WorldWideScience

Sample records for capillary fluidic device

  1. Fabrication of Microbeads with a Controllable Hollow Interior and Porous Wall Using a Capillary Fluidic Device

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sung-Wook; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Younan

    2009-01-01

    Poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microbeads with a hollow interior and porous wall are prepared using a simple fluidic device fabricated with PVC tubes, glass capillaries, and a needle. Using the fluidic device with three flow channels, uniform water-in-oil-in-water (W-O-W) emulsions with a single inner water droplet can be achieved with controllable dimensions by varying the flow rate of each phase. The resultant W-O-W emulsions evolve into PLGA microbeads with a hollow interior and por...

  2. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-04-08

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  3. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention is a......, when operatively connected, one or more chambers (21) comprising the chemical entities (41), the inlet(s) (5) and outlet(s) (6) and chambers (21) being in fluid connection. The device further comprise means for providing differing chemical conditions in each chamber (21)....

  4. More investigations in capillary fluidics using a drop tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Andrew; Weislogel, Mark; Wiles, Brently; Pettit, Donald; Snyder, Trevor

    2016-04-01

    A variety of contemplative demonstrations concerning intermediate-to-large length scale capillary fluidic phenomena were made possible by the brief weightless environment of a drop tower (Wollman and Weislogel in Exp Fluids 54(4):1, 2013). In that work, capillarity-driven flows leading to unique spontaneous droplet ejections, bubble ingestions, and multiphase flows were introduced and discussed. Such efforts are continued herein. The spontaneous droplet ejection phenomena (auto-ejection) is reviewed and demonstrated on earth as well as aboard the International Space Station. This technique is then applied to novel low-g droplet combustion where soot tube structures are created in the wakes of burning drops. A variety of new tests are presented that routinely demonstrate `puddle jumping,' a process defined as the spontaneous recoil and ejection of large liquid drops from hydrophobic surfaces following the step reduction in `gravity' characteristic of most drop towers. The inverse problem of `bubble jumping' is also demonstrated for the case of hydrophilic surfaces. A variety of puddle jump demonstrations are presented in summary as a means of suggesting the further exploitation of drop towers to study such large length scale capillary phenomena.

  5. Topology optimization of flexible micro-fluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreissl, Sebastian; Pingen, Georg; Evgrafov, Anton;

    2010-01-01

    A multi-objective topology optimization formulation for the design of dynamically tunable fluidic devices is presented. The flow is manipulated via external and internal mechanical actuation, leading to elastic deformations of flow channels. The design objectives characterize the performance...... in the undeformed and deformed configurations. The layout of fluid channels is determined by material topology optimization. In addition, the thickness distribution, the distribution of active material for internal actuation, and the support conditions are optimized. The coupled fluid-structure response...... is predicted by a non-linear finite element model and a hydrodynamic lattice Boltzmann method. Focusing on applications with low flow velocities and pressures, structural deformations due to fluid-forces are neglected. A mapping scheme is presented that couples the material distributions in the structural...

  6. Performance Verification for Safety Injection Tank with Fluidic Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yune, Seok Jeong; Kim, Da Yong [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In LBLOCA, the SITs of a conventional nuclear power plant deliver excessive cooling water to the reactor vessel causing the water to flow into the containment atmosphere. In an effort to make it more efficient, Fluidic Device (FD) is installed inside a SIT of Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR 1400). FD, a complete passive controller which doesn't require actuating power, controls injection flow rates which are susceptible to a change in the flow resistance inside a vortex chamber of FD. When SIT Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) water level is above the top of the stand pipe, the water enters the vortex chamber through both the top of the stand pipe and the control ports resulting in injection of the water at a large flow rate. When the water level drops below the top of the stand pipe, the water only enters the vortex chamber through the control ports resulting in vortex formation in the vortex chamber and a relatively small flow injection. Performance verification of SIT shall be carried out because SITs play an integral role to mitigate accidents. In this paper, the performance verification method of SIT with FD is presented. In this paper, the equations for calculation of flow resistance coefficient (K) are induced to evaluate on-site performance of APR 1400 SIT with FD. Then, the equations are applied to the performance verification of SIT with FD and good results are obtained.

  7. Stimuli-responsive materials: developing integrated opto-molecular systems as sensors and actuators in micro-fluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Florea, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    Micro-fluidic platforms have been conferred with inherent optical sensing capabilities by coating the walls of micro-fluidic channels or micro-capillaries with stimuli-responsive materials. These adaptive materials respond optically to environmental stimuli, such as changes in pH, solvent polarity, the presence of certain metal ions and light. This approach confers sensing capabilities along the entire length of the coated micro-channel or micro-capillary. Adaptive coatings based on two types...

  8. Manufacture of micro fluidic devices by laser welding using thermal transfer printing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, R.; Klein, K. F.; Tobisch, T.; Thoelken, D.; Belz, M.

