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Sample records for capitis cepillo dental

  1. Evaluación de la eficacia de dos prescripciones de cepillos dentales en la remoción de placa bacteriana en pacientes ortodóncicos Evaluation of two toothbrushes prescriptions on the removal of plaque in patients with fixed orthodontic appliances

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    D Zúñiga García

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La aparatología empleada en los tratamientos de ortodoncia, favorece la retención de placa bacteriana y dificulta su eliminación por parte del paciente, aumentando el riesgo de desarrollar caries, manchas blancas y enfermedad periodontal. Diferentes cepillos dentales se han desarrollado para facilitar la mantención de una adecuada higiene oral en estos pacientes, sin embargo, se ha observado que los cepillos comunmente indicados (cepillo ortodóncico mas cepillo unipenacho, no siempre son bien manejados y difícilmente se usan ambos. El cepillo Cross Action Pro-Salud®, se ha presentado como una alternativa simple de usar y de transportar, por ser un único cepillo que combina las caracteristicas de los dos cepillos comunmente recomendados. Para evaluar la efectividad de este cepillo, en comparación con la prescripción convencional, se evaluaron 2 grupos, de 23 pacientes cada uno, portadores de aparatología fija. Un grupo utilizó la prescripción habitual y un segundo grupo utilizó cepillo Cross Action Pro-Salud®, por un período de 45 días. Los indices de higiene de O`leary, de placa en brackets y gingival modificado fueron registrados al inicio y 45 días después del uso diario de los cepillos antes mencionados. Se utilizó test-t para comparar los resultados obtenidos y se determinó que se produjo una disminución significativa en los tres indices de higiene, no existiendo diferencias en los resultados obtenidos entre ambas prescripciones. El cepillo Oral-B Cross-Action Pro-Salud® es una alternativa recomendable, ya que permite eliminar efectivamente la placa bacteriana en pacientes ortodónticos, y al ser un único cepillo, facilita y acorta el tiempo de cepillado.Orthodontic fixed appliances include elements that allow the accumulation of bacterial plaque, making tooth brushing more difficult and increasing the risk of developing caries, white spot lesions, and periodontal disease. Several toothbrushes designs have been

  2. Pediculosis capitis: An update

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    Bhushan Madke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Head louse infestation, or pediculosis capitis, caused by Pediculus humanus var. capitis, is a common health concern in pediatric age group. An itching of the scalp is the chief symptom, whereas presence of viable nits confirms the diagnosis of head louse infestation. Secondary bacterial infection with impetignization with cervical and occipital lymphadenopathy can complicate the clinical scenario with physician misdiagnosing pediculosis to a primary bacterial infection. Screening and treatment of all close contacts is necessary for an adequate management of pediculosis. Medical management of head louse infestation requires proper application of topical pediculicidal agents′, chiefly permethrin lotion and wet combing with a fine toothcomb. Severe cases with high parasitic load justify the use of either oral cotrimoxazole or Ivermectin. Other described technique involves a single application of hot air for 30 minutes. Radical but culturally unacceptable method would be shaving of scalp in resistant cases. Environmental fogging with insecticides is neither necessary nor recommended.

  3. Cepillo manual frente a eléctrico en el control mecánico de placa en pacientes con discapacidad intelectual: estudio clínico aleatorizado

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    García-Carrillo Cacho, Ana

    2016-01-01

    En la población con discapacidad intelectual (DI), antes denominada retraso mental, diferentes estudios han encontrado consistentemente que el estado de salud bucodental es peor: los sujetos con DI tienen una peor higiene oral y, por lo tanto, los niveles de placa son superiores en comparación con la población general. La hipótesis de este estudio clínico aleatorizado fue que los cepillos de dientes eléctricos podrían proporcionar mejores resultados clínicos, en comparación con los cepillos d...

  4. A TREATMENT FOR SEBORRHEA CAPITIS (CRADLE CAP).

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    BRODIE, H R

    1964-01-18

    Forty-eight infants with seborrhea capitis were treated with a preparation containing a polypeptide-fatty acid complex and tyrothricin in a propylene glycol vehicle, to determine if this material was non-toxic and if it was effective in the treatment of infantile seborrheic dermatitis. In this uncontrolled study, the preparation was effective in 45 of 48 infants so treated; a possible mild sensitivity reaction was observed in one infant. PMID:14118686

  5. Repellency against head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis).

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    Semmler, Margit; Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Al-Rasheid, Khaled; Klimpel, Sven; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2010-02-01

    The head louse problem increases at all levels of the international societies due to activities or life conditions that lead to often hair contacts among people. Lice occur exclusively on humans. Thus, they avoid dropping down from a head and therefore accept even a bad smelling hair of new a host. Due to this behaviour, there are only a few products on the markets which dare to claim a repellency activity that protects humans from infestation with head lice. The present study shows that a combination of an extract of the seeds of the plant Vitex agnus castus (monk pepper) and the compound paramenthan-3,8-diol (which is also found in some plants, e.g. Eucalyptus) act synergistically and are able to protect human hair for at least 7 h from invasion of head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis). The recently developed product containing both compounds is named Licatack Preventive Spray. PMID:20054562

  6. MYCOLOGICAL STUDY OF TINEA CAPITIS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Anjana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Tinea capitis is a superficial fungal infection of the hair follicle of scalp. The causative dermatophytes vary with social status and geographical distribution. The incidence is high in developing countries due to factors like poverty compounded by overcrowding, improper hygiene and illiteracy. Tinea capitis is the most common dermatophytes infection of childhood, especially in school going children. It is self-limiting disease of childhood and seldom extends beyond puberty. India being a tropical developing country with high temperature and humidity favours superficial cutaneous mycotic infections. The objective of this study was to isolate and identify the dermatophytes causing tinea capitis. METHOD A prospective study was conducted from July 2013 to August 2015. The study included 90 clinically suspected cases of tinea capitis. Among the 90 clinically suspected cases, 51 cases showed mycological evidence of fungal infection. The confirmed positive cases were then speciated based on their cultural morphology and microscopy. RESULTS Among the 51 culture positive cases - 20(39.21% Trichophyton rubrum, 14(27.45% Trichophyton mentagrophytes, 06(11.76% Trichophyton tonsurans, 05(9.8% Microsporum gypseum, 03(5.8% Microsporum canis, 02(3.92% Microsporum audouinii and 01(1.96% Trichophyton violaceum species were obtained. CONCLUSION Trichophyton species were found to be the major causative agents for tinea capitis

  7. Distribution of pathogenic microorganisms isolated from dental hospital workers in Korea

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    Su Jung Kim; ÅEHyun-Ja Jeong

    2013-01-01

    With the significant rise in hospital infection management in dental hospitals as well as in hospitals, and in order to identify the distribution of pathogenic bacteria on hands and nasal cavity of workers in a dental hospital, bacteria from the hands and nasal cavities of six dentists and 44 dental hygienists from four dental hospitals were investigated. The results showed Staphylococcus aureus (13), Staphylococcus capitis (1), Staphylococcus epidermidis (12), Staphylococcus hominis (4), Sta...

  8. Caries experience among adults exposed to low to moderate doses of ionizing irradiation in childhood - the Tinea Capitis Cohort

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    Yuval eVered

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available While the impact of therapeutic levels of ionizing radiation during childhood on dental defects has been documented, the possible effect of low doses on dental health is unknown. The study aims were to assess the association between childhood exposure to low-moderate doses of therapeutic radiation and caries experience among a cohort of adults 50 years following the exposure.The analysis was based on a sample of 253 irradiated (in the treatment of Tinea Capitis and 162 non-irradiated subjects. The DMFT (Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth index was assessed during a clinical dental examination and questions regarding dental care services utilization, oral hygiene behavior, current self-perceived mouth dryness, socio-demographic parameters and health behavior variables were obtained through a face to face interview.An ordered multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the association of the main independent variable (irradiation status and other relevant independent variables on the increase in DMFT.Mean caries experience levels (DMFT were 18.6+7.5 for irradiated subjects compared to 16.4+7.2 for the non-irradiated (p=0.002. Controlling for gender, age, education, income, smoking, dental visit in the last year and brushing teeth behavior, irradiation was associated with a 72% increased risk for higher DMFT level (95% CI 1.19-2.50. A quantification of the risk by dose absorbed in the salivary gland and in the thyroid gland showed adjusted ORs of 2.21 per 1Gy (95% CI 1.40-3.50 and 1.05 per 1cGy (95% CI 1.01-1.09, respectively.Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation (0.2-0.4Gy might be associated with late outcomes of dental health. In line with the guidelines of the American Dental Association, these results call for caution when using dental radiographs.

  9. Treatment of pediculosis capitis infested children with 1% permethrin shampoo in Turkey.

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    Yazar, Suleyman; Sahin, Izzet

    2005-10-01

    Pediculosis capitis (head lice) is an infestation that affects many children. Although, there are a number of different treatment modalities, at the present study, we investigated the efficacy of permethrin in the treatment of pediculosis capitis in children. This study was carried out in 3 village primary schools in the Kayseri region involving 185 of 712 school children infested with Pediculus humanus capitis during a survey conducted in March 2001. It was found that 173 (97.29%) of the 178 students who applied the prescribed medications were cured, indicating that interestingly 1% permethrin shampoo (Kwellada) is an effective and safe treatment choice for pediculosis capitis.

  10. The changing pattern of Tinea capitis in Jamaica.

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    East-Innis, A; Rainford, L; Dunwell, P; Barrett-Robinson, D; Nicholson, A M

    2006-03-01

    The species of dermatophyte fungi causing tinea capitis vary from country to country and may also change with time. This study was done to identify the predominant organisms causing tinea capitis in the Jamaican population. It was a retrospective study looking at all fungal culture requests to the Microbiology Department at the University Hospital of the West Indies during the period January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2002. The results showed a gradual switch from the dominance of Microsporum audouinii (61.5%) in 1998 to the dominance of Trichophyton tonsurans (85%) in 2002. The mean age was 8.6. Females constituted 55.7% of positive cases and males, 44.3%. PMID:16921700

  11. Tinea Capitis in Infants: Recognition, Evaluation, and Management Suggestions

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    Michaels, Brent D.; Del Rosso, James Q.

    2012-01-01

    Tinea capitis is a reasonably common infection among the pediatric population; however, it is still a relatively rare entity among infants less than one year of age. As such, a high index of suspicion is necessary for diagnosis among infants and an appropriate diagnostic work up should be employed in any case where a dermatophyte infection is suspected. Several methods are available for diagnosis. In addition, proper identification of the specific dermatophyte genera involved should be consid...

  12. Cytobrush-culture method to diagnose tinea capitis.

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    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Isa-Isa, Rafael; Araiza, Javier; Cruz, Cecilia; Hernández, Marco A; Ponce, Rosa Maria

    2007-06-01

    This is a comparative study to isolate the dermatophytes of tinea capitis using the cytobrush and comparing it versus the standard method. A prospective, observational, comparative trial of 178 probable cases of tinea capitis was conducted in two dermatological centers. Each patient underwent mycological tests that included direct exam with KOH and cultures with either of two methods: scraping the scalp to remove hair and cell debris, and the cytobrush. A total of 135 clinically and mycologically proven cases of tinea capitis were included; 119 were non-inflammatory and 16 inflammatory tinea. A total of 131 had a positive direct exam and subsequent primary isolation cultures were obtained in 135 cases. The main dermatophytes isolated were Microsporum canis (68%) and Trichophyton tonsurans (20%). A total of 115/135 (85.1%), were detected with the traditional method, with an average of 11.2 days until positive, while the number detected with the cytobrush was 132/135 (97.7%) with an average of 8.5 days until positive. The chi-square statistical method showed that the cytobrush culture was superior to the standard one with a chi-square of 5.078 (P = 0.025), with a statistically significant difference versus the standard method.

  13. An unusual presentation: trichomycosis (trichobacteriosis) capitis in an infant.

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    Takcı, Zennure; Karadağ, Ayşe Serap

    2014-01-01

    Trichomycosis (trichobacteriosis) is an asymptomatic superficial bacterial colonization of the hair shaft that is clinically characterized by pale yellowish, reddish or blackish sticky, cylindrical concretions surrounding the hair shaft in the axillary or pubic region. As far as we know, the first and only case of trichomycosis capitis was reported in a 8-year-old boy in 2011. We encountered no cases of trichomycosis in infancy in the literature. The current case displays an atypical presentation of trichobacteriosis involving head hair in a 10-month-old male infant. PMID:26388604

  14. Long term effects of exposure to ionizing irradiation on periodontal health status – the Tinea Capitis cohort study

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    Siegal eSadetzki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies among long term survivors of childhood cancer who had received high dose irradiation therapy of 4-60 Gy, demonstrated acute and chronic dental effects including periodontal diseases. However, the possible effects of low to moderate doses of radiation on dental health are sparse. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between childhood exposure to low-moderate doses of ionizing radiation and periodontal health following 50 years from the exposure. The study population included 253 irradiated subjects (treated for Tinea Capitis in the 1950s and, 162 non-irradiated subjects, treated for Tinea Capitis in the 1950s. The estimated dose to the teeth was 0.2-0.4Gy. Dental examination was performed according to the Community Periodontal Index (CPI. Socio-economic and health behavior variables were obtained through a personal questionnaire. Periodontal disease was operationally defined as deep periodontal pockets. A multivariate logistic regression model was used for the association of irradiation status and other independent variables with periodontal status.The results showed that among the irradiated subjects, 23% (95% CI 18%-28% demonstrated complete edentulousness or insufficient teeth for CPI scoring as compared to 13% (95% CI 8%-19% among the non-irradiated subjects (p=0.01. Periodontal disease was detected among 54% of the irradiated subjects as compared to 40% of the non-irradiated (p=0.008. Controlling for education and smoking, the ORs for the association between radiation and periodontal disease were 1.61 (95% CI 1.01-2.57 and 1.95 (95% CI 1.1-3.5 for ever never and per 1 Gy absorbed in the salivary gland, respectively. In line with other studies, a protective effect for periodontal diseases among those with high education and an increased risk for ever smokers were observed. In conclusion, childhood exposure to low-moderate doses of ionizing radiation might be associated with later outcomes of dental health. The

  15. On the efficacy of Co-trimoxazole as an oral treatment for pediculosis capitis infestation.

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    Morsy, T A; Ramadan, N I; Mahmoud, M S; Lashen, A H

    1996-04-01

    No doubt, pediculosis capitis or Pediculus h. capitis infestation is an increasing health problem particularly among Egyptian children. Many chemical pediculocides are used with a variety of effectiveness and side effects. Meanwhile, Co-trimoxazole (Trimethoprim and sulphamethoxazole) have shown some pediculocidal action. In this paper, Co-trimoxazole was given to patients infested with pediculosis capitis. Prolonged course was needed to free the patients from adult and nymphal stages but not the eggs (nits). The results were discussed. It was concluded that until the discovery of cheap, safe and effective oral drug, topical application of pediculocides as ointment or shampoo is the method of choice.

  16. Caries Experience among Adults Exposed to Low to Moderate Doses of Ionizing Radiation in Childhood – The Tinea Capitis Cohort

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    Vered, Yuval; Chetrit, Angela; Sgan-Cohen, Harold D.; Amitai, Tova; Mann, Jonathan; Even-Nir, Hadas; Sadetzki, Siegal

    2016-01-01

    While the impact of therapeutic levels of ionizing radiation during childhood on dental defects has been documented, the possible effect of low doses on dental health is unknown. The study aim was to assess the association between childhood exposure to low–moderate doses of therapeutic radiation and caries experience among a cohort of adults 50 years following the exposure. The analysis was based on a sample of 253 irradiated (in the treatment of tinea capitis) and 162 non-irradiated subjects. The decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) index was assessed during a clinical dental examination and questions regarding dental care services utilization, oral hygiene behavior, current self-perceived mouth dryness, socio-demographic parameters, and health behavior variables were obtained through a face-to-face interview. An ordered multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the association of the main independent variable (irradiation status) and other relevant independent variables on the increase in DMFT. Mean caries experience levels (DMFT) were 18.6 ± 7.5 for irradiated subjects compared to 16.4 ± 7.2 for the non-irradiated (p = 0.002). Controlling for gender, age, education, income, smoking, dental visit in the last year, and brushing teeth behavior, irradiation was associated with a 72% increased risk for higher DMFT level (95% CI: 1.19–2.50). A quantification of the risk by dose absorbed in the salivary gland and in the thyroid gland showed adjusted ORs of 2.21 per 1 Gy (95% CI: 1.40–3.50) and 1.05 per 1 cGy (95% CI: 1.01–1.09), respectively. Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation (0.2–0.4 Gy) might be associated with late outcomes of dental health. In line with the guidelines of the American Dental Association, these results call for caution when using dental radiographs. PMID:26942172

  17. Clinico-mycological study of tinea capitis in Pondicherry

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    Reddy BSN

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinico-mycological analysis of 68 consecutive clinically diagnosed tinea capitis patients confirmed that the disease affects more commonly prepubertal children of either sex. Salient clinical features in order of frequency included patchy hair loss, scaly patches, black dots and inflammatory lesions with erythema, vesiculation and boggy swelling. Scaly type (36.9% was the most commonly encountered clinical pattern followed by black dot (33.8% and kerion (29.3%. Direct microscopic examination of the affected hair with 20% KOH revealed evidence of fungus in all patients with endothrix (58.8% being the common pattern noted. The rate of culture positivity of the aetiologic fungus grown on Sabouraud′s dextrose agar medium was 82.3%. T. violaceum (66.2% was the most frequently isolated fungus accounting for both inflammatory as well as non-inflammatory lesions.

  18. A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Squalamine Ointment for tinea capitis Treatment

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    Coulibaly, Oumar; thera, mahamadou,; Koné, Abdoulaye; siaka, goita; Traoré, Pierre; Djimde, Abdoulaye; Brunel, Jean-Michel; Gaudart, Jean; Piarroux, Renaud; Doumbo, Ogobara; Ranque, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    International audience Background Novel treatments against for tinea capitis are needed, and the natural aminosterol squal-amine is a potential topical antidermatophyte drug candidate. Objectives This phase II randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial aimed at testing the efficacy and safety of a three-week squalamine ointment regimen for the treatment of tinea capitis. Patients Males aged 6–15 years presenting with tinea capitis were treated with either topical squal-amine...

  19. Prevalence of Tinea Capitis among School Children in Nok Community of Kaduna State, Nigeria.

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    Dogo, Josephine; Afegbua, Seniyat Larai; Dung, Edward Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the prevalence of tinea capitis, an infection of the scalp by dermatophytes, has increased in children worldwide. This cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence and risk factor of tinea capitis among school children in Nok community of Kaduna State, Nigeria. A total of 100 children were screened and 45% were diagnosed to have tinea capitis after fungal culture and microscopy. The prevalence of tinea capitis among girls was higher (51.4%) than that among boys (41.5%) but not significantly different (p = 0.402). The prevalence with respect to age was lower for the age group 5-10 years (42.6%) than that of 11-15 years (50%) but was not significantly different (p = 0.524). Trichophyton rubrum (28.8%) and Microsporum canis (22.7%) were the most prevalent dermatophytes isolated and the least were Trichophyton verrucosum (4.5%) and Trichophyton tonsurans (4.5%). There were 73.3% single infection while 26.7% had 2-4 dermatophytes of the genera Microsporum and Trichophyton. The predisposing factors with statistically significant association with tinea capitis were number of children in the family (p = 0.02) and sharing of the same bed (p = 0.002). This indicates the high tendencies of spread of tinea capitis through human-to-human mode of transmission and possible animal contact. Community health education on the cause, mode of transmission, prevention, and prompt treatment of tinea capitis is recommended. PMID:27471603

  20. Dental Amalgam

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    ... Devices Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... a discussion with your dentist. More in Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Alternatives to Dental Amalgam Related Resources ...

  1. Different trichoscopic features of tinea capitis and alopecia areata in pediatric patients.

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    El-Taweel, Abd-Elaziz; El-Esawy, Fatma; Abdel-Salam, Osama

    2014-01-01

    Background. Diagnosis of patchy hair loss in pediatric patients is often a matter of considerable debate among dermatologists. Trichoscopy is a rapid and noninvasive tool to detect more details of patchy hair loss. Like clinical dermatology, trichoscopy works parallel to the skin surface and perpendicular to the histological plane; like the histopathology, it thus allows the viewing of structures not discovered by the naked eye. Objective. Aiming to compare the different trichoscopic features of tinea capitis and alopecia areata in pediatric patients. Patients and Methods. This study included 40 patients, 20 patients with tinea capitis and 20 patients with alopecia areata. They were exposed toclinical examination, laboratory investigations (10% KOH and fungal culture), and trichoscope examination. Results. Our obtained results reported that, in tinea capitis patients, comma shaped hairs, corkscrew hairs, and zigzag shaped hairs are the diagnostic trichoscopic features of tinea capitis. While in alopecia areata patients, the most trichoscopic specific features were yellow dots, exclamation mark, and short vellus hairs. Conclusion. Trichoscopy can be used as a noninvasive tool for rapid diagnosis of tinea capitis and alopecia areata in pediatric patients. PMID:25024698

  2. Different Trichoscopic Features of Tinea Capitis and Alopecia Areata in Pediatric Patients

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    Abd-Elaziz El-Taweel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diagnosis of patchy hair loss in pediatric patients is often a matter of considerable debate among dermatologists. Trichoscopy is a rapid and noninvasive tool to detect more details of patchy hair loss. Like clinical dermatology, trichoscopy works parallel to the skin surface and perpendicular to the histological plane; like the histopathology, it thus allows the viewing of structures not discovered by the naked eye. Objective. Aiming to compare the different trichoscopic features of tinea capitis and alopecia areata in pediatric patients. Patients and Methods. This study included 40 patients, 20 patients with tinea capitis and 20 patients with alopecia areata. They were exposed toclinical examination, laboratory investigations (10% KOH and fungal culture, and trichoscope examination. Results. Our obtained results reported that, in tinea capitis patients, comma shaped hairs, corkscrew hairs, and zigzag shaped hairs are the diagnostic trichoscopic features of tinea capitis. While in alopecia areata patients, the most trichoscopic specific features were yellow dots, exclamation mark, and short vellus hairs. Conclusion. Trichoscopy can be used as a noninvasive tool for rapid diagnosis of tinea capitis and alopecia areata in pediatric patients.

  3. Tinea Capitis In Assuit Governorate (A Clinical and Mycological Study

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    Amer Abu El ­ Enin *, Mohamed Khedr** and Alaa Abu El-Ata

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Tinea capitis is a common condition seen by clinician in all setting through out the world. Several investigations of the various superficial mycosewere carried out in Egypt, but they were mainly confined to urban areas. In the present work, the predominant species causing dermatophtosis in Assuit Governorate were investigated, this is represented in rural and partially suburban communities. A clinical and mycological study was done for hundred patients attending the Dermatology Out-patient Clinic in Al- Azhar University Hospital in Assuit City. The ages of patient ranged from 3 to 20 years . 60% of cases were between 6-10 years of ages. Males were affected more than females in a ratio of 3: 1 60% of cases were from rural areas. Positive history of contact with animals was present in 40%. The most common clinical variety was scaly type 55% followed by black dot 22%, kerion 20%, and lastly favus 3%. Direct microscopic examination was + ve in 80% of cases. Positive culture results were obtained in 90% of cases. The results indicated that Zoophilic dermatophytes was the predominant causative species in these regions. Five dermatophytes were identified namely: M.canis was the most frequently isolated organism from the clinical varieties of dermatophytosis (55% . followed by T. violaceum (20%. T. rubrum 12.8% , M. gypseum (10% and lastly T.soudanense (2.2%.

  4. Epidemiology of Pediculus humanus capitis infestation in Malaysian school children.

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    Sinniah, B; Sinniah, D; Rajeswari, B

    1981-05-01

    A survey of 308,101 primary school children in Peninsular Malaysia conducted in 1979 by the School Health Services, Ministry of Health, Malaysia, revealed that 10.7% of children were infested with Pediculus humanus capitis. The prevalence rate was higher in the economically less advanced states of Terenganu (34%), Kelantan (23%), and Perlis (21%) than in the other states (4-13%). Of 14,233 school children examined in the State of Melaka, 26% of Indians, 18.7% of Malays, 6.1% of Europeans, and 0.7% of Chinese had pediculosis. The prevalence rate, which has remained unchanged over the past 5 years, does not appear to vary with age but is higher in children with long hair and those from the lower socioeconomic groups. Boys have a lower infestation rate than do girls. The higher incidence in Indians and Malays correlates well with their lower socioeconomic status in the community, and their cultural habit of maintaining longer hair than do the Chinese. The difference become less apparent in the higher socioeconomic groups. PMID:7258487

  5. Volume of the ligamentum capitis femoris in osteoarthritic hip joints of adult dogs

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    J.D. Mande

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Ventrodorsal pelvic radiographs were made of 32 adult dogs under general anaesthesia. The hip joints were evaluated according to the severity of osteoarthritic changes graded as 0, 1, 2 or 3. The dogs were euthanased, the hip joints opened and the ligamentum capitis femoris dissected out in toto. The volume of each ligament was determined using a water displacement technique and the mean volume compared to the four radiographic grades of osteoarthritis. There was an inverse correlation (r = -0.75 between the mean volume of the ligamentum capitis femoris and the increasing severity of osteoarthritis as assessed by radiography. The results confirmed the crucial role of radiography in the clinical evaluation of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis in the adult dog. Assessment of the volume of the ligamentum capitis femoris revealed that it is an important tool for research in canine hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis.

  6. Prophylactic Ketoconazole Shampoo for Tinea Capitis in a High-Risk Pediatric Population

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    Bookstaver, P. Brandon; Watson, Holly J.; Winters, Shauna D.; Carlson, Adrian L.; Schulz, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Although topical agents for the treatment of tinea capitis decrease viable fungal elements and reduce shedding, their use as a prophylactic agent has not been investigated. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a prophylactic ketoconazole shampoo (Nizoral 2%) protocol to reduce the number of clinically evident tinea capitis infections in a high-risk African American, urban population. METHODS We conducted a retrospective analysis of a ketoconazole prophylaxis protocol that was implemented at an urban pediatric clinic for medically fragile children. Patients at high risk for tinea capitis received twice-weekly ketoconazole shampoo. The primary outcome of the study was a reduction in the number of documented tinea capitis infections between the 12-month preprotocol and 12-month postprotocol periods. A secondary outcome included the evaluation of predisposing risk factors for acquiring tinea infections. RESULTS Ninety-seven patients, with a mean age of 8.06 years, were included. Most patients (78%) were African American. There were a total of 13 tinea capitis infections during the 12-month preprotocol period. During the 12-month postprotocol period, 41 infections were documented: 37 (90.2%) in the prophylaxis group and 4 (9.8%) in the nonprophylaxis group. The average numbers of per-patient infections in the postprotocol period were 0.79 and 0.08 in the prophylaxis and nonprophylaxis groups, respectively. Initiation of prophylaxis did not reduce tinea capitis infections (p=NS). Previous history of infection and a high level of care were significant predictors of infections (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Improved hygiene, adherence to prescribed treatment regimens, and prevention of recurrent environmental exposure to surviving fomites should be stressed in high-risk patients and supersede the need for an antifungal (ketoconazole shampoo) prophylaxis protocol. PMID:22479162

  7. Trichotillomania in a young male complicated by tinea capitis associated with Cryptococcus laurentii and Candida parapsilosis

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    Fellner MJ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Fellner Department of Dermatology, New York Medical College, New York, NY, USA Abstract: This is the first case report of tinea capitis associated with Cryptococcus laurentii as well as Candida parapsilosis in an eleven year old male which responded to treatments with griseofulvin, lamisil, as well as fluconazole only to show recurrent alopecia from an underlying problem of trichotillomania. When confronted with the biopsy diagnosis of trichotillomania, the family admitted knowledge of the hair pulling disorder for at least five years. It took three providers to finally solve the question of the recalcitrant alopecia. Keywords: tinea capitis, trichotillomania, lamisil, fluconazole, griseofulvin, cryptococcus laurentii, candida parapsilosis

  8. A Prevalence Study Of Pediculus Humanus Capitis Infestation Among Children In A Slum Area Of Pune.

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    Satyamoorthy T.S

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross â€" sectional study among 512 children in age group 0-15 years was carried out in an urban slum of Pune during Aug.84 to Feb. 85. The prevalence rate of Pediculus humanus capitis among the study population was found to be 35.15 percent. The prevalence was found to increase with age. Girls were affected more than boys. Living in nuclear families, schooling and possession of long hair were found to have significant association with the prevalence of Pediculus humanus capitis. The quality of personal hygiene per se did not alter the prevalence of head louse infestation.

  9. Long-Term Effects of Exposure to Ionizing Irradiation on Periodontal Health Status – The Tinea capitis Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadetzki, Siegal; Chetrit, Angela; Sgan-Cohen, Harold D.; Mann, Jonathan; Amitai, Tova; Even-Nir, Hadas; Vered, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Studies among long-term survivors of childhood cancer who had received high-dose irradiation therapy of 4–60 Gy, demonstrated acute and chronic dental effects, including periodontal diseases. However, the possible effects of low to moderate doses of radiation on dental health are sparse. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between childhood exposure to low–moderate doses of ionizing radiation and periodontal health following 50 years since exposure. The study population included 253 irradiated subjects (treated for Tinea capitis in the 1950s) and, 162 non-irradiated subjects. The estimated dose to the teeth was 0.2–0.4 Gy. Dental examination was performed according to the community periodontal index (CPI). Socioeconomic and health behavior variables were obtained through a personal questionnaire. Periodontal disease was operationally defined as “deep periodontal pockets.” A multivariate logistic regression model was used for the association of irradiation status and other independent variables with periodontal status. The results showed that among the irradiated subjects, 23%, (95% CI 18–28%) demonstrated complete edentulousness or insufficient teeth for CPI scoring as compared to 13% (95% CI 8–19%) among the non-irradiated subjects (p = 0.01). Periodontal disease was detected among 54% of the irradiated subjects as compared to 40% of the non-irradiated (p = 0.008). Controlling for education and smoking, the ORs for the association between radiation and periodontal disease were 1.61 (95% CI 1.01–2.57) and 1.95 (95% CI 1.1–3.5) for ever never and per 1 Gy absorbed in the salivary gland, respectively. In line with other studies, a protective effect for periodontal diseases among those with high education and an increased risk for ever smokers were observed. In conclusion, childhood exposure to low-moderate doses of ionizing radiation might be associated with later outcomes of dental health. The results add

  10. Distribution of pathogenic microorganisms isolated from dental hospital workers in Korea

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    Su Jung Kim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available With the significant rise in hospital infection management in dental hospitals as well as in hospitals, and in order to identify the distribution of pathogenic bacteria on hands and nasal cavity of workers in a dental hospital, bacteria from the hands and nasal cavities of six dentists and 44 dental hygienists from four dental hospitals were investigated. The results showed Staphylococcus aureus (13, Staphylococcus capitis (1, Staphylococcus epidermidis (12, Staphylococcus hominis (4, Staphylococcus warneri (3, Staphylococcus xylosus (14, Staphylococcus. Lugdunensis (1, and Neisseria spp. (2 were isolated from the nasal cavity and Staphylococcus aureus (9, Staphylococcus capitis (4, Staphylococcus epidermidis (16, Staphylococcus hominis (8, Staphylococcus warneri (5, Staphylococcus xylosus (22, Staphylococcus leutus (3, Micrococcus spp. (4, Staphylococcus cohnii (1, Serratia marcescens (2, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3, Klebsiella pneumonia (2 and Pseudomonas pneumotropica (1 from the hands. An antimicrobial disk diffusion test was conducted on Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the hands and nasal cavity to detect MRSA by means of oxacillin. Two strains were detected. When the genes of penicillin binding protein 2 (mecA were detected from the 2 strains, MRSA was found from both strains. The results of this investigation on the distribution of various pathogenic bacteria and MRSA on hands and nasal cavity of workers of a dental hospital, will contribute to the basic data for the future infection management in a dental hospital.

  11. Dermoscopy findings in tinea capitis: case report and literature review Achados dermatoscópicos na tinea capitis: relato de caso e revisão da literatura

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Maria Costa Pinheiro; Larissa Araujo Lobato; Tatiana Cristina Nogueira Varella

    2012-01-01

    Dermoscopy is a method of increasing importance in the diagnoses of cutaneous diseases. On the scalp, dermoscopic aspects have been described in psoriasis, lichen planus, seborrheic dermatitis and discoid lupus. We describe the "comma" and "corkscrew hair" dermoscopic aspects found in a child of skin type 4, with tinea capitis.A dermatoscopia é um método que ganha cada vez mais importância na diagnose de diversas dermatoses. No couro cabeludo, já foram descritos os aspectos dermatoscópicos pr...

  12. Patterns of attachment of the myodural bridge by the rectus capitis posterior minor muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Yu, Sheng-Bo; Li, Yun-Fei; Chi, Yan-Yan; Zheng, Nan; Gao, Hai-Bin; Luan, Bing-Yi; Zhang, Zhao-Xi; Sui, Hong-Jin

    2016-03-01

    The myodural bridge was first described by Hack in 1995 and was thought to be related to chronic cervicogenic headaches. For a long time, few studies revealed the patterns of the myodural bridge considering the rectus capitis posterior minor muscle. In this study, P45 plastination technology and anatomical dissection were performed on head specimens, and four different terminal region types of the rectus capitis posterior minor muscle were observed, including the posterior atlanto-occipital interspace, posterior arch of the atlas and posterior atlanto-axial interspace. We propose that the myodural complex structures in the posterior atlanto-occipital and posterior atlanto-axial interspace have cooperative effects on cerebrospinal fluid and work together. This force might be an important source for the circulation of cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:25859757

  13. Bioactivity of Argentinean Essential Oils Against Permethrin-Resistant Head Lice, Pediculus humanus capitis

    OpenAIRE

    Toloza, Ariel C; Zygadlo, Julio; Biurrun, Fernando; Rotman, Alicia; Picollo, María I

    2010-01-01

    Infestation with the head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae), is one of the most common parasitic infestation of humans worldwide. Traditionally, the main treatment for control of head lice is chemical control that is based in a wide variety of neurotoxic synthetic insecticides. The repeated overuse of these products has resulted in the selection of resistant populations of head lice. Thus, plant-derived insecticides, such as the essential oils seem to be goo...

  14. Intractable Occipital Neuralgia Caused by an Entrapment in the Semispinalis Capitis

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Byung-chul; Kim, Deok-Ryeong; Lee, Sang-Won

    2013-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a rare pain syndrome characterized by periodic lancinating pain involving the occipital nerve complex. We present a unique case of entrapment of the greater occipital nerve (GON) within the semispinalis capitis, which was thought to be the cause of occipital neuralgia. A 66-year-old woman with refractory left occipital neuralgia revealed an abnormally low-loop of the left posterior inferior cerebellar artery on the magnetic resonance imaging, suggesting possible vascula...

  15. Fluoroscopy and Sonographic Guided Injection of Obliquus Capitis Inferior Muscle in an Intractable Occipital Neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ok Sun; Jeong, Seung Min; Ro, Ji Young; Kim, Duck Kyoung; Koh, Young Cho; Ko, Young Sin; LIM, SO DUG; Shin, Hwa Yong; Kim, Hae Kyoung

    2010-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a form of headache that involves the posterior occiput in the greater or lesser occipital nerve distribution. Pain can be severe and persistent with conservative treatment. We present a case of intractable occipital neuralgia that conventional therapeutic modalities failed to ameliorate. We speculate that, in this case, the cause of headache could be the greater occipital nerve entrapment by the obliquus capitis inferior muscle. After steroid and local anesthetic inject...

  16. Trichotillomania in a young male complicated by tinea capitis associated with Cryptococcus laurentii and Candida parapsilosis

    OpenAIRE

    Fellner MJ

    2013-01-01

    Michael J Fellner Department of Dermatology, New York Medical College, New York, NY, USA Abstract: This is the first case report of tinea capitis associated with Cryptococcus laurentii as well as Candida parapsilosis in an eleven year old male which responded to treatments with griseofulvin, lamisil, as well as fluconazole only to show recurrent alopecia from an underlying problem of trichotillomania. When confronted with the biopsy diagnosis of trichotillomania, the family admitted knowledg...

  17. The potential application of plant essential oils to control Pediculus humanus capitis (Anoplura: Pediculidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, María Mercedes; Werdin-González, Jorge Omar; Stefanazzi, Natalia; Bras, Cristina; Ferrero, Adriana Alicia

    2016-02-01

    The human head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis (Anoplura: Pediculidae), is an ectoparasite confined to the scalp and human hairs. The repeated use of insecticides for the control of head lice during past decades has resulted in the development of marked levels of resistance. Natural compounds such as essential oils (EOs) have been suggested as alternative sources for insect control agents. In order to introduce a new pediculicide based on EOs, the effectiveness of the product and their effects on human being must be analyzed. In consequence, the biological activity of EOs from the leaves and fruits of Schinus areira (Anacardiaceae) and the leaves of Thymus vulgaris (Lamiaceae), Aloysia polystachya and Aloysia citriodora (Verbenacea) were evaluated against the eggs and adults of P. humanus capitis by fumigant and contact toxicity bioassays. Additionally, dermal corrosion/irritation tests were performed on New Zealand albino rabbits. In a fumigant bioassay, EOs from the leaves and fruits of S. areira were the most toxic against P. humanus capitis adults while these EOs and T. vulgaris were the most effective against the eggs. In contact bioassay, the EO from T. vulgaris was the most toxic against both stages. In the corrosion/irritation tests, the EOs did not produce dermal effects. According to the results, the essential oils from the leaves of T. vulgaris would be a valid tool for the management of P. humanus capitis. This EO produces a high knockdown effect in adults (followed by mortality) and toxicity in the eggs when it is applied for 21 min at a low concentration. PMID:26462802

  18. Prevalence of Tinea capitis infection among primary school children in a rural setting in south-west Nigeria

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    Olusola Ayanlowo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dermatophyte infection is a common skin disorder. Tinea capitis, infection of the scalp and hair shaft, is the most common dermatophytosis in children aged between six months and pre-pubertal age. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence, causative agents and to identify predisposing factors among primary school children in a rural community in Sagamu, Ogun state, Nigeria. This was a descriptive cross sectional study. Interviewer administered questionnaire was used. Following a physical examination, children with a clinical diagnosis of tinea capitis had scalp and hair scrapings for microscopy and culture. Tinea capitis was confirmed in 15.4%. Trichophyton mentagrophyte (51.7% and Microsporum aoudouinii (20.7% were the most prevalent organisms in this study. The most common predisposing factors were carrying of objects on the scalp; sharing of hair clippers, scissors, combs, towels and fomites. Low socioeconomic status coupled with overcrowding and poor hygiene was the major determinant of tinea capitis among the children. Tinea capitis remains a common infection among Nigerian school children. Health promotion and health education interventions are recommended to promote good hygiene, better living conditions, early identification and treatment.

  19. Dental Sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Internships for... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research ...

  20. Dermoscopy findings in tinea capitis: case report and literature review Achados dermatoscópicos na tinea capitis: relato de caso e revisão da literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Costa Pinheiro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dermoscopy is a method of increasing importance in the diagnoses of cutaneous diseases. On the scalp, dermoscopic aspects have been described in psoriasis, lichen planus, seborrheic dermatitis and discoid lupus. We describe the "comma" and "corkscrew hair" dermoscopic aspects found in a child of skin type 4, with tinea capitis.A dermatoscopia é um método que ganha cada vez mais importância na diagnose de diversas dermatoses. No couro cabeludo, já foram descritos os aspectos dermatoscópicos presentes na psoríase, no líquen plano, na dermatite seborréica e no lúpus discóide. Nós descrevemos padrão dermatoscópico de "cabelos em vírgula e em saca rolhas" encontrado em uma criança com fototipo 4, com tinha do couro cabeludo.

