AGARWALA; V V SATYA PRASAD

    2016-12-01

    Iron aluminides containing carbon are promising materials for tribological applications. Because of graphite formation at higher ($>$20 wt%) Al-contents the addition of carbon to FeAl-based alloys has not been successful.The graphite precipitation may be avoided by addition of Zr or Ti. Dry sliding wear behaviour of FeAl based alloys containing 1–1.5wt% carbon with quaternary addition of Ti or Zr has been studied using ball-on-disk wear test. Effect of sliding speeds and applied loads is investigated and correlated with mechanical properties. Wear resistance of FeAl-based alloys is found to be significantly improved on addition of Ti/Zr. This is attributed to the high hardness of alloy carbides. The lower load-bearing capacity of graphite flakes in localized region was found to increase the wear rate of the alloy. The carbides such as Fe$_3$AlC$_{0.5}$, TiC and ZrC are embedded in the matrix after sliding wear without destruction or delamination. This significantly affects the wear resistance of FeAl-based alloys.

  8. High-strain composites and dual-matrix composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda Jimenez, Ignacio

    another finite element model that simulated a homogenized rod under axial compression. A statistical representation of the fiber angles was implemented in the model. The presence of fiber angles increased the longitudinal shear stiffness of the material, resulting in a higher strength in compression. The simulations showed a large increase of the strength in compression for lower values of the standard deviation of the fiber angle, and a slight decrease of strength in compression for lower values of the mean fiber angle. The strength observed in the experiments was achieved with the minimum local angle standard deviation observed in the CFRS rods, whereas the shear stiffness measured in torsion tests was achieved with the overall fiber angle distribution observed in the CFRS rods. High strain composites exhibit good bending capabilities, but they tend to be soft out-of-plane. To achieve a higher out-of-plane stiffness, the concept of dual-matrix composites is introduced. Dual-matrix composites are foldable composites which are soft in the crease regions and stiff elsewhere. Previous attempts to fabricate continuous dual-matrix fiber composite shells had limited performance due to excessive resin flow and matrix mixing. An alternative method, presented in this thesis uses UV-cure silicone and fiberglass to avoid these problems. Preliminary experiments on the effect of folding on the out-of-plane stiffness are presented. An application to a conical log-periodic antenna for CubeSats is proposed, using origami-inspired stowing schemes, that allow a conical dual-matrix composite shell to reach very high compaction ratios.

  9. Ceramic thin film thermocouples for SiC-based ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrbanek, John D., E-mail: John.D.Wrbanek@nasa.gov; Fralick, Gustave C.; Zhu Dongming

    2012-06-30

    Conductive ceramic thin film thermocouples were investigated for application to silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide ceramic matrix composite (SiC/SiC CMC) components. High temperature conductive oxides based on indium and zinc oxides were selected for testing to high temperatures in air. Sample oxide films were first sputtered-deposited on alumina substrates then on SiC/SiC CMC sample disks. Operational issues such as cold junction compensation to a 0 Degree-Sign C reference, resistivity and thermopower variations are discussed. Results show that zinc oxides have an extremely high resistance and thus increased complexity for use as a thermocouple, but thermocouples using indium oxides can achieve a strong, nearly linear response to high temperatures. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxide thin film thermocouples tested for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, N:In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZnO, AlZnO sputtered and tested on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CMC substrates Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO, AlZnO have high resistance, complex temperature response. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, N:In{sub 2}O{sub 3} conductive at room temperature, more linear temperature response.

  10. Impact–abrasion wear characteristics of in-situ VC-reinforced austenitic steel matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghaddam, E.G., E-mail: emad_g_moghaddam@alum.sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimzadeh, N. [Department of Materials Engineering, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad Branch, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Varahram, N.; Davami, P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    In this investigation, in-situ precipitation of vanadium carbides was employed to reinforce Fe–13Mn and Fe–13Mn–3W alloys by means of conventional melting and casting route. Microstructures were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical properties of the materials were determined by hardness, impact toughness and tension tests. It was observed that tungsten improved the strength of the matrix and the reinforcements as well as tensile properties and work hardening rate of the VC-reinforced composite. Ball mill abrasion test was utilized to simulate impact–abrasion wear condition using two types of abrasive minerals. The results showed that the degree of benefit to be gained by the use of in-situ VC-reinforced composite materials depends strongly on crush strength of the abrasives. It was found that the studied particle-reinforced composite materials were only advantageous when the abrasives were relatively soft, providing low-stress abrasion condition.

  11. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of stir-cast Zn–27Al based composites reinforced with rice husk ash, silicon carbide, and graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayo Alaneme

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure and mechanical properties of Zn–27Al based composites reinforced with rice husk ash (RHA, silicon carbide (SiC, and graphite (Cg particles have been investigated. The Zn–27Al composites consisting of varied weight ratios of the reinforcing materials were produced using the stir casting process. Hardness test, tensile properties evaluation, fracture toughness determination, and microstructural examination, were used to characterize the composites produced. Results show that the microstructures of the composites are similar, consisting of the dendritic structure of the Zn–27Al alloy matrix with fine dispersion of the reinforcing particles. The hardness of the composites decreased with increase in the weight percent of RHA (and corresponding decrease in SiC weight percent in the reinforcement. The tensile strength and yield strength decreased slightly with increase in the weight ratio of RHA in the composites with a maximum of 8.5% and 9.6% reductions respectively observed for as much as 40% RHA (corresponding to 40% reduction in SiC in the hybrid reinforcement. Although some of the composite compositions containing RHA had slightly higher % elongation values compared with those without RHA, it was generally observed that the % elongation was invariant to the composite RHA content. The fracture toughness of the composites increases with increase in the weight percent of RHA with as much as a 20% increase obtained for as much as 40% RHA (corresponding to 40% reduction in SiC in the hybrid reinforcement.

  12. Effects of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of silicon carbide composites fabricated by nano-infiltration and transient eutectic-phase process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki, E-mail: koyanagit@ornl.gov [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ozawa, Kazumi [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hinoki, Tatsuya; Shimoda, Kazuya [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Katoh, Yutai [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Unidirectional silicon carbide (SiC)-fiber-reinforced SiC matrix (SiC/SiC) composites fabricated by a nano-infiltration and transient eutectic-phase (NITE) process were irradiated with neutrons at 600 °C to 0.52 dpa, at 830 °C to 5.9 dpa, and at 1270 °C to 5.8 dpa. The in-plane and trans-thickness tensile and the inter-laminar shear properties were evaluated at ambient temperature. The mechanical characteristics, including the quasi-ductile behavior, the proportional limit stress, and the ultimate tensile strength, were retained subsequent to irradiation. Analysis of the stress–strain hysteresis loop indicated the increased fiber/matrix interface friction and the decreased residual stresses. The inter-laminar shear strength exhibited a significant decrease following irradiation.

  13. Synthesis of silicon carbide-silicon nitride composite ultrafine particles using a carbon dioxide laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masaaki; Maniette, Yves; Nakata, Yoshinori; Okutani, Takeshi (Government Industrial Development Lab., Hokkaido, Sapporo (Japan))

    1993-05-01

    The synthesis and the structure of silicon carbide-silicon nitride (SiC-Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) composite ultrafine particles have been studied. SiC-Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] composite ultrafine particles were prepared by irradiating a SiH[sub 4], C[sub 2]H[sub 4], and NH[sub 3] gas mixture with a CO[sub 2] laser at atmospheric pressure. The composition of composite powders changed with the reactant gas flow rate. The carbon and nitrogen content of the powder could be controlled in a wide range from 0 to 30 wt%. The composite powder, which contained 25.3 wt% carbon and 5.8 wt% nitrogen, had a [beta]-SiC structure. As the nitrogen content increased, SiC decreased and amorphous phase, Si[sub 3]N[sub 4], Si appeared. The results of XPS and lattice constant measurements suggested that Si, C, and N atoms were intimately mixed in the composite particles.

  14. Fracture toughness in metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Ipiña J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluations of the fracture toughness in metal matrix composites (Duralcan reinforced with 15% of Al(20(3 and SiC are presented in this work. The application of Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics is discussed and the obtained values are compared with the ones obtained by means of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics. Results show that J IC derived K JC values are higher than the corresponding values obtained by direct application of the linear elastic methodology. The effect of a heat treatment on the material fracture toughness was also evaluated in which the analyzed approaches showed, not only different toughness values, but also opposite tendencies. A second comparison of the J IC and K JC values obtained in this work with toughness values reported in the literature is presented and discussed.

  15. Thermal Transport in Refractory Carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal energy transport mechanisms in titanium carbide and zirconium carbide have been studied. Several compositions of vanadium carbide alloyed...with titanium carbide were used. The electronic component of the thermal conductivity exceeded the values computed using the classical value for L in

  16. Aluminium matrix composites: Challenges and opportunities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Surappa

    2003-02-01

    Aluminium matrix composites (AMCs) refer to the class of light weight high performance aluminium centric material systems. The reinforcement in AMCs could be in the form of continuous/discontinuous fibres, whisker or particulates, in volume fractions ranging from a few percent to 70%. Properties of AMCs can be tailored to the demands of different industrial applications by suitable combinations of matrix, reinforcement and processing route. Presently several grades of AMCs are manufactured by different routes. Three decades of intensive research have provided a wealth of new scientific knowledge on the intrinsic and extrinsic effects of ceramic reinforcement vis-a-vis physical, mechanical, thermo-mechanical and tribological properties of AMCs. In the last few years, AMCs have been utilised in high-tech structural and functional applications including aerospace, defence, automotive, and thermal management areas, as well as in sports and recreation. It is interesting to note that research on particle-reinforced cast AMCs took root in India during the 70’s, attained industrial maturity in the developed world and is currently in the process of joining the mainstream of materials. This paper presents an overview of AMC material systems on aspects relating to processing, microstructure, properties and applications.

  17. Novel Phosphate—sensitive Fluorescent Composite Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIEZeng-hong; LINXu-cong; CHENGuo-nan

    2003-01-01

    Via several techniques to modify sensitive matrix for inhabiting the leakage of fluoreseent indicator,a new stable scnsing material for monitoring phosphates has been prepared and applied to the measurement of phosphates in artificial seawater.It is based on the reaction of PO43- with Al(Ⅲ)-Morin that leads to the fluorescence quenching of the composite matrix.At pH value 4.0and the salinity value 25.0,the response time of output signal having reached the steady state is less than 300 seconds.Its calibration graph is gained in the range of H2PO4- mass concentration from 1.50 to 7.00μg/mL with the limit of detection (3σ/K)0.02μg/mL.When it was used to measure phosphates in artificial seawater,the recovery ranged from 96.78% to 102.09%.Being stored under the proper condition,the membranes maintain sensitive for 90-120days,and are able to be used for 50-80times with indicator supplement.

  18. Micromechanics Fatigue Damage Analysis Modeling for Fabric Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, J. B.; Xue, D.; Shi, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A micromechanics analysis modeling method was developed to analyze the damage progression and fatigue failure of fabric reinforced composite structures, especially for the brittle ceramic matrix material composites. A repeating unit cell concept of fabric reinforced composites was used to represent the global composite structure. The thermal and mechanical properties of the repeating unit cell were considered as the same as those of the global composite structure. The three-phase micromechanics, the shear-lag, and the continuum fracture mechanics models were integrated with a statistical model in the repeating unit cell to predict the progressive damages and fatigue life of the composite structures. The global structure failure was defined as the loss of loading capability of the repeating unit cell, which depends on the stiffness reduction due to material slice failures and nonlinear material properties in the repeating unit cell. The present methodology is demonstrated with the analysis results evaluated through the experimental test performed with carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix plain weave composite specimens.

  19. Microstructure and hardness of WC-Co particle reinforced iron matrix surface composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Peng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a high Cr cast iron surface composite material reinforced with WC-Co particles 2-6 mm in size was prepared using a pressureless sand mold infiltration casting technique. The composition, microstructure and hardness were determined by means of energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA, scanning electron microscope (SEM and Rockwell hardness measurements. It is determined that the obtained composite layer is about 15 mm thick with a WC-Co particle volumetric fraction of ~38%. During solidification, interface reaction takes place between WC-Co particles and high chromium cast iron. Melting and dissolving of prefabricated particles are also found, suggesting that local Co melting and diffusion play an important role in promoting interface metallurgical bonding. The composite layer is composed of ferrite and a series of carbides, such as (Cr, W, Fe23C6, WC, W2C, M6C and M12C. The inhomogeneous hardness in the obtained composite material shows a gradient decrease from the particle reinforced metal matrix composite layer to the matrix layer. The maximum hardness of 86.3 HRA (69.5 HRC is obtained on the particle reinforced surface, strongly indicating that the composite can be used as wear resistant material.

  20. Multifunctional Metal Matrix Composite Filament Wound Tank Liners Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) materials offer tremendous potential for lightweight propellant and pressurant tankage for space applications. Thin MMC liners for COPVs...

  1. A Revival of Waste: Atmospheric Pressure Nitrogen Plasma Jet Enhanced Jumbo Silicon/Silicon Carbide Composite in Lithium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing-Hong; Chuang, Shang-I; Liu, Wei-Ren; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2015-12-30

    In this study, a jumbo silicon/silicon carbide (Si/SiC) composite (JSC), a novel anode material source, was extracted from solar power industry cutting waste and used as a material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), instead of manufacturing the nanolized-Si. Unlike previous methods used for preventing volume expansion and solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), the approach proposed here simply entails applying surface modification to JSC-based electrodes by using nitrogen-atmospheric pressure plasma jet (N-APPJ) treatment process. Surface organic bonds were rearranged and N-doped compounds were formed on the electrodes through applying different plasma treatment durations, and the qualitative examinations of before/after plasma treatment were identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The surface modification resulted in the enhancement of electrochemical performance with stable capacity retention and high Coulombic efficiency. In addition, depth profile and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were executed to determine the existence of Li-N matrix and how the nitrogen compounds change the surface conditions of the electrodes. The N-APPJ-induced rapid surface modification is a major breakthrough for processing recycled waste that can serve as anode materials for next-generation high-performance LIBs.

  2. Analysis of alumina-based titanium carbide composites by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Kaleem; Tawfik, Walid; Farooq, Wazirzada A.; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, alumina (Al2O3) containing different volume % of titanium carbide (TiC) ranging from 0 to 30 were consolidated by the novel spark plasma sintering. The spectroscopic analysis of the plasma generated by irradiation of laser Nd:YAG (λ = 1,064 nm) on different concentrations of the composites in air atmospheric pressure was performed. The qualitative examination of the composites confirms the presence of aluminum, titanium, and carbon as major elements, while magnesium and sodium have been found as minor trace elements. Plasma parameters were estimated by assuming the LTE conditions for optically thin plasma. The electron density and temperature were evaluated by using the Stark broadening and intensity of selected aluminum emission lines, respectively. The addition of TiC to Al2O3 shows a linear behavior with plasma temperature corroborated by the calibration curve of Ti in the composites. The results suggest that calibration curve between plasma temperature and the composites can be used to estimate different concentrations of TiC in Al2O3 without analyzing the whole elements in the composites and thus opens up new applications of LIBS in ceramic industry.

  3. The composition of reaction substrates for TiC carbides synthesis and its influence on the thickness of iron casting composite layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Olejnik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of reaction substrates for the TiC carbide synthesis on the composite layer thickness produced in cast iron was examined. It was found that, at a constant weight of the charge amounting to 0.5 kg, changing the weight of the, placed in mould, stoichiometric mixture of titanium carbide (from 0.01 to 0.04 kg changed the thickness of the composite layer from 1 to 15 mm. Carbides synthesis starts directly in mould induced by the temperature of molten alloy poured into this mould (1700 K. The TiC carbides formed in this reaction are later, i.e. during alloy solidification, acting as a base composite material. The size of TiC carbides obtained in the synthesis is from 1 to 10 μm. They occur in the layers as locally compact and coagulated forms. Microstructure, chemical composition and structure of the obtained materials were tested by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray microanalysis (EDS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD.

  4. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  5. Creep behavior and wear resistance of Al 5083 based hybrid composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and boron carbide (B{sub 4}C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Ali [Faculty of Materials & Manufacturing Processes, Malek-e-Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Alireza, E-mail: alirezaabdollahi1366@gmail.com [Faculty of Materials & Manufacturing Processes, Malek-e-Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biukani, Hootan [Faculty of Engineering, South Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-25

    In the current research, aluminum based hybrid composite reinforced with boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was produced by powder metallurgy method. creep behavior, wear resistance, surface roughness, and hardness of the samples were investigated. To prepare the samples, Al 5083 powder was milled with boron carbide particles and carbon nanotubes using planetary ball mill under argon atmosphere with ball-to-powder weight ratio of 10:1 for 5 h. Afterwards, the milled powders were formed by hot press process at 380{sup °}C and then were sintered at 585{sup °}C under argon atmosphere for 2 h. There was shown to be an increase in hardness values of composite with an increase in B{sub 4}C content. The micrograph of worn surfaces indicate a delamination mechanism due to the presence of CNTs and abrasion mechanism in composite containing 10 vol.%B{sub 4}C. Moreover, it was shown that increasing B{sub 4}C content increases the wear resistance by 3 times under a load of 20 N and 10 times under a load of 10 N compared to CNTs-reinforced composite. surface roughness of the composite containing 5 vol.%CNT has shown to be more than other samples. The results of creep test showed that adding carbon nanotubes increases creep rate of Al 5083 alloy; however, adding B{sub 4}C decreases its creep rate. - Highlights: • Al 5083/(CNTs + B{sub 4}C) hybrid composite was produced by powder metallurgy method. • Creep behavior, wear resistance, surface roughness, and Hardness of samples were investigated. • Addition of CNTs to Al 5083 matrix reduces alloy hardness, wear resistance and creep strength. • By addition of B{sub 4}C and composite hybridization, creep strength and wear resistance increased. • Surface roughness of Al-5 vol.%CNT has shown to be more than other samples.

  6. Wear and cutting performance of diamond composite material-a comparison with tungsten carbide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xing-sheng; J. N. Boland

    2004-01-01

    A series of wear and rock cutting tests were undertaken to assess the wear and cutting performance of a thermally stable diamond composite (TSDC). The wear tests were conducted on a newly designed wear testing rig in which a rotating aluminium oxide grinding wheel is turned (also known as machined) by the testing tool element.The rock cutting tests were performed on a linear rock-cutting planer. The thrust and cutting forces acting on the tool were measured during these tests. A tungsten carbide element was also studied for comparative purposes. The wear coefficients of both materials were used to evaluate wear performance while cutting performance was assessed by tool wear and the rates of increase in forces with cutting distance.

  7. Thermal Properties of epoxy composites with silicon carbide and/or graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Yang Do; Nam, Dae Geun; Bae, Jong-Seong; Yeum, Jeong Hyun; Oh, Weontae

    2016-02-01

    Epoxy composites were fabricated with a filler of silicon carbide (SiC) and/or graphite to improve the thermal conductivity and thereby enhance the transfer of the heat from the light-emitting diode (LED) to the heat sink. The two fillers (SiC and graphite) were each added either separately, within a content range of 10 - 50 wt.%, or together to give a combined total content of 40 - 60 wt.%. The effect of the filler addition on the thermal and the mechanical properties of the epoxy composites was examined. The filler-induced change on the structural properties was investigated by using a morphological analysis of the epoxy composites, and the thermal conductivity was analyzed by measuring the thermal diffusivity, heat specific, and density. To confirm the adhesive property with aluminum, which is mostly used as the heat sink material were tested, the mechanical properties by using a bonding test with a modified tensile test. The thermal and the mechanical properties were improved with increasing filler content in the epoxy composites. In the case of combined filler addition, graphite was more effective than SiC in increasing the thermal properties. However, excessive filler addition reduced the epoxy's natural adhesive property and hence degraded the mechanical properties.

  8. Investigation on microstructural and mechanical properties of B4C–aluminum matrix composites prepared by microwave sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Ghasali

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available B4C reinforced aluminum composites were fabricated by microwave heating of the mixture of B4C (10, 15 and 20 wt% and aluminum powders at 650, 750, 850 and 950 °C. The effect of different amounts of B4C on the microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum matrix was examined. The maximum bending (238 ± 10 MPa and compressive strength (330 ± 10 MPa values were measured for composites sintered at 950 and 750 °C, respectively. The maximum hardness (112 Vickers was measured for Al–20 wt% B4C composite sintered at 850 °C. XRD investigations showed the decomposition of boron carbide and also the formation of Al3BC by heating the composites at 850 °C. SEM micrographs showed uniform distribution of reinforcement particles in Al matrix.

  9. Continuous SiC fiber, CVI SiC matrix composites for nuclear applications: Properties and irradiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai, E-mail: katohy@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ozawa, Kazumi; Shih, Chunghao; Nozawa, Takashi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shinavski, Robert J. [Hyper-Therm High Temperature Composites, Inc., Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Hasegawa, Akira [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi-ken (Japan); Snead, Lance L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) continuous fiber-reinforced, SiC-matrix composites (SiC/SiC composites) are industrially available materials that are promising for applications in nuclear environments. The SiC/SiC composites consisting of near-stoichiometric SiC fibers, stoichiometric and fully crystalline SiC matrices, and the pyrocarbon (PyC) or multilayered PyC/SiC interphase between the fiber and the matrix are considered particularly resistant to very high radiation environments. This paper provides a summary compilation of the properties of these composites, specifically those with the chemically vapor-infiltrated (CVI) SiC matrices, including newly obtained results. The properties discussed are both in unirradiated condition and after neutron irradiation to intermediate fluence levels (most data are for <∼10 displacement per atom) at 300–1300 °C.

  10. Characterization of boron carbide particulate reinforced in situ copper surface composites synthesized using friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiskumar, R., E-mail: sathiscit2011@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Murugan, N., E-mail: murugan@cit.edu.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, V V College of Engineering, Tisaiyanvilai, 627 657 Tamil Nadu (India); Vijay, S.J., E-mail: vijayjoseph@karunya.edu [Centre for Research in Metallurgy (CRM), School of Mechanical Sciences, Karunya University, Coimbatore, 641 114 Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-10-15

    Friction stir processing has evolved as a novel solid state technique to fabricate surface composites. The objective of this work is to apply the friction stir processing technique to fabricate boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites and investigate the effect of B{sub 4}C particles and its volume fraction on microstructure and sliding wear behavior of the same. A groove was prepared on 6 mm thick copper plates and packed with B{sub 4}C particles. The dimensions of the groove was varied to result in five different volume fractions of B{sub 4}C particles (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 vol.%). A single pass friction stir processing was done using a tool rotational speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 40 mm/min and an axial force of 10 kN. Metallurgical characterization of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites was carried out using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The sliding wear behavior was evaluated using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results indicated that the B{sub 4}C particles significantly influenced the area, dispersion, grain size, microhardness and sliding wear behavior of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites. When the volume fraction of B{sub 4}C was increased, the wear mode changed from microcutting to abrasive wear and wear debris was found to be finer. Highlights: • Fabrication of Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composite by friction stir processing • Analyzing the effect of B{sub 4}C particles on the properties of Cu/B4C surface composite • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles reduced the area of surface composite. • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles enhanced the microhardness and wear rate. • B{sub 4}C particles altered the wear mode from microcutting to abrasive.

  11. Fracture toughness of advanced alumina ceramics and alumina matrix composites used for cutting tool edges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Szutkowska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Specific characteristics in fracture toughness measurements of advanced alumina ceramics and alumina matrix composites with particular reference to α-Al2O3, Al2O3-ZrO2, Al2O3-ZrO2-TiC and Al2O3-Ti(C,N has been presented.Design/methodology/approach: The present study reports fracture toughness obtained by means of the conventional method and direct measurements of the Vickers crack length (DCM method of selected tool ceramics based on alumina: pure alumina, alumina-zirconia composite with unstabilized and stabilized zirconia, alumina–zirconia composite with addition of TiC and alumina–nitride-carbide titanium composite with 2wt% of zirconia. Specimens were prepared from submicro-scale trade powders. Vicker’s hardness (HV1, fracture toughness (KIC at room temperature, the indentation fracture toughness, Young’s modulus and apparent density were also evaluated. The microstructure was observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Findings: The lowest value of KIC is revealed by pure alumina ceramics. The addition of (10 wt% unstabilized zirconia to alumina or a small amount (5 wt% of TiC to alumina–zirconia composite improve fracture toughness of these ceramics in comparison to alumina ceramics. Alumina ceramics and alumina-zirconia ceramics reveal the pronounced character of R-curve because of an increasing dependence on crack growth resistance with crack extension as opposed to the titanium carbide-nitride reinforced composite based on alumina. R-curve has not been observed for this composite.Practical implications: The results show the method of fracture toughness improvement of alumina tool ceramics.Originality/value: Taking into account the values of fracture toughness a rational use of existing ceramic tools should be expected.

  12. INTEGRATED COI S200 - Hi-NiCalon FIBER WITH AN S200 MATRIX (POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE - PMC) / AETB 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    INTEGRATED COI S200 - Hi-NiCalon FIBER WITH AN S200 MATRIX (POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE - PMC) / AETB 16 (FOAM CORE) / CARBON REINFORCED CYANOESTER (CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITE - CMC) HOT STRUCTURE, PANEL 884-1: SAMPLE 1

  13. Low cost aluminium metal matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withers, G.

    2007-03-15

    Low cost, light weight Ultalite{reg_sign} is an Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite (AL-MMC) which utilises wear resistant ceramic particles derived from flyash. Ultalite AL-MMC typically contains between 10 and 30 per cent ceramic particles, and is formulated for the manufacture of wear resistant automotive components. Due to its low density and ease of processing into net shape die casting, Ultalite AL-MMC provides weight savings of up to 60 per cent over components fabricated from cast iron, thereby providing improved fuel efficiency with reduced greenhouse emissions. The original flyash material was sourced from a black coal power station in Queensland, where it contained a wide range of particles sizes. To narrow the size range and to remove impurities, a proprietary pretreatment developed by Dr Thomas Robl and co-researchers at the University of Kentucky was employed. The University of Kentucky developed the technology for the classification and benefaction of flyash to produce high-grade Pozzolan, which is used in Portland Cement product. This technology is now being applied to the production of Ultalite AL-MMC. Testing performed by Dr Robl has shown that the proprietary technology can eliminate the hollow particles, extract detrimental carbon-based impurities and remove the extremely fine and coarse particles. All that remains are dense ceramic particles with an average particle size of approximately 30 {mu}m. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Metal Matrix Composite Solar Cell Metallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilt David M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced solar cells are moving to ever thinner formats in order to save mass and in some cases improve performance. As cells are thinned, the possibility that they may fracture or cleave due to mechanical stresses is increased. Fractures of the cell can degrade the overall device performance if the fracture propagates through the contact metallization, which frequently occurs. To address this problem, a novel semiconductor metallization system based on multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT reinforcement, termed metal matrix composite (MMC metallization is under investigation. Electro-mechanical characterization of MMC films demonstrate their ability to provide electrical conductivity over >40 micron wide cracks in the underlying semiconductor, with the carbon nanotubes bridging the gap. In addition, these materials show a “self-healing” behaviour, electrically reconnecting at ~30 microns when strained past failure. Triple junction (TJ space cells with MMC metallization demonstrated no loss in Jsc after intentional fracture, whereas TJ cells with conventional metallization suffer up to 50% Jsc loss.

  15. Thermal conductivity of microPCMs-filled epoxy matrix composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, J.F.; Wang, X.Y; Huang, Z.; Zhao, Y.H.; Yuan, X.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Microencapsulated phase change materials (microPCMs) have been widely applied in solid matrix as thermal-storage or temperature-controlling functional composites. The thermal conductivity of these microPCMs/matrix composites is an important property need to be considered. In this study, a series of

  16. In-situ EBCs for High Performance Composite Propulsion Components Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicon Carbide based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) offer the potential to fundamentally change the design and manufacture of aeronautical and space propulsion...

  17. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites for Space Based Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-31

    composite plates were prepared using standard i, c-pressing procedures. The plates were cut into tensile specimens which were then subsequently notched...reinforced HMU composites were prepared using the matrix compositions and hot-pressing parameters shown in Table VI-1. The compositions are identical...shown in Figure VI-6. Traces of a- cristobalite are present in all three composites, with a noticeably larger amount present in the Nb20 5 composite. All

  18. Parametric Study Of A Ceramic-Fiber/Metal-Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes computer-model parametric study of effects of degradation of constituent materials upon mechanical properties of ceramic-fiber/metal-matrix composite material. Contributes to understanding of weakening effects of large changes in temperature and mechanical stresses in fabrication and use. Concerned mainly with influences of in situ fiber and matrix properties upon behavior of composite. Particular attention given to influence of in situ matrix strength and influence of interphase degradation.

  19. Influence of the Sr and Mg Alloying Additions on the Bonding Between Matrix and Reinforcing Particles in the AlSi7Mg/SiC-Cg Hybrid Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolata A. J.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to perform adequate selection of the phase composition of the composite designated for permanent - mould casting air compressor pistons. The hybrid composites based on AlSi7Mg matrix alloy reinforced with mixture of silicon carbide (SiC and glassy carbon (Cg particles were fabricated by the stir casting method. It has been shown that the proper selection of chemical composition of matrix alloy and its modification by used magnesium and strontium additions gives possibility to obtain both the advantageous casting properties of composite suspensions as well as good bonding between particles reinforcements and matrix.

  20. Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Process for Facile Electrosynthesis of Metal Carbides and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xingli; Chen, Chaoyi; Lu, Xionggang; Li, Shangshu; Xu, Qian; Zhou, Zhongfu; Ding, Weizhong

    2017-02-01

    Metal carbides (MCs) and composites including TiC, SiC, TaC, ZrC, NbC, Ti5Si3/TiC, and Nb/Nb5Si3 have been directly electrosynthesized from their stoichiometric metal oxides/carbon (MOs/C) mixture precursors by an innovative solid oxide membrane (SOM)-assisted electrochemical process. MOs/C mixture powders including TiO2/C, SiO2/C, Ta2O5/C, ZrO2/C, Nb2O5/C, TiO2/SiO2/C, Nb2O5/SiO2 were pressed to form porous pellets and then served as cathode precursors. A SOM-based anode, made from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based membrane, was used to control the electroreduction process. The SOM electrochemical process was performed at 1273 K (1000 °C) and 3.5 to 4.0 V in molten CaCl2. The oxygen component contained in the MOs/C precursors was gradually removed during electroreduction process, and thus, MOs/C can be directly converted into MCs and composites at the cathode. The reaction mechanism of the electroreduction process and the characteristics of the obtained MCs and composites products were systematically investigated. The results show that the electrosynthesis process typically involves compounding, electroreduction, dissolution-electrodeposition, and in situ carbonization processes. The products can be predesigned and controlled to form micro/nanostructured MCs and composites. Multicomponent multilayer composites (MMCs) have also been tried to electrosynthesize in this work. It is suggested that the SOM-assisted electroreduction process has great potential to be used for the facile and green synthesis of various MCs and composites.

