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Sample records for capture-the npdgamma experiment

  1. The NPDGamma Experiment at LANSCE

    CERN Document Server

    Gericke, M T; Chupp, T E; Coulter, K P; Dabaghyan, M; Dawkins, M; Desai, D; Freedman, S J; Gentile, T R; Gillis, R C; Greene, G L; Hersman, F W; Ino, T; Jones, G L; Kandes, M; Lauss, B; Leuschner, M B; Lozowski, W R; Mahurin, R; Masuda, Y; Mason, M; Mitchell, G S; Muto, S; Nann, H; Page, S A; Penttila, S I; Ramsay, W D; Santra, S B; Seo, P N; Sharapov, E I; Smith, T B; Snow, W M; Wilburn, W S; Yuan, V; Zhu, H

    2005-01-01

    The NPDGamma collaboration has constructed and commissioned an apparatus to determine the size of the pion-nucleon coupling constant in the parity non conserving pion exchange weak potential for N-N interactions. This coupling constant is directly proportional to the parity violating up-down asymmetry in the angular distribution of gamma rays with respect to the neutron spin direction in the capture of polarized cold neutrons on protons. The measurement of the weak pNN coupling will provide a test for the effective theory, describing the nucleon-nucleon interaction as mediated by the exchange of mesons, and provide results against which to compare models describing QCD at low energy. NPDGamma is located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and utilizes the special features of cold spallation neutrons to make it possible to measure very small gamma ray asymmetries. In this paper, we present the motivation for the experiment and report on experimental setup as well as the current status of the proj...

  2. GEANT4 Simulation of the NPDGamma Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frlez, Emil

    2014-03-01

    The n-> + p --> d + γ experiment, currently taking data at the Oak Ridge SNS facility, is a high-precision measurement of weak nuclear forces at low energies. Detecting the correlation between the cold neutron spin and photon direction in the capture of neutrons on Liquid Hydrogen (LH) target, the experiment is sensitive to the properties of neutral weak current. We have written a GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation of the NPDGamma detector that, in addition to the active CsI detectors, also includes different targets and passive materials as well as the beam line elements. The neutron beam energy spectrum, its profiles, divergencies, and time-of-flight are simulated in detail. We have used the code to cross-calibrate the positions of (i) polarized LH target, (ii) Aluminum target, and (iii) CCl4 target. The responses of the 48 CsI detectors in the simulation were fixed using data taken on the LH target. Both neutron absorption as well as scattering and thermal processes were turned on in the GEANT4 physics lists. We use the results to simulate in detail the data obtained with different targets used in the experiment within a comprehensive analysis. This work is supported by NSF grant PHY-1307328.

  3. An analysis of the parity violating asymmetry of polarized neutron capture in hydrogen from the NPDgamma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Elise

    The NPDgamma Experiment is used to study the n[special character omitted] + p → d + gamma reaction for the purpose of examining the hadronic weak interaction. The nucleon-nucleon interaction is overwhelmingly mediated by the strong force, however, the weak part can be extracted by a study of its parity violating manifestations. When neutrons are incident on protons, deuterons and 2.2 MeV gamma rays are produced. If the incoming neutrons are polarized, the parity violating weak interaction gives rise to a measured spatial asymmetry, A , in the outgoing gamma rays, as sigma[special character omitted] n · k[special character omitted] gamma is parity odd. At low energies, the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction can be modeled as meson exchange and characterized with six parameters. NPDgamma is sensitive to one of these parameters, hpi. Previous measurements that extrapolate hpi from more complicated interactions disagree, and disagree with the theoretical reasonable range. Additionally, a previous iteration of the NPDgamma Experiment performed at Los Alamos National Lab was statistics limited in its measurement of Agamma. For this reason, a new measurement was performed at the high neutron flux Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Lab. In the experiment, a high ux of cold neutrons was polarized to ˜95% by a supermirror polarizer, the spins flipped in a defined sequence by a radio-frequency spin rotator, and then the neutrons captured on a 16L liquid para-hydrogen target, which emits gamma-rays asymmetrically upon capture. The gamma-rays are detected in a 3pi array of 48 CsI crystal detectors. This thesis discusses the NPDgamma Experiment in detail, and includes an analysis of subset of the NPDgamma data that has unique timing and data acquisition properties that preclude it being analyzed with the combined data set. Agamma was extracted with a result of (6.254 +/- 37.694) x 10-9.

  4. Learning Practice-Based Research Methods: Capturing the Experiences of MSW Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natland, Sidsel; Weissinger, Erika; Graaf, Genevieve; Carnochan, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The literature on teaching research methods to social work students identifies many challenges, such as dealing with the tensions related to producing research relevant to practice, access to data to teach practice-based research, and limited student interest in learning research methods. This is an exploratory study of the learning experiences of…

  5. Navigating and Negotiating Pathways for Success: Capturing the Life Experiences of Urban Youth and Their Caregivers. Research Brief Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Promise, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This work is part of a larger study ["Navigating and Negotiating Pathways for Success: A Thematic Analysis of the Life Experiences of Urban Youth and Their Caregivers"] of how communities come together to support young people, and how young people and their families navigate and negotiate those communities to succeed academically and…

  6. Capturing the Daylight Dividend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Boyce; Claudia Hunter; Owen Howlett

    2006-04-30

    Capturing the Daylight Dividend conducted activities to build market demand for daylight as a means of improving indoor environmental quality, overcoming technological barriers to effective daylighting, and informing and assisting state and regional market transformation and resource acquisition program implementation efforts. The program clarified the benefits of daylight by examining whole building systems energy interactions between windows, lighting, heating, and air conditioning in daylit buildings, and daylighting's effect on the human circadian system and productivity. The project undertook work to advance photosensors, dimming systems, and ballasts, and provided technical training in specifying and operating daylighting controls in buildings. Future daylighting work is recommended in metric development, technology development, testing, training, education, and outreach.

  7. The Australian Research Quality Framework: A Live Experiment in Capturing the Social, Economic, Environmental, and Cultural Returns of Publicly Funded Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Claire

    2008-01-01

    The author regards development of Australia's ill-fated Research Quality Framework (RQF) as a "live experiment" in determining the most appropriate approach to evaluating the extra-academic returns, or "impact," of a nation's publicly funded research. The RQF was at the forefront of an international movement toward richer qualitative,…

  8. The effectiveness of videoconferencing for teaching English online to Chinese children through life science instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Jon M.

    The NPDgamma Experiment is used to study the n[special character omitted] + p → d + gamma reaction for the purpose of examining the hadronic weak interaction. The nucleon-nucleon interaction is overwhelmingly mediated by the strong force, however, the weak part can be extracted by a study of its parity violating manifestations. When neutrons are incident on protons, deuterons and 2.2 MeV gamma rays are produced. If the incoming neutrons are polarized, the parity violating weak interaction gives rise to a measured spatial asymmetry, A , in the outgoing gamma rays, as sigma[special character omitted] n · k[special character omitted] gamma is parity odd. At low energies, the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction can be modeled as meson exchange and characterized with six parameters. NPDgamma is sensitive to one of these parameters, hpi. Previous measurements that extrapolate hpi from more complicated interactions disagree, and disagree with the theoretical reasonable range. Additionally, a previous iteration of the NPDgamma Experiment performed at Los Alamos National Lab was statistics limited in its measurement of Agamma. For this reason, a new measurement was performed at the high neutron flux Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Lab. In the experiment, a high ux of cold neutrons was polarized to ˜95% by a supermirror polarizer, the spins flipped in a defined sequence by a radio-frequency spin rotator, and then the neutrons captured on a 16L liquid para-hydrogen target, which emits gamma-rays asymmetrically upon capture. The gamma-rays are detected in a 3pi array of 48 CsI crystal detectors. This thesis discusses the NPDgamma Experiment in detail, and includes an analysis of subset of the NPDgamma data that has unique timing and data acquisition properties that preclude it being analyzed with the combined data set. Agamma was extracted with a result of (6.254 +/- 37.694) x 10-9.

  9. How well do questionnaires on symptoms in neck-shoulder disorders capture the experiences of those who suffer from neck-shoulder disorders? A content analysis of questionnaires and interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brulin Christine

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has indicated neck-shoulder disorders to have a fluctuating course incorporating a variety of symptoms. These findings awoke our interest to make a comparison between symptoms experienced by people affected with the disorder and the content of questionnaires that assess pain and other symptoms in neck-shoulder disorders. Thus the aims of this study were: -to explore the symptoms experienced by people with non-specific neck-shoulder problems, as well as experiences of nuances and temporal variations (fluctuations of symptoms; -to investigate which sources were used in the development of ten questionnaires for assessing pain and other symptoms in the neck-shoulder; -to analyse the item content of the questionnaires; -to analyse the correspondence between the item content of the questionnaires and the symptoms described by the informants. Methods Content analysis of interviews with 40 people with non-specific neck-shoulder pain, and 10 questionnaires used to assess pain and other symptoms in neck-shoulder disorders. Results The interviews revealed a variety of symptoms indicating a bodily, mental/cognitive, and emotional engagement, and more general and severe symptoms than are usually considered in neck-shoulder questionnaires. Taking all questionnaires together many of the symptoms were considered, but most questionnaires only included a few of them. The informants were able to distinguish fluctuation of symptoms, and a variety of different qualities which were not usually considered in the questionnaires. Only two questionnaires had made use of the opinions of affected people in the development. Conclusion Few of the questionnaires had made use of the experiences of affected people in the development. The correspondence between the symptoms expressed by those affected and the content of the questionnaires was low. A variety of symptoms were expressed by the interviewees, and the participants were also able

  10. Urban Pulse: Capturing the Rhythm of Cities

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, Fabio; Lage, Marcos; Zhao, Kai; Gonçalves, Bruno; Wilson, Luc; Hsieh, Mondrian; Silva, Cláudio T

    2016-01-01

    Cities are inherently dynamic. Interesting patterns of behavior typically manifest at several key areas of a city over multiple temporal resolutions. Studying these patterns can greatly help a variety of experts ranging from city planners and architects to human behavioral experts. Recent technological innovations have enabled the collection of enormous amounts of data that can help in these studies. However, techniques using these data sets typically focus on understanding the data in the context of the city, thus failing to capture the dynamic aspects of the city. The goal of this work is to instead understand the city in the context of multiple urban data sets. To do so, we define the concept of an "urban pulse" which captures the spatio-temporal activity in a city across multiple temporal resolutions. The prominent pulses in a city are obtained using the topology of the data sets, and are characterized as a set of beats. The beats are then used to analyze and compare different pulses. We also design a vis...

  11. Capturing the Value of Biomedical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, Stefano; Jamaleddine, Zeina

    2016-03-24

    Assessing the real-world impact of biomedical research is notoriously difficult. Here, we present the framework for building a prospective science-centered information system from scratch that has been afforded by the Sidra Medical and Research Center in Qatar. This experiment is part of the global conversation on maximizing returns on research investment.

  12. Capturing the Complexity of Additively Manufactured Microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livescu, Veronica [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bronkhorst, Curt Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vander Wiel, Scott Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mayeur, Jason Rhea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Donald William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dippo, Olivia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-12

    The underlying mechanisms and kinetics controlling damage nucleation and growth as a function of material microstructure and loading paths are discussed. These experiments indicate that structural features such as grain boundaries, grain size distribution, grain morphology crystallographic texture are all factors that influence mechanical behavior.

  13. Capturing the stochastic mechanical behavior of micro and nanopillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantinidis, Avraam A. [Lab of Mechanics and Materials, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Aifantis, Katerina E., E-mail: aifantis@email.arizona.edu [Lab of Mechanics and Materials, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Civil Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); De Hosson, Jeff Th.M. [Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Groningen 9747AG (Netherlands)

    2014-03-01

    Experimental evidence has illustrated that micropillar deformation is highly stochastic, as the stress–strain curves are manifested by multiple strain bursts. Although initial theoretical works employing gradient plasticity can predict the stress–strain response of individual pillars, they cannot capture the stochastic effects observed for multiple same diameter specimens. This article presents simulations that are not only in precise qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental stress–strain curves for varying diameter pillars, but can also account for the observed stochasticity in same diameter micropillars. This is accomplished by implementing gradient plasticity within a cellular automaton, while allowing the yield-stress to randomly vary within the micropillar. In concluding, it is shown that the aforementioned numerical code can also capture the stress drops and size dependent strengthening observed in metallic glass nanopillars.

  14. Capturing the Meaning of Internet Search Queries by Taxonomy Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikk, Domonkos; Kardkovács, Zsolt T.; Bánsághi, Zoltán

    Capturing the meaning of internet search queries can significantly improve the effectiveness of search retrieval. Users often have problem to find relevant answer to their queries, particularly, when the posted query is ambiguous. The orientation of the user can be greatly facilitated, if answers are grouped into topics of a fixed subject taxonomy. In this manner, the original problem can be transformed to the labelling of queries — and consequently, the answers — with the topic names. Thus the original problem is transformed into a classification set-up. This paper introduces our Ferrety algorithm that performs topic assignment, which also works when there is no directly available training data that describes the semantics of the subject taxonomy. The approach is presented via the example of ACM KDD Cup 2005 problem, where Ferrety was awarded for precision and creativity.

  15. Capturing the superorganism: a formal theory of group adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, A; Grafen, A

    2009-04-01

    Adaptation is conventionally regarded as occurring at the level of the individual organism. However, in recent years there has been a revival of interest in the possibility for group adaptations and superorganisms. Here, we provide the first formal theory of group adaptation. In particular: (1) we clarify the distinction between group selection and group adaptation, framing the former in terms of gene frequency change and the latter in terms of optimization; (2) we capture the superorganism in the form of a 'group as maximizing agent' analogy that links an optimization program to a model of a group-structured population; (3) we demonstrate that between-group selection can lead to group adaptation, but only in rather special circumstances; (4) we provide formal support for the view that between-group selection is the best definition for 'group selection'; and (5) we reveal that mechanisms of conflict resolution such as policing cannot be regarded as group adaptations. PMID:19210588

  16. Einstein in Hollywood: Capturing the Scientific Minds of Movie Buffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Chadwick

    2010-10-01

    The film industry captures the minds of most students today. Americans spend one-half of their leisure time watching television, and students may often neglect their studies to catch the latest episode of Desperate Housewives or the new release of Leatherheads. Science teachers are challenged to compete with these seemingly unconquerable forces. One alternative to battling the influence of multimedia in its onslaught against the scientific minds of our youth is to embrace these monsters and tame them. By relating what the students know best (who kissed who in Walk the Line) with what they know least (thermodynamics, e.g.), teachers form connections in the minds of their students that will last for many years. In this session, the presenter will demonstrate an inquiry-based method employing clips from popular movies to learn physics. He will show movie clips from several different areas of physics, examine the particular clips in light of those physical principles, and discuss how to use the clips in the classroom.

  17. Capturing the complexity of uncertainty language to maximise its use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanchich, Marie; Sirota, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Uncertainty is often communicated verbally, using uncertainty phrases such as 'there is a small risk of earthquake', 'flooding is possible' or 'it is very likely the sea level will rise'. Prior research has only examined a limited number of properties of uncertainty phrases: mainly the probability conveyed (e.g., 'a small chance' convey a small probability whereas 'it is likely' convey a high probability). We propose a new analytical framework that captures more of the complexity of uncertainty phrases by studying their semantic, pragmatic and syntactic properties. Further, we argue that the complexity of uncertainty phrases is functional and can be leveraged to best describe uncertain outcomes and achieve the goals of speakers. We will present findings from a corpus study and an experiment where we assessed the following properties of uncertainty phrases: probability conveyed, subjectivity, valence, nature of the subject, grammatical category of the uncertainty quantifier and whether the quantifier elicits a positive or a negative framing. Natural language processing techniques applied to corpus data showed that people use a very large variety of uncertainty phrases representing different configurations of the properties of uncertainty phrases (e.g., phrases that convey different levels of subjectivity, phrases with different grammatical construction). In addition, the corpus analysis uncovered that uncertainty phrases commonly studied in psychology are not the most commonly used in real life. In the experiment we manipulated the amount of evidence indicating that a fact was true and whether the participant was required to prove the fact was true or that it was false. Participants produced a phrase to communicate the likelihood that the fact was true (e.g., 'it is not sure…', 'I am convinced that…'). The analyses of the uncertainty phrases produced showed that participants leveraged the properties of uncertainty phrases to reflect the strength of evidence but

  18. An interpolatory ansatz captures the physics of one-dimensional confined Fermi systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, M E S; Dehkharghani, A S; Volosniev, A G; Lindgren, E J; Zinner, N T

    2016-01-01

    Interacting one-dimensional quantum systems play a pivotal role in physics. Exact solutions can be obtained for the homogeneous case using the Bethe ansatz and bosonisation techniques. However, these approaches are not applicable when external confinement is present. Recent theoretical advances beyond the Bethe ansatz and bosonisation allow us to predict the behaviour of one-dimensional confined systems with strong short-range interactions, and new experiments with cold atomic Fermi gases have already confirmed these theories. Here we demonstrate that a simple linear combination of the strongly interacting solution with the well-known solution in the limit of vanishing interactions provides a simple and accurate description of the system for all values of the interaction strength. This indicates that one can indeed capture the physics of confined one-dimensional systems by knowledge of the limits using wave functions that are much easier to handle than the output of typical numerical approaches. We demonstrate our scheme for experimentally relevant systems with up to six particles. Moreover, we show that our method works also in the case of mixed systems of particles with different masses. This is an important feature because these systems are known to be non-integrable and thus not solvable by the Bethe ansatz technique. PMID:27324113

  19. An interpolatory ansatz captures the physics of one-dimensional confined Fermi systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, M E S; Dehkharghani, A S; Volosniev, A G; Lindgren, E J; Zinner, N T

    2016-01-01

    Interacting one-dimensional quantum systems play a pivotal role in physics. Exact solutions can be obtained for the homogeneous case using the Bethe ansatz and bosonisation techniques. However, these approaches are not applicable when external confinement is present. Recent theoretical advances beyond the Bethe ansatz and bosonisation allow us to predict the behaviour of one-dimensional confined systems with strong short-range interactions, and new experiments with cold atomic Fermi gases have already confirmed these theories. Here we demonstrate that a simple linear combination of the strongly interacting solution with the well-known solution in the limit of vanishing interactions provides a simple and accurate description of the system for all values of the interaction strength. This indicates that one can indeed capture the physics of confined one-dimensional systems by knowledge of the limits using wave functions that are much easier to handle than the output of typical numerical approaches. We demonstrate our scheme for experimentally relevant systems with up to six particles. Moreover, we show that our method works also in the case of mixed systems of particles with different masses. This is an important feature because these systems are known to be non-integrable and thus not solvable by the Bethe ansatz technique.

  20. The New Millennium and an Education That Captures the Basic Spirit of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    This document discusses reflections of the old and new millennium on education that capture the basic spirit of science. The explanation includes basic scientific ideas in physical sciences, earth systems, solar system and space; living systems; basic scientific thinking; the basic distinction between science and technology; basic connections…

  1. The BlackBerry Project: Capturing the Content of Adolescents' Text Messaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Marion K.; Rosen, Lisa H.; More, David; Ehrenreich, Samuel E.; Gentsch, Joanna K.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an innovative method for capturing the content of adolescents' electronic communication on handheld devices: text messaging, e-mail, and instant messaging. In an ongoing longitudinal study, adolescents were provided with BlackBerry devices with service plans paid for by the investigators, and use of text messaging was…

  2. Capturing the Chimera: Ideology and Persuasion in the Rhetoric of Soulforce

    OpenAIRE

    Null, Matthew Todd

    2008-01-01

    Capturing the Chimera: Ideology and Persuasion in the Rhetoric of Soulforce Matthew Todd Null (ABSTRACT) For more than half a century, gay rights organizations have sought cultural and political equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals in society. The organization Soulforce continues that legacy, but from a distinctive perspective. Soulforce, has positioned itself in a unique playing field by speaking directly to religious leaders and organizations in ...

  3. Capturing the two dimensions of residential segregation at the neighborhood level for health research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi eOka

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Two conceptual and methodological foundations of segregation studies are that (i segregation involves more than one group, and (ii segregation measures need to quantify how different population groups are distributed across space. Therefore, percentage of population belonging to a group is not an appropriate measure of segregation because it does not describe how populations are spread across different areal units or neighborhoods. In principle, evenness and isolation are the two distinct dimensions of segregation that capture the spatial patterns of population groups. To portray people’s daily environment more accurately, segregation measures need to account for the spatial relationships between areal units and to reflect the situations at the neighborhood scale. For these reasons, the use of local spatial entropy-based diversity index (SHi and local spatial isolation index (Si to capture the evenness and isolation dimensions of segregation, respectively, are preferable. However, these two local spatial segregation indexes have rarely been incorporated into health research. Rather ineffective and insufficient segregation measures have been used in previous studies. Hence, this paper empirically demonstrates how the two measures can reflect the two distinct dimensions of segregation at the neighborhood level, and argues conceptually and set the stage for their future use to effectively and meaningfully examine the relationships between residential segregation and health.

  4. Capturing the two dimensions of residential segregation at the neighborhood level for health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Masayoshi; Wong, David W S

    2014-01-01

    Two conceptual and methodological foundations of segregation studies are that (i) segregation involves more than one group, and (ii) segregation measures need to quantify how different population groups are distributed across space. Therefore, percentage of population belonging to a group is not an appropriate measure of segregation because it does not describe how populations are spread across different areal units or neighborhoods. In principle, evenness and isolation are the two distinct dimensions of segregation that capture the spatial patterns of population groups. To portray people's daily environment more accurately, segregation measures need to account for the spatial relationships between areal units and to reflect the situations at the neighborhood scale. For these reasons, the use of local spatial entropy-based diversity index (SHi ) and local spatial isolation index (Si ) to capture the evenness and isolation dimensions of segregation, respectively, are preferable. However, these two local spatial segregation indexes have rarely been incorporated into health research. Rather ineffective and insufficient segregation measures have been used in previous studies. Hence, this paper empirically demonstrates how the two measures can reflect the two distinct dimensions of segregation at the neighborhood level, and argues conceptually and set the stage for their future use to effectively and meaningfully examine the relationships between residential segregation and health. PMID:25202687

  5. Capturing the electromagnetic counterparts of binary neutron star mergers through low latency gravitational wave triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Q; Rowlinson, A; Gao, H; Zhang, B; Tingay, S J; Boer, M; Wen, L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the prospects for joint low-latency gravitational wave (GW) detection and prompt electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs). Assuming BNS mergers are associated with short duration gamma ray bursts (SGRBs), we evaluate if rapid EM follow-ups can capture the prompt emission, early engine activity or reveal any potential by-products such as magnetars or fast radio bursts. To examine the expected performance of low-latency search pipelines we simulate a population of coalescing BNSs using realistic distributions of source parameters to estimate the detectability and localisation efficiency at different times before merger. To determine what EM observations can be achieved, we consider a selection of facilities with GW follow-up agreements in place, from low-frequency radio to high energy $\\gamma$-ray; we assess the performance of each using observational SGRB flux data corrected to the range of the advanced GW interferometric detectors LIGO and Virgo. We ...

  6. Employee performance in the knowledge economy: Capturing the keys to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauth, Rebecca; Bevan, Stephen; Mills, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The present study examines the key determinants of employee performance in a knowledge-intensive service firm located in the UK. Using data from a pilot study, we mapped eight performance-related behaviors to two measures of global performance to isolate the strongest predictors of the latter. We also examined the degree to which these associations varied depending on whether employees or their managers reported on performance as well as according to the degree of complexity (eg, ongoing learning, multitasking, problem solving, etc.) present in workers' jobs. Findings revealed that more traditional employee performance-related behaviors (eg, dependability) as well as behaviors that have likely increased in importance in the knowledge economy (eg, sharing ideas and information) accounted for the most variance in reported global performance. Sharing ideas and information was a particularly important predictor for workers in complex jobs. When the performance-related behaviors were regressed on the organization's annual employee appraisal ratings, only dependability and time management behaviors were significantly associated with the outcome. As organizational success increasingly is dependent on intangible inputs stemming from the ideas, innovations and creativity of its workforce, organizations need to ensure that they are capturing the full range of behaviors that help to define their success. Further research with a diverse range of organizations will help define this further. PMID:22110316

  7. Data journeys: Capturing the socio-material constitution of data objects and flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Bates

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the development and piloting of a new methodology for illuminating the socio-material constitution of data objects and flows as data move between different sites of practice. The data journeys approach contributes to the development of critical, qualitative methodologies that can address the geographic and temporal scale of emerging knowledge infrastructures, and capture the ‘life of data’ from their initial generation through to re-use in different contexts. We discuss the theoretical development of the data journeys methodology and the application of the approach on a project examining meteorological data on their journey from initial production through to being re-used in climate science and financial markets. We then discuss three key conceptual findings from this project about: (1 the socio-material constitution of digital data objects, (2 ‘friction’ in the movement of data through space and time and (3 the mutability of digital data as a material property that contributes to driving the movement of data between different sites of practice.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations capture the misfolding of the bovine prion protein at acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chin Jung; Daggett, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease, is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that is transmissible to humans and that is currently incurable. BSE is caused by the prion protein (PrP), which adopts two conformers; PrPC is the native innocuous form, which is α-helix rich; and PrPSc is the β-sheet rich misfolded form, which is infectious and forms neurotoxic species. Acidic pH induces the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of bovine PrP at various pH regimes. An acidic pH environment induced conformational changes that were not observed in neutral pH simulations. Putative misfolded structures, with nonnative β-strands formed in the flexible N-terminal domain, were found in acidic pH simulations. Two distinct pathways were observed for the formation of nonnative β-strands: at low pH, hydrophobic contacts with M129 nucleated the nonnative β-strand; at mid-pH, polar contacts involving Q168 and D178 facilitated the formation of a hairpin at the flexible N-terminus. These mid- and low pH simulations capture the process of nonnative β-strand formation, thereby improving our understanding of how PrPC misfolds into the β-sheet rich PrPSc and how pH factors into the process. PMID:24970211

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Capture the Misfolding of the Bovine Prion Protein at Acidic pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Jung Cheng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, or mad cow disease, is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that is transmissible to humans and that is currently incurable. BSE is caused by the prion protein (PrP, which adopts two conformers; PrPC is the native innocuous form, which is α-helix rich; and PrPSc is the β-sheet rich misfolded form, which is infectious and forms neurotoxic species. Acidic pH induces the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of bovine PrP at various pH regimes. An acidic pH environment induced conformational changes that were not observed in neutral pH simulations. Putative misfolded structures, with nonnative β-strands formed in the flexible N-terminal domain, were found in acidic pH simulations. Two distinct pathways were observed for the formation of nonnative β-strands: at low pH, hydrophobic contacts with M129 nucleated the nonnative β-strand; at mid-pH, polar contacts involving Q168 and D178 facilitated the formation of a hairpin at the flexible N-terminus. These mid- and low pH simulations capture the process of nonnative β-strand formation, thereby improving our understanding of how PrPC misfolds into the β-sheet rich PrPSc and how pH factors into the process.

  10. Capturing the Dynamics of Unsteady Inviscid and Viscous Hydrogen-Air Detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romick, Christopher; Aslam, Tariq; Powers, Joseph

    2012-11-01

    We consider the calculation of one-dimensional unsteady detonation in a mixture of calorically imperfect ideal gases with detailed kinetics. Both inviscid and viscous detonations of an initially stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixture at ambient conditions of 293 . 15 K and 0 . 421 atm are considered using a chemical mechanism composed of 19 reversible reactions, containing 9 species and 3 elements. The use of detailed kinetics introduces multiple reaction length scales, and their interaction gives rise to complex dynamics. In the inviscid limit, both shock-capturing and shock-fitting are used on a uniform grid. The diffusive behavior is predicted using a wavelet-based adaptive mesh refinement technique and includes multi-component species, momentum, and energy diffusion, as well as DuFour and Soret effects. In the inviscid limit when using shock-capturing, finer resolutions are necessary to accurately capture the dynamics in the unstable regime than when using shock-fitting. At the resolutions necessary for accurate shock-capturing, diffusion can play a crucial role in determining the overall behavior. Near the neutral stability point, the addition of physical diffusions dampens the amplitude of oscillations significantly. Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering.

  11. Employee performance in the knowledge economy: Capturing the keys to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauth, Rebecca; Bevan, Stephen; Mills, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The present study examines the key determinants of employee performance in a knowledge-intensive service firm located in the UK. Using data from a pilot study, we mapped eight performance-related behaviors to two measures of global performance to isolate the strongest predictors of the latter. We also examined the degree to which these associations varied depending on whether employees or their managers reported on performance as well as according to the degree of complexity (eg, ongoing learning, multitasking, problem solving, etc.) present in workers' jobs. Findings revealed that more traditional employee performance-related behaviors (eg, dependability) as well as behaviors that have likely increased in importance in the knowledge economy (eg, sharing ideas and information) accounted for the most variance in reported global performance. Sharing ideas and information was a particularly important predictor for workers in complex jobs. When the performance-related behaviors were regressed on the organization's annual employee appraisal ratings, only dependability and time management behaviors were significantly associated with the outcome. As organizational success increasingly is dependent on intangible inputs stemming from the ideas, innovations and creativity of its workforce, organizations need to ensure that they are capturing the full range of behaviors that help to define their success. Further research with a diverse range of organizations will help define this further.

  12. Capturing the spectrum of interaction effects in genetic association studies by simulated evaporative cooling network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A McKinney

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from human genetic studies of several disorders suggests that interactions between alleles at multiple genes play an important role in influencing phenotypic expression. Analytical methods for identifying Mendelian disease genes are not appropriate when applied to common multigenic diseases, because such methods investigate association with the phenotype only one genetic locus at a time. New strategies are needed that can capture the spectrum of genetic effects, from Mendelian to multifactorial epistasis. Random Forests (RF and Relief-F are two powerful machine-learning methods that have been studied as filters for genetic case-control data due to their ability to account for the context of alleles at multiple genes when scoring the relevance of individual genetic variants to the phenotype. However, when variants interact strongly, the independence assumption of RF in the tree node-splitting criterion leads to diminished importance scores for relevant variants. Relief-F, on the other hand, was designed to detect strong interactions but is sensitive to large backgrounds of variants that are irrelevant to classification of the phenotype, which is an acute problem in genome-wide association studies. To overcome the weaknesses of these data mining approaches, we develop Evaporative Cooling (EC feature selection, a flexible machine learning method that can integrate multiple importance scores while removing irrelevant genetic variants. To characterize detailed interactions, we construct a genetic-association interaction network (GAIN, whose edges quantify the synergy between variants with respect to the phenotype. We use simulation analysis to show that EC is able to identify a wide range of interaction effects in genetic association data. We apply the EC filter to a smallpox vaccine cohort study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and infer a GAIN for a collection of SNPs associated with adverse events. Our results suggest an important

  13. Employee performance in the knowledge economy: Capturing the keys to success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Fauth

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca Fauth1, Stephen Bevan1, Peter Mills2,31The Work Foundation, London, UK; 2CIGNA, London, UK; 3The Whittington Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The present study examines the key determinants of employee performance in a knowledge-intensive service firm located in the UK. Using data from a pilot study, we mapped eight performance-related behaviors to two measures of global performance to isolate the strongest predictors of the latter. We also examined the degree to which these associations varied depending on whether employees or their managers reported on performance as well as according to the degree of complexity (eg, ongoing learning, multitasking, problem solving, etc. present in workers’ jobs. Findings revealed that more traditional employee performance-related behaviors (eg, dependability as well as behaviors that have likely increased in importance in the knowledge economy (eg, sharing ideas and information accounted for the most variance in reported global performance. Sharing ideas and information was a particularly important predictor for workers in complex jobs. When the performance-related behaviors were regressed on the organization’s annual employee appraisal ratings, only dependability and time management behaviors were significantly associated with the outcome. As organizational success increasingly is dependent on intangible inputs stemming from the ideas, innovations and creativity of its workforce, organizations need to ensure that they are capturing the full range of behaviors that help to define their success. Further research with a diverse range of organizations will help defi ne this further.Keywords: employee performance, knowledge economy, job complexity

  14. Capturing the electromagnetic counterparts of binary neutron star mergers through low-latency gravitational wave triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Q.; Howell, E. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Gao, H.; Zhang, B.; Tingay, S. J.; Boër, M.; Wen, L.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the prospects for joint low-latency gravitational wave (GW) detection and prompt electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs). For BNS mergers associated with short duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs), we for the first time evaluate the feasibility of rapid EM follow-ups to capture the prompt emission, early engine activity, or reveal any potential by-products such as magnetars or fast radio bursts. To achieve our goal, we first simulate a population of coalescing BNSs using realistic distributions of source parameters and estimate the detectability and localization efficiency at different times before merger. We then use a selection of facilities with GW follow-up agreements in place, from low-frequency radio to high-energy γ-ray to assess the prospects of prompt follow-up. We quantify our assessment using observational SGRB flux data extrapolated to be within the horizon distances of the advanced GW interferometric detectors LIGO and Virgo and to the prompt phase immediately following the binary merger. Our results illustrate that while challenging, breakthrough multimessenger science is possible with EM follow-up facilities with fast responses and wide fields-of-view. We demonstrate that the opportunity to catch the prompt stage (<5 s) of SGRBs can be enhanced by speeding up the detection pipelines of both GW observatories and EM follow-up facilities. We further show that the addition of an Australian instrument to the optimal detector network could possibly improve the angular resolution by a factor of 2 and thereby contribute significantly to GW-EM multimessenger astronomy.

  15. How can we capture the subject's perspective? An evidence-based approach for the social scientist

    OpenAIRE

    Lahlou, Saadi

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the methodological gap that impedes the collection of empirical data on subjective experience. It describes a new family of methods for social science research (Subjective Evidence-Based Ethnography: SEBE). The methods are based on: first-person audio-visual recording with a miniature video-camera worn at eye-level (‘subcam’); confronting subjects with these first-person recordings to collect their subjective experience; formulating the findings and discussing the final i...

  16. Teaching Bank Runs with Classroom Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkenborg, Dieter; Kaplan, Todd; Miller, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Once relegated to cinema or history lectures, bank runs have become a modern phenomenon that captures the interest of students. In this article, the authors explain a simple classroom experiment based on the Diamond-Dybvig model (1983) to demonstrate how a bank run--a seemingly irrational event--can occur rationally. They then present possible…

  17. An Analysis of the Costs, Benefits, and Implications of Different Approaches to Capturing the Value of Renewable Energy Tax Incentives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark

    2014-04-09

    This report compares the relative costs, benefits, and implications of capturing the value of renewable energy tax benefits in these three different ways – applying them against outside income , carrying them forward in time until they can be fully absorbed internally, or monetizing them through third-party tax equity investors – to see which method is most competitive under various scenarios. It finds that under current law and late-2013 market conditions, monetization makes sense for all but the most tax-efficient project sponsors. In other words, for most project sponsors, bringing in third-party tax equity currently provides net benefits to a project.

  18. The Artist's Lens: Capturing the World in the Visible and Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, J. S.; Webley, P.; Dehn, J.

    2014-12-01

    We go about our daily lives with our primary sensory input in the visible spectrum. This is but only one of the many available spectra that artists and scientists alike can use to capture and analyze how the world works. Each artist's creative voice comes from individual experiences and their philosophy on how to portray the world around us. Adding infrared technology to the artist's toolkit creates a new opportunity to glimpse into our world through a different set of lenses. By using both the subjective artist's-eye and the critical scientist's mind, we gain unique yet complementary viewpoints when we observe the same physical processes. Using digital SLR and thermal imaging cameras, we will capture still imagery and high-definition videos, at multiple frames per second. We will present examples, such as heat loss in cold environments over time, analyses of different rock structures, and the significance of emissivity on infrared measurements. We will show how these two spectra, the visible and infrared, together provide a novel outreach tool to visualize artistic and scientific principles. Our aim is to cultivate the interest of students of all ages in the arts and geophysical sciences and allow us all to learn more about the world in which we live.

  19. Capturing the Energy Absorbing Mechanisms of Composite Structures under Crash Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Bonnie

    As fiber reinforced composite material systems become increasingly utilized in primary aircraft and automotive structures, the need to understand their contribution to the crashworthiness of the structure is of great interest to meet safety certification requirements. The energy absorbing behavior of a composite structure, however, is not easily predicted due to the great complexity of the failure mechanisms that occur within the material. Challenges arise both in the experimental characterization and in the numerical modeling of the material/structure combination. At present, there is no standardized test method to characterize the energy absorbing capability of composite materials to aide crashworthy structural design. In addition, although many commercial finite element analysis codes exist and offer a means to simulate composite failure initiation and propagation, these models are still under development and refinement. As more metallic structures are replaced by composite structures, the need for both experimental guidelines to characterize the energy absorbing capability of a composite structure, as well as guidelines for using numerical tools to simulate composite materials in crash conditions has become a critical matter. This body of research addresses both the experimental characterization of the energy absorption mechanisms occurring in composite materials during crushing, as well as the numerical simulation of composite materials undergoing crushing. In the experimental investigation, the specific energy absorption (SEA) of a composite material system is measured using a variety of test element geometries, such as corrugated plates and tubes. Results from several crush experiments reveal that SEA is not a constant material property for laminated composites, and varies significantly with the geometry of the test specimen used. The variation of SEA measured for a single material system requires that crush test data must be generated for a range of

  20. Cross-border movement and women's health: how to capture the data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merry Lisa

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The movement of women across international borders is occurring at greater rates than ever before, yet the relationship between migration and women's health has been under-explored. One reason may be difficulty measuring migration variables including country of birth, length of time in country, immigration status, language ability, and ethnicity. A range of social, environmental, cultural, and medical characteristics associated with the pre-, during- and post-migration phases are also important to consider. The objective of this paper is to present challenges and solutions in measuring migration and related variables via survey-like questionnaires administered to international migrant women. Methods The development, validation, and translation of two questionnaires subsequently applied in studies of migrant women during pregnancy, birth and postpartum were used as case examples to highlight related measurement issues. Results Challenges: (1 Measuring socio-cultural, medical and environmental variables across the pre-during-post migration phases (since questions must be framed so that data relating to each phase of migration are captured; (2 Obtaining data for complex patterns of migration (i.e., multiple movements between multiple destinations; and (3 answering long questions across a time continuum. Solutions: (1 Using interviewer-assisted rather than self-administered questions; (2 Adding probes and explanations to 'walk' participants through their migration experiences; (3 Identifying variables (e.g., trafficking better captured using non-questionnaire data collection methods or better not collected (e.g., ethnicity due to extreme variations in meaning. Conclusion Carefully constructed and translated survey questionnaires are practical tools for the collection of a breadth of migrant data. These data, including detailed accounts of countries lived in, length of time in those countries, immigration status, change in

  1. 利用Winsock通信获取客户机的屏幕%Capture the Client's Screen with Winsock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高晓兴; 陈洪军

    2001-01-01

    介绍在VB下利用Winsock通信获得客户机屏幕信息的方法,重点讨论了Winsock的基本概念与操作以及通过程序截取屏幕图象的实现方法,同时介绍了一对多Winsock通信的实现方法,并给出了相应的VB代码。%In this paper we chiefly describe how to capture the screen information of the clients, using the Winsock in VB. We emphatically discuss the fundamental concepts and operations of Winsock, and the implementation method of capturing screen images. In the end we introduce the implementation of Point to Multi-Point(p2mp) Winsock Communications Mechanism, including the VB source codes.

  2. High-Resolution Climate Change Projections Capture the Elevation Dependence of Warming and Snow Cover Loss in California's Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, D.; Hall, A. D.; Berg, N.; Schwartz, M. A.; Sun, F.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution projections of warming and snow cover change are made for California's Sierra Nevada mountain range for the period 2081-2100 using hybrid dynamical-statistical downscaling. First, future climate change projections from five global climate models (GCMs) are downscaled dynamically. The warming signal exhibits a strong elevation dependence that is not captured by common statistical downscaling methods. Variations in the warming are attributed to snow albedo feedback and the blocking effect of the Sierra Nevada, which creates a sharp warming gradient between marine and continental air masses. These two physical processes are incorporated into a simple statistical model that mimics the dynamical model's warming patterns given GCM input. This statistical model is used to produce warming and snow cover loss projections for an ensemble of 35 GCMs. Capturing the elevation dependence is important for many applications of climate change, including surface hydrology, water resources, and ecosystems.

  3. Capturing the Evasive Passive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Stephen; Thornton, Rosalind; Murasugi, Keiko

    2009-01-01

    In the 1980s, researchers in child language devised several new experimental techniques to assess children's emerging linguistic competence. Innovations in methodology were needed to bridge the apparent gap between the expectation of rapid language acquisition, based on linguistic theory, and the protracted acquisition that was being witnessed…

  4. Capturing the Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This image shows comet Tempel 1, as seen by the Deep Impact spacecraft on June 21, 2005. It was taken using the clear filter of the spacecraft's medium resolution imager camera. The spacecraft was 11,564,081.7 kilometers (7,185,920 miles) away from the comet. Twelve images were combined together, and a logarithmic stretch was applied to enhance the coma of the comet.

  5. What Online User Innovation Communities Can Teach Us about Capturing the Experiences of Patients Living with Chronic Health Conditions. A Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Julia; Zanini, Claudia; Rubinelli, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background In order to adapt to societal changes, healthcare systems need to switch from a disease orientation to a patient-centered approach. Virtual patient networks are a promising tool to favor this switch and much can be learned from the open and user innovation literature where the involvement of online user communities in the innovation process is well-documented. Objectives The objectives of this study were 1) to describe the use of online communities as a tool to capture and harness innovative ideas of end users or consumers; and 2) to point to the potential value and challenges of these virtual platforms to function as a tool to inform and promote patient-centered care in the context of chronic health conditions. Methods A scoping review was conducted. A total of seven databases were searched for scientific articles published in English between 1995 and 2014. The search strategy was refined through an iterative process. Results A total of 144 studies were included in the review. Studies were coded inductively according to their research focus to identify groupings of papers. The first set of studies focused on the interplay of factors related to user roles, motivations, and behaviors that shape the innovation process within online communities. Studies of the second set examined the role of firms in online user innovation initiatives, identifying different organizational strategies and challenges. The third set of studies focused on the idea selection process and measures of success with respect to online user innovation initiatives. Finally, the findings from the review are presented in the light of the particularities and challenges discussed in current healthcare research. Conclusion The present paper highlights the potential of virtual patient communities to inform and promote patient-centered care, describes the key challenges involved in this process, and makes recommendations on how to address them. PMID:27272912

  6. What Online User Innovation Communities Can Teach Us about Capturing the Experiences of Patients Living with Chronic Health Conditions. A Scoping Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Amann

    Full Text Available In order to adapt to societal changes, healthcare systems need to switch from a disease orientation to a patient-centered approach. Virtual patient networks are a promising tool to favor this switch and much can be learned from the open and user innovation literature where the involvement of online user communities in the innovation process is well-documented.The objectives of this study were 1 to describe the use of online communities as a tool to capture and harness innovative ideas of end users or consumers; and 2 to point to the potential value and challenges of these virtual platforms to function as a tool to inform and promote patient-centered care in the context of chronic health conditions.A scoping review was conducted. A total of seven databases were searched for scientific articles published in English between 1995 and 2014. The search strategy was refined through an iterative process.A total of 144 studies were included in the review. Studies were coded inductively according to their research focus to identify groupings of papers. The first set of studies focused on the interplay of factors related to user roles, motivations, and behaviors that shape the innovation process within online communities. Studies of the second set examined the role of firms in online user innovation initiatives, identifying different organizational strategies and challenges. The third set of studies focused on the idea selection process and measures of success with respect to online user innovation initiatives. Finally, the findings from the review are presented in the light of the particularities and challenges discussed in current healthcare research.The present paper highlights the potential of virtual patient communities to inform and promote patient-centered care, describes the key challenges involved in this process, and makes recommendations on how to address them.