  1. Report of a patient with acne conglobata and perifolliculitis capitis abscedens et suffodiens

    OpenAIRE

    Mónica Lorena Cárdenas; Francisco López

    2011-01-01

    Perifoliculitis capitis abscedens et suffodiens, foliculitis disecante, celulitis disecante o enfermedad de Hoffman, es una condición inflamatoria rara, crónica, que afecta el escalpo de hombres jóvenes sobre todo de raza negra, caracterizada por aparición de nódulos y abscesos que drenan material purulento con formación de fístulas y trayectos, conduciendo finalmente a alopecia cicatrizal. En la actualidad se entiende esta entidad como un trastorno primario de la queratinización folicular, h...

  2. Análisis de la unión de la toxina Cry11Bb1 de bacillus thuringiensis subesp. Medellín a vesículas del epitelio en borde de cepillo del mosquito Aedes aegypti

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    Sergio Ordúz

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Las proteínas Cry11 son producidas por Bacillus thuringiensis, estas son potentes toxinas insecticidas contra larvas de mosquitos y su modo de acción se cree que es similar al de las toxinas del tipo Cry1, las cuales interactúan con el intestino medio de larvas de lepidópteros. En este trabajo, se estudió la interacción de la toxina de 94 kDa Cry11Bb de Bacillus thuringiensis subesp. medellin con el epitelio intestinal de larvas del mosquito Aedes aegypti utilizando vesículas de la membrana en borde de cepillo (VMBC. Un intermediario de la protoxina Cry11Bb de 68 kDa, y su forma activa 30/35 kDa se marcaron con Iodo-radioactivo e incubaron con las VMBC del mosquito. La protoxina marcada (125I-68 kDa interactuó específicamente con las vesículas y los experimentos de saturación en presencia de cantidades crecientes de vesículas mostraron que la interacción vesícula-125I-68 kDa fue saturable en el rango entre 10 a 80 ?g de VMBC. En contraste, la toxina marcada (125I-30/35 kDa no mostró ni unión específica, ni saturabilidad en la interacción. Adicionalmente, la toxina fue susceptible al ataque de las proteasas presentes en las vesículas y mediante la técnica de dynamic Light scattering, se evidenció que la toxina se presenta como un agregado proteico. Los resultados sugieren que la protoxina Cry11Bb de 68 kDa podría determinar la especificidad de la interacción y después de la unión ésta ser procesada hacia una forma funcional de 30/35 kDa capaz de interactuar con los lípidos de la membrana y generar, mediante la formación de poros, el desbalance osmótico que lleva a la muerte a las larvas de mosquitos.

  3. Report of a patient with acne conglobata and perifolliculitis capitis abscedens et suffodiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Lorena Cárdenas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Perifoliculitis capitis abscedens et suffodiens, foliculitis disecante, celulitis disecante o enfermedad de Hoffman, es una condición inflamatoria rara, crónica, que afecta el escalpo de hombres jóvenes sobre todo de raza negra, caracterizada por aparición de nódulos y abscesos que drenan material purulento con formación de fístulas y trayectos, conduciendo finalmente a alopecia cicatrizal. En la actualidad se entiende esta entidad como un trastorno primario de la queratinización folicular, haciendo parte de la tríada de oclusión folicular, consistente en la presencia de 3 ó 4 de las siguientes entidades: acné conglobata, perifoliculitis capitis abscedens et suffodiens, hidradenitis supurativa y quiste pilonidal. La tercera parte de los casos se asocia con acné conglobata como evento primario. Su manejo, frustrante durante muchos años, tiene nuevas esperanzas con el uso exitoso de isotretinoína y combinación de fármacos que intervienen cada uno de sus principios fisiopatológicos.

  4. [Treatment of pediculosis capitis in children with permethrin 1% shampoo or lotion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenone, H; Wiedmaier, G; Contreras, L

    1994-01-01

    A clinical and entomological trial was carried out in 88 head louse (Pediculus humanus capitis) infested children treated with a single dose of 1% permethrin shampoo or lotion. The sex distribution was 47 males an 41 females with ages ranging between 5 and 14 year olds. In order to assess the efficiency of treatments, search for adult forms, nymphs and eggs (nits) of the parasite was performed in each of the children, before and after treatment (30 minutes, 7 days and 21 days). The entomological evaluations consisted in stereoscopic and microscopic examinations of a mean of 12 hair samples taken from the retroauricular and occipital regions of each of the children, the biological condition of eggs, viable (immature, mature), dead and empty, was recorded. The cure rates--both clinical and entomological--obtained were 91.5% for shampoo and 95.2% for lotion. No adverse reactions with the two formulations used were reported. In conclusion, 1% permethrin shampoo or lotion in an effective and safe treatment for pediculosis capitis.

  5. Can neck exercises enhance the activation of the semispinalis cervicis relative to the splenius capitis at specific spinal levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomacher, Jochen; Erlenwein, Joachim; Dieterich, Angela; Petzke, Frank; Falla, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    The deep cervical extensor, semispinalis cervicis, displays changes in behaviour and structure in people with chronic neck pain yet there is limited knowledge on how activation of this muscle can be emphasized during training. Using intramuscular electromyography (EMG), this study investigated the activity of the deep semispinalis cervicis and the superficial splenius capitis muscle at two spinal levels (C2 and C5) in ten healthy volunteers during a series of neck exercises: 1. Traction and compression, 2. Resistance applied in either flexion or extension at the occiput, at the level of the vertebral arch of C1 and of C4, and 3. Maintaining the neck in neutral while inclined on the elbows, with and without resistance at C4. The ratio between semispinalis cervicis and the splenius capitis EMG amplitude was quantified as an indication of whether the exercise could emphasize the activation of the semispinalis cervicis muscle relative to the splenius capitis. Manual resistance applied in extension over the vertebral arch emphasized the activation of the semispinalis cervicis relative to the splenius capitis at the spinal level directly caudal to the site of resistance (ratio: 2.0 ± 1.1 measured at C5 with resistance at C4 and 2.1 ± 1.2 measured at C2 with resistance at C1). This study confirmed the possibility of emphasizing the activation of the semispinalis cervicis relative to the splenius capitis which may be relevant for targeted exercise interventions for this deep extensor muscle. Further studies are required to investigate the clinical efficacy of these exercises for people with neck pain. PMID:25935795

  6. Selection of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies in Staphylococcus capitis during growth under erythromycin stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bintao; Smooker, Peter M; Rouch, Duncan A; Deighton, Margaret A

    2016-08-01

    Accurate and reproducible measurement of gene transcription requires appropriate reference genes, which are stably expressed under different experimental conditions to provide normalization. Staphylococcus capitis is a human pathogen that produces biofilm under stress, such as imposed by antimicrobial agents. In this study, a set of five commonly used staphylococcal reference genes (gyrB, sodA, recA, tuf and rpoB) were systematically evaluated in two clinical isolates of Staphylococcus capitis (S. capitis subspecies urealyticus and capitis, respectively) under erythromycin stress in mid-log and stationary phases. Two public software programs (geNorm and NormFinder) and two manual calculation methods, reference residue normalization (RRN) and relative quantitative (RQ), were applied. The potential reference genes selected by the four algorithms were further validated by comparing the expression of a well-studied biofilm gene (icaA) with phenotypic biofilm formation in S. capitis under four different experimental conditions. The four methods differed considerably in their ability to predict the most suitable reference gene or gene combination for comparing icaA expression under different conditions. Under the conditions used here, the RQ method provided better selection of reference genes than the other three algorithms; however, this finding needs to be confirmed with a larger number of isolates. This study reinforces the need to assess the stability of reference genes for analysis of target gene expression under different conditions and the use of more than one algorithm in such studies. Although this work was conducted using a specific human pathogen, it emphasizes the importance of selecting suitable reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression more generally.

  7. The Prevalence of Pediculosis Capitis In Primary School Children In Assuit Governorate ( A Socioeconomic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Abu El Enin * and Ali Osman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in 2005 to determine the prevalence of pediculosis capitis and some risk factors among primary ­ school pupils in Assuit .We selected 1200 pupils (53% girls from primary schools by random sampling. Their hair was examined for head rate of infestation: 45 (3.8% were infected with lice, 43 (95.5% girls and 2 ( 4.5% boys. The highest louse of infestation was in 9 ­ years olds. There was a significant relationship between head louse infestation and sex ( P < 0.0001, age( P< 0.05 , parents education ( P<0.0001, father's job (P< 0.01, family size (P< 0.01, length of hair ( P< 0.0001 and having separate bathing facilities in the house (P< 0.0001.

  8. Acute osteomyelitis of the acetabulum induced by Staphylococcus capitis in a young athlete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Fukuda

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHOM of the acetabulum is a rare condition in children and usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus. We present an 11-year-old soccer athlete who suffered from acute osteomyelitis involving the acetabulum caused by S. capitis, a normal flora of the human skin but never reported in this condition. The disease was associated with repetitive skin injuries of the knee and potential osseous microtrauma of the hip joint by frequent rigorous exercise. This unusual case suggests that osseous microtrauma of the acetabulum, in addition to repetitive skin injuries, allowed normal skin flora to colonize to the ipsilateral acetabulum, which served as a favorable niche and subsequently led to AHOM.

  9. Report of a patient with acne conglobata and perifolliculitis capitis abscedens et suffodiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Lorena Cárdenas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Perifoliculitis capitis abscedens et suffodiens, dissecting folliculitis, dissecting cellulitis, or Hoffman disease is a rare, inflammatory and chronic condition, which affects the scalp of young black men, mainly characterized by the appearance of nodules and abscesses that drain purulent material with fistulas and pathways, leading ultimately to scarring alopecia. At present, this condition is defined as a primary disorder of follicular keratinization, being part of the triad or tetrad of follicular occlusion. One third of the cases are associated with acne conglobata as a primary event. Management, frustrating for many years, is promising with the successful use of isotretinoin and a combination of medications that intervene each of its physiopathological principles.

  10. The prevalence of Pediculus capitis among School Children in Fars Province, Southern Iran

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    R Neirami

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Pediculus capitis or head louse infestation affects millions of children worldwide, especially those in the 5-11 years age group. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of head pediculosis among school children in ur­ban and rural areas of Fars Province, southern Iran."nMethods: All school children of age 6-11 yr from both genders in all urban and rural areas of the province were screened for head louse infestation by examination of their hair and scalps. Parents of all infested children were also exam­ined. The study was repeated in different seasons in the same areas. Moreover, infested children were treated with 5% permethrin shampoo and re-examined one week later for any relapse."nResults: The general prevalence of head louse infestation in primary school students was 0.49% in autumn, 0.37% in win­ter and 0.20% in spring. In the mentioned seasons, the prevalence of P. capitis was higher among females and in ru­ral areas (P=0.001. Although treatment with permethrin shampoo failed in females, it was successful in all infected males from both regions in autumn and spring and in males from urban areas in winter."nConclusion: Head louse infestation is uncommon among Fars Province school children in rural and urban areas and should not be considered a public health priority. However, due to the higher prevalence of pediculosis in low socioeco­nomic group and rural area in our region, it seems that health promotion, particularly early detection and effec­tive management strategies should target this group in the province.

  11. Tinea capitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elewski BE, Hughey LC, Sobera JO, et al. Fungal diseases. In: Bolognia JL, Jorizzo JL, Schaffer JV, et ... chap 77. Hay RJ. Dermatophytosis and other superficial mycoses. In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R, eds. ...

  12. Jactatio capitis nocturna with persistence in adulthood: case report Jactatio capitis nocturna com persistência na vida adulta: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSANA S.C. ALVES

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic movement disorder, also known as jactatio capitis nocturna, is an infancy and childhood sleep-related disorder charactherized by repetitive movements occurring immediately prior to sleep onset and sustained into light sleep. We report a 19-year-old man with a history of headbanging and repetitive bodyrocking since infancy, occurring on a daily basis at sleep onset. He was born a premature baby but psychomotor milestones were unremarkable. Physical and neurological diagnostic workups were unremarkable. A hospital-based sleep study showed: total sleep time: 178 min; sleep efficiency index 35.8; sleep latency 65 min; REM latency 189 min. There were no respiratory events and head movements occurred at 4/min during wakefulness, stages 1 and 2 NREM sleep. No tonic or phasic electromyographic abnormalities were recorded during REM sleep. A clinical diagnosis of rhythmic movement disorder was performed on the basis of the clinical and sleep studies data. Clonazepam (0.5 mg/day and midazolam (15 mg/day yielded no clinical improvement. Imipramine (10 mg/day produced good clinical outcome. In summary, we report a RMD case with atypical clinical and therapeutical features.O distúrbio rítmico do movimento, também chamado jactatio capitis nocturna, é considerado um distúrbio do sono da infância e caracteriza-se por movimentos estereotipados que ocorrem no início ou no começo do sono. Relatamos o caso de um rapaz de 19 anos com história de movimentos rítmicos de cabeça e de balanceio do tronco desde lactente, sempre associados ao início do sono e de ocorrência diária. Tem antecedente de prematuridade mas com desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor normal. Seu exame físico geral e neurológico foram normais. O estudo polissonográfico hospitalar mostrou: tempo total de sono de 178 minutos, com eficiência de sono de 35,8%; latência de sono 65 minutos; e latência do sono REM 189 minutos. Não se observou apnéia e os movimentos de balanceio de

  13. Tinea capitis caused by Trichophyton tonsurans presenting as an obscure patchy hair loss due to daily antifungal shampoo use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sombatmaithai, Alita; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Tuchinda, Papapit; Surawan, Theetat; Muanprasart, Chanai; Matthapan, Lalita; Bunyaratavej, Sumanas

    2015-04-01

    Tinea capitis is unusual and often misdiagnosed in healthy adults. We report a case of a healthy woman with a several-year history of asymptomatic, bizarre-shaped, non-scarring alopecia. She had used over-the-counter ketoconazole shampoo regularly for a long time. An initial potassium hydroxide preparation showed negative result for fungal organism. The scalp biopsy revealed endothrix infection, and dermoscopic examination demonstrated the comma hair and corkscrew hair signs. The fungal culture showed Trichophyton tonsurans. The daily use of antifungal shampoo could be the important factor to conceal clinical and laboratory findings for diagnosis of T. tonsurans tinea capitis in our case, which required high clinical suspicion and histopathology and dermoscopic examinations. PMID:26114071

  14. Evaluation of resistance of commonly used antibiotics on clinical case of Staphylococcus capitis from Assir region, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazar M Abdalla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus capitis is a coagulase-negative species (CoNS of Staphylococcus. It causes antimicrobial resistance for nosocomial infections as well as for community-acquired infections. This case report involves a 51-year-old, married Saudi patient. He got admitted to the male medical ward of Aseer Central Hospital, with severe chest infection. Clinical examination, X-ray, and laboratory investigations were performed which involved bactech, culture media, antibiotic sensitivity test using disk diffusion [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC] and molecular [polymerase chain reaction (PCR] for detection of CoNS of Staphylococcus species and detection of the mecA gene. Laboratory data were recorded in special formats and analyzed by statistical computer program (SPSS. Results showed the resistance of isolated S. capitis to many commonly used antibiotics.

  15. An ultrastructural study on corkscrew hairs and cigarette-ash-shaped hairs observed by dermoscopy of tinea capitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mao; Ran, Yuping; Dai, Yaling; Lei, Song; Zhang, Chaoliang; Zhuang, Kaiwen; Hu, Wenying

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to explain the formation mechanisms of corkscrew hairs and cigarette-ash-shaped hairs observed by dermoscopy of tinea capitis. In the present work, the ultrastructure of the involved hairs collected from a girl with tinea capitis caused by Trichophyton violaceum was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). SEM observation of the corkscrew hair revealed bent hair shaft and asymmetrically disrupted cuticle layer. TEM findings demonstrated the hair shaft became weak. The corkscrew hairs closely covered by scales on the scalp were observed under dermoscopy. We speculate that the formation of corkscrew hairs is a result of a combination of internal damage due to hair degradation by T. violaceum and external resistance due to scales covering the hair. SEM observation of the cigarette-ash-shaped hair revealed irregularly disrupted and incompact end, which might represent the stump of the broken corkscrew hair after treatment. PMID:26301780

  16. Tinea capitis caused by Trichophyton tonsurans presenting as an obscure patchy hair loss due to daily antifungal shampoo use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sombatmaithai, Alita; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Tuchinda, Papapit; Surawan, Theetat; Muanprasart, Chanai; Matthapan, Lalita; Bunyaratavej, Sumanas

    2015-04-01

    Tinea capitis is unusual and often misdiagnosed in healthy adults. We report a case of a healthy woman with a several-year history of asymptomatic, bizarre-shaped, non-scarring alopecia. She had used over-the-counter ketoconazole shampoo regularly for a long time. An initial potassium hydroxide preparation showed negative result for fungal organism. The scalp biopsy revealed endothrix infection, and dermoscopic examination demonstrated the comma hair and corkscrew hair signs. The fungal culture showed Trichophyton tonsurans. The daily use of antifungal shampoo could be the important factor to conceal clinical and laboratory findings for diagnosis of T. tonsurans tinea capitis in our case, which required high clinical suspicion and histopathology and dermoscopic examinations.

  17. Tinea capitis caused by Trichophyton tonsurans presenting as an obscure patchy hair loss due to daily antifungal shampoo use

    OpenAIRE

    Sombatmaithai, Alita; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Tuchinda, Papapit; Surawan, Theetat; Muanprasart, Chanai; Matthapan, Lalita; Bunyaratavej, Sumanas

    2015-01-01

    Tinea capitis is unusual and often misdiagnosed in healthy adults. We report a case of a healthy woman with a several-year history of asymptomatic, bizarre-shaped, non-scarring alopecia. She had used over-the-counter ketoconazole shampoo regularly for a long time. An initial potassium hydroxide preparation showed negative result for fungal organism. The scalp biopsy revealed endothrix infection, and dermoscopic examination demonstrated the comma hair and corkscrew hair signs. The fungal cultu...

  18. Morbidity, surveillance and epidemiology of scorpion sting, cutaneous leishmaniasis and pediculosis capitis in Bandar-mahshahr County, Southwestern Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Kassiri; Mohammad-Hossein Feizhaddad; Mohammad Abdehpanah

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study epidemiologic features of scorpion stings, patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis and pediculosis capitis cases inBandar-mahshahrCounty,SouthwesternIran, during2008-2009.Methods:A descriptive study was conducted on the referred individuals with stung scorpions, pediculosis capitis and cutaneous leishmaniasis attending health centers fromBandar-mahshahrCounty in2008.The patients' medical records with epidemiologic and demographic data were collected.UsingSPSS, we have attempted to summarize statistics, namely frequencies and percentages.Results:A total of135 scorpion stings patients were studied.Of these,34.8% were female and65.2% male.Most of theScorpion stings were recorded in the21-30 year age group(37.8%).A total of82 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis were studied in this assignment that all cases have been reported from urban health centers.Considering number of wounds on the body the maximum of the patients(37.6%) had only one lesion.In this study, 12 referred patients from the health centers were studied for pediculosis capitis.According to obtained information one of the patients was male and11 patients were female.Conclusions:Some important measures, such aseducation, health promotion and public participation should be implemented for preventing of these diseases.

  19. Dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed. PMID:19410234

  20. Prevalence Rate and Risk Factors of Pediculus capitis Among Primary School Children in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassiri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Human head lice infestations caused by Pediculus capitis are a common health problem in school aged children in many parts of the globe. Its transmission occurs directly, mostly by head to head contact, and causes scalp itching. This insect is not known to be the vector of any human disease. Objectives This descriptive-analytical study was conducted in order to determine the prevalence of pediculosis, as well as some effective treatments, among pupils in the primary schools of Glogah county in the Mazandaran province of Iran, during the 2009-2010 school year. Materials and Methods A total of three-hundred students in the first through fifth grades in boys’ and girls’ primary schools were selected via multistage, systematic, cluster, random sampling in the urban and rural areas of Glogah county. They were examined for live lice or nits by experienced educators, while a questionnaire was used to record data on the demographic features and other related information of each student. These data were compared using a chi square analysis (SPSS software, and a P value of less than 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results Based on a total of 300 pupils, 17 of them (5.7% were infested with Pediculus capitis. The prevalence rate was 6.8% in the boys and 4.8% in the girls, while the rate of infestation was 7.7% in the urban areas and 3.4% in the villages. Those children between 9 and 10 years old showed the highest prevalence rate (7.4%. There was a significant association between pediculosis and a prior infestation, number of comb uses per day, frequency of hair washing (per week, having a hygiene teacher, sharing common instruments, health care of the children, children living with parents, knowledge of pediculosis, and the spacing of the children in each class. Conclusions The results showed that the prevalence of pediculosis among the Glogah county primary school students was less than the average percentages observed in other

  1. Electron Microscopic Alterations in Pediculus humanus capitis Exposed to Some Pediculicidal Plant Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkad, Dina M H El; El-Gebaly, Naglaa Saad M; Yousof, Hebat-Allah Salah A; Ismail, Mousa A M

    2016-08-01

    Head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis, infestation is an important public health problem in Egypt. Inadequate application of topical pediculicides and the increasing resistance to the commonly used pediculicides made the urgent need for the development of new agents able to induce irreversible changes in the exposed lice leading to their mortality. The aim of the present work is to evaluate pediculicidal efficacy of some natural products such as olive oil, tea tree oil, lemon juice, and ivermectin separately in comparison with tetramethrin-piperonyl butoxide (licid), as a standard pediculicide commonly used in Egypt. The effects of these products were evaluated by direct observation using dissecting and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). Results showed that after 1 hr exposure time in vitro, absolute (100%) mortalities were recorded after exposure to 1% ivermectin and fresh concentrate lemon juice. The mortalities were decreased to 96.7% after exposure to tea tree oil. Very low percentage of mortality (23.3%) was recorded after 1 hr of exposure to extra virgin olive oil. On the other hand, the reference pediculicide (licid) revealed only mortality rate of 93.3%. On the contrary, no mortalities were recorded in the control group exposed to distilled water. By SEM examination, control lice preserved outer smooth architecture, eyes, antenna, respiratory spiracles, sensory hairs, and legs with hook-like claws. In contrast, dead lice which had been exposed to pediculicidal products showed damage of outer smooth architecture, sensory hairs, respiratory spiracles and/or clinching claws according to pediculicidal products used. PMID:27658606

  2. Microsporum canis infection in three familial cases with tinea capitis and tinea corporis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bin; Xiao, Yuling; Ran, Yuping; Kang, Daoxian; Dai, Yaling; Lama, Jebina

    2013-10-01

    We report a familial infection caused by Microsporum canis. The first two patients were a 30-year-old female and her son, a 5-year-old boy, who came in contact with a pet dog at a farm house. The boy then suffered from hair loss for 3 months. There were circular and patchy alopecia with diffuse scaling on his scalp. Meanwhile, his mother also developed patchy erythema and scaling on her face. Several weeks later, the boy's sister, a 4-year-old girl, was noted to have inconspicuous scaly plaques in the center of her scalp. The development of tinea capitis in the two children and tinea corporis in their mother were diagnosed based on the positive KOH examination. Morphologic characteristics and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, amplified from primary culture isolates, confirmed that their infections were caused by the zoophilic M. canis. Repetitive sequence-based molecular typing using the DiversiLab system secreted enzymatic activity analysis, and antifungal susceptibility indicated that these isolates might share the same source. The boy and girl were cured by the treatment with oral itraconazole and topical naftifine-ketoconazole cream after washing the hair with 2 % ketoconazole shampoo, and their mother was successfully treated by terbinafine orally in combination with topical application of naftifine-ketoconazole cream.

  3. Bioactivity of Argentinean essential oils against permethrin-resistant head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloza, Ariel C; Zygadlo, Julio; Biurrun, Fernando; Rotman, Alicia; Picollo, María I

    2010-01-01

    Infestation with the head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae), is one of the most common parasitic infestation of humans worldwide. Traditionally, the main treatment for control of head lice is chemical control that is based in a wide variety of neurotoxic synthetic insecticides. The repeated overuse of these products has resulted in the selection of resistant populations of head lice. Thus, plant-derived insecticides, such as the essential oils seem to be good viable alternatives as some have low toxicity to mammals and are biodegradable. We determined the insecticidal activity of 25 essential oils belonging to several botanical families present in Argentina against permethrin-resistant head lice. Significant differences in fumigant activity against head lice were found among the essential oils from the native and exotic plant species. The most effective essential oils were Cinnamomum porphyrium, followed by Aloysia citriodora (chemotype 2) and Myrcianthes pseudomato, with KT(50) values of 1.12, 3.02 and 4.09; respectively. The results indicate that these essential oils are effective and could be incorporated into pediculicide formulations to control head lice infestations once proper formulation and toxicological tests are performed. PMID:21062140

  4. Microsporum canis infection in three familial cases with tinea capitis and tinea corporis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bin; Xiao, Yuling; Ran, Yuping; Kang, Daoxian; Dai, Yaling; Lama, Jebina

    2013-10-01

    We report a familial infection caused by Microsporum canis. The first two patients were a 30-year-old female and her son, a 5-year-old boy, who came in contact with a pet dog at a farm house. The boy then suffered from hair loss for 3 months. There were circular and patchy alopecia with diffuse scaling on his scalp. Meanwhile, his mother also developed patchy erythema and scaling on her face. Several weeks later, the boy's sister, a 4-year-old girl, was noted to have inconspicuous scaly plaques in the center of her scalp. The development of tinea capitis in the two children and tinea corporis in their mother were diagnosed based on the positive KOH examination. Morphologic characteristics and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, amplified from primary culture isolates, confirmed that their infections were caused by the zoophilic M. canis. Repetitive sequence-based molecular typing using the DiversiLab system secreted enzymatic activity analysis, and antifungal susceptibility indicated that these isolates might share the same source. The boy and girl were cured by the treatment with oral itraconazole and topical naftifine-ketoconazole cream after washing the hair with 2 % ketoconazole shampoo, and their mother was successfully treated by terbinafine orally in combination with topical application of naftifine-ketoconazole cream. PMID:23918090

  5. American Dental Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... site Partnerships and Commissions Joint Commission on National Dental Examinations Learn about the examinations used in licensing dentists and dental hygienists Commission on Dental Accreditation Explore CODA's role ...

  6. Dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since dental radiology has become a subject of the final examinations in dental medicine, there is a demand for literature presenting the basic principles of this subject field. The textbook in hand is primarily intended as an introduction for students attending the roentgenography lessons, or for students preparing for their dental medicine examinations. The book discusses the following aspects: physical principles and fundamentals; technical fundamentals of X-ray generation; image formation; X-ray films and film processing; intraoral imaging techniques; extraoral imaging techniques; special methods; panoramic technique; biological radiation effects; basic principles of radiation protection; legal aspects (X-ray Ordinance). (orig.)

  7. A randomized, double-blind study comparing the efficacy of selenium sulfide shampoo 1% and ciclopirox shampoo 1% as adjunctive treatments for tinea capitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Catherine; Koch, Laine H; Dice, James E; Dempsey, Kimberly K; Moskowitz, Alan B; Barnes-Eley, Myra L; Hubbard, Thomas W; Williams, Judith V

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to compare the efficacy of selenium sulfide shampoo 1% and ciclopirox shampoo 1% as adjunctive treatments for tinea capitis in children. Forty children aged 1-11 years with clinically diagnosed tinea capitis were randomized to receive selenium sulfide shampoo 1% or ciclopirox shampoo 1% twice a week as adjuncts to an 8-week course of ultramicronized griseofulvin dosed at 10-12 mg/kg/day. At weeks 2, 4, and 8, subjects returned to the clinic for evaluation and scalp cultures. Subjects then returned for follow-up visits 4 weeks after completing treatment. Overall, by 8 weeks, 30 of 33 (90.9%) treated children demonstrated mycological cure. Selenium sulfide shampoo 1% and ciclopirox shampoo 1% were equally effective as adjunctive treatments for tinea capitis in children in our study.

  8. The Prevalence of Pediculosis Capitis and Factors Related to The Treatment Success in Primary School Children and Their Family Members in Kocaeli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysun Sikar Akturk

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the presented study was determine the prevalence of Pediculosis capitis and factors related to the treatment success in a public primary school situated in an area having a low socio-economic status in the city of Kocaeli. Materials and Methods: A total of 414 students attending at the first grade of a public primary school in Kocaeli and 267 family members of the students with head lice and/or nits were screened. Students and their family members were examined by visual inspection and dermoscopic examination whether they had head lice and/or nits. The data were collected about some socio demographic characteristics of children’ and those of their family members with active Pediculosis capitis and shampoos with 1% permethrin was used to get rid of Pediculosis capitis. After two weeks, people who had received treatment were re-examined and factors related to the successful treatment were evaluated. Results: The prevalence of pediculosis capitis was 14.3% in school children and 13% in their family members. The prevalence was statistically significant with education levels of the mothers and fathers, social security of family and by gender. The treatment was successful in 38 of school children (66%, and in 10 of their family members (29% with pediculosis capitis. The success of the treatment was no statistically significant in gender, education level of the mothers and fathers, having social security and income. It was noticed that successful treatment was correlated with proper use of the shampoo and proper mechanical cleaning. Conclusions: Head lice is a public health problem that concerns both the school children and their family members. School children who were infested with Pediculosis capitis and their families should be periodically screened and should be immediately and simultaneously treated to preventing reinfestation. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(2.000: 181-190

  9. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  10. Wide geographical dissemination of the multiresistant Staphylococcus capitis NRCS-A clone in neonatal intensive-care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butin, M; Rasigade, J-P; Martins-Simões, P; Meugnier, H; Lemriss, H; Goering, R V; Kearns, A; Deighton, M A; Denis, O; Ibrahimi, A; Claris, O; Vandenesch, F; Picaud, J-C; Laurent, F

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial late-onset sepsis represents a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm neonates. The Staphylococcus capitis clone NRCS-A has been previously described as an emerging cause of nosocomial bacteraemia in French neonatal intensive-care units (NICUs). In this study, we aimed to explore the possible unrecognized dissemination of this clone on a larger geographical scale. One hundred methicillin-resistant S. capitis strains isolated from neonates (n = 86) and adult patients (n = 14) between 2000 and 2013 in four different countries (France, Belgium, the UK, and Australia) were analysed with SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and dru typing. The vast majority of NICU strains showed the NRCS-A pulsotype and the dt11c type (96%). We then randomly selected 14 isolates (from neonates, n = 12, three per country; from adult patients, n = 2), considered to be a subset of representative isolates, and performed further molecular typing (SacII PFGE, SCCmec typing, and multilocus sequence typing-like analysis), confirming the clonality of the S. capitis strains isolated from neonates, despite their distant geographical origin. Whole genome single-nucleotide polymorphism-based phylogenetic analysis of five NICU isolates (from the different countries) attested to high genetic relatedness within the NRCS-A clone. Finally, all of the NRCS-A strains showed multidrug resistance (e.g. methicillin and aminoglycoside resistance, and decreased vancomycin susceptibility), with potential therapeutic implications for infected neonates. In conclusion, this study represents the first report of clonal dissemination of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus clone on a large geographical scale. Questions remain regarding the origin and means of international spread, and the reasons for this clone's apparent predilection for neonates.

  11. Chemical composition and efficacy of some selected plant oils against Pediculus humanus capitis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yones, Doaa A; Bakir, Hanaa Y; Bayoumi, Soad A L

    2016-08-01

    Natural compounds have been suggested as alternative sources for pediculosis capitis control. We aimed to investigate the chemical composition and evaluate the pediculicidal activity of spearmint, clove, cassia, thyme, eucalyptus, and anise essential oils in addition to sesame oil against human head lice in vitro. A filter paper contact bioassay method was used by applying 0.25 and 0.5 mg/cm(2) of each tested oil to filter paper in Petri dishes with 15 females head lice and another with ten nits. The lice mortalities were reported every 5 min for 180 min. The percentage of inhibition of hatch (PIH) was used to calculate ovicidal activity by daily microscopic inspections 5 days after the hatching of controls. Comparison with the widely used pediculicide (malathion) was performed. The most effective essential oil was spearmint followed by cassia and clove with KT50 values of 4.06, 7.62, and 12.12 at 0.5 mg/cm(2) and 8.84, 11.38, and 19.73 at 0.25 mg/cm(2), respectively. Thyme, eucalyptus, and anise were also effective adulticides with KT50 values of 18.61, 32.65, and 37.34 at 0.5 mg/cm(2) and 29.92, 43.16, and 45.37 at 0.25 mg/cm(2), respectively. Essential oils were also successful in inhibiting nymph emergence. Spearmint oil was the most effective, with a complete inhibition of emergence at 0.5 mg/cm(2). Sesame fixed oil did not show any adulticidal or ovicidal activity against head lice in vitro. The observed insecticidal activity was comparable to malathion. The results herein described the effectiveness of these essential oils as potential pediculicides for head lice control. Incorporation of essential oils in pediculicide formulations needs proper formulation and clinical trials. PMID:27112758

  12. Aspectos clínico-epidemiológicos sobre pediculosis capitis en arenales, Estado Falcón, Venezuela Clinical and epidemiological aspects on pediculosis capitis in, Falcon State, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Cazorla PerfettI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available la pediculosis capitis humana es una infestación del cuero cabelludo y del pelo, ocasionada por el Pediculus humanus capitis, la que puede producir infecciones bacterianas secundarias en el sitio del rascado, anemia y estrés social y psicológico con alteración en la calidad de vida y consternación. Entre Marzo y Julio de 2011, se realizó un trabajo para estudiar aspectos epidemiológicos y clínicos de la pediculosis capitis en 199 personas (79 varones y 120 mujeres, habitantes de diferentes grupos etéreos (0-75 años; ± D.S= 21,28 ± 17 de la población rural Arenales, zona semiárida del estado Falcón, región nor-occidental de Venezuela. El diagnóstico ectoparasitológico se realizó por observación directa con peine "ad hoc" de huevos (liendres, estados imaginales y/o pre-imaginales sobre el cuero cabelludo. Los insectos se clarificaron y montaron en medio de Hoyer para observación microscópica. Los resultados revelaron una prevalencia global de pediculosis capitis del 10,10% (20/199, con porcentajes de infestación significativamente mayores en las niñas (90 vs 10% [Odds Ratio (OR = 3,04; p = 0,01] en edad escolar (OR= 1,02; p =0,015; con longitudes de cabello mayores de 3 cm (OR = 2,44; p = 0,004 y de tipo lisotrico (OR = 2,25; p = 0,015, sin embargo, no fueron diferentes entre grupos étnicos y color de pelo (P > 0,05. Se detectó un predominio de liendres (65% desde 1 hasta 64/individuos, ubicadas entre 0,1 y 9 cm del cuero cabelludo en todas las regiones de la cabeza, teniendo los individuos de menor edad las mayores cargas ectoparasitarias. Los síntomas significativamente asociados a pediculosis fueron el prurito (6,53% en individuos infestados y 12,06% en los no infestados; OR =11,99; p = 0,000 y las excoriaciones (1,51% en niños infestados y 3,52% en los no infestados; OR =4,34; p = 0,03. Otros posibles factores de riesgo significativamente involucrados en la dinámica de transmisión y mantenimiento de la infestaci

  13. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  14. Dental Implants

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... suffer from social consequences and poor nutrition. Rebuilding Bone When the supporting alveolar bone melts away , it’s gone for good, but through grafting, a skilled dental professional can recreate bone to fuse with and support an implant. This ...

  15. Dental Implants

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Dental Implants A fuller, more complete smile is within reach. The following information is designed to provide helpful facts so you ... found in nature. What Happens When You Lose a Tooth? When you lose a tooth, especially a ...

  16. Dental Training Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  17. Team approach to ERCP-directed single-brush cytology for the diagnosis of malignancy Abordaje en equipo de la citología con cepillo único guiada por CPRE para el diagnóstico del cáncer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Urbano

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the clinical usefulness of single-brush cytology performed at ERCP as initial method for detecting pancreatobiliary malignancy, ensuring a very close relationship between endoscopists, cytotechnicians, and cytopathologists. Study design: all 125 cytodiagnoses considered in this study correspond to the first brushing for each patient, collected by one of the three members of a fixed team of endoscopists in the presence of the same cytotechnician. Smears were fixed immediately with Merckofix® spray, stained with Papanicolau, and analyzed by the same cytopathologist in a laboratory exclusively devoted to gastrointestinal cytopathology located at the endoscopy unit. Results: of 125 cytological diagnoses 94 were considered benign, 4 suspicious, and 27 malignant. These findings were compared to the final diagnosis of 45 malignant and 80 benign lesions obtained either by surgical pathology or after at least one year of clinical follow-up. The comparison yielded 30 true positives, 78 true negatives, 1 false positive and 16 false negative results, which corresponds to a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of 65.2, 98.7, 96.8, 83, and 86.4%, respectively. Conclusion: results seem to confirm the usefulness of an effective team approach to ERCP-directed brush cytology for the diagnosis of pancreatobiliary malignancy. However, sensitivity continues to be rather low.Objetivo: evaluar la utilidad clínica de la citología con cepillo único durante la CPRE como método inicial de detección de los cánceres pancreaticobiliares, garantizando una relación muy cercana entre endoscopistas, citotécnicos y citopatólogos. Diseño del estudio: los 125 citodiagnósticos considerados por este estudio corresponden al primer cepillado de cada paciente, realizado por uno de los tres miembros de un equipo fijo de endoscopistas en presencia del mismo citotécnico. Los frotis se fijaron

  18. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental... prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental materials to Mexicali... Dental/Sybron Dental Specialities, Formally Known as Customedix Corporation, Including......

  19. Pediculose capitis: prevalência em escolares da Rede Municipal Pública de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil Pediculosis capitis: prevalence in students of the public school network of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Marcos Linardi

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available During 1985, 50,356 children and adolecents from 105 public schools of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State were questioned about or examined for head lice (Pediculus capitis. The mean prevalence of pediculosis, obtainde from the questionnaires and sometimes confirmed by head inspections, was 7.7% or else 10.2% when adjusted to 38,311 respondents. Current and past infestations combined - within a period of three months before survey - revealed a total prevalence of 57.4%. Significant differences were observed among socioeconomic levels, and grades of school age. The more prevalent categories among the factors studied were: sex - femal: 9.2% (P<0.001; ethnic group - white: 10.0% (P<0.001; hair length - long: 9.5% (P<0.05; year age-group - 1-5 years: 19.2% (P<0.001, with a peak in the 5th year (21.3%.

  20. American Dental Education Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interest Groups ADEA Governance Documents and Publications ADEA Dental Faculty Code of Conduct ADEA Bylaws ADEAGies Foundation ... Benefits for Faculty ADEA Member Benefits for Allied Dental Programs ADEA Member Benefits for Dental Schools ADEA ...

  1. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  2. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  3. Acute poisoning in a child following topical treatment of head lice (pediculosis capitis) with an organophosphate pesticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Muddathir H; Adeel, Ahmed Awad; Alhaboob, Ali Abdu N; Ashri, Ahmed M; Salih, Mustafa A

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report of acute organophosphate poisoning in a child treated with topical application of Diazinon-60 (WHO Class II toxicity) for head lice (pediculosis capitis). The patient presented with neurological symptoms and signs. After emergency respiratory and circulatory resuscitation the patient underwent dermal decontamination and was treated with atropine, high flow oxygen and pralidoxime. Scanning electron micrographs of scalp hair specimens revealed both viable and empty head lice nits (lice eggs that attach to the hair shaft). The patient was hospitalized for seven days and discharged after full recovery. The case highlights the importance of raising the awareness of health workers and the community about the danger of misusing pesticides for the treatment of head lice. PMID:27651556

  4. Finding Dental Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Internships for... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research ...

  5. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Internships for... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research ...

  6. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Student Resources National Exam Student Advisor Resources Dental Hygiene Programs Scholarships and Grants Research Center Transforming Dental Hygiene Education Advocacy Practice Issues Direct Access Scope ...