  1. Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Process for Facile Electrosynthesis of Metal Carbides and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xingli; Chen, Chaoyi; Lu, Xionggang; Li, Shangshu; Xu, Qian; Zhou, Zhongfu; Ding, Weizhong

    2016-09-01

    Metal carbides (MCs) and composites including TiC, SiC, TaC, ZrC, NbC, Ti5Si3/TiC, and Nb/Nb5Si3 have been directly electrosynthesized from their stoichiometric metal oxides/carbon (MOs/C) mixture precursors by an innovative solid oxide membrane (SOM)-assisted electrochemical process. MOs/C mixture powders including TiO2/C, SiO2/C, Ta2O5/C, ZrO2/C, Nb2O5/C, TiO2/SiO2/C, Nb2O5/SiO2 were pressed to form porous pellets and then served as cathode precursors. A SOM-based anode, made from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based membrane, was used to control the electroreduction process. The SOM electrochemical process was performed at 1273 K (1000 °C) and 3.5 to 4.0 V in molten CaCl2. The oxygen component contained in the MOs/C precursors was gradually removed during electroreduction process, and thus, MOs/C can be directly converted into MCs and composites at the cathode. The reaction mechanism of the electroreduction process and the characteristics of the obtained MCs and composites products were systematically investigated. The results show that the electrosynthesis process typically involves compounding, electroreduction, dissolution-electrodeposition, and in situ carbonization processes. The products can be predesigned and controlled to form micro/nanostructured MCs and composites. Multicomponent multilayer composites (MMCs) have also been tried to electrosynthesize in this work. It is suggested that the SOM-assisted electroreduction process has great potential to be used for the facile and green synthesis of various MCs and composites.

  2. Texture and residual strain in SiC/Ti-6-2-4-2 titanium matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaswamy, P.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Von Dreele, R.; Bennett, K.; Roberts, J.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Daymond, M. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom); Jayaraman, N. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Residual strain and texture variations were measured in two Titanium matrix composites reinforced with Silicon Carbide fibers (Ti/SiC) of similar composition but fabricated by different processing routes. Each composite comprised a Ti-6242 {alpha}/{beta} matrix alloy containing 35% by volume continuous SiC fibers. In one composite, the matrix was produced by a plasma spray (PS) route, and in the other by a wire drawing (WD) process. The PS and WD composites were reinforced with SCS-6 (SiC) and Trimarc (SiC) fibers, respectively. The texture in the titanium matrices differed significantly, from approximately {approx} 1.1x random for the monolithic and composite produced by PS route to {approx} 17x random in the monolithic and {approx}6x random in the composite produced by the WD route. No significant differences in matrix residual strains between the composites prepared by the two procedures were noted. The Trimarc (WD) fibers recorded higher ({approx}1.3x) compressive strains than the SCS-6 (PS) fibers in all the measured directions. The plane-specific elastic moduli, measured in load tests on the un-reinforced matrices, showed little difference.

  3. ECAP – New consolidation method for production of aluminium matrix composites with ceramic reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Šnajdar Musa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium based metal matrix composites are rapidly developing group of materials due to their unique combination of properties that include low weight, elevated strength, improved wear and corrosion resistance and relatively good ductility. This combination of properties is a result of mixing two groups of materials with rather different properties with aluminium as ductile matrix and different oxides and carbides added as reinforcement. Al2O3, SiC and ZrO2 are the most popular choices of reinforcement material. One of the most common methods for producing this type of metal matrix composites is powder metallurgy since it has many variations and also is relatively low-cost method. Many different techniques of compacting aluminium and ceramic powders have been previously investigated. Among those techniques equal channel angular pressing (ECAP stands out due to its beneficial influence on the main problem that arises during powder compaction and that is a non-uniform distribution of reinforcement particles. This paper gives an overview on ECAP method principles, advantages and produced powder composite properties.

  4. Mechanical and Corrosion Behaviour of Zn-27Al Based Composites Reinforced with Groundnut Shell Ash and Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K. Alaneme

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical and corrosion behaviour of Zn-27Al alloy based composites reinforced with groundnut shell ash and silicon carbide was investigated. Experimental test composite samples were prepared by melting Zn-27Al alloy with pre-determined proportions of groundnut ash and silicon carbide as reinforcements using double stir casting. Microstructural examination, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour were used to characterize the composites produced. The results show that hardness and ultimate tensile strength of the hybrid composites decreased with increase in GSA content. Although the % Elongation somewhat decreased with increase the GSA content, the trend was not as consistent as that of hardness and tensile strength. The fracture toughness of the hybrid composites however, increased with increase in the GSA content of the composites. In 3.5 % NaCl solution, the composites were resistant to corrosion with some of the hybrid composite grades containing GSA exhibiting relatively superior corrosion resistance to the grades without GSA. In 0.3M H2SO4 solution, the composites were generally a bit more susceptible to corrosion (compared to 3.5 % NaCl solution, but the effect of GSA content on the corrosion resistance of the composites was not consistent for the Zn-27Al alloy based composites.

  5. A Study of Current Chopping Characteristics in Metal-Carbide Composite Contact Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kusano, Takashi; Okutomi, Tsutomu; Yokokura, Kunio; Homma, Mitsutaka

    To clarify the effect of carbides on current chopping characteristics chopping current was evaluated for various metalcarbide contact materials. As a result, it was found that the chopping current of metal-carbide contacts was related to the vapor pressure of metals and the work function of carbides. It was also found that the chopping current was reduced by the heat treatment when the melting point of contacts is lower than the temperature of heat teatment.

  6. Evaluation of Solid Modeling Software for Finite Element Analysis of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Mital, Subodh; Lang, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Three computer programs, used for the purpose of generating 3-D finite element models of the Repeating Unit Cell (RUC) of a textile, were examined for suitability to model woven Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). The programs evaluated were the open-source available TexGen, the commercially available WiseTex, and the proprietary Composite Material Evaluator (COMATE). A five-harness-satin (5HS) weave for a melt-infiltrated (MI) silicon carbide matrix and silicon carbide fiber was selected as an example problem and the programs were tested for their ability to generate a finite element model of the RUC. The programs were also evaluated for ease-of-use and capability, particularly for the capability to introduce various defect types such as porosity, ply shifting, and nesting of a laminate. Overall, it was found that TexGen and WiseTex were useful for generating solid models of the tow geometry; however, there was a lack of consistency in generating well-conditioned finite element meshes of the tows and matrix. TexGen and WiseTex were both capable of allowing collective and individual shifting of tows within a ply and WiseTex also had a ply nesting capability. TexGen and WiseTex were sufficiently userfriendly and both included a Graphical User Interface (GUI). COMATE was satisfactory in generating a 5HS finite element mesh of an idealized weave geometry but COMATE lacked a GUI and was limited to only 5HS and 8HS weaves compared to the larger amount of weave selections available with TexGen and WiseTex.

  7. Interfacial studies of chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) ceramic-matrix composites. Annual report, 1 August 1987-31 July 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, J.J.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate the fiber/matrix interfacial chemistry in Chemical Vapor Infiltrated Silicon Carbide matrix composites utilizing Nicalon SiC and Nextel 440 mullite fibers and how this interface influences composite properties such as strength, toughness, and environmental stability. The SiC matrix was deposited using three different reactants; methyldichlorosilane (MDS), methyltrichlorosilane (MTS), and dimethyldichlorosilane (DMDS). It was found that by varying the reactant gas flow rates, the ratio of carrier gas to reactant gas, the type of carrier gas (hydrogen or argon), the flushing gas used in the reactor prior to deposition (hydrogen or argon), or the type of silane reactant gas used, the composition of the deposited SiC could be varied from very silicon rich (75 at %) to carbon rich (60%) to almost pure carbon. Stoichiometric SiC was found to bond very strongly to both Nicalon and Nextel fibers, resulting in a weak and brittle composite. A thin carbon interfacial layer deposited either deliberately by the decomposition of methane or inadvertently by the introduction of argon into the reactor prior to silane flow, resulted in a weakly bonded fiber/matrix interface and strong and tough composites. However, composites with this type of interface were not oxidatively stable. Preliminary results point to the use of a carbon-rich SiC interfacial zone to achieve a relatively weak, crack-deflecting fiber/matrix bond but also exhibiting oxidative stability.

  8. Modeling the Stress Strain Behavior of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2006-01-01

    Woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites represent one of the most mature composite systems to date. Future components fabricated out of these woven ceramic matrix composites are expected to vary in shape, curvature, architecture, and thickness. The design of future components using woven ceramic matrix composites necessitates a modeling approach that can account for these variations which are physically controlled by local constituent contents and architecture. Research over the years supported primarily by NASA Glenn Research Center has led to the development of simple mechanistic-based models that can describe the entire stress-strain curve for composite systems fabricated with chemical vapor infiltrated matrices and melt-infiltrated matrices for a wide range of constituent content and architecture. Several examples will be presented that demonstrate the approach to modeling which incorporates a thorough understanding of the stress-dependent matrix cracking properties of the composite system.

  9. Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composites: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdanels, David L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix (W/Cu) composites have served as an ideal model system with which to analyze the properties of metal matrix composites. A series of research programs were conducted to investigate the stress-strain behavior of W/Cu composites; the effect of fiber content on the strength, modulus, and conductivity of W/Cu composites; and the effect of alloying elements on the behavior of tungsten wire and of W/Cu composites. Later programs investigated the stress-rupture, creep, and impact behavior of these composites at elevated temperatures. Analysis of the results of these programs as allows prediction of the effects of fiber properties, matrix properties, and fiber content on the properties of W/Cu composites. These analyses form the basis for the rule-of-mixtures prediction of composite properties which was universally adopted as the criteria for measuring composite efficiency. In addition, the analyses allows extrapolation of potential properties of other metal matrix composites and are used to select candidate fibers and matrices for development of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite materials for high temperature aircraft and rocket engine turbine applications. The W/Cu composite efforts are summarized, some of the results obtained are described, and an update is provided on more recent work using W/Cu composites as high strength, high thermal conductivity composite materials for high heat flux, elevated temperature applications.

  10. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Zhan Jun [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Yang, Ying Chao [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Li, Kai Yuan [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Tao, Xin Yong [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Zhang, Li Tong [Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, China; Li, Xiao Dong [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Pan, Zhengwei [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Owing to their exceptional stiffness and strength1 4, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have long been considered to be an ideal reinforcement for light-weight, high-strength, and high-temperature-resistant ceramic matrix composites (CMCs)5 10. However, the research and development in CNT-reinforced CMCs have been greatly hindered due to the challenges related to manufacturing including poor dispersion, damages during dispersion, surface modification, densification and sintering, weak tube/matrix interfaces, and agglomeration of tubes at the matrix grain boundaries5,11. Here we report the fabrication of high-quality aligned CNT/SiC composites by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), a technique that is being widely used to fabricate commercial continuous-filament CMCs12 15. Using the CVI technique most of the challenges previously encountered in the fabrication of CNT composites were readily overcome. Nanotube pullouts, an important toughening mechanism for CMCs, were consistently observed on all fractured CNT/SiC samples. Indeed, three-point bending tests conducted on individual CNT/SiC nanowires (diameters: 50 200 nm) using an atomic force microscope show that the CNT-reinforced SiC nanowires are about an order of magnitude tougher than the bulk SiC. The tube/matrix interface is so intimate and the SiC matrix is so dense that a ~50-nm-thick SiC coating can effectively protect the inside nanotubes from being oxidized at 1600 C in air. The CVI method may be extended to produce nanotube composites from a variety of matrix

  11. Mechanical and morphological properties of basalt filled polymer matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to study the effect of basalt on physical, mechanical and morphological of the injection molded LDPE.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, the effect of basalt was investigated as a filler material in polymer matrix composite (PMC) and low density polyethylene (LDPE) was chosen as a matrix material.Findings: A variety of mechanical tests were performed on the resultant composites which has appropriate compositions. Tensile, flexu...

  12. Mechanical and Wear Properties of SiC/Graphite Reinforced Al359 Alloy-based Metal Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhranshu Bansal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Al359 alloy was reinforced with Silicon Carbide and Silicon Carbide/Graphite particles using stir casting process. Thereafter their mechanical and wear properties were investigated. It was found that the hardness of the Al359-Silicon Carbide composite is better than Al359-Silicon Carbide-Graphite composite. The Silicon Carbide/Graphite reinforced composite exhibits a superior ultimate tensile strength against Silicon Carbide reinforced composite. The wear test was conducted at different loading, sliding velocities and sliding distances conditions. Results showed that the wear resistance of Al359 alloy increased with the reinforcement of Silicon Carbide/Graphite material for higher loading, sliding velocities and sliding distance conditions. SEM images of the worn surface of the pin were examined to study their wear mechanism.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 65, No. 4, July 2015, pp. 330-338, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.65.8676

  13. Effects of interfaces and preferred orientation on the electrical response of composites of alumina and silicon carbide whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Brian D.

    Ceramic-matrix composites of alumina and silicon carbide whiskers have recently found novel commercial application as electromagnetic absorbers. However, a detailed understanding of how materials issues influence the composite electrical response which underpins this application has been absent until now. In this project, such composites were electrically measured over a wide range of conditions and modeled in terms of various aspects of the microstructure in order to understand how they work. For this purpose, three types of composites were made by different methods from the same set of ceramic powder blends loaded with different volume fractions of whiskers. In doing so, the interfaces between whiskers, the preferred orientations of whiskers, and the structure of electrically-connected whisker clusters were varied. In Chapter 3, it shown that Schottky energy barriers form at the junctions of the wide-bandgap semiconductor whiskers when metal electrodes are applied for measurements. These barriers were characterized on the microscopic and macroscopic level, and the gap between these different scales was bridged. Also, a modeling approach was developed for the loading dependence of the composite non-linear response which results from the barriers. In Chapter 4, the effects of significantly different types of preferred orientation are elucidated and a strong structure-property correlation is established. The effects of other structural issues on the electrical response are uncovered as well, such as those pertaining to porosity in the ceramic and the interfaces between electrically-connected SiCw. In Chapter 5, the non-linear response model of Chapter 3 is adapted in the development of a new model for electrically-percolated clusters. This model demonstrates how loading and interfacial issues influence the cluster topology and may result in the cluster having a non-linear electrical response. In Chapter 6, the effects of various factors on the broadband frequency

  14. Test on Sensor Effect of Cement Matrix Piezoelectric Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiaoming; LI Zhongxian; DING Yang; LI Zongjin

    2005-01-01

    A novel cement matrix smart piezoelectric composite and its application as sensing element are presented.A cement matrix smart piezoelectric composite piece encapsulated in a cement mortar formed a practical sensor, and it was tested on material test system with cyclic loading.According to the theoretical analysis, the function of the cement matrix piezoelectric sensor output voltage was expressed in terms of the magnitude of the input cyclic loading amplitude and frequency.The curve fitting of gain function that is defined as sensor′s gain factor under different frequencies of input loading was carried out. From the results of curve fitting, it is found that the cement matrix smart piezoelectric composite has a simple relationship between input loading and output voltage.Therefore the cement matrix piezoelectric composite sensor is suitable to be applied in structural health monitoring.

  15. Detecting Damage in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The majority of damage in SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites subjected to monotonic tensile loads is in the form of distributed matrix cracks. These cracks initiate near stress concentrations, such as 90 deg fiber tows or large matrix pores and continue to accumulate with additional stress until matrix crack saturation is achieved. Such damage is difficult to detect with conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques (immersion ultrasonics, x-ray, etc.). Monitoring a specimen.s electrical resistance change provides an indirect approach for monitoring matrix crack density. Sylramic-iBN fiber- reinforced SiC composites with a melt infiltrated (MI) matrix were tensile tested at room temperature. Results showed an increase in resistance of more than 500% prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage. A relationship between resistance change and matrix crack density was also determined.

  16. Detecting Cracks in Ceramic Matrix Composites by Electrical Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The majority of damage in SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites subjected to monotonic tensile loads is in the form of distributed matrix cracks. These cracks initiate near stress concentrations, such as 90o fiber tows or large matrix pores and continue to accumulate with additional stress until matrix crack saturation is achieved. Such damage is difficult to detect with conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques (immersion ultrasonics, x-ray, etc.). Monitoring a specimen.s electrical resistance change provides an indirect approach for monitoring matrix crack density. Sylramic-iBN fiber- reinforced SiC composites with a melt infiltrated (MI) matrix were tensile tested at room temperature. Results showed an increase in resistance of more than 500% prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage. A relationship between resistance change and matrix crack density was also determined.

  17. 600 Mesh Silicon Carbide Corona Protection Varnish with EPOXY/OMMT Nano-composite Adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chunxiu; ZHAO Yingnan; HOU Haibo; ZHANG Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    A new corona protection varnish was prepared by using epoxy/montmorillonite nano-composite and pure epoxy resin as adhesives respectively. The adhesive with different amounts of organic montmorillonite (OMMT) was mixed with 1200 mesh silicon carbide (SiC) by different weight ratios. The surface states of the varnishes with various adhesives were observed by powerful optical microscope. Some properties of the varnishes were analyzed during the enduring time under 5kV/cm DC, such as the relation of change in nonlinear coefifcient, natural surface resistivity, and surface temperature variation. The results showed that the amounts of OMMT had little effect on the natural surface resistance of the varnish but had important inlfuence on the nonlinear property of the varnish. When the range of the OMMT content was 2wt% to 6wt%, the nonlinear coefifcient of all materials with epoxy/OMMT nano-composite adhesive was higher than that with pure epoxy resin adhesive. The surface temperature of the varnish with epoxy/OMMT nanocomposite adhesive was all lower than that with the pure epoxy resin adhesive under high electrical ifeld strength.

  18. Ultrafine Molybdenum Carbide Nanoparticles Composited with Carbon as a Highly Active Hydrogen-Evolution Electrocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruguang; Zhou, Yao; Chen, Yongfang; Li, Pengxi; Liu, Qian; Wang, Jiacheng

    2015-12-01

    The replacement of platinum with non-precious-metal electrocatalysts with high efficiency and superior stability for the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) remains a great challenge. Herein, we report the one-step synthesis of uniform, ultrafine molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) nanoparticles (NPs) within a carbon matrix from inexpensive starting materials (dicyanamide and ammonium molybdate). The optimized catalyst consisting of Mo2C NPs with sizes lower than 3 nm encapsulated by ultrathin graphene shells (ca. 1-3 layers) showed superior HER activity in acidic media, with a very low onset potential of -6 mV, a small Tafel slope of 41 mV dec(-1), and a large exchange current density of 0.179 mA cm(-2), as well as good stability during operation for 12 h. These excellent properties are similar to those of state-of-the-art 20% Pt/C and make the catalyst one of the most active acid-stable electrocatalysts ever reported for HER.

  19. Fabrication of aluminum matrix composite reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1.0 wt.% carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced 2024A1 matrix composite was fabricated by cold isostatic press and subsequent hot extrusion techniques. The mechanical properties of the composite were measured by a tensile test. Meanwhile, the fracture surfaces were examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results show that CNTs are dispersed homogeneously in the composite and that the interfaces of the Al matrix and the CNT bond well. Although the tensile strength and the Young's modulus of the composite are enhanced markedly, the elongation does not decrease when compared with the matrix material fabricated under the same process. The reasons for the increments may be the extraordinary mechanical properties of CNTs, and the bridging and pulling-out role of CNTs in the Al matrix composite.

  20. High-Performance Metal/Carbide Composites with Far-From-Equilibrium Compositions and Controlled Microstructures

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Liangfa; O’Neil, Morgan; Erturun, Veysel; Benitez, Rogelio; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Karaman, Ibrahim; Radovic, Miladin

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of extending existing metal-ceramic composites to those with the compositions that are far from thermodynamic equilibrium is examined. A current and pressure-assisted, rapid infiltration is proposed to fabricate composites, consisting of reactive metallic and ceramic phases with controlled microstructure and tunable properties. An aluminum (Al) alloy/Ti2AlC composite is selected as an example of the far-from-equilibrium systems to fabricate, because Ti2AlC exists only in a narrow...

  1. Corrosion and wear resistance of titanium- and aluminum-based metal matrix composites fabricated by direct metal laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldera, Benjamin L.

    Titanium- and Aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC) have shown favorable properties for aerospace applications such as airframes, reinforcement materials and joining elements. In this research, such coatings were developed by direct metal laser deposition with a powder-fed fiber coupled diode laser. The MMC formulations consisted of pure titanium and aluminum matrices with reinforcing powder blends of chromium carbide and tungsten carbide nickel alloy. Two powder formulations were investigated for each matrix material (Ti1, Ti2, Al1 and Al2). Titanium based composites were deposited onto a Ti6Al4V plate while aluminum composites were deposited onto AA 7075 and AA 5083 for Al1 and Al2, respectively. Microstructures of the MMCs were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and reduced Young's modulus (Er) were assessed through depth-sensing instrumented nanoindentation. microhardness (Vickers) was also analyzed for each composite. The corrosion resistance of the MMCs were compared by monitoring open circuit potential (OCP), polarization resistance (Rp) and potentiodynamic polarization in 0.5 M NaCl to simulate exposure to seawater. The Ti-MMCs demonstrated improvements in hardness between 205% and 350% over Ti6Al4V. Al-MMCs showed improvements between 47% and 79% over AA 7075 and AA 5083. The MMCs showed an increase in anodic current density indicating the formation of a less protective surface oxide than the base metals.

  2. Numerical homogenization of elastic and thermal material properties for metal matrix composites (MMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Stefan; Mergheim, Julia; Zimmermann, Marco; Aurich, Jan C.; Steinmann, Paul

    2017-01-01

    A two-scale material modeling approach is adopted in order to determine macroscopic thermal and elastic constitutive laws and the respective parameters for metal matrix composite (MMC). Since the common homogenization framework violates the thermodynamical consistency for non-constant temperature fields, i.e., the dissipation is not conserved through the scale transition, the respective error is calculated numerically in order to prove the applicability of the homogenization method. The thermomechanical homogenization is applied to compute the macroscopic mass density, thermal expansion, elasticity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity for two specific MMCs, i.e., aluminum alloy Al2024 reinforced with 17 or 30 % silicon carbide particles. The temperature dependency of the material properties has been considered in the range from 0 to 500°C, the melting temperature of the alloy. The numerically determined material properties are validated with experimental data from the literature as far as possible.

  3. Evaluation the Properties of Titanium Matrix Composites by Melting Route Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is an in-situ synthesis of (TiB+TiC) hybrid titanium matrix composites (TMCs) by vacuum induction melting method and to verify its mechanical properties. The melting route was adopted to synthesize the commercial pure titanium (cp Ti) and granular boron carbide (B4C). The reinforcements, the fraction of 10 vol. pct, were formed by adding 1.88 wt pct B4C to cp Ti. After in-situ synthesis of TMCs, electron probe micro-analysis elemental mapping was carried out to confirm the distribution and shape of reinforcements. The cone-on-disk type sliding wear test was also done for the identification of TMCs. It is concluded that (TiB+TiC) hybrid TMCs can be in-situ synthesized and has better wear properties than H13.

  4. Machinability of Al-SiC metal matrix composites using WC, PCD and MCD inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beristain, J.; Gonzalo, O.; Sanda, A.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this work is the study of the machinability of aluminium-silicon carbide Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) in turning operations. The cutting tools used were hard metal (WC) with and without coating, different grades and geometries of Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD) and Mono-Crystalline Diamond (MCD). The work piece material was AMC225xe, composed of aluminium-copper alloy AA 2124 and 25% wt of SiC, being the size of the SiC particles around 3 {mu}m. Experiments were conducted at various cutting speeds and cutting parameters in facing finishing operations, measuring the surface roughness, cutting forces and tool wear. The worn surface of the cutting tool was examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). It was observed that the Built Up Edge (BUE) and stuck material is higher in the MCD tools than in the PCD tools. The BUE acts as a protective layer against abrasive wear of the tool. (Author)

  5. Mechanism of laser welding of SiC reinforced LD2 aluminum metal matrix composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the mechanism of SiCP/LD2 aluminum matrix composites during laser welding was investigated. The emphasis was laid on the study of the distribution of aluminum carbides in whole welds. The joint can be divided into three regions both in depth and in width. The depth is divided into severe reaction region, partial reaction region, and no reaction region. In these regions, the extent of interfacial reaction varies gradually, the shape of reactants varies from long to fine. In width it can also be divided into severe reaction region, partial reaction region, and initial reaction region from the center of the weld to about the welding junction. In the initial reaction region, nucleation and growth of the reaction products on the surface of SiC particles can be observed by using TEM. The investigation showed that the quantity and size of SiC are relative to the temperature gradient in the molten pool.

  6. High-Performance Metal/Carbide Composites with Far-From-Equilibrium Compositions and Controlled Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liangfa; O’Neil, Morgan; Erturun, Veysel; Benitez, Rogelio; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Karaman, Ibrahim; Radovic, Miladin

    2016-10-01

    The prospect of extending existing metal-ceramic composites to those with the compositions that are far from thermodynamic equilibrium is examined. A current and pressure-assisted, rapid infiltration is proposed to fabricate composites, consisting of reactive metallic and ceramic phases with controlled microstructure and tunable properties. An aluminum (Al) alloy/Ti2AlC composite is selected as an example of the far-from-equilibrium systems to fabricate, because Ti2AlC exists only in a narrow region of the Ti-Al-C phase diagram and readily reacts with Al. This kind of reactive systems challenges conventional methods for successfully processing corresponding metal-ceramic composites. Al alloy/Ti2AlC composites with controlled microstructures, various volume ratios of constituents (40/60 and 27/73) and metallic phase sizes (42–83 μm, 77–276 μm, and 167–545 μm), are obtained using the Ti2AlC foams with different pore structures as preforms for molten metal (Al alloy) infiltration. The resulting composites are lightweight and display exceptional mechanical properties at both ambient and elevated temperatures. These structures achieve a compressive strength that is 10 times higher than the yield strength of the corresponding peak-aged Al alloy at ambient temperature and 14 times higher at 400 °C. Possible strengthening mechanisms are described, and further strategies for improving properties of those composites are proposed.

  7. Isothermal and nonisothermal fatigue behavior of a metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, T. P.; Gayda, J.; Mackay, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The isothermal and nonisothermal fatigue resistance of a metal matrix composite (MMC) consisting of Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn (Ti-15-3) matrix reinforced by 33 vol pct continuous SiC fibers was investigated. The fibers were nominally oriented parallel to the specimen axis. Isothermal fatigue tests were performed in air at 300 and 550 C. The MMC had good isothermal fatigue resistance at low cyclic stress, with fatigue cracks initiating from fiber-matrix interfaces and foil laminations. At high cyclic stresses, stress relaxation in the matrix reduced isothermal composite fatigue resistance at 550 C. Nonisothermal fatigue loading substantially degraded composite fatigue resistnce. This degradation was produced by a thermomechanical fatigue damage mechanism associated with the fiber-matrix interfaces.

  8. Ordered hierarchical mesoporous/microporous carbon derived from mesoporous titanium-carbide/carbon composites and its electrochemical performance in supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hai-Jing; Wang, Jie; Wang, Cong-Xiao; Xia, Yong-Yao [Department of Chemistry and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular, Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Institute of New Energy, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2011-11-15

    Novel ordered hierarchical mesoporous/microporous carbon (OHMMC) derived from mesoporous titanium-carbide/carbon composites was prepared for the first time by synthesizing ordered mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium-carbide/carbon composites, followed by chlorination of titanium carbides. The mesostructure and microstructure can be conveniently tuned by controlling the TiC contents of mesoporous TiC/C composite precursor, and chlorination temperature. By optimal condition, the OHMMC has a high surface area (1917 m{sup 2}g{sup -1}), large pore volumes (1.24 cm{sup 3}g{sup -1}), narrow mesopore-size distributions (centered at about 3 nm), and micropore size of 0.69 and 1.25 nm, and shows a great potential as electrode for supercapacitor applications: it exhibits a high capacitance of 146 Fg{sup -1} in noaqueous electrolyte and excellent rate capability. The ordered mesoporous channel pores are favorable for retention and immersion of the electrolyte, providing a more favorable path for electrolyte penetration and transportation to achieve promising rate capability performance. Meanwhile, the micropores drilled on the mesopore-walls can increase the specific surface area to provide more sites for charge storage. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Comparison of self repair in various composite matrix materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2014-04-01

    In a comparison of self repair in graphite composites (for airplane applications) versus epoxy and vinyl ester composites (for building structures or walls) 1 the type of damage that the fiber/matrix is prone to experience is a prime factor in determining which materials self repair well and 2 the flow of energy during damage determines what kinds of damage that can be self repaired well. 1) In brittle composites, repair was successful throughout the composite due to matrix cracking which allowed for optimum chemical flow, whereas in toughened composites that did not crack, the repair chemical flows into a few layers of the composite. 2) If the damage energy is stopped by the composite and goes laterally, it causes delamination which will be repaired; however if the damage energy goes through the composite as with a puncture, then there will be limited delamination, less chemical release and less self repair.

  10. Laser Assisted Machining of Metal Matrix Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Metal matrix composites (MMC's) are of great interest in aerospace applications where their high specific strength provides a weight saving alternative to standard...

  11. Electromagnetic shielding of polymer-matrix composites with metallic nanoparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jalali, M; Dauterstedt, S; Michaud, A; Wuthrich, R

    2011-01-01

    To improve electromagnetic (EM) shielding and especially absorption of carbon fibre reinforced polymer-matrix composites for aircraft applications in high frequencies, the inclusion of metallic nanoparticles of iron, cobalt, nickel...

  12. Ultra-Low-Density (ULD) Polymer Matrix Composites (PMCs) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Phase I SBIR proposal seeks to demonstrate a new class of ultra-low-density (ULD) polymer matrix composites of high specific modulus and specific strength...

  13. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Vanes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The work proposed herein is to demonstrate that the higher temperature capabilities of Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) can be fully utilized to reduce emissions and...

  14. Fracture in brittle matrix particle composites with varying particle content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, M.R.A. van; Mier, J.G.M. van

    1999-01-01

    Fracture in brittle matrix particle and fibre composites can be conveniently modelled by means of lattice models where the particle and/or fibre structure is incorporated directly in the model. The particles, fibres and matrix, as well as the interfacial transition zone are assumed to behave as a

  15. Fracture in brittle matrix particle composites with varying particle content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, M.R.A. van; Mier, J.G.M. van

    1999-01-01

    Fracture in brittle matrix particle and fibre composites can be conveniently modelled by means of lattice models where the particle and/or fibre structure is incorporated directly in the model. The particles, fibres and matrix, as well as the interfacial transition zone are assumed to behave as a co

  16. Evaluation of drilling Al/B4C composites with carbide drills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rıza Motorcu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, cutting forces and torque was evaluated through Taguchi Method (TM in the drilling of the high density B4C particle reinforced composites, which were produced through powder metallurgy-hot pressing method, with coated and uncoated carbide drills. Cutting speed (18, 25 and 35 m/min, feed rate (0.08, 0.112 and 0.16 mm/rev, coating properties (coated and uncoated and the amounts of particle reinforcement (5%, 10% and 15% B4C were used as the control factors. It was observed that the increased feed rate and particle reinforcement increased the axial force and torque, and decreased the cutting speed. The uncoated drills had a better performance than the coated drills. The amount of B4C reinforcement was observed to be the most effective parameter on the axial force and torque with the contribution ratios of 96.6% and 49.1%, respectively. Moreover, the correlation coefficients (R2 of the first order predictive equations developed for the axial force and torque were calculated as 0.895 and 0.854, respectively.

  17. Radiation-tolerant joining technologies for silicon carbide ceramics and composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai, E-mail: katohy@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Snead, Lance L.; Cheng, Ting; Shih, Chunghao; Lewis, W. Daniel [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Koyanagi, Takaaki; Hinoki, Tatsuya [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Henager, Charles H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd., Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Ferraris, Monica [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Torino (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) for nuclear structural applications, whether in the monolithic ceramic or composite form, will require a robust joining technology capable of withstanding the harsh nuclear environment. This paper presents significant progress made towards identifying and processing irradiation-tolerant joining methods for nuclear-grade SiC. In doing so, a standardized methodology for carrying out joint testing has been established consistent with the small volume samples mandated by neutron irradiation testing. Candidate joining technologies were limited to those that provide low induced radioactivity and included titanium diffusion bonding, Ti–Si–C MAX-phase joining, calcia–alumina glass–ceramic joining, and transient eutectic-phase SiC joining. Samples of these joints were irradiated in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor at 500 or 800 °C, and their microstructure and mechanical properties were compared to pre-irradiation conditions. Within the limitations of statistics, all joining methodologies presented retained their joint mechanical strength to ∼3 dpa at 500 °C, thus indicating the first results obtained on irradiation-stable SiC joints. Under the more aggressive irradiation conditions (800 °C, ∼5 dpa), some joint materials exhibited significant irradiation-induced microstructural evolution; however, the effect of irradiation on joint strength appeared rather limited.