  7. Investigating the Use Of Portable Air Pollution Sensors to Capture the Spatial Variability Of Traffic-Related Air Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville Cavellin, Laure; Weichenthal, Scott; Tack, Ryan; Ragettli, Martina S; Smargiassi, Audrey; Hatzopoulou, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Advances in microsensor technologies for air pollution monitoring encourage a growing use of portable sensors. This study aims at testing their performance in the development of exposure surfaces for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3). In Montreal, Canada, a data-collection campaign was conducted across three seasons in 2014 for 76 sites spanning the range of land uses and built environments of the city; each site was visited from 6 to 12 times, for 20 min, using NO2 and O3 sensors manufactured by Aeroqual. Land-use regression models were developed, achieving R(2) values of 0.86 for NO2 and 0.92 for O3 when adjusted for regional meteorology to control for the fact that all of the locations were not monitored at the same time. A total of two exposure surfaces were then developed for NO2 and O3 as averages over spring, summer, and fall. Validation against the fixed-station data and previous campaigns suggests that Aeroqual sensors tend to overestimate the highest NO2 and O3 concentrations, thus increasing the range of values across the city. However, the sensors suggest a good performance with respect to capturing the spatial variability in NO2 and O3 and are very convenient to use, having great potential for capturing temporal variability.

  8. Structures of mammalian ER α-glucosidase II capture the binding modes of broad-spectrum iminosugar antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Alessandro T; Alonzi, Dominic S; Marti, Lucia; Reca, Ida-Barbara; Kiappes, J L; Struwe, Weston B; Cross, Alice; Basu, Souradeep; Lowe, Edward D; Darlot, Benoit; Santino, Angelo; Roversi, Pietro; Zitzmann, Nicole

    2016-08-01

    The biosynthesis of enveloped viruses depends heavily on the host cell endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glycoprotein quality control (QC) machinery. This dependency exceeds the dependency of host glycoproteins, offering a window for the targeting of ERQC for the development of broad-spectrum antivirals. We determined small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and crystal structures of the main ERQC enzyme, ER α-glucosidase II (α-GluII; from mouse), alone and in complex with key ligands of its catalytic cycle and antiviral iminosugars, including two that are in clinical trials for the treatment of dengue fever. The SAXS data capture the enzyme's quaternary structure and suggest a conformational rearrangement is needed for the simultaneous binding of a monoglucosylated glycan to both subunits. The X-ray structures with key catalytic cycle intermediates highlight that an insertion between the +1 and +2 subsites contributes to the enzyme's activity and substrate specificity, and reveal that the presence of d-mannose at the +1 subsite renders the acid catalyst less efficient during the cleavage of the monoglucosylated substrate. The complexes with iminosugar antivirals suggest that inhibitors targeting a conserved ring of aromatic residues between the α-GluII +1 and +2 subsites would have increased potency and selectivity, thus providing a template for further rational drug design. PMID:27462106

  9. Indirect genetic effects and the spread of infectious disease: are we capturing the full heritable variation underlying disease prevalence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debby Lipschutz-Powell

    Full Text Available Reducing disease prevalence through selection for host resistance offers a desirable alternative to chemical treatment. Selection for host resistance has proven difficult, however, due to low heritability estimates. These low estimates may be caused by a failure to capture all the relevant genetic variance in disease resistance, as genetic analysis currently is not taylored to estimate genetic variation in infectivity. Host infectivity is the propensity of transmitting infection upon contact with a susceptible individual, and can be regarded as an indirect effect to disease status. It may be caused by a combination of physiological and behavioural traits. Though genetic variation in infectivity is difficult to measure directly, Indirect Genetic Effect (IGE models, also referred to as associative effects or social interaction models, allow the estimation of this variance from more readily available binary disease data (infected/non-infected. We therefore generated binary disease data from simulated populations with known amounts of variation in susceptibility and infectivity to test the adequacy of traditional and IGE models. Our results show that a conventional model fails to capture the genetic variation in infectivity inherent in populations with simulated infectivity. An IGE model, on the other hand, does capture some of the variation in infectivity. Comparison with expected genetic variance suggests that there is scope for further methodological improvement, and that potential responses to selection may be greater than values presented here. Nonetheless, selection using an index of estimated direct and indirect breeding values was shown to have a greater genetic selection differential and reduced future disease risk than traditional selection for resistance only. These findings suggest that if genetic variation in infectivity substantially contributes to disease transmission, then breeding designs which explicitly incorporate IGEs might help

  10. Indirect Genetic Effects and the Spread of Infectious Disease: Are We Capturing the Full Heritable Variation Underlying Disease Prevalence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipschutz-Powell, Debby; Woolliams, John A.; Bijma, Piter; Doeschl-Wilson, Andrea B.

    2012-01-01

    Reducing disease prevalence through selection for host resistance offers a desirable alternative to chemical treatment. Selection for host resistance has proven difficult, however, due to low heritability estimates. These low estimates may be caused by a failure to capture all the relevant genetic variance in disease resistance, as genetic analysis currently is not taylored to estimate genetic variation in infectivity. Host infectivity is the propensity of transmitting infection upon contact with a susceptible individual, and can be regarded as an indirect effect to disease status. It may be caused by a combination of physiological and behavioural traits. Though genetic variation in infectivity is difficult to measure directly, Indirect Genetic Effect (IGE) models, also referred to as associative effects or social interaction models, allow the estimation of this variance from more readily available binary disease data (infected/non-infected). We therefore generated binary disease data from simulated populations with known amounts of variation in susceptibility and infectivity to test the adequacy of traditional and IGE models. Our results show that a conventional model fails to capture the genetic variation in infectivity inherent in populations with simulated infectivity. An IGE model, on the other hand, does capture some of the variation in infectivity. Comparison with expected genetic variance suggests that there is scope for further methodological improvement, and that potential responses to selection may be greater than values presented here. Nonetheless, selection using an index of estimated direct and indirect breeding values was shown to have a greater genetic selection differential and reduced future disease risk than traditional selection for resistance only. These findings suggest that if genetic variation in infectivity substantially contributes to disease transmission, then breeding designs which explicitly incorporate IGEs might help reduce disease

  11. Do maize models capture the impacts of heat and drought stresses on yield? Using algorithm ensembles to identify successful approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhenong; Zhuang, Qianlai; Tan, Zeli; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Zheng, Bangyou; Melillo, Jerry M

    2016-09-01

    Stresses from heat and drought are expected to increasingly suppress crop yields, but the degree to which current models can represent these effects is uncertain. Here we evaluate the algorithms that determine impacts of heat and drought stress on maize in 16 major maize models by incorporating these algorithms into a standard model, the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (APSIM), and running an ensemble of simulations. Although both daily mean temperature and daylight temperature are common choice of forcing heat stress algorithms, current parameterizations in most models favor the use of daylight temperature even though the algorithm was designed for daily mean temperature. Different drought algorithms (i.e., a function of soil water content, of soil water supply to demand ratio, and of actual to potential transpiration ratio) simulated considerably different patterns of water shortage over the growing season, but nonetheless predicted similar decreases in annual yield. Using the selected combination of algorithms, our simulations show that maize yield reduction was more sensitive to drought stress than to heat stress for the US Midwest since the 1980s, and this pattern will continue under future scenarios; the influence of excessive heat will become increasingly prominent by the late 21st century. Our review of algorithms in 16 crop models suggests that the impacts of heat and drought stress on plant yield can be best described by crop models that: (i) incorporate event-based descriptions of heat and drought stress, (ii) consider the effects of nighttime warming, and (iii) coordinate the interactions among multiple stresses. Our study identifies the proficiency with which different model formulations capture the impacts of heat and drought stress on maize biomass and yield production. The framework presented here can be applied to other modeled processes and used to improve yield predictions of other crops with a wide variety of crop models. PMID:27251794

  12. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) sounding network: operations, processing and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    M. P. Jensen; T. Toto; D. Troyan; P. E. Ciesielski; D. Holdridge; Kyrouac, J.; Schatz, J.; Y. Zhang; Xie, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place during the spring of 2011 centered in north-central Oklahoma, USA. The main goal of this field campaign was to capture the dynamical and microphysical characteristics of precipitating convective systems in the US Central Plains. A major component of the campaign was a six-site radiosonde array designed to capture the large-scale variability of the atmospheric state with the intent of deriving model fo...

  13. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) sounding network: operations, processing and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    M. P. Jensen; T. Toto; D. Troyan; P. E. Ciesielski; D. Holdridge; Kyrouac, J.; Schatz, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place during the spring of 2011 centered in north-central Oklahoma, USA. The main goal of this field campaign was to capture the dynamical and microphysical characteristics of precipitating convective systems in the Central Plains. A major component of the campaign was a 6-site radiosonde array designed to capture the large-scale variability of the atmospheric state with the intent of deriv...

  14. Implementation and Critical Assessment of the Flipped Classroom Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheg, Abigail G., Ed.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, traditional classroom teaching models have been transformed in order to better promote active learning and learner engagement. "Implementation and Critical Assessment of the Flipped Classroom Experience" seeks to capture the momentum of non-traditional teaching methods and provide a necessary resource for individuals…

  15. The Applications of Mixed Metal Oxides to Capture the CO2 and Convert to Syn-Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajan Babhare

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The applications of different mixed metal oxides were explored for the capture of CO2 and convert of CO2 to syn-gas. The several samples of the mixed metal oxides were prepared by the sol-gel, solid-solid fusion, precipitation, molten salt and template methods in order to investigate the performance of mixed mtal oxides to the CO2 applications. These samples were calcined for the 3 h in air at 900 oC. The mixed metal oxides samples were characterized by acidity/basicity, surface area, XRD pattern, SEM images and to capture CO2. The basicity and surface area of the samples of mixed metal oxides were found to be in the range from 0.7 to 15.7 mmol.g-1 and 2.24 to 138.76 m2.g-1, respectively. The ob-tained results of prepared mixed metal oxides by different method were compared for the purpose of searching the efficient materials. The temperature profiles of the captured CO2 by the samples of mixed metal oxides were obtained in the range 100 to 800 oC. The captured CO2 was found to be in the range from 7.36 to 26.93 wt.%. The conversions of CO2 by methane were explored to syn-gas over the mixed metal oxides including the calcium iron lanthanum mixed metal oxides and (5 wt.% Pd/Al2O3 at 700 oC with the gas hourly space velocities (GHSV 6000 ml.h-1.g-1 of methane, 6000 ml.h-1.g-1 of CO2 and 24000 ml.h-1.g-1 of helium.  © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 23rd September 2014; Revised: 4th February 2015; Accepted: 5th February 2015How to Cite: Babhare, S., Raskar, R., Bobade, K., Gaikwad, A. (2015. The Applications of Mixed Metal Oxides to Capture the CO2 and Convert to Syn-Gas. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (2: 125-142. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.2.7381.125-142Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.2.7381.125-142

  16. The Many Layers of Social Support: Capturing the Voices of Young People with Spina Bifida and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antle, Beverley J.; Montgomery, Gert; Stapleford, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Young people with physical disabilities experience greater difficulty than their able-bodied peers in many psychosocial domains as they transition toward adulthood. However, firsthand knowledge of the dimensions of social support that young people with physical disabilities find useful during this stage is lacking. This qualitative study involved…

  17. Accelerated particle-based target capture--the roles of volume transport and near-surface alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Reenen, Alexander; de Jong, Arthur M; Prins, Menno W J

    2013-02-01

    The upcoming generations of high-sensitive and miniaturized biosensing systems need target capture methods that are as efficient and as rapid as possible, with targets ranging from molecules to cells. Capture of the targets can be achieved using particles coated with affinity molecules, but there are still fundamental questions as to the processes that limit the association rates. In this paper we quantify and compare the reaction rates of particle-based target capture with different types of actuation, namely (i) passive thermal transport, (ii) fluid agitation by vortex mixing, and (iii) actively rotating particles. In the experiments, we use fluorescent nanoparticles as targets which are biochemically captured by magnetic microparticles, and the capture efficiency is quantified using fluorescence microscopy with single target resolution. The data unravel the contributions of volume transport, near-surface alignment, and the chemical reaction to the overall rate constant of association. Vortex mixing versus passive transport gives an increase of the reaction rate constant by more than an order of magnitude, implying that the encounter frequency as well as the near-surface alignment probability are increased. The importance of near-surface alignment is underscored by the data of active particle rotation; the binding probability per encounter is 4-fold enhanced on rotating capture particles. We discuss the implications of our results for different biological systems and for the development of novel actuation methods in particle-based target capture. PMID:23297682

  18. Capturing the WUnder: Using weather stations and WeatherUnderground to increase middle school students' understanding and interest in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, K. M.; Dunne, P.

    2014-12-01

    New models of elementary- and middle-school level science education are emerging in response to the need for science literacy and the development of the Next Generation Science Standards. One of these models is fostered through the NSF's Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) program, which pairs a graduate fellow with a science teacher at a local school for an entire school year. In our project, a PhD Earth Sciences student was paired with a local middle school science teacher with the goal of installing a weather station, and incorporating the station data into the 8th grade science curriculum. Here we discuss how we were able to use a school weather station to introduce weather and climate material, engage and involve students in the creative process of science, and motivate students through inquiry-based lessons. In using a weather station as the starting point for material, we were able to make science tangible for students and provide an opportunity for each student to experience the entire process of scientific inquiry. This hands-on approach resulted in a more thorough understanding the system beyond a knowledge of the components, and was particularly effective in challenging prior weather and climate misconceptions. We were also able to expand the reach of the lessons by connecting with other weather stations in our region and even globally, enabling the students to become members of a larger system.

  19. Experience in public goods experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Conte, Anna; Levati, M. Vittoria; Montinari, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    We use information on students' past participation in economic experiments, as stored in our database, to analyze whether behavior in public goods games is affected by experience (i.e., previous participation in social dilemma-type experiments) and history (i.e., participation in experiments of a different class than the social dilemma). We have three main results. First, at the aggregate level, the amount subjects contribute and expect others to contribute decrease with experience. Second, a...

  20. Examining experience

    OpenAIRE

    Lakeman, G. J. T.

    2012-01-01

    I think visual experiences are intentional. And I think that different philosophical views about visual experience may be understood in terms of what they say about the intentionality of visual experience. In this thesis, I evaluate different views of experience and experiential intentionality by examining connections between experiential intentionality and further phenomenological, doxastic, epistemic and content-fixing features present in cases of perception and hallucinat...

  1. An Improved Method of Capturing the Surface Boundary of a Ti-6Al-4V Fusion Weld Bead for Finite Element Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R. P.; Villa, M.; Sovani, Y.; Panwisawas, C.; Perumal, B.; Ward, R. M.; Brooks, J. W.; Basoalto, H. C.

    2016-02-01

    Weld simulation methods have often employed mathematical functions to describe the size and shape of the molten pool of material transiently present in a weld. However, while these functions can sometimes accurately capture the fusion boundary for certain welding parameters in certain materials, they do not necessarily offer a robust methodology for the more intricate weld pool shapes that can be produced in materials with a very low thermal conductivity, such as the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. Cross-sections of steady-state welds can be observed which contain a dramatic narrowing of the pool width at roughly half way in to the depth of the plate of material, and a significant widening again at the base. These effects on the weld pool are likely to do with beam focusing height. However, the resultant intricacy of the pool means that standard formulaic methods to capture the shape may prove relatively unsuccessful. Given how critical the accuracy of pool shape is in determining the mechanical response to the heating, an alternative method is presented. By entering weld pool width measurements for a series of depths in a Cartesian co-ordinate system using FE weld simulation software Sysweld, a more representative weld pool size and shape can be predicted, compared to the standard double ellipsoid method. Results have demonstrated that significant variations in the mid-depth thermal profile are observed between the two, even though the same values for top and bottom pool-widths are entered. Finally, once the benefits of the Cartesian co-ordinate method are demonstrated, the robustness of this approach to predict a variety of weld pool shapes has been demonstrated upon a series of nine weld simulations, where the two key process parameters (welding laser power and travel speed) are explored over a design space ranging from 1.5 to 3 kW and 50 to 200 mm/s. Results suggest that for the faster travel speeds, the more detailed Cartesian co-ordinate method is better, whereas

  2. Integrated Modeling for Safe Transportation - Driver modeling and driver experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Baumann, Martin; Colonius, Hans; Hungar, Hardi; Köster, Frank; Langner, Michael; Lüdtke, Andreas; Möbus, Claus; Peinke, Joachim; Puch, Stefan; Schiessl, Carola; Steenken, Rieke; Weber, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The project IMoST addresses the problem of capturing the behavior of a car driver in an executable model enabling design-time predictions of the interplay between driver, assistance system and car in realistic traffic scenarios. To this end, a generic cognitive model is instantiated and extended based on data gathered in targeted simulator experiments. The considered example scenario covers the entering of an expressway, with possible support for the driver in the form of an intelligent assis...

  3. State public policy issues involved with the Parkfield prediction experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R.; Goltz, J.

    1988-01-01

    The earthquake-prediction experiment at Parkfield may well be the most important such experiment currently underway worldwide. Its importance, however, extends beyond the scientific data that will be gathered and whether those data that will be gathered and whether those data can provide reliable prediction methods. Important public policy lessons are being learned (and are yet to be learned), and these lessons may be transferable to other parts of California and the nation. Indeed, the Parkfield experiment has captured the interest of numerous Californians, including State officials, emergency managers, the news media, and at least some of the public.

  4. The Prediction Performance of Asset Pricing Models and Their Capability of Capturing the Effects of Economic Crises: The Case of Istanbul Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Muzır

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is prepared to test the common opinion that the multifactor asset pricing models produce superior predictions as compared to the single factor models and to evaluate the performance of Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT and Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM. For this purpose, the monthly return data from January 1996 and December 2004 of the stocks of 45 firms listed at Istanbul Stock Exchange were used. Our factor analysis results show that 68,3 % of the return variation can be explained by five factors. Although the APT model has generated a low coefficient of determination, 28,3 %, it proves to be more competent in explaining stock return changes when compared to CAPM which has an inferior explanation power, 5,4 %. Furthermore, we have observed that APT is more robust also in capturing the effects of any economic crisis on return variations.

  5. Art Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spodek, Bernard; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents four articles that examine the role of art experiences in early childhood education: "Educationally Appropriate Art Activities for Young Children," by Bernard Spodek; "Teachers and Children Together: Constructing New Learning," by Lella Gandini; "Fostering Experiences between Young Children and Clay," by Cathy Weisman Topal; and…

  6. TRIO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

    1984-09-01

    The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.

  7. TRIO experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion

  8. Simulated experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cybernetic model has been developed to elucidate some of the main principles of the growth regulation system in the epidermis of the hairless mouse. A number of actual and theoretical biological experiments have been simulated on the model. These included simulating the cell kinetics as measured by pulse labelling with tritiated thymidine and by continuous labelling with tritiated thymidine. Other simulated experiments included steady state, wear and tear, painting with a carcinogen, heredity and heredity and tumour. Numerous diagrams illustrate the results of these simulated experiments. (JIW)

  9. Antimatter Experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Antimatter should behave in identical fashion to matter if a form of spacetime symmetry called CPT invariance holds. Two experiments at CERN near Geneva are testing this hypothesis using antihydrogen atoms

  10. Pixel Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Augustesen, Christina

    2015-01-01

    for using LED lighting in lighting design practice. The speculative experiments that have been set-up have aimed to clarify the variables that can be used as parameters in the design of lighting applications; including, for example, the structuring and software control of light. The experiments also...... design it became relevant to investigate the use of LEDs as the physical equivalent of a pixel as a design approach. In this book our interest has been in identifying how the qualities of LEDs can be used in lighting applications. With experiences in the planning and implementation of architectural...... lighting design in practice, one quickly experiences and realises that there are untapped potentials in the attributes of LED technology. In this research, speculative studies have been made working with the attributes of LEDs in architectural contexts, with the ambition to ascertain new strategies...

  11. Products search through the use of semantic properties - report from the experiment at Kunstindustrimuseet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Boelskifte, Per

    2005-01-01

    In April 2004 an experiment was carried out at The Technical University of Denmark and at the Danish Arts and Craft Museum. The purpose was to explore how precise verbal communication could capture the semantic content of physical products. The experiment explored the possibilities of verbal...... communication with regard to the semantic messages that products contain in the form of non-verbal expressions (i.e., through their shape and colour). 12 participants in groups of 2 selected exhibited products and described them verbally. Based on the verbal description, other teams were then asked to identify...... the products in question. A little less than half of the products were identified. The experiment indicates that it is possible to capture the essence of products' semantic content in a few words. The experiment also illustrated a number of problems in using this type of explorative research. Based...

  12. The Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariana Nicoara, Floare

    2016-04-01

    My name is Nicoara Floarea and I am teacher at Secondary School Calatele and I teach students from preparatory class and the second grade . They are six-eight years old. In my activity, for introducing scientific concepts to my students, I use various and active methods or traditional methods including experiments. The experiment stimulates students' curiosity, their creativity, the understanding and knowledge taught accessibility. I propose you two such experiments: The life cycle of the plants (long-term experiment, with rigorous observation time):We use beans, wheat or other; They are grown in pots and on the cotton soaked with water,keeping under students' observation protecting them ( just soak them regularly) and we waiting the plants rise. For discussions and comments of plant embryo development we use the plants which rose on the cotton soaked with water plants at the end of the first week. Last school year we had in the pot climbing beans which in May made pods. They were not too great but our experiment was a success. The students could deduce that there will develop those big beans which after drying will be planted again. The influence of light on plants (average duration experiment with the necessary observation time): We use two pots in which plants are of the same type (two geraniums), one of them is situated so as to get direct sunlight and other plant we put in a closed box. Although we wet both plants after a week we see that the plant that benefited from sunlight has turned strain in direct sunlight, developing normally in return the plant out of the box I have yellowed leaves, photosynthesis does not She has occurred . Students will understand the vital role of the Sun in plants' life, both in the classroom and in nature. The experiment is a method of teaching students extremely pleasant, with a remarkable percentage of acquiring more knowledge.

  13. Researching Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Lisa; Ingemann, Bruno

    for researching experiences in a variety of settings ranging from the museum, to news photography, and interactive media. The research led to the development of a set of methodological tools and approaches we term the ReflexivityLab. The interaction in the experimental situation between the media and body......, dialogue, moods, values and narratives have been investigated qualitatively with more than sixty informants in a range of projects. The processual methodological insights are put into a theoretical perspective and also presented as pragmatic dilemmas.      Researching Experiences is relevant not only...... for students and researchers in media and communication studies but also for practitioners within the fields of media, communication and experience design....

  14. Women's Experiences of Rage towards their Intimate Partners: Diverse Voices within the Criminal Justice System

    OpenAIRE

    Flemke, Kimberly Renee

    2003-01-01

    "Women's Experiences of Rage towards their Intimate Partners: Diverse Voices within the Criminal Justice System" By: Kimberly R. Flemke Abstract A multi-method study investigating incarcerated womenâ s experiences of rage towards their intimate partners was conducted. The sample was drawn from a Philadelphia prisonâ s recovery unit for women. Phenomenological and feminist critical theory perspectives guided the study; these combined approaches captured the essence of rage, while a...

  15. The Virtual Arizona Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. L.; Davis, R.; Conway, F. M.; Bellasai, R.

    2012-12-01

    To commemorate the once-in-a-lifetime event of Arizona's hundredth birthday, the Centennial Commission and the Governor of Arizona envisioned a museum and companion website that would capture the state's history, celebrate its people, and embrace its future. Working with world-renowned museum designers, the state began to seek ideas from across Arizona to create plans for a journey of discovery through science and the humanities. The museum would introduce visitors to some of the people who nurtured the state through its early years and others who are innovating its tomorrows. Showcases would include the resources and experiences that shaped the state's history and are transforming its present day, highlighting the ingenuity that tamed the wild frontier and is envisioning Arizona's next frontiers through science and technology. The Arizona Experience (www.arizonaexperience.org) was initially intended to serve as the web presence for the physical museum, but as delays occurred with the physical museum, the site has quickly developed an identify of its own as an interactive, multimedia experience, reaching a wider audience with functions that would be difficult or expensive to produce in a museum. As leaders in scientific and technological innovation in the state, the Arizona Geological Survey was tasked with designing and creating the Arizona Experience site. The general themes remain the same; however, the site has added content and applications that are better suited to the online environment in order to create a rich, dynamic supplement to a physical museum experience. The website offers the features and displays of the future museum with the interactive nature and learning environment of the web. This provides an encyclopedic overview of the State of Arizona by subject matter experts in a manner that is free and open to the public and erases socio-economic, political, and physical boundaries. Over the Centennial Year of 2012 the site will release a new theme and

  16. Channeling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Channeling of water flow and tracer transport in real fractures in a granite body at Stripa have been investigated experimentally. The experimental site was located 360 m below the ground level. Two kinds of experiments were performed. In the single hole experiments, 20 cm diameter holes were drilled about 2.5 m into the rock in the plane of the fracture. Specially designed packers were used to inject water into the fracture in 5 cm intervals all along the fracture trace in the hole. The variation of the injection flowrates along the fracture were used to determine the transmissivity variations in the fracture plane. Detailed photographs were taken from inside the hole and the visual fracture aperture was compared with the injection flowrates in the same locations. Geostatistical methods were used to evaluate the results. Five holes were measured in great detail. In addition 7 holes were drilled and scanned by simpler packer systems. A double hole experiment was performed where two parallel holes were drilled in the same fracture plane at nearly 2 m distance. Pressure pulse tests were made between the holes in both directions. Tracers were injected in 5 locations in one hole and monitored for in many locations in the other hole. The single hole experiment and the double hole experiment show that most of the fracture planes are tight but that there are open sections which form connected channels over distances of at least 2 meters. It was also found in the double hole experiment that the investigated fracture was intersected by at least one fracture between the two holes which diverted a large amount of the injected tracers to several distant locations at the tunnel wall. (authours)

  17. Extending Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A computer game's player is experiencing not only the game as a designer-made artefact, but also a multitude of social and cultural practices and contexts of both computer game play and everyday life. As a truly multidisciplinary anthology, Extending Experiences sheds new light on the mesh of...... possibilities and influences the player engages with. Part one, Experiential Structures of Play, considers some of the key concepts commonly used to address the experience of a computer game player. The second part, Bordering Play, discusses conceptual and practical overlaps of games and everyday life and the...

  18. A Case Study: How Do Social and Academic Experiences of African American Nontraditional Female Students on HBCU Campuses Influence Their Motivation to Graduate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson-Golden, Cheryl D.

    2013-01-01

    Through a qualitative collective case study research design, the study captured the social and academic experiences of 13 African American nontraditional undergraduate female students enrolled in a historically Black college campus (HBCU) located in the southern United States. Experiences of 13 African American nontraditional undergraduate female…

  19. Emotion experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.H. Frijda

    2005-01-01

    Highly divergent accounts exist of the nature of emotional feelings. Following Lambie and Marcel (2002), that divergence is traced back to actual differences in experience that result from variations in the involvement and direction of attention during emotions. The dimensions of variation include f

  20. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    Literature review: Collaborative experience has been shown to have a positive effect on the collaborative outcome in general (Anand & Khanna, 2000; Kale, Dyer & Singh, 2002). Furthermore, it has been linked to the ability to exploit the network of the firm for learning (Powell, Koput and Smith...

  1. Dirac experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, F; Afanasev, L; Benayoun, M; Brekhovskikh, V; Caragheorgheopol, G; Cechák, T; Chiba, M; Constantinescu, S; Doudarev, A; Dreossi, D; Drijard, Daniel; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Gallas, M V; Gerndt, J; Giacomich, R; Gianotti, P; Goldin, D; Gorin, A; Gortchakov, O; Guaraldo, C; Hansroul, M; Hosek, R; Iliescu, M; Jabitski, M; Kalinina, N; Karpoukhine, V; Kluson, J; Kobayshi, M; Kokkas, P; Komarov, V; Koulikov, A; Kouptsov, A; Krouglov, V; Krouglova, L; Kuroda, K I; Lanaro, A; Lapshine, B; Lednicky, R; Leruste, P; Levisandri, P; López-Aguera, A; Lucherini, V; Mäki, T; Manuilov, I; Montanet, L; Narjoux, J L; Nemenov, L; Nikitin, M; Nunez Pardo, T; Okada, K; Olchevskii, V; Pazos, A; Pentia, M; Penzo, Aldo L; Perreau, J M; Petrascu, C; Pló, M; Ponta, T; Pop, D; Riazantsev, A; Rodríguez, J M; Rodriguez Fernandez, A; Rykaline, V; Santamarina, C; Saborido, J; Schacher, J; Sidorov, A; Smolik, J; Takeutchi, F; Tarasov, A; Tauscher, L; Tobar, M J; Trusov, S; Vasquez, P; Vlachos, S; Yazkov, V; Yoshimura, Y; Zrelov, P

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of DIRAC experiment is the measurement of the lifetime tau of the exotic hadronic atom consisting of pi /sup +/ and pi /sup -/ mesons. The lifetime of this atom is determined by the decay mode pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ to pi /sup 0/ pi /sup 0/ due to the strong interaction. Through the precise relationship between the lifetime and the S-wave pion-pion scattering length difference a/sub 0/-a/sub 2/ for isospin 0 and 2 (respectively), a measurement of tau with an accuracy of 10% will allow a determination of a/sub 0/-a/sub 2/at a 5% precision level. Pion-pion scattering lengths have been calculated in the framework of chiral perturbation theory with an accuracy below 5%. In this way DIRAC experiment will provide a crucial test of the chiral symmetry breaking scheme in QCD effective theories at low energies. (19 refs).

  2. Russian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soviet research in terrestrial decontamination appears to have paralleled that of the US in many respects. However, the probability exists that long-term evaluations of decontamination techniques (over 10 to 20 years) have been carried out at one nuclear accident site (a marked divergence from US experience). The area of aquatic decontamination seems to offer the most intriguing possibilities for new information acquisition from the USSR; at this point only its potential importance can be speculated upon

  3. XMASS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Ko

    2016-06-01

    XMASS is a single phase liquid xenon scintillator detector. The project is designed for multi purposes, dark matter, neutrinoless double beta decay and 7Be/pp solar neutrino. As the first step of project, XMASS-I detector with 832kg sensitive volume started operation from Dec. 2010. In this paper, recent obtained physics results from commissioning data, refurbishment of detector and future step of experiment are presented.

  4. Shielding experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shielding mock-up experiments for Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) and Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) are carried out in shielding corner facility of APSARA reactor, to assess the overall accuracy of the codes and nuclear data used in reactor shield design. As APSARA is a swimming pool-type thermal reactor, for fast reactor experiments, typical fast reactor shielding facility was created by using uranium assemblies as spectrum converter. The flux was also enhanced by replacing water by air. Experiments have been carried out to study neutron attenuation through typical fast reactor radial and axial bulk shielding materials such as steel, sodium, graphite, borated graphite and boron carbide. A large number of reaction rates, sensitive to different regions of the neutron energy spectrum, were measured using foil activation and Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD) techniques. These experimental results were analysed using computational tools normally used in design calculations, viz., discrete ordinate transport codes with multigroup cross section sets. Comparison of measured reaction rates with calculations provided suitable bias factors for parameters relevant to shield design, such as sodium activation, fast neutron fluence, fission equivalent fluxes etc. The measured neutron spectrum on the incident face of shield model compares well with the calculated fast reactor blanket leakage neutron spectrum. The comparison of calculated reaction rates within shield model indicate that the calculations suffer from considerable uncertainties, in shield models with boron carbide/borated graphite. For AHWR shielding experiments, no spectrum converter was used as it is also a thermal reactor. Radiation streaming studies through penetrations/ducts of various shapes and sizes relevant to AHWR shielding were carried out. (author)

  5. Gudaga Goes to School Study: Methods Used in Understanding School Transitions and Early Education Experiences of an Urban Aboriginal Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplun, Cathy; Knight, Jennifer; Grace, Rebekah; Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob; Comino, Elizabeth; Jackson-Pulver, Lisa; Kemp, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The Gudaga Goes to School Study described the transition to school and early education experiences of 117 urban Aboriginal children and their families. This paper outlines the methods and design of the study. A life course approach, employing multidimensional and multi-theoretical frameworks was used to capture the complexity of issues surrounding…

  6. Stress, Coping, and Emotions on the World Stage : The Experience of Participating in a Major Soccer Tournament Penalty Shootout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordet, Geir; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to capture the first-hand experiences of stressors, coping, and emotions that elite professional soccer players have during a major soccer penalty shootout. Eight players who each took part in an important European Championships penalty shootout were interviewed. The results

  7. Experiment summary

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the production of particles coming from hard scattering processes covers a fundamental role in the characterization of the system formed in heavy-ion collisions, allowing to probe the microscopic processes underlying the interaction of high energy partons with the medium. An impressive amount of measurements related to jet, quarkonia, open heavy flavor, and electroweak signal production in nucleus-nucleus as well as p(d)-nucleus collisions was delivered by experiments at RHIC and LHC in past years. In these proceedings, the main experimental results presented during the Hard Probes conference are summarized.

  8. QUBIC Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Stolpovskiy, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    QUBIC is a ground-based experiment, currently under construction, that uses the novel bolometric interferometry technology. It is dedicated to measure the primordial B-modes of CMB. As a bolometric interferometer, QUBIC has high sensitivity and good systematics control. Dust contamination is controlled by operating with two bands -- 150 and 220 GHz. There are two possible sites for QUBIC: either Concordia station in Antarctic or in the Argentinian Puna desert. It is planned to see the first light in 2018-2019.

  9. Thomson Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    This experiment, conducted by JJ Thomson in 1897, established the existence of the electron. Thomson won the Nobel physics prize for this work in 1906. A beam of electrons crosses the chamber emitting blue light. Adding an electric field (E) or a magnetic field (B) exerts a force on the moving electrons.Use switch E to turn on the electric field in the chamber. Then, by turning knob B, you can increase the current in the coils, generating a magnetic field. By balancing the electric and magnetic fields, Thomson was able to keep the electron beam level and deduce the ratio of the electron's charge to its mass.

  10. 宗教为什么能俘获信徒们的心灵%Why Religion Capturing the Hearts of Believers?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王孝哲

    2016-01-01

    The religion is a kind of theistic belief.“God” is not the objective existence.“God” is the idol out of the people’ s idea.Why can the religion attract the people?Why can the religion capture the hearts of the believ-ers?The reasons are:the religion is adapted to the people’ s psychology and needs, and takes many measures for the people.The religion provides people with the ultimate concern, they can let the people feel cared and respec-ted.The religion points out the better future, so to let the people be confident.The religion publicizes that every-one is equal, so it caters to the desire of ordinary people for pursuing equality.The religion establishes certain group organization, so it satisfies the people’ s belonging need.Therefore, the religion has a significant impact in the society.%宗教是一种有神论信仰体系。“神”并不是客观存在的,只不过是人们设想出来的偶像。那么,宗教为什么能够吸引信徒,俘获众多信徒的心灵?这主要是在于:宗教是适应于人的某种心理需要而建立的,并在如何适应这种需要方面下了很大功夫,采取了许多办法。宗教给信仰它的人们以终极关怀,能让他们感到关爱而内心温暖。宗教给信仰它的人们指出实现美好未来的希望和途径,让他们感到有盼头。宗教宣扬“人人平等”,能迎合信徒追求平等的朴素愿望。宗教建立一定的群体组织,能满足信仰它的人们的归属需要。所以,宗教在社会上才能够发生一定的影响,俘获信徒们的心灵。

  11. Rutherford Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    This experiment, carried out by Ernest Rutherford in 1910, revolutionised understanding of the structure of matter, showing that almost all the mass of an atom is concentrated in a very small, positively charged nucleus. Alpha particles emitted at bombard a thin gold foil. A detector records the number of alpha particles crossing the foil per second. The number is displayed on the counter and updated every minute. Alpha particles are helium nuclei, they consist of 2 protons and 2 neutrons. Rotate the central knob to change the angle between the foil and the detector. The number of alpha particles detected depends on the angle. Most of the alpha particles travel straight through the foil because the gold atoms are mainly empty space. However some hit the atomic nucleus and are deflected.

  12. Metrology for fire experiments in outdoor conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Silvani, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Natural fires can be considered as scale-dependant, non-linear processes of mass, momentum and heat transport, resulting from a turbulent reactive and radiative fluid medium flowing over a complex medium, the vegetal fuel. In natural outdoor conditions, the experimental study of natural fires at real scale needs the development of an original metrology, one able to capture the large range of time and length scales involved in its dynamic nature and also able to resist the thermal, mechanical and chemical aggression of flames on devices. Robust, accurate and poorly intrusive tools must be carefully set-up and used for gaining very fluctuating data over long periods. These signals also need the development of original post-processing tools that take into account the non-steady nature of their stochastic components. Metrology for Fire Experiments in Outdoor Conditions closely analyzes these features, and also describes measurements techniques, the thermal insulation of fragile electronic systems, data acquisitio...

  13. Clustering experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhengwei; Tan, Ken; Di, Zengru; Roehner, Bertrand M

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that bees cluster together in cold weather, in the process of swarming (when the ``old'' queen leaves with part of the colony) or absconding (when the queen leaves with all the colony) and in defense against intruders such as wasps or hornets. In this paper we describe a fairly different clustering process which occurs at any temperature and independently of any special stimulus or circumstance. As a matter of fact, this process is about four times faster at 28 degree Celsius than at 15 degrees. Because of its simplicity and low level of ``noise'' we think that this phenomenon can provide a means for exploring the strength of inter-individual attraction between bees or other living organisms. For instance, and at first sight fairly surprisingly, our observations showed that this attraction does also exist between bees belonging to different colonies. As this study is aimed at providing a comparative perspective, we also describe a similar clustering experiment for red fire ants.

  14. Challenges of studying complex community health promotion programmes : Experiences from Stockholm diabetes prevention programme

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Camilla

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis focused on how to capture the complexity in the implementation of a community health promotion programme. The thesis is based on experiences of Stockholm diabetes prevention programme (SDPP), which was implemented in 1995-2004 in three municipalities, and include documentation within the programme, annual local governmental reports, local news cuttings, questionnaires and group discussions with the local steering committees members. The mate...

  15. Particle physics experiments 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes work carried out in 1983 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  16. Structural effect of the in situ generated titania on its ability to oxidize and capture the gas-phase elemental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tai Gyu; Hyun, Jung Eun

    2006-01-01

    Structural effect of the in situ generated TiO(2) sorbent particle was examined for its ability to capture elemental mercury under UV irradiation in a simulated combustion flue gas. Titania particles were prepared by thermal gas-phase oxidation of Titanium (IV) isopropoxide (TTIP) using a high temperature electric furnace reactor. The structural characteristics of the in situ generated TiO(2) at various synthesis temperatures were investigated; size distribution and the geometric mean diameter were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer, while fractal dimension and radius of gyration were evaluated from the transmission electron microscopy images. Results from the Hg(0) capture experiment show that with increasing titania synthesis temperature, the overall aggregate size increases and the morphology becomes more open-structured to gas-phase Hg(0) and UV light, resulting in the improved mercury removal capability. PMID:15949836

  17. Development of a carbonate absorption-based process for post-combustion CO2 capture: The role of biocatalyst to promote CO2 absorption rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Ye, X.; Zhang, Z.; Khodayari, A.; Djukadi, T.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) for post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture is described. IVCAP employs potassium carbonate (PC) as a solvent, uses waste or low quality steam from the power plant for CO2 stripping, and employs a biocatalyst, carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme, for promoting the CO2 absorption into PC solution. A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the activity of CA enzyme mixed in PC solutions in a stirred tank reactor system under various temperatures, CA dosages, CO2 loadings, CO2 partial pressures, and the presence of major flue gas contaminants. It was demonstrated that CA enzyme is an effective biocatalyst for CO2 absorption under IVCAP conditions. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Insomnia patients' help-seeking experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Janet M Y; Bartlett, Delwyn J; Armour, Carol L; Glozier, Nicholas; Saini, Bandana

    2014-03-01

    Timely access to appropriate treatment is important for optimizing insomnia management. To date, little is known about insomnia patients' treatment experiences or how they access and engage with the available health care resources. This study sought to capture the help-seeking experiences and behavioral patterns of patients with insomnia who are seeking or receiving specialist care. A purposive sample of 26 insomnia patients from specialist sleep and mental health clinics located in metropolitan New South Wales, Australia was recruited. Participants completed a brief questionnaire, followed by an in-depth, semi-structured interview. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using framework analysis. Three key themes emerged from the data: patients' sleep beliefs, treatment beliefs, and accessing specialized care. The findings show that daytime symptoms arising from insomnia serve as important illness cues for patients to seek medical help. In addition, participants' treatment pathways highlight factors that prevent the widespread use of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), including limited awareness about CBT-I, tentative referral mechanisms, limited service providers, and the high cost of CBT-I. PMID:23514322

  19. Effective UI The Art of Building Great User Experience in Software

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Jonathan; Wilson, Robb

    2010-01-01

    People expect effortless, engaging interaction with desktop and web applications, but producing software that generates enjoyable user experiences is much harder than many companies anticipate. With Effective UI, you'll learn proven user-experience strategies that will satisfy your clients and customers, drive business value, and increase brand strength. This book shows you how to capture the collaborative and cooperative spirit among designers, engineers, and management required for building engaging software. You'll also learn valuable methods for maintaining focus throughout the process -

  20. Experiment Dashboard for the LHC Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Andreeva, Julia; Gaidioz, Benjamin; Herrala, Juha; Maier, Gerhild; Rocha, Ricardo; Saiz, Pablo; Sidorova, Irina; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the Grid is to provide a coherent access to distributed computing resources. All LHC experiments are using several Grid infrastructures and a variety of the middleware flavors. Due to the complexity and heterogeinity of a distributed system the monitoring represents a challenging task. Independently of the underlying platform , the experiments need to ave a complete and uniform picture of their activities on the Grid ideally seen by the users as a single powerful computing resource. Overall operation of the infrastructure used by experiments is defined both by the quality of the Grid and the quality of the tools and services developed/used by the experiments. Correspondingly the required monitoring information should combine both Grid-related and experiment/application specific data. On the other hand, users of the LHC experiments have various roles and need different levels of details regarding monitoring data. The paper will focus on the Grid monitoring from the experiment/user perspectives with...

  1. Particle physics experiments 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work carried out in 1989 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel of Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  2. Particle physics experiments 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work carried out in 1987 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel (United Kingdom). The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  3. The Experience of KAI MAHI, an Employment Initiative for People with an Experience of Mental Illness, as Told by Zarna, Zeus, Lulu, Mary, Paul, and Hemi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Malmanche, Janie; Robertson, Linda

    2015-11-01

    There is a growing body of evidence endorsing the use of supported employment models for people with an experience of mental illness. However current literature and research regarding the perspective of people with experience of mental illness, as well as alternate models of employment support, is sparse. This study has captured the stories of employment of people with experience of mental illness who participated in KAI MAHI, a group based employment program. Findings identified key components of KAI MAHI, consistent with their overall experiences of employment, which were influential in assisting them to find and sustain employment. These included the opportunity for self-determination, a sense of self-efficacy, and respectful relationships. PMID:26173402

  4. Aeroelastic Benchmark Experiments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — M4 Engineering proposes to conduct canonical aeroelastic benchmark experiments. These experiments will augment existing sources for aeroelastic data in the...

  5. Framework of product experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desmet, P.; Hekkert, P.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a general framework for product experience that applies to all affective responses that can be experienced in human-product interaction. Three distinct components or levels of product experiences are discussed: aesthetic experience, experience of meaning, and emotional ex

  6. Particle physics experiments 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work carried out in 1982 on 52 experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel is described. Each experiment is listed under title, collaboration, technique, accelerator, year of running, status and spokesman. Unedited contributions are given from each experiment. (U.K.)

  7. The User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    User experience (UX) is about arranging the elements of a product or service to optimize how people will interact with it. In this article, the author talks about the importance of user experience and discusses the design of user experiences in libraries. He first looks at what UX is. Then he describes three kinds of user experience design: (1)…

  8. Real Life Experiences with Experience Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgård, Peter; Halskov, Kim

    2006-01-01

    Experience Design is an emergent field of study, and various approaches to the field abound. In this paper, we take a pragmatic approach to identifying key aspects of an experience design process, by reporting on a project involving the design of experience-oriented applications of interactive...... technologies for knowledge dissemination and marketing, in cooperation with public institutions and businesses. We argue that collaborative formulation of core design intentions and values is a valuable instrument in guiding experience design processes, and present three cases from this project, two of which...... the installations, the core values established to guide the design process and the intended use contexts. We argue that the installations present a broad spectrum of experience design installations that can assist designers in understanding the relations between core values, intentions, use context and interface...

  9. The Social Experiment Market

    OpenAIRE

    David Greenberg; Mark Shroder; Matthew Onstott

    1999-01-01

    In social experiments, individuals, households, or organizations are randomly assigned to two or more policy interventions. Elsewhere, we have summarized 143 experiments completed by autumn 1996. Here, we use the information we have gathered on these experiments and findings from informal telephone interviews to investigate the social experiment market--the buyers and sellers in the market that governs the production of experiments. We discuss target populations, types of interventions tested...