  7. Analysis of [Gossypium capitis-viridis × (G.hirsutum × G.australe2] Trispecific Hybrid and Selected Characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Chen

    Full Text Available Speciation is always a contentious and challenging issue following with the presence of gene flow. In Gossypium, there are many valuable resources and wild diploid cotton especially C and B genome species possess some excellent traits which cultivated cotton always lacks. In order to explore character transferring rule from wild cotton to upland tetraploid cotton, the [G. capitis-viridis × (G. hirsutum × G. australe2] triple hybrid was synthesized by interspecies hybridization and chromosome doubling. Morphology comparisons were measured among this hybrid and its parents. It showed that trispecific hybrid F1 had some intermediate morphological characters like leaf style between its parents and some different characters from its parents, like crawl growth characteristics and two kind flower color. It is highly resistant to insects comparing with other cotton species by four year field investigation. By cytogenetic analysis, triple hybrid was further confirmed by meiosis behavior of pollen mother cells. Comparing with regular meiosis of its three parents, it was distinguished by the occurrence of polyads with various numbers of unbalanced microspores and finally generating various abnormal pollen grains. All this phenomenon results in the sterility of this hybrid. This hybrid was further identified by SSR marker from DNA molecular level. It showed that 98 selected polymorphism primers amplified effective bands in this hybrids and its parents. The genetic proportion of three parents in this hybrid is 47.8% from G. hirsutum, 14.3% from G. australe, 7.0% from G. capitis-viridis, and 30.9% recombination bands respectively. It was testified that wild genetic material has been transferred into cultivated cotton and this new germplasm can be incorporated into cotton breeding program.

  8. Pediculosis capitis Among Primary School Children and Related Risk Factors in Urmia, the Main City of West Azarbaijan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Hazrati Tappeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pediculosis capitis is cosmopolitan health problem. In addition to its physical problems, its psycho­logical effects especially on pupils are more important. This study was conducted to determine the Pediculosis capitis among primary school pupils and also find out the role of probable related risk factors in Urmia city, Iran 2010.Methods: 35 primary schools of Urmia City according to the defined clusters randomly have been selected during 2010. 2040 pupils (866 boys and 1174 girls were included and examined individually and privately by experts. Presence of adult or immature lice or having nits less than 1 cm from the hair basis were defined as positive.Data about demographic features and factors which their effect should be determined were recorded in standard questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS software with proper statistical test.Results: Infestation was determined around 4%. Girls show significantly greater infestation. The availability of suit­able warm water for bathing and hair length (separately in girls and boys are significantly related to infestation load as well as infestation among different age groups.There was no significant relation between parent’s education and job and infestation as well as bathing repetition per week and the kind of energy source which they have. Also there is no significant correlation between educational grades and head lice infestation.Conclusion: The head louse pediculosis is a health problem and remains a health threatening for school chil­dren.Effective risk factors should be determined carefully and regionally. Proper training plays a great role in order to prevent and control the problem

  9. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht’s Dental Fear Survey (DFS questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht’s DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates’ of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%. However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%. Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P=0.004. “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services.

  10. Dental students--dental advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  11. Dental students--dental advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future. PMID:21314046

  12. Temporal study of staphylococcal species on the skin of human subjects in isolation and clonal analysis of Staphylococcus capitis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    OpenAIRE

    Maggs, A F; Pennington, T H

    1989-01-01

    The staphylococcal skin floras of an isolated group of subjects were studied for 1 year. A wide variation in isolation patterns was found for different species. Staphylococcus intermedius, previously thought to be of veterinary origin, was found to be part of the resident flora of some subjects, and this may indicate a wider role for it in clinical infection. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of S. capitis isolates indicated persistent skin coloniza...

  13. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  14. Dental Implant Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiki Oshida; Tuna, Elif B.; Oya Aktören; Koray Gençay

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with...

  15. COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH SURVEY TRAINING TO DENTAL HEALTH PERSONNEL

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Fikawati; Ita Yulita

    2015-01-01

    Dentist and dental nurse as dental health personnel in community health center are spearheads in community dental health service. The effectiveness and efficacy of community dental health service needs updated adequate dental health knowledge and skill. One effort to assure the fulfillment of those needs is by providing community dental health survey training. This training aims at improving the skill and capability of dental health personnel to conduct dental health survey. The training cons...

  16. Clinical types of tinea capitis and species identification in children: an experience from tertiary care centres of karachi, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the clinical types of Tinea Capitis and identify species in children reporting to two tertiary care centres of Karachi, Pakistan. Methods: The escriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted at the Dermatology Outpatients' Department, PNS Shifa Hospital and the Institute of Skin Diseases, Karachi, from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2009. It comprised 202 children with clinical diagnosis of tineacapitis, confirmed by skin scrapings, showing fungal hyphae and spores in 10% potassium hydroxide on direct microscopy. Wood's lamp examination was carried out and the scrapings were cultured on Sabouraud's agar. A detailed dermatological examination was performed for evidence of fungal infection elsewhere in the body. SPSS 19 was used for data analysis. Results: Male-to-female ratio was 1.1:1 and age ranged from 1 to 14 years. The commonest clinical type gray patch was observed in 71 (35.1%) of the patients, black dot in 63 (31.2%), kerion in 50 (24.8%), favus in 10 (5.0%), diffuse pustular in 6 (3.0%), and diffuse scale in 2 (1.0%) patients. The most frequent species grown on culture was Trichophyton(T).Soudanense, followed by T.Tonsurans, T. Schoenleinii, and T.Mentagrophytes respectively. Conclusion: Most of the patients of Tineacapitis presented with gray patch and black dot variety. The most common species identified by culture was Trichophyton Soudanense. Disease was equal in both gender and predominantly affected the population belonging to low and middle socioeconomic class. (author)

  17. Dental Encounter System (DES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Dental Encounter System (DES) is an automated health care application designed to capture critical data about the operations of VA Dental Services. Information on...

  18. Dental Treatment Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for emergency dental care. Open communication with the dentist can reduce the risk of complications during dental ... usually done in a reclining position. Let your dentist know if you are so far back that ...

  19. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Soft Tissue Surgery Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Oral and facial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues ... and Soft Tissue Surgery Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Oral and facial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues ...

  20. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  1. Fatigue of dental ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; lawn, brian

    2013-01-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics

  2. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  3. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ...-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food... classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II,...

  4. Biocompatibility of Dental Amalgams

    OpenAIRE

    Yurdanur Uçar; Brantley, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this review paper is to review the literature regarding the toxicology of mercury from dental amalgam and evaluate current statements on dental amalgam. Materials and Methods. Two key-words “dental amalgam” and “toxicity” were used to search publications on dental amalgam biocompatibility published in peer-reviewed journals written in English. Manual search was also conducted. The most recent declarations and statements were evaluated using information available on ...

  5. Stress Among Dental Students

    OpenAIRE

    Alzahem, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to balance stress across the different years of the curriculum, and maybe reduce the stress levels in the later years of the curriculum. A study into the new Dental Education Stress Management (DESM) prog...

  6. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  7. Implementing a National Dental Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond Lam; Estie Kruger; Marc Tennant

    2012-01-01

    AbstractBackground The Chronic Dental Disease Scheme (CDSS) is the first public dental policy in Australia to attract Medicare benefits for dental services. Aims This study examines the utilisation of a new federal method of funding dental care in Australia and provides an insight into the implications of government dental programs. The program titled; Chronic Dental Disease Scheme, provided government-subsidised dental care for people suffering from a chronic medical condition. Method A retr...

  8. Effectiveness of isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone D5 solution of removing cuticular hydrocarbons from human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Eric

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the treatment of human head lice infestation, healthcare providers are increasingly concerned about lice becoming resistant to existing pesticide treatments. Traditional pesticides, used to control these pests, have a neurological mechanism of action. This publication describes a topical solution with a non-traditional mechanism of action, based on physical disruption of the wax layer that covers the cuticle of the louse exoskeleton. This topical solution has been shown clinically to cure 82% of patients with only a 10-minute treatment time, repeated once after 7 days. All insects, including human head lice, have a wax-covered exoskeleton. This wax, composed of hydrocarbons, provides the insect with protection against water loss and is therefore critical to its survival. When the protective wax is disrupted, water loss becomes uncontrollable and irreversible, leading to dehydration and death. A specific pattern of hydrocarbons has been found in all of the head louse cuticular wax studied. Iso-octane effectively removes these hydrocarbons from human head lice’s cuticular wax. Methods A method of head louse cuticle wax extraction and analysis by gas chromatography was developed. Human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis were collected from infested patients and subjected to any of three extraction solvents comprising either the test product or one of two solvents introduced as controls. A gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector (GC/FID was used to determine the presence of hydrocarbons in the three head lice extracts. Results In the study reported herein, the test product isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone D5 (IPM/D5 was shown to perform comparably with iso-octane, effectively extracting the target hydrocarbons from the cuticular wax that coats the human head louse exoskeleton. Conclusions Disruption of the integrity of the insect cuticle by removal of specific hydrocarbons found in the cuticular wax

  9. Use of a poultry model to assess the transfer inhibition effect of head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketzis, Jennifer K; Clements, Kathleen; Honraet, Kris

    2014-05-01

    Head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) remain a nuisance, predominantly in school age children. Despite the availability of pediculicidal products, children, after treatment, easily become re-infested if the outbreak has not been controlled on a class or school level. Lice repellents and re-infestation deterrents have been developed to protect children post-treatment. In vitro assays, which are used to evaluate the performance of these products, have limited correlation to in vivo efficacy. In this study, a chicken model was developed as an alternative to in vitro models, more closely mimicking the in vivo situation of children at school. Chickens with natural infestations of Menopon spp. and Menacanthus spp. were divided into three groups and co-housed for 23 h: Group 1 was treated with a commercial product designed to kill lice and protect from re-infestation (Oystershell Laboratories); group 2 was used to assess lice re-population onto lice-free, untreated chickens; and group 3, the seeder group, consisted of lice-infested chickens. The chickens were examined for lice before and at regular intervals after treatment. The group 1 chickens had an average of 40 lice pre-treatment, 0 lice post-treatment and did not become re-infested during the 23-h period. Lice were slow to re-populate the group 2 chickens but were seen 3 h after co-housing with an average of 6 lice each at the end of the study. Group 3 chickens maintained their lice throughout the study (average of 32 at end of study). Based on this study, chickens can be used as a model to test the performance of lice repellents and re-infestation deterrents. PMID:24647985

  10. In vitro pediculicidal activity of herbal shampoo base on Thai local plants against head louse (Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassami, Watcharawit; Soonwera, Mayura

    2013-04-01

    Head lice infestation, a worldwide head infestation caused Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer, is an important public health problem in Thailand. Several chemical pediculicides have lost in efficacy due to increasing resistance of lice against insecticide. Therefore, non-toxic alternative products, such as natural products from plants, e.g. plant extract pediculicides, are needed for head lice control. The aims of this study were to evaluate the potential of pediculicidal activity of herbal shampoo base on three species of Thai local plants (Accacia concinna (Willd.) DC, Averrhoa bilimbi Linn. and Tamarindus indica Linn.) against head lice and to compare them with carbaryl shampoo (Hafif shampoo®; 0.6% w/v carbaryl) and non-treatment control in order to assess their in vitro. Doses of 0.12 and 0.25 ml/cm2 of each herbal shampoo were applied to filter paper, and ten head lice were place on the filter paper. The mortalities of head lice on the filter paper were recorded at 1, 5, 10, 30 and 60 min by sterio-microscope. All herbal shampoos at 0.25 ml/cm2 were more effective pediculicide than carbaryl shampoo with 100% mortality at 5 min. The median lethal time (LT50) of all herbal shampoos at 0.25 ml/cm2 showed no significant differences over at 0.12 ml/cm2 (Pshampoo, followed by Av. bilimbi extract shampoo and Ac. concinna extract shampoo, with LT50 valuesshampoos have high potential of pediculicide to head lice treatments for schoolchildren.

  11. Dental caries vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumar K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is one of the most common diseases in humans. In modern times, it has reached epidemic proportions. Dental caries is an infectious microbiologic disease of the teeth that results in localized dissolution and destruction of the calcified tissue. Dental caries is a mulitifactorial disease, which is caused by host, agent, and environmental factors. The time factor is important for the development and progression of dental caries. A wide group of microorganisms are identified from carious lesions of which S. mutans , Lactobacillus acidophilus , and Actinomyces viscosus are the main pathogenic species involved in the initiation and development of dental caries. In India, surveys done on school children showed caries prevalence of approximately 58%. Surveys among the U.S. population showed an incidence of 45.3% in children and 93.8% in adults with either past or present coronal caries. Huge amounts of money and time are spent in treating dental caries. Hence, the prevention and control of dental caries is the main aim of public health, eventually the ultimate objective of public health is the elimination of the disease itself. Recently, dental caries vaccines have been developed for the prevention of dental caries. These dental caries vaccines are still in the early stages.

  12. What is dental ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context.

  13. Employment of Dental Hygienists as Dental Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Cynthia; Odrich, Johanna

    1987-01-01

    A study of the use of dental hygienists to teach periodontics, preventive dentistry, community dentistry, and public health courses looked at employment patterns and practices and the qualifications of the teachers. (MSE)

  14. Impact of family ownerships, individual hygiene, and residential environments on the prevalence of pediculosis capitis among schoolchildren in urban and rural areas of northwest of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghanzadeh, Reza; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Salimian, Shahin; Asl Hashemi, Ahmad; Khayatzadeh, Simin

    2015-11-01

    In the appraisal of head lice outbreak, in addition to socioeconomic factors and availability of health care services, environmental conditions of the households must be taken into account. However, interviewing with children or mailing questionnaires to families may not reflect the actualities. Therefore, in this study, all the inclusive factors which may be associated with head lice outbreak were thoroughly and closely investigated. The data were collected by examining students at schools and surveying patients' households. A questionnaire concerning children's personal hygienic practices, family features, and environmental conditions of the households was filled out during the close assessment of the residential area. The overall prevalence of head lice was obtained as 5.9%, and the difference was not significant within the urban (5.1%) and rural (6.1%) communities. Overall, the number of infested students was more frequent in girls (6.6%) than boys (2.8%), but the difference was not significant. The highest infestation rate was obtained in the examined students whose fathers were unemployed, farmer, and herdsman. Family income showed greater correlation with the prevalence of pediculosis capitis. A high frequency of pediculosis capitis was identified among the students who were sharing individual items with siblings. Assessment of households showed that room flooring material and keeping animals at home were highly correlated with head lice prevalence. Households should be informed that infestations happen, irrespective of socioeconomic status. However, the physical and environmental conditions of living areas and households play an important role in head lice prevention. PMID:26276644

  15. Skin dose and response for the head and neck in patients irradiated with x-ray for tinea capitis: implications for environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose delivered to the skin of the head and neck in patients treated with x-ray irradiation for childhood tinea capitis was reconstructed. This was possible by utilizing a phantom made from the skull of a seven year old child and irradiating it with the same technique and x-ray machine used in tinea capitis therapy two to four decades ago. Seventy-eight basal cell carcinomas (BCC) have appeared so far in 40 of 1727 irradiated white children and none in 500 irradiated black children. The dose distribution over the face and scalp is used to estimate the risk of BCC per person per rad. These results must be considered preliminary due to the relatively young age of the irradiated group (<50 years) at the present time. From the decreased risk per rad for the portion of the scalp that is hair covered, it appears that environmental ultraviolet radiation may play a key role in the expression of BCC. A cumulative hazard plot is utilized to tentatively extend the data to lifetime risk of 0.003 per rad with an upper limit of 0.006 per rad. Environmental radiation dose to the skin possibly account for 20% of observed BCC if this tentative risk estimate is valid

  16. Weaker Dental Enamel Explains Dental Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre R Vieira; Carolyn W Gibson; Kathleen Deeley; Hui Xue; Yong Li

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogeni...

  17. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Amendments Dental Care Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees Dental health is an important part of ... for dental services. Dental Benefits for Children in CHIP States that provide CHIP coverage to children through ...

  18. Dental amalgam: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Bharti Ramesh; Wadhwani Kulvinder; Tikku Aseem; Chandra Anil

    2010-01-01

    Dental amalgam has served as an excellent and versatile restorative material for many years, despite periods of controversy. The authors review its history, summarize the evidence with regard to its performance and offer predictions for the future of this material. The PubMed database was used initially; the reference list for dental amalgam featured 8641 articles and 13 publications dealing with recent advances in dental amalgam. A forward search was undertaken on selected articles and using...

  19. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  20. Dental Implant Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Oshida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities.

  1. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  2. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more. PMID:27587574

  3. Tinea capitis: epidemiologia e ecologia dos casos observados entre 1983 e 2003 na Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil Tinea capitis: epidemiological and ecological aspects of cases observed from 1983 to 2003 in the Botucatu Medical School, state of São Paulo-Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Alencar Marques

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: Tinea capitis é importante infecção fúngica de interesse dermatológico e pediátrico. No Brasil sua prevalência é desconhecida, e os agentes causais principais são o Trichophyton tonsurans nas regiões Norte-Nordeste e o Microsporum canis no Sul-Sudeste do país. Conhecimento sobre gênero e espécies mais prevalentes tem importância sanitária e terapêutica. OBJETIVOS: Identificar espécies de dermatófitos, causa de Tinea capitis, em serviço universitário que atende clientela do Sistema Único de Saúde, de procedência urbana e rural, no interior do Estado de São Paulo. MÉTODOS: Amostras de casos clínicos suspeitos de Tinea capitis, procedentes da área de abrangência da Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu-Unesp, foram investigadas por exame direto e cultivo visando ao diagnóstico e isolamento do agente causal. RESULTADOS: De 1.055 suspeitas, 594 foram confirmadas por exame direto, em 364 (61,1% isolou-se o agente: M. canis em 88,2%, seguindo-se T. tonsurans (4,7%, T. rubrum (3,3%, M. gypseum (1,9%, T. mentagrophytes (1,6%. O sexo masculino correspondeu a 55,7% dos casos, e a faixa etária entre 0-5 anos predominou com 62,6% (p BACKGROUND: Tinea capitis is an important fungal infection of both pediatrical and dermatological interest. In Brazil, its prevalence is unknown, and main causal agents are Trichophyton tonsurans n northern and northeastern regions and Microsporum canis in southern and southeastern regions of the country. Knowledge on the most prevalent geni and species has sanitary and therapeutical importance. OBJECTIVE: To identify dermatophyte species causing Tinea capitis, in a University Hospital that sees patients of the Public Health System (SUS, coming from both urban and rural areas in the interior of State of São Paulo. METHODS: Samples of clinical cases with suspicion of Tinea capitis, coming from the area under Boucatu Medical School - Unesp’s responsibility, were investigated by means of

  4. Dental Abfraction - Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Irina-Maria Gheorghiu; Loredana Mitran; M Mitran; Magdalena Mironiuc-Cureu; A. A. Iliescu; Ioana Suciu

    2015-01-01

    Dental abfraction is a pathological process which causes a loss of dental hard substance. Etiopathogenesis is related to occlusal stress that causes microfractures in enamel and dentin in the cervical region. The restoration treatment is made using aesthetic adhesive materials, but must take into account the causal factors and the specific area where the restoration is done.

  5. Dental Abfraction - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina-Maria Gheorghiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental abfraction is a pathological process which causes a loss of dental hard substance. Etiopathogenesis is related to occlusal stress that causes microfractures in enamel and dentin in the cervical region. The restoration treatment is made using aesthetic adhesive materials, but must take into account the causal factors and the specific area where the restoration is done.

  6. The future dental workforce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J E; Wilson, N H F

    2009-02-28

    The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the time of writing this paper the momentous step of including dental care professionals (DCPs) on General Dental Council (GDC) registers in the United Kingdom has recently been completed. Second, the Scope of Practice of all dental professionals has been under consultation by the General Dental Council, and research evidence suggests that greater use should be made of skill-mix in the dental team. Third, within England, Lord Darzi has just published the 'Final Report of the NHS Next Stage Review', which emphasises 'quality care' and 'team-working' as key features of healthcare; this report was accompanied by an important document entitled 'A High Quality Workforce', in which plans for local workforce planning within the NHS are outlined, placing responsibilities at national, local and regional levels. Fourth, policy makers across the UK are wrestling with addressing oral health needs, promoting health and facilitating access to dental care, all of which have implications for the nature and shape of the dental workforce. Fifth, with the impact of globalisation and European policies we are net gainers of dentists as well as having more in training. Sixth, although there have been reviews and policy initiatives by regulatory, professional and other bodies in support of shaping the dental workforce, there has been little serious consideration of skill-mix and funding mechanisms to encourage team-working. Together, these events demand that we enter a fresh debate on the future dental workforce which should extend beyond professional and national boundaries and inform workforce planning. This debate is of great

  7. Detection of Common Dental Diseases by Dental Hygiene-Therapists

    OpenAIRE

    Macey, Richard John

    2016-01-01

    Thesis submitted to the University of Manchester by Richard Macey for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy entitled “Detection of Common Dental Diseases by Dental Hygiene-Therapists”, February 2016.Many adult patients that attend NHS dental practices on a regular basis are asymptomatic and do not need any further treatment other than a routine dental examination (“check-up”). As the oral health of the adult population is predicted to improve further, using the General Dental Practitioner to und...

  8. Flemish general dental practitioners' knowledge of dental radiology

    OpenAIRE

    Aps, Johan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess general dental practitioners' knowledge of dental radiography and radiation protection in order to alert the Belgian authorities and dental professional societies. Prior to attending a postgraduate course on intraoral radiology, general dental practitioners in Flanders, Belgium, were asked to fill in a questionnaire regarding the radiological equipment and the techniques they used for intraoral radiography. The availability and type of dental panoramic equi...

  9. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth" ("La Encia y…

  10. Prevalence of benign and malignant thyroid nodules in patients with previous history of radiotherapy for Tinea capitis in childhood (in khorosan province)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased prevalence of thyroid cancer was noted in patients with previous history of radiotherapy of the head and neck region in childhood. According to previous research, radiotherapy for Ti nia capitis was using up to 30 years ago in Khorasan Province. This study tries to evaluate prevalence of benign and malignant thyroid nodules and detect and treat these patients earlier to prevent more complications and increased cost. Methods and patients: Using mass media, we recalled all patients with history of radiotherapy for Tinea capitis in childhood. A questionnaire was filled for each patient and thyroid examination, thyroid scan and thyroid sonography were performed. Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) was done if a thyroid nodule larger than 1 cm was palpable. Serum TSH was measured in all patients. Also thyroid surgery was recommended for all patients with thyroid nodules more than 1 cm. A control group was defined from a group of patients who referred for non thyroidal sonography to radiology department of Ghaem hospital. These patients also were evaluated by clinical examination and thyroid sonography. Results: We studied 180 patients with mean age of 47.7 years and 127 age and sex m etched controls. Thyroid nodules was palpated in 45.5% of patients and 7% of controls (P0.01). The mean largest diameter of nodules were 24.8 mm in patients and 10.8 mm in control group (P<0.001). 75% of patients were agreed with FNAB and 5% of them had suspicious cytology results. No suspicious or malignant results was noted in control group. Twenty seven patients (33.7%) were operated. Pathological results were benign in 89.9% and malignant in 1% of patients. His study showed that thyroid nodules and thyroid neo plasma were significantly more larger in the patients group. Thyroid neoplasm were more frequent in younger patients with latent thyroid (from radiotherapy) of less than 40 years, so aggressive evaluation is recommended in these group

  11. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable...... scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  12. Xilitol and dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marten Titus

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread multifactoral disease. The main sympthons are minaral loss from tooth enemal and dentine, eventually leading to total destruction of the teeth, pain, impairment of mastication and problems with facial esthetics. ... Zie: Summary

  13. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to other parts of the mouth. However, your dentist can treat periodontal disease even when you are ... the teeth. Is it safe to visit your dentist in pregnancy? Dental care is safe during pregnancy ...

  14. Glossary of Dental Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... geta poker friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental ... and shape of teeth performed by a general dentist | More Edentulous having lost most or all of ...

  15. Dental Forensics: Bitemark Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2013-01-01

    Forensic odontology (dental forensics) can provide useful evidence in both criminal and civil cases, and therefore remains a part of the wider discipline of forensic science. As an example from the toolbox of forensic odontology, the practice and experience on bitemark analysis is reviewed here in brief. The principle of using visible bitemarks in crime victims or in other objects as evidence is fundamentally based on the observation that the detailed pattern of dental imprints tend to be pra...

  16. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  17. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist.This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain.Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways.Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders.It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal p...

  18. Saliva and dental erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf; Angélicas Reis Hannas; Melissa Thiemi Kato

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the re...

  19. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  20. Dental patients' use of the Internet.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-12-19

    To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and \\'dental tourism\\'.

  1. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  2. Dental fitness classification in the Canadian forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Richard R

    2008-01-01

    The Canadian Forces Dental Services utilizes a dental classification system to identify those military members dentally fit for an overseas deployment where dental resources may be limited. Although the Canadian Forces Dental Services dental classification system is based on NATO standards, it differs slightly from the dental classification systems of other NATO country dental services. Data collected by dental teams on overseas deployments indicate a low rate of emergency dental visits by Canadian Forces members who were screened as dentally fit to deploy. PMID:18277717

  3. DENTAL HOT-COLD SENSITIVITY AND TRAUMATIC DENTAL INJURIES

    OpenAIRE

    Traebert, Jefferson; Martins, Luiz Gustavo Teixeira; Traebert, Eliane Silva de Azevedo; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Although several studies have indicated negative impacts of traumatic dental injuries on children’s quality of life, virtually none of them have explored the possible association between them and the occurrence and dental hot-cold sensitivity. The aim of this study was to study the possible association of hot-cold dental sensitivity and history of traumatic dental injuries. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving a representative sample of 11- to 14-year-old schoolchildre...

  4. Role of Multislice Dental CT in Assessment of Dental Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Safa A Elaty *, Ahmed M Monib *, Yasser A Mohamed *,Ahmed F Abd elghany

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The use of dental implants to restore missing teeth has become increasingly widespread over the past two decades. Dental MSCT plays an important role in the preoperative planning of dental implants because it provides accurate measurement of the width and depth of the edentulous ridge as well as the bone density. And postoperatively, dental MSCT images can show the failure of an endosseous implant to osseointegrate, improper placement of an implant, and violation of important st...

  5. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  6. Dental practice network of U.S. dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Monica A; Beeson, Dennis C; Hans, Mark G

    2009-12-01

    As dental schools incorporate training in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) into their curricula, students must learn how to critically evaluate systematic reviews and meta-analyses. It is important that dental education in the United States support the American Dental Association's position statement on EBD, which defines "best evidence" as data obtained from all study designs. Given that much evidence is missing when EBD is derived from Cochrane Systematic Reviews' randomized clinical trials, we propose the creation of a dental practice network of U.S. dental schools. We developed an electronic clinical dentistry research database for EBD using Epi-Info (available at www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/downloads.htm). As a free, public use software, Epi-Info provides the foundation for the development of clinical research databases that can increase the research capacity through multisite studies designed to generate outcomes data on the effectiveness of dental treatment. The creation of a dental practice network of dental schools with their large number of patients would expand the research capacity for EBD practice and advance the EBD science regarding the effectiveness of dental treatment. The next step is to link clinical dental researchers/educators at multiple dental schools through a collaborative clinical research network, so that the findings can be applied to the EBD component of problem-based learning curricula of dental education. PMID:20007494

  7. Dental Health and Orthodontic Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Dental Health and Orthodontic Problems Page Content Article Body Dental Health Twin ... color can be tinted to match the teeth. Orthodontic Problems Crooked teeth, overbites and underbites are best ...

  8. Radiation protection in dental practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guide provides the dentist and dental support personnel with basic information on the safe use of x-rays in dental radiography. Included in this CODE are specific recommendations for eliminating unnecessary radiation exposure of both patients and staff

  9. Dental Care - Medicaid and Chip

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dental health is an important part of peoples overall health. States are required to provide dental benefits to children covered by Medicaid and the Childrens...

  10. Dental modification in the past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Pia; Alexandersen, Verner

    2003-01-01

    Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction......Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction...

  11. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a ... a large photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ...

  12. Dental technician of the future

    OpenAIRE

    Derksen, W.; Wismeijer, D.; Hanssen, S; Tahmaseb, A.

    2015-01-01

    The new technologies in the field of dental science have not only changed the way in which dentists run their practice but have also dramatically changed the procedures carried out in dental laboratories. Mechanical engineering, incorporated CMM, laser milling, 3D printing and 3D design in a mechanical tool shop are a few of the fields in which novel dental technologies are emerging. There has been a tremendous shift towards digital approaches in the dental environment, which has subsequently...

  13. Marketing applications for dental clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Čevela, Josef

    2010-01-01

    The essay deals with the marketing strategy of the dental clinic, more specifically the dental clinic Sorriso DENTAL s.r.o. It also analyses and describes the marketing mix. Based on these things, it offers certain recommendations for the clinic and its marketing conception.

  14. Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

  15. Dental operatory design and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, M

    1993-08-01

    Improving and expanding the dental services of a practice can involve purchasing new equipment and even modifying or expanding the physical plant. Operatory design is important to the efficiency with which dental procedures can be performed. Equipment purchases to outfit the dental operatory should be made based on the specific needs and functions of a practice.

  16. Dental ethics and emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Alvin B; Wolf, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Dental ethics is often taught, viewed, and conducted as an intell enterprise, uninformed by other noncognitive factors. Emotional intelligence (EQ) is defined distinguished from the cognitive intelligence measured by Intelligence Quotient (IQ). This essay recommends more inclusion of emotional, noncognitive input to the ethical decision process in dental education and dental practice.

  17. Dental formulations for the prevention of dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a therapeutic method for preventing and/or inhibiting dental erosion in a mammalian subject, and the provision of a dental care product for performing the method. The dental care product of the invention comprises a starch-degrading enzyme of E. C. 3.2.1.1, wherein said...... product comprises less than 1 wt.% ionic surfactant, and preferably is substantially free of endoprotease and/or lipase. The properties of the dental care product serve to prevent and/or inhibit dental erosion in a subject that typically results from repeated exposure of the patient's tooth surfaces...

  18. Risks from dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate the risks and consequences of exposure to dental X-ray. The methodology used was the survey of bibliographic literature on this matter. First, we tried to understand the operation and characteristics of dental X-rays. Afterwards, we tried to know about the risks that this procedure offers to workers and patients. And concluded with the consequences of such exposure. The results showed that dental x-rays only offer risks in prolonged exposure, can affect the worker or patient to pathologies such as cancer or a life-time decreased due to the stochastic effect. Therefore, radiological protection standards must be respected and practised. (author)

  19. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often...... combined, the result is that more than 100 trauma scenarios exist, when the two dentitions are combined. Each of these trauma scenarios has a specific treatment demand and prospect for healing. With such a complexity in diagnosis and treatment, it is obvious that even experienced practitioners may have...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.DentalTrauma...

  20. Dental Implant Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  1. Association between Childhood Dental Experiences and Dental Fear among Dental, Psychology and Mathematics Undergraduates in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Serra-Negra, Júnia M.; Vale, Miriam P.; Paiva, Saul M.; Maurício A. Oliveira; Ferreira, Meire C.; Bendo, Cristiane B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between childhood dental experiences and dental fear in adulthood among dentistry, psychology and mathematics undergraduate students. A cross-sectional study of 1,256 students from the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, was performed. Students responded to the Brazilian version of the Dental Fear Survey (DFS) and a questionnaire regarding previous dental experiences. Both the DFS and the questionnaire were self-administered. Associatio...

  2. [Hardening of dental instruments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasev, G P

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of prolonging the service life of stomatological instruments by the local hardening of their working parts is discussed. Such hardening should be achieved by using hard and wear-resistant materials. The examples of hardening dental elevators and hard-alloy dental drills are given. New trends in the local hardening of instruments are the treatment of their working parts with laser beams, the application of coating on their surface by the gas-detonation method. The results of research work and trials are presented.

  3. Dental Support Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufurrena, Quinn

    2015-01-01

    The Association of Dental Support Organizations is a recently formed association of 33 companies representing a range of management and support services for dental practices. These organizations do not engage in the practice of dentistry, although in some cases they operate as holding companies for practices that do, thus separating the legal responsibility of providing treatment from the management and flow of funds. This report summarizes some of the recent trends in oral health care and dentists' practice patterns that are prompting the increased prevalence of this model. The general functioning of the DSO model is described, including some common variations, and the core values of ADSO are featured. PMID:26455048

  4. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shoffstall-Cone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  5. Drugs that promote dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries result from erosion of tooth enamel or cementum by acidic substances produced by bacteria found in dental plaque. Caries can lead to pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Risk factors include certain dietary habits, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. Diabetes and Sjogren's syndrome can also promote dental caries. Psychotropic substances such as cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and cannabis can promote dental caries. Many medicinal drugs facilitate the formation of dental caries, through various mechanisms; they include formulations with a high sugar content; drugs that cause dry mouth (especially antimuscarinics); drugs that lower the buccal pH (inhaled powders, etc.); and drugs that cause demineralisation (tetracyclines, etc.). In practice, patients (and parents) should be informed that some drugs can increase the risk of dental caries. They should be encouraged to adapt and reinforce dental hygiene, and advised to visit a dentist regularly.

  6. The prevalence of Pediculus humanus capitis and the coexistence of intestinal parasites in young children in boarding schools in Sivas, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Değerli, Serpil; Malatyali, Erdoğan; Çeliksöz, Ali; Özçelik, Semra; Mumcuoğlu, Kosta Y

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Pediculus humanus capitis and the coexistence of intestinal parasites in boarding primary schools in Sivas, Turkey. Seven hundred seventy-two students (350 [45.3%] girls, 422 [54.7%] boys) were evaluated with combing for the presence of head lice, collection of fecal samples, and examination of the perianal region for intestinal parasites using the cellophane tape method. The overall infestation rate for head lice was 6% (n=46). Nine children had evidence of nits only (1.2%), whereas living lice and nits or eggs were found in 37 children (4.8%). Girls were significantly more commonly infested (12.9%) than boys (0.2%). Of the parameters evaluated, socioeconomic level, number of rooms per family, and size and weight of the children were statistically significantly different between the children with and without lice. Although the infestation rate of children with intestinal parasites was higher in the head louse-infested group (23.9%) than in the group of children without lice (17.6%), the differences were not statistically significant.

  7. Folliculitis et perifolliculitis capitis abscedens et suffodiens controlled with a combination therapy: Systemic antibiosis (Metronidazole Plus Clindamycin, dermatosurgical approach, and high-dose isotretinoin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi Tchernev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Folliculitis et perifolliculitis capitis abscedens et suffodiens is a rare disease of unknown etiology. It is a suppurative process that involves the scalp, eventually resulting in extensive scarring and irreversible alopecia. The condition is also known as ′acne necrotica miliaris′ or ′Proprionibacterium′ folliculitis. Most often the disease affects men of African-American or African-Caribbean descent between 20 and 40 years of age. The clinical picture is determined by fluctuating painful fistule-forming conglomerates of abscesses in the region of the occipital scalp. The cause of scalp folliculitis is not well understood. It is generally considered to be an inflammatory reaction to components of the hair follicle, particularly the micro-organisms. These include: bacteria (especially Propionibacterium acnes, but in severe cases, also Staphylococcus aureus, Yeasts (Malassezia species and mites (Demodex folliculorum. The initial histopathologic finding is an exclusively neutrophilic infiltration followed by a granulomatous infiltrate. The treatment of the disease is usually difficult and often disappointing. Successful treatment with isotretinoin 1 mg/kg body mass could be achieved only after regular systematic administration in the course of 3-4 months. Here we describe a patient with eruptive purulent form of the disease, which has been controlled with combination therapy: systemic antibiosis with metronidazole and clindamycin, dermatosurgical removal of single nodular formations, and isotretinoin 1 mg/kg body mass for 3-5 months.

  8. Kondensasi Pada Dental Amalgam

    OpenAIRE

    Batubara, Runi Syahriani

    2011-01-01

    Amalgam merupakan campuran dari dua atau beberapa logam (alloy) yang salah satunya adalah merkuri. Kata amalgam juga didefenisikan untuk menggambarkan kombinasi atau campuran dari beberapa bahan seperti merkuri, perak, timah, tembaga, dan lainnya. Dental amalgam sendiri adalah kombinasi alloy dengan merkuri melalui suatu proses yang disebut amalgamasi. Pemanipulasian amalgam meliputi triturasi, kondensasi, carving, dan polishing. Kondensasi merupakan penekanan amalgam setelah triturasi p...

  9. Mouth and dental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Baat; I. van der Waal

    2009-01-01

    Summary This chapter contains sections titled: • Introduction • Periodontal disease • Dental caries • Odontogenic infections • Alveolar osteitis • Xerostomia and hyposalivation • Candidiasis • Angular cheilitis • Denture stomatitis • Burning mouth syndrome • Recurrent aphthous stomatitis • Recurrent

  10. Modern Dental Marketing Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Salman Khan

    2015-01-01

    Many years ago when I started working, the only form of advertising that could be used by a Dental Clinic was listing in the local Yellow pages. Advertising was almost perceived as being ‘cheap’ in the UK. Fast forward to the 21st century! The marketing tools and services that are now available can seem overwhelming.

  11. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Kun-Feng Lin; Jui-che Tsai; Ching-Cheng Chuang; Shyh-Yuan Lee; Yi-Ching Ho; Yao-Sheng Hsieh; Chia-Wei Sun

    2013-01-01

    This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT) in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed.

  12. [Instruction in dental radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sanden, W J M; Kreulen, C M; Berkhout, W E R

    2016-04-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive intensive theoretical and practical training in practical and theoretical radiology, with the aim of obtaining the 'Eindtermen Stralingshygiëne voor Tandartsen en Orthodontisten'-certificate, which is required for legal permission to use oral radiology in dental practice. It is recommended that the curriculum be expanded to include the areas of knowledge required to qualify for the 'Eindtermen Stralingshygiëne voor het gebruik van CBCT-toestellen door tandartsen' (the certificate for the use of conebeam radiology by dentists). The general dental practitioner is faced with changing laws and regulations in all areas of practice. One of the most significant legal changes in the field of dental radiology was the introduction of the new radiation protection and safety rules in 2014. Moreover, a large group of dentists is also being confronted with the transition from conventional to digital images, with all its challenges and changes in everyday practice. PMID:27073811

  13. Ethics of dental health screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janakiram, Chandrashekar; Taha, Farheen

    2016-01-01

    Screening is the detection of disease at a point in its natural history when it is not yet symptomatic. In the natural history of dental caries, for example, the incipient lesions are at a reversible stage, which is a pre-symptomatic or an unrecognised symptomatic disease. Ideally, this is the stage during which screening should identify the risk of dental caries; however, presently, the so-called dental screening employed identifies the clinical cavitation of the tooth, which is very obvious to the individual. The individual already knows that he/she has dental caries and needs treatment, which the screening personnel (dental doctor) explains again during the screening procedure. Is it ethical to call such an event screening? The mushrooming of dental teaching hospitals has promoted regular screening of dental diseases among the communities and schoolchildren through their community dentistry-related activities. More often, it is a dental "check-up" that is carried out on the pretext of screening for dental diseases. Though the basic intention of this activity is to promote awareness of dental diseases and promote good health, there is also a hidden agenda to it. An artificial demand for dental care is created that is easily capitalised on by the dental teaching institutions to enhance its clinical activity. Dental screening is doing more harm than good as patients are made aware of the diseases for which they may not be able to afford treatment. This narrative review gives an account of the scientific evidence on screening for oral diseases, the current practices in screening and the ethical dilemmas of dental screening programmes. PMID:27474698

  14. Dental Therapy Assistant: Attitudes of Army Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Theodore H.; Bair, Jeffrey H.

    The U. S. Army Dental Corps has implemented a formal program based on the concept that dental care can be more efficiently and effectively provided with treatment teams composed of one dental officer, two dental therapy assistants, one basic assistant, and the shared support of other auxiliary personnel. Such a team will use three dental treatment…

  15. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam material... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section 872.3240 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a) Identification. A dental bur is a rotary... materials intended for use in the fabrication of dental devices. (b) Classification. Class I...