  18. Radiation-tolerant joining technologies for silicon carbide ceramics and composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Cheng, Ting; Shih, Chunghao; Lewis, W. Daniel; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Henager, Charles H.; Ferraris, Monica

    2014-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) for nuclear structural applications, whether in the monolithic ceramic or composite form, will require a robust joining technology capable of withstanding the harsh nuclear environment. This paper presents significant progress made towards identifying and processing irradiation-tolerant joining methods for nuclear-grade SiC. In doing so, a standardized methodology for carrying out joint testing has been established consistent with the small volume samples mandated by neutron irradiation testing. Candidate joining technologies were limited to those that provide low induced radioactivity and included titanium diffusion bonding, Ti–Si–C MAX-phase joining, calcia–alumina glass–ceramic joining, and transient eutectic-phase SiC joining. Samples of these joints were irradiated in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor at 500 or 800 °C, and their microstructure and mechanical properties were compared to pre-irradiation conditions. Within the limitations of statistics, all joining methodologies presented retained their joint mechanical strength to ~3 dpa at 500 °C, thus indicating the first results obtained on irradiation-stable SiC joints. Finally, under the more aggressive irradiation conditions (800 °C, ~5 dpa), some joint materials exhibited significant irradiation-induced microstructural evolution; however, the effect of irradiation on joint strength appeared rather limited.

  19. Polymer-derived silicon carbide fibers with near-stoichiometric composition and low oxygen content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacks, M.D.; Scheiffele, G.W.; Saleem, M.; Staab, G.A.; Morrone, A.A.; Williams, T.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-10-01

    Fine-diameter ({approximately} 10--15 {micro}m), polymer-derived SiC fibers were characterized. The average tensile strength of the fibers was {approximately} 2.8 GPa, although some lots had average strengths exceeding 3.5 GPa. Microstructure observations showed that fibers had fine grain sizes (mostly {approximately} 0.05--0.2 {micro}m), high densities ({approximately} 3.1--3.2 g/cm{sup 3}), and small residual pore sizes ({le} 0.1 {micro}m). Elemental analysis showed that fibers had near-stoichiometric composition. Electron and X-ray diffraction analyses indicated that fibers were primarily beta silicon carbide, with a minor amount of the alpha phase. A small amount of graphitic carbon was detected in some samples using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The residual oxygen content in the fibers was {le} 0.1 wt%. Fibers exhibited good thermomechanical stability, as heat treatment at 1,800 C for 4 h in argon resulted in only an {approximately} 8% decrease in strength.

  20. Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Don D.

    2005-07-17

    The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite.

  1. Review on preparation techniques of particle reinforced metal matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the investigation status of the techniques for preparation of metal matrix composites and the research outcomes achieved recently. The mechanisms, characteristics, application ranges and levels of development of these preparatior techniques are analyzed. The advantages and the disadvantages of each technique are synthetically evaluated. Lastly, the future directions of research and the prospects for the preparation techniques of metal matrix composites are forecasted.

  2. Review on preparation techniques of particle reinforced metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Bin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the investigation status of the techniques for preparation of metal matrix composites and the research outcomes achieved recently. The mechanisms, characteristics, application ranges and levels of development of these preparation techniques are analyzed. The advantages and the disadvantages of each technique are synthetically evaluated. Lastly, the future directions of research and the prospects for the preparation techniques of metal matrix composites are forecasted.

  3. Watermarking Digital Image Using Fuzzy Matrix Compositions and Rough Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharbani Bhattacharya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Watermarking is done in digital images for authentication and to restrict its unauthorized usages. Watermarking is sometimes invisible and can be extracted only by authenticated party. Encrypt a text or information by public –private key from two fuzzy matrix and embed it in image as watermark. In this paper we proposed two fuzzy compositions Product-Mod-Minus, and Compliment-Product-Minus. Embedded watermark using Fuzzy Rough set created from fuzzy matrix compositions.

  4. Glass matrix composite material prepared with waste foundry sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Zhao-shu

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The technology of glass matrix of the composite material manufactured through a sintering process and using waste foundry sand and waste glass as the main raw materials was studied. The effects of technological factors on the performance of this material were studied. The results showed that this composite material is formed with glass as matrix, core particulate as strengthening material, it has the performance of glass and ceramics, and could be used to substitute for stone.

  5. Glass matrix composite material prepared with waste foundry sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhao-shu; XIA Ju-pei; ZHU Xiao-qin; LIU Fan; HE Mao-yun

    2006-01-01

    The technology of glass matrix of the composite material manufactured through a sintering process and using waste foundry sand and waste glass as the main raw materials was studied. The effects of technological factors on the performance of this material were studied. The results showed that this composite material is formed with glass as matrix, core particulate as strengthening material, it has the performance of glass and ceramics, and could be used to substitute for stone.

  6. Reinforcement of tungsten carbide grains by nanoprecipitates in cemented carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingwei; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Haibin; Hou, Chao; Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Xilong

    2016-10-14

    In contrast to the conventional method that obtains a high fracture strength of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbides by reducing WC grain size to near-nano or nanoscale, a new approach has been developed to achieve ultrahigh fracture strength by strengthening the WC grains through precipitate reinforcement. The cemented carbides were prepared by liquid-state sintering the in situ synthesized WC-Co composite powders with a little excess carbon and pre-milled Cr3C2 particles having different size scales. It was found that the nanoscale dispersed particles precipitate in the WC grains, which mainly have a coherent or semi-coherent interface with the matrix. The pinning effect of the nanoparticles on the motion of dislocations within the WC grains was observed. The mechanisms for the precipitation of nanoparticles in the WC grains were discussed, based on which a new method to enhance the resistance against the transgranular fracture of cemented carbides was proposed.

  7. Reinforcement of tungsten carbide grains by nanoprecipitates in cemented carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingwei; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Haibin; Hou, Chao; Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Xilong

    2016-10-01

    In contrast to the conventional method that obtains a high fracture strength of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbides by reducing WC grain size to near-nano or nanoscale, a new approach has been developed to achieve ultrahigh fracture strength by strengthening the WC grains through precipitate reinforcement. The cemented carbides were prepared by liquid-state sintering the in situ synthesized WC-Co composite powders with a little excess carbon and pre-milled Cr3C2 particles having different size scales. It was found that the nanoscale dispersed particles precipitate in the WC grains, which mainly have a coherent or semi-coherent interface with the matrix. The pinning effect of the nanoparticles on the motion of dislocations within the WC grains was observed. The mechanisms for the precipitation of nanoparticles in the WC grains were discussed, based on which a new method to enhance the resistance against the transgranular fracture of cemented carbides was proposed.

  8. The material performance of HSS (high speed steel) tools and its relation with chemical composition and carbide distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, B.; Kusman, M.; Hamdani, R. A.

    2016-04-01

    The study aims to compare the performance of two types of material HSS (High Speed Steel) are widely used. It also will be the chemical composition and distribution of carbide particles therein. Two types of HSS are available in the market: HSS from Germany (Bohler) and HSS from China. This research employed the pure experimental design. It consists of two stages. The first, aims to test/operate lathe machines to determine the lifetime and performance of tools based on specified wear criteria. The second, characterization of microstructure using SEM-EDS was conducted. Firstly, grinding of toolss was done so that the toolss could be used for cutting metal in the turning process. Grinding processes of the two types of toolss were done at the same geometry, that is side rake angle (12°-18°), angle of keenness (60°-68°), and side relief angle (10°-12°). Likewise, machining parameters were set in the same machining conditions. Based on the results of the tests, it is found that to reach 0.2 mm wear point, toolss made of HSS from Germany needed 24 minutes, while toolss made of HSS from China needed 8 minutes. Next, microstructure tests using SEM/EDS were done. The results of the SEM tests indicate that the carbide particles of HSS from Germany were more evenly distributed than the carbide particles of HSS from China. Carbide compounds identified in HSS from China were Cr23C6 and Fe4Mo2C. Oxide impurity of Al2O3 was also found in the material. On the other hand, in HSS from Germany, no impurity and other carbide compounds were identified, except Cr23C6 and Fe4Mo2C, also Fe4W2C, and VC or V4C3.

  9. Wear Characteristics of Hybrid Composites Based on Za27 Alloy Reinforced With Silicon Carbide and Graphite Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mitrović

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the wear characteristics of a hybrid composite based on zinc-aluminium ZA27 alloy, reinforced with silicon-carbide and graphite particles. The tested sample contains 5 vol.% of SiC and 3 vol.% Gr particles. Compocasting technique has been used to prepare the samples. The experiments were performed on a “block-on-disc” tribometer under conditions of dry sliding. The wear volumes of the alloy and the composite were determined by varying the normal loads and sliding speeds. The paper contains the procedure for preparation of sample composites and microstructure of the composite material and the base ZA27 alloy. The wear surface of the composite material was examined using the scanning electronic microscope (SEM and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS. Conclusions were obtained based on the observed impact of the sliding speed, normal load and sliding distance on tribological behaviour of the observed composite.

  10. Estimation of fracture parameters for Al-SiC and Al-Fe2O3 metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, S.; Sridhar, R.; Irudaya Raja, S. Joseph

    2017-03-01

    In this paper silicon carbide and iron oxide is reinforced with aluminum matrix. The prepared composite provide high strength than the commercial composite. It provides high elastic properties and high service temperature. Since this material have great scope in space application it has been chosen for estimation of fracture toughness. Hence grain size of the samples increased this is due to the effect of reinforcement bonding with aluminum matrix. The CMOD test has been carried out for this Purpose. Microscopic examination has shown that with increase in of reinforcement test confirmed that with increase in reinforcement ratio the fracture toughness also increased. In this work specimens have been preferred with and without addition of SiC and Fe2O3 to compare the influence. The results are compared and it has been studied that Fracture Toughness increased significantly by addition of inclusions.

  11. Reaction-Based SiC Materials for Joining Silicon Carbide Composites for Fusion Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewinsohn, Charles A.; Jones, Russell H.; Singh, M.; Serizawa, H.; Katoh, Y.; Kohyama, A.

    2000-09-01

    The fabrication of large or complex silicon carbide-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) components for fusion energy systems requires a method to assemble smaller components that are limited in size by manufacturing constraints. Previous analysis indicates that silicon carbide should be considered as candidate joint materials. Two methods to obtain SiC joints rely on a reaction between silicon and carbon to produce silicon carbide. This report summarizes preliminary mechanical properties of joints formed by these two methods. The methods appear to provide similar mechanical properties. Both the test methods and materials are preliminary in design and require further optimization. In an effort to determine how the mechanical test data is influenced by the test methodology and specimen size, plans for detailed finite element modeling (FEM) are presented.

  12. Silicon carbide whisker reinforced ceramic composites and method for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, George C.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the fabrication of ceramic composites which possess improved mechanical properties especially increased fracture toughness. In the formation of these ceramic composites, the single crystal SiC whiskers are mixed with fine ceramic powders of a ceramic material such as Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, mullite, or B.sub.4 C. The mixtures which contain a homogeneous dispersion of the SiC whiskers are hot pressed at pressures in a range of about 28 to 70 MPa and temperatures in the range of about 1600.degree. to 1950.degree. C. with pressing times varying from about 0.75 to 2.5 hours. The resulting ceramic composites show an increase in fracture toughness of up to about 9 MPa.m.sup.1/2 which represents as much as a two-fold increase over that of the matrix material.

  13. Preparation technique of SiCp reinforced Al matrix composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Bin; CUI Hua; YU Zhi-yong; TAO Kai; YANG Bin; ZHANG Ji-shan

    2006-01-01

    A new preparation technique-"block dispersal and cast" method is introduced, and three kinds of powd.er mixing methods, vertical, horizontal and inclining styles, are compared. The results demonstrate that the inclining style is the best way to mix powders. The Al and nano SiC powders are pressed into blocks, dipped into molten Al, stirred into mold so that SiC/Al matrix composites can be obtained at last. The microstructure of SiC particle reinforced Al matrix composite prepared by "block dispersal and cast" method have been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Phase analysis has also been conducted by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that nano SiC particles can be dispersed uniformly in Al matrix. Thus, it is feasible to prepare SiC particle reinforced Al matrix composites by this method.

  14. Strain Rate Dependent Modeling of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations have been developed to model the polymer matrix, and have been incorporated into a micromechanics approach to analyze polymer matrix composites. The Hashin failure criterion has been implemented within the micromechanics results to predict ply failure strengths. The deformation model has been implemented within LS-DYNA, a commercially available transient dynamic finite element code. The deformation response and ply failure stresses for the representative polymer matrix composite AS4/PEEK have been predicted for a variety of fiber orientations and strain rates. The predicted results compare favorably to experimentally obtained values.

  15. Cavitation instabilities between fibres in a metal matrix composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    Short fibre reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are studied here to investigate the possibility that a cavitation instability can develop in the metal matrix. The high stress levels needed for a cavitation instability may occur in metal–ceramic systems due to the constraint on plastic flow...... of transversely staggered fibres is here modelled by using an axisymmetric cell model analysis. First the critical stress level is determined for a cavitation instability in an infinite solid made of the Al matrix material. By studying composites with different distributions and aspect ratios of the fibres...... induced by bonding to the ceramics that only show elastic deformation. In an MMC the stress state in the metal matrix is highly non-uniform, varying between regions where shear stresses are dominant and regions where hydrostatic tension is strong. An Al–SiC whisker composite with a periodic pattern...

  16. Composite Matrix Systems for Cryogenic Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As an alternative material to aluminum-lithium, cryotanks developed from fiber reinforced composites can offer significant weight savings in applications for fuel...

  17. Aluminum matrix composites reinforced with alumina nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Casati, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the latest efforts to develop aluminum nanocomposites with enhanced damping and mechanical properties and good workability. The nanocomposites exhibited high strength, improved damping behavior and good ductility, making them suitable for use as wires. Since the production of metal matrix nanocomposites by conventional melting processes is considered extremely problematic (because of the poor wettability of the nanoparticles), different powder metallurgy routes were investigated, including high-energy ball milling and unconventional compaction methods. Special attention was paid to the structural characterization at the micro- and nanoscale, as uniform nanoparticle dispersion in metal matrix is of prime importance. The aluminum nanocomposites displayed an ultrafine microstructure reinforced with alumina nanoparticles produced in situ or added ex situ. The physical, mechanical and functional characteristics of the materials produced were evaluated using different mechanical tests and micros...

  18. Effect of fibers on Hybrid Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Manikandan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Frictional co-efficient, impact quality; dielectric quality and compound resistance examination of bamboo/glass strands strengthened epoxy half breed composites were considered. Two distinctive crossover composites, for example, treated and untreated bamboo filaments were manufactured and impact of soluble base treatment of the bamboo strands on these properties were additionally concentrated on. It was watched that, effect quality and frictional co-proficient properties of the half and half composites increment with expansion in glass fiber content. These properties observed to be higher when salt treated bamboo filaments were utilized as a part of the half breed composites. It is watched that, concoction resistance was fundamentally increments for all chemicals with the exception of carbon tetrachloride. The disposal of nebulous hemi-cellulose with salt treatment prompting higher crystallinity of the bamboo filaments with antacid treatment may in charge of these perceptions. The impact of salt treatment on the holding between glass/bamboo composites was additionally concentrated on. Checking electron magnifying lens (SEM were additionally directed on the cross segments of broke surfaces with a specific end goal to rate the execution crossover composites were likewise conferred bear natural products.

  19. Studies on Mechanical Behaviour of Aluminium/Nickel Coated Silicon Carbide Reinforced Functionally Graded Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohandas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is to fabricate functionally graded aluminium (Al-Si6Cu/ nickel coated SiC metal matrix composite using centrifugal casting route. SiC particles (53-80 µm were coated with nickel using electroless coating technique to enhance the wettability with aluminium matrix. Several attempts were made to coat nickel on SiC by varying the process temperature (65 °C, 75 °C, and 85 °C to obtain a uniform coating. Silicon particles coated with nickel were characterised using EDS enabled Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope and it was found that the maximum nickel coating on SiC occurred at a process temperature of 75°C. This nickel coated SiC particles were used as the reinforcement for the manufacture of functionally graded metal matrix composite and a cast specimen of dimensions 150×90×15 mm was obtained. To ensure the graded properties in the fabricated composites, microstructure (at a distance of 1, 7 and 14 mm and hardness (at a distance of 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 mm from outer periphery taken in the radial direction was analysed using Zeiss Axiovert metallurgical microscope and Vickers micro hardness tester respectively. The microstructure reveals presence of more SiC particles at the outer periphery compared to inner periphery and the hardness test shows that the hardness also decreased from outer periphery (90 HV to inner periphery (78 HV.Tensile strength of specimen from outer zone (1-7mm and inner zone (8-14 mm of casting was also tested and found out a value of 153.3 Mpa and 123.3 Mpa for the outer zone and inner zone respectively. An important observation made was that the outer periphery of casting was particle rich and the inner periphery was particle deficient because of centrifugal force and variation in density between aluminium matrix and reinforcement. Functionally graded Al/SiC metal matrix composite could be extensively used in automotive industry especially in the manufacture of liners and brake drums.

  20. Structure of metal matrix composites with an addition of tuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Łach

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents preliminary results of tests of metal matrix composites structure which was modified by an addition of powderedvolcanic tuff. Distribution and shape of ceramic particles as well as the quality of the bonding along the tuff- metal matrix interface werestudied. Depth of tuff element diffusion in the matrix as well as diffusion in tuff particles were checked. Micro-hardness and porosity of the composites were also tested. The tuff from Filipowice near the town of Krzeszowice was used for the tests. Powder metallurgy wasapplied to obtain the composites and the matrix materials were copper and 316L steel powders. The tuff was introduced in 2, 5 and 10 %by weight. To remove water from the channels of aluminosilicates, the tuff was baked at 850 oC for 4 hours and then cooled together withthe oven. The tests revealed good quality of the bonding of the tuff particles and the matrix and their even distribution. The addition of tuff improved the hardness of the composites and reduced their porosity which has great significance because of possible applications of this kind of materials in general and copper composites in particular. This gives grounds for further studies on volcanic tuff use in metal composites

  1. Interfacial studies of chemical-vapor-infiltrated ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, J.J. (United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (USA))

    1990-06-15

    The objective of this program was to investigate the fiber-matrix interfacial chemistry in chemical-vapor-infiltrated SiC matrix composites utilizing NICALON SiC and Nextel 400 mullite fibers and how this interface influences composite properties such as strength, toughness and environmental stability. The SiC matrix was deposited using three different reactants: methyldichlorosilane, methyltrichlorosilane and dimethyldichlorosilane. It was found that by varying the reactant gas flow rates, the ratio of carrier gas to reactant gas, the type of carrier gas (hydrogen or argon), the flushing gas used in the reactor prior to deposition (hydrogen or argon) or the type of silane reactant gas used, the composition of the deposited SiC could be varied from very silicon rich (75 at.%) to carbon rich (60%) to almost pure carbon. Stoichiometric SiC was found to bond very strongly to both NICALON and Nextel fibers, resulting in a weak and brittle composite. A thin carbon interfacial layer deposited either deliberately by the decomposition of methane or inadvertently by the introduction of argon into the reactor prior to silane flow resulted in a weakly bonded fiber-matrix interface and strong and tough composites. However, composites with this type of interface were not oxidatively stable. Preliminary results point ot the use of a carbon-rich SiC (mixture of carbon plus SiC) interfacial zone to achieve a relatively weak, crack-deflecting fiber-matrix bond but also exhibiting oxidative stability. (orig.).

  2. Structure and mechanical properties of a multilayer carbide-hardened niobium composite material fabricated by diffusion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhov, V. P.; Ershov, A. E.; Stroganova, T. S.; Prokhorov, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    The structure, the bending strength, and the fracture mechanism of an artificial niobium-based composite material, which is fabricated by high-pressure diffusion welding of multilayer stacks assembled from niobium foils with a two-sided carbon coating, are studied. The microstructure of the composite material is found to consist of alternating relatively plastic layers of the solid solution of carbon in niobium and hardening niobium carbide layers. The room-temperature proportional limit of the developed composite material is threefold that of the composite material fabricated from coating-free niobium foils using the proposed technology. The proportional limit of the developed composite material and the stress corresponding to the maximum load at 1100°C are 500 and 560 MPa, respectively. The developed material is considered as an alternative to Ni-Al superalloys.

  3. Development and characterization of 430L matrix composites gradient materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Maria Ruiz-Navas

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a new concept that is Functionally Gradient Materials (FGM. The materials developed in this work are constituted by a 430L matrix core and composite materials with this matrix and gradient concentration with NbC reinforcement, from the core to the surface, through different steps. Composite powders of different content in NbC were produced through high energy milling in order to obtain the gradient composition. The morphology and microhardness of these powders were characterised and subsequently were processed through conventional P/M techniques, pressing and sintering. The materials obtained show improved wear behaviour.

  4. Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites with Multifunctional and Hybrid Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are leading candidate materials for a number of applications in aeronautics, space, energy, and nuclear industries. Potential composite applications differ in their requirements for thickness. For example, many space applications such as "nozzle ramps" or "heat exchangers" require very thin (structures whereas turbine blades would require very thick parts (> or = 1 cm). Little is known about the effect of thickness on stress-strain behavior or the elevated temperature tensile properties controlled by oxidation diffusion. In this study, composites consisting of woven Hi-Nicalon (trademark) fibers a carbon interphase and CVI SiC matrix were fabricated with different numbers of plies and thicknesses. The effect of thickness on matrix crack formation, matrix crack growth and diffusion kinetics will be discussed. In another approach, hybrid fiber-lay up concepts have been utilized to "alloy" desirable properties of different fiber types for mechanical properties, thermal stress management, and oxidation resistance. Such an approach has potential for the C(sub I)-SiC and SiC(sub f)-SiC composite systems. CVI SiC matrix composites with different stacking sequences of woven C fiber (T300) layers and woven SiC fiber (Hi-Nicalon (trademark)) layers were fabricated. The results will be compared to standard C fiber reinforced CVI SiC matrix and Hi-Nicalon reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites. In addition, shear properties of these composites at different temperatures will also be presented. Other design and implementation issues will be discussed along with advantages and benefits of using these materials for various components in high temperature applications.

  5. A numerical model for predicting crack path and modes of damage in unidirectional metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakuckas, J. G.; Tan, T. M.; Lau, A. C. W.; Awerbuch, J.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element-based numerical technique has been developed to simulate damage growth in unidirectional composites. This technique incorporates elastic-plastic analysis, micromechanics analysis, failure criteria, and a node splitting and node force relaxation algorithm to create crack surfaces. Any combination of fiber and matrix properties can be used. One of the salient features of this technique is that damage growth can be simulated without pre-specifying a crack path. In addition, multiple damage mechanisms in the forms of matrix cracking, fiber breakage, fiber-matrix debonding and plastic deformation are capable of occurring simultaneously. The prevailing failure mechanism and the damage (crack) growth direction are dictated by the instantaneous near-tip stress and strain fields. Once the failure mechanism and crack direction are determined, the crack is advanced via the node splitting and node force relaxation algorithm. Simulations of the damage growth process in center-slit boron/aluminum and silicon carbide/titanium unidirectional specimens were performed. The simulation results agreed quite well with the experimental observations.

  6. Standard Guide for Testing Polymer Matrix Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide summarizes the application of ASTM standard test methods (and other supporting standards) to continuous-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite materials. The most commonly used or most applicable ASTM standards are included, emphasizing use of standards of Committee D30 on Composite Materials. 1.2 This guide does not cover all possible standards that could apply to polymer matrix composites and restricts discussion to the documented scope. Commonly used but non-standard industry extensions of test method scopes, such as application of static test methods to fatigue testing, are not discussed. A more complete summary of general composite testing standards, including non-ASTM test methods, is included in the Composite Materials Handbook (MIL-HDBK-17). Additional specific recommendations for testing textile (fabric, braided) composites are contained in Guide D6856. 1.3 This guide does not specify a system of measurement; the systems specified within each of the referenced standards shall appl...

  7. Titanium Carbide: Nanotechnology, Properties, Application

    OpenAIRE

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Garbuzova, A. K.; Valuev, Denis Viktorovich

    2015-01-01

    The paper develops scientific and technological bases for fabrication of titanium carbide which is a nanocomponent of composite materials. The authors determine optimum technology specifications and the main titanium carbide properties: fineness of titaniferous raw materials, carbide-forming agent quantity, set temperature of plasma flow, tempering temperature, titanium carbide yield, productivity, specific surface, size and shape of particles. The paper includes equations to describe how the...

  8. Production of copper-niobium carbide nanocomposite powders via mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, M.T. [INETI-DMTP, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: tmarques@ineti.pt; Livramento, V. [INETI-DMTP, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [INETI-DMTP, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Almeida, A. [IST-Dep. Eng. de Materiais, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Vilar, R. [IST-Dep. Eng. de Materiais, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-06-15

    Nanocrystalline niobium carbide was synthesed in situ in a copper matrix during high-energy milling of elemental powders. Three powder batches were produced with nominal compositions of 5, 10 and 20 vol.% NbC. Characterisation by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy indicates that early during the milling process a carbide dispersion is formed within a nanostructured copper matrix. After annealing at 873 K, the carbide structure and particle size are maintained, reflecting the ability of the microstructure to resist to coarsening. The hardness levels attained are more than twice those of nanostructured copper.

  9. Processing and mechanical properties of short fibers/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4p} reinforced BaO.Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.2SiO{sub 2} ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Jingmei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ye Feng, E-mail: yf306@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu Limeng; Zhang Haijiao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2009-09-15

    Dense short silicon carbide (SiC{sub sf}) and carbon fibers (C{sub sf}) reinforced BaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} (BAS) glass-ceramic composites with silicon nitride were fabricated by hot-pressing technique. The phase characterization, microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the composites were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and three-point bending tests. The results showed that short silicon carbide and carbon fibers disperse homogeneously in BAS matrix, and had good chemical compatibility with the glass-ceramic matrix. The addition of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} could successfully eliminate the microcracks in the BAS matrix induced by the thermal mismatch between the fiber and matrix. Both the added short fibers could effectively reinforce the BAS glass-ceramic by the associated toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, fiber bridging and pullout effects.

  10. Spark plasma sintering of mechanically alloyed in situ copper-niobium carbide composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, B.D. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan); Othman, R. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Umemoto, M. [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology (Japan); Zuhailawati, H., E-mail: zuhaila@eng.usm.m [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2010-09-03

    A Cu-NbC composite with high electrical conductivity and high microhardness was synthesized by mechanical alloying and densified using spark plasma sintering (SPS). Mixtures of Cu-NbC powders corresponding to volume fractions of 1, 5, 15 and 25 vol% NbC were milled in a high energy planetary mill under argon atmosphere for 30 h using ethanol as process control agent. The Cu-NbC as-milled powder was sintered using spark plasma sintering temperatures between 900 and 1000 {sup o}C. X-ray diffraction investigation showed that NbC started to form in the copper matrix during ball milling and the reaction between Nb and C was completed after 10 min of SPS sintering. Electrical conductivity and density of the Cu-15 vol% NbC composite increased with increasing sintering temperature. The results showed the superior properties of SPS-prepared Cu-NbC composite: electrical conductivity is almost 4 times higher and microhardness is 3.5 times higher than with normal sintering. A highest density of 98% and electrical conductivity of 45.6% IACS were obtained in the Cu-1 vol% NbC composite. The highest microhardness of 452.9 Hv was achieved in the Cu-25 vol% NbC composite.

  11. Transverse fracture and fiber/matrix interface characteristics of hybrid ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Stephen Berry

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) represent an attractive class of engineering materials for use in high temperature, high wear and corrosive environments. Much effort has been made to ascertain and improve the strength and fracture characteristics of these materials. Approaches that have received a significant amount of attention include enhancing a ceramic material's mechanical properties through the use of continuous fiber reinforcement; fine, randomly dispersed discontinuous fiber (or whisker) reinforcement; and a hybrid combination of both continuous and discontinuous fibers. This dissertation addresses two important aspects of determining and improving the strength and toughness of CMCs and is comprised of three research papers that have been prepared for journal publication. The first paper, "Transverse Fracture Toughness of Unidirectional Continuous Fiber and Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Composites" provides the results of three-point chevron-notched-beam fracture toughness testing and demonstrates a significant improvement in transverse fracture toughness can be obtained through the use of hybrid fiber reinforcements. The second paper, "A Tensile Testing Method for Ceramic Matrix Composites" presents a novel approach to testing small brittle material specimens using conventional testing equipment with minimal specialized fixture components. The third paper, "Fiber/Matrix Interface Properties of Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Composites", presents a method of determining the characteristics of the fiber/matrix interface of a continuous fiber reinforced CMC and a related hybrid CMC reinforced by both continuous fibers and finely dispersed whiskers using a multiple fiber pullout technique.

  12. Dynamic stiffness matrix of partial-interaction composite beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjian Bao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Composite beams have a wide application in building and bridge engineering because of their advantages of mechanical properties, constructability and economic performance. Unlike static characteristics, the methods of studying the dynamic characteristics of partial-interaction composite beams were limited, especially dynamic stiffness matrix method. In this article, the dynamic stiffness matrix of partial-interaction composite beams was derived based on the assumption of the Euler–Bernoulli beam theory, and then it was used to predict the frequencies of the free vibration of the single-span composite beams with various boundary conditions or different axial forces. The corresponding vibration modes and buckling loads were also obtained. From the comparison with the existing results, the numerical results obtained by the proposed method agreed reasonably with those in the literatures. The dynamic stiffness matrix method is an accurate method which can determine natural vibration frequencies and vibration mode shapes in any precision theoretically. As a result, when the higher precision or natural frequencies of higher order are required, the dynamic stiffness matrix method is superior when compared to other approximate and numerical methods. The dynamic stiffness matrix method can also be combined with the finite-element method to calculate the free vibration frequencies and natural mode shapes of composite beams in complex conditions.

  13. Modeling the Mechanical Behavior of Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, William

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are ceramic materials, such as SiC, that have been reinforced by high strength fibers, such as carbon. Designers are interested in using ceramic matrix composites because they have the capability of withstanding significant loads while at relatively high temperatures (in excess of 1,000 C). Ceramic matrix composites retain the ceramic materials ability to withstand high temperatures, but also possess a much greater ductility and toughness. Their high strength and medium toughness is what makes them of so much interest to the aerospace community. This work concentrated on two different tasks. The first task was to do an extensive literature search into the mechanical behavior of ceramic matrix composite materials. This report contains the results of this task. The second task was to use this understanding to help interpret the ceramic matrix composite mechanical test results that had already been obtained by NASA. Since the specific details of these test results are subject to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), they are reported in a separate document (Jordan, 1997).

  14. Acoustic emission as a screening tool for ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojard, Greg; Goberman, Dan; Holowczak, John

    2017-02-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are composite materials with ceramic fibers in a high temperature matrix of ceramic or glass-ceramic. This emerging class of materials is viewed as enabling for efficiency improvements in many energy conversion systems. The key controlling property of ceramic matrix composites is a relatively weak interface between the matrix and the fiber that aids crack deflection and fiber pullout resulting in greatly increased toughness over monolithic ceramics. United Technologies Research Center has been investigating glass-ceramic composite systems as a tool to understand processing effects on material performance related to the performance of the weak interface. Changes in the interface have been shown to affect the mechanical performance observed in flexural testing and subsequent microstructural investigations have confirmed the performance (or lack thereof) of the interface coating. Recently, the addition of acoustic emission testing during flexural testing has aided the understanding of the characteristics of the interface and its performance. The acoustic emission onset stress changes with strength and toughness and this could be a quality tool in screening the material before further development and use. The results of testing and analysis will be shown and additional material from other ceramic matrix composite systems may be included to show trends.