  10. Product Experience Is Seductive.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoch, Stephen J

    2002-01-01

    Product experience seduces consumers into believing that they learn more than is actually so. There are several reasons for this. First, experience is more engaging than most attempts at education, both more vivid and intentional, and consequently more memorable. Second, experience is viewed as nonpartisan, devoid of the didacticism of formal education and the self-serving interests of advertisers. Third, much of experience is ambiguous, but not recognized as such. Experience supports a pseud...

  11. Adaptive structures flight experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maurice

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  12. Characterizing the growth to detonation in PETN and HNS with small-scale PDV cutback experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wixom, Ryan; Yarrington, Cole; Knepper, Robert; Tappan, Alexander; Olles, Joseph; Zelenok, Matthew; A-Team

    2015-06-01

    For many decades, cutback experiments have been used to characterize the equation of state and growth to steady detonation in explosive formulations. More recently, embedded gauges have been used to capture the growth to steady detonation in gas-gun impacted samples. Data resulting from these experiments are extremely valuable for parameterizing equation of state and reaction models used in hydrocode simulations. Due to the extremely fast growth to detonation in typical detonator explosives, cutback and embedded gauge experiments are extremely difficult, if not impossible. Using frequency shifted photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) we have measured particle velocity histories from explosive films impacted with electrically driven flyers. By varying the sample thickness and impact conditions we were able to capture the growth from inert shock to full detonation pressure within distances as short as 100 μm. These data were used to assess and improve burn-model parameterization and equations of state for simulating shock initiation. Additionally, we discuss details of the experiment and data analysis regarding the most accurate possible determination of the velocity spike.

  13. Capturing the Competence of Management Consulting Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Klaasjan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to assess whether the effort of consulting firms and branch organizations to establish a shared and standardized methodology as a means to professionalize consulting and as a standard for training is possible and sensible. Design/methodology/approach: A survey was conducted among Dutch management…

  14. Meeting the challenge : capturing the upstream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The challenge facing the exploration and production sector of the petroleum industry to capture and hold onto the upstream was the main focus of this paper. The exploration and production (E and P) business was described as being highly complex, characterized by constant change and increasing competition. Some of the dynamic changes which have occurred in the Western Canada Basin (WCB) during the last five years and how they relate to the international playing field were reviewed. Significant changes to the production ranking profile as a result of acquisitions, and basin reserve endowment and maturity are the two major factors affecting current and future dynamics of upstream WCB E and P activity. Competitive pressures, contractor relationships, infrastructure access and controls, environmental issues are some of the other factors. Taking these factors into account, Talisman Energy Inc. has used its growth in the WCB to leverage its international activities, diversifying to less mature, but proven hydrocarbon basins. The company's international exploration strategy is designed to be adaptive and flexible and is guided by focus on a limited number of core areas with proven source rock and existing production, achievement of a set production level within a five-year time frame, ensuring strong relationships with host governments and partners, and selecting areas where a multiple of opportunity types are available. In general, for any upstream company it is important to recognize that the more predictable traditional order has given way to a market-driven environment where the rules change almost daily, and success depends on the ability to adapt to change.14 figs

  15. SSC education: Science to capture the imagination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To the great majority of Americans, science is merely a collection of facts and theories that should (for unknown reasons) be memorized and perhaps even understood in order for one to function as a responsible citizen. Few see science as a way of thinking and questioning and as an approach to learning the secrets of our world. In addition, most children and many adults have a stereotypical view of scientists as studious men in lab coats who spend all their time working alone in dark and smelly chemical or biological laboratories. The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) totally contradicts such a perception. This great instrument is being created by thousands of scientists, engineers, business people, technicians, administrators, and others, from dozens of nations, working together to realize a shared vision to seek answers to shared questions. The SSCL also provides an opportunity to change the mistaken impressions about science and scientists that have resulted in fewer students pursuing careers in fields related to science. In addition, it will serve as a catalyst to help people understand the roles that scientific thought and inquiry can play in bettering their lives and the lives of their offspring. Recognizing this problem in our society, the creators of the SSC Laboratory made a commitment to use the SSC to improve science education. Consequently, in addition to building the world's premier high-energy physics laboratory, the SSCL has a second goal: creation of a major national and international educational resource. To achieve the latter goal, the Education Office of the SSCL is charged with using the resources of the Laboratory, both during construction and during operation, to improve education in science and mathematics at all levels (prekindergarten through post-doctorate) and for all components of our society (including the general public), in the United States and around the world

  16. Capturing the competence of management consulting work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, Klaasjan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to assess whether the effort of consulting firms and branch organizations to establish a shared and standardized methodology as a means to professionalize consulting and as a standard for training is possible and sensible. - Design/methodology/approach: A su

  17. Capturing the Dimensions of Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    In the largest study of instructional practice ever undertaken, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's Measures of Effective Teaching (MET) project is searching for tools to save the world from perfunctory teacher evaluations. The first report (released in December 2010) described the potential usefulness of student surveys for providing…

  18. Capturing the musical brain with Lasso

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toiviainen, Petri; Alluri, Vinoo; Brattico, Elvira;

    2014-01-01

    . The dependent variables comprised musical feature time series that were computationally extracted from the stimulus. We expected timbral features to obtain a higher prediction accuracy than rhythmic and tonal ones. Moreover, we expected the areas significantly contributing to the decoding models......We investigated neural correlates of musical feature processing with a decoding approach. To this end, we used a method that combines computational extraction of musical features with regularized multiple regression (LASSO). Optimal model parameters were determined by maximizing the decoding...... accuracy using a leave-one-out cross-validation scheme. The method was applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data that were collected using a naturalistic paradigm, in which participants' brain responses were recorded while they were continuously listening to pieces of real music...

  19. NICMOS CAPTURES THE HEART OF OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The infrared vision of the Hubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) is providing a dramatic new look at the beautiful Orion Nebula which contains the nearest nursery for massive stars. For comparison, Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) image on the left shows a large part of the nebula as it appears in visible light. The heart of the giant Orion molecular cloud, OMC-1, is included in the relatively dim and featureless area inside the blue outline near the top of the image. Light from a few foreground stars seen in the WFPC2 image provides only a hint of the many other stars embedded in this dense cloud. NICMOS's infrared vision reveals a chaotic, active star birth region (as seen in the right-hand image). Here, stars and glowing interstellar dust, heated by and scattering the intense starlight, appear yellow-orange. Emission by excited hydrogen molecules appears blue. The image is oriented with north up and east to the left. The diagonal extent of the image is about 0.4 light-years. Some details are as small as the size of our solar system. The brightest object in the image is a massive young star called BN (Becklin-Neugebauer). Blue 'fingers' of molecular hydrogen emission indicate the presence of violent outflows, probably produced by a young star or stars still embedded in dust (located to the lower left, southeast, of BN). The outflowing material may also produce the crescent-shaped 'bow shock' on the edge of a dark feature north of BN and the two bright 'arcs' south of BN. The detection of several sets of closely spaced double stars in these observations further demonstrates NICMOS's ability to see fine details not possible from ground-based telescopes. Credits: NICMOS image -- Rodger Thompson, Marcia Rieke, Glenn Schneider, Susan Stolovy (University of Arizona); Edwin Erickson (SETI Institute/Ames Research Center); David Axon (STScI); and NASA WFPC2 image -- C. Robert O'Dell, Shui Kwan Wong (Rice University) and NASA Image files in GIF and JPEG format and captions may be accessed on the Internet via anonymous ftp from ftp.stsci.edu in /pubinfo.

  20. Capturing the semiotic relationship between terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargood, Charlie; Millard, David E.; Weal, Mark J.

    2010-04-01

    Tags describing objects on the web are often treated as facts about a resource, whereas it is quite possible that they represent more subjective observations. Existing methods of term expansion expand terms based on dictionary definitions or statistical information on term occurrence. Here we propose the use of a thematic model for term expansion based on semiotic relationships between terms; this has been shown to improve a system's thematic understanding of content and tags and to tease out the more subjective implications of those tags. Such a system relies on a thematic model that must be made by hand. In this article, we explore a method to capture a semiotic understanding of particular terms using a rule-based guide to authoring a thematic model. Experimentation shows that it is possible to capture valid definitions that can be used for semiotic term expansion but that the guide itself may not be sufficient to support this on a large scale. We argue that whilst the formation of super definitions will mitigate some of these problems, the development of an authoring support tool may be necessary to solve others.

  1. Popper's Thought Experiment Reinvestigated

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    Popper's original thought experiment probed some fundamental and subtle rules of quantum mechanics. Two recent experiments have tested Popper's hypothesis, but they seem to give contrasting results and one suggests a violation of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. The equations governing these two experiments and Popper's thought experiment will be derived from basic principles. The experimental constants will be inputted and it will show that the two experiments agree with each other. It will be shown that no uncertainty relations are violated and that Popper's thought experiment was fundamentally flawed.

  2. Experiment WA1 (CDHS Neutrino Experiment)

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    Experiment WA1, also known under CDHS (CERN, Dortmund, Heidelberg, Saclay; spokesman Jack Steinberger), was the first neutrino experiment on the SPS, in its West Area. Magnetized iron (with a toroidal field) forms the core of the detector. On its outside we see drift chambers and photomultipliers (detecting the light from the plastic scintillators further in). Peter Schilly is wearing a white coat. See also CERN Annual Report 1976, p.57.

  3. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF2 scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  4. Observing System Simulation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prive, Nikki

    2015-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). The components of an OSSE are described, along with discussion of the process for validating, calibrating, and performing experiments. a.

  5. Neutrino beams and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a brief review of the early history of neutrino experiments, the principle of neutrino beams at proton accelerators is described and a survey of neutrino experiments since 1963 is given. ((orig.))

  6. The AMS experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) detector will be installed as a particle physics experiment on the International Space Station. It will look for antimatter pockets in space. AMS is a CERN recognised experiment.

  7. Experiments in Magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, J. P.

    1970-01-01

    Describes three student experiments in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In these experiments, it was found that the electrical conductivity of the local water supply was sufficient to demonstrate effectively some of the features of MHD flowmeters, generators, and pumps. (LC)

  8. Particle physics experiments 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rutherford Appleton laboratory report describes work carried out in 1984 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics selection panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  9. The Experiment Factory: Standardizing Behavioral Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochat, Vanessa V; Eisenberg, Ian W; Enkavi, A Zeynep; Li, Jamie; Bissett, Patrick G; Poldrack, Russell A

    2016-01-01

    The administration of behavioral and experimental paradigms for psychology research is hindered by lack of a coordinated effort to develop and deploy standardized paradigms. While several frameworks (Mason and Suri, 2011; McDonnell et al., 2012; de Leeuw, 2015; Lange et al., 2015) have provided infrastructure and methods for individual research groups to develop paradigms, missing is a coordinated effort to develop paradigms linked with a system to easily deploy them. This disorganization leads to redundancy in development, divergent implementations of conceptually identical tasks, disorganized and error-prone code lacking documentation, and difficulty in replication. The ongoing reproducibility crisis in psychology and neuroscience research (Baker, 2015; Open Science Collaboration, 2015) highlights the urgency of this challenge: reproducible research in behavioral psychology is conditional on deployment of equivalent experiments. A large, accessible repository of experiments for researchers to develop collaboratively is most efficiently accomplished through an open source framework. Here we present the Experiment Factory, an open source framework for the development and deployment of web-based experiments. The modular infrastructure includes experiments, virtual machines for local or cloud deployment, and an application to drive these components and provide developers with functions and tools for further extension. We release this infrastructure with a deployment (http://www.expfactory.org) that researchers are currently using to run a set of over 80 standardized web-based experiments on Amazon Mechanical Turk. By providing open source tools for both deployment and development, this novel infrastructure holds promise to bring reproducibility to the administration of experiments, and accelerate scientific progress by providing a shared community resource of psychological paradigms. PMID:27199843

  10. The Experiment Factory: standardizing behavioral experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa V Sochat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The administration of behavioral and experimental paradigms for psychology research is hindered by lack of a coordinated effort to develop and deploy standardized paradigms. While several frameworks (de Leeuw (2015; McDonnell et al. (2012; Mason and Suri (2011; Lange et al. (2015 have provided infrastructure and methods for individual research groups to develop paradigms, missing is a coordinated effort to develop paradigms linked with a system to easily deploy them. This disorganization leads to redundancy in development, divergent implementations of conceptually identical tasks, disorganized and error-prone code lacking documentation, and difficulty in replication. The ongoing reproducibility crisis in psychology and neuroscience research (Baker (2015; Open Science Collaboration (2015 highlights the urgency of this challenge: reproducible research in behavioral psychology is conditional on deployment of equivalent experiments. A large, accessible repository of experiments for researchers to develop collaboratively is most efficiently accomplished through an open source framework. Here we present the Experiment Factory, an open source framework for the development and deployment of web-based experiments. The modular infrastructure includes experiments, virtual machines for local or cloud deployment, and an application to drive these components and provide developers with functions and tools for further extension. We release this infrastructure with a deployment (http://www.expfactory.org that researchers are currently using to run a set of over 80 standardized web-based experiments on Amazon Mechanical Turk. By providing open source tools for both deployment and development, this novel infrastructure holds promise to bring reproducibility to the administration of experiments, and accelerate scientific progress by providing a shared community resource of psychological paradigms.

  11. The Experiment Factory: Standardizing Behavioral Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochat, Vanessa V.; Eisenberg, Ian W.; Enkavi, A. Zeynep; Li, Jamie; Bissett, Patrick G.; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    The administration of behavioral and experimental paradigms for psychology research is hindered by lack of a coordinated effort to develop and deploy standardized paradigms. While several frameworks (Mason and Suri, 2011; McDonnell et al., 2012; de Leeuw, 2015; Lange et al., 2015) have provided infrastructure and methods for individual research groups to develop paradigms, missing is a coordinated effort to develop paradigms linked with a system to easily deploy them. This disorganization leads to redundancy in development, divergent implementations of conceptually identical tasks, disorganized and error-prone code lacking documentation, and difficulty in replication. The ongoing reproducibility crisis in psychology and neuroscience research (Baker, 2015; Open Science Collaboration, 2015) highlights the urgency of this challenge: reproducible research in behavioral psychology is conditional on deployment of equivalent experiments. A large, accessible repository of experiments for researchers to develop collaboratively is most efficiently accomplished through an open source framework. Here we present the Experiment Factory, an open source framework for the development and deployment of web-based experiments. The modular infrastructure includes experiments, virtual machines for local or cloud deployment, and an application to drive these components and provide developers with functions and tools for further extension. We release this infrastructure with a deployment (http://www.expfactory.org) that researchers are currently using to run a set of over 80 standardized web-based experiments on Amazon Mechanical Turk. By providing open source tools for both deployment and development, this novel infrastructure holds promise to bring reproducibility to the administration of experiments, and accelerate scientific progress by providing a shared community resource of psychological paradigms. PMID:27199843

  12. The experiment in macroeconometrics

    OpenAIRE

    Staszewska, Anna; Aldrich, John

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the experiment in macroeconometrics, the different forms it has taken and the rules that have been proposed for its proper conduct. Here an "experiment" means putting a question to a model and getting an answer. Different types of experiment are distinguished and the justification that can be provided for a particular choice of experiment is discussed. Three types of macroeconometric modelling are considered: the Cowles (system of equations) approach, the vector autoregres...

  13. Visual experience and blindsight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Blindsight is classically defined as residual visual capacity, e.g., to detect and identify visual stimuli, in the total absence of perceptual awareness following lesions to V1. However, whereas most experiments have investigated what blindsight patients can and cannot do, the literature contains...... several, often contradictory, remarks about remaining visual experience. This review examines closer these remarks as well as experiments that directly approach the nature of possibly spared visual experiences in blindsight....

  14. Organic chemistry experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Seok Sik

    2005-02-15

    This book deals with organic chemistry experiments, it is divided five chapters, which have introduction, the way to write the experiment report and safety in the laboratory, basic experiment technic like recrystallization and extraction, a lot of organic chemistry experiments such as fischer esterification, ester hydrolysis, electrophilic aromatic substitution, aldol reaction, benzoin condensation, wittig reaction grignard reaction, epoxidation reaction and selective reduction. The last chapter introduces chemistry site on the internet and way to find out reference on chemistry.

  15. Particle physics experiments 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work carried out in 1988 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. More than forty projects at different accelerators (SPS, ISIS, PETRA, LAMPF, LEP, HERA, BNL, ILL, LEAR) are listed. Different organisations collaborate on different projects. A brief progress report is given. References to published articles are given. (author)

  16. Leisure experience and imagination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lengkeek, J.

    2001-01-01

    Holiday-makers experience the places where they are on holiday in different ways. Back in 1979, Erik Cohen introduced his 'modes of tourist experience'. Cohen's approach was promising for better understanding 'experiences' in a phenomenological way but very little happened afterwards with his 'modes

  17. Penetration of tungsten-alloy rods into composite ceramic targets: Experiments and 2-D simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of terminal ballistics experiments, with scaled tungsten-alloy penetrators, was performed on composite targets consisting of ceramic tiles glued to thick steel backing plates. Tiles of silicon-carbide, aluminum nitride, titanium-dibroide and boron-carbide were 20-80 mm thick, and impact velocity was 1.7 km/s. 2-D numerical simulations, using the PISCES code, were performed in order to simulate these shots. It is shown that a simplified version of the Johnson-Holmquist failure model can account for the penetration depths of the rods but is not enough to capture the effect of lateral release waves on these penetrations

  18. Experiments in physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, J M; Denaro, A R

    1968-01-01

    Experiments in Physical Chemistry, Second Edition provides a compilation of experiments concerning physical chemistry. This book illustrates the link between the theory and practice of physical chemistry. Organized into three parts, this edition begins with an overview of those experiments that generally have a simple theoretical background. Part II contains experiments that are associated with more advanced theory or more developed techniques, or which require a greater degree of experimental skill. Part III consists of experiments that are in the nature of investigations wherein these invest

  19. Experience Communication and Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    experience which is relevant in regards to some of the aesthetical experiences which we are met with within the industry of experience communication. The term "interference"  in the context of experience communication can be described as a kind of "intrusion," capable of creating a certain type of beauty...... to user aspect (web 2.0), the personal engagement or the community spirit. This increasing demand of experiences reflects the postmodern cultural trends where rules for how to think and behave no longer exist. This results in individualism, where the identity of the human being has changed from something...

  20. Knowing what would happen: The epistemic strategies in Galileo's thought experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Kristian

    2015-12-01

    While philosophers have subjected Galileo's classic thought experiments to critical analysis, they have tended to largely ignored the historical and intellectual context in which they were deployed, and the specific role they played in Galileo's overall vision of science. In this paper I investigate Galileo's use of thought experiments, by focusing on the epistemic and rhetorical strategies that he employed in attempting to answer the question of how one can know what would happen in an imaginary scenario. Here I argue we can find three different answers to this question in Galileo later dialogues, which reflect the changing meanings of 'experience' and 'knowledge' (scientia) in the early modern period. Once we recognise that Galileo's thought experiments sometimes drew on the power of memory and the explicit appeal to 'common experience', while at other times, they took the form of demonstrative arguments intended to have the status of necessary truths; and on still other occasions, they were extrapolations, or probable guesses, drawn from a carefully planned series of controlled experiments, it becomes evident that no single account of the epistemological relationship between thought experiment, experience and experiment can adequately capture the epistemic variety we find Galileo's use of imaginary scenarios. To this extent, we cannot neatly classify Galileo's use of thought experiments as either 'medieval' or 'early modern', but we should see them as indicative of the complex epistemological transformations of the early seventeenth century. PMID:26568092

  1. Student experiences in an integrated science course: A phenomenological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crapenhoft-Gatewood, Kelly Lynn

    The purpose of conducting this study was to describe the experiences of average to high-achieving, middle-income students in a newly implemented integrated science course at a Midwest inner-city high school. The focus of this study was to describe the meaning students ascribed to their experiences in this non-tracked, two-year science course, in which many of the suggestions made by science reform efforts were implemented. A phenomenological approach was used in order to develop a holistic picture of the student participants' experiences. Data collection was confined to interviewing, observing, and analyzing the journals of four middle-income, average to high-achieving students enrolled in the same class during the 1994-95 school year. The data were subjective perceptions of the students in their learning environment. A modified version of the Colaizzi method of analysis of phenomenological data was used. This design utilized the Epoche, Phenomenological Reduction, Imaginative Variation and Synthesis. Co-researchers' statements were clustered into horizons of meaning and organized into themes. The textural themes included curriculum, instruction, teachers, peers, and overall impressions. Relationships to time and interactions with peers and teachers were among the structural themes. From these themes, individual and composite textual descriptions were developed. With the addition of the structural components, an integrated composite textual-structural description of the students' experience in the integrated science course resulted. This final product captured the meanings and essences of their experience. This study adds to the scholarly literature and research as it relates to the implementation of progressive pedagogy and theory regarding student experiences in a science course. It will improve educational practice by helping educators make informed decisions regarding curriculum reform, instructional practices, and classroom environment. This study will also

  2. Experiences of gender-based violence among HIV-positive Rwandan women beyond the period of disclosure and implications for HIV programming

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jessica Blythe

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between gender-based violence (GBV) and HIV has gained prominence in the field of public health. In the context of Rwanda, poverty and the lasting affects of the 1994 Rwandan Genocide further complicate this relationship. In partnership with Women’s Equity in Access to Care and Treatment, an HIV treatment centre in Kigali, Rwanda, this study uses qualitative research methods to capture the experiences of GBV among HIV-positive Rwandan women. Participants spoke to the variety ...

  3. The Experience City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marling, Gitte; Jensen, Ole B.; Kiib, Hans

    2012-01-01

    This article take its point of departure in the pressure of the experience economy on European cities - a pressure which in recent years has found its expression in a number of comprehensive transformations of the physical and architectural environments, and new eventscapes related to fun...... and cultural experience are emerging. The physical, cultural and democratic consequences of this development are discussed in the article, as well as the problems and the new opportunities in the ‘Experience city’. It focuses on the design of the ‘Danish Experience City’ with a special emphasis on hybrid...... to relate to the wider international debate and development. In section two we present the main theoretical concepts and framings that will guide the understanding and the analysis of the experience city. In section three we focus on the design of the ‘Danish experience city’ and present the first research...

  4. Corpuscular model of two-beam interference and double-slit experiments with single photons

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Fengping; De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel; Miyashita, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    We introduce an event-based corpuscular simulation model that reproduces the wave mechanical results of single-photon double slit and two-beam interference experiments and (of a one-to-one copy of an experimental realization) of a single-photon interference experiment with a Fresnel biprism. The simulation comprises models that capture the essential features of the apparatuses used in the experiment, including the single-photon detectors recording individual detector clicks. We demonstrate that incorporating in the detector model, simple and minimalistic processes mimicking the memory and threshold behavior of single-photon detectors is sufficient to produce multipath interference patterns. These multipath interference patterns are built up by individual particles taking one single path to the detector where they arrive one-by-one. The particles in our model are not corpuscular in the standard, classical physics sense in that they are information carriers that exchange information with the apparatuses of the ...

  5. Exploring sensory neuroscience through experience and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyttenbach, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Many phenomena that we take for granted are illusions - color and motion on a TV or computer monitor, for example, or the impression of space in a stereo music recording. Even the stable image that we perceive when looking directly at the real world is illusory. One of the important lessons from sensory neuroscience is that our perception of the world is constructed rather than received. Sensory illusions effectively capture student interest, but how do you then move on to substantive discussion of neuroscience? This article illustrates several illusions, attempts to connect them to neuroscience, and shows how students can explore and experiment with them. Even when (as is often the case) there is no agreed-upon mechanistic explanation for an illusion, students can form hypotheses and test them by manipulating stimuli and measuring their effects. In effect, students can experiment with illusions using themselves as subjects. PMID:23493966

  6. Ball Collision Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  7. Realisation, experience, and purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sobisch, Jan-Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Often Buddhist mantra practises are portrayed as making and maintaining meditation experiences. Jigten Sumgön explains in his dGongs gcig (5.19) that such a 'making and maintaining' is only a mental fabrication and needs to be purified. Realisation does not arise from experience, but from...

  8. On the Poggendorff Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Ricardo Lopes; Silva, P. A. S.; Borges, Paulo de Faria

    2015-01-01

    Poggendorff showed experimentally, in the middle of the 19th century, that the weight of an Atwood machine is reduced when it is brought to motion. His experiment has been revisited from time to time, making use of instrumentation that reflects the technological development of the moment. In this paper, the evolution of the experiment is briefly…

  9. Teaching Knowledge Engineering: Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tom; Hartvig, Susanne C

    1998-01-01

    Includes description of experiences gained by teaching KE in construction domains. It outlines good starting points and overall guidance to education in applied AI.......Includes description of experiences gained by teaching KE in construction domains. It outlines good starting points and overall guidance to education in applied AI....

  10. New neutrino experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maury Goodman

    2004-02-01

    Following incredible recent progress in understanding neutrino oscillations, many new ambitious experiments are being planned to study neutrino properties. The most important may be to find a non-zero value of $_{13}$. The most promising way to do this appears to be to measure $_{}→ _{}$ oscillations with an $E/L$ near $ m^{2}_{\\text{atmo}}$. Future neutrino experiments are great.

  11. The Student Athlete Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayles, Joy Gaston

    2009-01-01

    Prior to the 1980s, the literature on the experiences of collegiate student athletes was rather scarce. Since that time the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has passed several eligibility rules to address concerns about the academic performance and the overall experience of student athletes on college campuses. As such, the…

  12. Real-World Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents IISME, a U.S. program that can give educators a real-world experience and that can deepen their subject-matter knowledge. It also presents the experiences of some teachers who are into this program. IISME's summer-fellowship program started out with 40 teachers and 12 companies. The group's growth picked up in 2001, when it…

  13. Peak Experience Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel G.; Evans, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This paper emerges from the continued analysis of data collected in a series of international studies concerning Childhood Peak Experiences (CPEs) based on developments in understanding peak experiences in Maslow's hierarchy of needs initiated by Dr Edward Hoffman. Bridging from the series of studies, Canadian researchers explore collected…

  14. Varieties of Musical Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharucha, J. Jamshed; Curtis, Meagan; Paroo, Kaivon

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that music cognition involves the use of acoustic and auditory codes to evoke a variety of conscious experiences. The variety of domains that are encompassed by music is so diverse that it is unclear whether a single domain of structure or experience is defining. Music is best understood as a form of communication in which…

  15. Fluorescence Experiments with Quinine

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, James E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments which illustrate the analytical capabilities of fluorescence, and outlines two straightforward analyses involving real analyses. These experiments are suitable for an undergraduate instrumental analysis course and require approximately six to seven hours of laboratory time. (MLH)

  16. Experiments as politics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spears, R; Smith, HJ

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the political nature of laboratory experiments. Such experiments can be construed as paradigms of power, open to construction and debate, where different agents and interests are involved in a process of struggle over both (re)presentation and substance. Ex

  17. Experiments with Succinct Solvers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholtz, Mikael; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Nielson, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    time of the solver and the aim of this note is to provide some insight into which formulations are better than others. The experiments addresses three general issues: (i) the order of the parameters of relations, (ii) the order of conjuncts in preconditions and (iii) the use of memoisation....... The experiments are performed for Control Flow Analyses for Discretionary Ambients....

  18. Particle physics experiments 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research programs described here were carried out in 1992 at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and funded by the United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council. The area covered in these experiments is particle physics. Unedited contributions from over forty experimental programs are included. Experiments are listed according to their current status, the accelerator used and its years of operation. (UK)

  19. Neutrino oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments ({nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {tau}}) currently being performed at accelerators are reviewed. Future plans for short and long base-line experiments are summarized. (author) 10 figs., 2 tabs., 29 refs.

  20. ATLAS Experiment Brochure

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, Steven

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  1. Why do Bell experiments?

    OpenAIRE

    Percival, Ian C.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments over three decades have been unable to demonstrate weak nonlocality in the sense of Bell unambiguously, without loopholes. The last important loophole remaining is the detection loophole, which is being tackled by at least three experimental groups. This letter counters five common beliefs about Bell experiments, and presents alternative scenarios for future developments.

  2. Experiences with Remote Laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Nafalski; Ozdemir Gol; Zorica Nedic; Jan Machotka; José M. M. Ferreira; Ingvar Gustavsson

    2010-01-01

    The paper reports on experiences of academics and students involved in using remote engineering laboratories both when students work individually or collaboratively with others on the experiments. Positives and negatives are highlighted and are contrasted with expectations of what the remote laboratories can bring into pedagogical environments. Recommendations and conclusions follow on how to better use the remote laboratories in teaching.

  3. The French experience

    CERN Document Server

    Bougard, Marie-Thérèse

    2003-01-01

    Developed for beginners, The French Experience 1 course book is designed to accompany the French Experience 1 CDs (9780563472582) but can also be used on its own to develop your reading and writing skills. You’ll gain valuable insights into French culture too.

  4. Franklin: User Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Research Supercomputing Center; He, Yun (Helen); Kramer, William T.C.; Carter, Jonathan; Cardo, Nicholas

    2008-05-07

    The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin user experiences from friendly early user period to production period. Selected successful user stories along with top issues affecting user experiences are presented.

  5. User Experience Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Jantzen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The present study develops a set of 10 dimensions based on a systematic understanding of the concept of experience as a holistic psychological. Seven of these are derived from a psychological conception of what experiencing and experiences are. Three supplementary dimensions spring from the obser...

  6. Space Experiment Module (SEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodell, Charles L.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Experiment Module (SEM) Program is an education initiative sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Shuttle Small Payloads Project. The program provides nationwide educational access to space for Kindergarten through University level students. The SEM program focuses on the science of zero-gravity and microgravity. Within the program, NASA provides small containers or "modules" for students to fly experiments on the Space Shuttle. The experiments are created, designed, built, and implemented by students with teacher and/or mentor guidance. Student experiment modules are flown in a "carrier" which resides in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. The carrier supplies power to, and the means to control and collect data from each experiment.

  7. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  8. Health education telecommunications experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Health/Education Telecommunications Experiment (HET) was conducted jointly by NASA and HEW on NASA's ATS-6 communications satellite. This experiment actually consisted of six experiments testing health and education applications of a communication spacecraft producing a broadcast of color television directly from space to over 120 low-cost receivers located in remote rural areas throughout the U.S. (including Alaska). The experiments were conducted over the period from 2 July 1974 to 20 May 1975 and operated on an almost daily basis. The overall telecommunications system to support these experiments consisted of many elements: The ATS-6 spacecraft; five different types of earth stations consisting of 120 video receive terminals, 51 telephony tranceivers and eight video originating terminals of three different types. Actual performance of the equipment as measured in the field was shown to equal or exceed predicted values.

  9. Cryogenics for LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic systems will be used by LHC experiments to maximize their performance. Institutes around the world are collaborating with CERN in the construction of these very low temperature systems. The cryogenic test facility in hall 180 for ATLAS magnets. High Energy Physics experiments have frequently adopted cryogenic versions of their apparatus to achieve optimal performance, and those for the LHC will be no exception. The two largest experiments for CERN's new flagship accelerator, ATLAS and CMS, will both use large superconducting magnets operated at 4.5 Kelvin - almost 270 degrees below the freezing point of water. ATLAS also includes calorimeters filled with liquid argon at 87 Kelvin. For the magnets, the choice of a cryogenic version was dictated by a combination economy and transparency to emerging particles. For the calorimeters, liquid argon was selected as the fluid best suited to the experiment's physics requirements. High Energy Physics experiments are the result of worldwide collaborations and...

  10. Experience as Excursion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie; Shanks, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A central value of what may be termed Experience Design is its aspiration to shift focus from the logic of singular design fields to the interrelations and interactions that take place in situations where people are simultaneously engaged with multiple designs. Experience Design can allow...... researchers and practitioners to travel – making it possible to follow experiences as they are enacted across and between places, modes of transportation, mobile mediation and assemblages of things. Drawing on the nomadic metaphysics of philosopher Michel Serres, the journeying, shifting and propagating...... qualities of experience are highlighted as part of a suggestion that design may indeed relate as much to metaphysics as to mechanics, materials science, and the psychology of the consumer and user. An Experience Design is sketched out as the choreography of temporary and shifting engagements across...

  11. Molybdenum solar neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the molybdenum solar neutrino experiment is to deduce the 8B solar neutrino flux, averaged over the past several million years, from the concentration of 98Tc in a deeply buried molybdenum deposit. The experiment is important to an understanding of stellar processes because it will shed light on the reason for the discrepancy between theory and observation of the chlorine solar neutrino experiment. Possible reasons for the discrepancy may lie in the properties of neutrinos (neutrino oscillations or massive neutrinos) or in deficiencies of the standard solar model. The chlorine experiment only measures the 8B neutrino flux in current times and does not address possible temporal variations in the interior of the sun, which are also not considered in the standard model. In the molybdenum experiment, we plan to measure 98Tc (4.2 Myr), also produced by 8B neutrinos, and possibly 97Tc (2.6 Myr), produced by lower energy neutrinos

  12. USML-1 Glovebox experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    This report covers the development of and results from three experiments that were flown in the Materials Science Glovebox on USML-1: Marangoni convection in Closed Containers (MCCC), Double Float Zone (DFZ), and Fiber Pulling in Microgravity (FPM). The Glovebox provided a convenient, low cost method for doing simple 'try and see' experiments that could test new concepts or elucidate microgravity phenomena. Since the Glovebox provided essentially one (or possibly two levels of confinement, many of the stringent verification and test requirements on the experiment apparatus could be relaxed and a streamlined test and verification plan for flight qualification could be implemented. Furthermore, the experiments were contained in their own carrying cases whose external configurations could be identified early in the integration sequence for stowage considerations while delivery of the actual experiment apparatus could be postponed until only a few months before flight. This minimized the time fluids must be contained and reduced the possibility of corrosive reactions that could ruin the experiment. In many respects, this exercise was as much about developing a simpler, cheaper way of doing crew-assisted science as it was about the actual scientific accomplishments of the individual experiments. The Marangoni Convection in Closed Containers experiment was designed to study the effects of a void space in a simulated Bridgman crystal growth configuration and to determine if surface tension driven convective flows that may result from thermal gradients along any free surfaces could affect the solidification process. The Fiber Pulling in Microgravity experiment sought to separate the role of gravity drainage from capillarity effects in the break-up of slender cylindrical liquid columns. The Stability of a Double Float Zone experiment explored the feasibility of a quasi-containerless process in which a solidifying material is suspended by two liquid bridges of its own melt.

  13. Simulation - modeling - experiment; Simulation - modelisation - experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    After two workshops held in 2001 on the same topics, and in order to make a status of the advances in the domain of simulation and measurements, the main goals proposed for this workshop are: the presentation of the state-of-the-art of tools, methods and experiments in the domains of interest of the Gedepeon research group, the exchange of information about the possibilities of use of computer codes and facilities, about the understanding of physical and chemical phenomena, and about development and experiment needs. This document gathers 18 presentations (slides) among the 19 given at this workshop and dealing with: the deterministic and stochastic codes in reactor physics (Rimpault G.); MURE: an evolution code coupled with MCNP (Meplan O.); neutronic calculation of future reactors at EdF (Lecarpentier D.); advance status of the MCNP/TRIO-U neutronic/thermal-hydraulics coupling (Nuttin A.); the FLICA4/TRIPOLI4 thermal-hydraulics/neutronics coupling (Aniel S.); methods of disturbances and sensitivity analysis of nuclear data in reactor physics, application to VENUS-2 experimental reactor (Bidaud A.); modeling for the reliability improvement of an ADS accelerator (Biarotte J.L.); residual gas compensation of the space charge of intense beams (Ben Ismail A.); experimental determination and numerical modeling of phase equilibrium diagrams of interest in nuclear applications (Gachon J.C.); modeling of irradiation effects (Barbu A.); elastic limit and irradiation damage in Fe-Cr alloys: simulation and experiment (Pontikis V.); experimental measurements of spallation residues, comparison with Monte-Carlo simulation codes (Fallot M.); the spallation target-reactor coupling (Rimpault G.); tools and data (Grouiller J.P.); models in high energy transport codes: status and perspective (Leray S.); other ways of investigation for spallation (Audoin L.); neutrons and light particles production at intermediate energies (20-200 MeV) with iron, lead and uranium targets (Le Colley F

  14. Understanding customer experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Christopher; Schwager, Andre

    2007-02-01

    Anyone who has signed up for cell phone service, attempted to claim a rebate, or navigated a call center has probably suffered from a company's apparent indifference to what should be its first concern: the customer experiences that culminate in either satisfaction or disappointment and defection. Customer experience is the subjective response customers have to direct or indirect contact with a company. It encompasses every aspect of an offering: customer care, advertising, packaging, features, ease of use, reliability. Customer experience is shaped by customers' expectations, which largely reflect previous experiences. Few CEOs would argue against the significance of customer experience or against measuring and analyzing it. But many don't appreciate how those activities differ from CRM or just how illuminating the data can be. For instance, the majority of the companies in a recent survey believed they have been providing "superior" experiences to customers, but most customers disagreed. The authors describe a customer experience management (CEM) process that involves three kinds of monitoring: past patterns (evaluating completed transactions), present patterns (tracking current relationships), and potential patterns (conducting inquiries in the hope of unveiling future opportunities). Data are collected at or about touch points through such methods as surveys, interviews, focus groups, and online forums. Companies need to involve every function in the effort, not just a single customer-facing group. The authors go on to illustrate how a cross-functional CEM system is created. With such a system, companies can discover which customers are prospects for growth and which require immediate intervention.

  15. Drexhage's Experiment for Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langguth, Lutz; Fleury, Romain; Alò, Andrea; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2016-06-01

    Drexhage's seminal observation that spontaneous emission rates of fluorophores vary with distance from a mirror uncovered the fundamental notion that a source's environment determines radiative linewidths and shifts. Further, this observation established a powerful tool to determine fluorescence quantum yields. We present the direct analogue for sound. We demonstrate that a Chinese gong at a hard wall experiences radiative corrections to linewidth and line shift, and extract its intrinsic radiation efficiency. Beyond acoustics, our experiment opens new ideas to extend the Drexhage experiment to metamaterials, nanoantennas, and multipolar transitions.

  16. Hydrothermal organic synthesis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    Ways in which heat is useful in organic synthesis experiments are described, and experiments on the hydrothermal destruction and synthesis of organic compounds are discussed. It is pointed out that, if heat can overcome kinetic barriers to the formation of metastable states from reduced or oxidized starting materials, abiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions is a distinct possibility. However, carefully controlled experiments which replicate the descriptive variables of natural hydrothermal systems have not yet been conducted with the aim of testing the hypothesis of hydrothermal organic systems.

  17. Network simulation experiments manual

    CERN Document Server

    Aboelela, Emad

    2011-01-01

    Network Simulation Experiments Manual, Third Edition, contains simulation-based experiments to help students and professionals learn about key concepts in computer networking. The simulation approach provides a virtual environment for a wide range of desirable features, such as modeling a network based on specified criteria and analyzing its performance under different scenarios. The experiments include the basics of using OPNET IT Guru Academic Edition; operation of the Ethernet network; partitioning of a physical network into separate logical networks using virtual local area networks (V

  18. The Experiment as Act

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    identify and locate the experiments of POEX65 as acts; and to ask the questions: what constitutes those acts as experiments? and how do we possibly archive them? My purpose, then, is to define the methodologies to obtain the contours of a post-phenomenology of experimental artistic production in order to...... be able to analyse the phenomena found at POEX65. Here I will use the notion of the ‘ontological theatre’ (Pickering), which, according to Pickering, is acted out in experimental art productions. The experiment could thus be seen as an ‘agency-realism’ – as an ‘act’ of relations across the aesthetics...

  19. Game user experience evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhaupt, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating interactive systems for their user experience (UX) is a standard approach in industry and research today. This book explores the areas of game design and development and Human Computer Interaction (HCI) as ways to understand the various contributing aspects of the overall gaming experience. Fully updated, extended and revised this book is based upon the original publication Evaluating User Experience in Games, and provides updated methods and approaches ranging from user- orientated methods to game specific approaches. New and emerging methods and areas explored include physiologi

  20. THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRAJEWSKI,R.F.; ANDREWS,J.W.; WEI,G.

    1999-09-01

    A laboratory experiment has been conducted which tests for the effects of distribution system purging on system Delivery Effectiveness (DE) as defined in ASHRAE 152P. The experiment is described in its configuration, instrumentation, and data acquisition system. Data gathered in the experiment is given and discussed. The results show that purging of the distribution system alone does not offer any improvement of the system DE. Additional supporting tests were conducted regarding experimental simulations of buffer zones and bare pipe and are also discussed.

  1. CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU-PHW program is based upon 38 years of heavy water reactor experience with 35 years of operating experience. Canada has had 72 reactor years of nuclear-electric operations experience with 10 nuclear units in 4 generating stations during a period of 18 years. All objectives have been met with outstanding performance: worker safety, public safety, environmental emissions, reliable electricity production, and low electricity cost. The achievement has been realized through total teamwork involving all scientific disciplines and all project functions (research, design, manufacturing, construction, and operation). (auth)

  2. Making the Experience City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the latest research into cultural planning and architectural branding in Denmark based on the ‘Experience City' research project located at Aalborg University. The paper explores the implication of the turn towards culture and experience in the contemporary Danish city. It thus...... makes an investigation into the complex relationship between the words and policies of the ‘Experience Economy' and the actual urban transformations made in cities with reference to these changes. The paper discusses the cases researched in relation to the state, market, civil society framework as well...

  3. Experience and Its Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Youqing

    2006-01-01

    Experience iS an activity that arouses emotions and generates meanings based on vivid sensation and profound compreh ension.It iS emotional,meaningful,and personal,playing a key role in the course of forming and developing one'S qualities.The psychological process of experience generation consists of such links as sensing things,arousing emotions,promoting comprehension and association,generating insights and meanings,and deepening emotional responses.Undergoing things personally by means of direct sensation,taking part in activities,and living life are the most important preconditions of experience generation.Emotional influence,situational edification,and arts edification ale extemal factors that induce experience generation.

  4. Lidar calibration experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, T.; Streicher, J.;

    1997-01-01

    A series of atmospheric aerosol diffusion experiments combined with lidar detection was conducted to evaluate and calibrate an existing retrieval algorithm for aerosol backscatter lidar systems. The calibration experiments made use of two (almost) identical mini-lidar systems for aerosol cloud...... detection to test the reproducibility and uncertainty of lidars. Lidar data were obtained from both single-ended and double-ended Lidar configurations. A backstop was introduced in one of the experiments and a new method was developed where information obtained from the backstop can be used in the inversion...... algorithm. Independent in-situ aerosol plume concentrations were obtained from a simultaneous tracer gas experiment with SF6, and comparisons with the two lidars were made. The study shows that the reproducibility of the lidars is within 15%, including measurements from both sides of a plume...

  5. Cooperative Prototyping Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Grønbæk, Kaj

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes experiments with a design technique that we denote cooperative prototyping. The experiments consider design of a patient case record system for municipal dental clinics in which we used HyperCard, an off the shelf programming environment for the Macintosh. In the ecperiments we...... tried to achieve a fluent work-like evaluation of prototypes where users envisioned future work with a computer tool, at the same time as we made on-line modifications of prototypes in cooperation with the users when breakdown occur in their work-like evaluation. The experiments showed...... these experiences we discuss problems in the process, requirements for design tools, and issues involved in getting going with cooperative prototyping with active user involvement....

  6. Conceptualising the audiobook experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iben Have

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we wish to introduce and discuss a theoretical framework for a possible conceptualisation of the differences between reading a printed book and listening to an audiobook. We tend to introduce similarities and differences between reading with the eyes and reading with the ears, implying that we should not discuss the audiobook experience as a remediation of the printed book experience only, but as an entirely different experience that could be conceptualised in continuation of mobile listening practises. As a methodological strategy we will emphasise the differences between the literary practices, reading with the eyes and reading with the ears. These different perspectives on reading are used to accentuate the distinct experiences, and future thorough analyses in continuation of this framework would appear much more complex and connected than in the present article.