  17. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  18. Radiology for dental assistants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book provides dental assistants with the knowledge they need to apply X-rays in a safe and economical manner. Starting from the theoretical fundamentals of radiophysics, the biologic effects of X-rays leading to the protective requirements of the new X-Ray Ordinance are explained. The main topics are the adjustment rules for dental film, panorama and cassette film images which are explained in detail and illustrated, the topics of materials and equipment, and processing up to the stage of a safe guarding. In chapters dealing with the practical points of view, the applications in paedodentistry and orthodontics, in endodonty, parodontology and in imaging the temporo-mandibular joints are described; these chapters also deal with recognizing and avoiding mistakes. An appendix with data worth knowing rounds up the contents. The book is based on numerous training seminars. (orig./MG)

  19. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg;

    2012-01-01

    Diagnose and treatment of traumatic dental injuries is very complex due to the multiple trauma entities represented by 6 lunation types and 9 fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and lunation injuries are often combined......, the result is, that more than 100 trauma scenario exist when the two dentitions are combined. Each of these trauma scenarios have a specific treatment demand and prospect for healing. With such a complexity in diagnose and treatment it is obvious that even experienced practitioners may have problems may have...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an internet based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long term follow up is now available to the public and professionals, on the internet using the address www...

  20. Access to public dental care facilities in Chandigarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himbala Verma

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Dental health care access and only limited dental facilities were available in most of the dental clinics in Chandigarh. Self-reported dental problem was low, and people ignored their dental problems.

  1. Dental Implants: Dual Stabilization Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    More recent epidemiological data seem to show an increasing trend of tooth loss due to periodontal reasons rather than caries; the presence of initial attachment loss, bone height and the habit of smoking significantly increase the risk of tooth mortality. A dental implant is a titanium screw which is placed into bone to replace missing teeth. The implant mimics the root of a tooth in function. Dental Implants have changed the face of dentistry over the last three decades. Success of dental i...

  2. Library service to dental practitioners.

    OpenAIRE

    Ashin, E R

    1983-01-01

    Dental school libraries offer resources of value to dental practitioners, but do not always consider practitioners to be primary clientele. A survey was conducted among the sixty U.S. dental school libraries to examine policies and attitudes toward service to practitioners. Although library use by dentists is estimated to be low, most libraries are willing to serve them as long as it does not reduce the libraries' ability to assist students and faculty. Of the respondents, 57% replied that th...

  3. Dental erosion - literature update

    OpenAIRE

    PICOS, ALINA M.; Andrea M. Chisnoiu; Jean F. Lasserre; Aurelia Spinei; Radu M.Chisnoiu; Andrei Picos

    2013-01-01

    Tooth wear is a complex, pluri-factorial process that must be taken into account in clinical practice. The main mechanisms typically related to dental wear are: abrasion, attrition, erosion and wear by fatigue. The dramatic increase in the frequency of erosive lesions, especially in younger age groups determined us to give a synthesis of the most recent scientific literature on the specific problem of erosion. Attention is drawn to the excessive consumption of acidic beverages in chi...

  4. Pubescent Dental Hygiene Education

    OpenAIRE

    MÁČALÍKOVÁ, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the stance of pubescent to oral hygiene. Theoretical part aims at the anatomy and physiology of buccal cavity, psychology of pubescent youths and next most frequent teeth troubles, such as caries, pulpitis and parodontosis. Their primary etiology, diagnostic, therapy and prevention are described. The noticeable part is devoted to oral hygiene, its resources, methods of teeth cleaning and prevention also. Practical part describes monitoring of the work of dental...

  5. Dental treatment abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalakkal, Paul; Ataide, Ida De Noronha De; Krishnan, Ramesh; Pavaskar, Rajdeep

    2014-07-01

    These case reports highlight dental treatment abuse performed by a quack on children. The anterior teeth of these children were metal capped using cement, which were otherwise healthy. The treatment was done on children without parental consent by a quack from Denmark who gave the reason as for resolving proclination of upper permanent incisors. The unanatomic, unaesthetic metal caps were removed after the child reported to the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry. PMID:25177645

  6. Fluoride in dental erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, A C; Wiegand, A.; Rios, D.; Buzalaf, M.A.R.; Lussi, A.

    2011-01-01

    Dental erosion develops through chronic exposure to extrinsic/intrinsic acids with a low pH. Enamel erosion is characterized by a centripetal dissolution leaving a small demineralized zone behind. In contrast, erosive demineralization in dentin is more complex as the acid-induced mineral dissolution leads to the exposure of collagenous organic matrix, which hampers ion diffusion and, thus, reduces further progression of the lesion. Topical fluoridation inducing the formation of a protective l...

  7. Nanotechnology and Dental Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Sandrine Lavenus; Guy Louarn; Pierre Layrolle

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of i...

  8. Radiologi Dental Digital

    OpenAIRE

    Evilani Sofyanti

    2008-01-01

    Salah satu teknologi yang terbaru dan paling menarik yang dikenal di bidang kedokteran gigi beberapa tahun terakhir ini adalah radiologi dental digital. Digital imaging telah ada sejak 1970-an, tetapi baru diperkenalkan ke bidang kedokteran gigi pada tahun 1987 oleh Dr. Francois Mugnon, Sejak saat itu produksinya telah dipasarkan oleh perusahaan-perusahaan terkenal yang menghasilkan produk-produk yang bersaing dalam pembuatan alat tersebut. Digital imaging adalah teknologi digital yang dia...

  9. Sensibilidad dentaria Dental sensibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Tortolini

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available La sensibilidad dentaria l es un problema común que se presenta entre el 9 y el 30% de la población adulta. La teoría hidrodinámica es aceptada como uno de los mecanismos de inducción de la respuesta pulpar dolorosa, debido a que los estímulos provocan el movimiento del fluido y para ello es necesario que la dentina este expuesta y que los túbulos dentinarios estén abiertos y permeables a la pulpa. Es fundamental realizar el diagnostico diferencial con otras causas de dolor dental e identificar los factores etiológicos y predisponentes.Dental sensitivity is a common problem and it affect 9 and 30% the adult poblation. The hidrodynamyc theory is cited as the menchanism of induction of a painful pulpal response and implies that stimuli tranmission across dentine increase the rate of fluid flow through dentinal tubules and for this to accur the dentinal tubules must be opened andpermeable to the pulp. An appropiate tretametn needs a diferential diagnosis eith other causes of dental pain and the identification of predisponing etiologic factors.

  10. ORO-DENTAL PATTERN IN MENTALLY RETARDED

    OpenAIRE

    Tandon, Pradeep; Jha, Sanjeev; Tandon, Ragini; Sondhi, Deepak; Chandra, Mahesh; Trivedi, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    SUMMARY The study was carried out in 25 mentally retarded children and compared with equal number of normal children. They were subjected to detailed psychiatric evaluation and dental examination. The dental anomalies were corroborated with cephalometric analysis of lateral cephalograms. It was concluded that all mentally retarded children had some dental abnormality in them in form of dental malocclusion, wide inter dental spaces, absence of teeth etc. We suggest early dental management for ...

  11. Medical emergencies in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, M H

    2009-06-01

    Serious medical emergencies are fortunately a rare occurrence in the dental practice environment; however, if an emergency situation is encountered a delay in treatment may result in potentially avoidable consequences. The risk of mortality or serious morbidity can be reduced by ensuring that basic emergency equipment and medications are in place, and that the dental team is appropriately trained in basic life support measures. This article aims to provide an overview of the basic emergency medications and equipment that should be present in dental practices, and to discuss specific responses to some of the more common adverse medical events that can present while providing dental treatment.

  12. Cognitive vulnerability and dental fear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer A John

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cognitive Vulnerability Model proposes that perceptions of certain characteristics of a situation are critical determinants of fear. Although the model is applicable to all animal, natural environment and situational fears, it has not yet been applied specifically to dental fear. This study therefore aimed to examine the association between dental fear and perceptions of dental visits as uncontrollable, unpredictable and dangerous. Methods The study used a clustered, stratified national sample of Australians aged 15 years and over. All participants were asked in a telephone interview survey to indicate their level of dental fear. Participants who received an oral examination were subsequently provided with a self-complete questionnaire in which they rated their perceptions of uncontrollability, unpredictability and dangerousness associated with dental visiting. Results 3937 participants were recruited. Each of the three vulnerability-related perceptions was strongly associated with the prevalence of high dental fear. In a logistic regression analysis, uncontrollability and dangerousness perceptions were significantly associated with high dental fear after controlling for age and sex. However, unpredictability perceptions did not have a statistically significant independent association with dental fear after controlling for all other variables. Conclusion Results are mostly consistent with the Cognitive Vulnerability Model of the etiology of fear, with perceptions of uncontrollability, unpredictability and dangerousness each showing a strong bivariate relationship with high dental fear prevalence. However, more extensive measures of vulnerability perceptions would be valuable in future investigations.

  13. Treatment of head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) infestation: is regular combing alone with a special detection comb effective at all levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Özgür; Balcıoğlu, I Cüneyt; Limoncu, M Emin; Girginkardeşler, Nogay; Arserim, Süha K; Görgün, Serhan; Oyur, Tuba; Karakuş, Mehmet; Düzyol, Didem; Gökmen, Aysegül Aksoy; Kitapçıoğlu, Gül; Özbel, Yusuf

    2015-04-01

    Head lice infestation (HLI) caused by Pediculus humanus capitis has been a public health problem worldwide. Specially designed combs are used to identify head lice, while anti-lice products are applied on the scalp for treatment. In the present study, we aimed to test whether combing only by precision detection comb (PDC) or metal pin comb (MPC) could be effective alternatives to the use of anti-lice products in children. A total of 560 children from two rural schools in Turkey were screened. In the PDC trial, children were combed every second day for 14 days, while in the MPC trial, combing was performed once in every four days for 15 days. Children were divided into two groups (dry combing and wet combing) for both trials and results were compared. The results showed no significant differences between dry and wet combing strategies for both combs for the removal of head lice (p > 0.05). The number of adult head lice declined significantly on each subsequent combing day in both approaches, except on day 15 in the MPC trial. In the end, no louse was found in 54.1 and 48.9% of children in the PDC and MPC trials, respectively. Since family members of infested children were not available, they were not checked for HLI. Four times combing within 2 weeks with MPC combs was found effective for both treatment of low HLI and prevention of heavy HLI. In conclusion, regular combing by special combs decreases HLI level in children and is safely applicable as long-term treatment. PMID:25604670

  14. The Level of Dental Anxiety and Dental Status in Adult Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dobros, Katarzyna; Hajto-Bryk, Justyna; Wnek, Anna; Zarzecka, Joanna; Rzepka, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to assess potential correlation between dental anxiety and overall dental status in adult patients, in consideration of the frequency of dental appointments and individual dental hygiene practices. Materials and Methods: Individual dental anxiety levels were assessed with the aid of the Corah’s dental anxiety scale (DAS). The study embraced 112 patients of the University Dental Clinic, Kraków. Following clinical and X-ray exams, r...

  15. Dental Chairside Technique. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, Maura; Weaver, Trudy Karlene

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: local anesthesia; dental office emergencies; oral hygiene;…

  16. Health Instruction Packages: Dental Assisting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Paula

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules to instruct dental assisting students in various office skills. The first module, "Dental Office Telephone Techniques," examines the qualities of a good telephone voice and demeanor and provides guidelines for taking a message and handling various telephone…

  17. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The handbook contains laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state. It describes licensure requirements and includes complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist. Applicants are…

  18. Dental technician of the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Derksen; D. Wismeijer; S. Hanssen; A. Tahmaseb

    2015-01-01

    The new technologies in the field of dental science have not only changed the way in which dentists run their practice but have also dramatically changed the procedures carried out in dental laboratories. Mechanical engineering, incorporated CMM, laser milling, 3D printing and 3D design in a mechani

  19. Basal cell carcinoma of the scalp after radiation therapy for tinea capitis: 33 patients; Carcinomes basocellulaires du cuir chevelu secondaires a une radiotherapie pour teigne: une serie de 33 malades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mseddi, M.; Bouassida, S.; Marrekchi, S.; Khemakhem, M.; Gargouri, N.; Turki, H.; Zahaf, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Hedi Chaker, Service de Dermatologie, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2004-08-01

    Occurrence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) following radiotherapy for tinea capitis is well known. The aim of this study was to specify the clinical and histological features of these BCC seen in 33 patients (1995 000). Twenty seven men and six women were diagnosed with BCC. The age of onset varied between 32 an 62 years. Radiotherapy was received between 5 and 17 years of age. The interval between irradiation and the onset of carcinoma varied between 21 and 51 years. Total number of lesions was 55. Forty percent of BCC occurred on the occipital area, the number varied from 1 to 5 and the size from 2 to 45 mm. Clinically, the nodular type was found in 51% of cases. Pigment was present in 64% of cases. Histological study showed a nodular aspect in 76% and pigmentation in 63% of cases. Nodular and pigmented type were the predominant BCC occurring after radiotherapy for tinea capitis in our series. In the literature, BCC are the most frequent carcinomas occurring after radiotherapy (70-100%). Pigmentation was not described in other series. The nodular histological form was the most frequent. (author)

  20. Ergonomic design for dental offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, David J; Sanders, Martha J; Turcotte, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    The increasing complexity of the dental office environment influences productivity and workflow for dental clinicians. Advances in technology, and with it the range of products needed to provide services, have led to sprawl in operatory setups and the potential for awkward postures for dental clinicians during the delivery of oral health services. Although ergonomics often addresses the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders for specific populations of workers, concepts of workflow and productivity are integral to improved practice in work environments. This article provides suggestions for improving workflow and productivity for dental clinicians. The article applies ergonomic principles to dental practice issues such as equipment and supply management, office design, and workflow management. Implications for improved ergonomic processes and future research are explored. PMID:20448328

  1. Dental Forensics: Bitemark Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Forensic odontology (dental forensics can provide useful evidence in both criminal and civil cases, and therefore remains a part of the wider discipline of forensic science. As an example from the toolbox of forensic odontology, the practice and experience on bitemark analysis is reviewed here in brief. The principle of using visible bitemarks in crime victims or in other objects as evidence is fundamentally based on the observation that the detailed pattern of dental imprints tend to be practically unique for each individual. Therefore, finding such an imprint as a bitemark can bear a strong testimony that it was produced by the individual that has the matching dental pattern. However, the comparison of the observed bitemark and the suspected set of teeth will necessarily require human interpretation, and this is not infallible. Both technical challenges in the bitemarks and human errors in the interpretation are possible. To minimise such errors and to maximise the value of bitemark analysis, dedicated procedures and protocols have been developed, and the personnel taking care of the analysis need to be properly trained. In principle the action within the discipline should be conducted as in evidence-based dentristy, i.e. accepted procedures should have known error rates. Because of the involvement of human interpretation, even personal performance statistics may be required from legal expert statements. The requirements have been introduced largely due to cases where false convictions based on bitemark analysishave been overturned after DNA analysis.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v15i2.76

  2. Sensibilidad dentaria Dental sensibility

    OpenAIRE

    P. Tortolini

    2003-01-01

    La sensibilidad dentaria l es un problema común que se presenta entre el 9 y el 30% de la población adulta. La teoría hidrodinámica es aceptada como uno de los mecanismos de inducción de la respuesta pulpar dolorosa, debido a que los estímulos provocan el movimiento del fluido y para ello es necesario que la dentina este expuesta y que los túbulos dentinarios estén abiertos y permeables a la pulpa. Es fundamental realizar el diagnostico diferencial con otras causas de dolor dental e identific...

  3. The american dental dream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The American Dental Dream-the cultural desire for straight, white teeth-is difficult, if not impossible, for poor and working-class people to achieve. Using ethnographic fiction, autoethnography, poetry, and qualitative interviewing, I brush away the taken-for-granted assumptions about teeth. I explore the personal, relational, and structural consequences of this cultural desire, and show how social class writes itself on our bodies. I write these culture-centered teeth tales to show how one might cope with their teeth. PMID:25257392

  4. The american dental dream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The American Dental Dream-the cultural desire for straight, white teeth-is difficult, if not impossible, for poor and working-class people to achieve. Using ethnographic fiction, autoethnography, poetry, and qualitative interviewing, I brush away the taken-for-granted assumptions about teeth. I explore the personal, relational, and structural consequences of this cultural desire, and show how social class writes itself on our bodies. I write these culture-centered teeth tales to show how one might cope with their teeth.

  5. [Dental prostheses and dental impressions from a hygienic viewpoint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, J P

    1986-12-01

    Dentures, dental impressions, removable orthodontic appliances and all dental technical devices, which are part of any dental treatment are parts as well of a potential crosscontamination chain in dental treatment. Most of those items do not tolerate heat as a sure sterilization medium. For disinfection, chemical disinfectant solutions may be used as far as they work properly and as they are tolerated by the materials in question. Though, one can report some progress in disinfection of dentures and impressions, there are still questions open depending on safety and/or compatibility of the particular materials. For disinfection of removable dentures chlorine-yielding preparations such as Maranon can be recommended. Peracid preparations, such as Sekusept, Sekusept steril and Dentavon may be useful for disinfection of dental impressions. To do the possible means to reduce the infection risk for all persons involved in the dental treatment, patient, dentist, dental technician and all auxiliary persons. This includes both, active hygiene provisions as sterilization and disinfection, as well as possible passive self protection.

  6. Dental Therapy Assistant: Effect on Team Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Theodore H.

    The U.S. Army Dental Corps has implemented a formal program based on the concept that dental care can be more efficiently and effectively provided with treatment teams composed of one dental officer, two dental therapy assistants (DTAs), one basic assistant, and the shared support of other auxiliary personnel. Such a team will use three dental…

  7. Intergrated dental care in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, P.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with integrated dental care in nursing homes. First, the dental treatment needs were ascertained of 432 residents in three Dutch nursing homes that offer integrated dental care. Dentist researchers intra-orally examined the residents and found that 72% required dental treatment. How

  8. 21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental mercury. 872.3700 Section 872.3700 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a device composed of mercury intended for use as a component of amalgam alloy in the restoration of...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental floss. 872.6390 Section 872.6390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  11. Career patterns of dental hygienists qualifying from the Liverpool Dental Hospital School of Dental Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillam, D G

    1989-04-22

    This study assesses the pattern of employment of dental hygienists who qualified from the Liverpool Dental Hospital School of Dental Hygiene between 1977 and 1986. Of the 100 students who qualified during this period, 98 responded to a questionnaire. Seventy-seven per cent were employed as dental hygienists or dental health educators at the time of the survey, which took place between October 1987 and February 1988. The results show that after an initial slight under-employment, the majority quickly found as much work as they wanted and worked for an average of 2.24 practices each. The majority chose part-time employment and there was a steady decline in the number of sessions worked from the third year after qualifying. This decline was due to domestic commitments rather than dissatisfaction with the job. Only 4% stated they would definitely not return to work as a hygienist whilst a further 10% were uncertain. PMID:2719891

  12. Developing core dental public health competencies for predoctoral dental and dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Atchison, Kathryn Ann

    2015-01-01

    Dental professionals are an "underutilized" workforce, when it comes to advocating for prevention and wellness in populations. The goal of this HRSA-funded project is to develop dental public health (DPH) competencies and curriculum for US predoctoral dental and dental hygiene programs. These competencies and accompanying curriculum are designed to better prepare the oral health workforce to meet the needs of the entire population, including the chronically underserved, those challenged by poor health literacy, or communities encountering barriers to accessing oral health care. By increasing the DPH competency of all graduating dental providers, in population-based approaches to preventing oral diseases rather than the existing exclusive focus on treatment, the number of providers who can respond to a population or the public's unmet needs and challenges, both in private practices and publicly supported clinics, will increase. This paper describes the competency development process and the eight competencies that were identified. PMID:26630639

  13. Developing core dental public health competencies for predoctoral dental and dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Atchison, Kathryn Ann

    2015-01-01

    Dental professionals are an "underutilized" workforce, when it comes to advocating for prevention and wellness in populations. The goal of this HRSA-funded project is to develop dental public health (DPH) competencies and curriculum for US predoctoral dental and dental hygiene programs. These competencies and accompanying curriculum are designed to better prepare the oral health workforce to meet the needs of the entire population, including the chronically underserved, those challenged by poor health literacy, or communities encountering barriers to accessing oral health care. By increasing the DPH competency of all graduating dental providers, in population-based approaches to preventing oral diseases rather than the existing exclusive focus on treatment, the number of providers who can respond to a population or the public's unmet needs and challenges, both in private practices and publicly supported clinics, will increase. This paper describes the competency development process and the eight competencies that were identified.

  14. Dental caries: Therapeutic possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Tamara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary tendencies in dentistry are based on the concept of maximal protection of healthy tooth tissues. Caries removal has been done traditionally with mechanical rotary instruments that are fast and precise. However, conventional cavity preparation has potential adverse effects to the pulp due to heat, pressure and vibrations. Moreover, drilling often causes pain and requires local anaesthesia, and these procedures are frequently perceived as unpleasant. Etiology, development and prevention of dental caries are better understood today and new restorative materials that bond micromechanically and/or chemically to dental tissues have been introduced. Thus, development of a new, less destructive caries removal technique is allowed. In the last decades, many alternative methods have been introduced in an attempt to replace rotary instruments. These are claimed to be efficient and selective for diseased tissues and to offer comfortable treatment to the patients. New methods include air abrasion, air polishing, ultrasonic, polymer burs, enzymes, systems for chemo-mechanical caries removal, and lasers. The aim of this paper was to discuss various caries removal techniques and possibilities of their use in clinical practice. Based on the literature review it can be concluded that none of the new caries removal methods can completely replace conventional rotary instruments.

  15. [Dental anatomy of dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisian, E G

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate dog teeth anatomy as animal model for study of etiopathogenesis of caries disease and physiological tooth wear in human. After examining the dog's dental system, following conclusions were drawn: the dog has 42 permanent teeth, which are distributed over the dental arches not equally, and so the upper dentition consists of 20, and the lower of 22 teeth. The largest are considered upper fourth premolar and lower first molars, which are called discordant teeth. Between discordant teeth and fangs a dog has an open bite, which is limited to the top and bottom conical crown premolar teeth. Thus, in the closed position of the jaws, behind this occlusion is limited by discordant teeth, just in contact are smaller in size two molars. Only large dog's molars in a valid comparison can be likened to human molars, which allows us to use them in an analog comparison between them with further study of the morphological features ensure durability short-crown teeth and their predisposition to caries.

  16. Incidence of dental caries in chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur Surrinder

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Three hundred patients of chronic urticaria were screened for dental affections. Sixty two (20.66% patients were detected to have dental caries. Among the control group which com-prised of 100 patients, 20% had dental caries. There was thus no increased incidence of dental caries among patients with urticaria. Only 2 patients had remission of urticaria following treat-ment of caries. Dental caries therefore is probably not a cause of chronic urticaria.

  17. Early prevention of dental caries in children

    OpenAIRE

    Lebedeva S.N.; Kharitonova T.L.; Kazakova L.N.

    2011-01-01

    Early prevention of dental caries in children plays an important role in the preservation of dental health. This article explains the necessity of early prevention of dental caries in children. The most effective methods of prevention of dental caries are beginning hygiene care and respect for the recommendations dentist since the first teeth. It is shown that the use of conservative therapy is very effective in the treatment of early forms of dental caries

  18. Spatially-oriented EMR for Dental Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Min; Koenig, Lisa; Lynch, John; Wirtz, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    As digital dental images become widely available, a new Electronic MR system (EMR) will be critical for the success of applying new technology to dental care. This project is designed an image-based and spatially-oriented EMR for dental surgery. A new panoramic image-based annotation model will be developed, which will complement dental charting precisely locating specific spatial findings for each patient. A spatially-oriented, multilayered data model for dental EMR will be developed using G...

  19. Initial dental needs and a projection of needed dental capacity in the Iowa Department of Corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringgenberg, Wendy J

    2011-04-01

    The dental health data for the Iowa Department of Corrections (IDOC) inmate population were analyzed to better understand dental health issues experienced by inmates and IDOC's system for responding to those dental needs. Each inmate is given a dental health assessment upon admission to Iowa's prison system. These data were analyzed for frequency of dental health needs and frequency of dental health services. In addition, emergency dental health services were analyzed. The findings show that each inmate has approximately 7.6 dental codes, including the initial exam, dental services provided, and dental needs not yet addressed. When reviewing only dental needs (and not the initial exam), 32% (5,110) identified dental needs were completed and 66% (10,572) were not.

  20. Dental implants in growing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of teeth by implants is usually restricted to patients with completed craniofacial growth. The aim of this literature review is to discuss the use of dental implants in normal growing patients and in patients with ectodermal dysplasia and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. It is recommended that while deciding the optimal individual time point of implant insertion, the status of skeletal growth, the degree of hypodontia, and extension of related psychological stress should be taken into account, in addition to the status of existing dentition and dental compliance of a pediatric patient.

  1. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulev Assen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  2. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulev, Assen; Roussev, Ilia; Karpuzov, Simeon; Stoilov, Georgi; Ignatova, Detelina; See, Constantin von; Mitov, Gergo

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  3. Documentation and comunication between dental offices and dental laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Carolina Santos Rondon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This research was conducted to review the documentation and communication protocols used by dental offices and dental laboratories in the cities: Rio de Janeiro (RJ and Araçatuba (SP, focusing on legal aspects of this practice, through a questionnaire with open and structured questions. The answers were subjected to statistical analysis with Chi-square and Fisher´s exact test, and showed that there is no agreement in the literature regarding documentation and communication protocols between the observed samples, as well as the perception of this practice by the interviewed, making evident the need to rethink the aspects that work through the relationship between dental offices and dental laboratories.

  4. Factors for Increasing Adoption of E-Courses Among Dental and Dental Hygiene Faculty Members

    OpenAIRE

    DeBate, Rita D.; Cragun, Deborah; Severson, Herbert H; Shaw, Tracy; Christiansen, Steve; Koerber, Anne; Tomar, Scott; Brown, Kelli McCormack; Tedesco, Lisa A.; Hendricson, William

    2011-01-01

    The incorporation of web-based learning into the dental curriculum has been consistently recommended in the literature on reform in dental education. There has been growing support for web-based learning in dental and dental hygiene education as demonstrated by deans’ identifying this as a planned curricular innovation. The purpose of our study was to explore characteristics of e-courses that may serve to increase adoption among dental and dental hygiene faculty members. Eight ninety-minute f...

  5. Dental pulp vascular permeability changes induced by dental bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiane da Costa; Sueli Patricia Harumi Miyagi; Marcelo dos Santos; Manoel Eduardo de Lima Machado; Márcia Martins Marques

    2012-01-01

    Aiming to compare the effect of different light sources for dental bleaching on vascular permeability of dental pulps, forty-eight incisors were used. The bleaching agent (35 % hydrogen peroxide) was activated by halogen light; LED (Light Emitting Diode) or LED, followed by laser phototherapy (LPT) (λ = 780 nm; 3 J/cm²). After the bleaching procedures, the animals received an intra-arterial dye injection and one hour later were sacrificed. The teeth were diaphanized and photographed. The...

  6. DOCUMENTATION AND COMUNICATION BETWEEN DENTAL OFFICES AND DENTAL LABORATORIES

    OpenAIRE

    Bruna Carolina Santos Rondon; Mário Marques Fernandes; Rachel Lima RIbeiro Tinoco; Eduardo Daruge Júnior

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This research was conducted to review the documentation and communication protocols used by dental offices and dental laboratories in the cities: Rio de Janeiro (RJ) and Araçatuba (SP), focusing on legal aspects of this practice, through a questionnaire with open and structured questions. The answers were subjected to statistical analysis with Chi-square and Fisher´s exact test, and showed that there is no agreement in the literature regarding documentation and communication protocol...

  7. Visibility of dental pulp spaces in dental ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Szopinski, K T; Regulski, P

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of dental ultrasound with conventional sonographic equipment. The teeth of three adult volunteers who had cone beam CT examinations performed previously with clinical indications and one extracted tooth were examined using linear and compact (hockey stick) sonographic probes. The sonographic images were compared with cone beam CT images reconstructed accordingly. Dental pulp spaces were demonstrated in all teeth not covered with prosthet...

  8. Magnetic resonance tomography and dental radiology (Dental-MRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To demonstrate the usefulness of Dental-MRT for imaging of anatomic and pathologic conditions of the mandible and maxilla. Methods: Seven healthy volunteers, 5 patients with pulpitis, 9 patients with dentigerous cysts, 5 patients after tooth transplantation and 12 patients with atrophic mandibles were evaluated. Studies of the jaws using axial T1- and T2-weighted gradient echo and spin echo sequences in 2D and 3D technique have been to performed. The acquired images were reconstructed with a standard dental software package on a workstation as panoramic and cross sectional views of the mandible or maxilla. Results: The entire maxilla and mandibula, teeth, dental pulp and the content of the mandibular canal were well depicted. Patients with inflammatory disease of the pulp chamber demonstrate bone marrow edema in the periapical region. Dentigerous cysts and their relation to the surrounding structures are clearly shown. After contrast media application marked enhancement of the dental pulp can be found. Conclusion: Dental-MRT provides a valuable tool for visualization and detection of dental diseases. (orig.)

  9. CT in dental osseointegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computerised tomography (CT) plays a key role in the pre-surgical evaluation of the alveolar process for titanium dental implants. The successful replacement of lost teeth by tissue integrated tooth root implants is a major advance in clinical dentistry. The paper will discuss briefly the history of osseointegration and how CT is now involved in helping the edentulous patient. CT is considered as a quick and convenient method of obtaining excellent anatomical information about the maxilla. Conventional tomography is difficult to obtain and does not provide valuable cross-sectional images. Exact height and width calculations can be made as well as screening out patients with advanced bone resorption. 3 refs. 6 figs

  10. DENTAL FLUOROSIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Imandel

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available Some children of Borazjan area have minute white flecks, yellow or brown spot areas scattered irregularly over the tooth surface, the causative factor was attributed to excess of fluoride in water. To verify this matter short chemical examination of water samples from endemic area was carried out. The results of water analysis by colorimetric method, using zirconium a1izarin reagent after distillation the samples, showed that the average mount of fluoride of Borazjan and the mixture of treated. Water of Boshigan River with water piped of Borazjan wells were 4 and 2 times respectively more than recommended control limits for fluoride and confirmed that this was the causative agent of mottled, teeth (Dental Fluorosis.

  11. Biofilm and Dental Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Øilo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All treatment involving the use of biomaterials in the body can affect the host in positive or negative ways. The microbiological environment in the oral cavity is affected by the composition and shape of the biomaterials used for oral restorations. This may impair the patients’ oral health and sometimes their general health as well. Many factors determine the composition of the microbiota and the formation of biofilm in relation to biomaterials such as, surface roughness, surface energy and chemical composition, This paper aims to give an overview of the scientific literature regarding the association between the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of dental biomaterials and oral biofilm formation, with emphasis on current research and future perspectives.

  12. Radiation protection in dental practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation protection in the dental practice is discussed in the light of results of an investigation into the radiation burden in the Netherlands resulting from dental x-ray radiographs. Although it has appeared that the number of dental x-ray radiographs has increased strongly the past decennia ( up till now about 0.4 per inhabitant per annum), the average dose per annum has been reduced with respect to the one in 1920 with at least a factor 45. This dose reduction has been achieved in the dental practice voluntary by, among other things, optimization, filtration, enlarging of the distance between focus and skin, reduction of the beam surface and the use of sensitive x-ray films. (author). 1 fig

  13. Dental abscess: A microbiological review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental abscess is a frequently occurring infectious process known to the health practice. The fate of the infection depends on the virulence of the bacteria, host resistance factors, and regional anatomy. Serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Acute dental abscess is polymicrobial, comprising of strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella, Fusobacterium species, and facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group. Numerous novel, uncultivable and fastidious organisms have been identified as potential pathogens with the use of non-culture techniques. The majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment while the use of antimicrobials is limited to severe spreading infections. There is a need for good-quality clinical trials of sufficient size to identify the ideal treatment. The microbiology of the acute dentoalveolar abscess and its treatment in the light of improved culture and diagnostic methods are reviewed.

  14. Dental Health: The Basic Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease, which causes inflamed and infected gums n Bruxism, which occurs when a person clenches his or ... each of which can be made worse by bruxism and malocclusion. Dental care and MS symptoms There ...

  15. Dental insurance! Are we ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Ravi S S; Jindal, R

    2011-01-01

    Dental insurance is insurance designed to pay the costs associated with dental care. The Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) bill which was put forward in the winter session of the Lok Sabha (2008) focused on increasing the foreign investment share from the existing 26% to 49% in the insurance companies of India. This will allow the multibillion dollar international insurance companies to enter the Indian market and subsequently cover all aspects of insurance in India. Dental insurance will be an integral a part of this system. Dental insurance is a new concept in Southeast Asia as very few countries in Southeast Asia cover this aspect of insurance. It is important that the dentists in India should be acquainted with the different types of plans these companies are going to offer and about a new relationship which is going to emerge in the coming years between dentist, patient and the insurance company.

  16. Electronic Dental Records System Adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovicz-Finkelsztain, Renata; Barsottini, Claudia G N; Marin, Heimar Fatima

    2015-01-01

    The use of Electronic Dental Records (EDRs) and management software has become more frequent, following the increase in prevelance of new technologies and computers in dental offices. The purpose of this study is to identify and evaluate the use of EDRs by the dental community in the São Paulo city area. A quantitative case study was performed using a survey on the phone. A total of 54 offices were contacted and only one declinedparticipation in this study. Only one office did not have a computer. EDRs were used in 28 offices and only four were paperless. The lack of studies in this area suggests the need for more usability and implementation studies on EDRs so that we can improve EDR adoption by the dental community.

  17. Dental insurance! Are we ready?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi SS Toor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental insurance is insurance designed to pay the costs associated with dental care. The Foreign Direct Investment (FDI bill which was put forward in the winter session of the Lok Sabha (2008 focused on increasing the foreign investment share from the existing 26% to 49% in the insurance companies of India. This will allow the multibillion dollar international insurance companies to enter the Indian market and subsequently cover all aspects of insurance in India. Dental insurance will be an integral a part of this system. Dental insurance is a new concept in Southeast Asia as very few countries in Southeast Asia cover this aspect of insurance. It is important that the dentists in India should be acquainted with the different types of plans these companies are going to offer and about a new relationship which is going to emerge in the coming years between dentist, patient and the insurance company.

  18. The Phenomenon of Dental Fear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    Odontophobia is a rather unique phobia with special psychosomatic components that impact on the dental health of odontophobic persons. It also has psychosocial components largely as a result of destruction of the teeth and subsequent embarrassment that can affect a person and cause a vicious cycle...... of dental fear (see fig. 1). The phenomenon is facilitated by misunderstandings and myths generated by both patients and dentists (see table 1 for examples). The most common reasons given in the literature for such strong fears of dental treatment are: 1) bad experiences in childhood for 85% of cases, 2......) feeling of powerlessness and lack of control over personal emotional reactions and over the social situation in the dental chair, 3) social learning processes in which the image of the dentist is cast in a negative light by the mass media or by the person's relatives or friends and 4) that the person has...

  19. Dental Services Among Medicare Beneficiaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) has a data highlight based on the 2012 Cost and Use Research Files. This work highlights dental information...

  20. The distribution features of pathogenic fungi of 127 cases of tinea capitis in Jingzhou%荆州地区127例头癣的病原菌分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽; 方静; 刘进先

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the distribution features of pathogenic fungi of 127 cases of tinea capitis in Jingzhou. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 127 cases which were diagnosed as tinea capitis by fungal microscopic examination and culture,from January 2004 to June 201 5 in Jingzhou.Results The incidence of tinea capitis was higest in 2006,then was a trend of fluctuation,however,declined as a whole.A total 127 strains of pathogenic fungi were isolated,of these strains,the major pathogenic fungi were Trichophyton violaceum (61.42%),Trichophyton rubrum (14.1 7%)and Trichophyton mentagrophyte (1 1.81%)in turn.The 4 clinical types were black dot tinea (57.48%),tinea kerion (24.41%), tinea alba (1 7.32%)and tinea favosa (0.79%).Conclusion The most common clinical type was black dot tinea and the path-ogenic fungus was Trichophyton violaceum .%目的了解荆州地区头癣的病原菌的分布特点。方法对2004年1月~2015年6月荆州地区127例经真菌镜检和真菌培养鉴定为头癣患者进行回顾性分析。结果荆州地区头癣发病率于2006年最高,此后呈波动状态,整体呈下降趋势。共分离出127株菌株,主要致病菌依次为紫色毛癣菌(61.42%)、红色毛癣菌(14.17%)和须癣毛癣菌(11.81%)。4种临床类型依次为黑点癣(57.48%)、脓癣(24.41%)、白癣(17.32%)和黄癣(0.79%)。结论荆州地区头癣以黑点癣最为常见,主要致病菌为紫色毛癣菌。

  1. Health promotion and dental caries

    OpenAIRE

    Marisa Maltz; Juliana Jobim Jardim; Luana Severo Alves

    2010-01-01

    The central idea of the Brazilian health system is to prevent the establishment of disease or detect it as early as possible. Prevention and treatment of dental caries are related to behavioral factors, including dietary and oral hygiene habits, which are related to many chronic diseases. Dental health promotion therefore should be fully integrated into broadly based health-promoting strategies and actions such as food and health policies, and general hygiene (including oral hygiene), among o...

  2. Soft skills and dental education

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, M. A. G.; Abu Kasim, N. H.; Naimie, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Soft skills and hard skills are essential in the practice of dentistry. While hard skills deal with technical proficiency, soft skills relate to a personal values and interpersonal skills that determine a person's ability to fit in a particular situation. These skills contribute to the success of organisations that deal face-to-face with clients. Effective soft skills benefit the dental practice. However, the teaching of soft skills remains a challenge to dental schools. This paper discus...

  3. Health Implications of Dental Amalgam

    OpenAIRE

    Naimi-Akbar, Aron

    2013-01-01

    Dental amalgam is one of the most widely used, but also the most controversial of dental restorative materials. Since its introduction during the first half of the 19 th century, concerns have been raised about health hazards related to the toxicity of a major component of amalgam, mercury. This has been a particularly contentious issue in Swed en, where amalgam use was discontinued in 2009, on environmental grounds. Two aspects of particular concern are the release...

  4. Dental aid in the Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylands, V

    1992-03-01

    From January to July of 1991, I worked on a dental project in Dharamsala, Northern India whose aim was to leave the Tibetan community there dentally self-sufficient. Since 1959, following the Chinese invasion of Tibet, India and Nepal have become home to thousands of Tibetan refugees. Dharamsala is home to His Holiness the Dalai Lama, the spiritual leader of Tibet, and also of the largest Tibetan refugee communities (approximately 15,000).

  5. Dental Education in Veterinary Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Diana L Eubanks

    2011-01-01

    Periodontal disease is among the most prevalent canine dis-eases affecting over 75% of dogs. Strengthening of the human-animal bond and the increasing education of the aver-age pet owner, have fostered a heightened awareness of periodontal care in dogs and cats. Industry support has further assisted the small animal veterinarian in providing quality dental treatments and prevention. As recently as the 1990’s, veterinary curriculums contained little or no dental training. That trend is changin...

  6. Current trends in dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja; Ong, Joo L.

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evoluti...