  15. Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Aluminium Based Metal Matrix Composites Reinforced With Sic & Al2O3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaal Haider

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Present study is focused on the fabrication of aluminium 6061 based metal matrix composites, Reinforced with silicon carbide and Al2O3 by stir casting technique. The percentage of one reinforcement particulate is kept constant and varying other and vice versa, namely typeI and typeII composites. The various mechanical tests like tensile strength test, hardness test, wear test and Impact strength performed on the samples obtained by stir casting technique for comparison purpose. The result indicated that the developed method is quite successful and there is an increase in the value of tensile strength, hardness value and Impact strength of newly developed composite having (SiC + Al2O3 particulates in comparison to the Aluminium.

  16. Fabrication and densification enhancement of SiC-particulate-reinforced copper matrix composites prepared via the sinter-forging process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammadmehdi Shabani; Mohammad Hossein Paydar; Mohammad Mohsen Moshksar

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication of copper (Cu) and copper matrix silicon carbide (Cu/SiCp) particulate composites via the sinter-forging process was investigated. Sintering and sinter-forging processes were performed under an inert Ar atmosphere. The influence of sinter-forging time, tempera-ture, and compressive stress on the relative density and hardness of the prepared samples was systematically investigated and subsequently com-pared with that of the samples prepared by the conventional sintering process. The relative density and hardness of the composites were enhanced when they were prepared by the sinter-forging process. The relative density values of all Cu/SiCp composite samples were observed to decrease with the increase in SiC content.

  17. Resolidification of metal matrix composites in microgravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vugt, L. van; Froyen, L. [Leuven Univ., Heverlee (BE). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering (MTM)

    2000-07-01

    During EuroMIR 94 (Altibor) and EuroMIR 95 (Alinsitu) space experiments, the influence of gravity on segregation and clustering of ceramic particles in an aluminium matrix is investigated, in combination with the effect of the thermal gradient and cooling rate. The reinforcements were respectively TiB{sub 2} and SiC. On comparison with the ground processed reference samples it appears that the distribution of the particles in the resolidified material is much more homogeneous, due to sedimentation of the reinforcements. On microscopic scale, differences in particle distribution can be found at a slow and fast cooling. The agglomeration of particles increases with a decreasing of the thermal gradient. In all used systems the particles arranged as a three dimensional skeleton during the liquid state, which interact with the solid-liquid interface during solidification. (orig.)

  18. Radiation-protective polymer-matrix nanostructured composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaloshkin, S.D.; Tcherdyntsev, V.V. [College of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnologies, National University of Science and Technology ' MISiS' , Leninsky Prospect, 4 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gorshenkov, M.V., E-mail: mvg@misis.ru [College of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnologies, National University of Science and Technology ' MISiS' , Leninsky Prospect, 4 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gulbin, V.N. [College of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnologies, National University of Science and Technology ' MISiS' , Leninsky Prospect, 4 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, S.A. [Russian State Technological University ' MATI' , Orshanskaya 3, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-protective composites were fabricated by solid state intermixing and thermal pressing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composites based on UHMWPE contain B{sub 4}S and W nanopowders as fillers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanical and {gamma}-radiation protective properties of the polymer-matrix nanocomposites were determined experimentally. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For composites containing 12% B{sub 4}C and 12% W the mechanical properties were studied prior to and after the irradiation with fast neutrons. - Abstract: UHMWPE-based nanostructured composites containing B{sub 4}C and W nanopowders were fabricated and studied. The mechanical and {gamma}-radiation protective properties of the polymer-matrix nanocomposites were determined experimentally. For selected composites the mechanical properties were studied prior to and after the irradiation.

  19. Ballistic Evaluation of rolled Homogeneous Steel Armor with Tungsten Carbide and Titanium Carbide Facing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-12-01

    LABORATORIES BALLISTIC EVALUATION OF ROLLED HMtOGE14EOUS STEEL ASWKR f VITH TUNGSTEN CARBIDE AND TITANIUM CARBIDE FACING (U) TECHNICAL REPORT NO. WAL...carbide steel and titanium carbide steel composite armor when attacked by cal. .40 H19B WC cores, cal. .0 AP W2 projectiles, ZOIN fragment simulating...determine the effectiveness of tungsten car- bide (WC) and titanium carbide (TIC) facing on steel armor for the defeat of steel and tungsten carbide

  20. Role of work hardening characteristics of matrix alloys in the strengthening of metal matrix composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K T Kashyap; C Ramachandra; C Dutta; B Chatterji

    2000-02-01

    The strengthening of particulate reinforced metal–matrix composites is associated with a high dislocation density in the matrix due to the difference in coefficient of thermal expansion between the reinforcement and the matrix. While this is valid, the role of work hardening characteristics of the matrix alloys in strengthening of these composites is addressed in the present paper. It is found that commercial purity aluminium which has the lowest work hardening rate exhibits the highest strength increment. This effect is due to increased prismatic punching of dislocations. This relationship of decreasing work hardening rate associated with increasing prismatic punching of dislocations in the order 7075, 2014, 7010, 2024, 6061 and commercial purity aluminium leading to increased strength increments is noted.

  1. Fatigue and frictional heating in ceramic matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, T.K.; Sørensen, B.F.; Brøndsted, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental technique for monitoring the damage evolution in ceramic matrix composites during cyclic testing. The damage is related to heat dissipation, which may be measured as radiated heat from the surface of the test specimen. In the present experimental set-up an iso......This paper describes an experimental technique for monitoring the damage evolution in ceramic matrix composites during cyclic testing. The damage is related to heat dissipation, which may be measured as radiated heat from the surface of the test specimen. In the present experimental set...... with a high spatial and temperature resolution and changes in the heat dissipation can be measured almost instantaneously. The technique has been tested on uni-directional ceramic matrix composites. Experimental results are shown and the possibilities and the limitations of the technique are discussed....

  2. The process of nanostructuring of metal (iron) matrix in composite materials for directional control of the mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemtsova, Elena; Yurchuk, Denis; Smirnov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We justified theoretical and experimental bases of synthesis of new class of highly nanostructured composite nanomaterials based on metal matrix with titanium carbide nanowires as dispersed phase. A new combined method for obtaining of metal iron-based composite materials comprising the powder metallurgy processes and the surface design of the dispersed phase is considered. The following stages of material synthesis are investigated: (1) preparation of porous metal matrix; (2) surface structuring of the porous metal matrix by TiC nanowires; (3) pressing and sintering to give solid metal composite nanostructured materials based on iron with TiC nanostructures with size 1-50 nm. This material can be represented as the material type "frame in the frame" that represents iron metal frame reinforcing the frame of different chemical compositions based on TiC. Study of material functional properties showed that the mechanical properties of composite materials based on iron with TiC dispersed phase despite the presence of residual porosity are comparable to the properties of the best grades of steel containing expensive dopants and obtained by molding. This will solve the problem of developing a new generation of nanostructured metal (iron-based) materials with improved mechanical properties for the different areas of technology.

  3. The Process of Nanostructuring of Metal (Iron Matrix in Composite Materials for Directional Control of the Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zemtsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We justified theoretical and experimental bases of synthesis of new class of highly nanostructured composite nanomaterials based on metal matrix with titanium carbide nanowires as dispersed phase. A new combined method for obtaining of metal iron-based composite materials comprising the powder metallurgy processes and the surface design of the dispersed phase is considered. The following stages of material synthesis are investigated: (1 preparation of porous metal matrix; (2 surface structuring of the porous metal matrix by TiC nanowires; (3 pressing and sintering to give solid metal composite nanostructured materials based on iron with TiC nanostructures with size 1–50 nm. This material can be represented as the material type “frame in the frame” that represents iron metal frame reinforcing the frame of different chemical compositions based on TiC. Study of material functional properties showed that the mechanical properties of composite materials based on iron with TiC dispersed phase despite the presence of residual porosity are comparable to the properties of the best grades of steel containing expensive dopants and obtained by molding. This will solve the problem of developing a new generation of nanostructured metal (iron-based materials with improved mechanical properties for the different areas of technology.

  4. Modeling of the flexural behavior of ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wen-Shyong; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of matrix cracking and fiber breakage on the flexural behavior of ceramic composite beams. A model has been proposed to represent the damage evolution of the beam, of which the matrix fracture strain is smaller than that of the fibers. Close form solutions of the critical loads for the initiation of matrix cracking and fiber breakage in the tension side of the beam have been found. The effects of thermal residual stresses and fiber/matrix debonding have been taken into account. The initial deviation of the load-deflection curve from linearity is due to matrix cracking, while fiber breakages are responsible for the drop in the load carrying capacity of the beam. The proportional limit as well as the nonlinear behavior of the beam deflection have been identified. The growth of the damaged zone has also been predicted. A three-point bending case is given as a numerical example.

  5. Anodization Mechanism on SiC Nanoparticle Reinforced Al Matrix Composites Produced by Power Metallurgy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia C. Ferreira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of aluminum-based composites reinforced by silicon carbide nanoparticles (Al/SiCnp produced by powder metallurgy (PM were anodized under voltage control in tartaric-sulfuric acid (TSA. In this work, the influence of the amount of SiCnp on the film growth during anodizing was investigated. The current density versus time response and the morphology of the porous alumina film formed at the composite surface are compared to those concerning a commercial aluminum alloy (AA1050 anodized under the same conditions. The processing method of the aluminum alloys influences the efficiency of the anodizing process, leading to a lower thicknesses for the unreinforced Al-PM alloy regarding the AA1050. The current density versus time response is strongly dependent on the amount of SiCnp. The current peaks and the steady-state current density recorded at each voltage step increases with the SiCnp volume fraction due to the oxidation of the SiCnp. The formation mechanism of the anodic film on Al/SiCnp composites is different from that occurring in AA1050, partly due the heterogeneous distribution of the reinforcement particles in the metallic matrix, but also to the entrapment of SiCnp in the anodic film.

  6. Progressive delamination in polymer matrix composite laminates: A new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Minnetyan, L.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness parameters has been developed and is described for the computational simulation of progressive delamination in polymer matrix composite laminates. The damage stages are quantified based on physics via composite mechanics while the degradation of the laminate behavior is quantified via the finite element method. The approach accounts for all types of composite behavior, laminate configuration, load conditions, and delamination processes starting from damage initiation, to unstable propagation, and to laminate fracture. Results of laminate fracture in composite beams, panels, plates, and shells are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of this new approach.

  7. Mechanisms in turning of metal matrix composites: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Sekhar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composites have evoked a keen interest from the automobile and aerospace sectors owing to their attractive mechanical properties and applications. Over the past two decades, researchers have unearthed many secrets pertaining to these advanced materials. This paper briefly reviews the research revelations of the mechanisms that make these materials so superior. Turning of metal matrix composites is focused in particular. Mechanisms such as particle fracture, particle pullout, debonding, dislocation phenomena, thermal softening, wear modes, surface generation, cutting forces, chip formation, strains and stresses are addressed. Discussions on related phenomena such as effects of tool coatings, adhesion, friction, microstructures and strain hardening are also presented.

  8. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure and interface of SiC particle reinforced 2124 Al matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Durbadal, E-mail: durbadal73@yahoo.co.in [MEF Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Viswanathan, Srinath [Dept of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The microstructure and interface between metal matrix and ceramic reinforcement of a composite play an important role in improving its properties. In the present investigation, the interface and intermetallic compound present in the samples were characterized to understand structural stability at an elevated temperature. Aluminum based 2124 alloy with 10 wt.% silicon carbide (SiC) particle reinforced composite was prepared through vortex method and the solid ingot was deformed by hot rolling for better particle distribution. Heat treatment of the composite was carried out at 575 °C with varying holding time from 1 to 48 h followed by water quenching. In this study, the microstructure and interface of the SiC particle reinforced Al based composites have been studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) associated with wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to identify the precipitate and intermetallic phases that are formed during heat treatment. The SiC particles are uniformly distributed in the aluminum matrix. The microstructure analyses of Al–SiC composite after heat treatment reveal that a wide range of dispersed phases are formed at grain boundary and surrounding the SiC particles. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy analyses confirm that finely dispersed phases are CuAl{sub 2} and CuMgAl{sub 2} intermetallic and large spherical phases are Fe{sub 2}SiAl{sub 8} or Al{sub 15}(Fe,Mn){sub 3}Si. It is also observed that a continuous layer enriched with Cu and Mg of thickness 50–80 nm is formed at the interface in between Al and SiC particles. EDS analysis also confirms that Cu and Mg are segregated at the interface of the composite while no carbide is identified at the interface. - Highlights: • The composite was successfully heat treated at 575°C for 1

  9. Composite Matrix Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Timothy R.

    1997-01-01

    This project concerns the design, fabrication and testing of carbon regenerators for use in Stirling power convertors. Radial fiber design with nonmetallic components offers a number of potential advantages over conventional steel regenerators: reduced conduction and pressure drop losses, and the capability for higher temperature, higher frequency operation. Diverse composite fabrication methods are explored and lessons learned are summarized. A pulsed single-blow test rig has been developed that has been used for generating thermal effectiveness data for different flow velocities. Carbon regenerators have been fabricated by carbon vapor infiltration of electroflocked preforms. Performance data in a small Stirling engine are obtained. Prototype regenerators designed for the BP-1000 power convertor were fabricated and delivered to NASA-Lewis.

  10. Effects of heat treatment on mechanical properties and microstructure of tungsten fi ber reinforced grey cast iron matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng jianHong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, grey cast iron matrix composites reinforced by different volume fractions of tungsten fibers (Vr = 0.95 %, 1.90 %, 2.85 %, 3.80 % were investigated in as-cast and under the heat treatment temperatures of 1,000℃ and 1,100℃. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the composites were analyzed and tested by means of SEM, micro-hardness tester and three-point bend testing. The results show that with increasing of the volume fraction of tungsten fibers, the composites reinforced by the tungsten fiber have higher fl exural strength and modulus than that of cast iron without reinforcement, and the fl exural strength increases with the increasing of heat treatment temperatures. Due to diffusion reaction between matrix and reinforcing phases, the process of heat treatment, the number of graphite fl akes in the matrix seemingly becomes lower; and some hard carbide particles are formed around the residual tungsten fi bers. Not only does the hardness of both matrix and reinforcement change tremendously, but also the region of reinforcement is also extended from the original 0.11 mm to 0.19 mm in radius.

  11. Numerical Study of the Effect of the Penetration of a Crack in the Matrix of a Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nehari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this numerical investigation, the effect of the penetration of a crack in a matrix reinforced by aluminum silicon carbide particles in a composite is studied in order to determine the thermo-mechanical behavior under the effect of different temperature gradients during cooling. To realize this, the thermal residual stresses are calculated by considering a wide range of cracks of different penetrations. The results of this investigation compared to a case without geometric discontinuity, have revealed no meaningful effect of the distribution of the stresses along a main direction perpendicular to the direction of the crack. On the other hand, regarding the distribution of the stresses along the plane of the crack and in vicinity of the particle, results show that the penetration of the crack in the matrix causes an asymmetry.

  12. Experimental Investigation on Active Cooling for Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Li-na; HE Guo-qiang; LIU Pei-jin

    2009-01-01

    Compared with conventional materials, the active cooling ceramic matrix composite used in ramjet or scramjet makes their structures lighter in mass and better in performance. In this paper, an active and a passive cooling refractory composite specimens are designed and tested with an experimental facility composed of multilayer smale scale cooling penel which consists of a water cooling system and a ceramic matrix composite specimen, and a gas generator used for providing lower and higher transfer rate gases to simulate the temperatures in combustion chamber of ramjst. The active cooling specimen can continuously suffer high surface temperature of 2 000K for 30s and that of 3 000 K for 9.3 s, respectively. The experiment results show that the active cooling composite structure is available for high-temperature condition in ramjet.

  13. High Strain Rate Behavior of Polymer Matrix Composites Analyzed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2001-01-01

    Procedures for modeling the high-speed impact of composite materials are needed for designing reliable composite engine cases that are lighter than the metal cases in current use. The types of polymer matrix composites that are likely to be used in such an application have a deformation response that is nonlinear and that varies with strain rate. To characterize and validate material models that could be used in the design of impactresistant engine cases, researchers must obtain material data over a wide variety of strain rates. An experimental program has been carried out through a university grant with the Ohio State University to obtain deformation data for a representative polymer matrix composite for strain rates ranging from quasi-static to high rates of several hundred per second. This information has been used to characterize and validate a constitutive model that was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  14. Rate Dependent Deformation and Strength Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    A research program is being undertaken to develop rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composite materials. In previous work in this program, strain-rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations used to analyze polymers have been implemented into a mechanics of materials based composite micromechanics method. In the current work, modifications to the micromechanics model have been implemented to improve the calculation of the effective inelastic strain. Additionally, modifications to the polymer constitutive model are discussed in which pressure dependence is incorporated into the equations in order to improve the calculation of constituent and composite shear stresses. The Hashin failure criterion is implemented into the analysis method to allow for the calculation of ply level failure stresses. The deformation response and failure stresses for two representative uniaxial polymer matrix composites, IM7/977-2 and AS4-PEEK, are predicted for varying strain rates and fiber orientations. The predicted results compare favorably to experimentally obtained values.

  15. CONSTITUTIVE RELATION OF DISCONTINUOUS REINFORCED METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季葆华; 王自强

    2001-01-01

    A micromechanical model is developed to simulate the mechanical behaviors of discontinuous reinforced composites. The analysis for a representative unit cell is based on the assumption of a periodic array of aligned reinforcements.The minimum energy principle is used to determine the unknown coefficients of the displacement field of the unit cell. The constitutive behavior of composites is studied to obtain the relationship between the main variables of matrix and reinforcements.It is concluded that the flow strength of composites is strongly influenced by volume fraction, aspect ratio of reinforcement, and the strain hardening exponent of matrix.An analytical constitutive relation of composites is obtained. The predicted results are in agreement with the existing experimental and numerical results.

  16. Standard specification for nuclear-grade aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This specification applies to pellets composed of mixtures of aluminum oxide and boron carbide that may be ultimately used in a reactor core, for example, in neutron absorber rods. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only.

  17. Carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites tailored for multifunctionality by filler incorporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seungjin

    This dissertation provides multifunctional carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites for vibration damping, thermal conduction and thermoelectricity. Specifically, (i) it has strengthened and stiffened carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites by the incorporation of halloysite nanotubes, carbon nanotubes and silicon carbide whiskers, (ii) it has improved mechanical energy dissipation using carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites with filler incorporation, (iii) it has increased the through-thickness thermal conductivity of carbon fiber polymer-matrix composite by curing pressure increase and filler incorporation, and (iv) it has enhanced the thermoelectric behavior of carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites. Low-cost natural halloysite nanotubes (0.1 microm diameter) were effective for strengthening and stiffening continuous fiber polymer-matrix composites, as shown for crossply carbon fiber (5 microm diameter, ˜59 vol.%) epoxy-matrix composites under flexure, giving 17% increase in strength, 11% increase in modulus and 21% decrease in ductility. They were less effective than expensive multiwalled carbon nanotubes (0.02 microm diameter), which gave 25% increase in strength, 11% increase in modulus and 14% decrease in ductility. However, they were more effective than expensive silicon carbide whiskers (1 microm diameter), which gave 15% increase in strength, 9% increase in modulus and 20% decrease in ductility. Each filler, at ˜2 vol.%, was incorporated in the composite at every interlaminar interface by fiber prepreg surface modification. The flexural strength increase due to halloysite nanotubes incorporation related to the interlaminar shear strength increase. The measured values of the composite modulus agreed roughly with the calculated values based on the Rule of Mixtures. Continuous carbon fiber composites with enhanced vibration damping under flexure are provided by incorporation of fillers between the laminae

  18. Cryogenic optical measurements of 12-segment-bonded carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composite mirror with support mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nakagawa, Takao; Onaka, Takashi; Enya, Keigo; Makiuti, Sin'itirou; Takaki, Junji; Haruna, Masaki; Kume, Masami; Ozaki, Tsuyoshi

    2008-03-01

    A 720 mm diameter 12-segment-bonded carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite mirror has been fabricated and tested at cryogenic temperatures. Interferometric measurements show significant cryogenic deformation of the C/SiC composite mirror, which is well reproduced by a model analysis with measured properties of the bonded segments. It is concluded that the deformation is due mostly to variation in coefficients of thermal expansion among segments. In parallel, a 4-degree-of-freedom ball-bearing support mechanism has been developed for cryogenic applications. The C/SiC composite mirror was mounted on an aluminum base plate with the support mechanism and tested again. Cryogenic deformation of the mirror attributed to thermal contraction of the aluminum base plate via the support mechanism is highly reduced by the support, confirming that the newly developed support mechanism is promising for its future application to large-aperture cooled space telescopes.

  19. Boron carbide: Consistency of components, lattice parameters, fine structure and chemical composition makes the complex structure reasonable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut

    2016-10-01

    The complex, highly distorted structure of boron carbide is composed of B12 and B11C icosahedra and CBC, CBB and B□B linear elements, whose concentration depends on the chemical composition each. These concentrations are shown to be consistent with lattice parameters, fine structure data and chemical composition. The respective impacts on lattice parameters are estimated and discussed. Considering the contributions of the different structural components to the energy of the overall structure makes the structure and its variation within the homogeneity range reasonable; in particular that of B4.3C representing the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range. Replacing in B4.3C virtually the B□B components by CBC yields the hypothetical moderately distorted B4.0C (structure formula (B11C)CBC). The reduction of lattice parameters related is compatible with recently reported uncommonly prepared single crystals, whose compositions deviate from B4.3C.

  20. Effect of Cutting Parameters on Thrust Force and Surface Roughness in Drilling of Al-2219/B4C/Gr Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, V. M.; Basavarajappa, G. S. Shiva Shankar S.; Suresh, R.

    2016-09-01

    In aluminium matrix composites, reinforcement of hard ceramic particle present inside the matrix which causes tool wear, high cutting forces and poor surface finish during machining. This paper focuses on effect of cutting parameters on thrust force, surface roughness and burr height during drilling of MMCs. In the present work, discuss the influence of spindle speed and feed rate on drilling the pure base alloy (Al-2219), mono composite (Al- 2219+8% B4C) and hybrid composite (Al-2219+8%B4C+3%Gr). The composites were fabricated using liquid metallurgy route. The drilling experiments were conducted by CNC machine with TiN coated HSS tool, M42 (Cobalt grade) and carbide tools at various spindle speeds and feed rates. The thrust force, surface roughness and burr height of the drilled hole were investigated in mono composite and hybrid composite containing graphite particles, the experimental results show that the feed rate has more influence on thrust force and surface roughness. Lesser thrust force and discontinuous chips were produced during machining of hybrid composites when compared with mono and base alloy during drilling process. It is due to solid lubricant property of graphite which reduces the lesser thrust force, burr height and lower surface roughness. When machining with Carbide tool at low feed and high speeds good surface finish was obtained compared to other two types of cutting tool materials.

  1. Metallic-fibre-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevost, F.; Schnedecker, G.; Boncoeur, M.

    1994-12-31

    A refractory metal wire cloth is embedded in an oxide ceramic matrix, using a plasma spraying technology, in order to elaborate composite plates. When mechanically tested, the composite fails with a pseudo-ductile fracture mode whereas the ceramic alone is originally brittle. It exhibits a higher fracture strength, and remains in the form of a single piece even when straining is important. No further heat treatment is needed after the original processing to reach these characteristics. (authors). 2 figs., 2 refs.

  2. Fiber/matrix adhesion in graphite/PEKK composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, R. A.; Hinkley, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments with poly ether ketone ketone (PEKK) resin and AS-4, IM-7, and G30-500 fibers showed excellent correlation between resin/fiber contact angle and composite transverse flexural strength as measures of resin/fiber interfacial strength. Both tests indicate the strongest interface for G30-500/PEKK followed by IM-7/PEKK and AS-4/PEKK. Also discussed are fiber effects on interlaminar fracture and on the in situ crystallization of the matrix during composite fabrication.

  3. Improved Fabrication of Ceramic Matrix Composite/Foam Core Integrated Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    2009-01-01

    The use of hybridized carbon/silicon carbide (C/SiC) fabric to reinforce ceramic matrix composite face sheets and the integration of such face sheets with a foam core creates a sandwich structure capable of withstanding high-heatflux environments (150 W/cm2) in which the core provides a temperature drop of 1,000 C between the surface and the back face without cracking or delamination of the structure. The composite face sheet exhibits a bilinear response, which results from the SiC matrix not being cracked on fabrication. In addition, the structure exhibits damage tolerance under impact with projectiles, showing no penetration to the back face sheet. These attributes make the composite ideal for leading edge structures and control surfaces in aerospace vehicles, as well as for acreage thermal protection systems and in high-temperature, lightweight stiffened structures. By tailoring the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a carbon fiber containing ceramic matrix composite (CMC) face sheet to match that of a ceramic foam core, the face sheet and the core can be integrally fabricated without any delamination. Carbon and SiC are woven together in the reinforcing fabric. Integral densification of the CMC and the foam core is accomplished with chemical vapor deposition, eliminating the need for bond-line adhesive. This means there is no need to separately fabricate the core and the face sheet, or to bond the two elements together, risking edge delamination during use. Fibers of two or more types are woven together on a loom. The carbon and ceramic fibers are pulled into the same pick location during the weaving process. Tow spacing may be varied to accommodate the increased volume of the combined fiber tows while maintaining a target fiber volume fraction in the composite. Foam pore size, strut thickness, and ratio of face sheet to core thickness can be used to tailor thermal and mechanical properties. The anticipated CTE for the hybridized composite is managed by

  4. 3-D woven, mullite matrix, composite filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, J.E.; Painter, C.J.; Radford, K.C. LeCostaouec, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    Westinghouse, with Techniweave as a major subcontractor, is conducting a three-phase program aimed at providing advanced candle filters for a 1996 pilot scale demonstration in one of the two hot gas filter systems at Southern Company Service`s Wilsonville PSD Facility. The Base Program (Phases I and II) objective is to develop and demonstrate the suitability of the Westinghouse/Techniweave next generation composite candle filter for use in Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and/or Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. The Optional Task (Phase M, Task 5) objective is to fabricate, inspect and ship to Wilsonville Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful commercializaion of advanced coal-based power-generation systems such as Pressurized Fluidized-bed Combustion (PFBC), including second-generation PFBC, and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC). Current generation monolithic ceramic filters are subject to catastrophic failure because they have very low resistance to crack propagation. To overcome this problem, a damage-tolerant ceramic filter element is needed.

  5. Thermosetting Polymer-Matrix Composites for Strucutral Repair Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertzen, William Kirby [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporate of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  6. Obtainment, machining and wear of metal matrix composites processed by powder metallurgy; Obtencao, usinagem e desgaste de materiais compositos de matriz metalica processados via metalurgia do po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Edilson Rosa Barbosa de. E-mail: erbjesus@usp.br

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this investigation was the obtainment of metal matrix composites (MMC) by the route of powder metallurgy, and the valuation of these materials with relation to their machining and wear characteristics. Firstly, were obtained pure commercial aluminium matrix composites materials, with 5, 10 and 15% volumetric fraction of silicon carbide particles. Was also obtained a material without reinforcement particles in order to verify by comparison, the influence of addition of reinforcement particles. The obtained materials were characterized physics (hydrostatic density), mechanics (hardness and tensile tests) and microstructurally (optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy). The results showed a homogeneous distribution of reinforcement particles in the composite, and improvement in the mechanical properties, mainly tensile strength (UTS) in comparison to the unreinforced material. After, tests were made to verify the materials behavior during machining and to check the performance of several tool materials (cemented carbide, ceramics and polycrystalline diamond). In these tests, values of the cutting force were measured by instrumented tool-holders. Phenomena such as tool wear, built-up edge formation and mechanism of chip formation were also observed and evaluated. The results from the cemented carbide tool tests, were utilised for the machinability index determination of each material. These results were applied to the Taylor equation and the equation constants for each material and test conditions were determined. The results showed that the inclusion of silicon carbide particles made extremely difficult the machining of the composites, and only with diamond tool, satisfactory results were obtained. At last, wear tests were performed to verify the influence of the reinforcement particles in the characteristics of wear resistance of the materials. The results obtained were utilized in the wear coefficient determination for each material. The

  7. Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcement from aluminum metal matrix composites scrap by salt flux addition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K R Ravi; R M Pillai; B C Pai; M Chakraborty

    2007-08-01

    Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcements from pure Al–SiCp composite scrap by salt flux addition has been theoretically predicted using interface free energies. Experiments performed confirm the theoretical prediction. Complete separation of matrix aluminum and reinforcement from metal matrix composites (MMCs) scrap has been achieved by addition of 2.05 wt% of equimolar mixture of NaCl–KCl salt flux with a metal and particle yield of 84 and 50%, respectively. By adding 5 wt% of NaF to equimolar mixture of NaCl–KCl, metal and particle yield improved to 91 and 73%, respectively. Reusability of both the matrix aluminum and the SiC separated from Al–SiCp scraps has been analysed using XRD, SEM and DTA techniques. The matrix alloy separated from Al–SiCp scraps can be used possibly as a low Si content Al–Si alloy. However, the interfacial reaction that occurred during the fabrication of the composites had degraded the SiC particles.

  8. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 1; Matrix Constitutive Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this first paper of a two part report, background information is presented, along with the constitutive equations which will be used to model the rate dependent nonlinear deformation response of the polymer matrix. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive models which were originally developed to model the viscoplastic deformation of metals have been adapted to model the nonlinear viscoelastic deformation of polymers. The modified equations were correlated by analyzing the tensile/ compressive response of both 977-2 toughened epoxy matrix and PEEK thermoplastic matrix over a variety of strain rates. For the cases examined, the modified constitutive equations appear to do an adequate job of modeling the polymer deformation response. A second follow-up paper will describe the implementation of the polymer deformation model into a composite micromechanical model, to allow for the modeling of the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composites.

  9. Titanium Carbide: Nanotechnology, Properties, Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Garbuzova, A. K.; Valuev, D. V.

    2015-09-01

    The paper develops scientific and technological bases for fabrication of titanium carbide which is a nanocomponent of composite materials. The authors determine optimum technology specifications and the main titanium carbide properties: fineness of titaniferous raw materials, carbide-forming agent quantity, set temperature of plasma flow, tempering temperature, titanium carbide yield, productivity, specific surface, size and shape of particles. The paper includes equations to describe how the major specifications of the fabrication technique influence the content of titanium carbide and free carbon in the end product.

  10. Analysis of Damage in a Ceramic Matrix Composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Talreja, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms of damage and the associated mechanical response are stud ied for a unidirectionally fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite subjected to uniaxial tensile loading parallel to fibers. A multi-stage development of damage is identified, and for each stage the governing mechanisms...

  11. Mechanosensitivity and compositional dynamics of cell–matrix adhesions

    OpenAIRE

    Schiller, Herbert B.; Fässler, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the compositional dynamics of cell–matrix adhesions and discusses the most prevalent functional domains in adhesome proteins. It also reviews the current literature and concepts about mechanosensing mechanisms that operate at the adhesion site.