  7. German and French experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this lecture author presents experience in-service inspection programme of primary circuit components at home and abroad, implementation into WWER (world methodology and equipment) as well as system qualification. Objectives European network for inspection qualification (ENIQ) are presented

  8. The world's biggest experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Gregson, Liz

    2008-01-01

    According to CERN, our understanding of the Universe is about the change. Meet the Imperial alumni and staff who are involved in CERN's Large Hadron Collider, the world's biggest experiment. (3 pages)

  9. Notes on Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physics Education, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Describes four physics experiments including "Investigation of Box Resonances Using a Micro"; "A Direct Reading Wattmeter, DC or AC"; "Exercises in the Application of Ohm's Law"; and "Hysteresis on Gas Discharges." Discusses procedures, instrumentation, and analysis in each example. (CW)

  10. Storage Ring EDM Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semertzidis, Yannis K.

    2016-04-01

    Dedicated storage ring electric dipole moment (EDM) methods show great promise advancing the sensitivity level by a couple orders of magnitude over currently planned hadronic EDM experiments. We describe the present status and recent updates of the field.

  11. Experiment-o-mania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drndarski, Marina

    2015-04-01

    Every 21st century student is expected to develop science literacy skills. As this is not part of Serbian national curriculum yet, we decided to introduce it with this project. Experiment-o-mania provides students to experience science in different and exciting way. It makes opportunity for personalized learning offering space and time to ask (why, where, how, what if) and to try. Therefore, we empower young people with skills of experimenting, and they love science back. They ask questions, make hypothesis, make problems and solve them, make mistakes, discuss about the results. Subsequently this raises the students' interest for school curriculum. This vision of science teaching is associated with inquiry-based learning. Experiment-o-mania is the unique and recognizable teaching methodology for the elementary school Drinka Pavlović, Belgrade, Serbia. Experiment-o-mania implies activities throughout the school year. They are held on extra class sessions, through science experiments, science projects or preparations for School's Days of science. Students learn to ask questions, make observations, classify data, communicate ideas, conduct experiments, analyse results and make conclusions. All science teachers participate in designing activities and experiments for students in Experiment-o-mania teaching method. But they are not alone. Teacher of fine arts, English teachers and others also take part. Students have their representatives in this team, too. This is a good way to blend knowledge among different school subject and popularize science in general. All the experiments are age appropriate and related to real life situations, local community, society and the world. We explore Fibonacci's arrays, saving energy, solar power, climate change, environmental problems, pollution, daily life situations in the country or worldwide. We introduce great scientists as Nikola Tesla, Milutin Milanković and sir Isaac Newton. We celebrate all relevant international days, weeks

  12. Foundation doctors’ induction experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Miles, Susan; Kellett, Joanne; Leinster, Sam J.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is well established that trainee doctors struggle with the transition from medical school to starting work and feel unprepared for many aspects of their new role. There is evidence that suitable induction experiences improve competence and confidence, but available data indicate that trainee doctors on the UK Foundation Programme are commonly not experiencing useful inductions. The aim of the reported research was to explore trainee doctors’ experiences with induction during the...

  13. The OPERA Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Iovane, G

    1998-01-01

    OPERA(Oscillation Project with Emulsion-tRacking Apparatus) is a new detector concept, iron(lead)-emulsion for a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. This experiment would perform an appearance search for nu_mu-nu_tau oscillation in the parameter region indicated by the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. OPERA can run at the Gran Sasso Laboratory in the proposed NGS (Neutrino to Gran Sasso) Beam from CERN.

  14. Surface electrical properties experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Gene; Strangway, David; Annan, Peter; Baker, Richard G.; Bannister, Lawrence; Brown, Raymon; Cooper, William; Cubley, Dean; deBettencourt, Joseph; England, Anthony W.; Groener, John; Kong, Jin-Au; LaTorraca, Gerald; Meyer, James; Nanda, Ved; Redman, David; Rossiter, James; Tsang, Leung; Urner, Joseph; Watts, Raymond

    1973-01-01

    The surface electrical properties (SEP) experiment was used to explore the subsurface material of the Apollo 17 landing site by means of electromagnetic radiation. The experiment was designed to detect electrical layering, discrete scattering bodies, and the possible presence of water. From the analysis of the data, it was expected that values of the electrical properties (dielectric constant and loss tangent) of lunar material in situ would be obtained.

  15. The MAJORANA Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, Matthew P.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, R.; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, John; Wolfe, B. A.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.

    2011-10-01

    The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

  16. Mechatronics with experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Cetinkunt, Sabri

    2014-01-01

    Mechatronics with Experiments, Second Edition comprehensively covers the fundamental scientific principles and technologies that are used in the design of modern computer-controlled machines and processes. It provides all of the technical background (covering mechanical, aerospace, chemical, electrical, and computer engineering) needed for designing an automated machine or process. The new edition of this textbook has been updated to include a number of experiments involving electronic circuit design and microcontroller programming and includes real time software development using MATLAB® and

  17. Accessibility and sensory experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryhl, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a new design concept; sensory accessibility. While acknowledging the importance of sensory experiences in architectural quality, as well as the importance of accommodating user needs the concept combines three equally important factors; architecture, the senses...... and accessibility. Sensory accessibility accommodates aspects of a sensory disability and describes architectural design requirements needed to ensure access to architectural experiences. In the context of architecture accessibility has become a design concept of its own. It is generally described as ensuring...

  18. Accelerator Experiments for Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Johnny S. T.

    2003-01-01

    Many recent discoveries in astrophysics involve phenomena that are highly complex. Carefully designed experiments, together with sophisticated computer simulations, are required to gain insights into the underlying physics. We show that particle accelerators are unique tools in this area of research, by providing precision calibration data and by creating extreme experimental conditions relevant for astrophysics. In this paper we discuss laboratory experiments that can be carried out at the S...

  19. Sculpting the Illness Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Bathje MS, OTR/L

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Otto Kamensek provided the cover art for the Fall 2014 issue of the Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. “Glimmer of Hope” is part of Otto’s collection “Shard’s, Bone Deep,” which includes hand-built ceramic sculptures that portray his experiences with a lifelong chronic illness. Engaging in ceramic sculpture helps him process the experiences associated with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis and provides a means to support others experiencing chronic illness.

  20. The LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Nakada, Tatsuya

    2000-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to fully exploit the large number of b hadrons expected at the LHC energy and luminosity. The experiment is equipped with particle identification devices and can efficiently trigger events with different B-meson final states, allowing systematic studies of CP violation and other rare phenomena in the b hadron system with a high precision which could reveal physics beyond the Standard Model.

  1. The experiment in living

    OpenAIRE

    Marres, Noortje

    2012-01-01

    This article engages with debates about widening participation in social research by examining a specific form of public action and knowledge, namely experiments in sustainable living. I propose that these experiments may be approached as forms of social research, and as such offer special opportunities for social research to insert itself into wider societal research arrangements. The article develops the notion of the multifarious instrument which highlights that genres of public action may...

  2. HOLLOWS of EXPERIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Nixon, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    This essay is divided into two parts, deeply intermingled. Part I examines not only the origin of conscious experience but also how it is possible to ask of our own consciousness how it came to be. Part II examines the origin of experience itself, which soon reveals itself as the ontological question of Being. The chief premise of Part I chapter is that symbolic communion and the categorizations of language have enabled human organisms to distinguish between themselves as actually existing en...

  3. Prolonged labour : women's experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Nystedt, Astrid

    2005-01-01

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to illuminate, describe, and promote understanding of women’s experiences of prolonged labour. The thesis compromises four studies. Methods: Paper I describes a case-referent study that recruited women (n = 255) giving singleton live birth to their first child by spontaneous labour after more than 37 completed weeks’ pregnancy. Participants completed a questionnaire that investigated childbirth experiences, previous family relationships, and childhood e...

  4. The CLOUD experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets (CLOUD) experiment as shown by Jasper Kirkby (spokesperson). Kirkby shows a sketch to illustrate the possible link between galactic cosmic rays and cloud formations. The CLOUD experiment uses beams from the PS accelerator at CERN to simulate the effect of cosmic rays on cloud formations in the Earth's atmosphere. It is thought that cosmic ray intensity is linked to the amount of low cloud cover due to the formation of aerosols, which induce condensation.

  5. Sculpting the Illness Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Molly Bathje MS, OTR/L

    2014-01-01

    Otto Kamensek provided the cover art for the Fall 2014 issue of the Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. “Glimmer of Hope” is part of Otto’s collection “Shard’s, Bone Deep,” which includes hand-built ceramic sculptures that portray his experiences with a lifelong chronic illness. Engaging in ceramic sculpture helps him process the experiences associated with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis and provides a means to support others experiencing chronic illness.

  6. Reconstructing Experiences through Sketching

    CERN Document Server

    Karapanos, Evangelos; Hassenzahl, Marc

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents iScale, a survey tool that aims at eliciting users' experiences with a product from memory. iScale employs sketching in imposing a process in the reconstruction of one's experiences. Two versions of iScale, the Constructive and the Value-Account iScale, were motivated by two distinct theories on how people reconstruct emotional experiences from memory. These two versions were tested in two separate studies. Study 1 aimed at providing qualitative insight into the use of iScale and compared its performance to that of free-hand sketching. Study 2 compared the two iScale versions to a control condition: that of reporting one's experiences without employing any form of sketching. Significant differences between iScale and the "no-sketching" tool were found. Overall, iScale resulted in a) an increase in the number of experience reports that subjects provided, b) an increase in the amount of contextual information for the reported experiences, and c) an increase in subjects' accuracy in recalling...

  7. Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrin, V N

    2011-01-01

    Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p + p --> d + e^+ + nu_e, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE -- the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6 +/- 3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3 ^{+3.9}_{-3.5} SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux at the earth of (3.41 ^{+0.76}_{-0.77}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of (3.30 ^{+0.13} _{-0.14}) x 10^{10}/(cm^...

  8. History of the Parkfield Prediction Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakun, W. H.; Langbein, J. O.; Lindh, A. G.; Roeloffs, E. R.

    2004-12-01

    The 1966 Parkfield earthquake (M6) marked in some ways the beginning of the modern era of seismology in California. Major field efforts were mounted by Caltech, UC Berkeley, and the fledgling USGS National Center for Earthquake Research; the resulting papers did much to shape seismology in the coming decades. In 1978 the USGS began a prediction experiment at Parkfield, focused on "capturing" the next M6 earthquake with a dense instrumental array, and providing, if possible, a short-term public warning. New instrumentation included additional invar-wire creepmeters across the fault, augmentation of the short-period seismic network, a proton-precession magnetometer array, and initial work on down-hole installations. In addition, the State of California installed a dense strong-motion array. Two million dollars in additional funding was provided by the USGS and the State of California in 1985 when an "official" earthquake prediction was issued by the USGS, anticipating an M6 event by 1993. Eight down-hole strainmeters, five more creepmeters, a dense array of down-hole 3-component seismometers, a two-color laser trilateration array, a small E&M array, a small very-dense strong-motion array, and a network of water wells were added in 1986-1987. Procedures for communicating short-term predictions to the public were cooperatively developed by Federal, State, and local officials and legislation was passed by the State of California clarifying legal responsibilities and liability questions for public officials and scientists involved in issuing short-term Parkfield predictions. When the earthquake did not occur by 1993, an independent review of the Parkfield experiment was conducted; the review concluded that Parkfield was still the best place to capture a moderate earthquake and that the monitoring effort should continue. With time, some instruments were upgraded or replaced, a few died, and a few were forgotten, but the majority of the monitoring effort continued and most

  9. Understanding customer experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Christopher; Schwager, Andre

    2007-02-01

    Anyone who has signed up for cell phone service, attempted to claim a rebate, or navigated a call center has probably suffered from a company's apparent indifference to what should be its first concern: the customer experiences that culminate in either satisfaction or disappointment and defection. Customer experience is the subjective response customers have to direct or indirect contact with a company. It encompasses every aspect of an offering: customer care, advertising, packaging, features, ease of use, reliability. Customer experience is shaped by customers' expectations, which largely reflect previous experiences. Few CEOs would argue against the significance of customer experience or against measuring and analyzing it. But many don't appreciate how those activities differ from CRM or just how illuminating the data can be. For instance, the majority of the companies in a recent survey believed they have been providing "superior" experiences to customers, but most customers disagreed. The authors describe a customer experience management (CEM) process that involves three kinds of monitoring: past patterns (evaluating completed transactions), present patterns (tracking current relationships), and potential patterns (conducting inquiries in the hope of unveiling future opportunities). Data are collected at or about touch points through such methods as surveys, interviews, focus groups, and online forums. Companies need to involve every function in the effort, not just a single customer-facing group. The authors go on to illustrate how a cross-functional CEM system is created. With such a system, companies can discover which customers are prospects for growth and which require immediate intervention. PMID:17345685

  10. Lived experiences of self-reported science-anxious students taking an interdisciplinary undergraduate science course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minger, Mark Austin

    Having fears and frustrations while studying science topics can lead to science anxiety for some individuals. For those who experience science learning anxiety, the reality is often poor performance, lowered self-esteem, anger, and avoidance of further science courses. Using an interpretive approach, this study captures the experiences of five self-reported science anxious students as they participate in an interdisciplinary science course at the University of Minnesota. A series of three in-depth interviews were conducted with five students who were enrolled in the "Our Changing Planet" course offered at the University of Minnesota. The interviews were transcribed verbatim, coded, and analyzed thematically. Four major themes emerged from the interviews. Two of the themes involve the realities of being a science anxious student. These focus on participants' experiences of feeling frustrated, anxious and incompetent when studying both math and science; and the experiences of trying to learn science content that does not seem relevant to them. The last two themes highlight the participants' perceptions of their experiences during the "Our Changing Planet" course, including how the course seemed different from previous science courses as well as their learning experiences in cooperative groups. After presenting the themes, with supporting quotations, each theme is linked to the related literature. The essence of the participants' science anxiety experiences is presented and practical implications regarding science anxious students are discussed. Finally, insights gained and suggestions for further research are provided.

  11. Statistical Properties of Car Following: Theory and Driving Simulator Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, Hiromasa; Zgonnikov, Arkady; Saito, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A fair simple car driving simulator was created based on the open source engine TORCS and used in car-following experiments aimed at studying the basic features of human behavior in car driving. Four subjects with different skill in driving real cars participated in these experiments. The subjects were instructed to drive a car without overtaking and losing sight of a lead car driven by computer at a fixed speed. Based on the collected data the distributions of the headway distance, the car velocity, acceleration, and jerk are constructed and compared with the available experimental data for the real traffic flow. A new model for the car-following is proposed to capture the found properties. As the main result, we draw a conclusion that human actions in car driving should be categorized as generalized intermittent control with noise-driven activation. Besides, we hypothesize that the car jerk together with the car acceleration are additional phase variables required for describing the dynamics of car motion g...

  12. An exploration of student nurses' experiences of formative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duers, Lorraine E; Brown, Norrie

    2009-08-01

    The idea that formative assessment has the potential to prepare students, not only to succeed in summative assessments during the course, but also in the world beyond the classroom [Melland, H., Volden, C., 1998. Classroom assessment: linking teaching and learning. Journal of Nursing Education 37(6), 275-277] fuelled the desire to explore student nurses experiences of being assessed formatively. Focus group discussion, within a UK Higher Education setting, captured the holistic, dynamic and individual experiences student nurses (n=14) have of formative assessment. Ethical approval was obtained. Findings from three separate focus group discussions indicate that lecturers do not use the term "formative assessment" in their communication with the student nurses; student preparation and effort is greater when assessment is for summative purposes; oral feedback is preferable to written feedback which can, at times, be illegible and utilise unfamiliar vocabulary; lecturer comments are regarded as being more valuable than grades; student nurses are not being prepared for the critical feedback associated with peer review and they may, therefore, be vulnerable to the process and outcome of peer review. Thus, the UK centric focus of this small qualitative research study need not detract from its ability to add to the global knowledge base on formative assessment in nursing. PMID:19285761

  13. Interfacial deflection and jetting of a paramagnetic particle-laden fluid: theory and experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Scott S. H.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of experiments and mathematical analysis of the deformation of a free surface by an aggregate of magnetic particles. The system we study is differentiated from ferrofluid systems because it contains regions rich with magnetic material as well as regions of negligible magnetic content. In our experiments, the magnetic force from a spherical permanent magnet collects magnetic particles to a liquid-air interface, and deforms the free surface to form a hump. The hump is composed of magnetic and non-magnetic regions due to the particle collection. When the magnet distance falls below a threshold value, we observe the transition of the hump to a jet. The mathematical model we develop, which consists of a numerical solution and an asymptotic approximation, captures the shape of the liquid-air interface during the deformation stage and a scaling prediction for the critical magnet distance for the hump to become a jet. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Staged theta pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two implosion heating circuits are being experimentally tested. The principal experiment in the program is the 4.5-m-long Staged Theta Pinch (STP). It uses two relatively low energy (50kJ and 100 kJ), high voltage (125 kV) capacitor banks to produce the theta pinch plasma inside the 20 cm i.d. quartz discharge tube. A lower voltage (50 kV), higher energy (750 kJ) capacitor bank is used to contain the plasma and provide a variable amount of adiabatic compression. Because the experiment produces a higher ratio of implosion heating to compressional heating than conventional theta pinches, it should be capable of producing high temperature plasmas with a much larger ratio of plasma radius to discharge tube radius than has been possible in the past. The Resonant Heating Experiment (RHX) in its initial configuration is the same as a 0.9-m-long section of the high voltage part of the STP experiment and all the plasma results here were obtained with the experiment in that configuration. Part of the implosion bank will be removed and a low inductance crowbar added to convert it to the resonant heating configuration. (U.K.)

  15. National Flood Interoperability Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidment, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Flood Interoperability Experiment is led by the academic community in collaboration with the National Weather Service through the new National Water Center recently opened on the Tuscaloosa campus of the University of Alabama. The experiment will also involve the partners in IWRSS (Integrated Water Resources Science and Services), which include the USGS, the Corps of Engineers and FEMA. The experiment will address the following questions: (1) How can near-real-time hydrologic forecasting at high spatial resolution, covering the nation, be carried out using the NHDPlus or next generation geofabric (e.g. hillslope, watershed scales)? (2) How can this lead to improved emergency response and community resilience? (3) How can improved an improved interoperability framework support the first two goals and lead to sustained innovation in the research to operations process? The experiment will run from September 2014 through August 2015, in two phases. The mobilization phase from September 2014 until May 2015 will assemble the components of the interoperability framework. A Summer Institute to integrate the components will be held from June to August 2015 at the National Water Center involving faculty and students from the University of Alabama and other institutions coordinated by CUAHSI. It is intended that the insight that arises from this experiment will help lay the foundation for a new national scale, high spatial resolution, near-real-time hydrologic simulation system for the United States.

  16. Experiments in computing: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedre, Matti; Moisseinen, Nella

    2014-01-01

    Experiments play a central role in science. The role of experiments in computing is, however, unclear. Questions about the relevance of experiments in computing attracted little attention until the 1980s. As the discipline then saw a push towards experimental computer science, a variety of technically, theoretically, and empirically oriented views on experiments emerged. As a consequence of those debates, today's computing fields use experiments and experiment terminology in a variety of ways. This paper analyzes experimentation debates in computing. It presents five ways in which debaters have conceptualized experiments in computing: feasibility experiment, trial experiment, field experiment, comparison experiment, and controlled experiment. This paper has three aims: to clarify experiment terminology in computing; to contribute to disciplinary self-understanding of computing; and, due to computing's centrality in other fields, to promote understanding of experiments in modern science in general.

  17. A facilitator of leisure activities for stress-related growth experience among middle-aged Korean women with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Leisure may serve as a coping resource following negative life events that facilitate positive changes. Previous studies on leisure have mainly focused on stress-related growth among individuals living in Western cultures. This study aimed to capture the role of leisure involvement as a facilitator of stress-related growth among middle-aged Korean women with depression. Three main themes were identified as an outcome of participation in leisure activities: (a) strengthening meaningful relationships, (b) improving positive emotions, and (c) facilitating personal strength. By participating in leisure activities, individuals with depression may develop the ability to cope with stress and experience positive changes.

  18. Experience and Sustainable Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tove Arendt

    2014-01-01

    consumption may re-enchant ordinary consumption and thereby even become a part of marketing and the experience economy. New layers of meaning are at stake and altruistic motives come into play; doing something good for someone or something, aside from oneself, is a very strong trigger of positive emotions......Experience understood as experience-based consumption is by now fairly absent from the research agenda of the different theories on sustainable consumption. On the basis of Colin Campbell’s notion of romantic ethics and emotional sentimentality in modern hedonism, I claim that sustainable....... Very often, however, the actual purchase does not live up to the demands of doing good in the sustainable consumption chain, and the individual might end up with a guilty conscience, which again is a possible trigger for lingering in a sentimental mode of guilt. Emotions of sentimentality may actually...

  19. Experience and Sustainable Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tove Arendt

    consumption may re-enchant ordinary consumption and thereby even become a part of marketing and the experience economy. New layers of meaning are at stake and altruistic motives come into play; doing something good for someone or something, aside from oneself, is a very strong trigger of positive emotions......Experience understood as experience-based consumption is by now fairly absent from the research agenda of the different theories on sustainable consumption. On the basis of Colin Campbell’s notion of romantic ethics and emotional sentimentality in modern hedonism, I claim that sustainable....... Very often, however, the actual purchase does not live up to the demands of doing good in the sustainable consumption chain, and the individual might end up with a guilty conscience, which again is a possible trigger for lingering in a sentimental mode of guilt. Emotions of sentimentality may actually...

  20. An Organoleptic Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risley, John M.

    1996-12-01

    Flavorings in foods and fragrances in personal care products is a topic often discussed in chemistry classes designed for the general education of non-science majors. A laboratory experiment has been designed to accompany the lecture topic. Compounds in ten different classes of organic molecules that are used in the fragrance and food industry are provided to students. Students whiff the vapors of each compound and describe the organoleptic properties using a set of terms utilized in the fragrance and food industry. A set of questions guides students to an understanding of the relationship between structure of molecules and smell. Students are permitted to create their own fragrance based on the results of the experiment. Student response has been favorable. The experiment rectifies misconceptions students have about structure and odor, and gives positive reinforcement to the lecture material.

  1. The POLARBEAR Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kermish, Z; Anthony, A; Arnold, K; Arnold, K; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M A; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Flanigan, D; Fuller, G; Ghribi, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kisner, T; Lee, A T; Jeune, M Le; Linder, E; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Quealy, E; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Shimizu, A; Shimon, M; Shimmin, C; Sholl, M; Siritanasak, P; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Tomaru, T; Tucker, C; Zahn, O

    2012-01-01

    We present the design and characterization of the POLARBEAR experiment. POLARBEAR will measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on angular scales ranging from the experiment's 3.5 arcminute beam size to several degrees. The experiment utilizes a unique focal plane of 1,274 antenna-coupled, polarization sensitive TES bolometers cooled to 250 milliKelvin. Employing this focal plane along with stringent control over systematic errors, POLARBEAR has the sensitivity to detect the expected small scale B-mode signal due to gravitational lensing and search for the large scale B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. POLARBEAR was assembled for an engineering run in the Inyo Mountains of California in 2010 and was deployed in late 2011 to the Atacama Desert in Chile. An overview of the instrument is presented along with characterization results from observations in Chile.

  2. Qualitative experiments in psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I explore the meaning of experiments in early twentieth century psychology, focusing on the qualitative experimental methodology of psychologist Frederic BARTLETT. I begin by contextualizing BARTLETT's experiments within the continental research tradition of his time, which...... was in a state of transition from a focus on elements (the concern of psychophysics) to a focus on wholes (the concern of Gestalt psychology). The defining feature of BARTLETT's early experiments is his holistic treatment of human responses, in which the basic unit of analysis is the active person relating...... to some material within the constraints of a social and material context. This manifests itself in a number of methodological principles that contrast with contemporary understandings of experimentation in psychology. The contrast is further explored by reviewing the history of "replications...

  3. Nuclear power experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Conference on Nuclear Power Experience, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, was held at the Hofburg Conference Center, Vienna, Austria, from 13 to 17 September 1982. Almost 1200 participants and observers from 63 countries and 20 organizations attended the conference. The 239 papers presented were grouped under the following seven main topics: planning and development of nuclear power programmes; technical and economic experience of nuclear power production; the nuclear fuel cycle; nuclear safety experience; advanced systems; international safeguards; international co-operation. The proceedings are published in six volumes. The sixth volume contains a complete Contents of Volume 1 to 5, a List of Participants, Authors and Transliteration Indexes, a Subject Index and an Index of Papers by Number

  4. Learning From Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visholm, Steen; Beck, Ulla Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the learning concept of group relation's conferences are discussed. The authors have worked with group relations conferences (GRC) in different contexts for many years-mainly as a part of educational programmes for managers and consultants (OPU at IGA Copenhagen, MPO at Roskilde...... University and NAPSO2). Seen from the horizon of their experience some of the basic concepts in the theories about GRC need clarifying, revision, and development. The GRC is a part of the learning from experience movement and as a consequence it stresses the underlying basis: learning is personal so everyone...... decides for themselves what makes sense and what does not. This principle sometimes works as a defence against a closer examination of the two questions: do GRCs provide relevant experiences to learn from, and what is it you learn or can expect to learn at a GRC. Here the learning concept of the GRCs...

  5. Double beta decay experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The great sensitivity of double beta decay to neutrino mass and right handed currents has motivated many new and exciting attempts to observe this elusive nuclear phenomenon directly. Experiments in operation and other coming on line in the next one or two years are expected to result in order-of-magnitude improvements in detectable half lives for both the two-neutrino and no-neutrino modes. A brief history of double beta decay experiments is presented together with a discussion of current experimental efforts, including a gas filled time projection chamber being used to study selenium-82. (author)

  6. Initial Cooling Experiment (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1978-01-01

    In 1977, in a record-time of 9 months, the magnets of the g-2 experiment were modified and used to build a proton/antiproton storage ring: the "Initial Cooling Experiment" (ICE). It served for the verification of the cooling methods to be used for the "Antiproton Project". Stochastic cooling was proven the same year, electron cooling followed later. Also, with ICE the experimental lower limit for the antiproton lifetime was raised by 9 orders of magnitude: from 2 microseconds to 32 hours. For its previous life as g-2 storage ring, see 7405430. More on ICE: 7711282, 7809081, 7908242.

  7. Skylab experiments on metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Materials Processing Facility is described. Eight experiments on metal processing under near-zero-gravity conditions were performed in this facility. Three of these involved metals and procedures of potential application to fabrication in space. A Multipurpose electric furnace within the Materials Processing Facility was employed to heat three ampoules of samples for each of the other five experiments. These five investigations cover diffusion versus convection rates in molten zinc, several immiscible alloy compositions, a whisker-reinforced silver-based composite, heat treating of porous silver samples, and a copper-aluminum eutectic.

  8. Who Needs Business Experience?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Achim; Ritter, Thomas; Coviello, Nicole;

    that prior business experience does not predict very early export (within three years). Our results offer fresh insight to the international business and international entrepreneurship literatures, and implications for policy development. In particular, international R&D collaborations at public research...... the founding teams’ pre-foundation R&D and customer collaborations to early exports. We also show that pre-foundation involvement in these various forms of collaboration, as well as a diverse stock of prior technical knowledge, can compensate for a lack of business experience in the team. The results also show...

  9. The OLYMPUS Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Milner, R; Hasell, D. K.; Beck, R; S. Belostotski(St. Petersburg, INP); Bernauer, J. C.; Bessuille, J.; Brinker, F.; Buck, B.; Calarco, J.R.; V. Carassiti; Cisbani, E.; Ciullo, G.; Kohl, M.; Contalbrigo, M; D'Ascenzo, N.

    2014-01-01

    The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alt...

  10. Copenhagen Sonic Experience Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    . Most of the time sound is a trivial part of everyday life involved in interactions, experiences, atmospheres, actions, etc. Although trivial, the role of the aural in the urban life world is more complex than what is suggested by sound level maps, and as such it may be a vital part of urbanity itself....... The challenge for planners, designers, and architects is to deal with the auditory not only as pollution but also as an integrated part of urban experience, promoting fellowship and liveliness as well as distress....

  11. Experiments versus simultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltser, Jana

    The world of instrumentation utilising X-ray radiation is expanding and leading to more sophisticated experiments. Every step of this process requires accurate calculation, and this is where simulation plays an important role. With the advert of modern computers and technologies, simulation has...... become a very powerful tool, which allows prediction of experimental outcomes with high precision and accuracy. The present Ph. D. work is dedicated to development of such a simulation tool based on a ray-tracing technique, McXtrace, its application for modelling of experiments at a synchrotron beamline...

  12. Future of neutrino experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Takaaki Kajita

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric, solar, reactor and accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments have measured $ m_{12}^{2}$, sin2 12, $| m_{23}^{2} |$ and sin2 223. The next stage of the oscillation studies should be the observation of a finite sin2 213. If a non-zero sin2 213 is observed, the subsequent goals should be the observation of the CP violation and the determination sign of $ m_{23}^{2}$. Possible future neutrino oscillation experiments that could assess these questions are discussed.

  13. Digital Heritage Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munar, Ana Maria; Ooi, Can-Seng

    The evolution of the Web and the expansion of social media are transforming our heritage experiences. Social media offer an innovative element to personal travel reflections by providing digital global platforms on which tourists can create and publish their travel stories. Social media transform......) and netnography (Kozinets, 2002). The social media platform analysed is TripAdvisor, which is the largest networking site focusing on tourism and travel. Study findings indicate that while heritage sites tend to promote their uniqueness and the cultural value of their products, tourists are just as concerned...... discusses virtual tourism culture and also generic tourist interests characterized by sensuality, cultural jointaffirmation and immediacy of the experience....

  14. The Moving Flame Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Stern, Melvin E.

    2011-01-01

    When a flame is rotated around the outside bottom rim of a cylindrical pan of water initially at rest, D. Fultz has observed that the fluid acquires a net vertical component of angular momentum opposite to the rotation of the heat source. We have repeated this experiment in a cylindrical annulus in order to restrict the radial motions and have found that the same phenomenon occurs. Using a simple model based on the latter experiment we investigate the mechanism by which a fluid can acquire an...

  15. The Archimedes experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Calloni, Enrico; De Laurentis, Martina; Esposito, Giampiero; Grilli, M; Majorana, Ettore; Pepe, G P; Petrarca, S; Puppo, Paola; Rapagnini, P; Ricci, F; Rosa, Luigi; Rovelli, Carlo; Ruggi, P; Saini, N L; Stornaiolo, Cosimo; Tafuri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Archimedes is an INFN-funded pathfinder experiment aimed at verifying the feasibility of measuring the interaction of vacuum fluctuations with gravity. The final experiment will measure the force exerted by the gravitational field on a Casimir cavity whose vacuum energy is modulated with a superconductive transition, by using a balance as a small force detector. Archimedes is a two-year project devoted to test the most critical experimental aspects, in particular the balance resonance frequency and quality factor, the thermal modulation efficiency and the superconductive sample realization.

  16. The Archimedes experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calloni, E.; Caprara, S.; Laurentis, M. De; Esposito, G.; Grilli, M.; Majorana, E.; Pepe, G. P.; Petrarca, S.; Puppo, P.; Rapagnani, P.; Ricci, F.; Rosa, L.; Rovelli, C.; Ruggi, P.; Saini, N. L.; Stornaiolo, C.; Tafuri, F.

    2016-07-01

    Archimedes is an INFN-funded pathfinder experiment aimed at verifying the feasibility of measuring the interaction of vacuum fluctuations with gravity. The final experiment will measure the force exerted by the gravitational field on a Casimir cavity whose vacuum energy is modulated with a superconductive transition, by using a balance as a small force detector. Archimedes is two-year project devoted to test the most critical experimental aspects, in particular the balance resonance frequency and quality factor, the thermal modulation efficiency and the superconductive sample realization.

  17. Construction Experience Program (CONEX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of the activities of the NEA WGRNR is introduced. In particular the following tasks related to the ConEx (Construction Experience Program) are presented: Rationale and goals of the ConEx program, Development of the event construction database ConEx and its structure, ConEx procedure for program management (uses of ConEx to create knowledge, conclusions of the ConEx synthesis first report on lessons learned during construction, Potential ConEx program uses for operating experience, training, etc.)

  18. Replicability of Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Norton

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The replicability of experiment is routinely offered as the gold standard of evidence. I argue that it is not supported by a universal principle of replicability in inductive logic. A failure of replication may not impugn a credible experimental result; and a successful replication can fail to vindicate an incredible experimental result. Rather, employing a material approach to inductive inference, the evidential import of successful replication of an experiment is determined by the prevailing background facts. Commonly, these background facts do support successful replication as a good evidential guide and this has fostered the illusion of a deeper, exceptionless principle.

  19. Belief Elicitation in Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanco, Mariana; Engelmann, Dirk; Koch, Alexander;

    Belief elicitation in economics experiments usually relies on paying subjects according to the accuracy of stated beliefs in addition to payments for other decisions. Such incentives, however, allow risk-averse subjects to hedge with their stated beliefs against adverse outcomes of other decisions...... in the experiment. This raises two questions: (i) can we trust the existing belief elicitation results, (ii) can we avoid potential hedging confounds? Our results instill confidence regarding both issues. We propose an experimental design that eliminates hedging opportunities, and use this to test for the empirical...

  20. AGS experiments---1987, 1988, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains: Experimental Areas Layout; Table of Beam Parameters and Fluxes; Experiment Schedule ''as run''; Experiment Long Range Schedule; A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Publications of AGS experiments; and List of experimenters

  1. AGS experiments: 1985, 1986, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depken, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout, table of beam parameters and fluxes, experiment schedule ''as run,'' experiment long range schedule, a listing of experiments by number, two-page summaries of each experiment, also ordered by number, and publications of AGS experiments, 1982-1987.

  2. AGS experiments, 1988, 1989, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depken, J.C.

    1991-04-01

    This report contains: experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; experiment long range schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS experiments; and list of experimenters.

  3. AGS experiments, 1988, 1989, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains: experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule ''as run''; experiment long range schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS experiments; and list of experimenters

  4. AGS experiments: 1985, 1986, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout, table of beam parameters and fluxes, experiment schedule ''as run,'' experiment long range schedule, a listing of experiments by number, two-page summaries of each experiment, also ordered by number, and publications of AGS experiments, 1982-1987

  5. Art and experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerwen, R.C.H.M. van

    2001-01-01

    This three-part dissertation is on the double role of experience in art: as a subject matter, and as the vehicle for our evaluations. It argues (Part three, Chs. 7, 8) for the inclusion within contemporary analytical ‘cognitivism’ (Part one, Chs. 1-3) of certain arguments from the founding fathers o

  6. Experiments on Photoconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    Computer-assisted experiments with CdS and CdSe photoresistors are described. The most important characteristics of the photoresistors are determined: (i) the spectral response, (ii) the photocurrent versus incident radiant power, (iii) the rise and decay time constants and (iv) the frequency response to modulated light. The photoconductivity gain…

  7. Parent Hearing Aid Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen; Roberts, Mallory; Mullings, Day; Harward, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses parent experiences in obtaining and managing hearing aids for their young child. The purpose was to identify challenges parents encounter to determine what state agencies can do to improve parent access to amplification. Data were collected July through September of 2010; 40 parents of children ages birth to 3 years old…

  8. Literature on photoproduction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Literature on gamma-proton, gamma-neutron, gamma-deuteron, gamma-nucleus experiments, inclusive photoproduction, particle yields in gamma-proton and gamma-nucleus, inelastic compton scattering, search for new particles, Primakoff effect, photofission, and QED-tests are compiled. (BJ)

  9. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Benschoten, James J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-part experiment designed to introduce cyclic voltammetry to graduate/undergraduate students. Part 1 demonstrates formal reduction potential, redox electron transfer, diffusion coefficient, and electrochemical reversibility. Part 2 investigates electrochemical behavior of acetaminophen. Part 3 examines such experimental variables…

  10. Experiments with Dipole Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Employment of a data-acquisition system for data collection and calculations makes experiments with antennas more convenient and less time consuming. The determined directional patterns of the dipole antennas of different lengths are in reasonable agreement with theory. The enhancement of the signal by using a reflector is demonstrated, and a…

  11. Experiments in Free Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Art, Albert

    2006-01-01

    A model lift containing a figure of Albert Einstein is released from the side of a tall building and its free fall is arrested by elastic ropes. This arrangement allows four simple experiments to be conducted in the lift to demonstrate the effects of free fall and show how they can lead to the concept of the equivalence of inertial and…

  12. The Huck Finn Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Bonnie; And Others

    This paper describes "The Huck Finn Experience," a high motivation interdisciplinary unit that takes students on a 6-week journey back to the life and times of Mark Twain through the fictional character of Huckleberry Finn. The unit described in the paper was designed for eighth-grade students but could be easily adapted to be successful with…

  13. The COMPASS experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Detail of one of the magnets on the Common Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) experiment. COMPASS studies the structure of composite particles which interact via the strong force, called hadrons. These have a complicated internal structure due to the nature of their force carriers, gluons, which can form self interacting bunches called glueballs.

  14. Science and Human Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Leon N.

    2015-01-01

    Part I. Science and Society: 1. Science and human experience; 2. Does science undermine our values?; 3. Can science serve mankind?; 4. Modern science and contemporary discomfort: metaphor and reality; 5. Faith and science; 6. Art and science; 7. Fraud in science; 8. Why study science? The keys to the cathedral; 9. Is evolution a theory? A modest proposal; 10. The silence of the second; 11. Introduction to Copenhagen; 12. The unpaid debt; Part II. Thought and Consciousness: 13. Source and limits of human intellect; 14. Neural networks; 15. Thought and mental experience: the Turing test; 16. Mind as machine: will we rubbish human experience?; 17. Memory and memories: a physicist's approach to the brain; 18. On the problem of consciousness; Part III. On the Nature and Limits of Science: 19. What is a good theory?; 20. Shall we deconstruct science?; 21. Visible and invisible in physical theory; 22. Experience and order; 23. The language of physics; 24. The structure of space; 25. Superconductivity and other insoluble problems; 26. From gravity to light and consciousness: does science have limits?

  15. The OLYMPUS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milner, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Hasell, D.K., E-mail: hasell@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kohl, M. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Schneekloth, U. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Akopov, N. [Alikhanyan National Science Laboratory (Yerevan Physics Institute), Yerevan (Armenia); Alarcon, R. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Andreev, V.A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Ates, O. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Avetisyan, A. [Alikhanyan National Science Laboratory (Yerevan Physics Institute), Yerevan (Armenia); Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R. [Friedrich Wilhelms Universität, Bonn (Germany); Belostotski, S. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Bernauer, J.C.; Bessuille, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Brinker, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Buck, B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Calarco, J.R. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Carassiti, V. [Università di Ferrara and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Ferrara (Italy); Cisbani, E. [Istituto Superiore di Sanità and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy); Ciullo, G. [Università di Ferrara and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Ferrara (Italy); and others

    2014-03-21

    The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron–proton and electron–proton elastic scattering cross-sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross-section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, μ{sub p}G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p}, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01 GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately 25°–75°. Symmetric Møller/Bhabha calorimeters at 1.29° and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at 12° served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5 fb{sup −1} was collected over two running periods in 2012. This paper provides details on the accelerator, target, detectors, and operation of the experiment.

  16. A cosmic rays experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Munguía, Gustavo; Pineda de Carías, María Cristina

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of an experiment performed to detect the total flux of muons incident over Tegucigalpa (Honduras) the day of the total solar eclipse of the 11 July, 1991; and also a comparison with data obtained before the eclipse and registered in the past years.

  17. The NA35 experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    1987-01-01

    The NA35 experiment ran on the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) accelerator at CERN. It was used for the study of relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions which were used to search for evidence of new types of quark matter. Quarks are found inside protons and neutrons, which in turn make up atoms.

  18. The Experience of Menarche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruble, Diane N.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    1982-01-01

    Examines reactions to menarche and the subsequent effects of this experience as a function of preparation for and timing of menarche. A questionnaire including measures of responses about first menstruation, current symptoms, and self-image was completed by 639 girls in fifth through twelfth grades. (Author/MP)

  19. Caring Experience and Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Betina

    2005-01-01

    ,didactics and educational thinking- and students experiences and sensing, and illuminates excluding processes in classrooms related to emotional, non-cognitive and relational aspects of the qualifying process. This is set into a larger framework of the biographical professionalization processes of students...

  20. Virtual Inquiry Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Danielle; Nilsen, Katy

    2011-01-01

    Children in classrooms and scientists in laboratories engage in similar activities: they observe, ask questions, and try to explain phenomena. Video conferencing technology can remove the wall between the classroom and the laboratory, bringing children and scientists together. Virtual experiences and field trips can provide many of the benefits of…

  1. Social experience infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistgaard, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Using the case of Kühlungsborn in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern as an example of a resort in which social experience infrastructure plays a pivotal role in the ongoing success of attracting German tourists from especially Berlin, Hamburg and Hanover it is the aim of this article in a descriptive...

  2. Experimenting with Guitar Strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    What follows is a description of a simple experiment developed in a non-mathematical general education science course on sound and light for fine arts students in which a guitar is used with data collection hardware and software to verify the properties of standing waves on a string.

  3. Neutrino Experiments Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, H T

    2001-01-01

    This article consists of two parts. The first section presents the highlights on the goals of neutrino physics, status of the current neutrino experiments and future directions and program. The second section describes the theme, program and research efforts for the TEXONO Collaboration among scientists from Taiwan and China.

  4. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance

  5. Experiment R701

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    This experiment was designed by the CERN-Aachen-MPI/Munich-Heidelberg Collaboration to study inelastic proton-proton collisions with streamer chambers. The photo shows the lower streamer chamber closely fitting around the central bicone vacuum chamber at I-7. The upper chamber, here removed, was similarly fitted (Photo Archive 7401099).

  6. Experiments with hydrogel pearls

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlin, Jerneja

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are very attractive materials since they can absorb large quantities of water. They also have very interesting optical properties which can be easily shown. The experiments with hydrogel pearls related to the absorption of water, density, optical properties and influence of pH are presented in the contribution.

  7. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance.

  8. Parabolic aircraft solidification experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Smith, Guy A.; OBrien, Susan

    1996-01-01

    A number of solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental environment which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Two techniques of interest are directional solidification and isothermal casting. Because of the wide-spread use of these experimental techniques in space-based research, several MSAD experiments have been manifested for space flight. In addition to the microstructural analysis for interpretation of the experimental results from previous work with parabolic flights, it has become apparent that a better understanding of the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible. Our university has performed in several experimental studies such as this in recent years. The most recent was in visualizing the effect of convective flow phenomena on the KC-135 and prior to that were several successive contracts to perform directional solidification and isothermal casting experiments on the KC-135. Included in this work was the modification and utilization of the Convective Flow Analyzer (CFA), the Aircraft Isothermal Casting Furnace (ICF), and the Three-Zone Directional Solidification Furnace. These studies have contributed heavily to the mission of the Microgravity Science and Applications' Materials Science Program.

  9. Linking consumer experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Karina Madsen

    become part of the individual self, worldview, and behaviour. This paper seeks to explore links between consumer experiences through the exploration of narrative sequences in travel blogs. Findings indicate that non-consumption is a central element to the bloggers and also indicative of a community...

  10. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  11. The OLYMPUS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, μpGpE/GpM, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01 GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately 25 -75 . Symmetric Moeller/Bhabha calorimeters at 1.29 and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at 12 served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5 fb-1 was collected over two running periods in 2012. This paper provides details on the accelerator, target, detectors, and operation of the experiment.

  12. Experimenting with Woodwind Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Simple experiments involving musical instruments of the woodwind family can be used to demonstrate the basic physics of vibrating air columns in resonance tubes using nothing more than straightforward measurements and data collection hardware and software. More involved experimentation with the same equipment can provide insight into the effects…

  13. The OLYMPUS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milner, R.; Hasell, D.K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kohl, M. [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); Collaboration: The OLYMPUS Collaboration; and others

    2013-12-15

    The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, {mu}{sub p}G{sup p}{sub E}/G{sup p}{sub M}, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01 GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately 25 -75 . Symmetric Moeller/Bhabha calorimeters at 1.29 and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at 12 served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5 fb{sup -1} was collected over two running periods in 2012. This paper provides details on the accelerator, target, detectors, and operation of the experiment.