  7. Implementing a National Dental Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Lam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground The Chronic Dental Disease Scheme (CDSS is the first public dental policy in Australia to attract Medicare benefits for dental services. Aims This study examines the utilisation of a new federal method of funding dental care in Australia and provides an insight into the implications of government dental programs. The program titled; Chronic Dental Disease Scheme, provided government-subsidised dental care for people suffering from a chronic medical condition. Method A retrospective analysis of activity data using the relevant item numbers were extracted from the open source Medicare Benefits Schedule database (MBS for years 2007-2009. Results During the study period, a total of approximately five million dental services were provided. There was a disproportionate use of services between jurisdictions. The highest proportion (66% of services was provided in the state of New South Wales (NSW with Victoria second (22%. The adjusted value of care provided as a proportion of comprehensive examinations ranged from $1937 in the northern territory (NT to $2900 in NSW. The value of care per dentist ranged from nearly $80 000 down to less than $1000 and the value of care per adult of the population ranged between $53 and $1 across Australia. The highest was always in NSW and the lowest always being the NT. Fixed prosthodontics (reconstruction accounted for the significant costs associated with the program. Conclusion The scheme has been utilised above its budget estimate with prosthodontics accounting for the majority of expenses. Treatment plans differed between jurisdictions. The increase in utilisation of the scheme was coincident with periods of increased in subsidy and remuneration and has been postulated to be a main driver for its utilisation rather than the improvement in chronic health.

  8. Dental implants in growing children

    OpenAIRE

    S.K. Mishra; Chowdhary, N.; Chowdhary, R.

    2013-01-01

    The replacement of teeth by implants is usually restricted to patients with completed craniofacial growth. The aim of this literature review is to discuss the use of dental implants in normal growing patients and in patients with ectodermal dysplasia and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. It is recommended that while deciding the optimal individual time point of implant insertion, the status of skeletal growth, the degree o...

  9. [Functional dental anatomy and amalgam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernier, B; Colon, P

    1989-01-01

    Very often, the functional dental anatomy are reflected during the rehabilitation of posterior quadrants. However, the placement, the shaping in correct relation of the different dental components are indispensable conditions to respect, in order to achieve an adequate integration of the restoration within the neuro-muscular system. A clinical protocol is proposed in order to reconcile the anatomical and biological prerequisite and the setting time of modern alloys.

  10. Surface texture measurement for dental wear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, R. S.; Mullen, F.; Bartlett, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    The application of surface topography measurement and characterization within dental materials science is highly active and rapidly developing, in line with many modern industries. Surface measurement and structuring is used extensively within oral and dental science to optimize the optical, tribological and biological performance of natural and biomimetic dental materials. Although there has historically been little standardization in the use and reporting of surface metrology instrumentation and software, the dental industry is beginning to adopt modern areal measurement and characterization techniques, especially as the dental industry is increasingly adopting digital impressioning techniques in order to leverage CAD/CAM technologies for the design and construction of dental restorations. As dental treatment becomes increasingly digitized and reliant on advanced technologies such as dental implants, wider adoption of standardized surface topography and characterization techniques will become evermore essential. The dental research community welcomes the advances that are being made in surface topography measurement science towards realizing this ultimate goal.

  11. Dental Therapy Assistant: Quality of Restorations Placed and Finished.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Theodore H.; Bair, Jeffrey H.

    The U.S. Army Dental Corps has implemented a new concept of dental care delivery, formally identified as the Improved Dental Care Delivery System. The concept is based on the conservation of professional manpower resources through the use of dental treatment teams employing expanded duty dental assistants. Dental Therapy Assistant (DTA) is the…

  12. Visibility of dental pulp spaces in dental ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopinski, K T; Regulski, P

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of dental ultrasound with conventional sonographic equipment. The teeth of three adult volunteers who had cone beam CT examinations performed previously with clinical indications and one extracted tooth were examined using linear and compact (hockey stick) sonographic probes. The sonographic images were compared with cone beam CT images reconstructed accordingly. Dental pulp spaces were demonstrated in all teeth not covered with prosthetic crowns. The dentin and pulp were best visualized at the level of the neck of the teeth. The dentin was hypoechoic, and the superficial layer comprising the cementum and the pulp spaces were hyperechoic. Dental ultrasound is feasible with general purpose sonographic machines. The buccal surfaces of all teeth are accessible with a compact (hockey stick) probe. Visualization and differentiation of dental pulp spaces, dentin and the superficial layer comprising cementum is possible in the portions of teeth not covered by the alveolar bone or prosthetic crowns. The dental pulp spaces are best seen at the level of the tooth neck. Pulp and endodontic fillings can be distinguished on ultrasound. PMID:24170803

  13. Health promotion and dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Maltz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The central idea of the Brazilian health system is to prevent the establishment of disease or detect it as early as possible. Prevention and treatment of dental caries are related to behavioral factors, including dietary and oral hygiene habits, which are related to many chronic diseases. Dental health promotion therefore should be fully integrated into broadly based health-promoting strategies and actions such as food and health policies, and general hygiene (including oral hygiene, among others. For decades, a linear relationship between sugar consumption and caries has been observed. Recent data has indicated that this relationship is not as strong as it used to be before the widespread use of fluoride. However, diet is still a key factor acting in the carious process. Oral hygiene is a major aspect when it comes to caries, since dental biofilm is its etiological factor. Oral hygiene procedures are effective in controlling dental caries, especially if plaque removal is performed adequately and associated with fluoride. An alternative to a more efficient biofilm control in occlusal areas is the use of dental sealants, which are only indicated for caries-active individuals. If a cavity is formed as a consequence of the metabolic activity of the biofilm, a restorative material or a sealant can be placed to block access of the biofilm to the oral environment in order to prevent caries progress. The prevention of dental caries based on common risk-factor strategies (diet and hygiene should be supplemented by more disease-specific policies such as rational use of fluoride, and evidence-based dental health care.

  14. Dental Education in Veterinary Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana L. Eubanks

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is among the most prevalent canine dis-eases affecting over 75% of dogs. Strengthening of the human-animal bond and the increasing education of the aver-age pet owner, have fostered a heightened awareness of periodontal care in dogs and cats. Industry support has further assisted the small animal veterinarian in providing quality dental treatments and prevention. As recently as the 1990’s, veterinary curriculums contained little or no dental training. That trend is changing as nearly every one of the 28 US Colleges of Veterinary Medicine offers some level of small animal dentistry during the four-year curriculum. Primary areas of focus are on client education, the treatment of periodontal disease, dental prophylaxis, dental radiology, endodontics, exodontics and pain control. Students receive instruction in dental anatomy during their di-dactic curriculum and later experience clinical cases. Graduate DVMs can attend a variety of continuing education courses and even choose to specialize in veterinary dentistry in both small animals and horses. Through the efforts of organizations such as the American Veterinary Dental So-ciety, The American Veterinary Dental College and The Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, many veterinarians have been able to advance their skills in dentistry and improve animal welfare. Increasing ex-pectations of the pet-owning public coupled with the recent advancements of training opportunities available for vete-rinary students, graduate DVMs and certified veterinary technicians make veterinary dentistry an emerging practice-builder among the most successful small animal hospitals.

  15. [Prosthetic dental alloys. 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Engelmbright, M A

    1990-11-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132464

  16. [Prosthetic dental alloys (2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Englembright, M A

    1990-12-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132470

  17. THERMOVISION IN DENTAL ALLERGOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dencheva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we aimed to optimize the thermal imaging method for evaluation of skin patch test reactions in dental clinical allergology. A total of 30 patients without a history of allergic diseases were included in the study - 12 men and 18 women, age 21 - 32 years. Skin patch testing was performed with a set of 20 standardized allergens. The thermographic investigations were performed with the FlirT620 infrared camera with a temperature resolution of 0,06°C. Thermograms were analysed using the Flir Reporter Professional software 2013. The statistical analysis of the results revealed an average correlation between the clinical evaluation of the results according to the cheme of ICDRG and the thermal image diagnostic (rphi = 0.538, p = 0.001. Absolute matching of clinical and thermal image results was observed only for the negative ones. For the clinically positive skin patch results matching with thermal image method was observed in 60.7% of the cases. Optimization of thermal imaging as a method for evaluation of skin patch test results could serve as a safe, accurate and non-invasive method, especially to distinguish weak (+, doubtful and irritant reactions, although not standardized criteria to distinguish these reactions have been elaborated yet. Crucial factor for the accurate interpretation of results is the precise diagnosing performed by well-trained physicians in this area, with clinical relevance, to minimize the role of subjective factors.

  18. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Dental Radiography Training for Dental Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... didactic and clinical training in dental radiography. 1. This responsibility must include: Defining the.... Dental radiography training may be freestanding (as a continuing education course offered by State dental/dental auxiliary societies, or by dental/dental auxiliary education programs); or be a part of...

  19. Dental anxiety reduction and dental attendance after treatment in a dental fear clinic: A follow-up study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.H.A. Aartman; A. de Jongh; P.C. Makkes; J. Hoogstraten

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess treatment outcome in terms of dental anxiety reduction at a post-treatment assessment and dental anxiety reduction and dental attendance one year later. Furthermore, it was determined to what extent psychopathological characteristics were related to treatme

  20. Curriculum Guidelines for Clinical Dental Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools curriculum guidelines for clinical dental hygiene include definitions, notes on the interrelationship of courses, an overview of course objectives, and suggested primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific objectives, sequencing, faculty, and facilities. (MSE)

  1. Curricular Guidelines for Teaching Dental Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeson, Jeffrey; Buckman, James

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Dental Anatomy and Occlusion of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by individual educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. (MLW)

  2. Challenges and Opportunities for Effective Dental Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieb, Barry R.

    1991-01-01

    Considered are aspects of effective dental automation, including integrating "islands of computing"; definition of a dental record; common nomenclature; an enabling architecture; capturing data at its source; computer-assisted software engineering; and system security. (DB)

  3. Dental pulp vascular permeability changes induced by dental bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane da Costa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to compare the effect of different light sources for dental bleaching on vascular permeability of dental pulps, forty-eight incisors were used. The bleaching agent (35 % hydrogen peroxide was activated by halogen light; LED (Light Emitting Diode or LED, followed by laser phototherapy (LPT (λ = 780 nm; 3 J/cm². After the bleaching procedures, the animals received an intra-arterial dye injection and one hour later were sacrificed. The teeth were diaphanized and photographed. The amount of blue stain content of each dental pulp was quantified using a computer imaging program. The data was statistically compared (p < 0.05. The results showed a significant higher (p < 0.01 dye content in the groups bleached with halogen light, compared with the control, LED and LED plus LPT groups. Thus, tooth bleaching activated by LED or LED plus LPT induces lesser resulted in increased vascular permeability than halogen light.

  4. Salivary biomarkers for dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoli; Jiang, Shan; Koh, David; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen

    2016-02-01

    As a highly prevalent multifactorial disease, dental caries afflicts a large proportion of the world's population. As teeth are constantly bathed in saliva, the constituents and properties of this oral fluid play an essential role in the occurrence and progression of dental caries. Various inorganic (water and electrolytes) and organic (proteins and peptides) components may protect teeth from dental caries. This occurs via several functions, such as clearance of food debris and sugar, aggregation and elimination of microorganisms, buffering actions to neutralize acid, maintaining supersaturation with respect to tooth mineral, participation in formation of the acquired pellicle and antimicrobial defense. Modest evidence is available on the associations between dental caries and several salivary parameters, including flow rate, buffering capacity and abundance of mutans streptococci. Despite some controversial findings, the main body of the literature supports an elevated caries prevalence and/or incidence among people with a pathologically low saliva flow rate, compromised buffering capacity and early colonization or high titer of mutans streptococci in saliva. The evidence remains weak and/or inconsistent on the association between dental caries and other saliva parameters, such as other possible cariogenic species (Lactobacillus spp., Streptococcus sanguis group, Streptococcus salivarius, Actinomyces spp. and Candida albicans), diversity of saliva microbiomes, inorganic and organic constituents (electrolytes, immunoglobulins, other proteins and peptides) and some functional properties (sugar clearance rate, etc.). The complex interactions between salivary components and functions suggest that saliva has to be considered in its entirety to account for its total effects on teeth. PMID:26662487

  5. Dental Anxiety in Elementary Schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete Rabaldo BOTTAN

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the percentage of students with dentalanxiety.Method: A transversal exploratory study was designed involving976 schoolchildren aged 9 to 17 years from three public schoolslocated in the urban perimeter of the city of Campos Novos (SC.Data collection instruments were questionnaires adapted from theDental Anxiety Scale (DAS and Dental Fear Survey (DFS.Results: 84% of the subjects manifested anxiety, most of thembeing classified as low-anxiety individuals. Girls were a little moreanxious than boys (87% versus 81%. The relationship betweenage group and percentage of anxious patients indicates a decreasein the frequency for older individuals. The most frequently mentionedphysiological responses were accelerated heart beat and tremors.The triggering factors were “to see” or “to hear the noise of” thedental bur and anesthesia. Most subjects (84.5% affirmed to havevisited a dental office in the past two years and 63.5% of themreported that the dental appointments were scheduled for restorativepurposes.Conclusion: Dental anxiety was present in this population in ahigh percentage.

  6. Belongingness in undergraduate dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, D R; Hellyer, P

    2016-05-27

    Objective To undertake a detailed educational evaluation into dental students' experience of the concept of belongingness and their development as 'safe beginners' on an outreach placement at the University of Portsmouth Dental Academy (UPDA).Method The participants were asked two questions: Did you feel belongingness at UPDA?; and When in your year rotation did you feel this? They completed the educational evaluation anonymously in their last week of attendance. The quantitative data was handled with descriptive statistics and the qualitative data was analysed for recurring themes.Results A 95% response rate was achieved. Eighty six percent of respondents strongly agreed to feeling belongingness and 56% felt it after their first two weeks. Four themes were identified: 'Interaction with the preexisting people environment' (1a. Initial welcoming and warmth 1b. Continued interest in me as an individual); 'Developing collegiality' (2a. My group of fellow students 2b. Working with the dental team as a dentist 2c. The team of everyone at UPDA); 'In the clinical environment' (3a. Being a dentist with responsibility and respect 3b. The physical environment 3c. Becoming a reflective independent practitioner); and 'Leadership'.Conclusion Belongingness in dental education should be defined as:- a deeply personal and contextually mediated experience in which a student becomes an essential and respected part of the dental educational environment where all are accepted and equally valued by each other and which allows each individual student to develop autonomy, self-reflection and self-actualisation as a clinician. PMID:27228935

  7. Correction parameters in conventional dental radiography for dental implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barunawaty Yunus

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radiographic imaging as a supportive diagnostic tool is the essential component in treatment planning for dental implant. It help dentist to access target area of implant due to recommendation of many inventions in making radiographic imaging previously. Along with the progress of science and technology, the increasing demand of easier and simpler treatment method, a modern radiographic diagnostic for dental implant is needed. In fact, Makassar, especially in Faculty of Dentistry Hasanuddin University, has only a conventional dental radiography. Researcher wants to optimize the equipment that is used to obtain parameters of the jaw that has been corrected to get accurate dental implant. Purpose: This study aimed to see the difference of radiographic imaging of dental implant size which is going to be placed in patient before and after correction. Method: The type of research is analytical observational with cross sectional design. Sampling method is non random sampling. The amount of samples is 30 people, male and female, aged 20–50 years old. The correction value is evaluated from the parameter result of width, height, and thick of the jaw that were corrected with a metal ball by using conventional dental radiography to see the accuracy. Data is analyzed using SPSS 14 for Windows program with T-test analysis. Result: The result that is obtained by T-Test analysis results with significant value which p<0.05 in the width and height of panoramic radiography technique, the width and height of periapical radiography technique, and the thick of occlusal radiography technique before and after correction. Conclusion: It can be concluded that there is a significant difference before and after the results of panoramic, periapical, and occlusal radiography is corrected.

  8. Mechanical properties and disruption of dental biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Rmaile, Amir

    2013-01-01

    A literature review of dental plaque biofilms formation, progression and detachment mechanisms is presented in this thesis. Various strategies that have been employed to reduce or eliminate dental biofilms are discussed. The focus of the thesis was on the mechanical properties and disruption of dental biofilms, especially from hard-to-access areas of the oral cavity, such as the interproximal (IP) sites between the teeth. Various methods to measure mechanical properties of dental biofilms wer...

  9. The evolution of dental group practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Albert Henry

    2013-12-01

    Dentists and the dental profession are changing. One significant change in the deliver of dental care is the evolution of group practices to include networks of dental practices with central management by various service organizations that are owned or financed by private equity firms. This article discusses their evolution and potential advantages and disadvantages for dentists who join them. The article concludes with a prediction about the future heterogeneity of the dental care system. PMID:24597018

  10. DISR: Dental Image Segmentation and Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Pilevar, Abdol Hamid

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose novel algorithms for retrieving dental images from databases by their contents. Based on special information of dental images, for better content-based dental image retrieval and representation, the image attributes are used. We propose Dental Image Segmentation and Retrieval (DISR), a content-based image retrieval method that is robust to translation and scaling of the objects in the images. A novel model is used to calculate the features of the image. We implemente...

  11. How to estimate dental age in paleodontology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran Šebečić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays there are many methods available for dental age estimation: morphological, radiological, biochemical. Some methods require sample sectioning while other non-destructive methods are more appropriate for use in paleodontology. Children’s dental age assessment is based on phases in growth and development of the deciduous and permanent dentition, while age assessment in the adult dentition is based upon changes in the structure of hard dental tissue caused by aging. Dental age calculating software enables automated age calculations.

  12. How to estimate dental age in paleodontology?

    OpenAIRE

    Vedran Šebečić; Andrea Hoch; Maja Sabalić

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays there are many methods available for dental age estimation: morphological, radiological, biochemical. Some methods require sample sectioning while other non-destructive methods are more appropriate for use in paleodontology. Children’s dental age assessment is based on phases in growth and development of the deciduous and permanent dentition, while age assessment in the adult dentition is based upon changes in the structure of hard dental tissue caused by aging. Dental age calculati...

  13. Image Post-Processing in Dental Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Gormez, Ozlem; Yilmaz, Hasan Huseyin

    2009-01-01

    Image post-processing of dental digital radiographs, a function which used commonly in dental practice is presented in this article. Digital radiography has been available in dentistry for more than 25 years and its use by dental practitioners is steadily increasing. Digital acquisition of radiographs enables computer-based image post-processing to enhance image quality and increase the accuracy of interpretation. Image post-processing applications can easily be practiced in dental office by ...

  14. Premature dental eruption: report of case.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, C M

    2011-08-05

    This case report reviews the variability of dental eruption and the possible sequelae. Dental eruption of the permanent teeth in cleft palate children may be variable, with delayed eruption the most common phenomenon. A case of premature dental eruption of a maxillary left first premolar is demonstrated, however, in a five-year-old male. This localized premature dental eruption anomaly was attributed to early extraction of the primary dentition, due to caries.

  15. Anxiety and pain during dental injections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van Wijk; J. Hoogstraten

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to study the relationship between anxiety and pain felt during a dental injection in a sample of ‘normal’ patients about to undergo ‘invasive’ dental treatment. Methods: Duration and intensity of pain during a dental injection were measured within a sample of 24

  16. A Cognitive Task Analysis for Dental Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Cheryl A.; Beemsterboer, Phyllis L.; Johnson, Lynn A.; Mislevy, Robert J.; Steinberg, Linda S.; Breyer, F. Jay

    2000-01-01

    As part of the development of a scoring algorithm for a simulation-based dental hygiene initial licensure examination, this effort conducted a task analysis of the dental hygiene domain. Broad classes of behaviors that distinguish along the dental hygiene expert-novice continuum were identified and applied to the design of nine paper-based cases…

  17. 77 FR 12517 - VA Dental Insurance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN99 VA Dental Insurance Program AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs...) proposes to amend its regulations to establish a pilot program to offer premium-based dental insurance to... insurer through the Federal contracting process to offer dental insurance, and the private insurer...

  18. Dental Assisting Course. Bilingual Vocational Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Cox, Guadalupe

    This course in dental assisting, one of a series of bilingual English-Spanish vocational education courses, is designed to prepare the student to assist the dentist at the chairside in the dental operatory, to perform reception and clerical functions, and to carry out selected dental laboratory work. The course covers an introduction to the…

  19. Reforming the mission of public dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, F A C; List, P F

    2012-10-01

    Australia has a complex history of providing public dental services to its communities. From the early days of Colonial settlement, the provision of dental care to the Australian public has largely been driven and influenced by organized groups and associations of dentists. The Constitution of Australia, under Section 51 xxiii A, allows for the Commonwealth to provide for medical and dental services. Unlike the United Kingdom, however, dental services have not been embedded into a universal national health service agenda. In 1974, that the Australian Government through the Australian School Dental Program provided the first funding and national direction for public dental services - and that, limited to children. The Commonwealth Dental Health Program 1993-1997 was the second national endeavor to provide public dental services, this time to financially disadvantaged adults. Since that time, public dental service responsibility has been shuttled between States/Territories and the Commonwealth. A new paradigm for public dental services in Australia requires strong Commonwealth leadership, as well as the commitment of State and Territories and the organized dental profession. The National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission provided the most recent scenario for a radical change in mission. This paper canvases the competing roles of strategic, functional, and structural issues in relationship to social network and policy issues, which must be recognized if Australians truly seek to reform public dental services. PMID:22998313

  20. Utilization of dental care: An Indian outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Brar, Prabhleen; Singh, Gurminder; Sofat, Anjali; Kakar, Heena

    2013-01-01

    Oral health has a significant impact on the quality of life, appearance, and self-esteem of the people. Preventive dental visits help in the early detection and treatment of oral diseases. Dental care utilization can be defined as the percentage of the population who access dental services over a specified period of time. There are reports that dental patients only visit the dentist when in pain and never bother to return for follow-up in most cases. To improve oral health outcomes an adequate knowledge of the way the individuals use health services and the factors predictive of this behavior is essential. The interest in developing models explaining the utilization of dental services has increased; issues like dental anxiety, price, income, the distance a person had to travel to get care, and preference for preservation of teeth are treated as barriers in regular dental care. Published materials which pertain to the use of dental services by Indian population have been reviewed and analyzed in depth in the present study. Dental surgeons and dental health workers have to play an adequate role in facilitating public enlightenment that people may appreciate the need for regular dental care and make adequate and proper use of the available dental care facilities. PMID:24082719

  1. DENTAL REIMBURSEMENT PROGRAM (DPR) - HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Dental Reimbursement Program (DPR) under Part F of the Ryan White CARE Act is intended to help accredited dental schools and post-doctoral dental education program cover their non-reimbursed costs of providing oral health care to individuals with HIV.

  2. First-Aid Algorithms in Dental Avulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginska, Joanna; Wilczynska-Borawska, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Almost one fourth of traumatic dental injuries occur at schools or in their surroundings. Prevalence of tooth avulsion varies from 0.5% to 16% of all cases of dental trauma. Children with dental avulsion may seek help from school nurses so they should be able to provide first-aid treatment. However, many studies showed that the general level of…

  3. Dental erosion: prevalence, incidence, and distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.J. Jager

    2015-01-01

    Dental erosion is one of the most common dental diseases and it is a growing problem. Numerous epidemiological studies have investigated the prevalence of dental erosion. For these studies different cross sections of the population are investigated. Large differences were found between countries, ge

  4. Dried fruit and dental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Michèle Jeanne

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive review of the literature has found that the common perceptions that dried fruits are "sticky", adhere to teeth, and are detrimental to dental health on account of their sugar content are based on weak evidence. There is a lack of good quality scientific data to support restrictive advice for dried fruit intake on the basis of dental health parameters and further research is required. A number of potentially positive attributes for dental health, such as the need to chew dried fruits which encourages salivary flow, and the presence of anti-microbial compounds and of sorbitol, also require investigation to establish the extent of their effects and whether they balance against any potentially negative attributes of dried fruit. Advice on dried fruit consumption should also take account of the nutritional benefits of dried fruit, being high in fibre, low in fat and containing useful levels of micronutrients.

  5. Dental health in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Z A

    1984-12-01

    Three epidemiological surveys have been carried out in Malaysia since 1971. All showed a high level of caries prevalence. Ninety per cent of school children between the ages of 6 and 18 suffered from dental caries, with a DMFT of approximately 3 and a dft of approximately 2. Ninety-five per cent of the adult population had caries experience, with the mean DMFT being 13.2. Approximately 55 per cent of children showed the presence of gingivitis with the mean number of inflamed gingival units per child ranging from 1.9 to 2.8, while 72.4 per cent of adults had some form of periodontal disease with 29 per cent having pockets deeper than 3 mm. The OHI-S score for adults was 2.2 and 81 per cent used toothbrushes to clean their teeth. A further 5.1 per cent used twigs and fingers with powdered charcoal or salt. One-third of the child population needed orthodontic treatment, with 0.3 per cent examined in peninsular Malaysia having cleft lip or palate or both. In the adult population 10.4 per cent of those examined required some form of orthodontic treatment. Twenty per cent of the children in the survey were in need of dentures; 54.7 per cent of the adults were either in need of dentures or were wearing dentures. Of these 25 per cent had complete dentures. The smoking habit was most commonly associated with pre-cancerous/cancerous lesions with alcohol consumption a close competitor; 114 adults, that is 1.3 per cent of those examined, suffer from leukoplakia but only one case of oral cancer was detected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. [Autism-friendly dental care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, L S; van Gemert-Schriks, M C M; Elhorst, J H

    2016-02-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) occurs in approximately 1% of the Dutch population. Among the group of patients with this disorder, there is a substantial diversity regarding skills, intelligence and treatability. However, there are also common characteristics; people with ASD often have difficulty with social interaction, communication, and exhibit typical patterns of behaviour. Therefore, problems may arise in the various areas of development, such as language development and responding to sensory stimuli. Dental practitioners will also be confronted with individuals with ASD. Care can be significantly improved, considering that negative experiences and dental anxiety are widespread at this time.

  7. Radiation protection in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In considering the special provisions required in dental radiography, investigations were conducted in Iran. Radiation dose levels in dental radiography were found to be high. Patient exposure from intraoral radiographic examination was calculated, using 50kV X-ray. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were fastened to the nasion, eyes, lip, philtrum, thyroid, gonads and to the right and left of the supra-orbital, infra-orbital temporomandibular joints of live patients. The highest exposure value was for the lower lip. Recommendations concerning educational training and protection of staff and patients were included

  8. Informed consent in dental extractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Capote Femenías

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available When performing any oral intervention, particularly dental extractions, the specialist should have the oral or written consent of the patient. This consent includes the explanation of all possible complications, whether typical, very serious or personalized associated with the previous health condition, age, profession, religion or any other characteristic of the patient, as well as the possi.ble benefits of the intervention. This article is related with the bioethical aspects related with dental extractions, in order to determine the main elements that the informed consent should include.

  9. Facial and Dental Injuries Facial and Dental Injuries in Karate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidovic-Stesevic, Vesna; Verna, Carlalberta; Krastl, Gabriel; Kuhl, Sebastian; Filippi, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Karate is a martial art that carries a high trauma risk. Trauma-related Swiss and European karate data are currently unavailable. This survey seeks to increase knowledge of the incidence of traumatic facial and dental injuries, their emergency management, awareness of tooth rescue boxes, the use of mouthguards and their modifications. Interviews were conducted with 420 karate fighters from 43 European countries using a standardized questionnaire. All the participants were semi-professionals. The data were evaluated with respect to gender, kumite level (where a karate practitioner trains against an adversary), and country. Of the 420 fighters interviewed, 213 had experienced facial trauma and 44 had already had dental trauma. A total of 192 athletes had hurt their opponent by inflicting a facial or dental injury, and 290 knew about the possibility of tooth replantation following an avulsion. Only 50 interviewees knew about tooth rescue boxes. Nearly all the individuals interviewed wore a mouthguard (n = 412), and 178 of them had made their own modifications to the guard. The results of the present survey suggest that more information and education in wearing protective gear are required to reduce the incidence of dental injuries in karate.

  10. Dental Problems in Calcium Metabolism Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rabbani M.D.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium metabolism disorders can be acute or chronic and chronic disorders can cause different disease states such as dental problems. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study done in Children's Medical Center affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences during 2005-2009, all (93 patients with hypoparathyroidism, nutritional rickets, hypophosphatemic rickets and renal osteodysthrophy from the endocrinology and nephrology departments of the Center were referred to a dentist there for orodental examination. Subsequently, the frequency of dental problems including taurodontism, enamel hypoplasia, dental abscess, dental caries and gingivitis were recorded and analyzed. Results: Nutritional rickets was the most common disorder in this study and delay in dentition was the most frequent dental problem in the patients (61.9%. Most cases of taurdontism and enamel hypoplasia were seen in patients with hypoparathyroidism (33% and 50%, respectively. Dental abscess, dental caries and gingivitis were more common in patients with renal osteodysthrophia (50%, 90% and 20%, respectively. In addition, dental caries and delay in dentition were the most prevalent disorders in this study (69.8% and 49.5%, respectively. Conclusion: According to the above findings, it seems that effective screening, regular periodic examinations, proper diagnosis and timely treatment of dental diseases are the main principles of prevention of orodental problems. Moreover, dentists as well as pediatricians should be aware of the features of the aforesaid disorders which lead to dental problems so that early intervention could prevent subsequent serious and more invasive dental problems.

  11. Radiographic signs and diagnosis of dental disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dental radiographs are critical for the complete assessment and treatment of dental diseases. Dental radiography is commonly used to evaluate congenital dental defects, periodontal disease, orthodontic manipulations, oral tumors, endodontic treatments, oral trauma, and any situation where an abnormality is suspected. Although standard radiographic equipment and film can be used to produce dental radiographs, dental X-ray equipment and film provide superior quality images and greater convenience of animal patient positioning. An understanding of normal dental radiographic anatomy is important when interpreting dental radiographs. Stage III periodontitis is the earliest stage of periodontal disease at which radiographic abnormalities become apparent. Bone loss associated with periodontal disease can be classified as either horizontal or vertical. Periapical radiolucencies can represent granulomas, cysts, or abscesses, whereas periapical radiodensities may represent sclerotic bone or condensing osteitis. Lytic lesions of the bone of the jaw often represent oral neoplasms. Neoplasms also can displace or disrupt teeth in the dental arch. Resorptive lesions can be external or internal and appear as radiolucent areas involving the external surface of the root or the pulp cavity, respectively. Feline dental resorptive lesions, also known as odontoclastic resorptions, are a specific form of dental resorptive lesions unique to cats

  12. Is there an association between the presence of dental fluorosis and dental trauma amongst school children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Lorenna Fonseca Braga de; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Mendes, Rafael Inácio Pompeu; Oliveira, Rodrigo Caldeira Nunes; Oliveira, Carolina de Castro; Lima, Carolina Veloso; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima

    2016-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate whether there is an association with the different levels of dental fluorosis and the presence of dental trauma amongst school children. A transversal study was conducted amongst school children from the age of 12. Dental examinations were conducted by 24 well trained and fully qualified dental surgeons. Data was collected from 36 randomly selected public schools amongst 89 schools in a municipality. The criteria used to diagnose dental fluorosis was based on the Dean's fluorosis Index and for diagnosing dental trauma we looked for clinical signs of crown fractures and dental avulsions. Multiple descriptive analysis, which was bivariate, was carried out. Amongst the 2,755 school children that took part in the study 1,089 (39.6%) were diagnosed with dental fluorosis and 106 (3.8%) had one tooth or more with dental trauma. We noted a high prevalence of dental fluorosis, independent of the level of severity, amongst individuals with one tooth or more who had dental trauma. This association was even more evident where there were severely high levels of fluorosis. We also noted that the presence of fluorosis was greater amongst those that actively paid more attention to discoloration on their teeth and who received treatment from a dental professional at their schools. Nevertheless dental fluorosis was associated with the presence of dental trauma, independent of its severity. PMID:26960108

  13. Is there an association between the presence of dental fluorosis and dental trauma amongst school children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Lorenna Fonseca Braga de; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Mendes, Rafael Inácio Pompeu; Oliveira, Rodrigo Caldeira Nunes; Oliveira, Carolina de Castro; Lima, Carolina Veloso; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima

    2016-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate whether there is an association with the different levels of dental fluorosis and the presence of dental trauma amongst school children. A transversal study was conducted amongst school children from the age of 12. Dental examinations were conducted by 24 well trained and fully qualified dental surgeons. Data was collected from 36 randomly selected public schools amongst 89 schools in a municipality. The criteria used to diagnose dental fluorosis was based on the Dean's fluorosis Index and for diagnosing dental trauma we looked for clinical signs of crown fractures and dental avulsions. Multiple descriptive analysis, which was bivariate, was carried out. Amongst the 2,755 school children that took part in the study 1,089 (39.6%) were diagnosed with dental fluorosis and 106 (3.8%) had one tooth or more with dental trauma. We noted a high prevalence of dental fluorosis, independent of the level of severity, amongst individuals with one tooth or more who had dental trauma. This association was even more evident where there were severely high levels of fluorosis. We also noted that the presence of fluorosis was greater amongst those that actively paid more attention to discoloration on their teeth and who received treatment from a dental professional at their schools. Nevertheless dental fluorosis was associated with the presence of dental trauma, independent of its severity.

  14. Disparities in unmet dental need and dental care received by pregnant women in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Astha; Chattopadhyay, Amit; Garcia, A Isabel; Adams, Amy B; Cheng, Diana

    2014-09-01

    To examine prenatal dental care needs, utilization and oral health counseling among Maryland women who delivered a live infant during 2001-2003 and identify the factors associated with having a dental visit and having an unmet dental need during pregnancy. Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System is an ongoing population based surveillance system that collects information of women's attitudes and experiences before, during, and shortly after pregnancy. Logistic regression was used to model dental visits and unmet dental need using predictor variables for Maryland 2001-2003 births. Less than half of all women reported having a dental visit and receiving oral health advice during pregnancy. Twenty-five percent of women reported a need for dental care, of which 33 % did not receive dental care despite their perceived need. Multivariate modeling revealed that racial minorities, women who were not married and those with annual income dental visit. Women who were not married, had low annual income, were older than 40 years of age, had an unintended pregnancy and received prenatal care later than desired were most likely to have an unmet dental need during pregnancy. Despite reported needs and existing recommendations to include oral health as a component of prenatal care, less than half of pregnant women have a dental visit during their pregnancy. One-third of women with a dental problem did not have a dental visit highlighting the unmet need for dental care during pregnancy.

  15. Factors for increasing adoption of e-courses among dental and dental hygiene faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBate, Rita D; Cragun, Deborah; Severson, Herbert H; Shaw, Tracy; Christiansen, Steve; Koerber, Anne; Tomar, Scott; Brown, Kelli McCormack; Tedesco, Lisa A; Hendricson, William

    2011-05-01

    The incorporation of web-based learning into the dental curriculum has been consistently recommended in the literature on reform in dental education. There has been growing support for web-based learning in dental and dental hygiene education as demonstrated by deans' identifying this as a planned curricular innovation. The purpose of our study was to explore characteristics of e-courses that may serve to increase adoption among dental and dental hygiene faculty members. Eight ninety-minute focus groups (three dental; five dental hygiene) were conducted with dental (n=27) and dental hygiene (n=23) faculty members from six academic institutions. The resulting data were analyzed to identify two overarching themes and associated subthemes with regard to benefits and barriers influencing adoption of e-courses. A working conceptual framework, based on the Diffusion of Innovations, was developed from these themes to understand the characteristics that may influence the rate of adoption of e-courses among dental and dental hygiene faculty members. Analysis of the data revealed four main adoption barriers: 1) low perceived relative advantage to faculty members; 2) low compatibility with current curriculum; 3) high perceived time commitment; and 4) complexity of e-course development. This exploratory assessment identifies leverage points for facilitating the adoption and sustainability of e-courses in dental and dental hygiene education. PMID:21546592

  16. Gold color in dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, T

    1997-01-01

    This article will help the dental laboratory with alloy selection by exploring how the relationship among color, ductility and strength applies to gold and how color can be quantified. Because higher quality materials translate into higher profits, upselling to the dentist and patient is also discussed.

  17. Nanoparticle release from dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landuyt, K L; Hellack, B; Van Meerbeek, B; Peumans, M; Hoet, P; Wiemann, M; Kuhlbusch, T A J; Asbach, C

    2014-01-01

    Dental composites typically contain high amounts (up to 60 vol.%) of nanosized filler particles. There is a current concern that dental personnel (and patients) may inhale nanosized dust particles (composite dust was analyzed in real work conditions. Exposure measurements of dust in a dental clinic revealed high peak concentrations of nanoparticles in the breathing zone of both dentist and patient, especially during aesthetic treatments or treatments of worn teeth with composite build-ups. Further laboratory assessment confirmed that all tested composites released very high concentrations of airborne particles in the nanorange (>10(6)cm(-3)). The median diameter of airborne composite dust varied between 38 and 70 nm. Electron microscopic and energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed that the airborne particles originated from the composite, and revealed that the dust particles consisted of filler particles or resin or both. Though composite dust exhibited no significant oxidative reactivity, more toxicological research is needed. To conclude, on manipulation with the bur, dental composites release high concentrations of nanoparticles that may enter deeply into the lungs.

  18. IV access in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, J J

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous (IV) access is a valuable skill for dental practitioners in emergency situations and in IV sedation. However, many people feel some apprehension about performing this procedure. This article explains the basic principles behind IV access, and the relevant anatomy and physiology, as well as giving a step-by-step guide to placing an IV cannula.

  19. Denitrification in human dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verstraete Willy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial denitrification is not considered important in human-associated microbial communities. Accordingly, metabolic investigations of the microbial biofilm communities of human dental plaque have focused on aerobic respiration and acid fermentation of carbohydrates, even though it is known that the oral habitat is constantly exposed to nitrate (NO3- concentrations in the millimolar range and that dental plaque houses bacteria that can reduce this NO3- to nitrite (NO2-. Results We show that dental plaque mediates denitrification of NO3- to nitric oxide (NO, nitrous oxide (N2O, and dinitrogen (N2 using microsensor measurements, 15N isotopic labelling and molecular detection of denitrification genes. In vivo N2O accumulation rates in the mouth depended on the presence of dental plaque and on salivary NO3- concentrations. NO and N2O production by denitrification occurred under aerobic conditions and was regulated by plaque pH. Conclusions Increases of NO concentrations were in the range of effective concentrations for NO signalling to human host cells and, thus, may locally affect blood flow, signalling between nerves and inflammatory processes in the gum. This is specifically significant for the understanding of periodontal diseases, where NO has been shown to play a key role, but where gingival cells are believed to be the only source of NO. More generally, this study establishes denitrification by human-associated microbial communities as a significant metabolic pathway which, due to concurrent NO formation, provides a basis for symbiotic interactions.

  20. [The future of dental amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a comment on 'The enigma of dental amalgam' by Carl Leinfelder published in 2004 in the Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry. In that paper a warning is stated against a too abrupt change from amalgam towards resin composite, because this will bring a lot of clinical problems

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  2. Dental approach to craniofacial syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger

    2012-01-01

    is essential for insight into craniofacial syndromes. The dentition, thus, becomes central in diagnostics and evaluation of the pathogenesis. Developmental fields can explore and advance the concept of dental approaches to craniofacial syndromes. Discussion. As deviations in teeth persist and do not reorganize...

  3. Computer Education for Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffcoat, M. K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A required computer course for preparing dental students to write computer programs, use software packages, and evaluate software for purchase is described. A post-course questionnaire survey of students revealed that the majority found the course helpful. A course outline is included. (Author/MLW)

  4. The business of dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Widyanti Sriyono

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization including General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS and Asia Fair Trade Agreement (AFTA are a new free trade system. In globalization era, there will be an intense and free competition in looking for jobs throughout the world. This new system will affect the health services system in which health services tend to follow an industrial model. Meaning that dentistry or dental health services tend to be part of a business system, and this system has caused controversy among the community and the profession itself. The results of the discussion revealed that professional and business of dentistry is compatible and complementary. The tendency of increasing number of legal form of practice (group and a professional corporation and the worldwide advertisement of these practices supported the premise that delivering dental practice tends to follow the industrial model. Dentists should not only more focus on achieving financial success in running the business of practice but profession should have the most concern for the people who seek their services. Delivering quality of dental care depends on the high skill of the dentist and on the satisfactory income for the survival of the practice in the long run, and this make the practice will be viewed by the public and profession as being appropriate and of high quality. Facing the globalization, besides possessing high clinical skill, dentists must have a firm understanding of management concepts and apply them in their practice. In conclusion: The profession and the business of dentistry are compatible and complementary. The delivery of the dental services tends to follow the industrial model, which is a current reality. Dentist should concern more on the delivering high quality of dental services, not only focus on the business of the practice, although the satisfactory income is important for the survival growth of the practice in the long run. It is suggested for dentists to follow as

  5. The difference of dental anxiety in children based on frequency of dental appointment

    OpenAIRE

    Mia Giri Astri; Eka Chemiawan; Eriska Rriyanti

    2011-01-01

    Background: Problem of children’s anxiety during dental procedures is a common phenomenon. This is called dental anxiety. The anxiety children patien need to be paid a special attention, because it will affect the success of dental treatment. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to find out the difference of dental anxiety degree in children aged 8 to 12 years old based on the frequency of dental visits in dental community health centre Bandung. Methods: The method of this research was a...