  12. Key Issues for Aerospace Applications of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Levine, S. R.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) offer significant advantages for future aerospace applications including turbine engine and liquid rocket engine components, thermal protection systems, and "hot structures". Key characteristics which establish ceramic matrix composites as attractive and often enabling choices are strength retention at high temperatures and reduced weight relative to currently used metallics. However, due to the immaturity of this class of materials which is further compounded by the lack of experience with CMC's in the aerospace industry, there are significant challenges involved in the development and implementation of ceramic matrix composites into aerospace systems. Some of the more critical challenges are attachment and load transfer methodologies; manufacturing techniques, particularly scale up to large and thick section components; operational environment resistance; damage tolerance; durability; repair techniques; reproducibility; database availability; and the lack of validated design and analysis tools. The presentation will examine the technical issues confronting the application of ceramic matrix composites to aerospace systems and identify the key material systems having potential for substantial payoff relative to the primary requirements of light weight and reduced cost for future systems. Current programs and future research opportunities will be described in the presentation which will focus on materials and processes issues.

  13. Metal matrix composites: History, status, factors and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyriac, Ajith James

    The history, status, and future of metal matrix composites are presented by evaluating the progression of available literature through time. The trends that existed and issues that still prevail are discussed and a prediction of the future for MMCs is presented. The factors that govern the performance of metal matrix composites are also discussed. In many developed countries and in several developing countries there exists continued interest in MMCs. Researchers tried numerous combinations of matrices and reinforcements since work strictly on MMCs began in the 1950s. This led to developments for aerospace and defense applications, but resultant commercial applications were limited. The introduction of ceramic whiskers as reinforcement and the development of 'in-situ' eutectics in the 1960s aided high temperature applications in aircraft engines. In the late 1970s the automobile industries started to take MMCs seriously. In the last 20 years, MMCs evolved from laboratories to a class of materials with numerous applications and commercial markets. After the collapse of the Berlin Wall, prevailing order in the world changed drastically. This effect was evident in the progression of metal matrix composites. The internet connected the world like never before and tremendous information was available for researchers around the world. Globalization and the internet resulted in the transformation of the world to a more level playing field, and this effect is evident in the nature and source of research on metal matrix composites happening around the world.

  14. Nickel and nickel-phosphorous matrix composite electrocoatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicolas SPYRELLIS; Evangelia A. PAVLATOU; Styliani SPANOU; Alexandros ZOIKIS-KARATHANASIS

    2009-01-01

    Nickel and nickel-phosphorous matrix composite coatings reinforced by TiO2, SiC and WC particles were produced under direct and pulse current conditions from an additive-free Watts' type bath. The influence of the variable electrolysis parameters (type of current, frequency of current pulses and current density) and the reinforcing particles properties (type, size and concentration in the bath) on the surface morphology and the structure of the deposits was examined. It is demonstrated that the embedding of ceramic particles modifies in various ways the nickel electrocrystallisation process. On the other hand, Ni-P amorphous matrix is not affected by the occlusion of the particles. Overall, the imposition of pulse current conditions leads to composite coatings with increased embedded percentage and more homogenous distribution of particles in the matrix than coatings produced under direct current regime.

  15. Review on Fabrication Methods of in situ Metal Matrix Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with a series of novel processing techniques based on the in situ production of metal matrix composites (MMCs). In situ techniques involve a chemical reaction resulting in the formation of a very fine and thermodynamically stable reinforcing ceramic phase within a metal matrix. As a result, this provides thermodynamic compatibility at the matrix-reinforcement interface. The reinforcement surfaces are also likely to be free of contamination and, therefore, a stronger matrix-dispersion bond can be achieved. Some of these technologies including DIMOXTM, XD, PRIMEXTM, reactive gas infiltration, high-temperature self-propagating synthesis (SHS), and liquid-solid, or solid-gas-liquid reactions as well as plasma in situ MMCs are expressed in this paper.

  16. Determination of gamma ray attenuation coefficients of Al–4% Cu/B4C metal matrix composites at 662, 1173 and 1332 keV

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I Akkurt; K Günoğlu; A Çalik; M S Karakas

    2014-08-01

    Gamma ray attenuation coefficients of metal matrix composites have been investigated. For this purpose, the linear attenuation coefficients of composites containing boron carbide (B4C) at different rates have been measured using a gamma spectrometer that contains a NaI(Tl) detector and MCA at 662, 1173 and 1332 keV, which are obtained from 137Cs and 60Co sources. The measured results were compared with the calculation obtained using computer code of XCOM for 1 keV–1 GeV gamma energies.

  17. Wear Studies on Metal Matrix Composites: a Taguchi Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Basavarajappa; G. Chandramohan

    2005-01-01

    An attempt has been made to study the influence of wear parameters like applied load, sliding speed, sliding distance and percentage of reinforcement on the dry sliding wear of the metal matrix composites. A plan of experiments,based on techniques of Taguchi, was pedormed to acquire data in controlled way. An orthogonal array and the analysis of variance were employed to investigate the influence of process parameters on the wear of composites. The objective is to establish a correlation between dry sliding wear of composites and wear parameters. These correlations were obtained by multiple regressions. Finally, confirmation tests were conducted to verify the experimental results foreseen from the mentioned correlations.

  18. Preparation of Cu-based Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yufeng SUN; Yuren WANG; Bingchen WEI; Weihuo LI

    2006-01-01

    Cu47Ti34Zr11Ni8 bulk metallic glass (BMG) matrix composites containing in situ formed TiC particles and δ-TiCu dendrite phase were developed by copper mold cast. The thermal stability and microstructure of the composites are investigated. Room temperature compression tests reveal that the composite samples exhibit higher fracture strength and distinct plastic strain of 0.2%~0.5%, comparing with that of the corresponding Cu47Ti34Zr11 Ni8 monolithic BMG.

  19. Investigations into Deformation Characteristics during Open-Die Forging of SiCp Reinforced Aluminium Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deep Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The deformation characteristics during open-die forging of silicon carbide particulate reinforced aluminium metal matrix composites (SiCp AMC at cold conditions are investigated. The material was fabricated by liquid stir casting method in which preheated SiC particles were mixed with molten LM6 aluminium casting alloy and casted in the silicon mould. Finally, preforms obtained were machined in required dimensions. Two separate cases of deformation, that is, open-die forging of solid disc and solid rectangular preforms, were considered. Both upper bound theoretical analysis and experimental investigations were performed followed by finite element simulation using DEFORM, considering composite interfacial friction law, barreling of preform vertical sides, and inertia effects, that is, effect of die velocity on various deformation characteristics like effective stress, strain, strain rate, forging load, energy dissipations, and height reduction. Results have been presented graphically and critically investigated to evaluate the concurrence among theoretical, experimental, and finite element based computational findings.

  20. Update on CMH-17 Volume 5 Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulonis, Rachael; Kiser, J. Douglas; David, Kaia E.; Davies, Curtis R.; Ashforth, Cindy

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of issues must be addressed during the process of certifying CMC (ceramic matrix composite) components for use in commercial aircraft. The Composite Materials Handbook-17, Volume 5, Revision A on ceramic matrix composites has just been revised to help support FAA certification of CMCs for elevated temperature applications. The handbook supports the development and use of CMCs through publishing and maintaining proven, reliable engineering information and standards that have been thoroughly reviewed. Volume 5 contains detailed sections describing CMC materialsprocessing design, analysisguidelines, testing procedures, and data analysis and acceptance. A review of the content of this latest revision will be presented along with a description of how CMH-17, Volume 5 could be used by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and others in the future.

  1. Investigation of Effect of Graphite Particles on Drillability of Metal Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanakumar ARUNACHALAM

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present article investigates the effect of graphite particles in the drilling of hybrid aluminium matrix composites (AMCs using TiN coated carbide drills. Materials used for the present investigation are Al6063-aluminum alloy reinforced with alumina of size 20 microns and graphite of an average size 75 microns, which are produced through stir casting method. Experiments are conducted based on Taguchi’s method L27 orthogonal array on a vertical machining centre. A model is developed to correlate the drilling parameters with burr height and surface roughness using regression analysis. The results indicate that the developed model is suitable for prediction of burr height and surface roughness in drilling of hybrid AMCs.The influence of different parameters on Surface roughness and burr height of Al6063/Al2O3p/Grp composites has been analyzed through ANOVA table and contour graphs.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.9724

  2. Processing of continuous fiber composites using thermoplastic polyimide matrix resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kranjc, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Composites have been produced which contain a solvent resistant polyimide matrix with favorable physical properties. The polyimide matrix resin has been designated as P12. The prepegs used to produce the composite contain a low molecular weight resin which is the polyamic acid precursor to P12. Polymerization and imidization of the precursor resin occurs in-situ during processing. Similar commercial systems are often processed in an autoclave and pressure is used at high temperatures to obtain consolidation between prepreg laminates. Pressure is generally applied after polymerization and imidization are complete and at temperatures above the melting point of the polymer. In this research a significant decrease in composite void content was obtained by applying pressure earlier in the cure. Obtaining composites with low void content with these types of systems can be difficult. This is due in part to the generation of low molecular weight reaction by products, water and methanol. High void content results in a decrease in the physical properties of the composite structure. This is especially true for fracture properties. An empirical equation was used to describe the rate of resin removal from the composite to the bleeder cloth during processing. This equation is based on Springer-Loos resin flow model. The conditions in which this model does not apply were also determined. Determining resin removal rates is helpful in producing composites with consistent fiber/resin ratios. In addition, conditions which favor void growth can be prevented.

  3. Computational simulation of reactive melt infiltration in a porous preform pertaining to the fabrication of ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Gopalaswamy

    Ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) are an important class of composite materials that are being considered for a broad range of aerospace components that need to withstand elevated temperatures. CMCs offer significant potential for raising the thrust-to-weight ratio of gas turbine engines by tailoring directions of high specific reliability using design-based fiber architecture. Reactive melt infiltration is a process used to manufacture silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) composites. This method of making SiC/SiC composites is advantageous since it is fast and net shapes can be obtained. The present stage of research on reactive infiltration is primarily experimental, wherein complete infiltration is rarely achieved and unreacted silicon still remains in the composite. Towards this end, this thesis deals with the modeling aspect of reactive melt infiltration and estimates permeability as a function of time for a preform geometry of hexagonally packed array of cylindrical (carbon-coated silicon carbide) fibers. The modeling of the complete process has been structured into two stages, namely, micro and macro modeling. At the micro level, spherical and cylindrical geometries are considered for the reinforcements coated with carbon and solutions to the problem of coupled heat and mass transfer with chemical reaction and volume expansion are derived and solved numerically. Finite element analysis is used to qualitatively study the change in porosity in a representative volume element (RVE) with moving boundaries. The porosity of an RVE is calculated as a function of time from the growth of the SiC layer on the carbon-coated reinforcement. The permeability of the preform is then estimated as a function of the porosity in the macro model. The thickness of the reaction product (SiC) layer forming the matrix in the composite is determined in terms of physical parameters (diffusivity of the reactants Si and carbon, temperature) and non

  4. Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation Tool for Ceramic Matrix and Polymer Matrix Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; Walton, Owen J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic-based, discrete-event progressive damage simulations of ceramic-matrix composite and polymer matrix composite material structures have been enabled through the development of a unique multiscale modeling tool. This effort involves coupling three independently developed software programs: (1) the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), (2) the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program (CARES/ Life), and (3) the Abaqus finite element analysis (FEA) program. MAC/GMC contributes multiscale modeling capabilities and micromechanics relations to determine stresses and deformations at the microscale of the composite material repeating unit cell (RUC). CARES/Life contributes statistical multiaxial failure criteria that can be applied to the individual brittle-material constituents of the RUC. Abaqus is used at the global scale to model the overall composite structure. An Abaqus user-defined material (UMAT) interface, referred to here as "FEAMAC/CARES," was developed that enables MAC/GMC and CARES/Life to operate seamlessly with the Abaqus FEA code. For each FEAMAC/CARES simulation trial, the stochastic nature of brittle material strength results in random, discrete damage events, which incrementally progress and lead to ultimate structural failure. This report describes the FEAMAC/CARES methodology and discusses examples that illustrate the performance of the tool. A comprehensive example problem, simulating the progressive damage of laminated ceramic matrix composites under various off-axis loading conditions and including a double notched tensile specimen geometry, is described in a separate report.

  5. Mechanically milled aluminium matrix composites reinforced with halloysite nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present work describes fabrication of aluminium AlMg1SiCu matrix composite materials reinforced with halloysite nanotubes by powder metallurgy techniques and hot extrusion.Design/methodology/approach: Mechanical milling, compacting and hot extrusion successively are considering as a method for manufacturing metal composite powders with a controlled fine microstructure and enhanced mechanical properties. It is possible by the repeated welding and fracturing of powders particles mixture in a highly energetic ball mill.Findings: The milling process has a huge influence on the properties of powder materials, changing the spherical morphology of as-received powder during milling process to flattened one due to particle deformation followed by welding and fracturing particles of deformed and hardened enough which allows to receive equiaxial particles morphology again. The investigation shows that so called brittle mineral particles yields to plastic deformation as good as ductile aluminium alloy particles. That indicates that the halloysite powder can play a role of the accelerator during mechanical milling. High energy ball milling as a method of mechanical milling improves the distribution of the halloysite reinforcing particles throughout the aluminium matrix, simultaneously reducing the size of particles. The apparent density changes versus milling time can be used to control the composite powders production by mechanical milling and the presence of halloysite reinforcements particles accelerates the mechanical milling process.Research limitations/implications: Contributes to knowledge about technology, structure and properties of aluminium alloy matrix composite material reinforced with mineral nanoparticles.Practical implications: Conducted research shows that applied technology allows obtaining very good microstructural characteristics.Originality/value: It has been confirmed that halloysite nanotubes can be applied as an effective

  6. Magnetically Induced Continuous CO2 Hydrogenation Using Composite Iron Carbide Nanoparticles of Exceptionally High Heating Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordet, Alexis; Lacroix, Lise-Marie; Fazzini, Pier-Francesco; Carrey, Julian; Soulantica, Katerina; Chaudret, Bruno

    2016-12-19

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles to convert electromagnetic energy into heat is known to be a key strategy for numerous biomedical applications but is also an approach of growing interest in the field of catalysis. The heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles is limited by the poor magnetic properties of most of them. Here we show that the new generation of iron carbide nanoparticles of controlled size and with over 80 % crystalline Fe2.2 C leads to exceptional heating properties, which are much better than the heating properties of currently available nanoparticles. Associated to catalytic metals (Ni, Ru), iron carbide nanoparticles submitted to magnetic excitation very efficiently catalyze CO2 hydrogenation in a dedicated continuous-flow reactor. Hence, we demonstrate that the concept of magnetically induced heterogeneous catalysis can be successfully applied to methanation of CO2 and represents an approach of strategic interest in the context of intermittent energy storage and CO2 recovery.

  7. Fibre-matrix interfaces in titanium matrix composites made with sigma monofilament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shatwell, R.A. [DERA, Farnborough (United Kingdom). Struct. Mater. Centre

    1999-01-31

    A review of the development of coatings for sigma monofilament is given. The coating must protect the underlying silicon carbide before, during and after consolidation. This requires the coating outer surface to be under negative or zero residual stress at room temperature. The coating should also be well bonded to the SiC. It is shown that stoichiometric TiB{sub 2} is under a tensile stress of around 3 GPa under these conditions and hence is unsuitable. The boron-rich outer surface of SM1240 is essentially unstressed and the carbon surface of SM1140+ is under {approx}300 MPa axial compressive stress. Failure of monofilament in the composite initiates at the W-SiC interface, rather than at the metal-fibre interface characteristic of SCS-6. In order to ensure this behaviour, the coating in the composite must be thick enough to ensure that the stress concentration field arising from irregularities at the TiC-C boundary do not initiate fracture of the SiC. This requires a minimum thickness of around 1 {mu}m of carbon. (orig.) 10 refs.

  8. Carbon effect in the sintered highspeed steels matrix composites – HSSMC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Matula

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Goal: The goal of this monograph is development of the tool materials being the outcome of the concept of merging the surface engineering as the domain of knowledge with technology which is the powder metallurgy. The result are the fabricated materials with the gradient, high-speed steels matrix composites (HSSMC surface layers on steel substrate, combining the mutually exclusive mechanical properties like the high surface hardness and ductility of a tool.Project/methodology/approach: Modern powder forming technologies were used for fabrication of the developed tool materials, e.g., powder injection moulding, pressureless forming, and classic compacting. Sintering was carried out in the vacuum or protective atmosphere conditions, which makes direct material hardening possible from the sintering temperature. Testing of mechanical properties encompassed hardness testing, bending strength testing, and determining the abrasion wear resistance. Detailed structural examinations were carried out to determine the effect of temperature and atmosphere during sintering on type and size of the carbide- and carbonitride precipitations. Moreover, retained austenite portion was determined after hardening and tempering.Achievements: The original achievement is development of the method of the polymer-powder slurry moulding for fabrication of coatings which, because of the binding agent degradation and sintering, form the homogeneous or gradient HSSMC surface layers on the steel substrate - completed or fabricated in the same technological process. Tool materials fabricated with this method are characteristic of high ductility of the steel core and high hardness of the surface layer.Limitations of research/applications: The assumption of the powder injection moulding technique is forming of the small elements with complex shapes and, therefore, this technology is not designed for fabrication of tools with the big overall dimensions. In case of the pressureless

  9. Crack Free Tungsten Carbide Reinforced Ni(Cr) Layers obtained by Laser Cladding

    OpenAIRE

    Amado Paz, José Manuel; Tobar Vidal, María José; YAÑEZ CASAL, ARMANDO JOSE; Amigó Borrás, Vicente; Candel Bou, Juan Jose

    2011-01-01

    The development of hardfacing coatings has become technologically significant in many industries A common approach is the production of metal matrix composites (MMC) layers. In this work NiCr-WC MMC hardfacing layers are deposited on C25 steel by means of laser cladding. Spheroidal fused tungsten carbides is used as reinforcement phase. Three different NiCr alloys with different Cr content were tested. Optimum conditions to obtain dense, uniform carbide distribution and hardness close to nomi...

  10. Internal friction in a new kind of metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Juan, J. [Dpt. Fisica Materia Condensada, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Apdo. 644-48080, Bilbao (Spain) and Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Apdo. 644-48080, Bilbao (Spain)]. E-mail: jose.sanjuan@ehu.es; No, M.L. [Dpt. Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Apdo. 644-48080, Bilbao (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Apdo. 644-48080, Bilbao (Spain)

    2006-12-20

    We have developed a new kind of metal matrix composites, based on powders of Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys (SMAs) surrounded by an indium matrix, specifically designed to exhibit high mechanical damping. The damping properties have been characterized by mechanical spectroscopy as a function of temperature between 150 and 400 K, frequency between 3 x 10{sup -3} and 3 Hz, and strain amplitude between 5 x 10{sup -6} and 10{sup -4}. The material exhibits, in some range of temperature, internal friction as high as 0.54. The extremely high damping is discussed in the light of the microstructure of the material, which has been characterized in parallel.

  11. Effect of Size, Content and Shape of Reinforcements on the Behavior of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) Under Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknia, A.; Pramanik, A.; Dixit, A. R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites (MMCs) 6061 aluminum, reinforced with silicon carbide particles, under unidirectional tensile loading by finite element analysis. The effects of particle's shape, size and content on the tensile properties of the composites were studied and compared with each other. In addition, stress and strain distributions and possible particle fracture or debonding were investigated. It was found that, among different shapes, a certain shape of reinforcement particle provided better tensile properties for MMCs and, within each shape category, composites with smaller particle size and higher particle content (20%) also showed better properties. It was also found that when the reinforcement content was 10%, the effects of shape and size of the particles were negligible. Not only interfacial length between the reinforcement and matrix materials, but also state of matrix material, due to the presence of the reinforcement particles, affected the stiffness of the MMCs. In almost all of the cases, except for MMCs with triangular particles, when the stress increased, with the increase in the applied positive displacement, the stress distributions remained unchanged.

  12. Matrix cracking of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites in shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Varun P.; Zok, Frank W.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanics of cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) under general loadings remains incomplete. The present paper addresses one outstanding aspect of this problem: the development of matrix cracks in unidirectional plies under shear loading. To this end, we develop a model based on potential energy differences upstream and downstream of a fully bridged steady-state matrix crack. Through a combination of analytical solutions and finite element simulations of the constituent stresses before and after cracking, we identify the dominant stress components that drive crack growth. We show that, when the axial slip lengths are much larger than the fiber diameter and when interfacial slip precedes cracking, the shear stresses in the constituents are largely unaffected by the presence of the crack; the changes that do occur are confined to a 'core' region within a distance of about one fiber diameter from the crack plane. Instead, the driving force for crack growth derives mainly from the axial stresses-tensile in the fibers and compressive in the matrix-that arise upon cracking. These stresses are well-approximated by solutions based on shear-lag analysis. Combining these solutions with the governing equation for crack growth yields an analytical estimate of the critical shear stress for matrix cracking. An analogous approach is used in deriving the critical stresses needed for matrix cracking under arbitrary in-plane loadings. The applicability of these results to cross-ply CMC laminates is briefly discussed.

  13. Prediction of high temperature metal matrix composite ply properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, J. J.; Chamis, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    The application of the finite element method (superelement technique) in conjunction with basic concepts from mechanics of materials theory is demonstrated to predict the thermomechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HTMMC). The simulated behavior is used as a basis to establish characteristic properties of a unidirectional composite idealized an as equivalent homogeneous material. The ply properties predicted include: thermal properties (thermal conductivities and thermal expansion coefficients) and mechanical properties (moduli and Poisson's ratio). These properties are compared with those predicted by a simplified, analytical composite micromechanics model. The predictive capabilities of the finite element method and the simplified model are illustrated through the simulation of the thermomechanical behavior of a P100-graphite/copper unidirectional composite at room temperature and near matrix melting temperature. The advantage of the finite element analysis approach is its ability to more precisely represent the composite local geometry and hence capture the subtle effects that are dependent on this. The closed form micromechanics model does a good job at representing the average behavior of the constituents to predict composite behavior.

  14. Organic matrix composite protective coatings for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursch, Harry W.; George, Pete

    1995-01-01

    Successful use of composites in low earth orbit (LEO) depends on their ability to survive long-term exposure to atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet radiation, charged particle radiation, thermal cycling, and micrometeoroid and space debris. The AO environment is especially severe for unprotected organic matrix composites surfaces in LEO. Ram facing unprotected graphite/epoxy flown on the 69-month Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission lost up to one ply of thickness (5 mils) resulting in decreased mechanical properties. The expected AO fluence of the 30 year Space Station Alpha mission is approximately 20 times that seen on LDEF. This exposure would result in significant material loss of unprotected ram facing organic matrix composites. Several protective coatings for composites were flown on LDEF including anodized aluminum, vacuum deposited coatings, a variety of thermal control coatings, metalized Teflon, and leafing aluminum. Results from the testing and analysis of the coated and uncoated composite specimens flown on LDEF's leading and trailing edges provide the baseline for determining the effectiveness of protectively coated composites in LEO. In addition to LDEF results, results from shuttle flight experiments and ground based testing will be discussed.

  15. A honeycomb composite of mollusca shell matrix and calcium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hua-jian; Li, Jin; Zhou, Chan; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yao-guang

    2016-03-01

    A honeycomb composite is useful to carry cells for application in bone, cartilage, skin, and soft tissue regenerative therapies. To fabricate a composite, and expand the application of mollusca shells as well as improve preparing methods of calcium alginate in tissue engineering research, Anodonta woodiana shell powder was mixed with sodium alginate at varying mass ratios to obtain a gel mixture. The mixture was frozen and treated with dilute hydrochloric acid to generate a shell matrix/calcium alginate composite. Calcium carbonate served as the control. The composite was transplanted subcutaneously into rats. At 7, 14, 42, and 70 days after transplantation, frozen sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, followed by DAPI, β-actin, and collagen type-I immunofluorescence staining, and observed using laser confocal microscopy. The composite featured a honeycomb structure. The control and composite samples displayed significantly different mechanical properties. The water absorption rate of the composite and control group were respectively 205-496% and 417-586%. The composite (mass ratio of 5:5) showed good biological safety over a 70-day period; the subcutaneous structure of the samples was maintained and the degradation rate was lower than that of the control samples. Freezing the gel mixture afforded control over chemical reaction rates. Given these results, the composite is a promising honeycomb scaffold for tissue engineering.

  16. Fiber-Matrix Interface Studies on Electron Beam Cured Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drazel, L.T.; Janke, C.J.; Yarborough, K.D.

    1999-05-23

    The recently completed Department of Energy (DOE) and industry sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) entitled, ''Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites,'' determined that the interlaminar shear strength properties of the best electron beam cured IM7/epoxy composites were 19-28% lower than autoclave cured IM7/epoxy composites (i.e. IM7/977-2 and IM7/977-3). Low interlaminar shear strength is widely acknowledged as the key barrier to the successful acceptance and implementation of electron beam cured composites in the aircraft/aerospace industry. The objective of this work was to improve the interlaminar shear strength properties of electron beam cured composites by formulating and evaluating several different fiber sizings or coating materials. The researchers have recently achieved some promising results by having discovered that the application of epoxy-based, electron beam compatible sizings or coatings onto surface-treated, unsized IM7 carbon fibers improved the composite interlaminar shear strength properties by as much as 55% versus composites fabricated from surface-treated, unsized IM7 fibers. In addition, by applying these same epoxy-based sizings or coatings onto surface-treated, unsized IM7 fibers it was possible to achieve an 11% increase in the composite interlaminar shear strength compared to composites made from surface-treated, GP-sized IM7 fibers. Work is continuing in this area of research to further improve these properties.

  17. Slow-release of methanogenic inhibitors derived from encapsulated calcium carbide using paraffin wax and/or rosin: matrix optimization and diffusion characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiantao, Zhao; Youcai, Zhao; Lijie, Zhang; Haoquan, Chen; Feng, Shi; Haiyan, Zhou

    2011-11-01

    Acetylene has been found to significantly inhibit biological activity of methanogens and thus might be applicable for reducing the generation and emission of methane from municipal solid waste landfills. However, acetylene is gaseous and so it is considered physically infeasible to directly apply this gas to waste in landfill conditions. In the present study, a novel acetylene release mechanism was tested, using a matrix of acetylene entrapped in high hydrophobic paraffin wax and/or rosin and calcium carbide capsules with a ratio of 1.0 g g(-1) matrix and a diameter of 10 mm to facilitate the gradual release of acetylene. A diffusion mechanism model (Q = &b.gamma; × t (0.5)) for the matrix was derived based on the T. Higuchi equation, and the effective diffusion coefficients (D(e)) were acquired by linear fitting. Additionally, it was found that D(e) remained constant when the rosin content was up to more than 20% g g(-1) matrix.

  18. The erosion performance of particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings produced by co-deposition cold gas dynamic spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This work reports on the erosion performance of three particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings, co-deposited with an aluminium binder via cold-gas dynamic spraying. The deposition of ceramic particles is difficult to achieve with typical cold spray techniques due to the absence of particle deformation. This issue has been overcome in the present study by simultaneously spraying the reinforcing particles with a ductile metallic binder which has led to an increased level of ceramic/cermet particles deposited on the substrate with thick (>400 μm) coatings produced. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the erosion performance of the co-deposited coatings within a slurry environment. The study also incorporated standard metallographic characterisation techniques to evaluate the distribution of reinforcing particles within the aluminium matrix. All coatings exhibited poorer erosion performance than the uncoated material, both in terms of volume loss and mass loss. The Al2O3 reinforced coating sustained the greatest amount of damage following exposure to the slurry and recorded the greatest volume loss (approx. 2.8 mm3) out of all of the examined coatings. Despite the poor erosion performance, the WC-CoCr reinforced coating demonstrated a considerable hardness increase over the as-received AA5083 (approx. 400%) and also exhibited the smallest free space length between adjacent particles. The findings of this study reveal that the removal of the AA5083 matrix by the impinging silicon carbide particles acts as the primary wear mechanism leading to the degradation of the coating. Analysis of the wear scar has demonstrated that the damage to the soft matrix alloy takes the form of ploughing and scoring which subsequently exposes carbide/oxide particles to the impinging slurry.

  19. Microstructural and Mechanical Study of Inconel 625 – Tungsten Carbide Composite Coatings Obtained by Powder Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huebner J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the investigation of fine (~0.54 μm tungsten carbide particles effect on structural and mechanical properties of laser cladded Inconel 625-WC composite. Three powder mixtures with different Inconel 625 – WC weight ratio (10, 20 and 30 weight % of WC were prepared. Coatings were made using following process parameters: laser beam diameter ø ≈ 500 μm, powder feeder rotation speed – 7 m/min, scanning velocity – 10 m/min, laser power – 220 W changed to 320 W, distance between tracks – 1 mm changed to 0.8 mm. Microstructure and hardness were investigated. Coatings produced by laser cladding were crack and pore free, chemically and structurally homogenous. High cooling rate during cladding process resulted in fine microstructure of material. Hardness improved with addition of WC from 396.3 ±10.5 HV for pure Inconel 625, to 469.9 ±24.9 HV for 30 weight % of WC. Tungsten carbide dissolved in Inconel 625 which allowed formation of intergranular eutectic that contains TCP phases.

  20. Influence of Hardness, Matrix and Carbides in Combination with Nitridation on Abrasive Wear Resistance of X210Cr12 Tool Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Orečný

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Materials used in abrasive wear conditions are usually selected according to their microstructure and hardness, however, other factors such as grain size, matrix saturation, carbides size and morphology are rarely considered. Therefore, the present study deals with the influence of different heat and chemical-heat treatments including their combination on abrasive wear resistance of X210Cr12 tool steel. The effects of material hardness, carbide morphology and microstructure on wear resistance after quenching and nitriding were also investigated. One sample series was quenched after austenitization at 960 °C for 20 min and tempered at 180 °C for 2 h. The second sample series was quenched from 1060 °C austenitization for 20 min and afterwards twice tempered at 530 °C for 1 h. From both the quenched and tempered states, one half of the samples was gas nitrided in NH3 atmosphere for 3 h and then diffusion annealed in N2 atmosphere for 4 h. Abrasion wear tests were performed by sliding the samples on Al2O3 paper. The samples weight loss was considered the main criterion for the wear resistance evaluation. The microstructures, nitrided layers and worn surfaces were observed using SEM microscopy. The highest abrasion wear resistance was obtained for the nitrided samples that were previously quenched from 1060 °C and tempered at 530 °C.

  1. Composite orthogonal projection methods for large matrix eigenproblems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾仲孝

    1999-01-01

    For classical orthogonal projection methods for large matrix eigenproblems, it may be much more difficult for a Ritz vector to converge than for its corresponding Ritz value when the matrix in question is non-Hermitian. To this end, a class of new refined orthogonal projection methods has been proposed. It is proved that in some sense each refined method is a composite of two classical orthogonal projections, in which each refined approximate eigenvector is obtained by realizing a new one of some Hermitian semipositive definite matrix onto the same subspace. A priori error bounds on the refined approximate eigenvector are established in terms of the sine of acute angle of the normalized eigenvector and the subspace involved. It is shown that the sufficient conditions for convergence of the refined vector and that of the Ritz value are the same, so that the refined methods may be much more efficient than the classical ones.

  2. Load redistribution considerations in the fracture of ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David J.; Wetherhold, Robert C.

    1992-01-01

    Using a macroscopic viewpoint, composite laminae are homogeneous orthotropic solids whose directional strengths are random variables. Incorporation of these random variable strengths into failure models, either interactive or noninteractive, allows for the evaluation of the lamina reliability under a given stress state. Using a noninteractive criterion for demonstration purposes, laminate reliabilities are calculated assuming previously established load sharing rules for the redistribution of load as the failure of laminae occur. The matrix cracking predicted by ACK theory is modeled to allow a loss of stiffness in the fiber direction. The subsequent failure in the fiber direction is controlled by a modified bundle theory. Results are compared with previous models which did not permit separate consideration of matrix cracking, as well as to results obtained from experimental data. The effects of variations from the ideal physical geometry which is normally used to depict the matrix cracking are also studied.