  14. The Doppler Pendulum Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. K.; Wong, H. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment to verify the Doppler effect of sound waves is described. An ultrasonic source is mounted at the end of a simple pendulum. As the pendulum swings, the rapid change of frequency can be recorded by a stationary receiver using a simple frequency-to-voltage converter. The experimental results are in close agreement with the Doppler…

  15. The big experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    MacEacheran, Mike

    2010-01-01

    "From an academic laboratory in Switzerland, Cern, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, is conducting physics experiments that are mesmerising everyone. But are its scientitsts really going to answer the questions of life, the Univers and everyhing in between?" (4 pages)

  16. Principal Experiences of Succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Farla Gay

    2015-01-01

    This multiple case study explored the experiences of school principals and the usefulness of Peters' (2011) succession planning model. Ten purposefully selected principals from varying grade levels were interviewed; none reported a formal succession plan, and all had been assistant principals. The study concluded the assistant principal position…

  17. Qualitative experiments in psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2015-01-01

    was in a state of transition from a focus on elements (the concern of psychophysics) to a focus on wholes (the concern of Gestalt psychology). The defining feature of BARTLETT's early experiments is his holistic treatment of human responses, in which the basic unit of analysis is the active person relating...

  18. The PADME experiment

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    The PADME experiment, hosted at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, will search for a Dark Photon that decays in invisible channels with a mass up to $23.7\\,\\mbox{MeV}$ and coupling constant down to $10^{-3}$.

  19. The ATRAP experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    Gerald Gabrielse, spokesperson, pictured in front of the Antihydrogen Trap (ATRAP) experiment, the first machine to accumulate cold antiprotons produced in the AD, and combine them with protons (antielectrons) to form antihydrogen. The study of antihydrogen in comparison with hydrogen will hopefully provide insight into the differences between matter and antimatter, especially in comparing their mass and spectra.

  20. The ATRAP experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The Antihydrogen Trap (ATRAP) experiment was the first machine to accumulate cold antiprotons, produced in the AD, and combine them with positrons (antielectrons) to form antihydrogen. The study of antihydrogen in comparison with hydrogen will hopefully provide insight into the differences between matter and antimatter, especially in comparing their mass and spectra.

  1. Modelling Urban Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Christian; Vetner, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    How can urban designers develop an emotionally satisfying environment not only for today's users but also for coming generations? Which devices can they use to elicit interesting and relevant urban experiences? This paper attempts to answer these questions by analyzing the design of Zuidas, a new...

  2. The Majorana Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Bai, Xinhua; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hong, H.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Medlin, D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perevozchikov, O.; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Reid, Douglas J.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Ronquest, M. C.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, V.; Zhang, C.

    2011-08-01

    The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

  3. The MAJORANA Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiseppe, V.E. [Univ S Dakota; Keller, C. [Univ S Dakota; Mei, D-M [Univ S Dakota; Perevozchikov, O. [Univ S Dakota; Perumpilly, G. [Univ S Dakota; Thomas, K. [Univ S Dakota; Xiang, W. [Univ S Dakota; Zhang, C. [Univ S Dakota; Aalseth, C.E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Aguayo, E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Ely, J. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Fast, J.E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Hoppe, E.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Hossbach, T.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Keillor, M. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Kephart, J.D. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Kouzes, R. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Miley, H.S. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Mizouni, L. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Myers, A.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Reid, D. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Amman, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Bergevin, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Chan, Y-D [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Detwiler, J.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Loach, J.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Luke, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Martin, R.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Poon, A.W.P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Prior, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Yaver, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Avignone, F.T. III [University of South Carolina; Creswick, R. [University of South Carolina; Farach, H. [University of South Carolina; Mizouni, L. [University of South Carolina; Avignone, Frank Titus [ORNL; Bertrand Jr, Fred E [ORNL; Capps, Gregory L [ORNL; Cooper, Reynold J [ORNL; Radford, David C [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Wilkerson, John F [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Yu, Chang-Hong [ORNL; Back, H.O. [University of North Carolina; Leviner, L. [North Carolina State University; Young, A.R. [North Carolina State University; Back (et al.), H.O. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC; Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Hong, H. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Howard, S. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Medlin, D. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Sobolev, V. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Barabash, A.S. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Konovalov, S.I. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Vanyushin, I. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Yumatov, V. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Barbeau, P.S. [University of Chicago; Collar, J.I. [University of Chicago; Fields, N. [University of Chicago; Boswell (et al.), M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brudanin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Egorov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Gusey, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Kochetov, O. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Shirchenko, M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Timkin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Yakushev, E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Bugg, W. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Efremenko, M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burritt (et al.), T.H. [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Burritt (et al.), T.H. [University of Washington, Dept Phys, Seattle, WA; Busch, M. [Duke University; Esterline, J. [Duke University; Swift, G. [Duke University; Tornow, W. [Duke University/TUNL; Ejiri, H. [Osaka University; Hazama, R. [Osaka University; Nomachi, M. [Osaka University; Shima, T. [Osaka University; Finnerty (et al.), P. [University of North Carolina; et al.

    2011-01-01

    The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

  4. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes Khz at > 100 kV/m E field

  5. FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

  6. A Harmonic Motion Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, P.; Krakower, Zeev

    2010-01-01

    We present a unit comprising theory, simulation and experiment for a body oscillating on a vertical spring, in which the simultaneous use of a force probe and an ultrasonic range finder enables one to explore quantitatively and understand many aspects of simple and damped harmonic motions. (Contains 14 figures.)

  7. The ALARM Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Ira

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted over three recent semesters of an introductory calculus course to test whether it was possible to quantify the effect that difficulty with basic algebraic and arithmetic computation had on individual performance. Points lost during the term were classified as being due to either algebraic and arithmetic mistakes…

  8. CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This paper highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on the operating performance and costs, reliability of system components and nuclear safety considerations both to the workers and the public

  9. Invisalign: early experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, L

    2003-12-01

    This article describes the Invisalign technique. It is based on the author's personal experience of over 60 cases started in the private practice setting. The technology behind Invisalign and its development is reviewed. The Invisalign clinical technique is described, and the advantages and disadvantages of using Invisalign are highlighted.

  10. Perfect/complete scattering experiments probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinpoppen, Hans; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to elucidate what kind of experiment must be performed in order to determine the full set of independent parameters which can be extracted and calculated from theory, where electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules, or molecular ions may serve as the interacting constituents of matter.  The feasibility of such perfect' and-or `complete' experiments, providing the complete quantum mechanical knowledge of the process, is associated with the enormous potential of modern research techniques, both, in experiment and theory.  It is even difficult to overestimate the role of theory in setting of the complete experiment, starting with the fact that an experiment can be complete only within a certain theoretical framework, and ending with the direct prescription of what, and in what conditions should be measured to make the experiment `complete'.  The language of the related theory is the language of quantum mechanical amplitudes and their relative phases.  This book captures the spi...

  11. Transformations of emotional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cortiñas, Lia Pistiner

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the author approaches mental pain and the problems in a psychoanalytic treatment of patients with difficulties in the psychic transformation of their emotional experiences. The author is interested in the symbolic failure related to the obstruction of development of phantasies, dreams, dream-thoughts, etc. She differentiates symbolization disturbances related to hypertrophic projective identification from a detention of these primitive communications and emotional isolation. She puts forward the conjecture that one factor in the arrest of this development is the detention of projective identifications and that, when this primitive means of communication is re-established in a container-contained relationship of mutual benefit, this initiates the development of a symbolization process that can replace the pathological 'protection'. Another hypothesis she develops is that of inaccessible caesuras that, associated with the detention of projective identification, obstruct any integrative or interactive movement. This caesura and the detention of projective identifications affect mental functions needed for dealing with mental pain. The personality is left with precarious mental equipment for transforming emotional experiences. How can a psychoanalytical process stimulate the development of creative symbolization, transforming the emotional experiences and leading towards mental growth? The author approaches the clinical problem with the metaphor of the psychic birth of emotional experience. The modulation of mental pain in a container-contained relationship is a central problem for the development of the human mind. For discovering and giving a meaning to emotional experience, the infant depends on reverie, a function necessary in order to develop an evolved consciousness capable of being aware, which is different from the rudimentary consciousness that perceives but does not understand. The development of mature mental equipment is associated with the

  12. Transformations of emotional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cortiñas, Lia Pistiner

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the author approaches mental pain and the problems in a psychoanalytic treatment of patients with difficulties in the psychic transformation of their emotional experiences. The author is interested in the symbolic failure related to the obstruction of development of phantasies, dreams, dream-thoughts, etc. She differentiates symbolization disturbances related to hypertrophic projective identification from a detention of these primitive communications and emotional isolation. She puts forward the conjecture that one factor in the arrest of this development is the detention of projective identifications and that, when this primitive means of communication is re-established in a container-contained relationship of mutual benefit, this initiates the development of a symbolization process that can replace the pathological 'protection'. Another hypothesis she develops is that of inaccessible caesuras that, associated with the detention of projective identification, obstruct any integrative or interactive movement. This caesura and the detention of projective identifications affect mental functions needed for dealing with mental pain. The personality is left with precarious mental equipment for transforming emotional experiences. How can a psychoanalytical process stimulate the development of creative symbolization, transforming the emotional experiences and leading towards mental growth? The author approaches the clinical problem with the metaphor of the psychic birth of emotional experience. The modulation of mental pain in a container-contained relationship is a central problem for the development of the human mind. For discovering and giving a meaning to emotional experience, the infant depends on reverie, a function necessary in order to develop an evolved consciousness capable of being aware, which is different from the rudimentary consciousness that perceives but does not understand. The development of mature mental equipment is associated with the

  13. Shaking Table Experiment of Trampoline Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, S.; Kunugi, T.; Fujiwara, H.

    2010-12-01

    It has been widely thought that soil response to ground shaking do not experience asymmetry in ground motion. An extreme vertical acceleration near four times gravity was recorded during the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi earthquake at IWTH25 station. This record is distinctly asymmetric in shape; the waveform envelope amplitude is about 1.6 times larger in the upward direction compared to the downward direction. To explain this phenomenon, Aoi et al. (2008) proposed a simple model of a mass bouncing on a trampoline. In this study we perform a shaking table experiment of a soil prototype to try to reproduce the asymmetric ground motion and to investigate the physics of this asymmetric behavior. A soil chamber made of an acrylic resin cylinder with 200 mm in diameter and 500 mm in height was tightly anchored to the shaking table and vertically shaken. We used four different sample materials; Toyoura standard sands, grass beads (particle size of 0.1 and 0.4 mm) and sawdust. Sample was uniformly stacked to a depth of 450 mm and, to measure the vertical motions, accelerometers was installed inside the material (at depths of 50, 220, and 390 mm) and on the frame of the chamber. Pictures were taken from a side by a high speed camera (1000 frames/sec) to capture the motions of particles. The chamber was shaken by sinusoidal wave (5, 10, and 20 Hz) with maximum amplitudes from 0.1 to 4.0 g. When the accelerations roughly exceeded gravity, for all samples, granular behaviors of sample materials became dominant and the asymmetric motions were successfully reproduced. Pictures taken by the high speed camera showed that the motions of the particles are clearly different from the motion of the chamber which is identical to the sinusoidal motion of the shaking table (input motion). Particles are rapidly flung up and freely pulled down by gravity, and the downward motion of the particles is slower than the upward motion. It was also observed that the timing difference of the falling motions

  14. Hydrothermal organic synthesis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    The serious scientific debate about spontaneous generation which raged for centuries reached a climax in the nineteenth century with the work of Spallanzani, Schwann, Tyndall, and Pasteur. These investigators demonstrated that spontaneous generation from dead organic matter does not occur. Although no aspects of these experiments addressed the issue of whether organic compounds could be synthesized abiotically, the impact of the experiments was great enough to cause many investigators to assume that life and its organic compounds were somehow fundamentally different than inorganic compounds. Meanwhile, other nineteenth-century investigators were showing that organic compounds could indeed be synthesized from inorganic compounds. In 1828 Friedrich Wohler synthesized urea in an attempt to form ammonium cyanate by heating a solution containing ammonia and cyanic acid. This experiment is generally recognized to be the first to bridge the artificial gap between organic and inorganic chemistry, but it also showed the usefulness of heat in organic synthesis. Not only does an increase in temperature enhance the rate of urea synthesis, but Walker and Hambly showed that equilibrium between urea and ammonium cyanate was attainable and reversible at 100 C. Wohler's synthesis of urea, and subsequent syntheses of organic compounds from inorganic compounds over the next several decades dealt serious blows to the 'vital force' concept which held that: (1) organic compounds owe their formation to the action of a special force in living organisms; and (2) forces which determine the behavior of inorganic compounds play no part in living systems. Nevertheless, such progress was overshadowed by Pasteur's refutation of spontaneous generation which nearly extinguished experimental investigations into the origins of life for several decades. Vitalism was dealt a deadly blow in the 1950's with Miller's famous spark-discharge experiments which were undertaken in the framework of the Oparin

  15. The deconstructive experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Robert J

    2005-01-01

    Logocentrism was conceptualized by Jacques Derrida as connoting the assertion within Western philosophical traditions of certain assumed truths and the exclusion of alternative perspectives. In this paper, the author proposes that the concept of logocentrism may be usefully applied within the clinical situation to enrich understanding of splitting between idealized and devalued perceptions of self and others. He presents a case of a woman with borderline personality disorder to illustrate a logocentric self-structure, as well as how common psychotherapeutic models inadvertently risk reinforcing such structures through the hierarchical nature of the patient-therapist relationship. The process of deconstructing logocentric self-structures is facilitated by the patient experiencing the therapist paradoxically as an extension of the self that sometimes behaves contrary to expectations. Such a deconstructive experience challenges reified perceptions of self and others, serves to broaden the experience of self, and enhances qualities of self-reflection and empathy. PMID:16555459

  16. A communist teaching experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skak, Morten

    -student teaching. A form of mutual teaching where (student)teachers have good knowledge of the students’ learning problems. The role of the (conventional) teacher: To initiate and supervise the process and act as “final” teacher when this is required. The experiment produced various problems and the students...... disliked the course design. The lack of students’ ability to get credit for own qualifications was seen as a major problem. My presentation will go through the experiment. The ultimate goal of teaching is to produce people who can raise welfare in our societies. How can we measure whether or not a new form...... of teaching is an improvement? I can only show two (poor?) methods: a) asking the students and b) use their examination results....

  17. The Experience City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marling, Gitte; Jensen, Ole B.; Kiib, Hans

    2009-01-01

    of a research project  mapping the different approaches to urban transformation and experience design, to the level of strategic thinking and planning, and to the content of the programs implemented. Special emphasis is put on on projects combining experience, leisure and learning, and on projects which have...... clear goals related to the improvement of social interaction, performance and cultural exchange. The article contains three sections. in section one, we present three European cases in order to relate to the wider international debate and development. In section two we present the main theoretical...... localisation. In particular the cases are represented in relation to their strategic and urban planning importance, their social and cultural content and their architectural representation and the programmes they contain. The article ends with a short discussion of some  of these preliminary findings as well...

  18. Quantum Gravity Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new quantum gravity experiment is reported with the data confirming the generali- sation of the Schrödinger equation to include the interaction of the wave function with dynamical space. Dynamical space turbulence, via this interaction process, raises and lowers the energy of the electron wave function, which is detected by observing conse- quent variations in the electron quantum barrier tunnelling rate in reverse-biased Zener diodes. This process has previously been reported and enabled the measurement of the speed of the dynamical space flow, which is consistent with numerous other detection experiments. The interaction process is dependent on the angle between the dynamical space flow velocity and the direction of the electron flow in the diode, and this depen- dence is experimentally demonstrated. This interaction process explains gravity as an emergent quantum process, so unifying quantum phenomena and gravity. Gravitational waves are easily detected.

  19. LASL fast liner experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LASL Fast Liner Experiment explores a fusion concept in which a prepared plasma is adiabatically compressed to thermonuclear temperatures and densities by a rapidly imploding solid metal liner. A prepared plasma having β > 1 is in contact with the liner and end plugs, and contains an embedded magnetic field to inhibit thermal conduction. Cylindrical liners are magnetically imploded by a large axial current carried in the liner shell. Theoretical estimates indicate an implosion velocity of at least 106 cm/s is necessary for this geometry if the plasma heating rate is to be greater than the cross-field thermal conduction loss rate. Experimental work to develop this concept involves attempts to provide a suitable preplasma for liner implosions as well as studies of magnetically driven liner implosions. In the plasma preparation experiments a coaxial plasma gun was used to inject plasma into a simulated liner geometry

  20. The ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Dunford, Monica Lynn

    2014-01-01

    In particle physics experiments, the discovery of increasingly more massive particles has brought deep understanding of the basic constituents of matter and of the fundamental forces among them. In order to explore Nature in its deepest elementary secrets, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was built at CERN, Geneva. The LHC provides the highest energy collisions in a laboratory, at very high rates to allow one to study very rare reactions. Two independent sophisticated huge instruments, called ATLAS and CMS detectors, are operated to explore in a most broad way the physics of these collisions. In addition to these two general-purpose detectors, smaller specialized experiments (LHCb, ALICE and some others) are collecting collision data as well.

  1. Experiments around I-8

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The lithium transition-radiation detectors and the large liquid argon calorimeters of experiment R806T are shown above and below the intersection at I-8 (Brookhaven-CERN-Saclay-Syracuse-Yale Collaboration, Study of large transverse momentum phenomena by electron and photon detection). At 90 deg to the intersecting beams are the monitoring proporional chambers of experiment R805 (Measurement of real to imaginary ratio of forward scattering amplitude - Coulomb interference - by the CERN-Rome Collaboration). Left and right of the intersection one sees, symmetrically placed around the interaction region, the large scintillation counters hodoscopes used by R801 (Pisa-Stony Brook Collaboration) to measure the pp total cross section and the features of inelastic collisions.

  2. Reproducible Experiment Platform

    CERN Document Server

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Baranov, Alexander; Khairullin, Egor; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Data analysis in fundamental sciences nowadays is an essential process that pushes frontiers of our knowledge and leads to new discoveries. At the same time we can see that complexity of those analyses increases fast due to a)~enormous volumes of datasets being analyzed, b)~variety of techniques and algorithms one have to check inside a single analysis, c)~distributed nature of research teams that requires special communication media for knowledge and information exchange between individual researchers. There is a lot of resemblance between techniques and problems arising in the areas of industrial information retrieval and particle physics. To address those problems we propose Reproducible Experiment Platform (REP), a software infrastructure to support collaborative ecosystem for computational science. It is a Python based solution for research teams that allows running computational experiments on shared datasets, obtaining repeatable results, and consistent comparisons of the obtained results. We present s...

  3. Transgressive first clinical experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Juul; Jeppesen, Lise Kofoed; Drachmann, Merete

    2014-01-01

    . The nursing students’ learning seems to be oriented towards socialization in the clinic as a workplace. This means that the nursing students seek to deal with overwhelming experiences concerning the naked bodies of patients and death, useful application of theoretical knowledge, the path from novice...... to advanced beginner, and adjusting to the workplace community. The conclusion is that the learning of nursing students during their first clinical in-service placement appears informal and not founded on evident best practice.......This Study seeks to comprehend learning experiences of nursing students during their first clinical in-service placement. This Paper is part of a longitudinal development project interviewing the Student Nurse after each one of the five clinical in-service placements and then one year after...

  4. Gross decontamination experiment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

  5. Gross decontamination experiment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment

  6. Motherhood experience for prisoners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lannuzya Verissimo e Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to understand the motherhood experience for prisoners. This is an exploratory-descriptive qualitative study conducted with 17 prisoner women in the Penitentiary System of Paraíba State, during the period of July to December of 2012. A sociodemographic questionnaire and semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. Data were organized and categorized following content analysis, generating three categories: separation suffering; comfort during anguish; family fragmentation. Results pointed out that motherhood experience in the prison is permeated by suffering and limitations. However, the presence of their child creates comfort during anguish and minimize difficulties in prison, although temporarily.  It is necessary to create inter sectoral actions to favor the mother-child relationship in the prison context.

  7. Microwave Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment, now under construction at the Laboratory, will use microwave heating from a free-electron laser. The intense microwave pulses will be injected into the tokamak to realize several goals, including a demonstration of the effects of localized heat deposition within magnetically confined plasma, a better understanding of energy confinement in tokamaks, and use of the new free-electron laser technology for plasma heating. The experiment, soon to be operational, provides an opportunity to study dense plasmas heated by powers unprecedented in the electron-cyclotron frequency range required by the especially high magnetic fields used with the MTX and needed for reactors. 1 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  8. "We work on experiments"

    CERN Multimedia

    BBC

    1975-01-01

    Short BBC (?) report on CERN. Emphasis on international collaboration, with Soviets and Chinese highlighted. At end, interview with Danish physicist (our of sync) who talks about working on Sundays and how experiments have 25 people, therefore it is a long way to glory. ISR. Comments: Film scratched and dirty. Colour pink. Looses sync at the end. Video transfer ends before the end of the film.

  9. The Santabot Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The focus is to study people's willingness to interact, and their reaction when a robot enters their daily environment. The robot autonomously detects and follows people, while keeping a safe distance. The conclusion was that people were positive towards robots in their daily life. The experiments...... gave knowledge about using robots in open-ended environments, and knowledge about people's reactions and expectations to robots in urban environments....

  10. Apollo lunar sounder experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R.J.; Adams, G.F.; Brown, W.E., Jr.; Eggleton, R.E.; Jackson, P.; Jordan, R.; Linlor, W.I.; Peeples, W.J.; Porcello, L.J.; Ryu, J.; Schaber, G.; Sill, W.R.; Thompson, T.W.; Ward, S.H.; Zelenka, J.S.

    1973-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the Apollo lunar sounder experiment (ALSE) are (1) mapping of subsurface electrical conductivity structure to infer geological structure, (2) surface profiling to determine lunar topographic variations, (3) surface imaging, and (4) measuring galactic electromagnetic radiation in the lunar environment. The ALSE was a three-frequency, wide-band, coherent radar system operated from lunar orbit during the Apollo 17 mission.

  11. The COMPASS experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Artistic view of the 60 m long Common Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) experiment. COMPASS takes beams from the SPS accelerator at CERN. This beam enters from the lower left and passes through the cylindrical target solenoid. COMPASS is used to study the internal structure of hadrons (composite particles interacting via the strong force) by looking at a property called spin and a phenomenon known as glueballs.

  12. The ACE experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The Antiproton Cell Experiment (ACE) as shown by Michael Holzscheiter (spokesperson), Niels Bassler (co-spokesperson) and Helge Knudsen. ACE is located on the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. An antiproton annihilates a proton in the nucleus of a cancer cell, producing a pair of gamma rays, destroying the entire cell and some surrounding cells. Many fewer antiprotons are required in this treatment than in the equivalent proton hadron therapy, so there is less risk of healthy tissue damage.

  13. The MUSE experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Downie E. J.

    2014-01-01

    The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. The MUSE experiment seeks to resolve this puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new ph...

  14. The Vinca dosimetry experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 15 October 1958 there occurred a very brief uncontrolled run of the zero-power reactor at the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Science, Vinca, near Belgrade, Yugoslavia. During this run six persons received various doses of radiation. They were subsequently given medical treatment of a novel kind at the Curie Hospital, Paris. In atomic energy operations to date, very few accidents involving excessive radiation exposure to human beings have occurred. In fact, the cases of acute radiation injury are limited to about 30 known high exposures, few of which were in the lethal or near-lethal range. Since direct experiment to determine the effects of ionizing radiation on man is unacceptable, information on these effects has to be based on a consideration of data relating to accidental exposures, viewed in the light of the much more extensive data obtained from experiments on animals. Therefore, any direct information on the effects of radiation on humans is very valuable. The international dosimetry project described in this report was carried out at Vinca, Yugoslavia, under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency to determine the precise amount of radiation to which the persons had been exposed during the accident. These dosimetry data, together with the record of the carefully observed clinical effects, are of importance both for the scientific study of radiation effects on man and for the development of methods of therapy. The experiment and measurements were carried out at the end of April 1960. The project formed part of the Agency's research programme in the field of health and safety. The results of the experiment are made available through this report to all Member States

  15. The NEXT experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DIaz, J; Yahlali, N; Ball, M; Carcel, S; Cervera, A; Gil, A [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (Centro mixto UV-CSIC), Apdo. de Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain) (Spain); Barata, J A S; Borges, F I G M; Conde, C A N; Dias, T H V T; Fernandes, L M P; Freitas, E D C [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal); Calvo, E [Instituto de Fisica de Altas EnergIas, IFAE, Barcelona (Spain); Carmona, J M; Cebrian, S; Dafni, T; Galan, J [U. Zaragoza (Spain); Cid, X [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ferrer-Ribas, E [CEA, IRFU, Saclay (France); Gil, I, E-mail: jose.diaz@uv.e [CIEMAT (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay measurements are the most promising experiments both to reveal the Majorana nature of the neutrino and to set a value for its mass. The NEXT project propose to build a High pressure Xenon TPC in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (Huesca, Spain) to measure double-beta decay of {sup 136}Xe, both normal and neutrinoless, with a source mass of 100 kg of enriched xenon.

  16. STELLA Experiment - Microbunch Diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, P.; Liu, Y.; Cline, D. B.; Babzien, M.; Gallardo, J. C.; Kusche, K. P.; Pogorelsky, I. V.; Skaritka, J.; van Steenbergen, A.; Yakimenko, V.; Kimura, W. D.

    1998-07-01

    A microbunch diagnostic system is built at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) of Brookhaven National Laboratory for monitoring microbunches (10-fs bunch length) produced by the Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator in Staged Electron Laser Acceleration experiment. It is similar to one already demonstrated at the ATF. With greatly improved beam optics conditions higher order harmonic coherent transition radiation will be measurable to determine the microbunch length and shape.

  17. Understanding Popper's Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Qureshi, T

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, proposed by Karl Popper, is considered by many, to be a crucial test of quantum mechanics. While many loop holes have been pointed out in the original proposal, it turned out that they are not crucial to the test. We point out what is fundamentally wrong with the proposal. Using just the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics, we demonstrate that Popper's basic premise was faulty.

  18. Creating Sustainable Digital Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozinets Robert V.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Is the social media hype about being cool or about making money? For Adam Froman, the answer is easy: Marketers need to be very clear about how social media activity supports overall business strategy. Only if the digital experience fi ts into the whole customer journey will consumers become engaged and add value to the company … and only then will the social brand become cool.

  19. Motherhood experience for prisoners

    OpenAIRE

    Lannuzya Verissimo e Oliveira; Francisco Arnoldo Nunes de Miranda; Gabriela Maria Cavalcanti Costa

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to understand the motherhood experience for prisoners. This is an exploratory-descriptive qualitative study conducted with 17 prisoner women in the Penitentiary System of Paraíba State, during the period of July to December of 2012. A sociodemographic questionnaire and semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. Data were organized and categorized following content analysis, generating three categories: separation suffering; comfort during anguish; family fragmen...

  20. The Ediacaran experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, S J

    1984-02-01

    The author reflects on presentations at an annual meeting of the Geological Society of America regarding the differences between Ediacaran fauna fossils and fossils from the Cambrian evolutionary explosion. The theory presented by Dolf Seilacher attributes the differences between Ediacaran animals and their modern counterparts to structure. He proposes that Ediacaran fauna were a failed evolutionary experiment. Related comments and meeting presentations are included. PMID:11541840

  1. Review of EDM experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current limits on physics beyond the SM come in large part from the non-observation of EDMs in the sensitive electric dipole moment experiments, like the neutron, 199Hg, and 205Tl. New systems with enhanced EDM sensitivity are coming online and promise a resolution of the baryon asymmetry of our universe (if an EDM is observed) or a severe constraint on physics beyond the SM by the end of the current decade.

  2. The CONNIE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Bonifazi, C; Butner, M; Cancelo, G; Vazquez, A Castaneda; Vergara, B Cervantes; Chavez, C R; Da Motta, H; D'Olivo, J C; Anjos, J Dos; Estrada, J; Moroni, G Fernandez; Ford, R; Foguel, A; Torres, K P Hernandez; Izraelevitch, F; Kavner, A; Kilminster, B; Kuk, K; Lima, H P; Makler, M; Molina, J; Moreno-Granados, G; Moro, J M; Paolini, E E; Haro, M Sofo; Tiffenberg, J; Trillaud, F; Wagner, S

    2016-01-01

    The CONNIE experiment uses fully depleted, high resistivity CCDs as particle detectors in an attempt to measure for the first time the Coherent Neutrino-Nucleus Elastic Scattering of antineutrinos from a nuclear reactor with silicon nuclei.This talk, given at the XV Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields (MWPF), discussed the potential of CONNIE to perform this measurement, the installation progress at the Angra dos Reis nuclear power plant, as well as the plans for future upgrades.

  3. Reproducible Experiment Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Baranov, Alexander; Khairullin, Egor; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    Data analysis in fundamental sciences nowadays is an essential process that pushes frontiers of our knowledge and leads to new discoveries. At the same time we can see that complexity of those analyses increases fast due to a) enormous volumes of datasets being analyzed, b) variety of techniques and algorithms one have to check inside a single analysis, c) distributed nature of research teams that requires special communication media for knowledge and information exchange between individual researchers. There is a lot of resemblance between techniques and problems arising in the areas of industrial information retrieval and particle physics. To address those problems we propose Reproducible Experiment Platform (REP), a software infrastructure to support collaborative ecosystem for computational science. It is a Python based solution for research teams that allows running computational experiments on shared datasets, obtaining repeatable results, and consistent comparisons of the obtained results. We present some key features of REP based on case studies which include trigger optimization and physics analysis studies at the LHCb experiment.

  4. The OLYMPUS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Milner, R; Kohl, M; Schneekloth, U; Akopov, N; Alarcon, R; Andreev, V A; Ates, O; Avetisyan, A; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Belostotski, S; Bernauer, J C; Bessuille, J; Brinker, F; Buck, B; Calarco, J R; Carassiti, V; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; D'Ascenzo, N; De Leo, R; Diefenbach, J; Donnelly, T W; Dow, K; Elbakian, G; Eversheim, D; Frullani, S; Funke, Ch; Gavrilov, G; Gläser, B; Görrissen, N; Hauschildt, J; Henderson, B S; Hoffmeister, Ph; Holler, Y; Ice, L D; Izotov, A; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Kelsey, J; Khaneft, D; Klassen, P; Kiselev, A; Krivshich, A; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Lenz, D; Lumsden, S; Ma, Y; Maas, F; Marukyan, H; Miklukho, O; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Naryshkin, Y; O'Connor, C; Benito, R Perez; Perrino, R; Redwine, R P; Piñeiro, D Rodríguez; Rosner, G; Russell, R L; Schmidt, A; Seitz, B; Statera, M; Thiel, A; Vardanyan, H; Veretennikov, D; Vidal, C; Winnebeck, A; Yeganov, V

    2014-01-01

    The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01~GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately $25^\\circ$--$75^\\circ$. Symmetric M{\\o}ller/Bhabha calorimeters at $1.29^\\circ$ and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at $12^\\circ$ served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5~fb$^{-1}$ was collect...

  5. Hyperon Beam Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment WA89 uses the upgraded Omega facility together with a hyperon beam installed at the end of the H1 beamline. The beam can deliver 2~10$ ^{5} \\% Sigma ^- $ per machine burst at 330 GeV/c with a background of 5 10$ ^{5} \\% \\pi ^- $. \\\\ \\\\ The goals of the experiment are: observation of charmed particles, mainly the charmed-strange baryons and measurements of their production in the kinematical range x$ _{F} $~$>$~0.2, and their decay properties, a search for exotic states such as U(3100) observed in the previous CERN hyperon beam experiment WA62, measurements of hyperon polarization and production properties. \\\\ \\\\ A vertex detector consisting of 24 silicon microstrip planes with 25~$\\mu$m pitch and 6~planes with 50~$\\mu$m pitch provides track measurements of sufficient accuracy to identify the decays of short living charmed particles and measure their lifetimes. A RICH detector provides good $\\pi$/K separation for momenta up to 100~GeV/c and $\\pi$/p separation up to 150~GeV/c. Photons are detecte...

  6. Experiments with Electrodynamic Wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, Nathan; Corey, Daniel; Cordrey, Vincent; Majewski, Walerian

    2015-04-01

    Our experiments were involving inductive magnetic levitation. A Halbach array is a system in which a series of magnets is arranged in a manner such that the magnetic field is cancelled on one side of the array while strengthening the field on the other. We constructed two circular Halbach wheels, making the strong magnetic field on the outer rim of the ring. Such system is usually dubbed as an Electrodynamic Wheel (EDW). Rotating this wheel around a horizontal axis above a flat conducting surface should induce eddy currents in said surface through the variable magnetic flux. The eddy currents produce, in turn, their own magnetic fields which interact with the magnets of the EDW. We demonstrated that these interactions produce both drag and lift forces on the EDW which can theoretically be used for lift and propulsion of the EDW. The focus of our experiments is determining how to maximize the lift-to-drag ratio by the proper choice of the induction element. We will also describe our experiments with a rotating circular Halbach array having the strong magnetic field of about 1 T on the flat side of the ring, and acting as a hovercraft.

  7. Experiments in optimizing simulations of the subsurface chlorophyll maximum in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siying; Li, Shiyu; Hu, Jiatang; Geng, Bingxu

    2016-04-01

    The subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM) is widespread in the oligotrophic ocean and significantly contributes to primary production. One reason for the SCM formation is believed to be the rapid export of phytoplankton from surface layers, which might be caused by aggregation, faster sinking rates under nutrient limitation, or the formation of a resting stage. In this study, these three processes were included in a biological model to investigate their contributions to subsurface chlorophyll. To further identify their individual effects on SCM formation, four modeling experiments were carried out. Three used a simple approach with either (a) density-dependent aggregation, (b) accelerated sinking rate of phytoplankton, or (c) a resting stage. The other experiment combined all three approaches (a-c). A set of observations in the South China Sea was used to optimize the four experiments and compare their abilities to replicate observed values. The results of the experiments with the resting stage showed the best fit to the field observations. All experiments were able to capture major features of the chlorophyll field (e.g. surface bloom and SCM). The experiment with accelerated sinking rate failed to reproduce the observed profile of particulate organic carbon. The experiment with only aggregation predicted lower chlorophyll concentrations in summer than those measured in the field, while experiments with the resting stage reproduced more accurate chlorophyll concentrations. Formulas including the resting stage more successfully captured the timing of phytoplankton export than did those including aggregation and accelerated sinking rate. The processes of aggregation and accelerated sinking rate made small contributions to the SCM formation in the last experiment. Overall, these results show that introducing the resting stage improves SCM simulations of the South China Sea. The results of the experiment with only the resting stage showed that the resting cells shift

  8. AGS experiments: 1990, 1991, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a description of the following: AGS Experimental Area - High Energy Physics FY 1993 and Heavy Ion Physics FY 1993; Table of Beam Parameters and Fluxes; Experiment Schedule ''as run''; Proposed 1993 Schedule; A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Publications of AGS Experiments; and List of AGS Experimenters

  9. AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule ''as run''; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here

  10. AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depken, J.C.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule ``as run``; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

  11. AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depken, J.C.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

  12. AGS experiments - 1982, 1983, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains layouts of experimental areas, a table of beam parameters and fluxes, the experiment schedule as run, the experiment long range schedule, a listing of experiments by number, and a section of two-page summaries of each experiment

  13. Simulation - modeling - experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After two workshops held in 2001 on the same topics, and in order to make a status of the advances in the domain of simulation and measurements, the main goals proposed for this workshop are: the presentation of the state-of-the-art of tools, methods and experiments in the domains of interest of the Gedepeon research group, the exchange of information about the possibilities of use of computer codes and facilities, about the understanding of physical and chemical phenomena, and about development and experiment needs. This document gathers 18 presentations (slides) among the 19 given at this workshop and dealing with: the deterministic and stochastic codes in reactor physics (Rimpault G.); MURE: an evolution code coupled with MCNP (Meplan O.); neutronic calculation of future reactors at EdF (Lecarpentier D.); advance status of the MCNP/TRIO-U neutronic/thermal-hydraulics coupling (Nuttin A.); the FLICA4/TRIPOLI4 thermal-hydraulics/neutronics coupling (Aniel S.); methods of disturbances and sensitivity analysis of nuclear data in reactor physics, application to VENUS-2 experimental reactor (Bidaud A.); modeling for the reliability improvement of an ADS accelerator (Biarotte J.L.); residual gas compensation of the space charge of intense beams (Ben Ismail A.); experimental determination and numerical modeling of phase equilibrium diagrams of interest in nuclear applications (Gachon J.C.); modeling of irradiation effects (Barbu A.); elastic limit and irradiation damage in Fe-Cr alloys: simulation and experiment (Pontikis V.); experimental measurements of spallation residues, comparison with Monte-Carlo simulation codes (Fallot M.); the spallation target-reactor coupling (Rimpault G.); tools and data (Grouiller J.P.); models in high energy transport codes: status and perspective (Leray S.); other ways of investigation for spallation (Audoin L.); neutrons and light particles production at intermediate energies (20-200 MeV) with iron, lead and uranium targets (Le Colley F

  14. Situating Emotional Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine D Wilson-Mendenhall

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Psychological construction approaches to emotion suggest that emotional experience is situated and dynamic. Fear, for example, is typically studied in a physical danger context (e.g., threatening snake, but in the real world, it often occurs in social contexts, especially those involving social evaluation (e.g., public speaking. Understanding situated emotional experience is critical because adaptive responding is guided by situational context (e.g., inferring the intention of another in a social evaluation situation vs. monitoring the environment in a physical danger situation. In an fMRI study, we assessed situated emotional experience using a newly developed paradigm in which participants vividly imagine different scenarios from a first-person perspective, in this case scenarios involving either social evaluation or physical danger. We hypothesized that distributed neural patterns would underlie immersion in social evaluation and physical danger situations, with shared activity patterns across both situations in multimodal sensory regions and in circuitry involved in integrating salient sensory information, and with unique activity patterns for each situation type in coordinated large-scale networks that reflect situated responding. More specifically, we predicted that networks underlying the social inference and mentalizing involved in responding to a social threat (in regions that make up the default mode network would be reliably more active during social evaluation situations. In contrast, networks underlying the visuospatial attention and action planning involved in responding to a physical threat would be reliably more active during physical danger situations. The results supported these hypotheses. In line with emerging psychological construction approaches, the findings suggest that coordinated brain networks offer a systematic way to interpret the distributed patterns that underlie the diverse situational contexts characterizing

  15. Situating emotional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Mendenhall, Christine D; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2013-01-01

    Psychological construction approaches to emotion suggest that emotional experience is situated and dynamic. Fear, for example, is typically studied in a physical danger context (e.g., threatening snake), but in the real world, it often occurs in social contexts, especially those involving social evaluation (e.g., public speaking). Understanding situated emotional experience is critical because adaptive responding is guided by situational context (e.g., inferring the intention of another in a social evaluation situation vs. monitoring the environment in a physical danger situation). In an fMRI study, we assessed situated emotional experience using a newly developed paradigm in which participants vividly imagine different scenarios from a first-person perspective, in this case scenarios involving either social evaluation or physical danger. We hypothesized that distributed neural patterns would underlie immersion in social evaluation and physical danger situations, with shared activity patterns across both situations in multiple sensory modalities and in circuitry involved in integrating salient sensory information, and with unique activity patterns for each situation type in coordinated large-scale networks that reflect situated responding. More specifically, we predicted that networks underlying the social inference and mentalizing involved in responding to a social threat (in regions that make up the "default mode" network) would be reliably more active during social evaluation situations. In contrast, networks underlying the visuospatial attention and action planning involved in responding to a physical threat would be reliably more active during physical danger situations. The results supported these hypotheses. In line with emerging psychological construction approaches, the findings suggest that coordinated brain networks offer a systematic way to interpret the distributed patterns that underlie the diverse situational contexts characterizing emotional life

  16. Experience the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gil, A.; Benacchio, L.; Boccato, C.

    2011-10-01

    The Moon is, together with the Sun, the very first astronomical object that we experience in our life. As this is an exclusively visual experience, people with visual impairments need a different mode to experience it too. This statement is especially true when events, such as more and more frequent public observations of sky, take place. This is the reason why we are preparing a special package for visual impaired people containing three brand new items: 1. a tactile 3D Moon sphere in Braille with its paper key in Braille. To produce it we used imaging data obtained by NASA's mission Clementine, along with free image processing and 3D rendering software. In order to build the 3D small scale model funding by Europlanet and the Italian Ministry for Research have been used. 2. a multilingual web site for visually impaired users of all ages, on basic astronomy together with an indepth box about the Moon; 3. a book in Braille with the same content of the Web site mentioned above. All the items will be developed with the collaboration of visually impaired people that will check each step of the project and support their comments and criticism to improve it. We are going to test this package during the next International Observe the Moon Night event. After a first testing phase we'll collect all the feedback data in order to give an effective form to the package. Finally the Moon package could be delivered to all those who will demand it for outreach or educational goals.

  17. 2169 steel waveform experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

    2012-11-01

    In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mmthick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

  18. Condensed landscape experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    demands, quality of space, mixture of functions, urban complexity, public life and cultural heritage. In order to launch such an approach, an understanding of the spatial, social and environmental significance of a radical re-thinking of relationships between architecture and landscape is necessary....... This paper addresses the question of whether the sensation of landscape can be condensed in function or to the size of an urban building. It also discusses the benefits and potentials of the amalgamate, by underlining the unique qualities of such a hybrid. In an attempt to define the experience of landscape...

  19. Survey of Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survey covers the following topics:- Introduction and history of tokamak research; review of tokamak apparatus, existing and planned; remarks on measurement techniques and their limitations; main results in terms of electron and ion temperatures, plasma density, containment times, etc. Empirical scaling; range of operating densities; impurities, origin, behaviour and control (including divertors); data on fluctuations and instabilities in tokamak plasmas; data on disruptive instabilities; experiments on shaped cross-sections; present experimental evidence on β limits; auxiliary heating; experimental and theoretical problems for the future. (author)

  20. Solar neutrino experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    The present status of experimental solar neutrino research is reviewed. Updated results from the Homestake, Kamiokande, GALLEX and SAGE detectors all show a deficit when compared to recent standard solar model calculations. Two of these detectors, GALLEX and SAGE, have recently been checked with artificial {sup 51}Cr neutrino sources. It is shown that astrophysical scenarios to solve the solar neutrino problems are not favoured by the data. There is hope that the results of forthcoming solar neutrino experiments can provide the answers to the open questions. (author) 6 figs., 3 tabs., 36 refs.

  1. The Malaysia LNG experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the nature of the LNG trade, the essential components and characteristics of an LNG project, and relates the Malaysia LNG experience to project realization with some emphasis on the financial aspects of the project. Twelve offshore lending institutions were involved in the total project loop providing U.S. dollar equivalents of 4.0 billions with interest rates ranging from 5% to 8%. The total project was completed on schedule and within budget except for the ships which got caught in the political development of the Malaysian petroleum industry at that time

  2. The Digital Archive Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2009-01-01

    This article, as well as the book, investigates the ways in which new digital media may enhance the experience of the art-archive. Taken as a whole, the new media is a vital component of a 'transdisciplinary' and transformative field, a cultural landscape that is changing rapidly the conditions....... The book discusses the challenges of the archive and the (art)museum in the age of digital media. It is based upon documentation from a research project, MAP - Media Art Platform, that drew upon the talents and collaboration of many institutions, artists, programmers, art historians, designers and others...

  3. Soil mechanics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J. K.; Bromwell, L. G.; Carrier, W. D., III; Costes, N. C.; Houston, W. N.; Scott, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 15 soil-mechanics experiment has offered greater opportunity for study of the mechanical properties of the lunar soil than previous missions, not only because of the extended lunar-surface stay time and enhanced mobility provided by the lunar roving vehicle (rover), but also because four new data sources were available for the first time. These sources were: (1) the self-recording penetrometer (SRP), (2) new, larger diameter, thin-walled core tubes, (3) the rover, and (4) the Apollo lunar-surface drill (ALSD). These data sources have provided the best bases for quantitative analyses thus far available in the Apollo Program.