  6. An Overview of Dental Radiology. NCHCT Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manny, Edward F.; And Others

    This overview of dental radiology contains sections on demographics, equipment, dental radiology quality assurance, efficacy, dental radiology education curricula, professional organizations' guidelines for training and use, and state activities. In section 1 dental personnel, population of dental personnel, employment and earning prospects,…

  7. Creating a Successful School-Based Mobile Dental Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David M.; Jahnke, Lauren R.; Kerber, Lisa; Nyer, Genie; Siemens, Kammi; Clark, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Background: Dental disease is one of the leading causes of school absenteeism for children. This article describes the creation and evolution of the St. David's Dental Program, a mobile school-based dental program for children. Methods: The dental program is a collaboration of community partners in Central Texas that provides free dental care to…

  8. 21 CFR 872.4130 - Intraoral dental drill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraoral dental drill. 872.4130 Section 872.4130...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4130 Intraoral dental drill. (a) Identification. An intraoral dental drill is a rotary device intended to be attached to a dental handpiece to drill holes...

  9. Organisational aspects of dental practices: do dental students think like patients or like general dental practitioners?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, R.E.; Brands, W.G.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Welie, J.V.M.; Truin, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In view of transparency in health care, the widespread desire for more patient-centred care, and in an attempt to facilitate educational programmes that effectively respond to these changes, two research questions are formulated: (i) How do dental students rate the importance of variou

  10. Child Dental Neglect: A Short Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazani, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Context: Child dental neglect is a terrible tragedy with a high prevalence. Dealing with this issue is important regarding psychological and physical health policies. The current review was conducted to provide health professionals insight into the different aspects of child dental neglect as reported in previous literature. Evidence Acquisition: Our review was prepared through an electronic search using Pub Med, Science Direct, Medline, Google, Cochran Library, Google Scholar and EMBASE databases. Relevant papers published since 2000 until now in English, discussing child dental neglect were retrieved. Both original and review papers were included. Eligible articles were fully read by the author. A data form was used to record useful findings. Results: Distinguishing the direct and indirect signs of dental neglect is the first step for improvement of this matter. The dental team are the main professionals who can improve parental knowledge about the consequences of child dental neglect. Victims suffer from short and long-term adverse outcomes. Collaborative attempts need to be made by different health professionals to deal with this problem. Conclusions: Child dental neglect has many long-term impacts. The main professionals who are responsible for identification, intervention and treatment of child dental neglect are dental practitioners. However, other professionals cannot ignore this task. Finally, child dental neglect, despite its derivative outcomes, may be a presentation of a broader maltreatment. PMID:25741483

  11. Communication in dental medicine: importance in motivating elderly dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutariu, Mihaela Monica; Forna, Norina

    2013-01-01

    Dental services for elderly patients are characterized by a series of particularities related to the vulnerability of this age group, which is affected by various co morbidities, and the diminished physical, cognitive and financial capacities. Finding ways to keep elderly patients coming to a dental office is possible by improving the dentist-patient relationship and implicitly the quality of care by increasing the self-esteem of the elderly and their place in society, by increasing the role of oral health in the quality of life, and here we refer to the pleasure of eating, the pleasant physical aspect and normal diction. The present paper presents the psychological aspects that interfere in the communication process between the dentist and the elderly patient and the changes motivation undergoes when people are in pain. These data can sometimes change the reticent attitude of the dentist towards the elderly patient which is often considered to be a risk patient. PMID:24502052

  12. Surfing for history: dental library and dental school websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreinbring, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Library and academic websites are among the most reliable Internet resources available today. Schools of all types use the Internet as a means of sharing information; and libraries provide broader access to their collections via the Web. For researchers seeking specific, authoritative resources on dental history, library and dental school websites are most helpful in identifying print and online resources, in describing manuscript collections, and in presenting a history of the host institution. A library site often can provide sufficient information online to eliminate the need for an in-person visit to the library. On the other hand, a library site may tantalize the historian with enough information on unique collections that a trip can be justified.

  13. Drug therapy for the pregnant dental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendia, Jonathan; Cuddy, Michael A; Moore, Paul A

    2012-09-01

    Providing needed dental treatment, managing oral infection, and controlling pain are essential functions of dentists for helping patients maintain overall health during pregnancy. Medications commonly required for dental care consist of local anesthetics and associated vasoconstrictors, centrally and peripherally acting analgesics, sedative and anxiolytic agents, and antibiotics. Therapeutic drugs routinely used in dental practice are selected because of their known safety and effectiveness. However, for a pregnant patient requiring dental care, the agents routinely prescribed should be reevaluated for potential risks to the mother and/or fetus. The decision to administer a specific drug requires that the benefits outweigh the potential risks of the drug therapy. This article reviews and updates the recommendations for using dental therapeutic agents, thereby enabling general practitioners to select the safest drugs when treating pregnant dental patients.

  14. Salivary gland doses from dental radiographic exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salivary gland doses incurred during dental radiography were measured by phantom dosimetry, and these dose data and data obtained during a two-week survey of Hiroshima and Nagasaki dental hospitals and clinics were used to estimate the respective doses to members of the populations of the two cities. The results obtained were used to supplement previously determined doses to the thyroid gland, lens, and pituitary gland from dental radiography. No significant differences in doses were observed by age, sex or city. Doses to the salivary glands during dental radiography are probably not sufficiently large to cause bias in assessments of atomic bomb survivors for late radiation effects. However, the steadily increasing use of dental radiography underscores the need for continued monitoring of dental radiography doses in the interests of these assessments. (author)

  15. [Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by dental restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kiminori

    2014-06-01

    We report herein on 5 patients with odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by a dental restoration (caries cutting, cavity preparation, inlay restoration). Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis was noted following dental restoration. Even though the pulp cavity and dental pulp were intact, the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis occurred caused by an apical lesion. Infection by way of the dentinal tubules was suggested to be a cause of the pathophysiology. Endoscopic sinus surgery was indicated in patients with intractable odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by the dental restoration. Cone-beam x-ray CT was useful for the accurate diagnosis of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by a dental restoration. Physicians should thus be aware of the possibility that a tooth, which has undergone dental restoration, may cause odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

  16. Tribology of dental materials: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of tribology in dentistry is a growing and rapidly expanding field. Intensive research has been conducted to develop an understanding of dental tribology for successful design and selection of artificial dental materials. In this paper, the anatomy and function of human teeth is presented in brief, three types of current artificial dental materials are summarized, and their advantages and disadvantages, as well as typical clinical applications, are compared based on the literature. Possible tribological damage of tooth structure, which is induced by complex interfacial motion, and friction-wear test methods are reported. According to results obtained by the authors and from the literature, the main progress in the area of dental tribology on both natural teeth and artificial dental materials is reviewed. Problems and challenges are discussed and future research directions for dental tribology are recommended. (topical review)

  17. Evaluation of dental material series from patients with dental prostheses and suspicion of delayed hypersensitivity*

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimura, Fernanda Cortinhas; Cunha, Victor do Espirito Santo; Hahnstadt, Ruppert Ludwig; Pires, Mário Cezar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with oral sensitivity are common in our practice. Allergic contact dermatitis is one of the most frequent etiologies. OBJECTIVES Evaluate oral contact dermatitis using the Brazilian standard series and complementary dental series in patients using dental prostheses, with or without oral complaints. Determine specific dental Brazilian series. METHODS Patients using dental prostheses with or without oral complaints realized patch tests. Brazilian standard series and compleme...

  18. Dental esthetic satisfaction, received and desired dental treatments for improvement of esthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Akarslan Zuhre; Sadik Burak; Erten Hulya; Karabulut Erdem

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The purposes of this research were to investigate factors influencing patients′ satisfaction with their present dental esthetic, received previous dental treatments on anterior teeth and basic treatments that they wanted to undergo to improve their dental appearance. Materials and Methods: A total of 1014 patients who attended a dental school in a major city in Turkey participated in the study. The participants were surveyed with a questionnaire containing questions about gende...

  19. Strategies to manage patients with dental anxiety and dental phobia: literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Appukuttan DP

    2016-01-01

    Deva Priya Appukuttan Department of Periodontics, Sri Ramakrishna Mission Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, India Abstract: Dental anxiety and phobia result in avoidance of dental care. It is a frequently encountered problem in dental offices. Formulating acceptable evidence-based therapies for such patients is essential, or else they can be a considerable source of stress for the dentist. These patients need to be identified at the earliest opportunity and their concerns addressed. The ...

  20. Factors of Child Dental Fear : A Literature Review of Dental Fear in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Nakata, Ayumi; Sato, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To provide an overview of the literature investigating dental fear in children during the past ten years and to review factors of child dental fear. Methods. The literature was systematically retrieved from an electronic database. The thirty four literatures which were written about the fear of dentistry, psychology and behavior during dental treatment were chosen. Results. The terms of fear being used were “Shika-kyoufu”, “Dental fear”, etc. However, the terms were not de...

  1. Unilateral and bilateral dental transpositions in the maxilla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Jakob Christian; Karimian, K; Ciarlantini, R;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: This was to elucidate dental and skeletal findings in individuals with unilateral and bilateral maxillary dental transpositions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample comprised of radiographic materials from 63 individuals with maxillary dental transpositions from the Departments of Odontology at...

  2. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed.

  3. Children's Dental Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Oral Health Children's Dental Health Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of Contents ... other strategies that can help prevent tooth decay. Dental Sealants Dental sealants are thin, plastic coatings painted ...

  4. Ergonomic applications to dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipra Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The term "work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs," refers to musculoskeletal disorders to which the work environment contributes significantly, or to musculoskeletal disorders that are made worse or longer lasting by work conditions or workplace risk factors. In recent years, there has been an increase in reporting WMSDs for dental persons. Risk factors of WMSDs with specific reference to dentistry include - stress, poor flexibility, improper positioning, infrequent breaks, repetitive movements, weak postural muscles, prolonged awkward postures and improper adjustment of equipment. Ergonomics is the science of designing jobs, equipment and workplaces to fit workers. Proper ergonomic design is necessary to prevent repetitive strain injuries, which can develop over time and can lead to long-term disability. In this article, 20 strategies to prevent WMSDs in the dental operatory are discussed.

  5. The Dental Trauma Internet Calculator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg;

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Prediction tools are increasingly used to inform patients about the future dental health outcome. Advanced statistical methods are required to arrive at unbiased predictions based on follow-up studies. Material and Methods The Internet risk calculator at the Dental Trauma Guide......) in the period between 1972 and 1991. Subgroup analyses and estimates of event probabilities were based on the Kaplan-Meier and the Aalen-Johansen method. Results The Internet risk calculator shows individualized prognoses for the short and long-term healing outcome of traumatized teeth with the following...... were based on the tooth’s root development stage and other risk factors at the time of the injury. Conclusions This article explains the data base, the functionality and the statistical approach of the Internet risk calculator....

  6. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic dental radiography is described in detail. It comprises an electron gun having an elongated tubular target carrier extending into the patient's mouth. The carrier supports an inclined target for direction of an X-ray pattern towards a film positioned externally of the patient's mouth. Image definition is improved by a focusing anode which focuses the electron beam into a sharp spot (0.05 to 0.10 mm diameter) on the target. The potential on the focusing anode is adjustable to vary the size of the spot. An X-ray transmitting ceramic (oxides of Be, Al and Si) window is positioned adjacent to the front face of the target. The electron beam can be magnetically deflected to change the X-ray beam direction. (author)

  7. [Dental implants in tooth grinders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbezoo, F; Brouwers, J E; Cune, M S; Naeije, M

    2004-03-01

    Bruxism (tooth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence is usually based on clinical experience only. So far, studies to the possible cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure do not yield consistent and specific outcomes. This is partly due to the large variation in the technical and the biological aspects of the investigations. Although there is still no proof that bruxism causes overload of dental implants and their suprastructures, a careful approach is recommended. Practical advices as to minimize the chance of implant failure are given. Besides the recommendation to reduce or eliminate bruxism itself, these advices concern the number and dimensions of the implants, the design of the occlusion and articulation patterns, and the use of a hard nightguard. PMID:15058243

  8. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 – 645 nm and 340 – 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy

  9. Ergonomic applications to dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shipra

    2011-01-01

    The term "work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs)," refers to musculoskeletal disorders to which the work environment contributes significantly, or to musculoskeletal disorders that are made worse or longer lasting by work conditions or workplace risk factors. In recent years, there has been an increase in reporting WMSDs for dental persons. Risk factors of WMSDs with specific reference to dentistry include - stress, poor flexibility, improper positioning, infrequent breaks, repetitive movements, weak postural muscles, prolonged awkward postures and improper adjustment of equipment. Ergonomics is the science of designing jobs, equipment and workplaces to fit workers. Proper ergonomic design is necessary to prevent repetitive strain injuries, which can develop over time and can lead to long-term disability. In this article, 20 strategies to prevent WMSDs in the dental operatory are discussed. PMID:22484877

  10. Treatment of protruding osseo integrated dental implant

    OpenAIRE

    Buddula Aravind; Sheridan Phillip; Balshe Ayman

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dental implants have been used in the treatment of partial or complete edentulism. The height and width of the residual alveolus and surrounding anatomical structures can determine the proper position and path of insertion of dental implants. The following case report describes the treatment of a malpositioned osseo integrated dental implant with an apex perforating the buccal cortex of alveolar bone. A 61-year-old male was referred by his local dentist for the chief complaint of a s...

  11. Dental workforce planning in Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    De Silva, Maduwage

    2012-01-01

    Sri Lanka is a developing South Asian country which provides free education and healthcare for all its citizens. This thesis presents a policy-oriented study, partly empirical and partly modelling, whose aim was to understand dental care provision and workforce planning, at a time where Sri Lanka?s dental health policies appear to have failed to achieve their intended results, leading to a mismatch between supply and demand, i.e. “underemployment and unemployment” of trained dental surgeons, ...

  12. Equity in dental care among Canadian households

    OpenAIRE

    Grootendorst Paul; Quiñonez Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Changes in third party financing, whether public or private, are linked to a household's ability to access dental care. By removing costs at point of purchase, changes in financing influence the need to reach into one's pocket, thus facilitating or limiting access. This study asks: How have historical changes in dental care financing influenced household out-of-pocket expenditures for dental care in Canada? Methods This is a mixed methods study, comprised of an historical ...

  13. Auricular electrical stimulation and dental pain threshold.

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, M. S.; Oleson, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    A modified double-blind evaluation of naloxone reversibility of dental analgesia produced by auricular electrical stimulation (AES) was examined in 40 subjects assigned randomly to one of four groups: AES followed by saline (AS), AES followed by naloxone (AN), placebo AES followed by saline (PS), and placebo AES followed by naloxone (PN). Dental pain threshold was tested using a hand-held dental pulp tester. A second investigator administered the true or placebo AES using an electrical stimul...

  14. Marketing Application in the Dental Office

    OpenAIRE

    Votánek, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this Bachelor` Thesis is how to apply marketing tools to the dental office environment. The theoritecal part deals with marketing terminology that is used in health care. I focus on the analysis of target groups, competition and marketing mix. The practical part is focused on the introduction of selected dental office to which applies the tools of marketing. In conclusion I will make appropriate recommendations to improve marketing activities in the dental office.

  15. Development of an interactive dental trauma guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2009-01-01

    resulting in 54 trauma scenarios of which many have specific requirements for treatment The situation is further complicated by the fact that the two dentitions have very different treatment demands. As a result it's impossible even for experienced practitioners to provide evidence-based treatment on the...... available on the internet at: "www.DentalTraumaGuide.org". We hope that the Dental Trauma Guide can help improve the knowledge about dental traumatology worldwide and hereby improve the quality of treatment....

  16. Development of an interactive dental trauma guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2009-01-01

    resulting in 54 trauma scenarios of which many have specific requirements for treatment The situation is further complicated by the fact that the two dentitions have very different treatment demands. As a result it's impossible even for experienced practitioners to provide evidence-based treatment...... be available on the internet at: "www.DentalTraumaGuide.org". We hope that the Dental Trauma Guide can help improve the knowledge about dental traumatology worldwide and hereby improve the quality of treatment....

  17. Tissue mimicking materials for dental ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Rahul S.; Culjat, Martin O.; Grundfest, Warren S.; Brown, Elliott R.; White, Shane N

    2008-01-01

    While acoustic tissue mimicking materials have been explored for a variety of soft and hard biological tissues, no dental hard tissue mimicking materials have been characterized. Tooth phantoms are necessary to better understand acoustic phenomenology within the tooth environment and to accelerate the advancement of dental ultrasound imaging systems. In this study, soda lime glass and dental composite were explored as surrogates for human enamel and dentin, respectively, in terms of compressi...

  18. Zirconia in dental implantology: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Apratim, Abhishek; Eachempati, Prashanti; Krishnappa Salian, Kiran Kumar; Singh, Vijendra; Chhabra, Saurabh; Shah, Sanket

    2015-01-01

    Background: Titanium has been the most popular material of choice for dental implantology over the past few decades. Its properties have been found to be most suitable for the success of implant treatment. But recently, zirconia is slowly emerging as one of the materials which might replace the gold standard of dental implant, i.e., titanium. Materials and Methods: Literature was searched to retrieve information about zirconia dental implant and studies were critically analyzed. PubMed databa...

  19. Perubahan Dimensi Pada Dental Amalgam

    OpenAIRE

    Rachmad Dini Aziz

    2008-01-01

    Amalgam didefinisikan sebagai campuran dari dua atau beberapa logam (alloy) yang salah satunya adalah merkuri. Dental amalgam sendiri merupakan campuran dari merkuri (Hg), perak(Ag),timah (Sn), tcmbaga (Cu) dan bahan-bahan lain yang memiliki fungsinya masing-masing. Semua unsure tersebut saling melengkapi jika dikombinasikan dengan perbandingan yang tepat. Amalgam dapat mengalami perubahan dimensi selama pemanipulasiannya. Terdapat dua jenis perubahan dimensi pada amalgam, yaitu kontraksi...

  20. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    OpenAIRE

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Marwaha, Mohita; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal ...

  1. Dental sealants. Who needs them?

    OpenAIRE

    Siegal, M D; Farquhar, C L; Bouchard, J M

    1997-01-01

    Most childhood tooth decay is preventable with a combination of fluoride--which protects the smooth surfaces of a tooth--and dental sealants--which protect tooth surfaces with irregularities called pits and fissures. Sealants are plastic coatings that protect these vulnerable areas, often narrower than a single toothbrush bristle, from decay-causing bacteria and food in the mouth. Yet, 1988-1991 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey showed that while many children sti...

  2. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Sivolella; Barbara Zavan; Letizia Ferroni; Chiara Gardin; Vincenzo Vindigni; Edoardo Stellini; Marco Roman; Ilaria Tocco; Riccardo Guazzo; Luca Sbricoli; Eriberto Bressan

    2013-01-01

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical process...

  3. Ergonomic applications to dental practice

    OpenAIRE

    Shipra Gupta

    2011-01-01

    The term "work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs)," refers to musculoskeletal disorders to which the work environment contributes significantly, or to musculoskeletal disorders that are made worse or longer lasting by work conditions or workplace risk factors. In recent years, there has been an increase in reporting WMSDs for dental persons. Risk factors of WMSDs with specific reference to dentistry include - stress, poor flexibility, improper positioning, infrequent breaks, repetitive...

  4. International Association of Dental Traumatology guidelines for the management of traumatic dental injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Lars; Andreasen, Jens O; Day, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Avulsion of permanent teeth is one of the most serious dental injuries, and a prompt and correct emergency management is very important for the prognosis. The International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) has developed a consensus statement after a review of the dental literature...

  5. Diagnosing dental caries in populations with different levels of dental fluorosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvad, Bente; Machiulskiene, Vita; Fejerskov, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    concentrations of 0.3 and 1.1 ppm (0.3 and 1.1 mg/l) fluoride, respectively, 150 children were clinically examined twice, 2 wk apart, for dental fluorosis, using the Thylstrup-Fejerskov index (TF index), and for dental caries using the Nyvad visual-tactile caries criteria. The prevalence of dental fluorosis...

  6. Productivity in dental care for children. Factors influencing the time spent delivering dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N J

    1994-12-01

    The cost of dental services is related to their productivity. The purpose of the study was to identify factors influencing productivity, measured as time spent providing dental care per child under care, per year, in public dental clinics. The time was expected to vary with characteristics of the patients, the personnel and the clinics. Time spent by dentists and dental hygienists delivering dental care for children aged three to 18 years was obtained from 137 public dental clinics. The data showed substantial variation in productivity between clinics. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the time spent per child was associated with interval between examinations, proportion of male dentists, ratio of dental assistants to dentists, proportion of child treatment time given by dental hygienists and proportion of all treatment time spent on child patients. These variables explained 43 per cent of the variance in the total time spent by dentists and hygienists and 41 per cent of the variance in dentists' time. Individual dentists and hygienists may reduce the mean time spent per child by extending recall intervals. On an administrative level, dentists' time per child may be reduced by employing more dental assistants or dental hygienists and allowing dentists to treat patient groups other than children. It is concluded that productivity in dental care for children in the public dental services may be influenced in several ways, both by clinical and administrative decisions. PMID:7850642

  7. Predictors of dental avoidance among Australian adults with different levels of dental anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Armfield; M. Ketting

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: It has been proposed that avoidance of dental visits might be the main determinant of poor oral health outcomes in people with high dental anxiety (HDA). This study aimed to determine the predictors of dental avoidance among people with HDA and also whether these predictors differed from

  8. Dental students’ part-time jobs in dental practices in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.G. Poorterman; B.T. Dikkes; H.S. Brand

    2010-01-01

    Objective:  In the Netherlands, the Individual Health Care Professions Act (IHCP Act) allows dental students, amongst other non-qualified individuals, to work under certain conditions in a dental practice. The aim of the study was to determine how many dental students have part-time employment in de

  9. Dental hygiene students’ part-time jobs in dental practices in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.G. Poorterman; B.T. Dikkes; H.S. Brand

    2010-01-01

    Objective:  Many students have paid employment while studying. In the Netherlands, the Individual Health Care Professions Act (IHCP Act) allows dental hygiene students to work under certain conditions in a dental practice. The aim of the study was to determine how many dental hygiene students have p

  10. Dental Radiology: The Forgotten Problem?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiology is an essential part of dental practice. Traditionally, this has relied upon a small number of simple radiographic techniques with a low level of associated radiation risk. High numbers of dental X ray examinations, the frequently young age of patients and the relatively low health benefits of dentistry mean that justification of examinations remains an important consideration. Most dentists work in independent practice and self-referral for imaging is normal. Non-clinical pressures, such as financial factors and defensive practice, may influence the use of X ray examinations. Referral criteria are available at national and international levels, but their evidence basis is variable and there is a lack of data for their impact on behaviour. Particular challenges in justification include frequency of X ray examinations, the use of routine panoramic radiography and cone beam CT. Improving the practice of justification in dental radiology will rely on the availability of high quality referral criteria, improved education of dentists and greater attention to audit of practice. (author)

  11. Bacterial sex in dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genes are transferred between bacteria in dental plaque by transduction, conjugation, and transformation. Membrane vesicles can also provide a mechanism for horizontal gene transfer. DNA transfer is considered bacterial sex, but the transfer is not parallel to processes that we associate with sex in higher organisms. Several examples of bacterial gene transfer in the oral cavity are given in this review. How frequently this occurs in dental plaque is not clear, but evidence suggests that it affects a number of the major genera present. It has been estimated that new sequences in genomes established through horizontal gene transfer can constitute up to 30% of bacterial genomes. Gene transfer can be both inter- and intrageneric, and it can also affect transient organisms. The transferred DNA can be integrated or recombined in the recipient's chromosome or remain as an extrachromosomal inheritable element. This can make dental plaque a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes. The ability to transfer DNA is important for bacteria, making them better adapted to the harsh environment of the human mouth, and promoting their survival, virulence, and pathogenicity.

  12. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sivolella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years.

  13. Dental Tissue — New Source for Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Petrovic; Vladisav Stefanovic

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells have been isolated from many tissues and organs, including dental tissue. Five types of dental stem cells have been established: dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, periodontal ligament stem cells, and dental follicle progenitor cells. The main characteristics of dental stem cells are their potential for multilineage differentiation and self-renewal capacity. Dental stem cells can differentiate into odontoblasts, adipo...

  14. Functional Expression of Dental Plaque Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Norman Peterson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota’s transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

  15. Utilization of dental care: An Indian outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Brar, Prabhleen; Singh, Gurminder; Sofat, Anjali; Kakar, Heena

    2013-01-01

    Oral health has a significant impact on the quality of life, appearance, and self-esteem of the people. Preventive dental visits help in the early detection and treatment of oral diseases. Dental care utilization can be defined as the percentage of the population who access dental services over a specified period of time. There are reports that dental patients only visit the dentist when in pain and never bother to return for follow-up in most cases. To improve oral health outcomes an adequat...

  16. Navy Dental Corps: ninety years ... and forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woofter, Dennis D; Peters, Andrew; Kvaska, Greg; Turner, Carol I; Peters, Robert J; Shaffer, Richard G; Sobocinski, Andre B

    2003-01-01

    The Navy Dental Corps is responsible for ensuring the readiness of America's sailors and marines and optimizing their oral health. This article traces the history from the 1912 Act of Congress authorizing thirty "assistant dental surgeons" as the first Navy Dental Corps through service around the world. Navy dentists have seen service in every war and action in the past ninety years, reaching a peak of seven thousand officers and eleven thousand technicians in World War II. The Navy Dental Corps has served in the Korean and Vietnam Wars, Beirut, Somalia, Haiti, 9/11, Desert Storm, Desert Shield, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. PMID:12892336

  17. Dental students' perception of patient anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, J; Tripp, G

    1993-04-01

    This study examined the ability of dental students to assess patients' anxiety during dental treatment, and the relationship between patients' general, waiting room and clinic levels of anxiety. Sixty-six restorative dental patients and 35 Final-year dental students participated in the study. Prior to a routine dental appointment, patients completed visual analogue scales indicating their general and waiting room levels of anxiety. During treatment, patients and dental students completed similar scales to indicate patients' levels of anxiety up to and at that time. Patients' general and waiting room levels of anxiety were found to correlate significantly with their reports of anxiety during treatment. Female patients reported higher levels of anxiety than male patients. The correlations between patient and student ratings of patients' anxiety were small and non-significant, suggesting the students were not accurate in their estimates of patients' anxiety during treatment. It is suggested, therefore, that dental students be encouraged to ask patients directly how they are feeling about the dental situation. Such discussion could take place prior to, or at the beginning of, the dental appointment.

  18. Bombita Rodríguez, el cepillo a contrapelo de la memoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colacrai, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available [es] El presente trabajo intenta un acercamiento al fenómeno mediático que significó la aparición de Bombita Rodríguez en el programa “Peter Capusotto y sus videos”. Con la intención de rastrear algunas posibles causas de las repercusiones se analizará el contexto histórico, la tradición humorística a la que responden sus autores, la forma en la que la memoria es parodiada y los procedimientos discursivos por medio de los cuales se construyó al famoso “Palito Ortega Montonero”. [en] The present work is to approach the media phenomenon that marked the emergence of Bombita Rodriguez on “Peter Capusotto and his videos. “ With the intention of tracing some possible causes of the effects will analyze the historical, the humorous tradition to which respond to the authors, how the memory is parodied and the discursive procedures through which built the famous “Palito Ortega Montonero. “

  19. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B antigenemia among dental students in a private South Indian dental institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvan Nagpal

    2015-12-01

    Results: 352 dental students who gave consent were screened out of a total of 453 dental students. Out of 352 students, 163 (46% were vaccinated and 189 (54% were non-vaccinated. All the dental students were found to be seronegative for HBV infection. Conclusions: Though a low rate of HBV infection was observed among dental students, a significant number of dental students were non-vaccinated which suggests a need for proactive implementation of HBV vaccination programme. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(12.000: 3543-3547

  20. Assessment of Final Year Dental Students' Views of Science Education in Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MajidReza Mokhtari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the dental student's concepts about dental implant education which can be used in dentistry doctorate curriculum revision and could be useful for professors of periodontology, prosthodontics and maxillofacial surgery.Materials & Methods: This was an educational research which was conducted in Mashhad dental school in 2011 and 58 end year dental students were participated in this study and filled out questionnaires about dental implant education and the concepts of these students about theoretical and practical aspects of dental implant education were evaluated.Results: A total of 98.27% of the students were agreed about education of simple implant surgery so that they could put a simple implant and 87.94% of the students were agreed about education of dental implant as a single course credit and about creation of a dental educational group, 96.56% were agreed. About dental implant educational topics, the most educational need was education of principles of implant surgery followed by education of putting a simple frontal implant, and the least, was introduction and history of dental implants.Conclusions: Because of necessity of development for new sciences in order to promote health in the society, education of dental implant for general dentistry students and revision of general dentistry curriculum seems necessary.

  1. The supply and utilization of dental services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.; Postma, J.H.M.

    1984-01-01

    In this article the question is addressed whether regional differences in the supply of dental manpower influences the utilization of dental services. The percentage of the population that visits the dentist, is indeed higher in regions with a higher density of dentists. The number of people that vi

  2. Dental students' attitudes toward tobacco cessation counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Patrick L; Davis, Elaine L; McCall, W D

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine if level of education, gender, and tobacco history affected attitudes of dental students toward tobacco cessation counseling. A secondary objective was to examine the psychometric properties of the survey instrument. First- and fourth-year dental students at one school of dental medicine completed a survey examining attitudes toward tobacco cessation and perceived barriers to performing tobacco cessation counseling in a dental setting. Analyses were conducted to determine whether there were differences in attitudes by gender, level of education, or personal and family tobacco use. A main effect for education level was discovered. Fourth-year students were more likely than first-year students to consider the prescription of nicotine gum and transdermal patches to be within the scope and responsibility of the dental profession. No significant differences were seen with regard to gender or students' personal and family tobacco histories. Dental students were in general agreement that tobacco cessation counseling is within the responsibility of the dental profession, is within the scope of dental practice, and can be effective. Psychometric analysis revealed reliability of the survey instrument.

  3. Simple Way of Recording Dental Arch Forms

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Shreya; Ratre, Ram Kishore; Jain, Sandhya; Chandki, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Like finger prints each individual has a unique dental arch form design. Recording patient’s dental arch form may be required in various fields in dentistry be it longitudinal studies for evaluating growth, forensic dentistry and most importantly in orthodontic practice for fabricating arch wires for individual patients. An easy and practical method to obtain individual arch form for each patient is explained.

  4. DEVELOPMENT TRENDS IN THE GLOBAL DENTAL MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica BULAT

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the key trends of the market, and segments the global dental equipment and consumables market by components and into various geographic regions in way of market size. It discusses the key market drivers, main players, restraints and opportunities of the global dental equipment and consumables market.

  5. Equity in dental care among Canadian households

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grootendorst Paul

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in third party financing, whether public or private, are linked to a household's ability to access dental care. By removing costs at point of purchase, changes in financing influence the need to reach into one's pocket, thus facilitating or limiting access. This study asks: How have historical changes in dental care financing influenced household out-of-pocket expenditures for dental care in Canada? Methods This is a mixed methods study, comprised of an historical review of Canada's dental care market and an econometric analysis of household out-of-pocket expenditures for dental care. Results We demonstrate that changes in financing have important implications for out-of-pocket expenditures: with more financing come drops in the amount a household has to spend, and with less financing come increases. Low- and middle-income households appear to be most sensitive to changes in financing. Conclusions Alleviating the price barrier to care is a fundamental part of improving equity in dental care in Canada. How people have historically spent money on dental care highlights important gaps in Canadian dental care policy.

  6. LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OCCURRING DURING DENTAL IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihomir Georgiev

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available With regard to the emergence of new concepts in dental treatment involving placement of dental implants and the significance of therapeutic treatment of the intrusion in their complications. The purpose of the article is to make a review of the problems and to point out options for their treatment.

  7. Use of Curriculum Guidelines by Dental Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Frank R.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of dental school course directors concerning their knowledge and use of curriculum guidelines provided by the American Association of Dental Schools found that many are aware of the guidelines and find them useful. Further guideline dissemination efforts and determining priorities for curriculum elements are recommended. (MSE)

  8. American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Site Map Privacy Policy News RSS Links Find A Dentist Platinum Sponsors Dental Sleep Solutions Ez Sleep ProSomnus Sleep Technologies Nierman Practice Management ResMed SML-Space Maintainers Laboratory Gold Sponsors Airway Metrics LLC Dental Prosthetic Services SomnoMed ...

  9. [Dental ceramics: its history and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moureau, Thomas; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an historical background of dental ceramics. It synthesises the evolution of such material and its technical improvements from the stone-age to our time. Focusing on the importance of dental aesthetics, it shows the investigations realised to upgrade the prosthetic results.

  10. Baccalaureate Dental Hygiene Education: Creating a Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayman, Dona E.

    1985-01-01

    Inherent in the meaning of baccalaureate dental hygiene education is the offering of upper-division courses in the theory and practice of dental hygiene itself. Restructuring the associate programs as strictly two-year, lower-division programs would require standardization of baccalaureate programs as strictly upper-division curricula. (MLW)

  11. Dental homologies in lamniform sharks (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kenshu

    2002-01-01

    The dentitions of lamniform sharks are said to exhibit a unique heterodonty called the "lamnoid tooth pattern." The presence of an inflated hollow "dental bulla" on each jaw cartilage allows the recognition of homologous teeth across most modern macrophagous lamniforms based on topographic correspondence through the "similarity test." In most macrophagous lamniforms, three tooth rows are supported by the upper dental bulla: two rows of large anterior teeth followed by a row of small intermediate teeth. The lower tooth row occluding between the two rows of upper anterior teeth is the first lower anterior tooth row. Like the first and second lower anterior tooth rows, the third lower tooth row is supported by the dental bulla and may be called the first lower intermediate tooth row. The lower intermediate tooth row occludes between the first and second upper lateral tooth rows situated distal to the upper dental bulla, and the rest of the upper and lower tooth rows, all called lateral tooth rows, occlude alternately. Tooth symmetry cannot be used to identify their dental homology. The presence of dental bullae can be regarded as a synapomorphy of Lamniformes and this character is more definable than the "lamnoid tooth pattern." The formation of the tooth pattern appears to be related to the evolution of dental bullae. This study constitutes the first demonstration of supraspecific tooth-to-tooth dental homologies in nonmammalian vertebrates.

  12. Acute focal infections of dental origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsen, Ingar; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the most important pus-producing acute oral infections (dental infections) that can spread extra-orally. Most of these infections are spread by bacteria entering the bloodstream. However, dental infections have a number of other pathways for dissemination. By forming abscesses

  13. The Status of Dental Ethics Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, John G.

    1988-01-01

    A survey of dental schools in 1980 showed that 13 of the 55 responding schools provided no formal instruction in ethics. The status of instruction in dental ethics in 1986 is discussed. Survey data showed that schools providing ethics instruction often confused law, jurisprudence, and avoidance of malpractice with ethics. (MLW)

  14. Haptic rendering for dental training system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG DangXiao; ZHANG YuRu; WANG Yong; L(U) PeiJun; ZHOU RenGe; ZHOU WanLin

    2009-01-01

    Immersion and Interaction are two key features of virtual reality systems,which are especially important for medical applications.Based on the requirement of motor skill training in dental surgery,haptic rendering method based on triangle model is investigated in this paper.Multi-rate haptic rendering architecture is proposed to solve the contradiction between fidelity and efficiency requirements.Realtime collision detection algorithm based on spatial partition and time coherence is utilized to enable fast contact determination.Proxy-based collision response algorithm is proposed to compute surface contact point.Cutting force model based on piecewise contact transition model is proposed for dental drilling simulation during tooth preparation.Velocity-driven levels of detail hapUc rendering algorithm is proposed to maintain high update rate for complex scenes with a large number of triangles.Hapticvisual collocated dental training prototype is established using half-mirror solution.Typical dental operations have been realized Including dental caries exploration,detection of boundary within dental crose-section plane,and dental drilling during tooth preparation.The haptic rendering method is a fundamental technology to improve Immersion and interaction of virtual reality training systems,which is useful not only in dental training,but also in other surgical training systems.

  15. Dental caries from a molecular microbiological perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Nyvad; W. Crielaard; A. Mira; N. Takahashi; D. Beighton

    2013-01-01

    Dental caries results from an imbalance of the metabolic activity in the dental biofilm. The microbial communities of teeth have traditionally been studied by standard cultural approaches. More recently, cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene have been used to characterize the microbial composi

  16. Dental Student Stress, Burnout, and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elaine L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A study examined the relationships between self-reported academic burnout, perceived dental educational stress, and memory performance among 46 first-year dental students. In addition, the observed relationship between negative adjectives used for self-description and memory focused attention on the possible role of mood state in memory…

  17. Adults with Disabilities and Proper Dental Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Cinotti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    Repeated studies of graduating dental students indicate limited preparation to provide services for individuals with special healthcare needs. By the end of the 1990s and into the present decade, more than half of the U.S. dental schools provided less than five hours of class room presentations and about three quarters of the schools provided 0-5…

  18. Health Instruction Packages: Consumer--Dental Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Floyd R.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of five learning modules to instruct dental patients and the general public in the fundamental principles of dental hygiene. The first module, "Identify the Responsibilities for Your Oral Health" by Floyd R. Tanner, discusses the respective roles of the dentist and the patient in…

  19. First Aid Procedures for Dental Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Nancy Happel; Londeree, Kathy

    1982-01-01

    Guidelines for first aid procedures for temporary relief of dental emergencies include information on: (1) dental first aid supplies; (2) treatment of oral injuries; (3) orthodontic emergencies; (4) toothaches; and (5) prolonged bleeding due to an extraction. Consulting a dentist as soon as possible is strongly recommended. (JN)

  20. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook. 1988 Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The laws, rules and regulations of the New York State Education Department governing dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state are presented. In addition, the requirements and procedures for obtaining licensure and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist in New York are discussed. The following chapters are provided: (1)…

  1. Dental health practices in Norwegian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helöe, L A; Aarö, L E; Sögaard, A J

    1982-12-01

    A nationwide sample of 1511 Norwegian adults were interviewed in 1979-80 concerning health habits, including dental habits. While daily toothbrushing and regular treatment attendance appeared to have become the rule among young and middle aged individuals, use of dental floss and especially of fluoride tablets or rinses, still are the exception. Dental health habits were clustered around the variable treatment attendance with slightly different patterns for men and for women. Measures of sugar consumptions were only slightly correlated with background variables and dental health behavior. While the latter was socially dependent, consumption of sugar probably was attached to personal characteristics or situational factors. The correlations between dental health behavior and other health behavior practices were generally weak, and somewhat different for men and women. Two separate types of motives for preventive behavior were distinguished between: health motives and cosmetic motives.