  3. Damping behaviors of metal matrix composites with interface layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A novel technique of designing the interface layer in metal matrix composites of high damping capacity was developed via different CVD coatings on carbon fibers in Cf/Al composites. It was shown that the interface layer improved the tensile strength, elastic modulus and damping capacity of the Cf/Al composites. A carbon layer showed the highest improvement and a silicon layer the lowest, while a mixed carbon and silicon layer exhibited an intermediate effect. Moreover, the thickness of interface layer also influences the damping capacity. A thicker carbon layer produced a better damping capacity because the dependence of damping capacity on strain amplitude was increased. It is suggested that a micro-sliding action occurring in the interface layer is the main mechanism responsible for the high damping capacity of the composites.

  4. EFFECT OF RICE HUSKS AS FILLER IN POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hardinnawirda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, rice husk-filled polyester composites were produced with rice husks (RH as the filler and unsaturated polyester resin (UPR as the matrix. Several percentages of filler loadings were used (10, 15, 20 and 25 wt % in order to gain insights into the effect of filler content on the mechanical properties and water intake of the composites. The tensile strength of the RH-filled UPR composites was found to decrease as the filler loading increased; however, as it reached 25 wt %, the strength showed a moderate increase. The Young’s modulus showed a remarkable increase for 15 wt % of RH but decreased as the RH percentage increased further to 25 wt %. A water absorption test was conducted and the results showed that the composites absorb more water as the percentage weight of RH increased, which is attributed to the ability of the RH filler to absorb water.

  5. Inorganic Polymer Matrix Composite Strength Related to Interface Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Bridge

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Resin transfer molding of an inorganic polymer binder was successfully demonstrated in the preparation of ceramic fiber reinforced engine exhaust valves. Unfortunately, in the preliminary processing trials, the resulting composite valves were too brittle for in-engine evaluation. To address this limited toughness, the effectiveness of a modified fiber-matrix interface is investigated through the use of carbon as a model material fiber coating. After sequential heat treatments composites molded from uncoated and carbon coated fibers are compared using room temperature 3-point bend testing. Carbon coated Nextel fiber reinforced geopolymer composites demonstrated a 50% improvement in strength, versus that of the uncoated fiber reinforced composites, after the 250 °C postcure.

  6. Progressive fracture of polymer matrix composite structures: A new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Minnetyan, L.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness parameters has been developed and is described for the computational simulation of progressive fracture of polymer matrix composite structures. The damage stages are quantified based on physics via composite mechanics while the degradation of the structural behavior is quantified via the finite element method. The approach account for all types of composite behavior, structures, load conditions, and fracture processes starting from damage initiation, to unstable propagation and to global structural collapse. Results of structural fracture in composite beams, panels, plates, and shells are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of this new approach. Parameters and guidelines are identified which can be used as criteria for structural fracture, inspection intervals, and retirement for cause. Generalization to structures made of monolithic metallic materials are outlined and lessons learned in undertaking the development of new approaches, in general, are summarized.

  7. A study on microstructure of aluminium matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardeep Sharma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the effect of graphite particles addition on the microstructure of Al6082 metal matrix composites manufactured by conventional stir casting process. The reinforcement content was varied from 0% to 12% in a step of 3%. The microstructures of the manufactured composites were analyzed by scanning electron micrographic test. Elemental mapping of the Al6082 + 12% Gr reinforced composite was carried out to see the different elements present with their amount. Different elements present in the manufactured composites were verified by X-ray diffraction technique to justify the elemental map analysis. The result of this microstructural investigation revealed that a non-uniform distribution of graphite particles takes place at all weight percentages of graphite reinforcement.

  8. The preparation and performance of calcium carbide-derived carbon/polyaniline composite electrode material for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xianyou; Li, Na; An, Hongfang; Chen, Huajie; Guo, Jia

    Calcium carbide (CaC 2)-derived carbon (CCDC)/polyaniline (PANI) composite materials are prepared by in situ chemical oxidation polymerization of an aniline solution containing well-dispersed CCDC. The structure and morphology of CCDC/PANI composite are characterized by Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N 2 sorption isotherms. It has been found that PANI was uniformly deposited on the surface and the inner pores of CCDC. The supercapacitive behaviors of the CCDC/PANI composite materials are investigated with cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge and cycle life measurements. The results show that the CCDC/PANI composite electrodes have higher specific capacitances than the as grown CCDC electrodes and higher stability than the conducting polymers. The capacitance of CCDC/PANI composite electrode is as high as 713.4 F g -1 measured by cyclic voltammetry at 1 mV s -1. Besides, the capacitance retention of coin supercapacitor remained 80.1% after 1000 cycles.

  9. The preparation and performance of calcium carbide-derived carbon/polyaniline composite electrode material for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liping; Wang, Xianyou; Li, Na; An, Hongfang; Chen, Huajie [School of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Minister of Education, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Wang, Ying; Guo, Jia [School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Hubei 430073 (China)

    2010-03-15

    Calcium carbide (CaC{sub 2})-derived carbon (CCDC)/polyaniline (PANI) composite materials are prepared by in situ chemical oxidation polymerization of an aniline solution containing well-dispersed CCDC. The structure and morphology of CCDC/PANI composite are characterized by Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N{sub 2} sorption isotherms. It has been found that PANI was uniformly deposited on the surface and the inner pores of CCDC. The supercapacitive behaviors of the CCDC/PANI composite materials are investigated with cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge and cycle life measurements. The results show that the CCDC/PANI composite electrodes have higher specific capacitances than the as grown CCDC electrodes and higher stability than the conducting polymers. The capacitance of CCDC/PANI composite electrode is as high as 713.4 F g{sup -1} measured by cyclic voltammetry at 1 mV s{sup -1}. Besides, the capacitance retention of coin supercapacitor remained 80.1% after 1000 cycles. (author)

  10. Preparation of SiC Fiber Reinforced Nickel Matrix Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Zhang; Nanlin Shi; Jun Gong; Chao Sunt

    2012-01-01

    A method of preparing continuous(Al+Al2O3)-coated SiC fiber reinforced nickel matrix composite was presented,in which the diffusion between SiC fiber and nickel matrix could be prevented.Magnetron sputtering is used to deposit Ni coating on the surface of the(Al+Al2O3)-coated SiC fiber in preparation of the precursor wires.It is shown that the deposited Ni coating combines well with the(Al+Al2O3) coating and has little negative effect on the tensile strength of(Al+Al2O3)-coated SiC fiber.Solid-state diffusion bonding process is employed to prepare the(Al+Al2O3)-coated SiC fiber reinforced nickel matrix with 37% fibers in volume.The solid-state diffusion bonding process is optimized and the optimum parameters are temperature of 870,pressure of 50 MPa and holding time of 2 h.Under this condition,the precursor wires can diffuse well,composite of full density can be formed and the(Al+Al2O3) coating is effective to restrict the reaction between SiC fiber and nickel matrix.

  11. Thermal-vacuum response of polymer matrix composites in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Matthews, R.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a thermal-vacuum outgassing model and test protocol for predicting outgassing times and dimensional changes for polymer matrix composites. Experimental results derived from 'control' samples are used to provide the basis for analytical predictions to compare with the outgassing response of Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) flight samples. Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) data are also presented. In addition, an example is given illustrating the dimensional change of a 'zero' CTE laminate due to moisture outgassing.

  12. Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites - CRADA Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, C. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howell, Dave [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The major cost driver in manufacturing polymer matrix composite (PMC) parts and structures, and one of the elements having the greatest effect on their quality and performance, is the standard thermal cure process. Thermal curing of PMCs requires long cure times and high energy consumption, creates residual thermal stresses in the part, produces volatile toxic by-products, and requires expensive tooling that is tolerant of the high cure temperatures.

  13. Nondestructive Damage Evaluation in Ceramic Matrix Composites for Aerospace Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dassios, Konstantinos G.; Evangelos Z. Kordatos; Dimitrios G. Aggelis; Matikas, Theodore E.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) and acoustic emission (AE) are the two major nondestructive methodologies for evaluating damage in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for aerospace applications. The two techniques are applied herein to assess and monitor damage formation and evolution in a SiC-fiber reinforced CMC loaded under cyclic and fatigue loading. The paper explains how IRT and AE can be used for the assessment of the material's performance under fatigue. IRT and AE parameters are specificall...

  14. Cure shrinkage effects in epoxy and polycyanate matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spellman, G.P.

    1995-12-22

    A relatively new advanced composite matrix, polycyanate ester, was evaluated for cure shrinkage. The chemical cure shrinkage of composites is difficult to model but a number of clever experimental techniques are available to the investigator. In this work the method of curing a prepreg layup on top of a previously cured laminate of identical ply composition is utilized. The polymeric matrices used in advanced composites have been primarily epoxies and therefore a common system of this type, Fiberite 3501-6, was used as a base case material. Three polycyanate matrix systems were selected for the study. These are: Fiberite 954-2A, YLA RS-3, and Bryte Technology BTCy-1. The first three of these systems were unidirectional prepreg with carbon fiber reinforcement. The Bryte Technology material was reinforced with E-glass fabric. The technique used to evaluate cure shrinkage results in distortion of the flatness of an otherwise symmetric laminate. The first laminate is cured in a conventional fashion. An identical layup is cured on this first laminate. During the second cure all constituents are exposed to the same thermal cycles. However, only the new portion of the laminate will experience volumetric changes associate with matrix cure. The additional strain of cure shrinkage results in an unsymmetric distribution of residual stresses and an associated warpage of the laminate. The baseline material, Fiberite 3501-6, exhibited cure shrinkage that was in accordance with expectations. Cure strains were {minus}4.5E-04. The YLA RS-3 material had cure strains somewhat lower at {minus}3.2E-04. The Fiberite 954-2A cure strain was {minus}1.5E-04 that is 70% lower than the baseline material. The glass fabric material with the Bryte BTCy-1 matrix did not result in meaningful results because the processing methods were not fully compatible with the material.

  15. Neutron diffraction study of metal-matrix composite with fullerite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, P. A.; Blanter, M. S.; Brazhkin, VV; Somenkov, VA; Filonenko, V. P.

    2016-09-01

    Interaction of amorphous fullerite C60 with austenitic Fe-33.2 wt. % Ni alloy at pressures 0-8 GPa and temperatures 600-1100 °C was studied by neutron diffraction. The amorphous fullerite was obtained by ball milling and mixed with the powder of the crystalline alloy. The interaction at sintering led to the dissolution of carbon in fcc Fe-Ni solid solution and the formation of carbide (Fe, Ni)3C, but the Fe-Ni-C alloy did not undergo phase transformations and preserved the original fcc structure. As a result, the alloy hardened, we could also witness a clear barometric effect: at the pressure of 2 GPa the amount of the dissolved carbon and the microhardness turned out to be significantly higher than those at 8 GPa. During sintering amorphous fullerite is undergoing phase transitions and its microhardness is higher than the microhardness of the metal component. At high temperatures of interaction graphite appears. The presence of Fe-Ni alloy in the composite reduces the temperature of graphite formation in comparison with transformations in the pure amorphous fullerene.

  16. An Experimental Study Of Aluminum Alloy Matrix Composite Reinforced SiC Made By Hot Pressing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suśniak M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates the possibility of using powder metallurgy processing for producing a metal matrix composite. Materials were prepared from AlSi5Cu2 chips with reinforcement of 10, 15, 20 wt. % silicon carbide. Aluminum alloy chips were milled with SiC powder in a high-energy ball mill by 40 hours. Mechanical alloying process lead to obtain an uniform distribution of hard SiC particles in the metallic matrix and refine the grain size. The consolidation of composite powders was performed by vacuum hot pressing at 450°C, under pressure of 600 MPa by 10 min. The results shows that the addition of SiC particles has a substantial influence on the microstructure and mechanical properties of composite powder as well as consolidated material. Hot pressing is an effective consolidation method which leads to obtain dense AlSi5Cu2/SiC composite with homogeneous structure and advanced mechanical properties.

  17. Effect of reinforcement of AL-6063 with SiC on mechanical behavior and microstructure of metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Aravindan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A phrase heard often in recent years, advanced composite materials like Al/SiC metal matrix composite is gradually becoming very important materials in auto and aerospace industries due to their superior properties. The present study examines the mechanical properties of aluminum (Al-6063/SiC Silicon carbide reinforced particles metal-matrix composites (MMCs by varying weight fractions of SiC. For this (Al-6063/SiC reinforced particles MMCs are fabricated by stir casting method at air atmosphere . The MMCs are prepared in the form of bars with varying the reinforced particles by weight fraction ranging from 2 %, 4 %, 6 %, 8 % and 10 %. The reinforced particles size of SiC is varying between 25-40 microns. The microstructure study shows that the distribution of particles becomes better with increasing weight fraction of SiC. The Mechanical properties like, Ultimate tensile strength (MPa, % Elongation, Hardness (HRB, Yield Strength (N.m are investigated on prepared specimens of MMCs. It was observed that the hardness of the composite is increased gradually from 2-6 % and drastically from 8-10%. The tensile strength and ultimate break load are increased with rising of reinforced weight fraction and the improvement varies between 15.8- 27 % and 2-15 % respectively.

  18. Study on dry friction and wear resistance of a WC-Co particle reinforced iron matrix composite material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Peng

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to select a suitable material for the rolling mill guide application, the dry sliding friction and wear resistance of a tungsten carbide combining cobalt (WC-Co particle reinforced chromium cast iron composite material were studied. In particular, the wear resistance was discussed in detail. The results showed that the composite material demonstrates 25 times the wear resistance of high Cr cast iron, and 9 times the wear resistance of heat resistant steel. However, the average friction factor in the stable friction stage showed a relationship of μComposites/45 # steel > μHigh chromium cast iron/45 # steel > μHeat resistant steel/45 # steel. The wear resistance mechanism of the composite material was associated with the reinforcing particles, which protruded from the worn surface to bear the friction load when the matrix material surface was worn, thereby reducing the abrasive and adhesive wear. In addition, the matrix material possessed suitable hardness and toughness, providing a support to the reinforcements.

  19. Centrifugal casting of ZA8 zinc alloy and composite A356/silicon carbide: Study and modeling of phases' and particles' segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balout, Bahaa

    Centrifugation is a casting technology that allows the production of cylindrical and graduated parts with different mechanical properties through the section. The need for materials with good quality and specific mechanical properties has been driven this technology in order to produce different types of materials such as zinc alloys and graduated metal matrix composites reinforced by hard and wear resistant particles. The goal of this research project is to study and model the eutectic macrosegregation, the solidification speed, and the speeds of solidification fronts during centrifugal casting of ZA8 zinc-aluminum alloy in order to improve the part quality and increase its strength and field reliability. Moreover, the segregation of the particles during centrifugal casting of an aluminum matrix composite reinforced by silicon carbide particles (A356/SiC) is also studied to improve and control the graduation of the parts. The cooling rate, the speed, acceleration/deceleration, displacement, and segregation of the particles across the section will be modeled by discretization of Stokes' law in time in order to take into consideration the change in the centrifugal radius and melt viscosity during cooling process. This study will allow the control of the graduation degree of particles across the section in order to improve the properties and wear resistance of the composite. This composite can be used in systems where friction is critical and load is high (reinforcements of parts for the cylinders of pneumatic systems). The results show that the maximum macrosegregation zone of the eutectic across the casting section corresponds to the last point of solidification. The eutectic macrosegregation produced during centrifugal casting of thin walled part is a normal segregation which varies depending on the solidification speed and the ratio between the speeds of solidification fronts. On the other hand, it was found that the position and volume fraction of the particles

  20. Modeling of burr size in drilling of aluminum silicon carbide composites using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash A. Thakre

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Exit burrs produced during various machining processes degrade the product quality and functionality of different parts of assembly. It is essential to select the optimum tool geometry and process parameters for minimizing the burr formation during machining. In this paper, the effects of cutting speed, feed rate, point angle of drill bits and concentration of the reinforcements on the burrs produced were investigated. Response surface methodology has been adopted to create the quadratic model for the height and thickness of the burrs produced during drilling of AlSiC composites. Analysis of means and variance were used to find the significance of the process parameters on the responses and to find the optimum combination of parameters to minimize the burr formation. Feed rate, point angle and concentration of reinforcements in the matrix are found to be the significant factors. Both the responses were found to be minimum for lower feed rate, higher point angle and higher concentration of reinforcements. Scanning electron microscopy was used to understand the mechanism of burr formation.

  1. Precipitating Mechanism of Carbide in Cold-Welding Surfacing Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanbin ZHANG; Dengyi REN

    2004-01-01

    Carbides in a series of cold-welding weld metals were studied by means of SEM, TEM and EPMA, and the forming mechanism of carbide was proposed according to their distribution and morphology. Due to their different carbide-forming tendency, Nb and Ti could combine with C to form particulate carbide in liquid weld metal and depleted the carbon content in matrix, while V induced the carbide precipitated along grain boundary. But too much Nb or Ti alone resulted in coarse carbide and poor strengthened matrix. When suitable amount of Nb, Ti and V coexisted in weld metal, both uniformly distributed particulate carbide and well strengthened matrix could be achieved. It was proposed that the carbide nucleated on the oxide which dispersed in liquid weld metal, and then grew into multi-layer complex carbide particles by epitaxial growth. At different sites, carbide particles may present as different morphologies.

  2. A Comprehensive Study on Microstructure Mechanics Relationships of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-20

    The background of this research stems from the need to understand the physical mechanisms of brittle matrix cracks in fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites . Three...theoretical and the simulative aspects. Ceramic matrix composites , Matrix cracking stress, Specimen fabrication, Testing, Theory, Simulations, Uniaxial fiber, Fracture mechanics, Oxidation, Fiber breaks.

  3. Local anodic oxidation on hydrogen-intercalated graphene layers: oxide composition analysis and role of the silicon carbide substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Francesco; Piazza, Vincenzo; Coletti, Camilla; Roddaro, Stefano; Beltram, Fabio; Pingue, Pasqualantonio

    2017-03-10

    We investigate nanoscale local anodic oxidation (LAO) on hydrogen-intercalated graphene grown by controlled sublimation of silicon carbide (SiC). Scanning probe microscopy was used as a lithographic and characterization tool in order to investigate the local properties of the nanofabricated structures. The anomalous thickness observed after the graphene oxidation process is linked to the impact of LAO on the substrate. Micro-Raman (μ-Raman) spectroscopy was employed to demonstrate the presence of two oxidation regimes depending on the applied bias. We show that partial and total etching of monolayer graphene can be achieved by tuning the bias voltage during LAO. Finally, a complete compositional characterization was achieved by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  4. Local anodic oxidation on hydrogen-intercalated graphene layers: oxide composition analysis and role of the silicon carbide substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Francesco; Piazza, Vincenzo; Coletti, Camilla; Roddaro, Stefano; Beltram, Fabio; Pingue, Pasqualantonio

    2017-03-01

    We investigate nanoscale local anodic oxidation (LAO) on hydrogen-intercalated graphene grown by controlled sublimation of silicon carbide (SiC). Scanning probe microscopy was used as a lithographic and characterization tool in order to investigate the local properties of the nanofabricated structures. The anomalous thickness observed after the graphene oxidation process is linked to the impact of LAO on the substrate. Micro-Raman (μ-Raman) spectroscopy was employed to demonstrate the presence of two oxidation regimes depending on the applied bias. We show that partial and total etching of monolayer graphene can be achieved by tuning the bias voltage during LAO. Finally, a complete compositional characterization was achieved by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  5. Micro-strain Evolution and Toughening Mechanisms in a Trimodal Al-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzheng; Topping, Troy D.; Yang, Hanry; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Schoenung, Julie M.; Nutt, Steven R.

    2015-03-01

    A trimodal metal matrix composite (MMC) based on AA (Al alloy) 5083 (Al-4.4Mg-0.7Mn-0.15Cr wt pct) was synthesized by cryomilling powders followed by compaction of blended powders and ceramic particles using two successive dual mode dynamic forgings. The microstructure consisted of 66.5 vol pct ultrafine grain (UFG) region, 30 vol pct coarse grain (CG) region and 3.5 vol pct reinforcing boron carbide particles. The microstructure imparted high-tensile yield strength (581 MPa) compared to a conventional AA 5083 (242 MPa) and enhanced ductility compared to 100 pct UFG Al MMC. The deformation behavior of the heterogeneous structure and the effects of CG regions on crack propagation were investigated using in situ scanning electron microscopy micro-tensile tests. The micro-strain evolution measured using digital image correlation showed early plastic strain localization in CG regions. Micro-voids due to the strain mismatch at CG/UFG interfaces were responsible for crack initiation. CG region toughening was realized by plasticity-induced crack closure and zone shielding of disconnected micro-cracks. However, these toughening mechanisms did not effectively suppress its brittle behavior. Further optimization of the CG distribution (spacing and morphology) is required to achieve toughness levels required for structural applications.

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Particle Segregation During Centrifugal Casting of Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balout, B.; Litwin, J.

    2012-04-01

    When a metal matrix composite undergoes centrifugal casting, the velocity, deceleration, displacement, and segregation of its particles are modeled according to changes in the centrifugal radius, as well as by variations in the molten metal viscosity as the temperature decreases during the cooling process. A cast aluminum alloy A356 reinforced by 10 V% of silicon carbide particles (SiC), with a median diameter of 12 μm, was used to conduct the experiments, and a mathematical modeling showed that the particles' volume fraction on the outer casting face varied according to whether the viscosity of the liquid metal used was constant or variable. If variations in viscosity during the cooling process are taken into account, then the volume fraction of the particles for a given time of centrifugation changes on the outer casting face, while it increases if the viscosity was constant. Modeling the particle segregation with variable viscosity produces results that are closer to those obtained with experiments than is the case when a constant viscosity is used. In fact, the higher the initial pouring and mold temperatures, the higher the effect of the viscosity variation on particle segregation.

  7. Additive Manufacturing of SiC Based Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael Charles; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics and SiC fiber reinforcedSiC ceramic matrix composites (SiCSiC CMCs) offer high payoff as replacements for metals in turbine engine applications due to their lighter weight, higher temperature capability, and lower cooling requirements. Additive manufacturing approaches can offer game changing technologies for the quick and low cost fabrication of parts with much greater design freedom and geometric complexity. Four approaches for developing these materials are presented. The first two utilize low cost 3D printers. The first uses pre-ceramic pastes developed as feed materials which are converted to SiC after firing. The second uses wood containing filament to print a carbonaceous preform which is infiltrated with a pre-ceramic polymer and converted to SiC. The other two approaches pursue the AM of CMCs. The first is binder jet SiC powder processing in collaboration with rp+m (Rapid Prototyping+Manufacturing). Processing optimization was pursued through SiC powder blending, infiltration with and without SiC nano powder loading, and integration of nanofibers into the powder bed. The second approach was laminated object manufacturing (LOM) in which fiber prepregs and laminates are cut to shape by a laser and stacked to form the desired part. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted on materials from all approaches with select approaches also characterized with XRD, TGA, and bend testing.

  8. Microstructural Evolution in Laser Deposited Nickel-Titanium-Carbon in Situ Metal-Matrix Composites (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    investigated Ni-TiC composites processed by direct laser fabrication (DLF) from a feedstock of elemental nickel and titanium carbide powders. They focused... laser fabrication using powder and wire. Mater Design 2007; 28:2040-6. 3. Y. Choi, J. K. Lee, M. E. Mullins, J. Mater. Sci 32(1997) 1717-1724. 4

  9. Assessment of hyaline cartilage matrix composition using near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukuru, Uday P; McGoverin, Cushla M; Pleshko, Nancy

    2014-09-01

    Changes in the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are characteristic of injury or disease in cartilage tissue. Various imaging modalities and biochemical techniques have been used to assess the changes in cartilage tissue but lack adequate sensitivity, or in the case of biochemical techniques, result in destruction of the sample. Fourier transform near infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy has shown promise for the study of cartilage composition. In the current study NIR spectroscopy was used to identify the contributions of individual components of cartilage in the NIR spectra by assessment of the major cartilage components, collagen and chondroitin sulfate, in pure component mixtures. The NIR spectra were obtained using homogenous pellets made by dilution with potassium bromide. A partial least squares (PLS) model was calculated to predict composition in bovine cartilage samples. Characteristic absorbance peaks between 4000 and 5000 cm(-1) could be attributed to components of cartilage, i.e. collagen and chondroitin sulfate. Prediction of the amount of collagen and chondroitin sulfate in tissues was possible within 8% (w/dw) of values obtained by gold standard biochemical assessment. These results support the use of NIR spectroscopy for in vitro and in vivo applications to assess matrix composition of cartilage tissues, especially when tissue destruction should be avoided. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Morphological evolution of primary TiC carbide in laser clad TiC reinforced FeAl intermetallic composite coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑶; 王华明

    2003-01-01

    The novel rapidly solidified TiC/FeAl composite coatings were fabricated by laser cladding on the substrate of 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel, particular emphasis has been placed on the growth morphologies of TiC carbide and its growth mechanism under a constant solidification conditions. Results show that the growth morphology of TiC carbide strongly depends upon the nucleation process and mass transportation process of TiC forming elements in laser melt pool. With increasing amount of titanium and carbon in melt pool, the growth morphology of TiC carbide changes from block-like to star-like and well-developed dendrite. As the amount of titanium and carbon increases further, TiC carbide particles are found to be irregular polyhedral block. Although the growth morphologies of TiC are various,their advancing fronts are all faceted, illustrating that TiC carbide grows by the mechanism of lateral ledge growth.

  11. Effect of added silicon carbide nanowires and carbon nanotubes on mechanical properties of 0-3 natural rubber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janyakunmongkol, Khantichai; Nhuapeng, Wim; Thamjaree, Wandee

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the mechanical properties of 0-3 nanocomposite materials containing silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNWs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and natural rubber were studied. The SiCNWs and CNTs were used as reinforcement fiber whereas natural rubber was used as the matrix phase. The chemical vapor depositions (CVD) was used for synthesizing the nanowire and nanotube phases. The volume fraction of reinforcement was varied from 0 to 10%. The nanophases were mixed in the natural rubber matrix and molded by the hand lay-up technique. The mechanical properties of the samples were examined and compared with those of neat natural rubber. From the results, it was found that the hardness and density of the samples increased with the quantities of nanophases. The nanocomposites with a volume fraction of 10% exhibited maximum hardness (50.5 SHORE A). The maximum tensile strength and extent of elongation at break of the samples were obtained from the 4% volume fraction sample, which were 16.13 MPa and 1,540%, respectively.

  12. Electrochemical process for the manufacturing of titanium alloy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Soare

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new method for precursors’ synthesis of titanium alloys matrix composites through an electrochemical process in molten calcium chloride. The cathode of the cell was made from metallic oxides powders and reinforcement ceramic particles, which were pressed and sintered into disk form and the anode from graphite. The process occurred at 850 °C, in two stages, at 2,7 / 3,2 V: the ionization of the oxygen in oxides and the reduction with calcium formed by electrolysis of calcium oxide fed in the electrolyte. The obtained composite precursors, in a form of metallic sponge, were consolidated by pressing and sintering. Chemical and structural analyses on composites samples were performed.

  13. Thermal transport investigation in a CNTs/solid matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulerouah, Aoumeur; Longuemart, Stéphane; Hus, Philippe; Sahraoui, Abdelhak Hadj

    2013-02-01

    The evolution of the thermal parameters of solid-solid composites based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (single-walled (SWNT) and multi-walled (MWNT)) were studied. A granular potassium bromide (KBr) material was chosen as a matrix. The evolutions of the dynamic thermal parameters (diffusivity, effusivity and conductivity) of the composites as a function of the weight fraction of the CNTs inclusions were obtained using the photoacoustic technique. The experimental evolution of the thermal conductivity of the composites with the CNTs loading showed two distinct behaviours, an increase up to around 2% of CNTs loading followed by a decrease. A heat transport model has been proposed to account for these two different observed trends providing a consistent explanation of the experimental data.

  14. Probabilistic Evaluation of Bolted Joints in Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    1997-01-01

    Computational methods are described to probabilistically simulate fracture in bolted composite structures. Progressive fracture is simulated via an innovative approach independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness. The effect on structure damage of design variable uncertainties is quantified. The Fast Probability Integrator is used to assess the scatter in the composite structure response before and after damage. Sensitivity of the response to design variables is evaluated. The methods are demonstrated for bolted joint polymer matrix composite panels under end loads. The effects of fabrication process are included in the simulation of damage in the bolted panel. The results show that the most effective way to reduce the end displacement at fracture is to control the load and ply thickness.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of a new high entropy composite matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, G.; Matara, M. A.; Csaki, I.; Popescu, C. A.; Truşcă, R.

    2016-06-01

    Even if high entropy alloys were not reported in a scientific journal till 2003, these new alloys have been investigated since 1995 due to their high temperature properties. In the last years the synthesis of these alloys has been widely investigated. Thus, the present work has been carried out to produce a high entropy composite using an equiatomic AlCrFeMnNi high entropy alloy (HEA) matrix and graphite particles (Gr) as reinforcing material. The high entropy composite was obtained by powder metallurgy route using a planetary ball mill. The mechanically alloyed mixture was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Microstructural investigation realized by SEM revealed the homogenous structure of the composite, with multiple phases and decreasing particles size, mostly reaching nanometric scale.

  16. Mechanical characteristics of biodegradable magnesium matrix composites: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Haghshenas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a new generation of biodegradable metallic materials, magnesium alloys, has been called a revolutionary material for biomedical applications (i.e. in orthopedics applications as a bone-implant material, thanks to the reasonable strength (similar to bone tissue, compared to available metallic alloys and high biocompatibility of magnesium and its alloys. However, pure magnesium can corrode too quickly in the physiological pH (7.4–7.6 and high chloride environment of the physiological system and therefore lose their mechanical integrity before tissues have sufficiently. Engineering approach to this challenge (high corrosion rate of Mg can be (i alloying of element additions, (ii surface treatment and (iii development of metal (magnesium matrix composites (MMCs. Magnesium-based composites, as bio-materials, can provide a combination of unique characteristics including adjustable mechanical properties (i.e. tensile strength, elastic modulus, ductility and corrosion resistance. This is the main advantage of magnesium-based composites as compared with alloying and surface treatment approaches. Here, the matrix materials are biomedical magnesium alloys based on Mg–Zn, Mg–Ca and Mg–REE alloy systems (REE stands for rare earth elements including yttrium, Y, cerium, Ce, lanthanum, La. The reinforcement phases are mainly based on hydroxyapatite (HAP, calcium polyphosphate (CPP, and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP particles, and hybrid HAP + β-TCP particles. In this paper a comprehensive review is provided on different grades of biodegradable magnesium matrix composites, with focus on their mechanical properties.

  17. Dry sliding wear studies of aluminum matrix hybrid composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Monikandan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, hybrid composites are fabricated with self-lubricating characteristics to make them as resource-efficient materials. AA6061-10 wt. % B4C–MoS2 hybrid composites reinforced with 2.5, 5 and 7.5 wt. % concentration of MoS2 particles are produced using stir casting technique, and mechanical and tribological properties are evaluated. Microstructural characterization of the hybrid composites revealed the uniform distribution of reinforcement (B4C and MoS2 particles in the matrix material. Hardness and fracture toughness of the hybrid composites are decreased monotonously with an increase in the addition of MoS2 particles. Dry sliding tribological studies conducted using a pin-on-disk tribotester under atmospheric conditions revealed the formation of MoS2-lubricated tribolayer on the worn pin surface which significantly influenced the tribological properties. The addition of MoS2 particles decreased the friction coefficient and wear rate of the hybrid composites. Delamination and abrasion are observed to be the controlling wear mechanisms and material in the form of platelet-shaped debris, and flow-type chip debris is formed, and a long and shallow crater on the worn pin surface of the hybrid composite is also observed.