  4. The Next Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novella, P.

    2009-07-01

    The full text of publication follows: The NEXT experiment will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay with a high-pressure gas- Xenon TPC. Xe{sup 136} is a {beta}{beta}0{nu} emitter and yields an excellent energy resolution when used as a calorimeter, acting both as the source and as the active material of the detector. External backgrounds can be rejected by means of the tracking capabilities of the TPC. A detector containing about 100 kg Xe{sup 136} is expected to be installed at Canfranc Underground Laboratory. (author)

  5. The Quijote CMB Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Rubiño-Martín, J A; Tucci, M; Genova-Santos, R; Hildebrandt, S R; Hoyland, R; Herreros, J M; Gomez-Renasco, F; Caraballo, C Lopez; Martínez-González, E; Vielva, P; Herranz, D; Casas, F J; Artal, E; Aja, B; de la Fuente, L; Cano, J L; Villa, E; Mediavilla, A; Pascual, J P; Piccirillo, L; Maffei, B; Pisano, G; Watson, R A; Davis, R; Davies, R; Battye, R; Saunders, R; Grainge, K; Scott, P; Hobson, M; Lasenby, A; Murga, G; Gómez, C; Gómez, A; Arino, J; Sanquirce, R; Pan, J; Vizcarguenaga, A; Etxeita, B

    2008-01-01

    We present the current status of the QUIJOTE (Q-U-I JOint TEnerife) CMB Experiment, a new instrument which will start operations early 2009 at Teide Observatory, with the aim of characterizing the polarization of the CMB and other processes of galactic and extragalactic emission in the frequency range 10-30 GHz and at large angular scales. QUIJOTE will be a valuable complement at low frequencies for the PLANCK mission, and will have the required sensitivity to detect a primordial gravitational-wave component if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is larger than r=0.05.

  6. French experience with electropolishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the results obtained in CHINON B1 comparing deposited activity observed on different surface finishes EDF decided to electropolish steam generator channel heads (S.G.C.H.) in order to reduce operator dose during plant maintenance. The qualification tests were performed on steam generator materials (Inconel 600 and S.S. 308 L) with the full on site operational equipment (i.e. a sealed sucker). In 1988 the 4 SGCH of NOGENT 2 were electropolished. In 1990 we observed a dose rate reduction of 45% at NOGENT 2 compared to NOGENT 1. Other French experience is electropolishing of 27 S.G.C.H., since 1988. (author)

  7. S band transponder experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, W. L.; Muller, P. M.; Wollenhaupt, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    It is reported that this experiment measures the lunar gravitational field, which in turn provides information on the distribution of lunar mass and its correlation with surface features such as craters, mountains, and maria. The lunar gravitational field is measured by observing the dynamical motion of spacecraft in free-fall orbits. Effective detection of mass variations is greatly enhanced by low-altitude trajectories, such as the eccentric orbits during revolutions 3 to 16 of the Apollo 16 spacecraft and the 11 km periapsis of the Apollo 16 subsatellite during May 1972. The observational data are the precise earth-based radio tracking measurements initially used for real-time navigation.

  8. THYROGLOSSAL CYST OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study shares our experiences in managing patients with thyroglossal cysts. These are common midline tumors of neck. Characteristically these masses move on protrusion of tongue due to their intimate relationship with hyoid bone. Adults commonly presented with this lesion even though literature review suggests it to be common in children. All these patients underwent surgerybecause of the presence of mass rather than any symptoms. All 30 patients taken up in this study had a normal functioning thyroid in the normal position in addition to the cystic lesion.

  9. The experience of scar management for adults with burns: An interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C; Bonas, S; Shepherd, L; Hedges, E

    2016-09-01

    Burns can have both physical and psychological effects on individuals. Pressure garments and silicone gels are used to improve the aesthetic appearance and functions of the skin, but these treatments have been associated with various physical, emotional, sexual and social difficulties. Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was used to explore participants' experiences of scar management. IPA examines individual experiences before comparing results across cases, and is suited to capture the different ways in which individuals experience a phenomena as well as cautiously looking at patterns across cases. Eight burn patients who had experienced scar management, including pressure garments, were interviewed. Two superordinate themes were identified: Assimilation of Pressure Garment Identity, and Psychosocial Functions of the Pressure Garments. The findings offered insight into the positive and negative experiences of scar management, describing the diverse personal and social functions of the pressure garments and how they became integrated into participants' identities. By understanding the individual nature of these experiences, healthcare professionals can enhance support around these issues and potentially aid adherence to treatment. Further research with different demographic groups as well as for other burn treatments would be useful to develop and contextualise these findings.

  10. A struggle to survive: the experience of awaiting pediatric heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Samantha J; Nicholas, David B; Regehr, Cheryl; West, Lori J

    2014-12-01

    Despite the establishment of heart transplantation as a life-saving therapy for children and adolescents, little research has focused on the biopsychosocial impact of the transplant process. Few studies have captured the subjective experiences of young heart transplant recipients. This study examined the experiences and perspectives of children and adolescents during the pretransplant phase of waiting for a donor organ. Grounded theory methods guided data collection and analysis. A total of 27 adolescents participated in semistructured qualitative interviews. Findings illuminate the waiting period for pediatric heart transplantation to be a pervasive experience, with consequent impact on physical, psychological, and social well-being. Participants described various biopsychosocial processes and experiences that occurred during this time, with data analysis yielding themes reflecting notions of "struggling to survive," including physical limitations, lethargy, social isolation, discomfort with physical appearance, and academic issues. This research identifies the pretransplant experience as a period framed within a text of debilitation and negative self-perceptions related to health and well-being. Supporting children and their families as they navigate this complex and uncertain journey is merited, and results invite further interventional development and research.

  11. Accumulating advantages over time: Family experiences and social class inequality in academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Daniel; Roksa, Josipa

    2013-07-01

    Children from different family backgrounds enter schooling with different levels of academic skills, and those differences grow over time. What explains this growing inequality? While the social reproduction tradition has argued that family contexts are central to producing class gaps in academic achievement, recent quantitative studies have found that family experiences explain only a small portion of those inequalities. We propose that resolving this inconsistency requires developing a new measure of family experiences that captures the continuity of exposure over time and thus more closely reflects the logic of the social reproduction tradition. Results using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Kindergarten cohort (ECLS-K) show that, consistent with previous quantitative research, time-specific measures of family experiences have little explanatory power. However, cumulative family experiences account for most of the growing inequality in academic achievement between children from different social class backgrounds over time. These findings support claims from the social reproduction tradition, and contribute more broadly to the understanding of how family experiences contribute to social inequality. PMID:23721671

  12. Aesthetic experience of dance performances

    OpenAIRE

    Vukadinović Maja; Marković Slobodan

    2012-01-01

    In this study the aesthetic experience of dance performances is investigated. The study includes construction of an instrument for measuring the aesthetic experience of dance performances and an investigation of the structure of both dancers’ and spectators’ aesthetic experience. The experiments are carried out during eight different performances of various dance forms, including classical ballet, contemporary dance, flamenco and folklore. Three factors of aesthetic experience of dance ...

  13. Experiment@Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Restivo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The main goal of the Project Experiment@Portugal is to produce a complete survey of Portuguese developments in remote and virtual labs. This knowledge will provide the conditions for joining forces in order to organize a well structured national website integrating a database of available remote and virtual experiments, categorized for sharing purposes, and looking for delivering valuable contents for high schools and for higher education. It is expected that the final result will bring up a solid team able to offer in this domain a Portuguese partner at international level

  14. Postmenopausal osteoporosis: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R N Mehrotra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is very little published literature about experience with osteoporosis treatment from our country. Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective analysis of first 50 patients enrolled in our clinic for osteoporosis. Postmenopausal women with T score of less than -2.5 or history suggestive fragility fracture with supportive bone mineral density (BMD were included. Patients having hypercalcemia, abnormal renal function, myeloma and on long-term steroids were also excluded. Results: Nearly 34% subjects were below the age of 60 years, 47% of subjects were between 60 and 70 years, whereas 18% were above 70 years. Nearly 6% had family history of osteoporosis s or history of osteoporotic fractures. Nearly 20% subjects had fracture prior to starting of any treatment. A total of 86% (40/46 had evidence of Vitamin D (VD deficiency. Nearly 80% of patients were treated with bisphosphonates, 12% were treated with injectable bisphosphonates, and 8% were treated with teriperatide. Nearly 16% patients had duration of more than 5 years of experience with bisphosphonates. Follow up BMD was available in 25 subjects. BMD had improved significantly in 68% of subjects. In 24% the BMD was stable (the change was less than least significant change (LSC. In 8% BMD had shown a significant decline while being on treatment. Conclusion: Postmenopausal osteoporosis occurs in relatively younger women in our country. Majority of them are VD deficient. Oral bisphosphonates is the most common used drug; it is fairly well tolerated and effective.

  15. PAC Experiments at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The study of hyperfine interactions offers the possibility to use radioactive nuclei as probes in matter. The @g-@g perturbated angular correlation (PAC) technique following implantation has found widespread application in this field. At ISOLDE we have been investigating electric field gradients at impurities in non-cubic metals in an ongoing series of experiments. \\\\ \\\\ The small number of probe atoms necessary for these measurements make them also ideally suited for studies of surface problems like diffusion, structure and dynamics. Cd on a molybdenum O110? surface will be studied as first system. For this purpose 10|1|0~atoms of |1|1|1|mCd will be evaporated onto the clean surface and the electric field gradient for isolated adatoms on terrace sites will be determined by PAC. The UHV system constructed for such experiments at ISOLDE is shown in the schematic drawing. It is coupled to the beam line through differential pumping stations and contains standard surface treatment and analysis equipment.

  16. The NEXT experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez-Cadenas, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01

    NEXT (Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC) is an experiment to search neutrinoless double beta decay processes (bb0nu) in Xe136. The NEXT technology is based in the use of time projection chambers operating at a typical pressure of 15 bar and using electroluminescence to amplify the signal (HPXE). The main advantages of the experimental technique are: a) excellent energy resolution; b) the ability to reconstruct the trajectory of the two electrons emitted in the decays, which further contributes to the suppression of backgrounds; c) scalability to large masses; and d) the possibility to reduce the background to negligible levels thanks to the barium tagging technology (BATA). The NEXT roadmap was designed in four stages: i) Demonstration of the HPXE technology with prototypes deploying a mass of natural xenon in the range of 1 kg, using the NEXT-DEMO (IFIC) and NEXT-DBDM (Berkeley) prototypes; ii) Characterisation of the backgrounds to the bb0nu signal and measurement of the bb2nu signal with the NEW detecto...

  17. Female physicist doctoral experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.

    2013-06-01

    The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why and how women make career choices based on aspects both inside and outside of school and their subsequent interaction. Results indicate that female physicists experience conflict in achieving balance within their graduate school experiences and personal lives and that this then influences their view of their future careers and possible career choices. Female physicists report both early and long-term support outside of school by family, and later departmental support, as being essential to their persistence within the field. A greater focus on informal and out-of-school science activities for females, especially those that involve family members, early in life may help influence their entrance into a physics career later in life. Departmental support, through advisers, mentors, peers, and women’s support groups, with a focus on work-life balance can help females to complete graduate school and persist into an academic career.

  18. The EBEX Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxley, P.; Ade, P.; Baccigalupi, C.; deBernardis, P.; Cho, H-M.; Devlin, M.J.; Hanany, S.; Johnson, B.R.; Jones, T.; Lee, A.T.; Matsumura,T.; Miller, A.D.; Milligan, M.; Renbarger, T.; Spieler, H.G.; Stompor,R.; Tucker, G.S.; Zaldarriaga, M.

    2005-01-06

    EBEX is a balloon-borne polarimeter designed to measure the intensity and polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The measurements would probe the inflationary epoch that took place shortly after the big bang and would significantly improve constraints on the values of several cosmological parameters. EBEX is unique in its broad frequency coverage and in its ability to provide critical information about the level of polarized Galactic foregrounds which will be necessary for all future CMB polarization experiments. EBEX consists of a 1.5 m Dragone-type telescope that provides a resolution of less than 8 arcminutes over four focal planes each of 4. diffraction limited field of view at frequencies up to 450 GHz. The experiment is designed to accommodate 330 transition edge bolometric detectors per focal plane, for a total of up to 1320 detectors. EBEX will operate with frequency bands centered at 150, 250, 350, and 450 GHz. Polarimetry is achieved with a rotating achromatic half-wave plate. EBEX is currently in the design and construction phase, and first light is scheduled for 2008.

  19. Experience in open markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topic of discussion in this session was experience in open markets. The session was led by Guido Bachman, President of the Independent Power Producers' Society of Alberta (IPPSA), assisted by panel members Richard Way, Director of Energy Risk Management at TransAlta, John O'Donnell, Professor of Finance at Michigan State University, and Kelly Lail, Manager of Power Acquisition at B.C. Hydro. Way spoke of the experiences with market restructuring in Alberta, describing the consultative and legislative process which determined the structure of the Alberta Power Pool (APP). The Pool began operations in January 1996. Currently there are 33 participants from generators, to distributors and marketers. Supply and demand are managed by APP by setting an hourly price based on offers and bids. Both generators and distributors get the hourly pool price, so the input price and export price of the pool are the same, however, generators and distributors are free to enter into 'contract for difference' agreements. O'Donnell discussed the status of competition in Michigan. He stressed the importance of Ontario to the Michigan market, echoing the conviction of U.S. regulators that a freer economy works better. Kelly Lail spoke of the unbundling of B.C. Hydro into several generating, transmission and distribution companies in preparation for moving from exclusive service to exclusive wholesale competition. He predicted that the fierce competition will lead to a an industry shakeout, leaving only one big (B.C. Hydro) and a few niche players

  20. The Halogen Occultation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, James M., III; Gordley, Larry L.; Park, Jae H.; Drayson, S. R.; Hesketh, W. D.; Cicerone, Ralph J.; Tuck, Adrian F.; Frederick, John E.; Harries, John E.; Crutzen, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) uses solar occultation to measure vertical profiles of O3, HCl, HF, CH4, H2O, NO, NO2, aerosol extinction, and temperature versus pressure with an instantaneous vertical field of view of 1.6 km at the earth limb. Latitudinal coverage is from 80 deg S to 80 deg N over the course of 1 year and includes extensive observations of the Antarctic region during spring. The altitude range of the measurements extends from about 15 km to about 60-130 km, depending on channel. Experiment operations have been essentially flawless, and all performance criteria either meet or exceed specifications. Internal data consistency checks, comparisons with correlative measurements, and qualitative comparisons with 1985 atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) results are in good agreement. Examples of pressure versus latitude cross sections and a global orthographic projection for the September 21 to October 15, 1992, period show the utility of CH4, HF, and H2O as tracers, the occurrence of dehydration in the Antarctic lower stratosphere, the presence of the water vapor hygropause in the tropics, evidence of Antarctic air in the tropics, the influence of Hadley tropical upwelling, and the first global distribution of HCl, HF, and NO throughout the stratosphere. Nitric oxide measurements extend through the lower thermosphere.

  1. Initiation Train Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Elizabeth; Johnson, Carl; Liechty, Gary; Whitley, Von

    2015-06-01

    In an effort to evaluate and qualify a new detonator diagnostic, booster selection and main charge configuration, a variety of small-scale tests have been conducted. This paper will describe the needs, testing approach and model validation. Because of the limited size available some novel approaches were made to understand the observed phenomenon. Function time and time of arrival at various locations in the initiation train are desirable data points. Knowing when each segment initiates the next segment and the time to run up to detonation is critical. Results of our experiments were modeled for timing accuracy, wave shape and pressure. Agreement between the experiments and models will be discussed. The testing that will be discussed is time of arrival wires, PDV, and fiber optic arrays. The time of arrival wire measures the detonator cup breakout time. When correlated to bridge burst, an absolute time is collected. This data point also gives time zero for the booster initiation. Many models actually start at the booster, rather than the detonator, so the inclusion of this data point will improve modeling efforts.

  2. The EBEX Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Oxley, P; Baccigalupi, C; De Bernardis, P; Cho, H M; Devlin, M J; Hanany, S; Johnson, B R; Jones, T; Lee, A T; Matsumura, T; Miller, A D; Milligan, M; Renbarger, T; Spieler, H G; Stompor, R; Tucker, G S; Zaldarriaga, M

    2004-01-01

    EBEX is a balloon-borne polarimeter designed to measure the intensity and polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The measurements would probe the inflationary epoch that took place shortly after the big bang and would significantly improve constraints on the values of several cosmological parameters. EBEX is unique in its broad frequency coverage and in its ability to provide critical information about the level of polarized Galactic foregrounds which will be necessary for all future CMB polarization experiments. EBEX consists of a 1.5 m Dragone-type telescope that provides a resolution of less than 8 arcminutes over four focal planes each of 4 degree diffraction limited field of view at frequencies up to 450 GHz. The experiment is designed to accommodate 330 transition edge bolometric detectors per focal plane, for a total of up to 1320 detectors. EBEX will operate with frequency bands centered at 150, 250, 350, and 450 GHz. Polarimetry is achieved with a rotating achromatic half-wave pla...

  3. The CAST experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAST (CERN Axion Solar Telescope) is a helioscope looking for axions coming from the solar core to the Earth. The experiment, located at CERN, is based on the Primakoff effect and uses a magnetic field of 9 Tesla provided by a decommissioned LHC magnet. CAST is able to follow the Sun during sunrise and sunset and therefore three X-ray detectors are mounted on both ends of the magnet waiting for a photon from axion-to-photon conversion due to the Primakoff effect. During its first phase, which concluded in 2004, CAST has been looking for axions with masses up to 0.02 eV. CAST's second phase manages to re-establish the coherence needed to scan for axions with masses up to 1.16 eV by using a buffer gas. This technique enables the experiment to look into the theoretical regions for axions. During the years 2005 and 2006, the use of 4He in CAST has already provided coherence in order to look for axions with masses up to 0.4 eV

  4. Advanced Liquid Feed Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, E.; Noll, C.

    1993-06-01

    The Advanced Liquid Feed Experiment (ALFE) is a Hitchhiker experiment flown on board the Shuttle of STS-39 as part of the Space Test Payload-1 (STP-1). The purpose of ALFE is to evaluate new propellant management components and operations under the low gravity flight environment of the Space Shuttle for eventual use in an advanced spacecraft feed system. These components and operations include an electronic pressure regulator, an ultrasonic flowmeter, an ultrasonic point sensor gage, and on-orbit refill of an auxiliary propellant tank. The tests are performed with two transparent tanks with dyed Freon 113, observed by a camera and controlled by ground commands and an on-board computer. Results show that the electronic pressure regulator provides smooth pressure ramp-up, sustained pressure control, and the flexibility to change pressure settings in flight. The ultrasonic flowmeter accurately measures flow and detects gas ingestion. The ultrasonic point sensors function well in space, but not as a gage during sustained low-gravity conditions, as they, like other point gages, are subject to the uncertainties of propellant geometry in a given tank. Propellant transfer operations can be performed with liquid-free ullage equalization at a 20 percent fill level, gas-free liquid transfer from 20-65 percent fill level, minimal slosh, and can be automated.

  5. The VIP Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pauli Exclusion Principle (PEP) is a basic principle of Quantum Mechanics, and its validity has never been seriously challenged. However, given its importance, it is very important to check it as thoroughly as possible. The recently approved VIP (VIolation of Pep) experiment, represents an improved version of the Ramberg and Snow experiment (Ramberg and Snow, Phys. Lett. B238 (1990) 438). VIP shall be performed at the Gran Sasso underground laboratories, and aims to test the Pauli Exclusion Principle for electrons with unprecedented accuracy. VIP is a Collaboration among four Institutions out of three countries (LNF-INFN, and INFN Trieste Italy; SMI-Vienna, Austria; IFIN-HH, Bucharest, Romania). It uses an apparatus with CCDs (Charge Coupled Device) as detectors of X rays - looking for PEP violating transitions in Copper: transitions from the 2p level to 1s with the 1s already occupied by 2 electrons. The characteristic of such transition is the energy - displaced with respect to the normal 2p → 1s one by about 300 eV. VIP will bring the limit on the probability that PEP is violated by electrons to 10-30, exploring so a region where new theories allow for a possible PEP violation. (authors)

  6. Petascale system management experiences.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, N.; Bradshaw, R.; Lueninghoener, C.; Cherry, A.; Coghlan, S.; Scullin, W. (LCF); ( MCS)

    2008-01-01

    Petascale High-Performance Computing (HPC) systems are among the largest systems in the world. Intrepid, one such system, is a 40,000 node, 556 teraflop Blue Gene/P system that has been deployed at Argonne National Laboratory. In this paper, we provide some background about the system and our administration experiences. In particular, due to the scale of the system, we have faced a variety of issues, some surprising to us, that are not common in the commodity world. We discuss our expectations, these issues, and approaches we have used to address them. HPC systems are a bellwether for computing systems at large, in multiple regards. HPC users are motivated by the need for absolute performance; this results in two important pushes. HPC users are frequently early adopters of new technologies and techniques. Successful technologies, like Infiniband, prove their value in HPC before gaining wider adoption. Unfortunately, this early adoption alone is not sufficient to achieve the levels of performance required by HPC users; parallelism must also be harnessed. Over the last 15 years, beowulf clustering has provided amazing accessibility to non-HPC-savvy and even non-technical audiences. During this time, substantial adoption of clustering has occurred in many market segments unrelated to computational science. A simple trend has emerged: the scale and performance of high-end HPC systems are uncommon at first, but become commonplace over the course of 3-5 years. For example, in early 2003, several systems on the Top500 list consisted of either 1024 nodes or 4096-8192 cores. In 2008, such systems are commonplace. The most recent generation of high-end HPC systems, so called petascale systems, are the culmination of years of research and development in research and academia. Three such systems have been deployed thus far. In addition to the 556 TF Intrepid system at Argonne National Laboratory, a 596 TF Blue Gene/L-based system has been deployed at Lawrence Livermore

  7. Experimenting model deconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Manuel; Wirtz, Stefan; Ali, Mazhar

    2013-04-01

    Physical soil erosion models describe erosion and transport of solids by flowing water as the interaction of the soils' resistivity to be eroded, the force of the water to entrain particles and its capacity to transport them in suspension. This has lead to concepts in which hydraulic parameters as flow velocity or composite parameters such as shear stress, stream power etc. are set into a direct relation to erosion and sediment transport. Soils' resistivity to erosion is in general represented as a threshold problem, in which a critical force is trespassed and the following increase of erosion depends on the characteristics of the sediments and the flowing water. Despite considerable efforts, these model concepts have not been able to produce more reliable and accurate reproduction and forecast of soil erosion than "simple" empirical models such as the USLE and its derivates. And there is still a lack in knowledge about the reasons for this failure. A considerable number of studies have addressed the following questions: 1) What are the main parameters of soils and flowing water influencing soil erosion?, 2) What relationship do these parameters have with the intensity and different types of soil erosion?, but only few researchers have faced the consequence: 3) Are the present concepts suitable to describe and quantify soil erosion accurately? Similar to other studies, we investigated the influence of basic parameters as grain size, slope, discharge and flow velocity on sediment transport by shallow flowing water in laboratory experiments. Variable flow was applied under different slopes on non-cohesive mobile beds. But in addition, field experiments were designed to quantify the hydraulic and erosive effects of small rills in the field. Here, small existing rills were flushed with defined flows, and flow velocity as well as transported sediments was quantified. The laboratory flume experiments clearly show a strong interaction of flow velocity, the size of the

  8. The trapped human experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, R; Agapiou, A; Bocos-Bintintan, V; Brown, L J; Burns, C; Creaser, C S; Devenport, N A; Gao-Lau, B; Guallar-Hoyas, C; Hildebrand, L; Malkar, A; Martin, H J; Moll, V H; Patel, P; Ratiu, A; Reynolds, J C; Sielemann, S; Slodzynski, R; Statheropoulos, M; Turner, M A; Vautz, W; Wright, V E; Thomas, C L P

    2011-12-01

    This experiment observed the evolution of metabolite plumes from a human trapped in a simulation of a collapsed building. Ten participants took it in turns over five days to lie in a simulation of a collapsed building and eight of them completed the 6 h protocol while their breath, sweat and skin metabolites were passed through a simulation of a collapsed glass-clad reinforced-concrete building. Safety, welfare and environmental parameters were monitored continuously, and active adsorbent sampling for thermal desorption GC-MS, on-line and embedded CO, CO(2) and O(2) monitoring, aspirating ion mobility spectrometry with integrated semiconductor gas sensors, direct injection GC-ion mobility spectrometry, active sampling thermal desorption GC-differential mobility spectrometry and a prototype remote early detection system for survivor location were used to monitor the evolution of the metabolite plumes that were generated. Oxygen levels within the void simulator were allowed to fall no lower than 19.1% (v). Concurrent levels of carbon dioxide built up to an average level of 1.6% (v) in the breathing zone of the participants. Temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide levels and the physiological measurements were consistent with a reproducible methodology that enabled the metabolite plumes to be sampled and characterized from the different parts of the experiment. Welfare and safety data were satisfactory with pulse rates, blood pressures and oxygenation, all within levels consistent with healthy adults. Up to 12 in-test welfare assessments per participant and a six-week follow-up Stanford Acute Stress Response Questionnaire indicated that the researchers and participants did not experience any adverse effects from their involvement in the study. Preliminary observations confirmed that CO(2), NH(3) and acetone were effective markers for trapped humans, although interactions with water absorbed in building debris needed further study. An unexpected observation from the NH(3

  9. Experience Report for WOPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, G

    2010-04-06

    One of the purposes of the SQA effort at LLNL is to attempt to determine the 'goodness' of the research codes used for various scientific applications. Typically these are two and three dimensional multi-physics simulation and modeling codes. These legacy research codes are used for applciations such as atmospheric dispersion modeling and analysis and prediction of the performance of engineered systems. These codes are continually subjected to automated regression test suites consisting of verified and validated expected results. Code is managed in repositories. Experience level of developers is high in the knowledge domain, platforms, and languages used. Code size of the multi-physics code used in this study was 578,242 lines excluding comment and blank lines or 5538.7 function points. Languages were 70% C++, 20% C, and 10% Fortran. The code has 130 users and a development team of 14 and an embedded SQE. The code has achieved 100% prime feature test coverage, 73.6% functional test coverage, and 71.5% statement test coverage. The average cyclomatic complexity of the code was 6.25. The codes have evolved over 10 years. Research codes are challenging because there is a desire to balance agility with discipline as well as compliance with DOE standards. Agility is important to allow experimentation with new algorithms and addition of the latest physics features. Discipline is important to increase the quality of the codes. Automation of processes and defect prevention/detection are deployed throughout the software development process. Since resarch codes are a small segment of the software industry, not much information exists in terms of reliability studies on these types of codes. This paper describes attempts to determine the goodness of these research codes. Goodness defined as both correctness of the codes and their fault densities. Correctness is determined by user interviews, peer review; feature based automated testing, and coverage measurement. This

  10. Aesthetic experience of dance performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukadinović Maja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the aesthetic experience of dance performances is investigated. The study includes construction of an instrument for measuring the aesthetic experience of dance performances and an investigation of the structure of both dancers’ and spectators’ aesthetic experience. The experiments are carried out during eight different performances of various dance forms, including classical ballet, contemporary dance, flamenco and folklore. Three factors of aesthetic experience of dance performances are identified: Dynamism, Exceptionality and Affective Evaluation. The results show that dancers’ aesthetic experience has a somewhat different factorial structure from that of the spectators’. Unlike spectators’ aesthetic experience, dancers’ aesthetic experience singles out the Excitement factor. The results are discussed within the context of dancers’ proprioception and spectators’ exteroception since these findings confirm the idea of a significant role of proprioception in dancers’ aesthetic experience.

  11. The Cibola flight experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffrey, Michael Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Anthony [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, Anthony [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roussel - Dupre, Diane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Katko, Kim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Palmer, Joseph [ISE-3; Robinson, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wirthlin, Michael [BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV; Howes, William [BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV; Richins, Daniel [BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV

    2009-01-01

    The Cibola Flight Experiment (CFE) is an experimental small satellite carrying a reconfigurable processing instrument developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that demonstrates the feasibility of using FPGA-based high-performance computing for sensor processing in the space environment. The CFE satellite was launched on March 8, 2007 in low-earth orbit and has operated extremely well since its deployment. The nine Xilinx Virtex FPGAs used in the payload have been used for several high-throughput sensor processing applications and for single-event upset (SEU) monitoring and mitigation. This paper will describe the CFE system and summarize its operational results. In addition, this paper will describe the results from several SEU detection circuits that were performed on the spacecraft.

  12. Industrial experience with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium is a reference material for the construction of waste containers in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. It has been in industrial service for over 30 a, often in severe corrosion environments, but it is still considered a relatively exotic material with limited operating history. This has arisen because of the aerospace applications of this material and the misconception that the high strength-to-weight ratio dominates the choice of this material. In fact, the advantage of titanium lies in its high reliability and excellent corrosion resistance. It has a proven record in seawater heat exchanger service and a demonstrated excellent reliability even in polluted water. For many reasons it is the technically correct choice of material for marine applications. In this report we review the industrial service history of titanium, particularly in hot saline environments, and demonstrate that it is a viable waste container material, based upon this industrial service history and operating experience. (author)

  13. The SNO+ Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Mark C

    2008-01-01

    The SNO+ experiment is the follow-up to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). The heavy water that was in SNO will be replaced with a liquid scintillator of linear alkylbenzene (plus fluor). SNO+ has many physics goals including detecting pep and CNO solar neutrinos, detecting geo-neutrinos, studying reactor neutrino oscillations, serving as a supernova neutrino detector and carrying out a search for neutrinoless double beta decay by adding neodymium to the liquid scintillator. Since a large amount of 150Nd isotope can be added to SNO+, a competitive search would be possible, with sensitivity below 100 meV using natural Nd and sensitivity below 40 meV with enriched neodymium.

  14. CAREER GUIDANCE EXPERIENCE ABROAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Tolstoguzov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe the experience of careeroriented activities carried out with students of schools in developed and developing countries. Career Guidance in Russia, despite the vast experience of its implementation, is experiencing serious difficulties. In this regard, it is important to take into account the international experience career-oriented activities, such as in the developed countries of North America and the European Union as well as in several Asian countries with rapidly growing economies and a large demographic potential, taking into account the best variants for the Russian education system. Methods. The experience of career-oriented work undertaken with pupils of the USA, Canada, Israel, France, UK, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Japan, Singapore, China and India is shown on the basis of the comparative analysis of different publications and information sources. The author has made an attempt to generalize the principles of psycho-pedagogical and administrative assistance in professional self-determination of senior pupils abroad. Scientific novelty. The approaches to career-oriented activities in countries with different levels of economic development are compared for the first time. Some principles are revealed. Firstly, the higher the income level per capita in the country, the greater attention is given to vocational guidance. The politics in the developed countries is based on interests of the individual: children’s acquaintance with the world of professions begins already at younger school and the moment of definitive selfdetermination is postponed till the end of their senior stage of education; the possibility of direction change of professional preparation in case of detection of discrepancy of qualities of the pupil to originally selected profile is provided. Career-oriented activity in developing countries, on the contrary, is rigidly coordinated to requirements of economy and a labour market

  15. Design of Computer Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlendorff, Christian

    The main topic of this thesis is design and analysis of computer and simulation experiments and is dealt with in six papers and a summary report. Simulation and computer models have in recent years received increasingly more attention due to their increasing complexity and usability. Software...... packages make the development of rather complicated computer models using predefined building blocks possible. This implies that the range of phenomenas that are analyzed by means of a computer model has expanded significantly. As the complexity grows so does the need for efficient experimental designs...... and analysis methods, since the complex computer models often are expensive to use in terms of computer time. The choice of performance parameter is an important part of the analysis of computer and simulation models and Paper A introduces a new statistic for waiting times in health care units. The statistic...

  16. "Experience and Learning"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2007-01-01

    Taking it's point of departure in some critical remarks to some of the most important recent theorizing of learning in the workplace, this chapter presents an alternative framework for theorizing learning as a subjective process in a social and societal context, based in life history research. Key...... concepts derived from European critical theory, subjectivity and experience, are briefly introduced with a view to their intellectual background. The chapter elaborates the implication of these concepts in relation to the understanding of emotional aspects of learning in everyday work life and in relation...... to the understanding of knowledge, based on examples from the author's research into professional learning (general practitioners). The pivotal role of language use and language socialisation is explained in brief, developing a psychodynamic complement to a language game concept of language use....

  17. The Bumpy Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobble, James Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-09

    This document summarizes the Bumpy Torus Experiment as a viable fusion reactor concept. Conclusions reached include the following: In 30 years, order-of-magnitude technological advances have occurred in multiple areas of plasma heating and confinement. The ORNL bumpy torus of the 1970s was technology limited. Now that ITER is technology limited, an alternate concept is needed. A device built on such a concept should be current free, CW, modular, have a gentle shutdown, and demonstrable stability. The bumpy torus meets or has the potential to meet all of these criteria. Earlier, stability was not possible due to power limits; it has not been fully tested. It is time to revisit the bumpy-torus concept with a modest new machine.

  18. The pentomic experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pentomic experience is presented in outline form. The subject is discussed under the following topics: context, objectives, description, assessment, and lessons. The context included President Eisenhower's open-quotes new lookclose quotes strategy and service rivalry for nuclear share. The objectives for the Pentomic Division included dual capability with nuclear emphasis, strategic mobility, smaller, and major organizational changes. The Pentomic Division is described as a separate division in which the infantry battle group is a basic building block. The Pentomic Division was designed to be dual-capable in both conventional and nuclear warfare and was assessed or perceived to be neither. The possible reasons for the failure of the concept were: problem too hard, wrong solution, premature solution, weak implementation, and overambitious goals

  19. INITIAL COOLING EXPERIMENT (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    ICE was built in 1977, using the modified bending magnets of the g-2 muon storage ring (see 7405430). Its purpose was to verify the validity of stochastic and electron cooling for the antiproton project. Stochastic cooling proved a resounding success early in 1978 and the antiproton project could go ahead, now entirely based on stochastic cooling. Electron cooling was experimented with in 1979. The 26 kV equipment is housed in the cage to the left of the picture, adjacent to the "e-cooler" located in a straight section of the ring. With some modifications, the cooler was later transplanted into LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) and then, with further modifications, into the AD (Antiproton Decelerator), where it cools antiprotons to this day (2006). See also: 7711282, 7802099, 7809081.

  20. Reviewing operational experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to provide detailed supplementary guidance to OSART experts to aid in the evaluation of operational experience feedback (OEF) programmes at nuclear power plants. The document begins by describing the objectives of an OEF programme. It goes on to indicate preparatory work and investigatory guidance for the expert. Section 5 describes attributes of an excellent OEF programme. Appended to these guidelines are examples of OEF documents from various plants. These are intended to help the expert by demonstrating the actual implementation of OEF in practice. These guidelines are in no way intended to conflict with existing national regulations and rules. A comprehensive OEF programme, as described in Section 2, would be impossible to evaluated in detail in the amount of time typically allocated for assessing OEF in an OSART review. The expert must use his or her time wisely by concentrating on those areas that appear to be the weakest

  1. Reactor operation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the TRIGA Users Conference in Helsinki 1970 the TRIGA reactor Vienna was in operation without any larger undesired shutdown. The integrated thermal power production by August 15 1972 accumulated to 110 MWd. The TRIGA reactor is manly used for training of students, for scientific courses and research work. Cooperation with industry increased in the last two years either in form of research or in performing training courses. Close cooperation is also maintained with the IAEA, samples are irradiated and courses on various fields are arranged. Maintenance work was performed on the heat exchanger and to replace the shim rod magnet. With the view on the future power upgrading nine fuel elements type 110 have been ordered recently. Experiments, performed currently on the reactor are presented in details

  2. Experience with Kamini reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamini is a 233U fuelled, 30 kW(th) research reactor. It is one of the best neutron source facility with a core average flux of 1012 n/cm2/s in IGCAR used for neutron radiography of active and nonradioactive objects, activation analysis and radiation physics research. The core consists of nine plate type fuel elements with a total fuel inventory of 590 g of 233U. Two safety control plates made of cadmium are used for start up and shutdown of the reactor. Three beam tubes, two-thimble irradiation site outside reflector and one irradiation site nearer to the core constitute the testing facilities of Kamini. Kamini attained first criticality on 29th October 96 and nominal power of 30 kW in September 1997. This paper covers the design features of the reactor, irradiation facilities and their utilities and operating experience of the reactor. (author)

  3. Coblation Tonsillectomy our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tonsillectomy happens to be the commonly performed surgery these days. Like any other surgical procedure this surgical procedure has also undergone tremendous technological changes. One such evolving change happens to be coblation tonsillectomy. Coblation technology is actually an offshoot of radiofrequency surgery. This technique involves passing radiofrequency energy through a conductive medium like isotonic sodium chloride or potassium chloride solution. This produces a plasma field which is composed of sodium and hydroxyl ions which ablates tissue. This tissue ablation takes place at (60-70° C which is much lower than that achieved during other electro surgical techniques (400 – 600° C. This article attempts to discuss the use of this technology to perform tonsillectomy with special emphasis on sharing our experience with the system. This study involves critical appraisal of 25 coblation tonsillectomy surgeries performed at Stanley Medical college during the year 2013.

  4. Customer experiences and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Customer experiences and expectations from competition and cogeneration in the power industry were reviewed by Charles Morton, Director of Energy at CPC International, by describing Casco's decision to get into cogeneration in the early 1990s in three small corn milling plants in Cardinal, London and Port Colborne, Ontario, mainly as result of the threat of a 40 per cent increase in power prices. He stressed that cost competitiveness of cogeneration is entirely site-specific, but it is generally more attractive in larger facilities that operate 24 hours a day, where grid power is expensive or unreliable. Because it is reliable, cogeneration holds out the prospect of increased production-up time, as well as offering a hedge against higher energy costs, reducing the company's variable costs when incoming revenues fall short of costs, and providing an additional tool in head-to-head competition

  5. Gas Detection for Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Hay, D

    2001-01-01

    Flammable gases are often used in detectors for physics experiments. The storage, distribution and manipulation of such flammable gases present several safety hazards. As most flammable gases cannot be detected by human senses, specific well-placed gas detection systems must be installed. Following a request from the user group and in collaboration with CERN safety officers, risk analyses are performed. An external contractor, who needs to receive detailed user requirements from CERN, performs the installations. The contract is passed on a guaranteed results basis. Co-ordination between all the CERN groups and verification of the technical installation is done by ST/AA/AS. This paper describes and focuses on the structured methodology applied to implement such installations based on goal directed project management techniques (GDPM). This useful supervision tool suited to small to medium sized projects facilitates the task of co-ordinating numerous activities to achieve a completely functional system.

  6. Laterality and language experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Rachel; Vaid, Jyotsna

    2006-09-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted on studies that examined hemispheric functional asymmetry for language in brain-intact monolingual and bilingual adults. Data from 23 laterality studies that directly compared bilingual and monolingual speakers on the same language were analysed (n = 1234). Variables examined were language experience (monolingual, bilingual), experimental paradigm (dichotic listening, visual hemifield presentation, and dual task) and, among bilinguals, the influence of second language proficiency (proficient vs nonproficient) and onset of bilingualism (early, or before age 6; and late, or after age 6). Overall, monolinguals and late bilinguals showed reliable left hemisphere dominance, while early bilinguals showed reliable bilateral hemispheric involvement. Within bilinguals, there was no reliable effect of language proficiency when age of L2 acquisition was controlled. The findings indicate that early learning of one vs. two languages predicts divergent patterns of cerebral language lateralisation in adulthood. PMID:16882556

  7. The PODS diversity experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high integrity system typically has a number of redundant components operating in parallel to reduce the probability of a system failure. If the component failures were random, then the probability of several components failing simultaneously would be much smaller than the failure probability of any single component. However, should the components contain common design flaws, then more than one component could fail simultaneously due to a common cause (a common mode failure). This would increase the probability of a system failure. For a computer-based system where the same software component is being run in each processor, any software fault is a potential cause of common mode failure. One method of reducing common software faults is to use diverse software in each processor (n-version programming). This paper discusses how the use of software diversity raises a number of issues. A diversity experiment is described

  8. CBM Experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) project at the future accelerator center FAIR will be a dedicated heavy-ion experimental operating in fixed target mode at beam energies from 8 to 45 AGeV. The ultimate goal of the research program is to explore the QCD phase diagram in the range of moderate temperature but the highest net-baryon densities. The CBM detector concept aims to obtain feasibility of measurement of hadronic, leptonic and photonic observables at interaction rates up to 10 MHz. It will allow to detect extremely rare probes such as charm near its production threshold. The CBM experiment will enter a new era with diagnostic probes never accessible before in the FAIR energy range, and thus has a unique research potential. (author)

  9. The PANTHER User Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coram, Jamie L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morrow, James D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Perkins, David Nikolaus [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This document describes the PANTHER R&D Application, a proof-of-concept user interface application developed under the PANTHER Grand Challenge LDRD. The purpose of the application is to explore interaction models for graph analytics, drive algorithmic improvements from an end-user point of view, and support demonstration of PANTHER technologies to potential customers. The R&D Application implements a graph-centric interaction model that exposes analysts to the algorithms contained within the GeoGraphy graph analytics library. Users define geospatial-temporal semantic graph queries by constructing search templates based on nodes, edges, and the constraints among them. Users then analyze the results of the queries using both geo-spatial and temporal visualizations. Development of this application has made user experience an explicit driver for project and algorithmic level decisions that will affect how analysts one day make use of PANTHER technologies.

  10. Baryon conservation (experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton decay as a generic term is here defined to include the decay of neutrons which have been stabilized against BETA-decay by nuclear binding. A history of proton stability is thus presented by means of a an annotated chronolgy and tables based on questionnaries. The latter supplied by research groups planning proton lifetime experiments outside the USA. Each of seven tables present location, depth, weight of detector, method of detection, Partial Lifetime Limits Obtainable, and Present Status and/or Time when (Preliminary) Results are Expected from each of the collaborative institutions. The latter include Frascati-Milano-Torino, Frascati-Milano-Rome-Torino, Orsay-Ecole Polytechnique-Saclay, Torino-Moscow-Frascati, Bombay-Osaka-Tokyo, and two locations reported on by the Institute for Nuclear Research of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. Survey reports on other institutions are also given, imcluding universities

  11. The NA49 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loiez

    2000-01-01

    The two spokespersons of NA49, Reinhard Stock, Frankfurt (1991-1996), sitting and standing, Peter Seyboth, (1997-present), MPI Munich, in the target area of NA49 in front of the first superconducting vertex magnetone of the TPCs. NA49 is one of the seven experiments (NA44, NA45, NA49, NA50, NA52, WA97/NA57 and WA98) involved in CERN's Heavy Ion programme which provided evidence for the existence of a new state of matte, the quark-gluon plasma. In this state, quarks, instead of being bound up into more complex particles such as protons and neutrons, are liberated and roam freely. Theory predicts that this state must have existed at about 10 microseconds after the Big Bang, before the formation of matter as we know it today.

  12. Tritium neutrino mass experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current status of the experimental search for neutrino mass is reviewed, with emphasis on direct kinematic methods, such as the beta decay of tritium. The situation concerning the electron neutrino mass as measured in tritium beta decay is essentially unchanged from a year ago, although a great deal of experimental work is in progress. The ITEP group continues to find evidence for a nonzero mass, now slightly revised to 26(5) eV. After correcting for recently discovered errors in the energy loss distribution and source thickness, however, the Z/umlt u/rich group still claims and upper limit of 18 eV. There may be evidence for neutrino mass and mixing in the SN1987a data, in the same range suggested by the ITEP experiment. 42 refs., 3 figs

  13. The 'DANTE' experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ray; Morris, Gareth A.

    2011-12-01

    The selective excitation scheme known as 'DANTE' emerged from a confluence of several ideas for new NMR experiments, some more fanciful than others. DANTE offers a simple and effective way to restrict excitation to a very narrow frequency band, usually that of a single resonance line. Initially applied to the study of individual proton-coupled carbon-13 spin multiplets, the method has been extended to water presaturation, relaxation measurements, and chemical exchange studies. Through the imposition of a magnetic field gradient it offers a simple method to enhance resolution by restricting the effective volume of the sample. Multiple DANTE excitation (with Hadamard encoding) can speed up multidimensional spectroscopy by orders of magnitude. Applied to magnetic resonance imaging, the DANTE sequence has been used to superimpose a rectangular grid onto a cardiac image, permitting motional distortions to be monitored in real time.