  2. Ceramics as biomaterials for dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Watzke, Ronny; Peschke, Arnd; Kappert, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Sintered ceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used as biomaterials for dental restoration, especially as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Biomaterials were developed either to veneer metal frameworks or to produce metal-free dental restorations. Different types of glass-ceramics and ceramics are available and necessary today to fulfill customers' needs (patients, dentists and dental technicians) regarding the properties of the biomaterials and the processing of the products. All of these different types of biomaterials already cover the entire range of indications of dental restorations. Today, patients are increasingly interested in metal-free restoration. Glass-ceramics are particularly suitable for fabricating inlays, crowns and small bridges, as these materials achieve very strong, esthetic results. High-strength ceramics are preferred in situations where the material is exposed to high masticatory forces.

  3. Dental service utilization of disabled children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, G L; Soh, G; Vignehsa, H; Chellappah, N K

    1991-01-01

    This study examines factors influencing the use of dental services by disabled children. A total of 322 disabled children, aged 6 to 18 years, attending nine special schools were randomly selected for a clinical examination. Their parents or guardians were interviewed to determine the child's pattern of dental service use, parental perception of the child's dental needs, and special problems encountered with seeking care. It was found that 68.3% of the children had never visited a dentist within the previous year. The most common reason given for no care was an assumption that "nothing was wrong." The results indicated a low rate of dental service use among the disabled children. A lack of parental dental awareness appeared to be a major contributory factor. PMID:1839867

  4. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric...... dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric...... case reports), the publication rate is less than 1 percent--completely out of proportion to the size of the problem dental trauma impose in children....

  5. Dental enamel, fluorosis and amoxicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ciarrocchi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Amoxicillin is one of the most used antibiotics among pediatric patients for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections and specially for acute otitis media (AOM, a common diseases of infants and childhood. It has been speculated that the use of amoxicillin during early childhood could be associated with dental enamel fluorosis, also described in literature with the term Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH, because they are generally situated in one or more 1st permanent molars and less frequently in the incisors. The effect of Amoxicillin seems to be independent of other risk factors such as fluoride intake, prematurity, hypoxia, hypocalcaemia, exposure to dioxins, chikenpox, otitis media, high fever and could have a significant impact on oral health for the wide use of this drug in that period of life. Objective: The aim of this work was to review the current literature about the association between amoxicillin and fluorosis. Methods and Results: A literature survey was done by applying the Medline database (Entrez PubMed; the Cochrane Library database of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL. The databases were searched using the following strategy and keywords: amoxicillin* AND (dental fluorosis* OR dental enamel* AND MIH*. After selecting the studies, only three relevant articles published between 1966 and 2011 were included in the review. Conclusion: The presence of several methodological issues does not allow to draw any evidence-based conclusions. No evidence of association was detected, therefore, there is a need of further well-designed studies to assess the scientific evidence of the relationship between amoxicillin and fluorosis and to restrict the prescription of this drug for recurrent upper respiratory tract infections especially acute otitis media (AOM during the first two years of life. When it is possible can be opportune to use an alternative antibiotic treatment.

  6. Dental underemployment: a study of uncontrolled dental manpower immigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, J; Gat, E; Lubliner, D; Malowanczyk, C; Shwatz, C; Zusman, S; Ela, K

    1993-08-01

    In the 1980s three studies were conducted in Israel utilising different methods of dental manpower evaluations. All identified a large future surplus of dentists. The current study re-evaluates the manpower supply and discusses possible solutions. A random sample of 800 dentists was approached by three mailings and a telephone call follow-up with a response of 49.7 per cent. Almost 90 per cent of dentists reported an undersupply of patients, with a mean working load of 26.3 hours/week, but being willing to add up to 3.4 working hours/week. The oversupply of dentists has been dramatically affected by the addition of almost 1000 dentists who emigrated to Israel in 1991-92. To prevent a significant unemployment rate among dentists and an uncontrolled free market, it is urgently suggested for the benefit of both provider and consumer that; the demand for services be increased and additional financing of dental care be made available, that the total number of dentists be decreased by various measures and that their geographical distribution be improved. If necessary limits should be placed on the number of practices or the number of patients permitted per practice. PMID:8276515

  7. Spontaneous Differentiation of Dental Pulp stem cells on Dental polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bherwani, Aneel; Suarato, Giulia; Qin, Sisi; Chang, Chung-Cheh; Akhavan, Aaron; Spiegel, Joseph; Jurukovski, Vladimir; Rafailovich, Miriam; Simon, Marcia

    2012-02-01

    Dental pulp stem cells were plated on two dentally relevant materials i.e. PMMA commonly used for denture and Titanium used for implants. In both cases, we probed for the role of surface interaction and substrate morphology. Different films of PMMA were spun cast directly onto Si wafers; PMMA fibers of different diameters were electro spun onto some of these substrates. Titanium metal was evaporated onto Si surfaces using an electron beam evaporator. In addition, on some surfaces, P4VP nanofibers were spun cast. DPSC were grown in alpha-MEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 0.2mM L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate, 2mm glutamine and 10mM beta-glycerol phosphate either with or without 10nM dexamethasone. After 21 days samples were examined using confocal microscopy of cells and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX). In the case of Titanium biomineralization was observed independent of dexamethasone, where the deposits were templated along the fibers. Minimal biomineralization was observed on flat Titanium and PMMA samples. Markers of osteogenesis and specific signaling pathways are being evaluated by RT-PCR, which are up regulated on each surface, to understand the fundamental manner in which surfaces interact with cell differentiation.

  8. Pocket atlas of dental radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasler, F.A. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology, Dental Institute; Visser, H. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Dental School

    2007-07-01

    In this age of highly specialized medical imaging, an examination of the teeth and alveolar bone is almost unthinkable without the use of radiographs. This highly informative and easy-to-read book with a collection of 798 radiographs, tables, and photos provides a myriad of problem-solving tips concerning the fundamentals of radiographic techniques, quality assurance, image processing, radiographic anatomy, and radiographic diagnosis. Information is easy to find, enabling the reader to literally get a grasp of essential new knowledge in next to no time. The dental practice team now has a pocket 'consultant' at its fingertips, providing practical ways to incorporate new technique into daily practice. (orig.)

  9. Dosimetric essay in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neck study was observated in the tiroids glands,laryngeal zone, sensitive organs for the ionizing radiation for increase dental xray exams. Was selected 29th patients with radiography prescription complete (in the Odontology Faculty Clinics Uruguaian). It took radiographies with and without tiroids necklace and apron lead using dosemeters. Dosimetric studies had demonstrated good dose between patients. For measuring the radiation dose have been used TLD thermoluminescence dosimetric and Harshaw 6600 for read it. The thyroids necklace use and odontology postgrading for training course for dentistry was the two recommendations advised

  10. Dental Trauma. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Soto Ugalde

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental traumas in children are common; therefore the dentist should be trained to solve them. This paper presents the diagnosis, treatment and outcome of a child with a 12 mm overjet, mouth breathing habit and bilabial incompetence who suffered a severe trauma to tooth number 11, causing its mobility. A splint was applied to the affected tooth and subsequently, a root canal filling was performed, all with a satisfactory outcome. Although these traumas are common, the presentation of this case is important due to its use in the teaching context.

  11. First dental visit of a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera R

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the common chief complaints of the Indian children and the average age group at which they report for in their first dental visit. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out using the case records of 716 children who reported to the postgraduate section of Department of Pediatric dentistry, Meenakshi Ammal Dental College, Chennai, in 2007. The age groups of the children were divided into three categories 0-3 years, 3-6 years and 6-12 years. The various chief complaints were categorised as follows, Orientation to prevention, Routine visit, Deposits / Discoloration, Habits, Unerupted / Missing or Extra Tooth, Pain, Dental caries, Malocclusion, Trauma, others. The average age group and most common complaint at the first dental visit was assessed. A prospective study was done in January 2008, were 215 children were screened. The assessment was made as explained above. Results: Retrospective study Maximum number of children who reported for their first dental visit was between 6-12 years (59.08%. Most common chief complaint for the visit was pain (42.04%. Second common complaint being dental caries (28.49%. Prospective study Maximum number of children who reported for their first dental visit was between 6-12 years (69.77%. Most common chief complaint was dental caries (34.88%. Second common complaint being pain (27.91%. Conclusion: Children report for the first dental visit most commonly only after 6 years and for complaints like pain and dental caries. Orientation to prevention is not considered and preventive dentistry is yet to reach the common population in India.

  12. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic...

  14. Maintenance of an Adequate Dental Hygiene Education System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Eugene; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Administrative decisions about the future of dental hygiene programs are often based on inadequate information about employment trends and about the importance of the dental hygienist in dental practices. Studies indicate that demand for dental hygiene services will remain high in the 1980s. (Author/MLW)

  15. Use of Case-Based Learning in Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Dina Agnone; DeBiase, Christina B.; Gibson-Howell, Joan C.

    1998-01-01

    A survey investigated the extent of use of case-based learning in 141 dental hygiene programs. A majority of responding schools use the approach, most frequently in clinical dental hygiene, community dental health, and dental science courses. Proportion of instructional time was greatest in the content areas of special needs, ethics, medical…

  16. 21 CFR 872.4630 - Dental operating light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental operating light. 872.4630 Section 872.4630...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4630 Dental operating light. (a) Identification. A dental operating light, including the surgical headlight, is an AC-powered device intended to...

  17. Health Occupations Education Program Development Guide No. 5: Dental Assisting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Occupational Education Instruction.

    The bulletin, which is part of the New York State "Health Occupations Education Program Development Guide Series," focuses on the dental assisting program. The curriculum is designed to provide training for dental assistants in their assistant role at chairside, in the dental operatory and laboratory, and in the dental office and reception area. A…

  18. Child dental fear and general emotional problems: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B. Krikken; J.M. ten Cate; J.S.J. Veerkamp

    2010-01-01

    AIM: This was to investigate the relation between general emotional and behavioural problems of the child and dental anxiety and dental behavioural management problems. BACKGROUND: Dental treatment involves many potentially unpleasant stimuli, which all may lead to the development of dental anxiety

  19. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a) Identification. A dental diamond instrument is an abrasive device intended to smooth tooth surfaces during...

  20. 21 CFR 872.4565 - Dental hand instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., operative dental amalgam carver, surgical bone chisel, operative amalgam and foil condenser, endodontic... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental hand instrument. 872.4565 Section 872.4565...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4565 Dental hand instrument. (a) Identification....

  1. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy,...

  3. 21 CFR 872.6890 - Intraoral dental wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraoral dental wax. 872.6890 Section 872.6890...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6890 Intraoral dental wax. (a) Identification. Intraoral dental wax is a device made of wax intended to construct patterns from which custom made...

  4. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass...

  5. A study of dental anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to find out the prevalence of dental anomalies in 600 normal persons (male:363, female:237) at age 14 to 39 years, through history taking, oral examination, and radiographic observations of subjects. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The prevalence of individual dental anomalies were as follows; Congenitally missing teeth 7%; supernumerary teeth 1.33%; ectopic eruption 8.50%; transposition 0.33%; rotation 23.67%; microdontia 11.16% (peg lateral is 5.33%; third molar 5.83%); prolonged retention of deciduous teeth 1.33%; crowding 49.83%; and spacing 15.17%. 2. Alterations in numbers of teeth : The most frequently missing teeth were mandibular lateral incisors, followed by mandibular second premolars and maxillary second premolars. In numbers of congenitally missing teeth per person, 52.38% had one missing tooth and 30.95% had two missing teeth. In supernumerary teeth, there was higher rate in male than in female. Most supernumerary teeth were mesiodens of median area in maxilla and the eruption pattern of that teeth generally was unerupted state. 3. In transposition, exchange of position of teeth involved the canine and first premolar. 4. Congenital missing rate of permanent successors in prolonged retention of deciduous teeth was 69.23%. 5. Crowding and spacing had respectively higher rate in mandible and in maxilla.

  6. Dental considerations in pregnant patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    khedmat S.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available During the human gestation period, various systemic alterations occur in the mother"nsecondary to endocrine changes. These changes, combined with the presence of the gravid uterus, result"nin conditions affecting the various systems of the mother which must be considered by the dentist."nFetal development is divided into three stages:"n1 The fertilization and implantation period"n2 The embryonic period and"n3 The fetal period."nThe second period characterized by organogenesis which taratogens may result in functional and"nmorphogenic malformations."nThe ideal dental treatment schedule for the pregnant patient is twice during first trimester, at least once"nduring second trimester and once during third trimester."nThe second trimester is an ideal time for performing dental treatment."nEmergency problem should be alleviated immediately during pregnancy."nIndicated medications should not be with held because of pregnancy but patients must be informed of"nbenefits and risks."nWith careful attention to the special needs of the pregnant patient, the dentist can provide high quality"ndental care while minimizing potential risks to mother and fetus."nEmphasis should be on preventive strategies and meticulous oral hygiene to manage common oral"nproblems associated with pregnancy.

  7. [Dental caries--therapeutic possibilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perić, Tamara; Marković, Dejan; Zivković, Slavoljub

    2008-01-01

    Contemporary tendencies in dentistry are based on the concept of maximal protection of healthy tooth tissues. Caries removal has been done traditionally with mechanical rotary instruments that are fast and precise. However, conventional cavity preparation has potential adverse effects to the pulp due to heat, pressure and vibrations. Moreover, drilling often causes pain and requires local anaesthesia, and these procedures are frequently perceived as unpleasant. Etiology, development and prevention of dental caries are better understood today and new restorative materials that bond micromechanically and/or chemically to dental tissues have been introduced. Thus, development of a new, less destructive caries removal technique is allowed. In the last decades, many alternative methods have been introduced in an attempt to replace rotary instruments. These are claimed to be efficient and selective for diseased tissues and to offer comfortable treatment to the patients. New methods include air abrasion, air polishing, ultrasonic, polymer burs, enzymes, systems for chemo-mechanical caries removal, and lasers. The aim of this paper was to discuss various caries removal techniques and possibilities of their use in clinical practice. Based on the literature review it can be concluded that none of the new caries removal methods can completely replace conventional rotary instruments.

  8. Immediate loading of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, P J; Liddelow, G J

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the concept of immediate loading as it pertains to dental implants and the indications for clinical practice. The definition of immediate loading will be considered together with a review of the relevant literature in an attempt to provide evidence-based guidelines for successful implementation into practice. A search of electronic databases including Medline, PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was undertaken using the terms "immediate loading'', "dental implants'', "immediate function'', "early loading'', "oral implants'', "immediate restoration'' and "systematic review''. This was supplemented by handsearching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Emphasis was given to systematic reviews and controlled clinical trials. A definition of immediate loading was suggested pertinent to the realities of logistics in clinical practice with respect to application and time frame. The literature was evaluated and shown to be limited with significant shortcomings. Guidelines and recommendations for clinical protocols were suggested and illustrated by examples of case types with a minimum of 1-3 years follow-up. A list of additional references for further reading was provided. Within the limitations of this review, there is evidence to suggest that immediate loading protocols have demonstrated high implant survival rates and may be cautiously recommended for certain clinical situations. However, more high level evidence studies, preferably randomized controlled trials (RCTs), over a long time frame are required to show a clear benefit over more conventional loading protocols.

  9. A study of dental anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Sook; Kim, Jae Duck [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to find out the prevalence of dental anomalies in 600 normal persons (male:363, female:237) at age 14 to 39 years, through history taking, oral examination, and radiographic observations of subjects. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The prevalence of individual dental anomalies were as follows; Congenitally missing teeth 7%; supernumerary teeth 1.33%; ectopic eruption 8.50%; transposition 0.33%; rotation 23.67%; microdontia 11.16% (peg lateral is 5.33%; third molar 5.83%); prolonged retention of deciduous teeth 1.33%; crowding 49.83%; and spacing 15.17%. 2. Alterations in numbers of teeth : The most frequently missing teeth were mandibular lateral incisors, followed by mandibular second premolars and maxillary second premolars. In numbers of congenitally missing teeth per person, 52.38% had one missing tooth and 30.95% had two missing teeth. In supernumerary teeth, there was higher rate in male than in female. Most supernumerary teeth were mesiodens of median area in maxilla and the eruption pattern of that teeth generally was unerupted state. 3. In transposition, exchange of position of teeth involved the canine and first premolar. 4. Congenital missing rate of permanent successors in prolonged retention of deciduous teeth was 69.23%. 5. Crowding and spacing had respectively higher rate in mandible and in maxilla.

  10. Dental Erosion: Causes, diagnostics and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Sosa-Puente

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: A pesar de ser un tópico altamente examinado, es difícil encontrar estudios que esclarezcan la problemática de la erosión dental. En este trabajo se analizó en la literatura los agentes que desencadenan la erosión dental, los principales métodos de diagnosis, los tratamientos más empleados en la actualidad y la interrelación con los materiales dentales. La etiología de la erosión es multifactorial incluyendo elementos ácidos, desórdenes alimenticios y reflujo gastroesofágico. Sin embargo, los factores biológicos como la saliva o los hábitos también intervienen en el establecimiento de la afección. Para establecer un diagnóstico fiable, la apariencia clínica se vuelve decisiva. Un auxiliar diagnóstico para evaluar el estado y progreso de la erosión es el índice Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE establecido en el 2008. La terapéutica deberá estar ligada a la erradicación del agente causal y consistirá desde simple observación hasta coronas totales en los casos más severos, pero esta dependerá totalmente de la extensión, severidad, sintomatología y tipo de dentición presente. Dentro de los materiales dentales empleados en el tratamiento de piezas erosionadas, se encuentran el ionómero de vidrio y el composite; siendo este último quien presenta mayor resistencia a la biodegradación al interactuar con elementos ácidos. El ionómero de vidrio constituye el material más vulnerable mientras que la resina se posiciona como la más resistente. La erosión dental se ha vuelto una cuestión de gran importancia en el ámbito odontológico por las graves repercusiones que se producen en las estructuras dentales, posicionándola como uno de los desordenes dentales con mayor trascendencia en la actualidad. Abstract: Despite being a highly studied topic, it is difficult to find studies that clarify the problematic of dental erosion. In this study was analyzed the literature to find information on agents that

  11. Prevalence of Pediculus humanus capitis among school girls of Chuang-Wei and Nan-Ao Districts in I-Lan County and Man-Chow District in Ping-Tung County, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, D; Liu, H Y; Fan, P C

    1981-03-01

    By using the naked eye examination and comb method, a field survey and combing collection of head louse (Pediculus humanus capitis) among school girls in three different area (Man-Chow, Nan-Ao and Chuang-Wei) of Taiwan were performed from July 1979 to February, 1980. The general infestation rate of head louse was 39.8% (or 998/2,509). In the primary schools, comparatively, the rate at Man-Chow (66.7%) was highest, the next at Nan-Ao (55.4%) and the lowest at Chuang-Wei (39.4%). While in the junior high schools, the rate was apparently higher at Nan-Ao (38.4%) than that at Man-Chow (15.6%) and Chang-Wei (12.0%). The highest rate in the primary schools was found in 3rd graders except at Chuang-Wei in 5th graders. The corresponding figure in the junior high schools was found in 1st graders except at Nan-Ao in 2nd graders. Of 774 infested girls studied, according to the number of lice per infested girl, the percentages of infestation in the 5 groups were: the very light (nits only) 54.5, light (1-10) 38.5, moderate (11-50) 6.5, heavy (51-100) 0.4 and very heavy (over 100) 0.1 respectively. Of 2,178 head lice examined, 53.0% was nymphs; 28.7% females; 18.2% males. The average number of head louse in each infested girl 6.2.

  12. Current overview on dental stem cells applications in regenerative dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Teeth are the most natural, noninvasive source of stem cells. Dental stem cells, which are easy, convenient, and affordable to collect, hold promise for a range of very potential therapeutic applications. We have reviewed the ever-growing literature on dental stem cells archived in Medline using the following key words: Regenerative dentistry, dental stem cells, dental stem cells banking, and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth. Relevant articles covering topics related to dental...

  13. Helicobacter pylori in the dental plaque of healthy Saudis

    OpenAIRE

    Contractor Qais; Tahir Mohammed; Naseem Shahzad; Ahmad Shamweel

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the dental plaque of healthy Saudis and its relation to dental care. One hundred randomly selected healthy Saudis attending the dental clinic were assessed for oral hygiene and periodontal disease by dental examination. Information about the use of toothpaste, chewing stick, smoking and dentures was obtained. Samples of dental plaque were collected after scoring it according to the plaque index. Presence of H. ...

  14. Assessment of atmospheric microbial contamination in a mobile dental unit

    OpenAIRE

    Shivakumar K; Prashant G; Madhu Shankari G; Subba Reddy V; Chandu G

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Bioaerosols are important considerations in infection control as well as in occupational health. Bioaerosols may carry potentially hazardous microbes, viruses, fungi, allergens, and other toxic substances that may harm the dental operator, patient, and the dental assistant by causing nosocomial infections. Objective: To assess the level of atmospheric microbial contamination before, during, and after dental treatment procedures in the dental operatory of a mobile dental unit...

  15. Work-related ocular events among Nigerian dental surgeons

    OpenAIRE

    Azodo, Clement C.; Ezeja, Ejike B

    2015-01-01

    Objective Daily clinical activities in dental operatory expose dental surgeons to varied forms of ocular events. The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence and pattern of ocular splashes and foreign bodies among dental surgeons in Nigeria. Methods This questionnaire-based cross-sectional of dental surgeons in Southern Nigeria was conducted between September 2010 and August 2011. The information elicited were demography, experience and type of ocular event, implicated dental proc...

  16. MICROWAVE PROPAGATION IN TOOTH AND DENTAL DEFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Papezova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION:The most common method of conventional dental diagnosisinvolves X-rays, such as Radio Tomography (RT or Computer Tomography (CT. Such methods are used for diagnosing pores in dental material that can lead to premature failure of dental material. Diagnosis by X-ray provides an objective analysis. However, repeated radiation from X-rays can cause biological damage to human tissues. From this point of view, there is a significant need to progress to quantitative non-invasive and non-destructive testing (NDT methods to measure dental material and improve treatment options. This article focuses on applying microwave technology to characterize teeth and teeth replacements. Knowledge of microwave propagation in biomaterial with no defects, using a defined microwave frequency range, and subsequently comparing the result with defective material could provide a means of dental diagnosis without the risk of radiation for the patient, i.e. without X-ray. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this study was to examine microwave technology in the field of dental medical diagnosis as a new NDT method. METHODS: The basic concept of applying microwave technology to characterize teeth in dental diagnosis was examined using a basic algorithm designed in the MATLAB programming language. Tests used dielectric properties of tooth and tooth decay and propagated electromagnetic (EM waves to show different characteristics of chosen materials.RESULTS: The analyses of frequency dependent reflection and transmission coefficients of the chosen material, specificallyteeth, atfrequency range 0 GHz to 30 GHz, computed differences between healthy and defective dental material.CONCLUSION: Thus, this could be used in providing a dental diagnosis without exposing patients to radiation, i.e. without X-ray. The next stage will involve creating a complete model of a jaw with teeth, and designing a sensor for crack detection for comparisons using this basic algorithm.

  17. What Will Dental Practice Be Like In 2025? Will You Help Dental Hypotheses Find Answers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward F. Rossomando

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the rapid acceptance of digital dental equipment, the dental office of 2011 looks very different from that of 1900. Despite these changes, the general dentist of 2011 performs almost the same functions as in 1900 namely the restoration of decayed teeth and the replacement of those lost due to disease. In addition to changes in technology, the last few decades of the 20th century ushered in a revolution in biology leading to the development of a genomic basis of dental disease and the development of bio-based diagnostics and therapeutics. In 2011 few if any of these bio-discoveries have changed dental practice but by 2025 we expect they will. In this editorial, Dental Hypotheses asks readers to “hypothesize” on what dental practice will be like in 2025.

  18. Does dental health education affect inequalities in dental health?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L; Wight, C

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the Lothian 1991 dental health campaigns on 5-year-old schoolchildren's oral hygiene and gingival health in relation to deprivation. A stratified random sample of 486 children was selected from 92 primary schools in the city of Edinburgh. Clinical examinations...... took place immediately before (T1), a month after (T2) and 4 months after the campaign (T3). A total of 342 (70 per cent) children received all 3 examinations. Oral hygiene and gingival health were examined using a modified Silness and Löe and the Ainamo and Bay Index. Toothbrushes and take...... to established social indicators. The results showed a statistically significant improvement in plaque scores at T2 and T3 (P gingival health improved at T2 and T3 (P

  19. Laser therapy in general dental practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbar, Arun A.

    2006-02-01

    This is a clinical presentation on the use of laser therapy in a private dental practice using a 810nm diode. A wide range of conditions involving pain management, treatment and as an adjunct to procedures to enhance patient comfort and experience. This will include cases treated for TMD (Temporo mandibular dysfunction), apthous ulcers, angular chelitis, cold sores, gingival retraction, periodontal treatment and management of failing dental implants. The case presentation will include the protocols used and some long term reviews. The results have been very positive and will be shared to enable this form of treatment to be used more frequently and with confidence within dental practice.

  20. METHACRYLATE AND ACRYLATE ALLERGY IN DENTAL STUDENTS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Lyapina

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A multitude of acrylic monomers is used in dentistry, and when dental personnel, patients or students of dental medicine become sensitized, it is of great importance to identify the dental ;acrylic preparations to which the sensitized individual can be exposed. Numerous studies confirm high incidence of sensitization to (meth acrylates in dentatal professionals, as well as in patients undergoing dental treatment and exposed to resin-based materials. Quite a few studies are available aiming to evaluate the incidence of sensitization in students of dental medicineThe purpose of the study is to evaluate the incidence of contact sensitization to some (meth acrylates in students of dental medicine at the time of their education, in dental professionals (dentists, nurses and attendants and in patients, the manifestation of co-reactivity.A total of 139 participants were included in the study, divided into four groups: occupationally exposed to (methacrylates and acrylic monomers dental professionals, 3-4 year-of-education students of dental medicine, 6th year–of-education students of dental medicine and patients with suspected or established sensitization to acrylates, without occupational exposure. All of them were patch-tested with methyl methacrylate (MMA, triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TREGDMA, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA, 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy phenyl]propane (bis-GMA, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA, and tetrahidrofurfuril metacrylate. The overall sensitization rates to methacrylates in the studied population are comparative high – from 25.9% for MMA to 31.7% for TREGDMA. Significantly higher incidence of sensitization in the group of 3-4 course students compared to the one in the group of dental professionals for MMA and TREGDMA was observed. Highest was the incidence of sensitization to ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate, BIS-GMA, 2-HEMA and tetrahydrofurfuryl methacrylate in the group of patients, with

  1. Dental optical coherence domain reflectometry explorer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, Matthew J. (Livermore, CA); Colston, Jr., Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Sathyam, Ujwal S. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A hand-held, fiber optic based dental device with optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) sensing capabilities provides a profile of optical scattering as a function of depth in the tissue at the point where the tip of the dental explorer touches the tissue. This system provides information on the internal structure of the dental tissue, which is then used to detect caries and periodontal disease. A series of profiles of optical scattering or tissue microstructure are generated by moving the explorer across the tooth or other tissue. The profiles are combined to form a cross-sectional, or optical coherence tomography (OCT), image.

  2. Optical approach in characterizing dental biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoli, Nazif; Vučić, Zlatko; Milat, Ognjen; Gladić, Jadranko; Lovrić, Davorin; Pandurić, Vlatko; Marović, Danijela; Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Ristić, Mira; Čalogović, Marina; Tarle, Zrinka

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the current activities of a research collaborative program between three institutions from Zagreb (School of Dental Medicine, Institute of Physics, and Institute Ruđer Bo\\vsković). Within the scope of this program, it is planned to investigate and find guidelines for the refinement of the properties of dental biomaterials (DBs) and of procedures in restorative dental medicine. It is also planned to identify and model the dominant mechanisms which control polymerization of DBs. The materials to be investigated include methacrylate based composite resins, new composite materials with amorphous calcium phosphate, silorane based composite resins, glass-ionomer cements, and giomer.

  3. Improvement of Cheilitis granulomatosa after Dental Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Sasaki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old male suffered from swelling of the lower lip for 3 months. Neither facial nerve palsy nor fissuring of the tongue was present. Histological examination of a biopsy taken from the lower lip revealed non-caseous epithelioid cell granulomas, suggestive of cheilitis granulomatosa. Patch testing revealed positive reactions to mercury chloride and amalgam. His symptoms markedly improved 3 months after treatment of the apical periodontitis and replacement of dental crowns. As his dental crowns did not contain mercury, we believe that the cheilitis granulomatosa may have been related to the focal dental infection.

  4. Improvement of Cheilitis granulomatosa after Dental Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Kayoko; Hayashi, Teppei; Inasaka, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2011-05-01

    A 38-year-old male suffered from swelling of the lower lip for 3 months. Neither facial nerve palsy nor fissuring of the tongue was present. Histological examination of a biopsy taken from the lower lip revealed non-caseous epithelioid cell granulomas, suggestive of cheilitis granulomatosa. Patch testing revealed positive reactions to mercury chloride and amalgam. His symptoms markedly improved 3 months after treatment of the apical periodontitis and replacement of dental crowns. As his dental crowns did not contain mercury, we believe that the cheilitis granulomatosa may have been related to the focal dental infection. PMID:21941479

  5. Emerging infections - implications for dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, N P

    2016-07-01

    Over the last 20 years the majority of emerging infections which have spread rapidly across the globe have been respiratory infections that are spread via droplets, a trend which is likely to continue. Aerosol spray generation in the dental surgery has the potential to spread such infections to staff or other patients. Although the diseases may differ, some common approaches can reduce the risk of transmission. Dental professionals should be aware of areas affected by emerging infections, the incubation period and the recent travel history of patients. Elective dental care for those returning from areas affected by emerging infections should be delayed until the incubation period for the infection is over. PMID:27388077

  6. Performance of Zirconia for Dental Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf J. Kohal

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The positive results of the performance of zirconia for orthopedics devices have led the dental community to explore possible esthetical and mechanical outcomes using this material. However, questions regarding long-term results have opened strong and controversial discussions regarding the utilization of zirconia as a substitute for alloys for restorations and implants. This narrative review presents the current knowledge on zirconia utilized for dental restorations, oral implant components, and zirconia oral implants, and also addresses laboratory tests and developments, clinical performance, and possible future trends of this material for dental healthcare.

  7. Utilization of dental services in Southern China

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, ECM; Lin, HC; Wang, ZJ; Wong, MCM; Schwarz, E

    2001-01-01

    A population's utilization of dental services is an important parameter in oral health care planning, which has rarely been studied in China. The objectives of this report were to describe the dental service utilization pattern of middle-aged and elderly Chinese and to analyze the influence of selected variables on the use of dental services. A Guangdong Province population of 1573 35- to 44-year-olds and 1515 65- to 74-year-olds recruited from urban and rural communities was interviewed in t...

  8. Dental devices: classification of dental amalgam, reclassification of dental mercury, designation of special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy; technical amendment. Final rule; technical amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a final rule in the Federal Register of August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686) which classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and designated special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. The effective date of the rule was November 2, 2009. The final rule was published with an inadvertent error in the codified section. This document corrects that error. This action is being taken to ensure the accuracy of the agency's regulations.

  9. Effects of dental materials on MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As MR imaging of the head and neck area becomes increasingly important in evaluating pathologic conditions of the brain, mid-face, and pharynx, it is becoming apparent that artifacts due to certain dental materials can obscure the findings. Although this fact has been known for some time, a study to identify which materials produce artifacts has not been performed. The authors examined the degree of artifact production caused by various materials commonly used in dental restorations. Since not all dental materials produce artifacts during MR imaging, these materials are described also

  10. Study of the factors associated with dental caries in children who receive early dental care

    OpenAIRE

    FRAIZ Fabian Calixto; Luiz Reynaldo de Figueiredo WALTER

    2001-01-01

    The present study investigated the factors associated with the development of dental caries in preschool children who receive regular dental care and follow-up. The research was carried out at the Baby Clinic, Londrina State University, and comprised two hundred preschool children, whose ages ranged from 24 to 48 months, as well as their mothers, who had already taken part in a dental program at the Baby Clinic during, at least, the previous twelve months. Regarding oral hygiene habits, there...

  11. Modern dental imaging: a review of the current technology and clinical applications in dental practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenberghe, Bart; Jacobs, Reinhilde [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Oral Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Leuven (Belgium); Bosmans, Hilde [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Radiology Section, Department of Medical Diagnostic Sciences, Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-11-15

    A review of modern imaging techniques commonly used in dental practice and their clinical applications is presented. The current dental examinations consist of intraoral imaging with digital indirect and direct receptors, while extraoral imaging is divided into traditional tomographic/panoramic imaging and the more recently introduced cone beam computed tomography. Applications, limitations and current trends of these dental ''in-office'' radiographic techniques are discussed. (orig.)

  12. DOES INCREASING DENTAL EDUCATION IMPROVE THE ORAL HYGIENE STATUS OF DENTAL STUDENTS?

    OpenAIRE

    Purnima V.; Thilagarani; Pramod; Vidyesh Durga; Nitin; Ravishankar; Anil; Amit

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of increased knowledge acquired by the dental student in preventive aspects of dental education during his curriculum on his own health attitude, oral hygiene and gingival status. METHODS: A total of 240 students pursuing the undergraduate course (B.D.S) at t he New Horizon Dental College and Research Institute, Bilaspur (Chhattisgarh) were recruited for the study and divided into 4 groups based on the ...

  13. Application of Behavior Management Techniques for Paediatric Dental Patients by Tanzanian Dental Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Kawia, Hassan Mohamed; Mbawalla, Hawa Shariff; Kahabuka, Febronia Kokulengya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Management of children’s behavior is an integral component of pediatric dental practice. Objective: To investigate the oral health care providers’ awareness, use and factors for choice of behavior management techniques when attending paediatric dental patients. Methods: A cross-sectional study among dental practitioners in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Data collection was done through interview using a structured questionnaire. The recorded information included: awareness and applicati...

  14. Pneumoconiosis and respiratory problems in dental laboratory technicians: Analysis of 893 dental technicians

    OpenAIRE

    Dilek Ergün; Recai Ergün; Cengiz Özdemir; Türkan Nadir Öziş; Hinç Yilmaz; İbrahim Akkurt

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the rate of pneumoconiosis in dental technicians (DTP) and to evaluate the risk factors. Material and Methods: Data of 893 dental technicians, who were admitted to our hospital in the period January 2007–May 2012, from 170 dental laboratories were retrospectively examined. Demographic data, respiratory symptoms, smoking status, work duration, working fields, exposure to sandblasting, physical examination findings, chest radiographs, pulmonary function tests and high-res...

  15. Relationships between daily total fluoride intake and dental fluorosis and dental caries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanyong Xiang; Minghao Zhou; Ming Wu; Xinya Zhou; Li Lin; Jiuning Huang; Youxing Liang

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To explore the relationships between the dally total intake of fluoride,dental fluorosis and dental caries.Methods:An epidemiological method was used to investigate the daily total intake of fluoride,dental fluorosis,and dental caries among 236 and 290 children aged 8-13 years in a severe endemic area and in a non-fluorosis control area,respectively.The children were divided into eight subgroups according to each child's estimated dally total intake of fluoride.The prevalence of dental fluorosis and dental caries in each group was calculated.Results:As expected,elevated levels of fluoride intake were significantly associated with a higher prevalence of dental fluorosis and an increasing amount of more severe defect dental fhiorosis.When the dally total F intake was 2.78 rag/child/day,the prevalence of dental fluorosis was nearly 100%,with the prevalence of defect dental fluorosis increasing with increasing fluoride intake.There was also a significant negative(inverse) dose-response relationship between the dally total intake of fluoride and the overall preva-lence of dental caries,the prevalence of which decreased when the daily total intake of fluoride increased up to 3.32 mg/child/day.However,at higher levels of daily total intake of fluoride the prevalence of dental caries increased,giving rise to a U-shaped dose-response relationship curve.Conclusion:It is important to monitor total fluoride exposure and protect children from excessive fluoride intake,especially during the years of tooth development.

  16. Postal audit in dental radiodiagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to Czech laws dental intraoral X-ray machines are classified as simple sources of ionizing radiation. Consequently , their use is licensed on condition that an adequate quality assurance program is realized. In general, the programme is based on acceptance tests, status tests and constancy tests. The particular methods are specified in the recommendation [1] published by State Office for Nuclear Safety .Both the acceptance and status tests involve in situ measurements to control parameters of the X-ray machine and the developing process. Only persons who were licensed for such handling can do these measurements. The yearly status tests are very detailed and several years ' experience showed it might be advantageous to have a simpler method additionally available for purposes of the state supervision. Such a method is supposed as a postal audit. It should be simple enough to make the operation of the state supervision more effective but it also should provide sufficient information on radiation protection of the patients. Besides it should enable to prolong the period for the status tests ultimately .As for the postal audit, a small package containing a proper dosimetric set would be sent directly to the dentist who would treat it according to instructions. This paper describes such method that was developed in the National Radiation Protection Institute (NRPI) and results of pilot study that was carried out to test the method. The described method will be a helpful tool for the operation of the state supervision in the dental radiodiagnostics. The method will be implemented into the existing system of controls from 2002. Due to its simplicity and a quite rich content of information allows to check a big amount of the dental workplaces at once. It is supposed that one half of all Czech X-ray units will be checked in this way every year performed on state costs. It means 175 audits per month approximately. In this way, the operation of the quality assurance

  17. Protocol for diagnostic test accuracy study: the efficacy of screening for common dental diseases by Dental Care Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Macey, Richard; Walsh, Tanya; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Worthington, Helen; Tickle, Martin; Ashley, James; Brocklehurst, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background The bulk of service delivery in dentistry is delivered by general dental practitioners, when a large proportion of patients who attend regularly are asymptomatic and do not require treatment. This represents a substantial and unnecessary cost, given that it is possible to delegate a range of tasks to dental care professionals, who are a less expensive resource. Screening for the common dental diseases by dental care professionals has the potential to release general dental practiti...

  18. Effect of Different Disinfection Protocols on Microbial and Biofilm Contamination of Dental Unit Waterlines in Community Dental Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Dallolio; Amalia Scuderi; Rini, Maria S.; Sabrina Valente; Patrizia Farruggia; Bucci Sabattini, Maria A.; Gianandrea Pasquinelli; Anna Acacci; Greta Roncarati; Erica Leoni

    2014-01-01

    Output water from dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) may be a potential source of infection for both dental healthcare staff and patients. This study compared the efficacy of different disinfection methods with regard to the water quality and the presence of biofilm in DUWLs. Five dental units operating in a public dental health care setting were selected. The control dental unit had no disinfection system; two were disinfected intermittently with peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide 0.26% and two un...

  19. Awareness Of Dental Implants As A Treatment Modality Among People Visiting Mahatma Gandhi Dental College AND Hospital, Jaipur

    OpenAIRE

    Bhoomika Khosya; Devaraj CG

    2015-01-01

    Background: Currently, dental implants are widely accepted as a prosthetic treatment of completely or partially edentulous patients. To assess awareness of Dental Implants as a treatment modality among people visiting Mahatma Gandhi Dental College and Hospital, Jaipur. Methodology: A cross sectional survey was conducted among 114 patients visiting Mahatma Gandhi Dental College and Hospital, Jaipur using a self-explanatory questionnaire. Results: Out of the 114 dental patients, only 40.4% h...

  20. Pediatric dental chair vs. traditional dental chair: A pediatric dentist′s poll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Barjatya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Proper positioning of the child patient, can not only have positive ramifications for the operator′s posture, comfort, and career longevity - it can also lead to better treatment and increased productivity. The aim of the survey questionnaire was to assess the utilization, need, and attitude concerning dental chairs among pediatric dentist while working on and managing the child patient. Study Design: The questions were structured using adobe forms central online software, regarding the user-friendliness of pediatric dental chair vs. traditional adult dental chair available in the market. Results: Our result shows that out of 337 respondents, 79% worked on pediatric dental chair, whereas 21% had no experience of it. Of these 79% pediatric dentist, 48% preferred pediatric dental chair. But pediatric dental problem still has certain disadvantages like higher cost, leg space problem, lower availability, etc. Conclusion: During the research it was found that ergonomics and usability issues were the main problems. Thus, pediatric dental chair is not so popular in the current scenario. This study allowed for general ideas for the improvement of dental chairs and thus improved dental chair would fill the gap in the current scenario.