  18. Aluminium matrix heterophase composites for air compressor pistons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Dyzia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of surface test of composite shaped in the permanent mould casting process. As part of the research anddevelopment project realized in the Department of Materials Technology at the Silesian University of Technology, a pilot plant scale stand was built to manufacture of more than 50 kg suspensions in a single technological cycle. Made in industrial conditions castings to form in the five inner core mould mounted in GM110 permanent mould casting machine confirmed the possibility of the shaping the composite pistons. Castings made from composite suspension AlSi7Mg/SiC and AlSi7Mg/SiC + Cg according to the technology procedure were classified as correct and devoted to the proper machining forming working surfaces of the piston to the air compressor. Comparative tests were performed for the casting of unreinforced AlSi7Mg alloy and composite castings. To assess the ability to fill the mold cavity and the accuracy of mapping used in contour shape FRT analysis of the distance between the grooves on the surface of the piston skirt. Studies have confirmed the differences in the fluidity of alloy matrix and composites suspensions. The difference in the accuracy of the dimensional mapping mould does not disqualify of composite materials, all castings are classified as correct and used for machining.

  19. Aspects of fabrication aluminium matrix heterophase composites by suspension method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolata, A. J.; Dyzia, M.

    2012-05-01

    Composites with an aluminium alloy matrix (AlMMC) exhibit several advantageous properties such as good strength, stiffness, low density, resistance and dimensional stability to elevated temperatures, good thermal expansion coefficient and particularly high resistance to friction wear. Therefore such composites are more and more used in modern engineering constructions. Composites reinforced with hard ceramic particles (Al2O3, SiC) are gradually being implemented into production in automotive or aircraft industries. Another application of AlMMC is in the electronics industry, where the dimensional stability and capacity to absorb and remove heat is used in radiators. However the main problems are still: a reduction of production costs, developing methods of composite material tests and final product quality assessment, standardisation, development of recycling and mechanical processing methods. AlMMC production technologies, based on liquid-phase methods, and the shaping of products by casting methods, belong to the cheapest production methods. Application of a suspension method for the production of composites with heterophase reinforcement may turn out to be a new material and technological solution. The article presents the material and technological aspects of the transfer procedures for the production of composite suspensions from laboratory scale to a semi-industrial scale.

  20. Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (MMC's) (Center Director's Discretionary Fund, Project No. 98-09)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.; Carter, R. W.; Ding, J.

    1999-01-01

    This technical memorandum describes an investigation of using friction stir welding (FSW) process for joining a variety of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC's) reinforced with discontinuous silicon-carbide (SiC) particulate and functional gradient materials. Preliminary results show that FSW is feasible to weld aluminum MMC to MMC or to aluminum-lithium 2195 if the SiC reinforcement is <25 percent by volume fraction. However, a softening in the heat-affected zone was observed and is known to be one of the major limiting factors for joint strength. The pin tool's material is made from a low-cost steel tool H-13 material, and the pin tool's wear was excessive such that the pin tool length has to be manually adjusted for every 5 ft of weldment. Initially, boron-carbide coating was developed for pin tools, but it did not show a significant improvement in wear resistance. Basically, FSW is applicable mainly for butt joining of flat plates. Therefore, FSW of cylindrical articles such as a flange to a duct with practical diameters ranging from 2-5 in. must be fully demonstrated and compared with other proven MMC joining techniques for cylindrical articles.

  1. Development of a Precipitation-Strengthened Matrix for Non-quenchable Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Nhon Q.; Sorensen, Jim; Klier, Eric M.; Sanaty-Zadeh, Amirreza; Bayansan, Davaadorj; Seidman, David N.; Dunand, David C.

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in metal matrix composite-encapsulated ceramic armor show promise in lightweight armor technology. The system contains ceramic tiles, such as alumina, sandwiched between unreinforced aluminum or aluminum metal matrix composite (Al-MMC), which has a better toughness compared to the ceramic tiles. The sandwich structures should not be quenched during the fabrication, as the large mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the ceramic tiles and the unreinforced aluminum or Al-MMC creates internal stresses high enough to fracture the ceramic tiles. However, slow cooling of most commercial alloys creates large precipitates making solute unavailable for the formation of fine precipitates during aging. Here, we develop a non-quenched, high-strength metal matrix utilizing dilute Al-Sc-Zr alloys. We demonstrate that the dilute Al-0.09 Sc-0.045 Zr at.% alloy and the same alloy containing 0-4 vol.% alumina short fibers do not result in precipitation upon slow cooling from a high temperature, and can thereafter be aged to increase their strength. They exhibit a moderate strength, but improved ductility and toughness as compared to common armor aluminum alloys, such as AA5083-H131, making them attractive as armor materials and hybrid armor systems.

  2. Development and properties of an oxide fiber-oxide matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, S.M.; Blum, Y.D. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kanazawa, C.H.

    1999-03-01

    Continuous oxide fiber/oxide matrix composites are attractive for use as high temperature structural materials because they can combine composite properties with long-term oxidative stability. The development of a matrix for such a composite and prevention of matrix-fiber coating interaction is described here. The goal use temperature of the composite is 1100 C. The composite is being developed by the M{sup 2}C Consortium comprising 3M, Rockwell International, and SRI International. The composite consists of an alumina-based woven-tow fiber preform, coated with lanthanum phosphate (monazite) in an oxide matrix derived from a preceramic-polymer slurry filled with active and inert powders. This approach to the matrix enables conventional polymer matrix composite technology such as RTM to be used in composite part fabrication. Only one infiltration of the matrix is required, a critical factor in keeping the cost low. (orig.) 6 refs.

  3. Compositional effects on mechanical properties of hafnium-carbide-strengthened molybdenum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzke, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical properties of swaged rod thermomechanically processed from arc melted Mo-2Re-Hf-C alloys containing as much as 0.9-mol% HfC were evaluated. The low-temperature ductilities of these alloys were not influenced by the amount of HfC present but by the amount of Hf in excess of stoichiometry. Maximum ductility occurred at 0.2- to 0.3-at.% excess Hf. At 0.3- to 0.5-mol% HfC, alloy strength varied directly with the Mo content of extracted carbide particles, both decreasing as the amount of excess Hf increased. Additions of 2-at.% Re had little effect on strength or ductility. Tensile and creep strengths of Mo-2Re-0.7Hf-0.5C alloy equaled or exceeded those of other high strength Mo alloys.

  4. Hertzian indentation of colloidally processed titanium carbide-nickel aluminide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, R. Bradley

    Advanced cermets based on titanium carbide (TiC), with a ductile nickel aluminide (Ni3Al) binder, have shown significant promise for use in a variety of demanding wear environments, due to a combination of high strength and good corrosion behaviour. A unique feature of TiC-Ni3Al cermets is that they show increasing strength from room temperature up to ˜1,000°C, while current materials such as tungsten carbide/cobalt (WC/Co) show significant strength degradation above ˜500°C. In this thesis, aqueous colloidal forming methods have been applied to process TiC preforms. The mechanisms and effectiveness of suspension stabilization were examined using methods such as zeta potential analysis, rheological measurements, and sedimentation trials for two common dispersants; an ammonium salt of polymethacrylate (PMA-NH 4) and two molecular weights (l,800 and 10,000) of polyethylenimine (PEI). TiC preforms were prepared by slip casting suspensions of up to 50 vol. % solids content. After drying, the TiC-based cermets were processed by melt infiltration with the Ni3Al alloy (IC-50) at 1475°C.Ni 3Al content was varied between 20 and 50 vol. % using this approach, resulting in final densities that exceeded 98% of theoretical. These samples were subjected to Hertzian indentation testing with loads ranging from 250 -- 2000 N, using WC-Co spheres with sizes ranging from 1.191 to 2.38 mm. Indentation stress-strain curves were produced from the indentation data and compared to the calculated elastic Hertzian response. The bonded interface method was used to examine the subsurface deformation of the material under load. Significant deformation of the binder and the eventual fracture of the TiC grains were observed. The nature of the quasi-plasticity of TiC-Ni 3Al and the effects of binder content on surface and subsurface deformation is examined.

  5. Strain Rate Dependency of Bronze Metal Matrix Composite Mechanical Properties as a Function of Casting Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lloyd; Joyce, Peter; Radice, Joshua; Gregorian, Dro; Gobble, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Strain rate dependency of mechanical properties of tungsten carbide (WC)-filled bronze castings fabricated by centrifugal and sedimentation-casting techniques are examined, in this study. Both casting techniques are an attempt to produce a functionally graded material with high wear resistance at a chosen surface. Potential applications of such materials include shaft bushings, electrical contact surfaces, and brake rotors. Knowledge of strain rate-dependent mechanical properties is recommended for predicting component response due to dynamic loading or impact events. A brief overview of the casting techniques for the materials considered in this study is followed by an explanation of the test matrix and testing techniques. Hardness testing, density measurement, and determination of the volume fraction of WC particles are performed throughout the castings using both image analysis and optical microscopy. The effects of particle filling on mechanical properties are first evaluated through a microhardness survey of the castings. The volume fraction of WC particles is validated using a thorough density survey and a rule-of-mixtures model. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) testing of various volume fraction specimens is conducted to determine strain dependence of mechanical properties and to compare the process-property relationships between the two casting techniques. The baseline performances of C95400 bronze are provided for comparison. The results show that the addition of WC particles improves microhardness significantly for the centrifugally cast specimens, and, to a lesser extent, in the sedimentation-cast specimens, largely because the WC particles are more concentrated as a result of the centrifugal-casting process. Both metal matrix composites (MMCs) demonstrate strain rate dependency, with sedimentation casting having a greater, but variable, effects on material response. This difference is attributed to legacy effects from the casting process, namely

  6. Microstructure of C/C Composites with Different Matrix Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Hao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of carbon/carbon(C/C composites with different matrix carbon was studied by polarized light microscopy (PLM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and XRD techniques respectively. PLM results indicate that the different matrix carbon exhibits different optical reactivity, and the average optical reactivity is gradually enhanced from normal pitch carbon, smooth laminar of pyrocarbon, rough laminar of pyrocarbon to mesophase pitch carbon; SEM results show that the normal pitch carbon is mainly of grapy structure, the pyrocarbon exhibits like-crinkle lamellar structure, while the mesophase pitch carbon exhibits lamellar banded structure with different shapes. Under HRTEM, the lattice fringes of the mesophase pitch carbon are arranged regularly, is a long range ordered crystal structure, and the preferred orientation is high. The degree of the graphite and the interlayer spacing of the material B (mesophase pitch-based C/C composites are better than that of the material D (pyrocarbon-based C/C composites.

  7. LDEF results for polymer matrix composite experiment AO 180

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    This report represents a summary of the results obtained to-date on a polymer matrix composite experiment (AO 180) located at station D-12, about 82 deg off the 'ram' direction. Different material systems comprised of graphite, boron, and aramid (Kevlar) fiber reinforcements were studied. Although previous results were presented on in-situ thermal-vacuum cycling effects, particularly dimensional changes associated with outgassing, additional comparative data will be shown from ground-based tests on control and flight samples. The system employed was fully automated for thermal-vacuum cycling using a laser interferometer for monitoring displacements. Erosion of all three classes of materials due to atomic oxygen (AO) will also be discussed, including angle of incidence effects. Data from this experiment will be compared to published results for similar materials in other LDEF experiments. Composite materials' erosion yields will be presented on an AO design nomogram useful for estimating total material loss for given exposure conditions in low Earth orbit (LEO). Optical properties of these materials will also be compared with control samples. A survey of the damage caused by micrometeoroids/debris impacts will be addressed as they relate to polymer matrix composites. Correlations between hole size and damage pattern will be given. Reference to a new nomogram for estimating the number distribution of micrometeoroid/debris impacts for a given space structure as a function of time in LEO will be addressed based on LDEF data.

  8. Multiscale modeling of PVDF matrix carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greminger, Michael; Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh

    2017-06-01

    Self-sensing carbon fiber reinforced composites have the potential to enable structural health monitoring that is inherent to the composite material rather than requiring external or embedded sensors. It has been demonstrated that a self-sensing carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite can be created by using the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) as the matrix material and using a Kevlar layer to separate two carbon fiber layers. In this configuration, the electrically conductive carbon fiber layers act as electrodes and the Kevlar layer acts as a dielectric to prevent the electrical shorting of the carbon fiber layers. This composite material has been characterized experimentally for its effective d 33 and d 31 piezoelectric coefficients. However, for design purposes, it is desirable to obtain a predictive model of the effective piezoelectric coefficients for the final smart composite material. Also, the inverse problem can be solved to determine the degree of polarization obtained in the PVDF material during polarization by comparing the effective d 33 and d 31 values obtained in experiment to those predicted by the finite element model. In this study, a multiscale micromechanics and coupled piezoelectric-mechanical finite element modeling approach is introduced to predict the mechanical and piezoelectric performance of a plain weave carbon fiber reinforced PVDF composite. The modeling results show good agreement with the experimental results for the mechanical and electrical properties of the composite. In addition, the degree of polarization of the PVDF component of the composite is predicted using this multiscale modeling approach and shows that there is opportunity to drastically improve the smart composite’s performance by improving the polarization procedure.

  9. Microstructure characterization of laser-deposited titanium carbide and zirconium-based titanium metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ochonogor, OF

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available produced with 10, 20, and 30 vol.% reinforcing ceramic, and Zr + TiC MMCs were fabricated with 10, 20, and 30 vol.% TiC. The deposited thin walls were analysed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy...

  10. EVALUATION & COMPARISION OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ALUMINIUM ALLOY 5052 REINFORCED WITH SILICONCARBIDE, GRAPHITE AND FLY ASH HYBRID METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANKUSH SACHDEVA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The engineering fraternity has always been looking forward to develop an outstanding and wonder-materials which would fit the ever-changing demands of the world. In order to fullfill the demands various newdiscoveries have been made by scientists, engineers and resrearchers. In todays competitive world many, materials have been tried for various unexplored conditions , but the never ending demand of the world encourages the researchers to develop the new material. Now the researchers are preparing the material by the combination of different materials called hybrid composite material.. Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs have emerged as a class of materials suitable for structural, aerospace, automotive, electronic, thermal and wearapplications owing to their advantages over the conventional materials. The present study was taken up to explore the possibility of using different reinforcements (silicon carbide, fly ash and graphite to enhance the properties of aluminium alloy (Al5052 composites. Different samples were prepared from the aluminium withvarying reinforcement composition. The mechanical properties studied after the experiment were strength, hardness and elongation.Further, these composites were characterized with the help of, mechanical testing and scanning electron microscopy.

  11. PYROLYTIC CARBIDE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    and injector design changes were made to improve the quality of the carbide produced. Niobium carbide and tantalum carbide coated nozzles are described...Additional data for pyrolytic niobium carbide and hafnium carbide is also presented. (Author)

  12. Numerical analysis on thermal drilling of aluminum metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Maheshwaran, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    The work-material deformation is very large and both the tool and workpiece temperatures are high in thermal drilling. Modeling is a necessary tool to understand the material flow, temperatures, stress, and strains, which are difficult to measure experimentally during thermal drilling. The numerical analysis of thermal drilling process of aluminum metal matrix composite has been done in the present work. In this analysis the heat flux of different stages is calculated. The calculated heat flux is applied on the surface of work piece and thermal distribution is predicted in different stages during the thermal drilling process.

  13. Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites - Aerospace potential and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R.

    1992-01-01

    Thermostructural ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites are attractive in numerous aerospace applications; the noncatastrophic fracture behavior and flaw-insensitivity of continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs renders them especially desirable. The present development status evaluation notes that, for most highly-loaded high-temperature applications, the requisite fiber-technology base is at present insufficient. In addition to materials processing techniques, the life prediction and NDE methods are immature and require a projection of 15-20 years for the maturity of CMC turbine rotors. More lightly loaded, moderate temperature aircraft engine applications are approaching maturity.

  14. Thermal-vacuum effects on polymer matrix composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Mabson, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented on the thermal-vacuum response of a variety of fiber reinforced polymers matrix composites that comprised the UTIAS experiment on the LDEF satellite. Theoretical temperature-time predictions for this experiment are in excellent agreement with test data. Results also show quite clearly the effect of outgassing in the dimensional changes of these materials and the corresponding coefficients of thermal expansion. Finally, comparison with ground-based simulation tests are presented as well. Use of these data for design purposes are also given.

  15. Tensile Mechanical Properties and Strengthening Mechanism of Hybrid Carbon Nanotube and Silicon Carbide Nanoparticle-Reinforced Magnesium Alloy Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhou, Xia; Su, Depeng; Wu, Chengwei; Liu, Liming

    2012-01-01

    .... The results showed that grains of the matrix in the AZ91/(CNT + SiC) composites were obviously refined after adding hybrid CNTs and SiC nanoparticles to the AZ91 alloy, and the room-temperature mechanical properties of AZ91/(CNT + SiC...

  16. Metal matrix composites synthesis, wear characteristics, machinability study of MMC brake drum

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Nanjappan; Davim, J Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This book is dedicated to composite materials, presenting different synthesis processes, composite properties and their machining behaviour. The book describes also the problems on manufacturing of metal matrix composite components. Among others, it provides procedures for manufacturing of metal matrix composites and case studies.

  17. Laser Machining of Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmon, D. C.; Ojard, G.; Brewer, D.

    2012-01-01

    As interest grows in considering the use of ceramic matrix composites for critical components, the effects of different machining techniques, and the resulting machined surfaces, on strength need to be understood. This work presents the characterization of a Melt Infiltrated SiC/SiC composite material system machined by different methods. While a range of machining approaches were initially considered, only diamond grinding and laser machining were investigated on a series of tensile coupons. The coupons were tested for residual tensile strength, after a stressed steam exposure cycle. The data clearly differentiated the laser machined coupons as having better capability for the samples tested. These results, along with micro-structural characterization, will be presented.

  18. Buckling Analysis of Unidirectional PolymerMatrix Composite Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawad Kadhim Uleiwi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the estimation of critical load of unidirectional polymer matrix composite plates by using experimental and finite element techniques at different fiber angles and fiber volume fraction of the composite plate.Buckling analysis illustrated that the critical load decreases in nonlinear relationship with the increase of the fiber angle and that it increases with the increase of the fiber volume fraction.The results show that the maximum value of the critical load is (629.54 N/m at (? = 0? and (Vf = 40 % for the finite element method, while the minimum value of the critical load is (49 N/m at (? = 90? and (Vf = 10 % for the experimental results. The results also indicated that the maximum difference between the finite element analysis and experimental work is about (11 % at ( ? = 0? and (Vf = 40 %

  19. Update on CMH-17 Volume 5: Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Kaia; Pierce, Jennifer; Kiser, James; Keith, William P.; Wilson, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    CMC components are projected to enter service in commercial aircraft in 2016. A wide range of issues must be addressed prior to certification of this hardware. The Composite Materials Handbook-17, Volume 5 on ceramic matrix composites is being revised to support FAA certification of CMCs for hot structure and other elevated temperature applications. The handbook supports the development and use of CMCs through publishing and maintaining proven, reliable engineering information and standards that have been thoroughly reviewed. Volume 5 will contain detailed sections describing CMC materials processing, design analysis guidelines, testing procedures, and data analysis and acceptance. A review of the status of and plans for two of these areas, which are being addressed by the M and P Working Group and the Testing Working Group, will be presented along with a timeline for the preparation of CMH-17, Volume 5.

  20. Flexural analysis of palm fiber reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Raghav, Dasarath; Santhosh Kiran, R.; Mahesh, Bhargav; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainty in availability of fossil fuels in the future and global warming increased the need for more environment friendly materials. In this work, an attempt is made to fabricate a hybrid polymer matrix composite. The blend is a mixture of General Purpose Resin and Cashew Nut Shell Liquid, a natural resin extracted from cashew plant. Palm fiber, which has high strength, is used as reinforcement material. The fiber is treated with alkali (NaOH) solution to increase its strength and adhesiveness. Parametric study of flexure strength is carried out by varying alkali concentration, duration of alkali treatment and fiber volume. Taguchi L9 Orthogonal array is followed in the design of experiments procedure for simplification. With the help of ANOVA technique, regression equations are obtained which gives the level of influence of each parameter on the flexure strength of the composite.

  1. High temperature fatigue of metal matrix composite for automotive applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie-Louise, A.; Koster, A.; Remy, L. [Centre des Materiaux, PM. Fourt, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris, UMR CNRS 763, Evry (France); Bourgeois, M.; Martin-Borret, S. [PSA, Peugeot Citroeen, Direction de la Recherche et de l' Innovation Automobile, Velizy-Villacoublay (France)

    2004-07-01

    The high temperature low cycle fatigue (LCF) of metal-matrix composite (A356 with alumina reinforcement) was investigated. LCF tests interrupted and conducted up to failure were performed. Firstly, the effect of process defects and volume fraction of alumina was investigated for this composite. Then, damage accumulation was reported: an interrupted test procedure was used with a plastic replication technique. According to crack growth, the end of the LCF test is associated with a critical crack length equal to about 2 mm. Furthermore, an original crack growth LCF test was made using a specimen with three through notches at different locations. The effect of notch location was estimated. TOMKINS' model has finally been modified to predict the LCF crack growth and the life of smooth specimens. (orig.)

  2. Modeling oxidation damage of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Peng Yang; Gui-Qiong Jiao; Bo Wang

    2011-01-01

    For fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), oxidation of the constituents is a very important damage type for high temperature applications. During the oxidizing process, the pyrolytic carbon interphase gradually recesses from the crack site in the axial direction of the fiber into the interior of the material. Carbon fiber usually presents notch-like or local neck-shrink oxidation phenomenon, causing strength degradation. But, the reason for SiC fiber degradation is the flaw growth mechanism on its surface. A micromechanical model based on the above mechanisms was established to simulate the mechanical properties of CMCs after high temperature oxidation. The statistic and shearlag theory were applied and the calculation expressions for retained tensile modulus and strength were deduced, respectively. Meanwhile, the interphase recession and fiber strength degradation were considered. And then, the model was validated by application to a C/SiC composite.

  3. Discontinuously reinforced intermetallic matrix composites via XD synthesis. [exothermal dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. S.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of recent results obtained for discontinuously reinforced intermetallic matrix composites produced using the XD process. Intermetallic matrices investigated include NiAl, multiphase NiAl + Ni2AlTi, CoAl, near-gamma titanium aluminides, and Ll2 trialuminides containing minor amounts of second phase. Such mechanical properties as low and high temperature strength, compressive and tensile creep, elastic modulus, ambient ductility, and fracture toughness are discussed as functions of reinforcement size, shape, and volume fraction. Microstructures before and after deformation are examined and correlated with measured properties. An observation of interest in many of the systems examined is 'dispersion weakening' at high temperatures and high strain rates. This behavior is not specific to the XD process; rather similar observations have been reported in other discontinuous composites. Proposed mechanisms for this behavior are presented.

  4. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 2; Composite Micromechanical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this second paper of a two part report, a three-dimensional composite micromechanical model is described which allows for the analysis of the rate dependent, nonlinear deformation response of a polymer matrix composite. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations utilized to model the deformation response of a polymer are implemented within the micromechanics method. The deformation response of two representative laminated carbon fiber reinforced composite materials with varying fiber orientation has been predicted using the described technique. The predicted results compare favorably to both experimental values and the response predicted by the Generalized Method of Cells, a well-established micromechanics analysis method.

  5. Al6061 Hybrid Metal Matrix Composite Reinforced with Alumina and Molybdenum Disulphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pitchayyapillai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum Hybrid Reinforcement Technology is a response to the dynamic ever-increasing service requirement of industries such as transportation, aerospace, automobile, and marine, due to its attractive properties like high ductility, highly conductivity, light weight, and high strength to weight ratio. In this evolution, an attempt has been made to investigate the wear rate of Al6061 hybrid metal matrix composite reinforced with the hard ceramic alumina (4, 8, and 12 wt.% of Al2O3 and soft solid lubricant of molybdenum disulphide (2, 4, and 6 wt.% of MoS2 is fabricated by using stir casting method. The unlubricated pins on disc wear tests were conducted to examine the wear behaviour of Al6061/12 wt.% of Al2O3/MoS2 composites. The sliding wear tests were carried out at various loads of 15, 30, and 45 N, sliding velocity (1.25, 2.50, and 3.25 m/sec, and different MoS2 wt.% (2, 4, and 6 wt.%. In addition, the CNC turning experiments were conducted on Al6061/12 wt.% Al2O3/6 wt.% MoS2 using CNMG 120408 uncoated carbide cutting tool under cutting of 100, 150, and 200 m/min, feed of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mm/rev, and depth of cut of 1, 1.5, and 2 mm.

  6. Measurements of Erosion Wear Volume Loss on Bare and Coated Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Sutter, James K.; Mondry, Richard J.; Bowman, Cheryl; Ma, Kong; Horan, Richard A.; Naik, Subhash K.; Cupp, Randall J.

    2003-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the erosion behavior of uncoated and coated polymer matrix composite (PMC) specimens subjected to solid particle impingement using air jets. The PMCs were carbon-Kevlar (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) fiber-epoxy resin composites with a temperature capability up to 393 K (248 F). Tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) was the primary topcoat constituent. Bondcoats were applied to the PMC substrates to improve coating adhesion; then, erosion testing was performed at the University of Cincinnati. All erosion tests were conducted with Arizona road-dust (ARD), impinging at angles of 20 and 90 on both uncoated and two-layer coated PMCs at a velocity of 229 m/s and at a temperature of 366 K (200 F). ARD contains primarily 10-m aluminum oxide powders. Vertically scanning interference microscopy (noncontact, optical profilometry) was used to evaluate surface characteristics, such as erosion wear volume loss and depth, surface topography, and surface roughness. The results indicate that noncontact, optical interferometry can be used to make an accurate determination of the erosion wear volume loss of PMCs with multilayered structures while preserving the specimens. The two-layered (WC-Co topcoat and metal bondcoat) coatings on PMCs remarkably reduced the erosion volume loss by a factor of approximately 10. The tenfold increase in erosion resistance will contribute to longer PMC component lives, lower air friction, reduced related breakdowns, decreased maintenance costs, and increased PMC reliability. The decrease in the surface roughness of the coated vanes will lead to lower air friction and will subsequently reduce energy consumption. Eventually, the coatings could lead to overall economic savings.

  7. Determination of composition and fluidity of an alloy for impregnating hard alloys on the basis of titanium carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z. Issagulov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper optimum compositions of a metal bond of Cr – Ni - Co system are determined by mathematical planning methods. As a response function, value of bending strength at a temperature of 800 °C was used. On the basis of the developed planning matrix samples of required composition were made, bending strength and long-term strength are measured. A certain composition of alloy-bond and its quantity is found. Spiral tests were conducted to determine fluidity.

  8. Microstructure of a cement matrix composite reinforced with polypropylene fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rincón, J. M.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the microstructural characterization of a composite material, which is comprised of polypropylene fibers in an cement matrix, by means of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. The microstructure of the different phases that compose the matrix is very heterogeneous, though there is a uniform distribution of the fibers inside it. The surface of this composite is different after setting, cured and hardening depending if the zone is or not in touch with the walls of the mould. The interface between the different crystalline regions of the cement matrix and the dispersed fibers shows compatibility between the matrix and the polymeric fibers. The mechanical properties (compression and bending strength have also been evaluated. The use of melamine formaldehyde as additive leads to a reinforcement of the cement matrix and to the improvement of the mechanical properties.

    Se ha llevado a cabo una observacíón microestructural detallada de un material compuesto de fibras de polipropileno embebidas en una matriz de cemento usando los nuevos tipos de microscopía electrónica de barrido, tales como: un microscopio electrónico medioambiental (acrónimo en inglés: ESEM y uno de emisión de campo (acrónimo en inglés: FESEM. La microestructura de las diferentes fases que componen la matriz es muy heterogénea, aunque hay una distribución uniforme de las fibras dentro de ellas. La superficie de este material compuesto es diferente después del fraguado, curado y endurecimiento según qué zonas estén o no en contacto con las paredes del molde. La interfase entre las diferentes fases cristalinas de la matriz de cemento y las fibras dispersadas se ha observado a diferentes aumentos, comprobándose compatibilidad entre la matriz y las fibras poliméricas. Las propiedades de resistencia mecánica (tanto a flexión como a compresión han sido tambi

  9. Composite uranium carbide targets at TRIUMF: Development and characterization with SEM, XRD, XRF and L-edge densitometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Peter; Bricault, Pierre; Dombsky, Marik; Erdmann, Nicole; Hanemaayer, Vicky; Wong, John; Lützenkirchen, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    The production of radioactive ion beams (RIB) from spallation targets by irradiation with a continuous 500 MeV proton beam, has been routine at TRIUMF for several years. Based on the experience with composite refractory carbide targets a procedure for the fabrication of UC2/C targets was developed. It includes the preparation of UC2 by carbothermal reduction of UO2, the slip-casting of fine-grained UC2/C slurry on graphite foil under inert gas atmosphere and the cutting of composite target discs which are stacked up to a lamellar structure. The thermal properties of such an arrangement are adequate to withstand the high power deposition of an intense, continuous proton beam and also beneficial for the fast release of short-lived radioactive isotopes. Molecular structure, particle size and the impact of sintering of the target discs were investigated via XRD and SEM. Thickness and mass distribution were measured with position-sensitive LIII-edge densitometry. The results confirm that the properties of the UC2/C target material are well suited for RIB production at TRIUMF while there is still room for improvement with regard to uniformity of mass distribution in target disc thickness.

  10. Capacitance of two-dimensional titanium carbide (MXene) and MXene/carbon nanotube composites in organic electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Agnese, Yohan; Rozier, Patrick; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Gogotsi, Yury; Simon, Patrice

    2016-02-01

    Pseudocapacitive materials that store charges by fast redox reactions are promising candidates for designing high energy density electrochemical capacitors. MXenes - recently discovered two-dimensional carbides, have shown excellent capacitance in aqueous electrolytes, but in a narrow potential window, which limits both the energy and power density. Here, we investigated the electrochemical behavior of Ti3C2 MXene in 1M solution of 1-ethly-3-methylimidazolium bis- (trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide (EMITFSI) in acetonitrile and two other common organic electrolytes. This paper describes the use of clay, delaminated and composite Ti3C2 electrodes with carbon nanotubes in order to understand the effect of the electrode architecture and composition on the electrochemical performance. Capacitance values of 85 F g-1 and 245 F cm-3 were obtained at 2 mV s-1, with a high rate capability and good cyclability. In situ X-ray diffraction study reveals the intercalation of large EMI+ cations into MXene, which leads to increased capacitance, but may also be the rate limiting factor that determines the device performance.

  11. Metal-Matrix Composites Prepared by Paper-Manufacturing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Claudia; Aneziris, Christos G.; Pranke, Katja

    2016-01-01

    In this work, metal-matrix composites were prepared via paper-manufacturing technology using metastable austenitic steel powder of type 16-7-3 (Cr-Mn-Ni in wt pct) and magnesia partially stabilized zirconia reinforcing particles. The influence of the process parameters on the paper web formation and the resulting properties of the MMCs were studied and solids retention of >90 wt pct was achieved. During filtration of the aqueous fiber-filler suspension, the steel particles were incorporated in the fiber network, and steel clusters were formed. Calendering had a positive influence on the porosity, bulk density, and tensile strength of the green paper sheets. Within this contribution, the debinding process for the metal-matrix paper sheets was in focus. A debinding rate of 0.5 K/min to 733 K (460 °C) with a dwell time of 90 minutes was sufficient to completely remove cellulose fibers. The sintered composites attained a tensile strength of up to 177 N/mm2 at a total porosity of 66 pct.