  14. The HOLMES Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faverzani, M.; Alpert, B.; Backer, D.; Bennet, D.; Biasotti, M.; Brofferio, C.; Ceriale, V.; Ceruti, G.; Corsini, D.; Day, P. K.; De Gerone, M.; Dressler, R.; Ferri, E.; Fowler, J.; Fumagalli, E.; Gard, J.; Gatti, F.; Giachero, A.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Heinitz, S.; Hilton, G.; Köster, U.; Lusignoli, M.; Maino, M.; Mates, J.; Nisi, S.; Nizzolo, R.; Nucciotti, A.; Orlando, A.; Parodi, L.; Pessina, G.; Pizzigoni, G.; Puiu, A.; Ragazzi, S.; Reintsema, C.; Ribeiro-Gomez, M.; Schmidt, D.; Schuman, D.; Siccardi, F.; Sisti, M.; Swetz, D.; Terranova, F.; Ullom, J.; Vale, L.

    2016-08-01

    The determination of the neutrino mass is an open issue in modern particle physics and astrophysics. The direct mass measurement is the only theory-unrelated experimental tool capable to probe such quantity. The HOLMES experiment will measure the end-point energy of the electron capture decay of ^{163}Ho, aiming at a statistical sensitivity on the neutrino mass around 1 eV/c^2. In order to acquire the large needed statistics by keeping the pile-up contribution as low as possible, 1000 transition edge sensors will be readout simultaneously with the frequency domain readout, a multiplexing technique where the multiplex factor is only limited by the bandwidth of the available commercial fast digitizers. We outline here the HOLMES project with its technical challenges, and its status and perspectives.

  15. Voyager imaging experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B.A.; Briggs, G.A.; Danielson, G.E.; Cook, A.F.; Davies, M.E.; Hunt, G.E.; Masursky, H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Owen, T.C.; Sagan, C.; Suomi, V.E.

    1977-01-01

    The overall objective of this experiment is exploratory reconnaissance of Jupiter, Saturn, their satellites, and Saturn's rings. Such reconnaissance, at resolutions and phase angles unobtainable from Earth, can be expected to provide much new data relevant to the atmospheric and/or surface properties of these bodies. The experiment also has the following specific objectives: Observe and characterize the global circulation of the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn; Determine the horizontal and vertical structure of the visible clouds and establish their relationship to the belted appearance and dynamical properties of the planetary atmospheres; Determine the vertical structure of high, optically-thin, scattering layers on Jupiter and Saturn; Determine the nature of anomalous features such as the Great Red Spot, South Equatorial Belt disturbances, etc.; Characterize the nature of the colored material in the clouds of Jupiter and Saturn, and identify the nature and sources of chromophores on Io and Titan; Perform comparative geologic studies of many satellites at less than 15-km resolution; Map and characterize the geologic structure of several satellites at high resolution (???1 km); Investigate the existence and nature of atmospheres on the satellites; Determine the mass, size, and shape of many of the satellites by direct measurement; Determine the direction of the spin axes and periods of rotation of several satellites, and establish coordinate systems for the larger satellites; Map the radial distribution of material in Saturn's rings at high resolution; Determine the optical scattering properties of the primaries, rings, and satellites at several wavelengths and phase angles; Search for novel physical phenomena, e.g., phenomena associated with the Io flux tube, meteors, aurorae, lightning, or satellite shadows. ?? 1977 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  16. Column and Batch Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. Gardea-Torresdey

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Batch and column experiments were performed to determine the Cu(II binding capacity of silica-immobilized humin biomass. For column studies, 500 bed volumes of a 0.1 mM Cu(II solution were passed through humin packed columns at the flow rates of 1, 1.5, 2, and 3 mL/min. The biopolymer showed an average Cu binding capacity of 12 ± 1.5 mg/g and a Cu recovery of about 96.5 % ± 1.5. The breakthrough points for Cu(II alone were approximately 420, 390, 385, and 300 bed volumes for the flow rates of 1, 1.5, 2 and 3 mL/min, respectively. The interference studies demonstrated that at low concentrations, the hard cations Ca(II and Mg(II did not seem to represent a major interference on Cu(II binding to the humin biopolymer. The selectivity showed by this biopolymer was Cu(II>Ca(II>Mg(II. On the other hand, batch experiments showed that Ca(II + Mg(II at 100mM each reduced the Cu(II binding to 73 %. However, 1000 mM concentrations of Ca(II and Mg(II, separately and in mixture, reduced the Cu(II binding to 47 %, 44 % and 31 %, respectively. The results of this study showed that immobilized humin in a silica matrix could represent an inexpensive bio-source for Cu removal from contaminated water, even in the presence of low concentrations of the hard cations Ca(II and Mg(II.

  17. The brain imaging data structure, a format for organizing and describing outputs of neuroimaging experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Auer, Tibor; Calhoun, Vince D; Craddock, R Cameron; Das, Samir; Duff, Eugene P; Flandin, Guillaume; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Glatard, Tristan; Halchenko, Yaroslav O; Handwerker, Daniel A; Hanke, Michael; Keator, David; Li, Xiangrui; Michael, Zachary; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, B Nolan; Nichols, Thomas E; Pellman, John; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Rokem, Ariel; Schaefer, Gunnar; Sochat, Vanessa; Triplett, William; Turner, Jessica A; Varoquaux, Gaël; Poldrack, Russell A

    2016-01-01

    The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques has defined modern neuroimaging. Since its inception, tens of thousands of studies using techniques such as functional MRI and diffusion weighted imaging have allowed for the non-invasive study of the brain. Despite the fact that MRI is routinely used to obtain data for neuroscience research, there has been no widely adopted standard for organizing and describing the data collected in an imaging experiment. This renders sharing and reusing data (within or between labs) difficult if not impossible and unnecessarily complicates the application of automatic pipelines and quality assurance protocols. To solve this problem, we have developed the Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS), a standard for organizing and describing MRI datasets. The BIDS standard uses file formats compatible with existing software, unifies the majority of practices already common in the field, and captures the metadata necessary for most common data processing operations. PMID:27326542

  18. For the love of experience: changing the experience economy discourse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.C. Snel

    2011-01-01

    The attention for experiences as economic offerings has increased enormously in the last decade. However, the lack of a clear definition of experience and the bias towards the organization’s perspective in the discourse cause much confusion. In this study experience is taken back to its basis: the e

  19. SPRUCE experiment data infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassovski, M.; Hanson, P. J.; Boden, T.; Riggs, J.; Nettles, W. R.; Hook, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA has provided scientific data management support for the US Department of Energy and international climate change science since 1982. Among the many data activities CDIAC performs are design and implementation of the data systems. One current example is the data system and network for SPRUCE experiment. The SPRUCE experiment (http://mnspruce.ornl.gov) is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. Experimental work in the 8.1-ha S1 bog will be a climate change manipulation focusing on the combined responses to multiple levels of warming at ambient or elevated CO2 (eCO2) levels. The experiment provides a platform for testing mechanisms controlling the vulnerability of organisms, biogeochemical processes and ecosystems to climatic change (e.g., thresholds for organism decline or mortality, limitations to regeneration, biogeochemical limitations to productivity, the cycling and release of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere). The manipulation will evaluate the response of the existing biological communities to a range of warming levels from ambient to +9°C, provided via large, modified open-top chambers. The ambient and +9°C warming treatments will also be conducted at eCO2 (in the range of 800 to 900 ppm). Both direct and indirect effects of these experimental perturbations will be analyzed to develop and refine models needed for full Earth system analyses. SPRUCE provides wide range continuous and discrete measurements. To successfully manage SPRUCE data flow

  20. The TOYSAT structural control experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breakwell, J. A.; Chambers, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Lockheed TOYSAT experiment is described. The experiment was designed to test hypothesis concerning the application of optimal control theory to flexible spacecraft. The theory is presented, and results described.

  1. Experiences with biomass in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregg, Jay Sterling; Bolwig, Simon; Solér, Ola;

    The Bioenergy Department in SENER have requested assistance with planning for the deployment of bioenergy (Biomass, biogas and waste incineration) in Mexico and information on Danish experiences with developing policy initiatives promoting bioenergy. This introduction to the Danish experiences...

  2. Partnership in Undergraduate Research Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Practical laboratory and work experience has been helpful in reinforcing the undergraduate educational experience. With limited resources, individual organizations may struggle to give a student a well rounded opportunity. Most undergraduates work within internships or cooperative educational fram...

  3. Beyond Medical "Missions" to Impact-Driven Short-Term Experiences in Global Health (STEGHs): Ethical Principles to Optimize Community Benefit and Learner Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melby, Melissa K; Loh, Lawrence C; Evert, Jessica; Prater, Christopher; Lin, Henry; Khan, Omar A

    2016-05-01

    Increasing demand for global health education in medical training has driven the growth of educational programs predicated on a model of short-term medical service abroad. Almost two-thirds of matriculating medical students expect to participate in a global health experience during medical school, continuing into residency and early careers. Despite positive intent, such short-term experiences in global health (STEGHs) may exacerbate global health inequities and even cause harm. Growing out of the "medical missions" tradition, contemporary participation continues to evolve. Ethical concerns and other disciplinary approaches, such as public health and anthropology, can be incorpo rated to increase effectiveness and sustainability, and to shift the culture of STEGHs from focusing on trainees and their home institutions to also considering benefits in host communities and nurtur ing partnerships. The authors propose four core principles to guide ethical development of educational STEGHs: (1) skills building in cross-cultural effective ness and cultural humility, (2) bidirectional participatory relationships, (3) local capacity building, and (4) long-term sustainability. Application of these principles highlights the need for assessment of STEGHs: data collection that allows transparent compar isons, standards of quality, bidirectionality of agreements, defined curricula, and ethics that meet both host and sending countries' standards and needs. To capture the enormous potential of STEGHs, a paradigm shift in the culture of STEGHs is needed to ensure that these experiences balance training level, personal competencies, medical and cross-cultural ethics, and educational objectives to minimize harm and maximize benefits for all involved. PMID:26630608

  4. Beyond Medical "Missions" to Impact-Driven Short-Term Experiences in Global Health (STEGHs): Ethical Principles to Optimize Community Benefit and Learner Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melby, Melissa K; Loh, Lawrence C; Evert, Jessica; Prater, Christopher; Lin, Henry; Khan, Omar A

    2016-05-01

    Increasing demand for global health education in medical training has driven the growth of educational programs predicated on a model of short-term medical service abroad. Almost two-thirds of matriculating medical students expect to participate in a global health experience during medical school, continuing into residency and early careers. Despite positive intent, such short-term experiences in global health (STEGHs) may exacerbate global health inequities and even cause harm. Growing out of the "medical missions" tradition, contemporary participation continues to evolve. Ethical concerns and other disciplinary approaches, such as public health and anthropology, can be incorpo rated to increase effectiveness and sustainability, and to shift the culture of STEGHs from focusing on trainees and their home institutions to also considering benefits in host communities and nurtur ing partnerships. The authors propose four core principles to guide ethical development of educational STEGHs: (1) skills building in cross-cultural effective ness and cultural humility, (2) bidirectional participatory relationships, (3) local capacity building, and (4) long-term sustainability. Application of these principles highlights the need for assessment of STEGHs: data collection that allows transparent compar isons, standards of quality, bidirectionality of agreements, defined curricula, and ethics that meet both host and sending countries' standards and needs. To capture the enormous potential of STEGHs, a paradigm shift in the culture of STEGHs is needed to ensure that these experiences balance training level, personal competencies, medical and cross-cultural ethics, and educational objectives to minimize harm and maximize benefits for all involved.

  5. Workplace Devaluation: Learning from Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Klunk, Clare Dvoranchik

    1999-01-01

    Many successful professionals, recognized for their experience, knowledge, competence and commitment to their field, experience a contradiction when they realize that their contributions are no longer valued by decision-makers in their organizations. Professionals, regardless of gender, position, education, race or profession, who experience workplace devaluation agree that this experience devalues their contributions and demeans their sense of self. This study illuminates the professio...

  6. When an experiment is crucial?

    OpenAIRE

    Pleitez, V.

    1998-01-01

    Although we accept that Physics is, as a last resort, an experimental science, the relationship between theory and experiment is far away from being trivial. Any experiment is always explained within a determinate theoretical context and, at the same time, an experiment can give suggestions for theories or even can bring new theoretical challenges. Thus, we cannot say without ambiguity when an experiment is a crucial one.

  7. Experience representation in information systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kaczmarek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This thesis looks into the ways subjective dimension of experience could be represented in artificial, non-biological systems, in particular information systems. The pivotal assumption is that experience as opposed to mainstream thinking in information science is not equal to knowledge, so that experience is a broader term which encapsulates both knowledge and subjective, affective component of experience, which so far has not been properly embraced by knowledge representation theories. Th...

  8. Experience representation in information systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kaczmarek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This thesis looks into the ways subjective dimension of experience could be represented in artificial, non-biological systems, in particular information systems. The pivotal assumption is that experience as opposed to mainstream thinking in information science is not equal to knowledge, so that experience is a broader term which encapsulates both knowledge and subjective, affective component of experience, which so far has not been properly embraced by knowledge representation theories. This ...

  9. Fresh perspectives on customer experience

    OpenAIRE

    McColl-Kennedy, Janet; Gustafsson, Anders; Jaakkola, Elina; Klaus, Phil; Radnor, Zoe; Perks, Helen; Friman, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose is to provide directions for future research on: (1) broadening the role of customers in customer experience; (2) taking a practice-based approach to customer experience; and (3) recognizing the holistic, dynamic nature of customer experience across all touch points and over time. Design/methodology/approach – The approach is conceptual identifying current gaps in research on customer experience. Findings – The findings include a set of research questions and re...

  10. Changing tomorrow in customer experience

    OpenAIRE

    Olenius, Leena

    2013-01-01

    This Master’s thesis explores the customer experience approach and considers the need of development in customer experience management in the case company. The key issues are how customer experience management, CEM, causes attention and whether it can be improved. Customer experience is important to take into account if the company wants to improve their customer satisfaction and this way to offer an added value to its important customers. Today’s business life has its own challenges and ...

  11. THE EXPERIENCE OF ART – THE EMPIRIA OR EXPERIMENT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciszek Chmielowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In contemporary aesthetics exists an belief, that the experience of art is the primary fact, which initiates and leads theoretical reflection, as also is the state basis of creating, valuing and the opinion on art. Present text is the test of philosophical recognition of relationship between field of products of new art as well as with context formative it experiences. Author motivates thesis, that radical changes in present art have their source in of meanings consisting on primary notion of experience changes. The present artistic practice goes away from aesthetical experience as empiria and the contemplation and used the notion of experience as experiment and investigation, which dismisses art from her proper functions and brings it rather to aggressive ideology of scientism. The recognition of this progressive change of meanings in founding the art notion of experience has the important consequences both for understanding of present art and for describing it theory.

  12. Dynamic Processes of an Airport’s System. Applying Value Network Analysis (VNA to the Air Traveller Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Vaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we argue that networks are fundamental instruments for the development of the business system of airports’ landside area. We propose value network analysis (VNA to gain a better understanding of how processes and people create value in airports’ network ecosystem. This methodology makes it possible to understand and visualise the internal and external value networks, mapping the players and their interrelationships and thus capturing the dynamics of the airports’ entire system. Applying value network analysis (VNA to the air traveller experience, we conclude that this approach provides a network ecosystem perspective on how processes and people create value within the air traveller experience network. For the validation of this scenario, several interviews were conducted with experts.

  13. Antihydrogen Experiment Gravity Interferometry Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Gerber, S; Tietje, I C; Allkofer, Y R; Trezzi, D; Dassa, L; Rienacker, B; Khalidova, O; Ferrari, G; Krasnicky, D; Perini, D; Cerchiari, G; Belov, A; Boscolo, I; Sacerdoti, M G; Ferragut, R O; Nedelec, P; Testera, G; Hinterberger, A; Al-qaradawi, I; Malbrunot, C L S; Brusa, R S; Prelz, F; Manuzio, G; Riccardi, C; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Haider, S; Haug, F; Merkt, F; Turbabin, A; Castelli, F; Doser, M; Penasa, L; Gninenko, S; Cataneo, F; Zenoni, A; Cabaret, L; Comparat, D P; Zmeskal, J; Scampoli, P; Dudarev, A; Kellerbauer, A G; Lagomarsino, V E; Mariazzi, S; Fesel, J V; Nesteruk, K P; Eisel, W T; Carraro, C; Zavatarelli, S M

    The AEGIS experiment (Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) has the aim of carrying out the first measurement of the gravitational interaction of antimatter to a precision of 1%, by applying techniques from atomic physics, laser spectroscopy and interferometry to a beam of antihydrogen atoms. A further goal of the experiment is to carry out spectroscopy of the antihydrogen atoms in flight.

  14. Early smoking experience in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Urbán, Róbert

    2010-01-01

    Initial smoking experience is a potential predictor of later smoking. Our study has a twofold aim: (1) to provide further support for construct validity of retrospective measurement of an early smoking experience questionnaire (ESE) in a representative sample of adolescents; (2) to examine the association of initial smoking experience with sensation-seeking, current smoking and nicotine dependence.

  15. Single-nucleon experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deur, Alexandre

    2009-12-01

    We discuss the Jefferson Lab low momentum transfer data on moments of the nucleon spin structure functions $g_1$ and $g_2$ and on single charged pion electroproduction off polarized proton and polarized neutron. A wealth of data is now available, while more is being analyzed or expected to be taken in the upcoming years. Given the low momentum transfer selected by the experiments, these data can be compared to calculations from Chiral Perturbation theory, the effective theory of strong force that should describe it at low momentum transfer. The data on various moments and the respective calculations do not consistently agree. In particular, experimental data for higher moments disagree with the calculations.The absence of contribution from the $\\Delta$ resonance in the various observables was expected to facilitate the calculations and hence make the theory predictions either more robust or valid over a larger $Q^2$ range. Such expectation is verified only for the Bjorken sum, but not for other observables in which the $\\Delta$ is suppressed. Preliminary results on pion electroproduction off polarized nucleons are also presented and compared to phenomenological models for which contributions from different resonances are varied. Chiral Perturbation calculations of these observables, while not yet available, would be valuable and, together with these data, would provide an extensive test of the effective theory.

  16. Particle physics experiments, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data taking for this experiment was completed in December 1983. The samples include approximately 19,000 (ν) and 11,000 (ν-bar) charged current events. These constitute the largest data set of interactions on free protons. Work published to date includes studies of inclusive structure functions and final state properties, exclusive final states, neutral current cross sections and production of strange and charmed particles. During the past year results have been published on the production of f2 (1270) and ν0 (770) mesons in ρp and ρ-barp charged current interactions. In the case of the f2 this represents the first observation of such production. It is found that the multiplicities are 0.047±0.017 in ρp and 0.17±0.018 in ρ-barp. The f2 mesons are mostly produced at large hadronic invariant mass W and in the forward hemisphere. The production of ν0 mesons can be observed with high statistics in both ρp and ρ-barp interactions and the differential cross section studied. The observations are compared with LUND Monte Carlo predictions, which are generally found to be too high. However qualitative features of the data are reproduced. Work continues on a precise determination of the neutral current/charged current ratio, on the study of charged and neutral current structure functions and on the production of strange particles. (author)

  17. Experiments with particle damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollkamp, Joseph J.; Gordon, Robert W.

    1998-06-01

    High cycle fatigue in jet engines is a current military concern. The vibratory stresses that cause fatigue can be reduced by adding damping. However, the high temperatures that occur in the gas turbine greatly hinder the application of mature damping technologies. One technology which may perform in the harsh environment is particle damping. Particle damping involves placing metallic or ceramic particles inside structural cavities. As the cavity vibrates, energy is dissipated through particle collisions. Performance is influenced by many parameters including the type, shape, and size of the particles; the amount of free volume for the particles to move in; density of the particles; and the level of vibration. This paper presents results from a series of experiments designed to gain an appreciation of the important parameters. The experimental setup consists of a cantilever beam with drilled holes. These holes are partially filled with particles. The types of particles, location of the particles, fill level, and other parameters are varied. Damping is estimated for each configuration. Trends in the results are studied to determine the influence of the varied parameter.

  18. Subterranean stress engineering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of stress in a subterranean rock mass has classically been assumed to be constant at best. In soil with a high clay content, preconsolidation and drainage methods can lead to more stable foundation material, but methods for engineering the stresses in large masses of rock are not well known. This paper shows the results from an experiment designed to alter the in situ rock stress field in an oil shale mine. This was done by hydrofracturing the rock by use of a packed-well injection system and then propping the crack open with a thixotropic gel, which slowly hardened to the consistency of cement. Successive hydrofracture and high-pressure grouting resulted in an overstressed region. Well-head injection pressures, surface tilts, injection rates, and subterranean strains were measured and recorded on floppy disk by a Z-80 microprocessor. The results were then transmitted to the large computer system at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). To put the data in a more useful form, computer-generated movies of the tilts and strains were made by use of computer graphics developed at LASL. The purpose of this paper is to present results from the Single Large Instrumented Test conducted in the Colony Oil Shale Mine near Rifle, Colorado. 13 figures

  19. The LOPES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.link@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Apel, W.D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik (Germany); Baehren, L. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Buchholz, P. [Universitaet Siegen, Fachbereich Physik (Germany); Buitink, S. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics (Netherlands); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita Torino (Italy); INAF Torino, Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita Torino (Italy); Daumiller, K. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Souza, V. de [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Doll, P.; Engel, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Cosmic ray particles hit the Earth's atmosphere and induce extensive air showers (EAS). These EAS mainly consist of electrons and positrons that produce radio emission due to their interaction with the Earth's magnetic field. Measuring this radio emission is the purpose of the LOPES (LOFAR Prototype Station) experiment. LOPES is located at Campus North of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at the same site as the EAS particle detector KASCADE-Grande. Since the first measurements in 2003, LOPES was improved by various experimental setups and could establish the radio technique. By now, detailed studies of the measured radio signal are performed, like the behaviour of the lateral distribution or the polarization of the electric field. Furthermore, with LOPES the dependence of the radio pulse on properties of the incoming cosmic ray, like primary energy, primary mass, or incoming direction is investigated. In this article we describe the different LOPES setups, next we explain our standard analysis procedure and then we discuss some highlights of our recent results.

  20. VISIR: Experiences and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Tawfik

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It is of crucial importance the integration of practical sessions in engineering curricula owing to their significant role in understanding engineering concepts and scientific phenomena. However, the lack of practical sessions due to the high costs of the equipment and the unavailability of instructors has caused a significant declination in experimentation in engineering education. Remote laboratories have tackled this issues providing online reusable and shared workbenches unconstrained by neither geographical nor time considerations. Thereby, they have extremely proliferated among universities and integrated into engineering curricula over the last decade. This contribution compiles diverse experiences based on the deployment of the remote laboratory, Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality (VISIR, on the practices of undergraduate engineering grades at various universities within the VISIR community. It aims to show the impact of its usage on engineering education concerning the assessments of students and teachers as well. In addition, the paper address the next challenges and future works carried out at several universities within the VISIR community.

  1. Young students experience theory

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Three sixteen-year-old students from the International School of Geneva, La Chataigneraie have spent a week finding out about the life of a theoretical physicist at CERN. Student Peter Bishop at the blackboard with Robert Fleischer of Theory Division. Peter Bishop, Sam Schoenholz and Alexander Hultin spent the time with the Theory Unit of the Physics department. The visit was at the suggestion of the students themselves, who are required to undertake work experience at an organization, gaining insights into professional life, as part of their studies. After an introduction to CERN at Microcosm, each student had the opportunity to learn about physics at a level well beyond their current academic training. They were mentored by theoretical physicists who introduced them to the basics of particle physics, discussing physics in general as well as topics such as predicting the mass of the Higgs boson and cosmology. A visit to CMS, guided by Ariane Frey, proved very impressive, but the working conditions of physi...

  2. rf experiments on PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of rf experiments are being conducted on PLT in order to explore rf techniques which could improve tokamak performance parameters. Of special importance are the studies of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating, lower hybrid MHD stabilization and electron heating, down-shifted electron cyclotron heating, and fast wave current drive. Ion Bernstein wave heating results at modest power indicate that the particle confinement time could be enhanced relative to that for fast wave heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and neutral beam heating. At these power levels a conclusive determination of energy confinement scaling with power cannot yet be given. Central sawtooth and m = 1 MHD stabilization is being obtained with centrally peaked lower hybrid (LH) current drive and the central electron temperature is peaking to values (approx.5 keV) well outside the bounds of ''profile consistency.'' In this case the electron energy confinement is apparently increased relative to the ohmic value. The production of relativistic electrons via heating at the down-shifted electron cyclotron (EC) frequency is found to be consistent with theoretical predictions and lends support to the use of this method for heating in relatively high magnetic field devices

  3. Chamera: A Himalayan experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 540 MW Chamera hydroelectric project is located on the Ravi River in the foothills of the Himalayas 500 km north of Delhi. The Chamera Constructors Consortium is made up of a joint venture of SNC Inc., Acres International, Marine Industries Limited and General Electric Canada. The consortium provides engineering, procurement, and construction management services, and supplies turbines and gates, generators and associated electrical equipment. The experience of the consortium in dealing with the Indian Government is detailed. A multi-envelope bidding system was used, with the lowest cost, technically acceptable bid receiving the contract. Misunderstandings can arise due to different perceptions of the bidding process between Canadian companies and the National Hydroelectric Power Corporation (NHPC) of the Indian government, with NHPC taking a more formal approach in contractual dealings. Export paperwork was frequently in error leading to delays in passage of goods through Indian customs. With the liberalization of the Indian trade laws there is a potential for Canada to supply a significant quantity of equipment for India's planned 38,000 MW of hydroelectric expansion. 11 figs., 2 tabs

  4. My experience in arbitration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Witz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the nature of arbitration as one of the alternatives in dispute resolution processes different from mediation and conciliation, and obviously, from judicial adjudication. Unlike a mediator or a conciliator, an arbitrator is empowered to pass a judgement, like a court. In other words, the arbitrator will render a decision which is binding for the parties. The arbitrator has the jurisdictio, like a judge. Although the office of a judge and an arbitrator is the same, the source of their power is different. The judge’s power originates from a State, whereas the power of the arbitrator results primarily from a contract. Unlike the court, the arbitrator lacks the imperium, i.e. the power to make the award enforceable. When a party refuses to enforce the award, enforceability can only be provided by the judge or an authority of the state where the award has to be enforced. In a certain sense the state thus provides the back up for the arbitration system. This paper presents personal thoughts drawn from the author’s professional experience as an arbitrator in Franco-German disputes.

  5. The PAMELA Space Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mocchiutti, E; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Borisov, S; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; De Pascale, M P; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Galper, A M; Gillard, W; Grishantseva, L; Hofverberg, P; Jerse, G; Koldashov, S V; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Maksumov, O; Malvezzi, V; Marcelli, L; Menn, W; Mikhailov, V V; Nikonov, N N; Osteria, G; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Runtso, M; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Yu I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Wu, J; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2009-01-01

    The 15th of June 2006, the PAMELA satellite-borne experiment was launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome and it has been collecting data since July 2006. The apparatus comprises a time-of-flight system, a silicon-microstrip magnetic spectrometer, a silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter, an anticoincidence system, a shower tail counter scintillator and a neutron detector. The combination of these devices allows precision studies of the charged cosmic radiation to be conducted over a wide energy range (100 MeV -- 100's GeV) with high statistics. The primary scientific goal is the measurement of the antiproton and positron energy spectrum in order to search for exotic sources, such as dark matter particle annihilations. PAMELA is also searching for primordial antinuclei (anti-helium) and testing cosmic-ray propagation models through precise measurements of the anti-particle energy spectrum and precision studies of light nuclei and their isotopes. Moreover, PAMELA is investigating phenomena connected with so...

  6. The 'Patient experience' revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, Doug; Zavadsky, Matt

    2014-02-01

    We're arguably at the most pivotal time in our young profession. The ACA has provided EMS an unprecedented opportunity to become a part of the healthcare system, a move that many of us have dreamed about for decades. We need to pay attention to the changing dynamics of the environment in which we operate. The factors that currently impact hospitals, doctors and other healthcare providers will also impact us sooner than we think. Take the time to help shape our future and how we participate in this new healthcare system. It's time to focus on the patient and the patient's experience with our service. Wayne Gretzky said two important things during an interview when he was asked what makes him such a great hockey player. One was, "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take." The other was, "A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be. I skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been." Our advice to you is to go ahead, take the shot, get ahead of the other team and focus on improved customer satisfaction sooner rather than later. PMID:24660359

  7. REBEKA bundle experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a summary of experimental investigations describing the fuel rod behavior in the refilling and reflooding phase of a loss-of-coolant accident of a PWR. The experiments were performed with 5x5 and 7x7 rod bundles, using indirectly electrically heated fuel rod simulators of full length with original PWR-KWU-geometry, original grid spacers and Zircaloy-4-claddings (Type Biblis B). The fuel rod simulators showed a cosine shaped axial power profile in 7 steps and continuous, respectively. The results describe the influence of the different parameters such as bundle size on the maximum coolant channel blockage, that of the cooling on the size of the circumferential strain of the cladding (azimuthal temperature distribution) a cold control rod guide thimble and the flow direction (axial temperature distribution) on the resulting coolant channel blockage. The rewetting behavior of different fuel rod simulators including ballooned and burst Zircaloy claddings is discussed as well as the influence of thermocouples on the cladding temperature history and the rewetting behavior. All results prove the coolability of a PWR in the case of a LOCA. Therefore, it can be concluded that the ECC-criteria established by licensing authorities can be fulfilled. (orig./HP)

  8. Visual experiences during paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M Whitham

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available RationaleParalysed human volunteers (n=6 participated in an electroencephalographic study after which they undertook studies of attempted eye movement. The interventions tested a central, intentional component to one’s internal visual model.Methods Six subjects reclined in a supported chair and were ventilated after paralysis (cisatracurium, 20 mg intravenously. In illumination, subjects were requested to focus alternately on the faces of investigators standing on the left and the right within peripheral vision. In darkness, subjects were instructed to look away from a point source of light. Subjects were to report their experiences after reversal of paralysis.Results During attempted eye movement in illumination, one subject had an illusion of environmental movement but four subjects perceived faces as clearly as if they were in central vision. In darkness, four subjects reported movement of the target light in the direction of attempted eye movements and three could control the movement of the light at will. ConclusionThe hypothesis that internal visual models receive intended ocular-movement-information directly from oculomotor centres is strengthened by this evidence.

  9. Use experience of FLUKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In order to conduct the shield design calculation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under planning in CERN at present, the radiation group of CERN uses FLUKA (Monte Carlo High Energy Radiation Transport Code). Here is introduced on outline of FLUKA and use experience of FLUKA in the LHC-B detector shield design calculation in LHC plan. FLUKA can be said to be the highest standard in the high energy radiation transportation code of the world at every points of the physical model, the Monte Carlo calculation technique and the convenience at usage of the code. In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), a using right of FLUKA for the target neutronics and facility shielding design at the neutron science research center is obtained and it seems to be an effective design means in these future designs. However, because FLUKA is allowed a limited opening and no own verification on the code, it will be supposed to be a large problem on investigating a validity in design. (K.G.)

  10. Biofuels: The African experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrillo, L.A.; Nkolo, M. [German Agency for Technical Cooperation GTZ, Delegation Regionale des Eaux et Forets, Bertoua (Cameroon)

    2009-07-01

    In July 2006, the African Non-Petroleum Producers Association was formed in Senegal, Africa to develop alternative energy sources. It involved 13 of Africa's poorest nations, who joined forces to become global suppliers of biofuels, and some have set mandatory mixing of ethanol into gasoline. Although several biofuel production projects have been launched in western Africa, many of the new projects and plantations have not yet reached maturity due to the time lag between plantation and full-scale production, which is about 6 years. Major projects that could be producing significant quantities of biofuels in the next few years are not yet reflected in production statistics. Although ethanol is not yet being produced in large quantities in Africa, short-term opportunities exist. Countries in the South African Development Community are using molasses from the sugar can industry to produce ethanol. Biodiesel is also not currently produced on a significant scale in western Africa, but several other countries are gaining experience with cotton and palm oil resources, and Jatropha. Biomass residue also represents a large potential for all African countries involved in timber production. Unlike biodiesel production, land use conflicts are not an issue with biomass residue production.

  11. Phishing: A Field Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuvasin Charoen, Ph.D.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Phishing is a method that hackers use to fraudulently acquire sensitive or private information from a victimby impersonating a real entity [1]. Phishing can be defined as the act of soliciting or stealing sensitiveinformation such as usernames, passwords, bank account numbers, credit card numbers, and socialsecurity or citizen ID numbers from individuals using the Internet [2]. Phishing often involves some kindof deception. The results from a study of Jagatic et al. (2007 indicate that Internet users are four timesmore likely to become phishing victims if they receive a request from someone appearing to be a knownfriend or colleague. The Anti-Phishing Work Group indicates that at least five percent of users respondedto phishing scams and about two million users gave away their information to spoofed websites [3]. Thisresults in direct losses of $1.2 billion for banks and credit card companies (Dhamija, 2006.In order to understand how phishing can be conducted, the researcher set up a phishing experiment inone of Thailand’s higher education institutions. The subjects were MBA students. A phishing email wassent to the subjects, and the message led the subject to visit the phishing website. One hundred seventystudents became victims. The data collection included a survey, an interview, and a focus group. Theresults indicated that phishing could be easily conducted, and the result can have a great impact on thesecurity of an organization. Organizations can use and apply the lessons learned from this study toformulate an effective security policy and security awareness training programs.

  12. L3 + Cosmics Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %RE4 %title\\\\ \\\\The L3+C experiment takes advantage of the unique properties of the L3 muon spectrometer to get an accurate measurement of cosmic ray muons 30 m underground. A new muon trigger, readout and DAQ system have been installed, as well as a scintillator array covering the upper surfaces of the L3 magnet for timing purposes. The acceptance amounts to 200 $m^2 sr$. The data are collected independently in parallel with L3 running. In spring 2000 a scintillator array will be installed on the roof of the SX hall in order to estimate the primary energy of air showers associated with events observed in L3+C.\\\\ \\\\The cosmic ray muon momentum spectrum, the zenith angular dependence and the charge ratio are measured with high accuracy between 20 and 2000 GeV/c. The results will provide new information about the primary composition, the shower development in the atmosphere, and the inclusive pion and kaon (production-) cross sections (specifically the "$\\pi$/K ratio") at high energies. These data will also hel...

  13. A moving experience !

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The Transport Service pulled out all the stops and, more specifically, its fleet of moving and lifting equipment for the Discovery Monday on 6 June - a truly moving experience for all the visitors who took part ! Visitors could play at being machine operator, twiddling the controls of a lift truck fitted with a jib to lift a dummy magnet into a wooden mock-up of a beam-line.They had to show even greater dexterity for this game of lucky dip...CERN-style.Those with a head for heights took to the skies 20 m above ground in a telescopic boom lift.Children were allowed to climb up into the operator's cabin - this is one of the cranes used to move the LHC magnets around. Warm thanks to all members of the Transport Service for their participation, especially B. Goicoechea, T. Ilkei, R. Bihery, S. Prodon, S. Pelletier, Y. Bernard, A.  Sallot, B. Pigeard, S. Guinchard, B. Bulot, J. Berrez, Y. Grandjean, A. Bouakkaz, M. Bois, F. Stach, T. Mazzarino and S. Fumey.

  14. Joint collaborative technology experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Michael; Ciccimaro, Donny; Yee, See; Denewiler, Thomas; Stroumtsos, Nicholas; Messamore, John; Brown, Rodney; Skibba, Brian; Clapp, Daniel; Wit, Jeff; Shirts, Randy J.; Dion, Gary N.; Anselmo, Gary S.

    2009-05-01

    Use of unmanned systems is rapidly growing within the military and civilian sectors in a variety of roles including reconnaissance, surveillance, explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), and force-protection and perimeter security. As utilization of these systems grows at an ever increasing rate, the need for unmanned systems teaming and inter-system collaboration becomes apparent. Collaboration provides a means of enhancing individual system capabilities through relevant data exchange that contributes to cooperative behaviors between systems and enables new capabilities not possible if the systems operate independently. A collaborative networked approach to development holds the promise of adding mission capability while simultaneously reducing the workload of system operators. The Joint Collaborative Technology Experiment (JCTE) joins individual technology development efforts within the Air Force, Navy, and Army to demonstrate the potential benefits of interoperable multiple system collaboration in a force-protection application. JCTE participants are the Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Airbase Technologies Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRL/RXQF); the Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center Software Engineering Directorate (AMRDEC SED); and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center - Pacific (SSC Pacific) Unmanned Systems Branch operating with funding provided by the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise (JGRE). This paper will describe the efforts to date in system development by the three partner organizations, development of collaborative behaviors and experimentation in the force-protection application, results and lessons learned at a technical demonstration, simulation results, and a path forward for future work.

  15. The CAPTAIN Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bian, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    The Cryogenic Apparatus for Precision Tests of Argon Interactions with Neutrinos (CAPTAIN) program is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two liquid Argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs), a primary detector with a mass of approximately 10 ton that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a two ton prototype detector for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in the high-energy regime (1.5-5 GeV) at Fermilab NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in the low-energy regime (<50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies. The prototype detector (Mini-CAPTAIN) has been commissioned and the first UV laser track has been seen in its TPC. This paper gives an overview of the CAPTAIN pr...

  16. The Brazilian Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, Antonio Carlos S. de

    1998-12-31

    This presentation discusses the technology and experience of Petrobras in the development of deep-water exploitation off the coast of Brazil. The company recently found important oil deposits in waters over 300 m deep in Campos Basin, the main petroleum province in Brazil, located offshore Rio de Janeiro State. It is estimated that 50% of the new discoveries will take place in waters deeper than 1000 m. Unlike other companies, Petrobras made an option to develop its offshore fields by means of sub-sea equipment and floating production units. This was possible mainly because of the characteristics of the reservoirs and the mild environmental conditions in Campos Basin. Petrobras has 288 subsea trees on the seabed, 48 subsea manifolds and 21 floating production units in operation. The company has constantly moved on to deeper and deeper waters and by the end of 1998 a new milestone will be achieved with a Roncador field subsea well at 1853 m. Procap-2000, a strategic research and development corporate programme for ultra-deep water technology, was developed. Other innovations by Petrobras are also discussed. 3 figs.

  17. Project Feedback Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the financial responsibility of the Karlsruhe Research Center 5 reactors and 1 reprocessing plant are being decommissioned with these activities reaching a total volume of 2 billion Euros. Three reactor projects have already been completed: The FR 2 research reactor is in the state of safe enclosure i.e., only the reactor pressure vessel and its internals are in place. Apart from that the reactor building is empty. The reactors KKN and HDR have been dismantled completely and the sites have been re-cultivated (green field) again. The state of the other projects are as follows: - Multi Purpose Research Reactor (MZFR): remote controlled dismantling of the reactor vessel and internals; - Compact Sodium Cooled Reactor (KNK): installation of the equipment for the remote controlled dismantling of the reactor tank and its internals; - Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK): decontamination of the process cells, construction of a vitrification facility for the treatment of the high-active waste concentrate (HAWC) and commission of the equipment for the segmentation of the HAWC storage tanks. The experience gained so far with regard to the technology applied and the licensing procedure will be described and discussed in the paper. The decommissioning progress is decisively determined by the direct treatment and disposal of the generated radioactive wastes. The FZK facilities and processing units available for this purpose will be also presented. Furthermore, the consequences of establishing specific organizational units as well as of a consistent project management will be outlined. (author)

  18. Gathering positive experience

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Last Monday, the new CERN Machine Advisory Committee (CMAC) met for the first time, and we had good news to tell its members. Over the weekend, injection tests for both LHC beams were successfully carried out. In other words, we’ve had beam in the LHC for the first time since September 2008. That’s a good feeling, but it’s no reason for complacency. There’s still a long way to go before first physics at the new energy frontier. As the Bulletin has reported over recent weeks, we’re gathering a lot of positive experience with the new quench detection and protection system (QPS), which is already allowing us to monitor the LHC far better than we were able to in the past. So far, the QPS for three of the LHC’s eight sectors has been put through its paces, and we’ve also power tested those sectors to 2000 amperes, the equivalent of around 1.2 TeV per beam. The next step is to slowly increase the current to 4000 amperes, and...

  19. Glovebox fire experiment, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gloveboxes used for plutonium facilities in Japan and foreign countries have considerable combustibles as their components, so that the fire resistivity of the gloveboxes is a serious problem in the safety evaluation of the facilities. Actually, a big fire having burned gloveboxes occurred in a foreign weapon facility. But the fire in the weapon facility should be distinguished from that in nuclear fuel facilities, since the former handles quite combustible plutonium metal, while the latter handle quite stable plutonium oxide. The countermeasures to fires should be decided, considering the properties and quantity of combustibles around gloveboxes and ventilation systems, as the probability and scale of fires can be presumed from them. From the viewpoint of safety, the experiment on glovebox fires was carried out by the Plutonium Fuel Division, PNC. The experimental conditions are explained. The samples were the acrylic resin panels with four glove ports and a small glovebox currently used. The glovebox showed the considerable fire resistance, and the panel hardly burned. The weakest component of the glovebox against fire was the gloves. The countermeasure to curtain the gloves with an insulating material seemed to be effective. The ventilation of the room and the glovebox worked as fire preventer at least in the first stage of fire. (Kako, I.)

  20. My program is ok - am I? Computing freshmen's experiences of doing programming assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Päivi; Simon, Beth

    2012-03-01

    This article provides insight into how computing majors experience the process of doing programming assignments in their first programming course. This grounded theory study sheds light on the various processes and contexts through which students constantly assess their self-efficacy as a programmer. The data consists of a series of four interviews conducted with a purposeful sample of nine computer science majors in a research intensive state university in the United States. Use of the constant comparative method elicited two forms of results. First, we identified six stages of doing a programming assignment. Analysis captures the dimensional variation in students' experiences with programming assignments on a detailed level. We identified a core category resulting from students' reflected emotions in conjunction with self-efficacy assessment. We provide a descriptive model of how computer science majors build their self-efficacy perceptions, reported via four narratives. Our key findings are that some students reflect negative views of their efficacy, even after having a positive programming experience and that in other situations, students having negative programming experiences still have a positive outlook on their efficacy. We consider these findings in light of possible languages and support structures for introductory programming courses.

  1. Sorption of phosphate onto calcite; results from batch experiments and surface complexation modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Dieke; Jakobsen, Rasmus;

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of phosphate onto calcite was studied in a series of batch experiments. To avoid the precipitation of phosphate-containing minerals the experiments were conducted using a short reaction time (3h) and low concentrations of phosphate (⩽50μM). Sorption of phosphate on calcite was stud....... Generally the model captures the variation in phosphate adsorption onto calcite as a function of solution composition, though it was necessary to include two types of sorption sites (strong and weak) in the model to reproduce the convex shape of the sorption isotherms.......The adsorption of phosphate onto calcite was studied in a series of batch experiments. To avoid the precipitation of phosphate-containing minerals the experiments were conducted using a short reaction time (3h) and low concentrations of phosphate (⩽50μM). Sorption of phosphate on calcite...... was studied in 11 different calcite-equilibrated solutions that varied in pH, PCO2, ionic strength and activity of Ca2+, CO32- and HCO3-. Our results show strong sorption of phosphate onto calcite. The kinetics of phosphate sorption onto calcite are fast; adsorption is complete within 2–3h while desorption...