  1. Multimodal management of dental pain with focus on alternative medicine: A novel herbal dental gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kumarswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental pain is the most common symptom associated with a wide array of dental problems and significantly impacts the oral health-related quality of life. The epidemiology and prevalence of oral diseases that could lead to dental pain are diverse and indicate regional variations. Several researchers have dwelled into the neurobiology and pathophysiology of dental pain making the pain pathways more clear and deciphering the precise targets for the management of pain. Although a number of pharmacological drugs are available in the market, a significant percentage of the population in India prefers alternative herbal medication for relief from dental pain due to the side effects and interactions of pharmacological treatment. However, there is a void in dental literature pertaining to the use, benefits, and safety of the herbal medicines. Therefore, the present assessment has been penned down, focusing on the current multimodal approaches for treating dental pain, the current unmet need, and the role of herbal medication in India for the management of dental pain, with a discussion on novel herbal dental gel.

  2. Multimodal management of dental pain with focus on alternative medicine: A novel herbal dental gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarswamy, A

    2016-01-01

    Dental pain is the most common symptom associated with a wide array of dental problems and significantly impacts the oral health-related quality of life. The epidemiology and prevalence of oral diseases that could lead to dental pain are diverse and indicate regional variations. Several researchers have dwelled into the neurobiology and pathophysiology of dental pain making the pain pathways more clear and deciphering the precise targets for the management of pain. Although a number of pharmacological drugs are available in the market, a significant percentage of the population in India prefers alternative herbal medication for relief from dental pain due to the side effects and interactions of pharmacological treatment. However, there is a void in dental literature pertaining to the use, benefits, and safety of the herbal medicines. Therefore, the present assessment has been penned down, focusing on the current multimodal approaches for treating dental pain, the current unmet need, and the role of herbal medication in India for the management of dental pain, with a discussion on novel herbal dental gel. PMID:27307656

  3. Pre-admission credentials and dental school performance of dental hygienists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriello, S M; George, J M; May, K N

    1993-04-01

    This study examined the effect of dental hygiene preparation prior to entering dental school on dental school performance. Study participants included 203 female students who entered a public dental school from 1980-1989. Groups 1 and 2 had completed dental school prerequisites and a dental hygiene curriculum in a community college setting (n = 19) or university setting (n = 22) respectively, and Group 3 (n = 162) were traditional students with no dental hygiene education. Preadmission variables were predental science and non-science grade point averages (GPA) and Dental Admission Test (DAT) scores. Performance variables were GPA of years one and two of dental school and National Board scores (Part 1). Results showed that Group 2 hygienists had significantly lower predental science GPAs than Group 1 or 3 and significantly lower non-science GPAs than Group 3 (p difference was seen in first and second year GPAs or the National Board average. Adjusting performance scores to compensate for deficiencies in preadmission variables showed that Group 2 hygienists had significantly higher adjusted first-year GPAs and National Board averages than Group 3 (p < 0). Thus, hygienists performed as well as non-hygienists in spite of weaker admission credentials. PMID:8482741

  4. [Microbial corrosion of dental alloy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lele; Liu, Li

    2004-10-01

    There is a very complicated electrolytical environment in oral cavity with plenty of microorganisms existing there. Various forms of corrosion would develop when metallic prosthesis functions in mouth. One important corrosive form is microbial corrosion. The metabolic products, including organic acid and inorganic acid, will affect the pH of the surface or interface of metallic prosthesis and make a change in composition of the medium, thus influencing the electron-chemical reaction and promoting the development of corrosion. The problem of develpoment of microbial corrosion on dental alloy in the oral environment lies in the primary condition that the bacteria adhere to the surface of alloy and form a relatively independent environment that promotes corrosion. PMID:15553877

  5. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic radiography is described in detail. It comprises a tubular target carrier supporting at its distal end a target with an inclined forward face. Image definition is improved by positioning in the path of the X-rays a window of X-ray transmitting ceramic material, e.g. 90% oxide of Be, or Al, 7% Si02. The target carrier forms a probe which can be positioned in the patient's mouth. X-rays are directed forwardly and laterally of the target to an X-ray film positioned externally. The probe is provided with a detachable sleeve having V-form arms of X-ray opaque material which serve to depress the tongue out of the radiation path and also shield the roof of the mouth and other regions of the head from the X-ray pattern. A cylindrical lead shield defines the X-ray beam angle. (author)

  6. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral X-ray apparatus which reduces the number of exposures necessary to obtain panoramic dental radiographs is described in detail. It comprises an electron gun, a tubular target carrier projecting from the gun along the beam axis and carrying at its distal end a target surrounded by a shield of X-ray opaque material. This shield extends forward and laterally of the target and has surfaces which define a wedge or cone-shaped radiation pattern delimited vertically by the root tips of the patient's teeth. A film holder is located externally of the patient's mouth. A disposable member can fit on the target carrier to depress the patient's tongue out of the radiation pattern and to further shield the roof of the mouth. The electron beam can be magnetically deflected to change the X-ray beam direction. (author)

  7. Nanotechnology: Role in dental biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are surface- adherent populations of microorganisms consisting of cells, water and extracellular matrix material Nanotechnology is promising field of science which can guide our understanding of the role of interspecies interaction in the development of biofilm. Streptococcus mutans with other species of bacteria has been known to form dental biofilm. The correlation between genetically modified bacteria Streptococcus mutans and nanoscale morphology has been assessed using AFMi.e atomic force microscopy. Nanotechnology application includes 16 O/ 18 O reverse proteolytic labeling,use of quantum dots for labeling of bacterial cells, selective removal of cariogenic bacteria while preserving the normal oral flora and silver antimicrobial nanotechnology against pathogens associated with biofilms. The future comprises a mouthwash full of smart nanomachines which can allow the harmless flora of mouth to flourish in a healthy ecosystem

  8. Materials for endosseous dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wataha, J C

    1996-02-01

    The goal of placement of endosseous dental implants is to achieve osseointegration or biointegration of the bone with the implant. A wide variety of materials has been used for these implants, but only a few promote osseointegration and biointegration. Titanium and titanium alloy (Ti6A14V) have been the most widely used of these materials. The surface oxide of titanium appears to be central to the ability of this material to osseointegrate. The oxide limits dissolution of elements and promotes the deposition of biological molecules which allow bone to exist as close as 30 A to the surface of the implant. The details of the ultrastructure of the gap between the implant and bone remain undefined, and the consequences of elements which are released on the interface over time are not known. These areas of investigation are particularly important in defining the differences between commercially pure titanium implants and those made of titanium, aluminium and vanadium. The epithelial interface between the gingiva and titanium appears to contain many of the structural characteristics of the native tooth-gingiva interface, but details are still vague. The connective tissue interface with the titanium appears to be one of tightly fitting tissues rather than adhesion. Ceramic coatings appear to improve the ingrowth of bone and promote chemical integration of the implant with the bone. The characteristics of these coatings are complex and affect the bony response, but the mechanisms remain obscure. The degradation of the coatings is an issue of particular controversy. Progress in dental implantology is likely to continue as the interface between the material and bone is more clearly understood, and biological molecules and artificial tissues are developed.

  9. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric...... Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out......Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric...

  10. Death in dental clinic: Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshappa, Kedarnath Nakkalahalli; Rangaswamy, Shruthi

    2016-01-01

    Deaths during dental treatment or as a result of dental treatment are rare, but the unfortunate fact is that such deaths do occur. Unexpected death of a patient can be emotionally draining and even harrowing to his or her relatives. The death of a patient may bring an enormous feeling of anxiety both at the personal and professional level, stress, profound grief, damage to self-esteem, loss of self-confidence, reputation, and specter of litigation on a dental surgeon. No dentist can be guaranteed to be free of such an incident during the course of his or her practice. The dentist should respond in a compassionate and respectful manner in case of such unfortunate tragic events, and also ensure self-protection. This article emphasizes on prevention of such incidents and throws some light on how to respond in case of an unfortunate death in a dental clinic, including the medico-legal aspects.

  11. Death in dental clinic: Indian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedarnath Nakkalahalli Seshappa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deaths during dental treatment or as a result of dental treatment are rare, but the unfortunate fact is that such deaths do occur. Unexpected death of a patient can be emotionally draining and even harrowing to his or her relatives. The death of a patient may bring an enormous feeling of anxiety both at the personal and professional level, stress, profound grief, damage to self-esteem, loss of self-confidence, reputation, and specter of litigation on a dental surgeon. No dentist can be guaranteed to be free of such an incident during the course of his or her practice. The dentist should respond in a compassionate and respectful manner in case of such unfortunate tragic events, and also ensure self-protection. This article emphasizes on prevention of such incidents and throws some light on how to respond in case of an unfortunate death in a dental clinic, including the medico-legal aspects.

  12. Teething & Dental Hygiene for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Sleep Growing Healthy Healthy Children > Healthy Living > Oral Health > Dental Health & Hygiene for Young Children Healthy Living Listen Español Text ...

  13. Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body. Back to Top Step 3. Visit a Dentist Regularly Your client should have regular dental appointments. ... re an important source of information for the dentist. If you have questions about what the dentist ...

  14. Probiotics in the prevention of dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johany Duque de Estrada Riverón

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics have the potential to provide significant benefits to human health, so we decided to investigate the probiotics species that may have preventive action against dental caries mainly in children in order to determine if there can be created a preventive medicine, made from probiotics found in the oral cavity. Oral probiotics that have shown promising activities in the prevention of dental caries are: Streptococcus salivarius (strain K12, BGH01 Lactobacillus salivarius, BGH089 gasseri Lactobacillus, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus oligofermentans. In vitro studies on the use of probiotics for the prevention of dental caries have shown interesting results, but in vivo they are not very encouraging. It is necessary to deepen in the therapeutic effects of probiotics strains already discovered in order to obtain from them an effective preventive agent against dental caries and so ensuring a better quality of life, especially in children.

  15. Infant oral exam and first dental home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Kavitha

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to familiarize general practitioners with the components of a dental home including an infant oral exam, and to the First Dental Home initiative, which is unique to the State of Texas. This article encourages the general practitioners to actively participate in providing care for young children under the age of 3. Components of an infant oral examination are described here with emphasis on knee-to-knee or lap exam, caries risk assessment, preventive treatment, age-appropriate anticipatory guidance, and parent education. The First Dental Home is uniquely designed to help pediatric clients 6 months through 35 months of age to establish a dental home. The objectives, goal and components of FDH are discussed in detail.

  16. Death in dental clinic: Indian scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshappa, Kedarnath Nakkalahalli; Rangaswamy, Shruthi

    2016-01-01

    Deaths during dental treatment or as a result of dental treatment are rare, but the unfortunate fact is that such deaths do occur. Unexpected death of a patient can be emotionally draining and even harrowing to his or her relatives. The death of a patient may bring an enormous feeling of anxiety both at the personal and professional level, stress, profound grief, damage to self-esteem, loss of self-confidence, reputation, and specter of litigation on a dental surgeon. No dentist can be guaranteed to be free of such an incident during the course of his or her practice. The dentist should respond in a compassionate and respectful manner in case of such unfortunate tragic events, and also ensure self-protection. This article emphasizes on prevention of such incidents and throws some light on how to respond in case of an unfortunate death in a dental clinic, including the medico-legal aspects.

  17. Bone manipulation procedures in dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Yuvika; Jindal, Govind; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants for the rehabilitation of missing teeth has broadened the treatment options for patients and clinicians equally. As a result of advances in research in implant design, materials, and techniques, the use of dental implants has increased dramatically in the past two decades and is expected to expand further in the future. Success of dental implants depends largely on the quality and quantity of the available bone in the recipient site. This however may be compromised or unavailable due to tumor, trauma, periodontal disease, etc., which in turn necessitates the need for additional bone manipulation. This review outlines the various bone manipulation techniques that are used to achieve a predictable long-term success of dental implants.

  18. Role of dental expert in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anoop K; Kumar, Sachil; Rathore, Shiuli; Pandey, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Forensic dentistry has become an integral part of forensic science over the past 100 years that utilizes dental or oro-facial findings to serve the judicial system. This has been due to the dedication of people like Gustafson's, Keiser-Nielson, and Suzuki for this field. They established the essential role which forensic dentistry plays mainly in the identification of human remains. The tooth has been used as weapons and under certain circumstances, may leave information about the identity of the biter. Dental professionals have a major role to play in keeping accurate dental records and providing all necessary information so that legal authorities may recognize mal practice, negligence, fraud or abuse, and identity of unknown individuals. This paper will try to summarize the various roles of dental experts in forensic medicine. PMID:25298709

  19. Growth Trends in Dental Service Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    There are a number of factors fueling the growth of large group practices managed by corporations across the U.S., including California. These evolving trends are shaping the dental profession and practice models in a variety of ways.

  20. Death in dental clinic: Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshappa, Kedarnath Nakkalahalli; Rangaswamy, Shruthi

    2016-01-01

    Deaths during dental treatment or as a result of dental treatment are rare, but the unfortunate fact is that such deaths do occur. Unexpected death of a patient can be emotionally draining and even harrowing to his or her relatives. The death of a patient may bring an enormous feeling of anxiety both at the personal and professional level, stress, profound grief, damage to self-esteem, loss of self-confidence, reputation, and specter of litigation on a dental surgeon. No dentist can be guaranteed to be free of such an incident during the course of his or her practice. The dentist should respond in a compassionate and respectful manner in case of such unfortunate tragic events, and also ensure self-protection. This article emphasizes on prevention of such incidents and throws some light on how to respond in case of an unfortunate death in a dental clinic, including the medico-legal aspects. PMID:27555720

  1. Application of biophysical technologies in dental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Susan M.; Pender, Neil; de Josselin de Jong, Elbert; Smith, Philip W.

    2009-05-01

    There is a wealth of evidence to indicate that if dental caries can be recognized at an early stage, it is possible to halt its progression or even reverse it. This has led to an increased interest in the development of diagnostic techniques capable of visualizing caries at an early stage in addition to providing clinicians with an aid to diagnosis. Several techniques are available for research and clinical applications for detecting early demineralization. This manuscript has reviewed some of the techniques currently available to determine their advantages, whether they have any limitations and their applicability to dental research and clinical dentistry. Not one method is the perfect choice in all situations, but what is clear is that the development and application of biophysical technologies have allowed major advances to be made in dental research as well as in clinical dentistry. With continued developments these technologies will play an important role in the future management of dental disease.

  2. Radiological protection in the dental profession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of legislation concerning health and safety of people as affected by work activities. In connection with legislation in the special field of radiological protection, it was agreed between the (United Kingdom) Health and Safety Executive and the British Dental Association that a survey should be carried out into the use of radiography in dental practices. The terms of the survey, and relevant safety standards, are summarized. The results are discussed under the following headings: personal radiation dose to dental staff, beam filtration, beam diameter, timing units, warning signals, dose per exposure, scattered doserate, film processing, location of the x-ray set, maintenance of the x-ray equipment, holding of dental films, instruction training and supervision. Conclusions are reached, and basic rules proposed. (U.K.)

  3. Survey of radiologic practices among dental practitioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence and contribute to patient exposure in radiologic procedures performed in the offices of 132 staff members within the dental department of a teaching hospital. A questionnaire was prepared in which data were requested on brands of film used, type of x-ray unit used, processing, and use of leaded apron, cervical shield, and film holder. Offices were also visited to evaluate performance of existing dental x-ray equipment. Both the Dental Radiographic Normalizing and Monitoring Device and the Dental Quality Control Test Tool were evaluated. The average exposure was equivalent to the class D film (220 mR), but only 13% of those surveyed used the faster class E film, which would reduce patient exposure in half. The survey indicates that dentists are not using the newer low-exposure class E film in their practices

  4. Tracheobronchial Foreign Body Aspiration: Dental Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataman Köse

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to extract foreign bodies for avoiding life-threatening complications. They can lead to death if they are not treated. Different signs and symptoms could occur according to the complete or partial airway obstruction. Foreign body aspiration is a rare incident in adults. The organic foreign materials such as foods are found to be aspirated more commonly and are usually settled in the right bronchial system. However, dental prosthesis and teeth aspirations are rare in literature. In our study, a 52-year-old male patient who had aspirated the front part of his lower dental prosthesis accidentally is presented and the foreign body is extracted by using rigid bronchoscopy. There are many causes of aspiration but dental prosthetic aspirations should be kept in mind during sleep. For this reason, dental apparatus must be taken out while asleep.

  5. FastStats: Oral and Dental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State and Territorial Data Reproductive Health Contraceptive Use Infertility Reproductive Health FastStats Mobile Application Get Email Updates ... Links National Health Interview Survey National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial ...

  6. Image segmentation for automated dental identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj Said, Eyad; Nassar, Diaa Eldin M.; Ammar, Hany H.

    2006-02-01

    Dental features are one of few biometric identifiers that qualify for postmortem identification; therefore, creation of an Automated Dental Identification System (ADIS) with goals and objectives similar to the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) has received increased attention. As a part of ADIS, teeth segmentation from dental radiographs films is an essential step in the identification process. In this paper, we introduce a fully automated approach for teeth segmentation with goal to extract at least one tooth from the dental radiograph film. We evaluate our approach based on theoretical and empirical basis, and we compare its performance with the performance of other approaches introduced in the literature. The results show that our approach exhibits the lowest failure rate and the highest optimality among all full automated approaches introduced in the literature.

  7. Dental implant surgery: planning and guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype application has been developed for interactive planning of dental implants on the EasyVision workstation. The user is led step by step via virtual positioning of the implant to the design of a customized drill guide. (orig.)

  8. Clinical Pharmacy Education in a Dental Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, Dennis K.; Walker, John A.

    1978-01-01

    A clinical pharmacy training program for undergraduate students developed at the University of Iowa provides conjoint training of pharmacy and dental students in the clinic areas and pharmacy at the College of Dentistry. (LBH)

  9. Insure Kids Now (IKN) (Dental Care Providers)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Insure Kids Now (IKN) Dental Care Providers in Your State locator tool is provided, in accordance with the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization...

  10. Bone manipulation procedures in dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Yuvika; Jindal, Govind; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants for the rehabilitation of missing teeth has broadened the treatment options for patients and clinicians equally. As a result of advances in research in implant design, materials, and techniques, the use of dental implants has increased dramatically in the past two decades and is expected to expand further in the future. Success of dental implants depends largely on the quality and quantity of the available bone in the recipient site. This however may be compromised or unavailable due to tumor, trauma, periodontal disease, etc., which in turn necessitates the need for additional bone manipulation. This review outlines the various bone manipulation techniques that are used to achieve a predictable long-term success of dental implants. PMID:27433052

  11. Stress Among First-Year Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandy, Thomas G. And Others

    1984-01-01

    A study to document the stress (anxiety and depression) levels of students at a small midwestern dental school is described. The points of greatest distress during the first academic year were also investigated. (MLW)

  12. Survey of radiologic practices among dental practitioners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goren, A.D.; Sciubba, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Malamud, H. (Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (USA))

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence and contribute to patient exposure in radiologic procedures performed in the offices of 132 staff members within the dental department of a teaching hospital. A questionnaire was prepared in which data were requested on brands of film used, type of x-ray unit used, processing, and use of leaded apron, cervical shield, and film holder. Offices were also visited to evaluate performance of existing dental x-ray equipment. Both the Dental Radiographic Normalizing and Monitoring Device and the Dental Quality Control Test Tool were evaluated. The average exposure was equivalent to the class D film (220 mR), but only 13% of those surveyed used the faster class E film, which would reduce patient exposure in half. The survey indicates that dentists are not using the newer low-exposure class E film in their practices.

  13. Evaluation of dental solid waste in Hamedan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabizadeh R.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Today, one of the most important environmental issues is dental solid wastes which are of great importance because of the presence of hazardous, toxic and pathogen agents. In this survey, solid waste produced in Hamedan general dental offices is evaluated. "nMaterials and Methods: In this descriptive study, from 104 general dental offices in Hamedan , 10 offices were selected in simple random way. From each offices, 3 sample at the end of successive working day (Sunday, Monday and Tuesday were analyzed. Samples were manually sorted into different 74 components and measured by means of laboratory scale. Then, measured components were classified in the basis of characteristic and hazardous potential as well as material type. "nResults: Total annual waste produced in general dental offices in Hamadan is 14662.67 Kg (9315.45>95.0% Confidence Interval>20009.88. Production percentages of infectious, domestic type, chemical and pharmaceutical and toxic wastes were 51.93, 38.16, 9.47, 0.44 respectively. Main components of produced dental waste were 14 components that consist of more than 80 percents of total dental solid waste. So, waste reduction, separation and recycling plans in the offices must be concentrated on these main components. "nConclusion: In order to dental waste proper management, it is suggested that in addition to educate dentists for waste reduction, separation and recycling in the offices, each section of dental waste(toxic,chemical and pharmaceutical, infectious and domestic type wastes separately and according to related criteria should be managed.

  14. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-10-18

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the October 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Dental sealants, applied soon after a child's permanent molars come in, can protect against cavities for up to nine years. Applying sealants in schools for low-income children could save millions in dental treatment costs.  Created: 10/18/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/18/2016.

  15. Dental caries - A complete changeover (Part I)

    OpenAIRE

    Usha Carounanidy; Sathyanarayanan R

    2009-01-01

    In spite of a knowledge explosion in cariology science, dental caries still remains a misunderstood phenomenon by the clinicians. In order to effectively use the wide range of preventive and management strategies, it is imperative to look beyond those black and white spots that manifest on the tooth surfaces. This paper focuses on the revised versions of the etiopathogenesis and definition of dental caries disease in the present century.

  16. Dental caries - A complete changeover (Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Carounanidy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of a knowledge explosion in cariology science, dental caries still remains a misunderstood phenomenon by the clinicians. In order to effectively use the wide range of preventive and management strategies, it is imperative to look beyond those black and white spots that manifest on the tooth surfaces.This paper focuses on the revised versions of the etiopathogenesis and definition of dental caries disease in the present century.

  17. Dangers from mercury in dental office

    OpenAIRE

    E. Yasini

    1996-01-01

    Mercury has been used in amalgam restorations for more than a century though it is poisonous and mercury vapor can endanger the health of patients and dental office staff. Therefore, they should be aware of its hazards and observe guidelines to prevent injury to nervous system, heart, kidneys, alimentary and respiratory systems. The source of mercury poisoning in dental offices can be of stored mercury, evaporation while mixing, inserting, condensing, carving, burnishing or ...

  18. Orthodontic First Aid for General Dental Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodipo, Ibukunoluwa; Birdsall, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    Orthodontic emergencies occasionally arise and although they can cause discomfort to the patient, they can usually be stabilized by a general dentist and then followed up by the orthodontist. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Patients undergoing orthodontic treatment may initially present to their general dental practitioner with an orthodontic emergency as opposed to their orthodontist. It is therefore important that general dental practitioners are aware of common orthodontic emergencies and their management. PMID:27529914

  19. Dental Treatment in Patients with Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Zimmermann; Maria Inês Meurer; Liliane Janete Grando; Joanita Ângela Gonzaga Del Moral; Inês Beatriz da Silva Rath; Silvia Schaefer Tavares

    2015-01-01

    Dental treatment of patients with leukemia should be planned on the basis of antineoplastic therapy which can be chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. Many are the oral manifestations presented by these patients, arising from leukemia and/or treatment. In addition, performing dental procedures at different stages of treatment (before, during, or after) must follow certain protocols in relation to the haematological indices of patients, aimed at maintaining...

  20. Health protection: Fluoridation and dental health.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Tooth decay, which affects 95 percent of Americans, is our most common health problem, costing an estimated +2 billion yearly for treatment. By the time children reach 17 years of age, 94 percent have experienced caries and 36 percent have lost one or more permanent teeth due to caries. Dental disease prevention embodies the spectrum of many activities from the fluoridation of community and school water supplies to the dental health education of the child and adult. At this stage of our knowl...

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection and dental care.

    OpenAIRE

    Hardo, P G; Tugnait, A; Hassan, F.; Lynch, D A; West, A P; Mapstone, N P; Quirke, P.; Chalmers, D M; Kowolik, M J; Axon, A T

    1995-01-01

    Sixty two patients (mean age 45.6 years) were assessed for oral hygiene and periodontal disease by dental examination before endoscopy. Information about oral care, smoking, and dentures was obtained and samples of dental plaque collected. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in plaque as sought by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and gastric antral biopsy specimens were taken for histological examination. Although H pylori was detected in the antral specimens of 34 patients (54%) ...

  2. Romanian Consumers Habits regarding Dental Hygiene

    OpenAIRE

    Cetinã Iuliana; Gârdan Daniel Adrian; Geangu Iuliana Petronela

    2011-01-01

    In the actual context, marketing in the dental care services field is confronting with more and more challenging demands. Among them one of the most important one is refering to the need to integrate consumers motivation in the field of marketing strategy. The present research aims to investigate the content and the different corelations of consumer habits regarding dental hygiene. The results are intended to be used in developing new promotional campaigns build on motivational techniques for...

  3. Ceramics for Dental Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A. Holloway

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past forty years, the technological evolution of ceramics for dental applications has been remarkable, as new materials and processing techniques are steadily being introduced. The improvement in both strength and toughness has made it possible to expand the range of indications to long-span fixed partial prostheses, implant abutments and implants. The present review provides a state of the art of ceramics for dental applications.

  4. Child Dental Neglect: A Short Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ramazani, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Context: Child dental neglect is a terrible tragedy with a high prevalence. Dealing with this issue is important regarding psychological and physical health policies. The current review was conducted to provide health professionals insight into the different aspects of child dental neglect as reported in previous literature. Evidence Acquisition: Our review was prepared through an electronic search using Pub Med, Science Direct, Medline, Google, Cochran Library, Google Scholar and EMBASE data...

  5. Dental Fusion with Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dental Fusion is developmental anomaly due to the union of two tooth germs resulting in a single tooth. It is an infrequent phenomenon but may cause caries, periodontal, cosmetic and malocclusion abnormalities. Oral Submucous Fibrosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder and a precancerous condition affecting oral mucosa causing inability to open the mouth, burning sensation and leathery consistency. This manuscript describes a case of OSMF and dental fusion. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 308-310

  6. Pharmacokinetics of mercury from dental amalgam

    OpenAIRE

    Sandborgh Englund, Gunilla

    1998-01-01

    PHARMACOKINETICS OF MERCURY FROM DENTAL AMALGAM Gunilla Sandborgh Englund Dept. of Basal Oral Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 04Huddinge The overall aim of the present work has been to obtain quantitative and qualitativedata on mercury from dental amalgam in humans. The influence of amalgam removal on mercury levels in blood, plasma and urine hasbeen studied in twelve volunteers. All amalgam fillings were removed during one dentalsession. A transient increase of...

  7. Ergonomics preventive recommendations to protected dental professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacevska, Ivona; Denkova, Natasa; Dimova, Cena; Georgiev, Zlatko; Petrovski, Mihajlo

    2015-01-01

    Dental clinicians are permanently exposed to a variety of occupational hazards which at some time manifest as painful conditions or final like a muscle-skeletal diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the most commonly represented professional burdens of dental professionals, preventive suggestions and recommendations for their minimizing. Repeated movements, incorrect position of the body, arms, shoulder neck, load of lower limbs, spine, are only part o...

  8. Using imaging technology in dental internship

    OpenAIRE

    Dziedzic, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    This diploma thesis deals with application of imaging technology in dental internship, especially with use of digital photography and video. Theoretical part of the thesis examines and summarizes utilization of these techniques in the environment of dental surgery. In applied part of this work, technical background of particular submitter has been analyzed. Further, innovation of the environment as well as producing, processing and application procedures for the visual records have been propo...

  9. Physical education undergraduates and dental trauma knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarini, Sônia Regina; Pedrini, Denise; Brandini, Daniela Atili; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Santos, Manoel Ferreira; Correa, João Paulo Toscani; Silva, Fernando Ferreira

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the level of knowledge of undergraduates from the College of Physical Education (Toledo, Araçatuba) concerning dental avulsion injuries. Data showed that 95% of the respondents did not know what dental avulsion is, 73.5% said they know how to define dental replantation, however, only 26% were able to do it correctly. When asked about first emergency measures after an avulsion, 50% of the respondents said they know what they should do, and the most cited measure was to seek a dentist. When asked about optimal storage media, 45.5% would keep it in a favorable one, and 28% did not know where to keep the tooth until treatment. Only 25.6% indicated a suitable extra-oral time for replantation; 90.3% of the respondents had received no advice about the emergency management of dental avulsion; 90% said they consider this an important and necessary subject. The results indicated that educational campaigns are necessary to improve the emergency management of dental injuries by those future P.E. professors for a better prognosis of dental replantation. PMID:16262617

  10. Dental Caries Vaccine – A Possible Option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    KT, Shanmugam; KMK, Masthan; N, Balachander; Jimson, Sudha; R, Sarangarajan

    2013-01-01

    Dental caries is an irreversible microbial disease of the calcified tissues of the teeth and it has a multifactorial origin. In India, the dental caries prevalence in 35-44 year olds was reported to be 80-95% in a DCI survey. Among the elderly in the 65-74 years age group, the DCI survey reported the caries prevalence to be about 70%, while the present survey reported it to be 51- 95% in various states. Surveys which were done on school children in India showed a carie prevalence of approximately 58%.Among the U.S. population, a survey showed an incidence of 93.8% in adults with either past or present coronal caries and an incidence of 45.3% in children 23. In countries like Brazil and China, it is reaching epidemic proportions. Thus, more effective public-health measures are needed to combat dental caries. Mutans streptococci is one of the main microorganisms which are associated with the aetiology of dental caries. Preclinical studies of immunological interventions have shown that the disease can be interrupted. Clinical trials have indicated that a mucosal immune response to Streptococcus mutans crucial antigens can influence the pathogenesis of dental caries. The dental caries vaccine, when it is used in appropriate individuals at the appropriate time, can reduce the reemergence of the disease. PMID:23905153

  11. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250∙250∙500 μm(3) was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging. PMID:27021387

  12. [Dental technician's pneumoconiosis; a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman Eyüboğlu, Canan; Itil, Oya; Gülşen, Aşkin; Kargi, Aydanur; Cimrin, Arif

    2008-01-01

    Since 1939, it has been known that, silicosis and extrinsic allergic alveolitis can be seen among dental technicians. The interstitial disease caused by the exposure to complex substances used by dental technicians is classified as a special group called dental technician's pneumoconiosis. A 36-year-old man, who has no smoking history, presented with severe dyspnea. He had worked in different dental laboratories for 22 years, but he did not have respiratory symptoms until five years ago. After that date, he had hospitalized and had been examined for respiratory pathologies for many times. He had came to our clinic, because of the progression of his dyspnea. Diffuse pulmonary parenchymal infiltrates which can be related with pneumoconiosis and chronic type 1 respiratory deficiency had been diagnosed as the result of the examinations. While he has no history of smoking or any other risk factors or diseases in his medical history, the case was accepted as dental technician's pneumoconiosis. The factors related with the pathogenesis of dental technician's pneumoconiosis are; the complex compound of the substances (metal dusts, silica, plaster, wax and resins, chemical liquids, methyl methacrylate) used in this sector and their effects on the lung parenchyma. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis related with methyl methacrylate has been reported. The most important factor to acquire an occupational lung disease is a complex occupational exposure. The insufficient workplace airing and the lack of preventive measures added on this exposure, the risks become much more greater. PMID:18701982

  13. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250•250•500 μm3 was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging.

  14. Perception of Dental Professionals towards Biostatistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Manu; Gupta, Mudit; Dany, Subha Soumya; Rajput, Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Biostatistics is becoming an integral part of dental sciences. Awareness regarding the subject is not thoroughly assessed in the field of dentistry. So the study was conducted to assess dental professionals' knowledge, attitude, and perception toward biostatistics at an academic dental institution. An anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among all the faculty and postgraduate students of two dental colleges in Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh. The responses were assessed on 5-point likert scale. The survey response rate was 73.71%. Two-thirds of respondents believed biostatistics to be a difficult subject and at the same time half of them did not consider it to be more difficult than other subjects in dentistry. Females were less competent than males in applying biostatistical skills which was found to be statistically significant. Results suggested that dentists with research or academics as an adjunct to their clinical practice had better command over the subject. The current study shows that there is lack of command over the subject of biostatistics among dental professionals although they were aware of its importance in dentistry. There is a need of changing the training pattern of biostatistics for dental professionals which would make them confident enough to apply biostatistics in their clinical practice.

  15. [Dental technician's pneumoconiosis; a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman Eyüboğlu, Canan; Itil, Oya; Gülşen, Aşkin; Kargi, Aydanur; Cimrin, Arif

    2008-01-01

    Since 1939, it has been known that, silicosis and extrinsic allergic alveolitis can be seen among dental technicians. The interstitial disease caused by the exposure to complex substances used by dental technicians is classified as a special group called dental technician's pneumoconiosis. A 36-year-old man, who has no smoking history, presented with severe dyspnea. He had worked in different dental laboratories for 22 years, but he did not have respiratory symptoms until five years ago. After that date, he had hospitalized and had been examined for respiratory pathologies for many times. He had came to our clinic, because of the progression of his dyspnea. Diffuse pulmonary parenchymal infiltrates which can be related with pneumoconiosis and chronic type 1 respiratory deficiency had been diagnosed as the result of the examinations. While he has no history of smoking or any other risk factors or diseases in his medical history, the case was accepted as dental technician's pneumoconiosis. The factors related with the pathogenesis of dental technician's pneumoconiosis are; the complex compound of the substances (metal dusts, silica, plaster, wax and resins, chemical liquids, methyl methacrylate) used in this sector and their effects on the lung parenchyma. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis related with methyl methacrylate has been reported. The most important factor to acquire an occupational lung disease is a complex occupational exposure. The insufficient workplace airing and the lack of preventive measures added on this exposure, the risks become much more greater.

  16. Assessment formats in dental medicine: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard-Szep, Susanne; Güntsch, Arndt; Pospiech, Peter; Söhnel, Andreas; Scheutzel, Petra; Wassmann, Torsten; Zahn, Tugba

    2016-01-01

    Aim: At the annual meeting of German dentists in Frankfurt am Main in 2013, the Working Group for the Advancement of Dental Education (AKWLZ) initiated an interdisciplinary working group to address assessments in dental education. This paper presents an overview of the current work being done by this working group, some of whose members are also actively involved in the German Association for Medical Education's (GMA) working group for dental education. The aim is to present a summary of the current state of research on this topic for all those who participate in the design, administration and evaluation of university-specific assessments in dentistry. Method: Based on systematic literature research, the testing scenarios listed in the National Competency-based Catalogue of Learning Objectives (NKLZ) have been compiled and presented in tables according to assessment value. Results: Different assessment scenarios are described briefly in table form addressing validity (V), reliability (R), acceptance (A), cost (C), feasibility (F), and the influence on teaching and learning (EI) as presented in the current literature. Infoboxes were deliberately chosen to allow readers quick access to the information and to facilitate comparisons between the various assessment formats. Following each description is a list summarizing the uses in dental and medical education. Conclusion: This overview provides a summary of competency-based testing formats. It is meant to have a formative effect on dental and medical schools and provide support for developing workplace-based strategies in dental education for learning, teaching and testing in the future. PMID:27579365

  17. CANDLE Syndrome: orodfacial manifestations and dental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, T; Stephen, L; Scott, C; di Pasquale, T; Naser-Eldin, A; Chetty, M; Shaik, S; Lewandowski, L; Beighton, P

    2015-01-01

    A South African girl with CANDLE Syndrome is reported with emphasis on the orodental features and dental management. Clinical manifestations included short stature, wasting of the soft tissue of the arms and legs, erythematous skin eruptions and a prominent abdomen due to hepatosplenomegaly. Generalized microdontia, confirmed by tooth measurement and osteopenia of her jaws, confirmed by digitalized radiography, were previously undescribed syndromic components. Intellectual impairment posed problems during dental intervention. The carious dental lesions and poor oral hygiene were treated conservatively under local anaesthetic. Prophylactic antibiotics were administered an hour before all procedures.Due to the nature of her general condition, invasive dental procedures were minimal. Regular follow-ups were scheduled at six monthly intervals. During this period, her overall oral health status had improved markedly.The CANDLE syndrome is a rare condition with grave complications including immunosuppression and diabetes mellitus. As with many genetic disorders, the dental manifestations are often overshadowed by other more conspicuous and complex syndromic features. Recognition of both the clinical and oral changes that occur in the CANDLE syndrome facilitates accurate diagnosis and appropriate dental management of this potentially lethal condition. PMID:26711936

  18. Is water in dental units microbiologically safe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Michałkiewicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Water supplied to the dental units must be of sufficient quality. The article presents the results of the microbiological analysis of cold municipal water which flows into a patient’s disposable mouthwash cup, and demineralized water which flows through a waterline into the tool panel of a dental unit from the tank placed in the water group. Material and Methods: In order to assess the degree of purity (impurities of water used in dental units, 2 series of microbiological tests were carried out in 6 dental surgeries from April to June, 2013. The water samples for microbiological testing were collected into sterile microbiological bottles in accordance with the current methodology. The water for the tests was collected from a sterile cup-filling tap (municipal water and from an air/water syringe (demineralized water. The bacteria were cultured according to the Polish Standards – PN-EN ISO 6222, PN-EN ISO 9308-1, and PN-EN ISO 16266. Results: In the tested samples of water numerous psychrophilic bacteria (max 29 100 CFU/ml and mesophilic bacteria (max 24 700 CFU/ml, including single coliforms, were found. Conclusions: The results show that water delivered to a dental unit should be periodically tested bacteriologically and in terms of physical and chemical properties. Water systems of dental units should also be periodically disinfected to eliminate bacteria and biofilm. Med Pr 2015;66(6:763–770

  19. Etiology of dental erosion--intrinsic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutzel, P

    1996-04-01

    Dental erosion due to intrinsic factors is caused by gastric acid reaching the oral cavity and the teeth as a result of vomiting or gastroesophageal reflux. Since clinical manifestation of dental erosion does not occur until gastric acid has acted on the dental hard tissues regularly over a period of several years, dental erosion caused by intrinsic factors has been observed only in those diseases which are associated with chronic vomiting or persistent gastroesophageal reflux over a long period. Examples of such conditions include disorders of the upper alimentary tract, specific metabolic and endocrine disorders, cases of medication side-effects and drug abuse, and certain psychosomatic disorders, e.g. stress-induced psychosomatic vomiting, anorexia and bulimia nervosa or rumination. Based on a review of the medical and dental literature, the main symptoms of all disorders which must be taken into account as possible intrinsic etiological factors of dental erosion are thoroughly discussed with respect to the clinical picture, prevalence and risk of erosion. PMID:8804885

  20. The Dental Values Scale: development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Angela D; Catano, Victor M; Boran, Thomas L; Cunningham, Donald P

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce a valid scale for use in measuring the values of dental students and practitioners--the lack of which has impeded research on professionalism in dentistry. Following standard scale development procedures, we had focus groups of dental practitioners (N=23) develop a ninety-nine-item pool of value terms related to dentistry. Next, Canadian dentists (N=449) rated the relevance of each item through an online survey. They also rated the values in a generic values measure, Schwartz's Values Scale. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified twenty-five items representing five values: Altruism, Personal Satisfaction, Conscientiousness, Quality of Life, and Professional Status. These values correlate with related dimensions from Schwartz's measure; they also correspond to the values in the American Dental Education Association's statement on professionalism. We then administered the new Dental Values Scale to dental students (N=96) to determine the relationship between practitioner and student values. First-year students were higher in Conscientiousness, Altruism, and Personal Satisfaction than practitioners, but these values decreased over time to those held by the dentists. We discuss the implication of these results and the potential value of the new scale for dental education. PMID:21123496