  12. Quantifying Effects of Voids in Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Marlana B.; Sankar, Bhavani V.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Randomness in woven ceramic matrix composite architecture has been found to cause large variability in stiffness and strength. The inherent voids are an aspect of the architecture that may cause a significant portion of the variability. A study is undertaken to investigate the effects of many voids of random sizes and distributions. Response surface approximations were formulated based on void parameters such as area and length fractions to provide an estimate of the effective stiffness. Obtaining quantitative relationships between the properties of the voids and their effects on stiffness of ceramic matrix composites are of ultimate interest, but the exploratory study presented here starts by first modeling the effects of voids on an isotropic material. Several cases with varying void parameters were modeled which resulted in a large amount of variability of the transverse stiffness and out-of-plane shear stiffness. An investigation into a physical explanation for the stiffness degradation led to the observation that the voids need to be treated as an entity that reduces load bearing capabilities in a space larger than what the void directly occupies through a corrected length fraction or area fraction. This provides explanation as to why void volume fraction is not the only important factor to consider when computing loss of stiffness.

  13. Thermal and destructive interrogation of ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojard, Greg; Doza, Douglas; Ouyang, Zhong; Angel, Paul; Smyth, Imelda; Santhosh, Unni; Ahmad, Jalees; Gowayed, Yasser

    2015-03-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are intended for elevated temperature use and their performance at temperature must be clearly understood as insertion efforts are to be realized. Most efforts to understand ceramic matrix composites at temperature are based on their lifetime at temperature under stress based on fatigue or creep testing or residual testing after some combination of temperature, stress and time. While these efforts can be insightful especially based on their mechanical performance, there is no insight into how other properties are changing with thermal exposure. To gain additional insight into oxidation behavior of CMC samples, a series of fatigue and creep samples tested at two different temperatures were non-destructively interrogated after achieving run-out conditions by multiple thermal methods and limited X-ray CT. After non-destructive analysis, residual tensile tests were undertaken at room temperature. The resulting residual properties will be compared against the non-destructive data. Analysis will be done to see if data trends can be determined and correlated to the level and duration of exposure.

  14. Functionally Graded Al Alloy Matrix In-Situ Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Subramaniya Sarma, V.; Murty, B. S.

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, functionally graded (FG) aluminum alloy matrix in-situ composites (FG-AMCs) with TiB2 and TiC reinforcements were synthesized using the horizontal centrifugal casting process. A commercial Al-Si alloy (A356) and an Al-Cu alloy were used as matrices in the present study. The material parameters (such as matrix and reinforcement type) and process parameters (such as mold temperature, mold speed, and melt stirring) were found to influence the gradient in the FG-AMCs. Detailed microstructural analysis of the composites in different processing conditions revealed that the gradients in the reinforcement modify the microstructure and hardness of the Al alloy. The segregated in-situ formed TiB2 and TiC particles change the morphology of Si particles during the solidification of Al-Si alloy. A maximum of 20 vol pct of reinforcement at the surface was achieved by this process in the Al-4Cu-TiB2 system. The stirring of the melt before pouring causes the reinforcement particles to segregate at the periphery of the casting, while in the absence of such stirring, the particles are segregated at the interior of the casting.

  15. Particulate Titanium Matrix Composites Tested--Show Promise for Space Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Ellis, J. Rodney; Arnold. Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    Uniformly distributed particle-strengthened titanium matrix composites (TMCs) can be manufactured at lower cost than many types of continuous-fiber composites. The innovative manufacturing technology combines cold and hot isostatic pressing procedures to produce near-final-shape components. Material stiffness is increased up to 26-percent greater than that of components made with conventional titanium materials at no significant increase in the weight. The improved mechanical performance and low-cost manufacturing capability motivated an independent review to assess the improved properties of ceramic titanium carbide (TiC) particulate-reinforced titanium at elevated temperature. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center creatively designed and executed deformation and durability tests to reveal operating regimes where these materials could lower the cost and weight of space propulsion systems. The program compares the elevated-temperature performance of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V matrix material to an alloy containing 10 wt% of TiC particles. Initial experiments showed that at these relatively low particle concentrations the material stiffness of the TMC was improved 20 percent over that of the plain Ti-6Al-4V alloy when tested at 427 C. The proportional limit and ultimate strength of the composite in tension are 21- and 14-percent greater than those of the plain alloy. Compression tests showed that the proportional limit is about 30 percent greater for TMC than for the plain alloy. The enhanced deformation resistance of the TMC was also evident in a series of tensile and compressive stress relaxation tests that were made. Specimens were subjected to tensile or compressive strain amplitudes of 0.75 percent for 24 hr followed by a return to zero strain imposed for 24 hr. The stress relaxation data were normalized with respect to the maximum stress for each case and plotted as a function of time in the following graph. Tensile stresses relaxed 19 percent for the

  16. Structural and functional polymer-matrix composites for electromagnetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junhua

    This dissertation addresses the science and technology of functional and structural polymer-matrix composite materials for electromagnetic applications, which include electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding and low observability (Stealth). The structural composites are continuous carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composites, which are widely used for airframes. The functional composites are composites with discontinuous fillers and in both bulk and coating forms. Through composite structure variation, attractive electromagnetic properties have been achieved. With no degradation of the tensile strength or modulus, the shielding effectiveness of the structural composites has been improved by enhancing multiple reflections through light activation of the carbon fiber. The multiple reflections loss of the electromagnetic wave increases from 1.1 to 10.2 dB at 1.0 GHz due to the activation. Such a large effect of multiple reflections has not been previously reported in any material. The observability of these composites has been lowered by decreasing the electrical conductivity (and hence decreasing the reflection loss) through carbon fiber coating. The incorporation of mumetal, a magnetic alloy particulate filler (28-40 mum size), in a latex paint has been found to be effective for enhancing the shielding only if the electrical resistivity of the resulting composite coating is below 10 O.cm, as rendered by a conductive particulate filler, such as nickel flake (14-20 mum size). This effectiveness (39 dB at 1.0 GHz) is attributed to the absorption of the electromagnetic wave by the mumetal and the nickel flake, with the high conductivity rendered by the presence of the nickel flake resulting in a relatively high reflection loss of 15.5 dB. Without the nickel flake, the mumetal gives only 3 dB of shielding and 1.5 dB of reflection loss at 1.0 GHz. Nickel powder (0.3-0.5 mum size) has been found to be an effective filler for improving the shielding of polyethersulfone (PES

  17. Hygrothermal modeling and testing of polymers and polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weiqun

    2000-10-01

    The dissertation, consisting of four papers, presents the results of the research investigation on environmental effects on polymers and polymer matrix composites. Hygrothermal models were developed that would allow characterization of non-Fickian diffusion coefficients from moisture weight gain data. Hygrothermal testing was also conducted to provide the necessary data for characterizing of model coefficients and model verification. In part 1, a methodology is proposed that would allow characterization of non-Fickian diffusion coefficients from moisture weight gain data for a polymer adhesive below its Tg. Subsequently, these diffusion coefficients are used for predicting moisture concentration profiles through the thickness of a polymer. In part 2, a modeling methodology based on irreversible thermodynamics applied within the framework of composite macro-mechanics is presented, that would allow characterization of non-Fickian diffusion coefficients from moisture weight gain data for laminated composites with distributed uniaxial damage. Comparisons with test data for a 5-harness satin textile composite with uniaxial micro-cracks are provided for model verifications. In part 3, the same modeling methodology based on irreversible thermodynamics is extended to the case of a bi-axially damaged laminate. The model allows characterization of nonFickian diffusion coefficients as well as moisture saturation level from moisture weight gain data for laminates with pre-existing damage. Comparisons with test data for a bi-axially damaged Graphite/Epoxy woven composite are provided for model verifications. Finally, in part 4, hygrothermal tests conducted on AS4/PR500 5HS textile composite laminates are summarized. The objectives of the hygrothermal tests are to determine the diffusivity and maximum moisture content of the laminate.

  18. Effect of temper on seawater corrosion of an aluminum-silicon carbide composite alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Z.; Abdul Aleem, B.J. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-11-01

    The corrosion behavior of annealed (O), as-fabricated (F), and naturally age-hardened (T4) aluminum alloy Al 6013 with 20 vol% silicon carbide in particulate form was investigated in 3.5 wt% sodium chloride and in Arabian Gulf water. Of the three tempers, T4 showed the lowest corrosion rate (0.04 mpy and 2.61 mpy) in deaerated and aerated NaCl, respectively. The corrosion rate in seawater was slightly higher. Predominant forms of corrosion were pitting and intergranular corrosion. Formation of corrosion chimneys was observed. X-ray diffraction Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy showed intermetallic formation and the presence of a gelatinous film of aluminum hydroxide of bayrite type. The higher corrosion resistance of the T4 temper resulted from finer and more homogeneously distributed precipitates compared to tempers F and O. In view of the alloy`s good corrosion resistance and outstanding ultimate tensile strength, yield strength and specific modulus, it can be considered a strong competitor to Al 2024, Al 2014, and Al 6061, which are used mainly for structural applications.

  19. Modeling elastic and thermal properties of 2.5D carbon fiber and carbon/SiC hybrid matrix composites by homogenization method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Claudio Pardini

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Advanced carbon fiber hybrid carbon-ceramic matrix composites are realizing their potential in many thermostructural components for aerospace vehicles. This work presents ab-initio predictions of elastic constants and thermal properties for 2.5D carbon fiber reinforced carbon-silicon carbide hybrid matrix composites, by using the homogenization technique. The homogenization technique takes properties of individual components of the composites (fiber and matrix and characteristics of the geometrical architecture of the preform to perform calculations. Ab-initio modeling of mechanical and thermal properties is very attractive, especially during the material development stage, when larger samples may be prohibitively expensive or impossible to fabricate. Modeling is also useful when bigger samples would be prohibitively expensive or impractical. Thermostructural composites made of 2.5D preforms are easy to manufacture in relation to 3D preforms. Besides, 2.5D preforms are also resistant to thermo cycling and have high resistance to crack propagation in relation to ply stacked composites such as unidirectional (1D and bidirectional (2D structures. The calculations were performed by setting an overall carbon fiber volume fraction at 40, 45 and 50 for a 2D stacked composite, and volume fraction in Z-direction of 2, 4 and 6.

  20. Impact of long-term thermal exposure on a SiC fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmig, S.; Elgeti, S.; You, Jeong-Ha, E-mail: you@ipp.mpg.de

    2013-11-15

    Silicon carbide long fiber-reinforced copper matrix composites offer huge potential as a heat sink material of divertor for applications at temperatures above 300 °C thanks to the beneficial combination of strong ceramic fibers and highly conductive copper. For applications at higher operation temperatures, long term thermal stability is an issue, as thermal exposure may cause a detrimental change in microstructure in terms of chemistry and integrity of the constituents leading to overall deterioration of composite strength. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of long term thermal exposure at an elevated temperature on a Cu/SiC{sub f} composite material. To this end, composite samples were fabricated and subjected to a heat treatment at 550 °C for 400 h. Extensive tensile tests were conducted for a wide range of fibers volume fractions to evaluate the strength before and after the heat treatment. Acoustic emission was detected in situ during tensile tests for tracking the failure events. Microscopic analysis was carried out to capture the chemical change and damage. It turned out that the applied heat treatment caused significant reduction of strength. Microanalysis revealed that infiltration and diffusion of copper into the fibers via the cracks of the damaged fibers are the direct cause of the embrittlement.

  1. Impact of long-term thermal exposure on a SiC fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmig, S.; Elgeti, S.; You, Jeong-Ha

    2013-11-01

    Silicon carbide long fiber-reinforced copper matrix composites offer huge potential as a heat sink material of divertor for applications at temperatures above 300 °C thanks to the beneficial combination of strong ceramic fibers and highly conductive copper. For applications at higher operation temperatures, long term thermal stability is an issue, as thermal exposure may cause a detrimental change in microstructure in terms of chemistry and integrity of the constituents leading to overall deterioration of composite strength. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of long term thermal exposure at an elevated temperature on a Cu/SiCf composite material. To this end, composite samples were fabricated and subjected to a heat treatment at 550 °C for 400 h. Extensive tensile tests were conducted for a wide range of fibers volume fractions to evaluate the strength before and after the heat treatment. Acoustic emission was detected in situ during tensile tests for tracking the failure events. Microscopic analysis was carried out to capture the chemical change and damage. It turned out that the applied heat treatment caused significant reduction of strength. Microanalysis revealed that infiltration and diffusion of copper into the fibers via the cracks of the damaged fibers are the direct cause of the embrittlement.

  2. Comparison of Theoretical Models and Finite Element Simulation of ZrO{sub 2}-based Composites for Inert Matrix Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, Vivek [Indian Institute of Technology-Kanpur, Kanpur (India); Mistarihi, Qusai M.; Ryu, Ho Jin [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The improvement of thermal properties of ZrO{sub 2} has been investigated in many ways to enhance the performance of inert matrix fuel (IMF). Inert matrix fuel is a useful concept to burn transuranic elements (TRU) without increasing extra plutonium. The addition of reinforcements with a high thermal conductivity has been proposed in the previous studies. Molybdenum and silicon carbide are good candidate materials for the reinforcement because of their high thermal conductivities and low neutron absorption cross sections. Recently, ZrO{sub 2}-based composites reinforced with Mo-wire mesh or carbon foam were fabricated by spark plasma sintering. When the effects of the structures of reinforcements were compared, interconnected structures provided more enhanced thermal conductivity than discrete structures. The effective thermal conductivity of composite materials with various reinforcement structures can be calculated by using the finite element analyses. The finite element analyses presented a good agreement with theoretical models in estimating the effects of the reinforcement on the thermal conductivities of discrete Mo reinforced ZrO{sub 2} nanocomposites. It is found that the effects of interconnected thermal reinforcements on the effective thermal conductivity can be estimated by using the percolation model.

  3. Synergistic Effects of Temperature and Oxidation on Matrix Cracking in Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the synergistic effects of temperatrue and oxidation on matrix cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) has been investigated using energy balance approach. The shear-lag model cooperated with damage models, i.e., the interface oxidation model, interface debonding model, fiber strength degradation model and fiber failure model, has been adopted to analyze microstress field in the composite. The relationships between matrix cracking stress, interface debonding and slipping, fiber fracture, oxidation temperatures and time have been established. The effects of fiber volume fraction, interface properties, fiber strength and oxidation temperatures on the evolution of matrix cracking stress versus oxidation time have been analyzed. The matrix cracking stresses of C/SiC composite with strong and weak interface bonding after unstressed oxidation at an elevated temperature of 700 °C in air condition have been predicted for different oxidation time.

  4. Wear of semi-solid rheocast SiCp/Al metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Curle, UA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available casting of SiC metal matrix composites. The metal matrix consisting of nearly spherical proeutectic a(Al) globules was produced. Spheroidization of fibrous eutectic silicon took place upon heat treatment of the as-cast metal matrix composites (MMCs...

  5. Strong, damage tolerant oxide-fiber/oxide matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yahua

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is an easy and cost effective method to fabricate fiber-reinforced green composites. Non-conductive Nextel(TM) 720 fibers were successfully coated with a transient, conductive polypyrrole submicron surface layer for use directly as an electrode in EPD processing. However, electric-field shielding limits particle infiltration into the conductive fiber bundles and they mostly deposit on the outer surface of the fiber bundle. When the bundle is large, central cavities exist after deposition. The EPD cell was modified for electrophoretic infiltration deposition (EPID). Non conductive fibers were laid on an electrode and charged particles in an ethanol suspension are driven there through by an electric field, infiltrate and deposit on the electrode to then build up into the fiber preform and fill the voids therein. Dense, uniform, green fiber composites were successfully fabricated via constant current EPID. The EPID process is modeled as capillary electrophoretic infiltration. The process consists of two steps: particle electrophoresis outside the capillaries and electrophoretic infiltration inside the capillaries. Due to the zero net flow of the ethanol across the capillary cross-section, there is no electro-osmotic flow contribution to the deposition rate. Hamaker's law was extended to the EPID process, i.e., the deposition yield is proportional to the electric field inside the capillaries. The total deposition yield is controlled by the slow step of the process, i.e., the rate of electrophoresis in the open suspension outside the capillaries. AlPO4 was proposed as a weak layer between oxide fibers and oxide matrix in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC's). AlPO 4 nano particles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation of Al 3+ and HPO42- with urea at 95°C. The solution pH basic region and amorphous AlPO4 precipitated of narrow size distribution with a mean particle size 50nm. Nextel 720 fibers were pretreated with

  6. Structure and property evaluation of a vacuum plasma sprayed nanostructured tungsten-hafnium carbide bulk composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rea, K.E.; Viswanathan, V.; Kruize, A. [Surface Engineering and Nanotechnology Facility (SNF), University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); AMPAC, Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering (MMAE), Nanoscience and Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Hosson, J.Th.M. de [Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, NL-9747 AG (Netherlands); O' Dell, S.; McKechnie, T. [Plasma Processes, Inc., 4914 Moores Mill Road, Huntsville, AL 35811 (United States); Rajagopalan, S.; Vaidyanathan, R. [AMPAC, Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering (MMAE), Nanoscience and Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Seal, S. [Surface Engineering and Nanotechnology Facility (SNF), University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); AMPAC, Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering (MMAE), Nanoscience and Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)], E-mail: sseal@mail.ucf.edu

    2008-03-25

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) forming of tungsten-based metal matrix nanocomposites (MMCs) has shown to be a cost effective and time saving method for the formation of bulk monolithic nanostructured thermo-mechanical components. Spray drying of powder feedstock appears to have a significant effect on the improved mechanical properties of the bulk nanocomposite. The reported elastic modulus of the nanocomposite nearly doubles due to the presence of HfC nano particulates in the W matrix. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) revealed the retention of nanostructures at the select process conditions and is correlated with the enhanced mechanical properties of the nanocomposite.

  7. Thermodynamic modelling of phase equilibrium in system Ti-B-Si-C, synthesis and phases composition of borides and carbides layers on titanic alloyVT-1 at electron beam treatment in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnyagina, N. N.; Khaltanova, V. M.; Lapina, A. E.; Dasheev, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Composite layers on the basis of carbides and borides the titan and silicon on titanic alloy VT-1 are generated at diffused saturation in vacuum. Formation in a composite of MAX phase Ti3SiC2 is shown. Thermodynamic research of phase equilibrium in systems Ti-Si-C and Ti-B-C in the conditions of high vacuum is executed. The thermodynamics, formation mechanisms of superfirm layers borides and carbides of the titan and silicon are investigated.

  8. Machining of fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komanduri, Ranga; Zhang, Bi; Vissa, Chandra M.

    Factors involved in machining of fiber-reinforced composites are reviewed. Consideration is given to properties of composites reinforced with boron filaments, glass fibers, aramid fibers, carbon fibers, and silicon carbide fibers and to polymer (organic) matrix composites, metal matrix composites, and ceramic matrix composites, as well as to the processes used in conventional machining of boron-titanium composites and of composites reinforced by each of these fibers. Particular attention is given to the methods of nonconventional machining, such as laser machining, water jet cutting, electrical discharge machining, and ultrasonic assisted machining. Also discussed are safety precautions which must be taken during machining of fiber-containing composites.

  9. Effects of B4C addition on the micro- structural and thermal properties of hot pressed SiC ceramic matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Keçeli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of paper is to evaluate effects of B4C addition on the microstructural and thermal properties of hot pressed SiC ceramic matrix composites.Design/methodology/approach: The effect of B4C addition on microstructural and thermal properties of the SiC-B4C powder composites were investigated after high energy milling and hot pressing. SiC powders containing 5wt%, 10wt%, 15wt% B4C were mechanically alloyed in a high energy ball mill for 8 h.Findings: Microstructural characterisation investigations (SEM, XRD were carried out on mechanically alloyed SiC powder composites containing 5 wt %, 10 wt %, 15 wt % B4C powders and on these powder composites sintered in vacuum at 50 MPa at 2100ºC. The thermal properties were characterised using DTA, TGA and dilatometer. The results were evaluated.Research limitations/implications: In this study, the effect of B4C addition on microstructural and mechanical properties of the SiC-B4C powder composites was investigated after high energy milling and hot pressing.Originality/value: Ceramic matrix composite (CMC material systems are stimulating a lot of interest to be used and provide unique properties for aircraft and land-based turbine engines, defence applications, rocket motors, aerospace hot structures and industrial applications. Boron carbide (B4C-silicon carbide (SiC ceramic composites are very promising armour materials because they are intrinsically very hard. Advanced SiC-based armour is desired so that the projectile is completely defeated without penetrating the ceramic armour.

  10. Structure and property evaluation of a vacuum plasma sprayed nanostructured tungsten-hafnium carbide bulk composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rea, K. E.; Viswanathan, V.; Kruize, A.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; O'Dell, S.; McKechnie, T.; Rajagopalan, S.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Seal, S.; O’Dell, S.

    2008-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) forming of tungsten-based metal matrix nanocomposites (MMCs) has shown to be a cost effective and time saving method for the formation of bulk monolithic nanostructured then no-mechanical components. Spray drying of powder feedstock appears to have a significant effect on

  11. Effect of microstructure on the high temperature strength of nitride bonded silicon carbide composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Rakshit; P K Das

    2002-10-01

    Four compositions of nitride bonded SiC were fabricated with varying particle size of SiC of ∼ 9.67, ∼ 13.79, ∼ 60 and their mixture with Si of ∼ 4.83 particle size. The green density and hence the open porosity of the shapes were varied between 1.83 to 2.09 g/cc and 33.3 to 26.8 vol.%, respectively. The effect of these parameters on room temperature and high temperature strength of the composite up to 1300°C in ambient condition were studied. The high temperature flexural strength of the composite of all compositions increased at 1200 and 1300°C because of oxidation of Si3N4 phase and blunting crack front. Formation of Si3N4 whisker was also observed. The strength of the mixture composition was maximum.

  12. Spark plasma sintering of silicon carbide, multi-walled carbon nanotube and graphene reinforced zirconium diboride ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaraman Yadhukulakrishnan, Govindaraajan

    Scope and Method of Study: Space vehicles re-entering the earth's atmosphere experience very high temperatures due to aerodynamic heating. Ultra-high temperature ceramics (UHTC) with melting point higher than 3200°C are promising materials for thermal protection systems of such space vehicles re-entering the earth's atmosphere. Among several UHTC systems ZrB2 based ceramic composites are particularly important for thermal protection systems due to their better mechanical and thermoelectric properties and high oxidation resistance. In this study spark plasma sintering of SiC, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and graphene nano platelets (GNP) reinforced ZrB2 ultra-high temperature ceramic matrix composites is reported. Findings and Conclusions: Systematic investigations on the effect of reinforcement type (SiC, CNTs and GNP) and content (10-40 vol.% SiC, 2-6 vol.% CNTs and 2-6 vol.% GNP) on densification behavior, microstructure development, and mechanical properties (microhardness, bi-axial flexural strength, and indentation fracture toughness) are reported. With the similar SPS parameters near-full densification (>99% relative density) was achieved with 10-40 vol.% SiC, 4-6 vol.% CNT reinforced composites. Highly dense composites were obtained in 4-6 vol.% GNP reinforced composites. The SiC, CNT and GNP reinforcement improved the indentation fracture toughness of the composites through a range of toughening mechanisms, including particle shearing, crack deflection at the particle-matrix interface, and grain pull-outs for ZrB2-SiC composites, CNT pull-outs and crack deflection in ZrB2-CNT composites and crack deflection, crack bridging and GNP sheet pull-out for ZrB2 -GNP composites.

  13. Development of a Low-Cost Process for Manufacturing of Ti-Metal Matrix Composite by Roll-Diffusion Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testani, C.; Ferraro, F.

    2010-06-01

    Composite materials with titanium-alloy matrix are currently the class of material with the highest specific resistance at temperatures up to 800 °C. The main hurdle to their application is their final cost. Even if it is clear that the costs of constituent materials are decreasing due to volume production effects, the production processing costs remain high due to the batch production approach. Centro Sviluppo Materiali’s (CSM) efforts have focused on the manufacturing process in order to obtain an innovative solution to reduce the manufacturing costs with respect to the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process that represents the standard production process for this class of materials. The new approach can allow a cost reduction of about 40%; this result was obtained by developing an experimental “diffusion bonding” plant for co-rolling at high temperature in a superplastic rolling regime, sheets of titanium alloy and monofilament silicon carbide fabrics. The experimental pilot plant was proposed for patent with RM2006A000261 in May 2006. This paper describes the manufacturing phases and process results. Moreover, has been shown that the diffusion in the solid state was obtained in a process window that was at least 100 times faster than that of HIP. High-temperature tensile tests were carried out on specimens machined from metallic matrix composite materials produced with the roll-diffusion bonding (RDB) process. The samples produced were also submitted to electrochemical dissolution tests of the metallic matrix in order to verify the geometric integrity of the fibers inside the matrix after the bonding phase. The results achieved as well as the process knowledge acquired with the CSM pilot plant are the base for further development of industrial application of the titanium roll-diffusion bonding.

  14. Reactive diffusion between silicon and niobium carbide: Application to the in-situ synthesis of a silicon carbide-niobium disilicide composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, C.R. [National Central Univ., Chung Li (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Woodford, J.; Chang, Y.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-10-01

    Reactive diffusion studies between NbC and Si were carried out at 1,300 C under a vacuum of 10{sup {minus}5} torr and a uniaxial pressure of 1 MPa. The annealing time ranged from 8 to 100 hours. The Si used was single crystal silicon; the NbC was hot-pressed powder compact. A NbSi{sub 2} + SiC two-phase reaction layer formed with NbSi{sub 2} as the matrix and SiC as discontinuous particles. The microstructure of the reaction product is homogeneous, dense, and fine. The NbSi{sub 2} grain size and SiC particle size are in the micron range. The growth of the reaction products follows parabolic kinetics. Extrapolation of the data to zero thickness suggests an apparent incubation time of 3.5 hours. However, for short annealing time (< 60 hours), the thickness data can be approximated by linear kinetics with an initial growth rate of about 2 {micro}m/hr. Based on these experimental observations, a growth mechanism for the reactive diffusion between Si single crystal and NbC powder compact is proposed. The authors propose that the nucleation sites for the SiC particles are at the voids of the NbC powder compact. This proposed nucleation mechanism offers a potential way of controlling the SiC particle size by changing the void size and void density of the NbC powder compact. This hypothesis, if proven to be true, will allow one to control mechanical properties of the composites by tailoring the SiC particles formed. It is also pointed out that the microstructure requires Si to be the dominant diffusing species and to diffuse through the reaction layer, while Nb and C only have to undergo local rearrangement.

  15. The Influence of Al4C3 Nanoparticles on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Metal Matrix Composites at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorozhtsov, S.; Kolarik, V.; Promakhov, V.; Zhukov, I.; Vorozhtsov, A.; Kuchenreuther-Hummel, V.

    2016-05-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) based on aluminum and reinforced with nonmetallic particles are of great practical interest due to their potentially high physico-mechanical properties. In this work, Al-Al4C3 composites were obtained by a hot-compacting method. Introduction of nanodiamonds produced by detonation to the Al powder in an amount of 10 wt.% led to the formation of ~15 wt.% of aluminum carbide during hot compacting. It was found that composite materials with the diamond content of 10 wt.% in the initial powder mix have an average microhardness of 1550 MPa, whilst the similarly compacted aluminum powder without reinforcing particles shows a hardness of 750 MPa. The mechanical properties of an Al-Al4C3 MMC at elevated test temperatures exceeded those of commercial casting aluminum alloys such as A356.

  16. Interfacial Engineering of Silicon Carbide Nanowire/Cellulose Microcrystal Paper toward High Thermal Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yimin; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Pan, Guiran; Sun, Jiajia; Hu, Jiantao; Huang, Yun; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jian-Bin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-11-16

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of electronic devices toward higher speed and better performance. However, high interfacial thermal resistance between fillers and matrix or between fillers and fillers has been one of the primary bottlenecks for the effective thermal conduction in polymer composites. Herein, we report on engineering interfacial structure of silicon carbide nanowire/cellulose microcrystal paper by generating silver nanostructures. We show that silver nanoparticle-deposited silicon carbide nanowires as fillers can effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of the matrix. The in-plane thermal conductivity of the resultant composite paper reaches as high as 34.0 W/m K, which is one order magnitude higher than that of conventional polymer composites. Fitting the measured thermal conductivity with theoretical models qualitatively demonstrates that silver nanoparticles bring the lower interfacial thermal resistances both at silicon carbide nanowire/cellulose microcrystal and silicon carbide nanowire/silicon carbide nanowire interfaces. This interfacial engineering approach provides a powerful tool for sophisticated fabrication of high-performance thermal-management materials.

  17. Nondestructive Damage Evaluation in Ceramic Matrix Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos G. Dassios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrared thermography (IRT and acoustic emission (AE are the two major nondestructive methodologies for evaluating damage in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs for aerospace applications. The two techniques are applied herein to assess and monitor damage formation and evolution in a SiC-fiber reinforced CMC loaded under cyclic and fatigue loading. The paper explains how IRT and AE can be used for the assessment of the material’s performance under fatigue. IRT and AE parameters are specifically used for the characterization of the complex damage mechanisms that occur during CMC fracture, and they enable the identification of the micromechanical processes that control material failure, mainly crack formation and propagation. Additionally, these nondestructive parameters help in early prediction of the residual life of the material and in establishing the fatigue limit of materials rapidly and accurately.

  18. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This project demonstrated that higher temperature capabilities of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) can be used to reduce emissions and improve fuel consumption in gas turbine engines. The work involved closely coupling aerothermal and structural analyses for the first-stage vane of a high-pressure turbine (HPT). These vanes are actively cooled, typically using film cooling. Ceramic materials have structural and thermal properties different from conventional metals used for the first-stage HPT vane. This project identified vane configurations that satisfy CMC structural strength and life constraints while maintaining vane aerodynamic efficiency and reducing vane cooling to improve engine performance and reduce emissions. The project examined modifications to vane internal configurations to achieve the desired objectives. Thermal and pressure stresses are equally important, and both were analyzed using an ANSYS® structural analysis. Three-dimensional fluid and heat transfer analyses were used to determine vane aerodynamic performance and heat load distributions.

  19. Nondestructive damage evaluation in ceramic matrix composites for aerospace applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassios, Konstantinos G; Kordatos, Evangelos Z; Aggelis, Dimitrios G; Matikas, Theodore E

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) and acoustic emission (AE) are the two major nondestructive methodologies for evaluating damage in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for aerospace applications. The two techniques are applied herein to assess and monitor damage formation and evolution in a SiC-fiber reinforced CMC loaded under cyclic and fatigue loading. The paper explains how IRT and AE can be used for the assessment of the material's performance under fatigue. IRT and AE parameters are specifically used for the characterization of the complex damage mechanisms that occur during CMC fracture, and they enable the identification of the micromechanical processes that control material failure, mainly crack formation and propagation. Additionally, these nondestructive parameters help in early prediction of the residual life of the material and in establishing the fatigue limit of materials rapidly and accurately.

  20. Permeability characterization of polymer matrix composites by RTM/VARTM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, N. K.; Sirisha, M.; Inani, A.

    2014-02-01

    Cost effective manufacturing of high performance polymer matrix composite structures is an important consideration for the growth of its use. Resin transfer moulding (RTM) and vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) are the efficient processes for the cost effective manufacturing. These processes involve transfer of resin from the tank into the reinforcing preform loaded into a closed mould. Resin flow within the preform and reinforcement wetting can be characterized using the permeability properties. Different reinforcement and resin properties and process parameters affecting the permeability are discussed based on state of art literature review covering experimental studies. General theory for the determination of permeability is presented. Based on the literature review, permeability values for different reinforcement architecture, resin and processing conditions are presented. Further, possible sources of error during experimental determination of permeability and issues involved with reproducibility are discussed.