  2. AGS experiments -- 1991, 1992, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains: (1) FY 1993 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1994--95 AGS schedule; (3) AGS experiments ≥ FY 1993 (as of 30 March 1994); (4) AGS beams 1993; (5) AGS experimental area FY 1991 physics program; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1992 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1993 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program (planned); (9) a listing of experiments by number; (10) two-page summaries of each experiment; (11) listing of publications of AGS experiments; and (12) listing of AGS experiments

  3. The gallium solar neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overwhelming majority of solar neutrinos are low energy pp-neutrinos. Among the few potential experiments for their detection, the radiochemical Gallium Solar Neutrino experiment is the only one which has been demonstrated to be feasible. The strong motivations for performing such an experiment, the experimental approach, the major results of the pilot experiment performed in an international collaboration, recent progress in further reducing the counter backgrounds, experiments towards Resonance Ionization of Gallium for ultimate background reduction, the status of the project, and the plans for the future are all described. (author)

  4. An emergency exercise experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emergency exercises are held to satisfy regulatory requirements and to hopefully improve emergency response. Unfortunately, simply satisfying the requirement is often the principle concern of those who plan drills. Argonne National Laboratory has detailed emergency plans, and each Division is required to have an emergency exercise at least once each year. However, the pressure to minimize time taken from research efforts reduces the value of many exercises. During the past year, the Health Physics Section at ANL made an effort to optimize the information and training obtained in the time allotted for a drill. The purpose of this presentation is to share our approach and the results of one experience with the anticipation that it will stimulate others to critically look at emergency exercises in their organizations. To be of value, an emergency response exercise must have clear objectives, allow organized reporting, contain a documented follow-up critique, and provide for correction of deficiencies in training and in the emergency plan. A mock criticality incident at ANL was used to test specific emergency response capabilities. The objectives of the 45 minute exercise included testing: (1) how well Health Physics, Fire Department, and Medical personnel would deal with the unexpected find of an unconscientious, contaminated person in a high radiation field; (2) the capability to quickly predict environmental radioactivity concentration for a surprise mock stack release of fission products; (3) the time required and accuracy for dose assessment from personnel dosimeters, criticality dosimeters and samples of blood and hair which were irradiated to known doses in the Argonne Janus reactor; (4) how well Health Physics personnel would identify and sort 'exposed persons' who had no dosimeters (small radioactive sources were hidden on select persons); and (5) how persons from the evacuated building would be accounted for. As a result of findings, special Health Physics

  5. Regulatory and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulatory and operating experience in the disposal of radioactive waste can be divided into three time periods, World War II and its aftermath, Post World War II till the end of the cold war, and crystal ball gazing into the future. In the first period, there was little regulatory guidance and operating practices, all conducted under wartime secrecy conditions, sometimes were not even up to the norms of the times. Environmental releases resulted in some seriously contaminated sites and high dosages to some offsite populations. Failure to consider even the storage of wastes in a systems context resulted in some stocks that were difficult to recover, treat and dispose of in a final manner. In the second period, increasing civilian uses of nuclear power and isotopes for medical, research, and industrial purposes and military pressure for increased production of Pu-239 resulted in large and more dispersed disposal of radioactive wastes. Regulatory regimes, following growing environmental consciousness, came into existence that minimized exposure to environmental contamination. Practices, in most instances, increasingly conformed to these regulatory demands. The future is unknowable. However, for high level wastes, except for thermodynamically stable forms, no technology can guarantee safety and present methodologies are calculated to produce doses orders of magnitude lower than regulatory limits. Therefore, it is possible that research will be limited to no higher technology than is reasonably achievable. Whereas for low level waste, where proof is practicably possible, as high technology as is reasonably achievable will be best in the long run. (author). 24 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  6. The isotope correlation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ESARDA working group on Isotopic Correlation Techniques, ICT and Reprocessing Input Analysis performed an Isotope Correlation Experiment, ICE with the aim to check the feasibility of the new technique. Ten input batches of the reprocessing of the KWO fuel at the WAK plant were analysed by 4 laboratories. All information to compare ICT with the gravimetric and volumetric methods was available. ICT combined with simplified reactor physics calculation was included. The main objectives of the statistical data evaluation were detection of outliers, the estimation of random errors and of systematic errors of the measurements performed by the 4 laboratories. Different methods for outlier detection, analysis of variances, Grubbs' analysis for the constant-bias model and Jaech's non-constant-bias model were applied. Some of the results of the statistical analysis may seem inconsistent which is due to the following reasons. For the statistical evaluations isotope abundance data (weight percent) as well as nuclear concentration data (atoms/initial metal atoms) were subjected to different outlier criteria before being used for further statistical evaluations. None of the four data evaluation groups performed a complete statistical data analysis which would render possible a comparison of the different methods applied since no commonly agreed statistical evaluation procedure existed. The results prove that ICT is as accurate as conventional techniques which have to rely on costly mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis. The potential of outlier detection by ICT on the basis of the results from a single laboratory is as good as outlier detection by costly interlaboratory comparison. The application of fission product or Cm-244 correlations would be more timely than remeasurements at safeguards laboratories

  7. SELENE (KAGUYA) PDAP experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobue, Shinichi; Shinohara, Iku; Yamamoto, Yukio; Okada, Tatsuaki; Okumura, Hayato

    SELENE (KAGUYA) PDAP experiment Shin-ichi Sobue, Yukio Yamamoto, Hayato Okumura, Tatsuaki Okada and Iku Shinohara SELENE (whose Japanese Nickname is 'KAGUYA' from Japanese old story) is the most sophisticated lunar exploration mission in the post-Apollo Era. SELENE consists of the main orbiter and two small satellites - the Relay satellite 'OKINA' and the VRAD satellite 'OUNA'. The main orbiter will observe the distribution of the elements and minerals on the surface, the surface and sub-surface structure, the gravity field, the remnant of the magnetic field and the environment of energetic particles and plasma of the Moon. The Relay satellite 'OKINA' will relay the Doppler ranging signal between the Main Orbiter and the ground station for the world's first direct measurement of he gravity field in the farside of the Moon. The differential VLBI Radio-Sources on board the Relay satellite "OKINA" and the VRAD satellite 'OUNA' are used to determine the gravity field of the Moon most precisely. SELENE data will be used for studying 'lunar origin and evolution' and "exploration" of the Moon and will be archived and distributed in PDS-like format with the descriptions of data format and technical information. This PDS-like format is slightly different from catalog for search and order in catalog DB (some keyword (attribute) and value definition are different). Thus, to establish the catalog interoperability function with PDS/NASA and PSA/ESA by using PDAP, it is necessary to develop PDS label (keyword and value) mapping software to translate SELENE PDS like label extracted from SELENE product to PDS compatible PDS-label and archive such the label information to our prototype catalog database We also implemented the retrieving prototype system to access that prototype catalog database. Those systems were finished to implement by the end of this March. This paper describes the result of this prototype development and evaluation report. In addition, this paper shows some

  8. Welcome to the experience economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, B J; Gilmore, J H

    1998-01-01

    First there was agriculture, then manufactured goods, and eventually services. Each change represented a step up in economic value--a way for producers to distinguish their products from increasingly undifferentiated competitive offerings. Now, as services are in their turn becoming commoditized, companies are looking for the next higher value in an economic offering. Leading-edge companies are finding that it lies in staging experiences. To reach this higher level of competition, companies will have to learn how to design, sell, and deliver experiences that customers will readily pay for. An experience occurs when a company uses services as the stage--and goods as props--for engaging individuals in a way that creates a memorable event. And while experiences have always been at the heart of the entertainment business, any company stages an experience when it engages customers in a personal, memorable way. The lessons of pioneering experience providers, including the Walt Disney Company, can help companies learn how to compete in the experience economy. The authors offer five design principles that drive the creation of memorable experiences. First, create a consistent theme, one that resonates throughout the entire experience. Second, layer the theme with positive cues--for example, easy-to-follow signs. Third, eliminate negative cues, those visual or aural messages that distract or contradict the theme. Fourth, offer memorabilia that commemorate the experience for the user. Finally, engage all five senses--through sights, sounds, and so on--to heighten the experience and thus make it more memorable.

  9. Mapping Bicyclists’ Experiences in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snizek, Bernhard; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick; Skov-Petersen, Hans

    responded and sketched their most recent cycle route and a total of 890 points to locations along the route where they had had positive and negative cycling experiences. The survey was implemented as an online questionnaire built on Google Maps, and allowed up to three positive and three negative experience......This paper presents an approach to the collection, mapping, and analysis of cyclists’ experiences. By spatially relating located experiences to the availability of bicycle facilities and other aspects of the urban environment, their influence on cyclists’ experiences can be analysed. 398 cyclists...... points to be mapped and classified. By relating the characteristics of the experience points and the routes to the traversed urban area in general, the significance of the preconditions for obtaining positive or negative experiences could be evaluated. Thereby urban spaces can be mapped according...

  10. Mapping bicyclists’ experiences in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snizek, Bernhard; Sick Nielsen, Thomas Alexander; Skov-Petersen, Hans

    2013-01-01

    responded and sketched their most recent cycle route and a total of 890 points to locations along the route where they had had positive and negative cycling experiences. The survey was implemented as an online questionnaire built on Google Maps, and allowed up to three positive and three negative experience......This paper presents an approach to the collection, mapping, and analysis of cyclists’ experiences. By spatially relating located experiences to the availability of bicycle facilities and other aspects of the urban environment, their influence on cyclists’ experiences can be analysed. 398 cyclists...... points to be mapped and classified.By relating the characteristics of the experience points and the routes to the traversed urban area in general, the significance of the preconditions for obtaining positive or negative experiences could be evaluated. Thereby urban spaces can be mapped according...

  11. SIR-B experiments in Japan. I - Sensor calibration experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Masaru; Echizenya, Yoshimatsu; Kamata, Mitsuhiro; Kawai, Eiji; Hiromoto, Norihisa

    1988-03-01

    A sensor calibration experiment was proposed as part of SIR-B experiments in Japan, together with the rice crop experiment and the ocean oil-pollution detection experiment. This sensor calibration experiment was intended (1) to establish a transfer function from image data to radar backscattering characteristics, (2) to evaluate 3-dB resolutions, (3) to verify the ability to resolve two closely-spaced targets, and (4) to clarify sidelobe structures due to range and azimuth compressions. The disused Akita Airport was chosen as the main test site for the calibration experiment on the first three objectives. This paper describes the test site, the design of the corner reflectors, and briefly predicts the results.

  12. Characteristics of the Nordic Seas overflows in a set of Norwegian Earth System Model experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chuncheng; Ilicak, Mehmet; Bentsen, Mats; Fer, Ilker

    2016-08-01

    Global ocean models with an isopycnic vertical coordinate are advantageous in representing overflows, as they do not suffer from topography-induced spurious numerical mixing commonly seen in geopotential coordinate models. In this paper, we present a quantitative diagnosis of the Nordic Seas overflows in four configurations of the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) family that features an isopycnic ocean model. For intercomparison, two coupled ocean-sea ice and two fully coupled (atmosphere-land-ocean-sea ice) experiments are considered. Each pair consists of a (non-eddying) 1° and a (eddy-permitting) 1/4° horizontal resolution ocean model. In all experiments, overflow waters remain dense and descend to the deep basins, entraining ambient water en route. Results from the 1/4° pair show similar behavior in the overflows, whereas the 1° pair show distinct differences, including temperature/salinity properties, volume transport (Q), and large scale features such as the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The volume transport of the overflows and degree of entrainment are underestimated in the 1° experiments, whereas in the 1/4° experiments, there is a two-fold downstream increase in Q, which matches observations well. In contrast to the 1/4° experiments, the coarse 1° experiments do not capture the inclined isopycnals of the overflows or the western boundary current off the Flemish Cap. In all experiments, the pathway of the Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water is misrepresented: a major fraction of the overflow proceeds southward into the West European Basin, instead of turning westward into the Irminger Sea. This discrepancy is attributed to excessive production of Labrador Sea Water in the model. The mean state and variability of the Nordic Seas overflows have significant consequences on the response of the AMOC, hence their correct representations are of vital importance in global ocean and climate modelling.

  13. Global Troposphere Experiment Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandy, Alan R.; Thornton, Donald C.

    1997-01-01

    For the Global Troposphere Experiment project Pacific Exploratory Measurements West B (PEM West B), we made determinations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with isotopically labelled internal standards. This technique provides measurements with precision of 1 part-per-trillion by volume below 20 pptv and 1% above 20 pptv. Measurement of DMS and SO2 were performed with a time cycle of 5-6 minutes with intermittent zero checks. The detection limits were about 1 pptv for SO2 and 2 pptv for DMS. Over 700 measurements of each compound were made in flight. Volcanic impacts on the upper troposphere were again found as a result of deep convection in the tropics. Extensive emission of SO2 from the Pacific Rim land masses were primarily observed in the lower well-mixed part of the boundary layer but also in the upper part of the boundary layer. Analyses of the SO2 data with aerosol sulfate, beryllium-7, and lead-210 indicated that SO2, contributed to half or more of the observed total oxidized sulfur (SO2 plus aerosol sulfate) in free tropospheric air. Cloud processing and rain appeared to be responsible for lower SO2 levels between 3 and 8.5 km than above or below this region. During both phases of PEM-West, dimethyl sulfide did not appear to be a major source of sulfur dioxide in the upper free troposphere over the western Pacific Ocean. In 1991 the sources Of SO2 at high altitude appeared to be both anthropogenic and volcanic with an estimated 1% being solely from DMS. The primary difference for the increase in the DMS source was the very low concentration of SO2 at high altitude. In the midlatitude region near the Asian land masses, DMS in the mixed layer was lower than in the tropical region of the western Pacific. Convective cloud systems near volcanoes in the tropical convergence in the western Pacific troposphere were a major source of SO2 at high altitudes during PEM-West B. High levels of SO2 were

  14. Spatial dynamics in the experience economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Anne Birte; Topsø Larsen, Karin; Schrøder, Lise

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. What is the experience economy? The experience economy and innovation. The experience economy and governance. The experience economy, space and place......Introduction. What is the experience economy? The experience economy and innovation. The experience economy and governance. The experience economy, space and place...

  15. Provenance of e-Science Experiments - experience from Bioinformatics

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwood, M.; Goble, C.A.; Stevens, R. D.; Zhao, J.(Central China Normal University (HZNU), Wuhan, 430079, China); Addis, M; Marvin, D; Moreau, L; Oinn, T.

    2003-01-01

    Like experiments performed at a laboratory bench, the data associated with an e-Science experiment are of reduced value if other scientists are not able to identify the origin, or provenance, of those data. Provenance information is essential if experiments are to be validated and verified by others, or even by those who originally performed them. In this article, we give an overview of our initial work on the provenance of bioinformatics e-Science experiments within myGrid. We use two kinds ...

  16. Enthusiastic Teachers, Vivid Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    2000-04-01

    ascination with materials and chemical change is a hallmark of chemists, and it is also an important pedagogical tool. A fringe benefit of editing JCE is that I encounter so many nice people who send interesting and helpful communications. One of the first of these to cross my desk this year was from E. J. Behrman, who recommended that I read and call to your attention "Brilliant Light: A Chemical Boyhood" by Oliver Sacks, noted neurologist and author. It appeared in the December 20, 1999, issue of The New Yorker and is well worth your time and effort to find and read. Sacks's reminiscence of his boyhood interest in chemistry is fascinating. His obvious love of our science is inspiring. And he has expressed both in words that are brilliantly chosen and a joy to read. In a profile of Sacks that appeared in Chemical and Engineering News (January 10, 2000), Madeleine Jacobs relates that he is writing a book on his boyhood encounters with chemistry (to be published by Alfred A. Knopf). I am looking forward to that with great anticipation. During 1999 he also wrote an article on the periodic table in the New York Times Magazine (April 18) and an op-ed piece on chemistry sets in the New York Times (May 13). In the latter he describes how hard it is these days for a nonchemist, especially a young one, to obtain chemicals to experiment with. Chemistry sets are not what they used to be! Sacks's writings contain important messages for all of us who teach chemistry and all who are involved in piquing students' interest in our subject. A brief excerpt from his New Yorker article illustrates my point. I knew zinc--the dull, slightly bluish birdbath in the garden was made of zinc--and tin, from the heavy tinfoil in which sandwiches were wrapped for a picnic. My mother showed me that when tin or zinc was bent it uttered a special "cry." "It's due to deformation of the crystal structure," she said, forgetting that I was five and could not understand her--and yet her words made me

  17. OSMOSE experiment representativity studies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliberti, G.; Klann, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-10-10

    leads to a uniform well-behaved system so that the reactor configuration is in the fundamental mode. In fact, an important property of the oscillation experiments performed in the OSMOSE program is that the neutron flux at the sample location has reached the asymptotic fundamental mode of the MINERVE lattice. This property allows the use of simple spatial methods for the analysis (e.g. a lattice code with axial buckling representing the leakage), without loss of accuracy. The computational challenge is then reduced to the need of an appropriate cross-section processing and of accurate resonance shielding algorithms. In the present study, calculations have been performed to investigate the similarity of the flux spectra at the sample position of different OSMOSE configurations with the neutron energy distributions characterizing existing thermal and fast reactors proposed under the advanced reactor programs Gen-IV, GNEP and NGNP.

  18. Simulator experiments: effects of NPP operator experience on performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beare, A.N.; Gray, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    During the FY83 research, a simulator experiment was conducted at the control room simulator for a GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) NPP. The research subjects were licensed operators undergoing requalification training and shift technical advisors (STAs). This experiment was designed to investigate the effects of senior reactor operator (SRO) experience, operating crew augmentation with an STA and practice, as a crew, upon crew and individual operator performance, in response to anticipated plant transients. Sixteen two-man crews of licensed operators were employed in a 2 x 2 factorial design. The SROs leading the crews were split into high and low experience groups on the basis of their years of experience as an SRO. One half of the high- and low-SRO experience groups were assisted by an STA. The crews responded to four simulated plant casualties. A five-variable set of content-referenced performance measures was derived from task analyses of the procedurally correct responses to the four casualties. System parameters and control manipulations were recorded by the computer controlling the simulator. Data on communications and procedure use were obtained from analysis of videotapes of the exercises. Questionnaires were used to collect subject biographical information and data on subjective workload during each simulated casualty. For four of the five performance measures, no significant differences were found between groups led by high (25 to 114 months) and low (1 to 17 months as an SRO) experience SROs. However, crews led by low experience SROs tended to have significantly shorter task performance times than crews led by high experience SROs. The presence of the STA had no significant effect on overall team performance in responding to the four simulated casualties. The FY84 experiments are a partial replication and extension of the FY83 experiment, but with PWR operators and simulator.

  19. Innovative science experiments using Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. P. Ajith; Satyanarayana, V. V. V.; Singh, Kundan; Singh, Parmanand

    2009-09-01

    A simple, flexible and very low cost hardware plus software framework for developing computer-interfaced science experiments is presented. It can be used for developing computer-interfaced science experiments without getting into the details of electronics or computer programming. For developing experiments this is a middle path between push-button systems and the develop-from-scratch approach. Emphasis is on leveraging the power of personal computers for experiment control, data acquisition and the mathematical analysis of data. The language 'Python' is chosen for data acquisition and analysis. This article explains the architecture of Phoenix (Physics with Home-made Equipment and Innovative Experiments) along with some sample experiments. The hardware design is open and the project is totally based on free software.

  20. Data analysis for electronic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this lecture I schell attempt to cover the principal off-line software aspects in electronic experiments. Of course, this is too ambitious an undertaking for two reasons: Firstly the field is vast, and some important aspect will certainly have escaped my attention. Secondly, the choice of methods, features, algorithms, and packages presented will be biased through my personal opinion and experience, although to some extent it is influenced as well by the opinion and experience of my colleagues, who, like myself, are working in this field at CERN. Therefore, beware. Whenever I shall claim something to be evident, a matter of experience -- a fact --it ain't necessarily so. On the other hand, it will not be entirely wrong, since our experience is based on something like 30 experiments in high-energy physics using electronic for other people, and although these people are of course misled, one has to admit their existence. (orig.)

  1. Dashboard for the LHC experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, J.; Belov, S.; Berejnoj, A.; Cirstoiu, C.; Chen, Y.; Chen, T.; Chiu, S.; Miguel, M. D. F. D.; Ivanchenko, A.; Gaidioz, B.; Herrala, J.; Janulis, M.; Kodolova, O.; Maier, G.; Maguire, E. J.; Munro, C.; Rivera, R. P.; Rocha, R.; Saiz, P.; Sidorova, I.; Tsai, F.; Tikhonenko, E.; Urbah, E.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present the Experiment Dashboard monitoring system, which is currently in use by four Large Hadron Collider (LHC)[1] experiments. The goal of the Experiment Dashboard is to monitor the activities of the LHC experiments on the distributed infrastructure, providing monitoring data from the virtual organization (VO) and user perspectives. The LHC experiments are using various Grid infrastructures (LCG[2]/EGEE[3], OSG[4], NDGF[5]) with correspondingly various middleware flavors and job submission methods. Providing a uniform and complete view of various activities like job processing, data movement and publishing, access to distributed databases regardless of the underlying Grid flavor is the challenging task. In this paper we will describe the Experiment Dashboard concept, its framework and main monitoring applications.

  2. Dashboard for the LHC experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present the Experiment Dashboard monitoring system, which is currently in use by four Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments. The goal of the Experiment Dashboard is to monitor the activities of the LHC experiments on the distributed infrastructure, providing monitoring data from the virtual organization (VO) and user perspectives. The LHC experiments are using various Grid infrastructures (LCG/EGEE, OSG, NDGF) with correspondingly various middleware flavors and job submission methods. Providing a uniform and complete view of various activities like job processing, data movement and publishing, access to distributed databases regardless of the underlying Grid flavor is the challenging task. In this paper we will describe the Experiment Dashboard concept, its framework and main monitoring applications

  3. Authoring Immersive Mixed Reality Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misker, Jan M. V.; van der Ster, Jelle

    Creating a mixed reality experience is a complicated endeavour. From our practice as a media lab in the artistic domain we found that engineering is “only” a first step in creating a mixed reality experience. Designing the appearance and directing the user experience are equally important for creating an engaging, immersive experience. We found that mixed reality artworks provide a very good test bed for studying these topics. This chapter details three steps required for authoring mixed reality experiences: engineering, designing and directing. We will describe a platform (VGE) for creating mixed reality environments that incorporates these steps. A case study (EI4) is presented in which this platform was used to not only engineer the system, but in which an artist was given the freedom to explore the artistic merits of mixed reality as an artistic medium, which involved areas such as the look and feel, multimodal experience and interaction, immersion as a subjective emotion and game play scenarios.

  4. Status of the GERDA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GERDA experiment is being built in the LNGS underground laboratories for the search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Phase I of the experiment GERDA will be able to test the claim of observation of the neutrinoless double beta decay. In a second phase newly developed detectors will be added aiming to a total exposure of 100 kg yr. Status of the experiment and first results from segmented detectors operated in cryogenic liquid are presented.

  5. Experiments at CERN in 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of the current experimental programme at CERN. The experiments listed are being performed at one of the following machines: The Super Proton Synchrotron, the Proton Synchrotron and the Synchro-Cyclotron. The four experiments planned for the Large Electron Positron machine are also listed. Each experiment is briefly described and a schematic layout of its apparatus is included, together with lists of participants and institutions. (orig./HSI)

  6. Trust and Financial Crisis Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Carin van der Cruijsen; Jakob De Haan; David-Jan Jansen

    2013-01-01

    Using eight annual surveys from the Netherlands between 2006 and 2013, we examine whether financial crisis experiences affect trust in banks, trust in the banking supervisor, and generalized trust. Adverse experiences during the financial crisis do not only directly lower trust in banks, but also have a negative effect on generalized trust. Customers of a bank that ran into problems have less trust in banks than respondents without this experience. Our results also indicate that respondents w...

  7. Volunteers in the experience economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudiksen, Sune Klok

    2012-01-01

    and discussed. The Questions addressed is how to enlist, motivate and reward volunteers a long the way and how to manage and guide volunteers. Furthermore what kind of special relationship does the volunteer have in the making of the experience design and in the experience of that design. This paper combines...... theories from psychology about motivational factors, game theories about rewards, business model theory about crowdsourcing and crowdfunding, user and customer experience theory with 25 interviews with experienced industry experts limited to the cultural sector and with relation to experience economy...

  8. Designing experiments through compressed sensing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-06-01

    In the following paper, we discuss how to design an ensemble of experiments through the use of compressed sensing. Specifically, we show how to conduct a small number of physical experiments and then use compressed sensing to reconstruct a larger set of data. In order to accomplish this, we organize our results into four sections. We begin by extending the theory of compressed sensing to a finite product of Hilbert spaces. Then, we show how these results apply to experiment design. Next, we develop an efficient reconstruction algorithm that allows us to reconstruct experimental data projected onto a finite element basis. Finally, we verify our approach with two computational experiments.

  9. Evaluation of Saxton critical experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Noh, Jae Man; Jung, Hyung Guk; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Young Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    As a part of International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), SAXTON critical experiments were reevaluated. The effects of k{sub eff} of the uncertainties in experiment parameters, fuel rod characterization, soluble boron, critical water level, core structure, {sup 241}Am and {sup 241}Pu isotope number densities, random pitch error, duplicated experiment, axial fuel position, model simplification, etc., were evaluated and added in benchmark-model k{sub eff}. In addition to detailed model, the simplified model for Saxton critical experiments was constructed by omitting the top, middle, and bottom grids and ignoring the fuel above water. 6 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs. (Author)

  10. Experiment prediction for Loft Nonnuclear Experiment L1-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer analysis, using the WHAM and RELAP4 computer codes, was performed to predict the LOFT system thermal-hydraulic response for Experiment L1-4 of the nonnuclear (isothermal) test series. Experiment L1-4 will simulate a 200 percent double-ended offset shear in the cold leg of a four-loop large pressurized water reactor. A core simulator will be used to provide a reactor vessel pressure drop representative of the LOFT nuclear core. Experiment L1-4 will be initiated with a nominal isothermal primary coolant temperature of 282.20C, a pressurizer pressure of 15.51 MPa, and a primary coolant flow of 270.9 kg/s. In general, the predictions of saturated blowdown for Experiment Ll-4 are consistent with the expected system behavior, and predicted trends agree with results from Semiscale Test S-01-4A, which simulated the Ll-4 experiment conditions

  11. DHS Research Experience Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatachalam, V

    2008-10-24

    I learned a great deal during my summer internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). I plan to continue a career in research, and I feel that my experience at LLNL has been formative. I was exposed to a new area of research, as part of the Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) group, and I had the opportunity to work on projects that I would not have been able to work on anywhere else. The projects both involved the use of a novel mass spectrometer that was developed at LLNL, so I would not have been able to do this research at any other facility. The first project that Zachary and I worked on involved using SPAMS to detect pesticides. The ability to rapidly detect pesticides in a variety of matrices is applicable to many fields including public health, homeland security, and environmental protection. Real-time, or near real-time, detection of potentially harmful or toxic chemical agents can offer significant advantages in the protection of public health from accidental or intentional releases of harmful pesticides, and can help to monitor the environmental effects of controlled releases of pesticides for pest control purposes. The use of organophosphate neurotoxins by terrorists is a possibility that has been described; this is a legitimate threat, considering the ease of access, toxicity, and relatively low cost of these substances. Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) has successfully been used to identify a wide array of chemical compounds, including drugs, high explosives, biological materials, and chemical warfare agent simulants. Much of this groundbreaking work was carried out by our group at LLNL. In our work, we had the chance to show that SPAMS fulfills a demonstrated need for a method of carrying out real-time pesticide detection with minimal sample preparation. We did this by using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer to obtain spectra of five different pesticides. Pesticide samples were chosen to

  12. Welcome to the experience economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, B J; Gilmore, J H

    1998-01-01

    First there was agriculture, then manufactured goods, and eventually services. Each change represented a step up in economic value--a way for producers to distinguish their products from increasingly undifferentiated competitive offerings. Now, as services are in their turn becoming commoditized, companies are looking for the next higher value in an economic offering. Leading-edge companies are finding that it lies in staging experiences. To reach this higher level of competition, companies will have to learn how to design, sell, and deliver experiences that customers will readily pay for. An experience occurs when a company uses services as the stage--and goods as props--for engaging individuals in a way that creates a memorable event. And while experiences have always been at the heart of the entertainment business, any company stages an experience when it engages customers in a personal, memorable way. The lessons of pioneering experience providers, including the Walt Disney Company, can help companies learn how to compete in the experience economy. The authors offer five design principles that drive the creation of memorable experiences. First, create a consistent theme, one that resonates throughout the entire experience. Second, layer the theme with positive cues--for example, easy-to-follow signs. Third, eliminate negative cues, those visual or aural messages that distract or contradict the theme. Fourth, offer memorabilia that commemorate the experience for the user. Finally, engage all five senses--through sights, sounds, and so on--to heighten the experience and thus make it more memorable. PMID:10181589

  13. An Undergraduate Column Chromatography Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danot, M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for an experiment designed to introduce undergraduate students to the theoretical and technical aspects of column chromatography. The experiment can also be shortened to serve as a demonstration of the column chromatography technique. (JN)

  14. Pharmacology Experiments on the Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    A computer program that replaces a set of pharmacology and physiology laboratory experiments on live animals or isolated organs is described and illustrated. Five experiments are simulated: dose-effect relationships on smooth muscle, blood pressure and catecholamines, neuromuscular signal transmission, acetylcholine and the circulation, and…

  15. LCA Experiences in Danish Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole; Christensen, Per

    1999-01-01

    A study on Danish industry's experiences with LCA has been performed. Twenty-six enter-prises from different sectors filled in a questionnaire. The enterprises are still in an adoption and learning phase and experiences with full-blown LCA's are sparse. Expectations of future market pressure...

  16. NATO: In-orbit experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capulli, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    The performance of the NATO-111-A and NATO 111-B satellite battery is reported. The electrical power subsystem is briefly described. The electrical characteristics and the reconditioning experience of the batteries is cited. The in-orbit experience is compared with results of preflight accelerated life tests.

  17. Experience economy brimming with potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming; Sundbo, Jon

    2014-01-01

    In these days of economic uncertainty, businesses ought to make better use of recent research into the experience economy. Perhaps co-creation and individualisation can save us from the crisis, argue the editors of a new book about the latest research into the experience economy....

  18. Kaliski's explosive driven fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment performed by a group in Poland on the production of DD fusion neutrons by purely explosive means is discussed. A method for multiplying shock velocities ordinarily available from high explosives by a factor of ten is described, and its application to DD fusion experiments is discussed

  19. An Accounting International Experience Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Leigh Redd; Rudolph, Holly R.; Seay, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Accounting students need practical opportunities to personally experience other cultures and international business practices if they are to effectively compete in today's global marketplace. In order to address this need, the Department of Accounting at Murray State University offers an international experience course which includes a short-term…

  20. Axion experiment makes its debut

    CERN Multimedia

    Dumé, Belle

    2004-01-01

    An experiment built from components recycled from other experiments has put new limits on the properties of particles that might be the "dark matter" that makes up about 25% of the universe. The CERN Axion Solar telescope (CAST) was built to search for exotic particles called axions that might be produced inside the sun (1 page)

  1. Crucial Experiments in Quantum Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigg, George L.

    The six experiments included in this monography are titled Blackbody Radiation, Collision of Electrons with Atoms, The Photoelectric Effect, Magnetic Properties of Atoms, The Scattering of X-Rays, and Diffraction of Electrons by a Crystal Lattice. The discussion provides historical background by giving description of the original experiments and…

  2. Experiences on IGSCC crack manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veron, P. [Equipos Nucleares, S.A., Maliano (Spain)

    1997-02-01

    The author presents his experience in manufacturing IGSCC realistic defects, mainly in INCONEL 600 MA Steam Generator Tubes. From that experience he extracts some knowledge about this cracking (influence of chemistry in the environment, stress state, crack growth rate, and occurrence in laboratory condition of break before leak).

  3. Experimenting with Inexpensive Plastic Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Leander; Marques, Adriana; Sánchez, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Acommon undergraduate laboratory experience is the determination of the elastic constant of a spring, whether studying the elongation under a static load or studying the damped harmonic motion of the spring with a suspended mass. An alternative approach to this laboratory experience has been suggested by Menezes et al., aimed at studying the…

  4. Price Discrimination: A Classroom Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiló, Paula; Sard, Maria; Tugores, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a classroom experiment aimed at familiarizing students with different types of price discrimination (first-, second-, and third-degree price discrimination). During the experiment, the students were asked to decide what tariffs to set as monopolists for each of the price discrimination scenarios under…

  5. Experimenting with Brass Musical Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Describes experiments to address the properties of brass musical instruments that can be used to demonstrate sound in any level physics course. The experiments demonstrate in a quantitative fashion the effects of the mouthpiece and bell on the frequencies of sound waves and thus the musical pitches produced. (Author/NB)

  6. Work, Experience and Adult Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2006-01-01

    A presentation and discussion of the theories of work, experience and adult education developed by the German philosopher and sociologist Oskar Negt.......A presentation and discussion of the theories of work, experience and adult education developed by the German philosopher and sociologist Oskar Negt....

  7. Scyllac ''derated'' feedback sector experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 1200 sector of the Scyllac torus was ''derated'' for feedback stabilization experiments to reduce the m = 1 instability growth rates to values which are compatible with the response time of the feedback system. Initial plasma studies are given and compared with the predictions of an MHD model. Plasma stabilization experiments are reported. (U.S.)

  8. Two Computer-Assisted Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Two computer-assisted experiments are described: (i) determination of the speed of ultrasound waves in water and (ii) measurement of the thermal expansion of an aluminum-based alloy. A new data-acquisition system developed by PASCO scientific is used. In both experiments, the "Keep" mode of recording data is employed: the data are…

  9. Occupational Experience, Mobility, and Wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groes, Fane

    . In a sample of full time private employed, the first five years of experience in an occupation increases average wages with 8% to 15%, conditional on rm and industry tenure. We further show that the probability of switching occupation declines with experience in the occupation and that the declining hazard...

  10. A Classroom Experiment on Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, Mary Mathewes; Hazlett, Denise; Ygosse Battisti, Jolanda E.

    2012-01-01

    This classroom experiment uses double oral auction credit markets to illustrate the role of banks as financial intermediaries. The experiment demonstrates how risk affects market interest rates in the presence of asymmetric information. It provides fodder for a discussion of the moral-hazard problem of deposit insurance and its impact on depositor…

  11. Remembered Experiences and Revisit Intentions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, Stuart; Mattsson, Jan; Sørensen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    path modelling, we examine the impact of positive affect tourist experiences on the development of revisit intentions. We find that longer-term remembered experiences have the strongest impact on revisit intentions, more so than predicted or immediate memory after an event. We also find that remembered...

  12. An Experiment on Wind Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Vincenzo; Fiordilino, Emilio; Gallitto, Aurelio Agliolo; Aglieco, Pasquale

    2012-01-01

    We discuss an experiment on wind energy performed with home-made apparatus. The experiment reproduces a laboratory windmill, which can pump water from a lower level to a higher one. By measuring the gain of the gravitational potential energy of the pumped water, one can determine the power extracted from the wind. The activity was carried out with…

  13. Defining and Measuring User Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Jan

    2006-01-01

    User experience is being used to denote what a user goes through while using a computerized system. The concept has gained momentum as a means to distinguish new types of applications such as games and entertainment software from more traditional work-related applications. This paper focuses...... definition of usability to develop the notion of user experience....

  14. Mystical experience in the lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marc Nicklas; Schjødt, Uffe; Nielbo, Kristoffer Laigaard;

    2014-01-01

    , our data indicate that the experiences reported by the participants had a high degree of authenticity and had lasting effects in terms of memory and attribution. These findings demonstrate that at least some forms of mystical experience can be studied in a controlled environment. Prospects...

  15. The theory of experience orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Legaard

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the theory of experience orientation, which builds on the division of experiences in two categories: Goal-oriented and Omni-oriented. The theory comes from preliminary studies of userexperiences in a work-context, where I have found this distinction to be beneficial. In this...

  16. Experiments with a data public

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Koed; Munk, Anders Kristian

    the public is already venting its frustrations, i.e. on social media? In this paper we consider our recent experience of being enrolled as data-Experts in a participatory democratic experiment that attempted to use Facebook to collectively envision the school of the future in the municipality of Aalborg....

  17. Stretching the Traditional Notion of Experiment in Computing: Explorative Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiaffonati, Viola

    2016-06-01

    Experimentation represents today a 'hot' topic in computing. If experiments made with the support of computers, such as computer simulations, have received increasing attention from philosophers of science and technology, questions such as "what does it mean to do experiments in computer science and engineering and what are their benefits?" emerged only recently as central in the debate over the disciplinary status of the discipline. In this work we aim at showing, also by means of paradigmatic examples, how the traditional notion of controlled experiment should be revised to take into account a part of the experimental practice in computing along the lines of experimentation as exploration. Taking inspiration from the discussion on exploratory experimentation in the philosophy of science-experimentation that is not theory-driven-we advance the idea of explorative experiments that, although not new, can contribute to enlarge the debate about the nature and role of experimental methods in computing. In order to further refine this concept we recast explorative experiments as socio-technical experiments, that test new technologies in their socio-technical contexts. We suggest that, when experiments are explorative, control should be intended in a posteriori form, in opposition to the a priori form that usually takes place in traditional experimental contexts. PMID:26018042

  18. Stretching the Traditional Notion of Experiment in Computing: Explorative Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiaffonati, Viola

    2016-06-01

    Experimentation represents today a 'hot' topic in computing. If experiments made with the support of computers, such as computer simulations, have received increasing attention from philosophers of science and technology, questions such as "what does it mean to do experiments in computer science and engineering and what are their benefits?" emerged only recently as central in the debate over the disciplinary status of the discipline. In this work we aim at showing, also by means of paradigmatic examples, how the traditional notion of controlled experiment should be revised to take into account a part of the experimental practice in computing along the lines of experimentation as exploration. Taking inspiration from the discussion on exploratory experimentation in the philosophy of science-experimentation that is not theory-driven-we advance the idea of explorative experiments that, although not new, can contribute to enlarge the debate about the nature and role of experimental methods in computing. In order to further refine this concept we recast explorative experiments as socio-technical experiments, that test new technologies in their socio-technical contexts. We suggest that, when experiments are explorative, control should be intended in a posteriori form, in opposition to the a priori form that usually takes place in traditional experimental contexts.

  19. The experience of living with fibromyalgia: confronting an invisible disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturge-Jacobs, Marilyn

    2002-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a complex, chronic, painful musculoskeletal syndrome which is characterized by extreme fatigue, disordered sleep, and other associated physical and cognitive problems. Because its etiology is unknown, and because no specific pathophysiological mechanisms have been found to underlie the syndrome, making a diagnosis is very difficult. FM adversely affects the quality of life, and the societal costs based on medical expenses, lost wages, lost tax revenue and compensation expenditures are very significant. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe and enhance the understanding of the experience of living with FM. The participants included nine women ranging in age from 30 years to 56 years who had been diagnosed with the condition for more than a year. Data were collected by means of unstructured interviews. Thematic analysis, using van Manen's (1990) methodology, identified eight themes: (a) pain-the constant presence, (b) fatigue-the invisible foe, (c) sleep-the impossible dream, (d) thinking of a frog (e) dealing with a flare-up, (f) longing for a normal life, (g) the power of naming-seeking a diagnosis, and (h) living within the boundaries. These themes were integral parts of the whole story, and through their interrelationships, the essence confronting an invisible disability was captured. The findings of this qualitative study have implications for nursing practice, education and research. It has become an increasing challenge for our health care system to adequately cope with the large numbers of persons diagnosed with chronic illnesses. Administrators of these systems can benefit from the information learned during this study. PMID:12371466

  20. The T2K experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Abgrall, N.; Aihara, H.; Ajima, Y.; Albert, J. B.; Allan, D.; Amaudruz, P.-A.; Andreopoulos, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anerella, M. D.; Angelsen, C.; Aoki, S.; Araoka, O.; Argyriades, J.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; de André, J. P. A. M.; Autiero, D.; Badertscher, A.; Ballester, O.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Baron, P.; Barr, G.; Bartoszek, L.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berns, H.; Bertram, I.; Besnier, M.; Beucher, J.; Beznosko, D.; Bhadra, S.; Birney, P.; Bishop, D.; Blackmore, E.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Bodek, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bouchez, J.; Boussuge, T.; Boyd, S. B.; Boyer, M.; Braam, N.; Bradford, R.; Bravar, A.; Briggs, K.; Brinson, J. D.; Bronner, C.; Brook-Roberge, D. G.; Bryant, M.; Buchanan, N.; Budd, H.; Cadabeschi, M.; Calland, R. G.; Calvet, D.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Carroll, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Carver, A.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cavata, C.; Cazes, A.; Cervera, A.; Charrier, J. P.; Chavez, C.; Choi, S.; Chollet, S.; Christodoulou, G.; Colas, P.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, W.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cooke, P.; Curioni, A.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, S.; Day, M.; De La Broise, X.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Debraine, A.; Delagnes, E.; Delbart, A.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dinh Tran, P.; Dobson, J.; Doornbos, J.; Dore, U.; Drapier, O.; Druillole, F.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Durkin, T.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziomba, M.; Ellison, B.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escallier, J. E.; Escudero, L.; Esposito, L. S.; Faszer, W.; Fechner, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finch, A.; Fisher, C.; Fitton, M.; Flight, R.; Forbush, D.; Frank, E.; Fransham, K.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Gallop, M.; Galymov, V.; Ganetis, G. L.; Gannaway, F. C.; Gaudin, A.; Gaweda, J.; Gendotti, A.; George, M.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Giomataris, I.; Giraud, J.; Ghosh, A. K.; Golan, T.; Goldhaber, M.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gomi, S.; Gonin, M.; Goyette, M.; Grant, A.; Grant, N.; Grañena, F.; Greenwood, S.; Gumplinger, P.; Guzowski, P.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamano, K.; Hansen, C.; Hara, T.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartfiel, B.; Hartz, M.; Haruyama, T.; Hasanen, R.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hastings, S.; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Hayashi, K.; Hayato, Y.; Haycock, T. D. J.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Henderson, R.; Herlant, S.; Higashi, N.; Hignight, J.; Hiraide, K.; Hirose, E.; Holeczek, J.; Honkanen, N.; Horikawa, S.; Hyndman, A.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Iida, M.; Ikeda, M.; Ilic, J.; Imber, J.; Ishida, T.; Ishihara, C.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iwasaki, M.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Joo, K. K.; Jover-Manas, G.; Jung, C. K.; Kaji, H.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kaneyuki, K.; Karlen, D.; Kasami, K.; Kasey, V.; Kato, I.; Kawamuko, H.; Kearns, E.; Kellet, L.; Khabibullin, M.; Khaleeq, M.; Khan, N.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, S.-B.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, B.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Kogan, G.; Koike, S.; Komorowski, T.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kouzuma, Y.; Kowalik, K.; Kravtsov, V.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kubota, J.; Kudenko, Y.; Kulkarni, N.; Kurchaninov, L.; Kurimoto, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kurosawa, Y.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Langstaff, R.; Laveder, M.; Lawson, T. B.; Le, P. T.; Le Coguie, A.; Le Ross, M.; Lee, K. P.; Lenckowski, M.; Licciardi, C.; Lim, I. T.; Lindner, T.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, G. D.; Lu, P.; Ludovici, L.; Lux, T.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Makida, Y.; Malafis, C. J.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marchionni, A.; Mark, C.; Marino, A. D.; Marone, A. J.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Maryon, T.; Marzec, J.; Masliah, P.; Mathie, E. L.; Matsumura, C.; Matsuoka, K.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; McLachlan, T.; Mercer, I.; Messina, M.; Metcalf, W.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Minvielle, R. E.; Mituka, G.; Miura, M.; Mizouchi, K.; Mols, J.-P.; Monfregola, L.; Monmarthe, E.; Moreau, F.; Morgan, B.; Moriyama, S.; Morris, D.; Muir, A.; Murakami, A.; Muratore, J. F.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagashima, G.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamoto, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Naples, D.; Nelson, B.; Nicholls, T. C.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishino, H.; Nitta, K.; Nizery, F.; Nowak, J. A.; Noy, M.; Obayashi, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Ohhata, H.; Okamura, T.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Ohlmann, C.; Olchanski, K.; Openshaw, R.; Oser, S. M.; Otani, M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Ozaki, T.; Pac, M. Y.; Palladino, V.; Paolone, V.; Paul, P.; Payne, D.; Pearce, G. F.; Pearson, C.; Perkin, J. D.; Pfleger, M.

    2011-12-01

    The T2K experiment is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. Its main goal is to measure the last unknown lepton sector mixing angle θ13 by observing νe appearance in a νμ beam. It also aims to make a precision measurement of the known oscillation parameters, Δm232 and sin22θ23, via νμ disappearance studies. Other goals of the experiment include various neutrino cross-section measurements and sterile neutrino searches. The experiment uses an intense proton beam generated by the J-PARC accelerator in Tokai, Japan, and is composed of a neutrino beamline, a near detector complex (ND280), and a far detector (Super-Kamiokande) located 295 km away from J-PARC. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the instrumentation aspect of the T2K experiment and a summary of the vital information for each subsystem.