    2016-03-01

    Micro-fluidic devices are widely used today in the areas of medical diagnostics and drug research, as well as for applications within the process, electronics and chemical industry. Microliters of fluids or single cell to cell interactions can be conveniently analyzed with such devices using fluorescence imaging, phase contrast microscopy or spectroscopic techniques. Typical micro-fluidic devices consist of a thermoplastic base component with chambers and channels covered by a hermetic fluid and gas tight sealed lid component. Both components are usually from the same or similar thermoplastic material. Different mechanical, adhesive or thermal joining processes can be used to assemble base component and lid. Today, laser beam welding shows the potential to become a novel manufacturing opportunity for midsize and large scale production of micro-fluidic devices resulting in excellent processing quality by localized heat input and low thermal stress to the device during processing. For laser welding, optical absorption of the resin and laser wavelength has to be matched for proper joining. This paper will focus on a new approach to prepare micro-fluidic channels in such devices using a thermal transfer printing process, where an optical absorbing layer absorbs the laser energy. Advantages of this process will be discussed in combination with laser welding of optical transparent micro-fluidic devices.

  9. Development of fluidic device in SIT for Korean Next Generation Reactor I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The KNGR is to install a Fluidic Device at the bottom of the inner space of the SIT (Safety Injection Tank) to control the flow rate of safety injection coolant from SIT during LBLOCA. During the past two years, a scale model test to obtain the required flow characteristics of the device under the KNGR specific conditions has been performed using the experience and existing facility of AEA Technology (UK) with appropriate modifications. The performance verification test is to be performed this year to obtain optimum characteristics and design data of full size fluidic device. The purpose of the model test was to check the feasibility of developing the device and to produce a generic flow characteristic data. The test was performed in approximately 1/7 scale in terms of flow rate with full height and pressure. This report presents the details of system performance requirements for the device, design procedure for the fluidic device to be used, test facility and test method. The time dependent flow, pressure and Euler number are presented as characteristics curves and the most stable and the most effective flow control characteristic parameters were recommended through the evaluation. A method to predict the size of the fluidic device is presented. And a sizing algorithm, which can be used to conveniently determine the major geometric data of the device for various operating conditions, and a FORTRAN program to produce the prediction of performance curves have been developed. (author). 32 refs., 15 tabs., 47 figs

  10. Microfluidic chip-capillary electrophoresis devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Ying Sing; Du, Fuying; Guo, Wenpeng; Ma, Tongmei; Nie, Zhou; Sun, Hui; Wu, Ruige; Zhao, Wenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microfluidic chip (MC) devices are relatively mature technologies, but this book demonstrates how they can be integrated into a single, revolutionary device that can provide on-site analysis of samples when laboratory services are unavailable. By introducing the combination of CE and MC technology, Microfluidic Chip-Capillary Electrophoresis Devices broadens the scope of chemical analysis, particularly in the biomedical, food, and environmental sciences.The book gives an overview of the development of MC and CE technology as well as technology that now allows

  11. Fabrication of fluidic devices with 30 nm nanochannels by direct imprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta, Irene Fernandez; Palmarelli, Anna Laura; Liang, Xiaogan;

    2011-01-01

    and hydrophilic) for its direct use for biological applications. Devices having 30 nm wide, 30 nm deep nanochannels have been fabricated, and the successful performance of the fluidic system and the continuity of the nanochannels have been proven by flow tests. © 2011 American Vacuum Society....

  12. Customizable 3D Printed 'Plug and Play' Millifluidic Devices for Programmable Fluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichiro Tsuda

    Full Text Available Three dimensional (3D printing is actively sought after in recent years as a promising novel technology to construct complex objects, which scope spans from nano- to over millimeter scale. Previously we utilized Fused deposition modeling (FDM-based 3D printer to construct complex 3D chemical fluidic systems, and here we demonstrate the construction of 3D milli-fluidic structures for programmable liquid handling and control of biological samples. Basic fluidic operation devices, such as water-in-oil (W/O droplet generators for producing compartmentalized mono-disperse droplets, sensor-integrated chamber for online monitoring of cellular growth, are presented. In addition, chemical surface treatment techniques are used to construct valve-based flow selector for liquid flow control and inter-connectable modular devices for networking fluidic parts. As such this work paves the way for complex operations, such as mixing, flow control, and monitoring of reaction / cell culture progress can be carried out by constructing both passive and active components in 3D printed structures, which designs can be shared online so that anyone with 3D printers can reproduce them by themselves.

  13. Customizable 3D Printed ‘Plug and Play’ Millifluidic Devices for Programmable Fluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Soichiro; Jaffery, Hussain; Doran, David; Hezwani, Mohammad; Robbins, Phillip J.; Yoshida, Mari; Cronin, Leroy

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) printing is actively sought after in recent years as a promising novel technology to construct complex objects, which scope spans from nano- to over millimeter scale. Previously we utilized Fused deposition modeling (FDM)-based 3D printer to construct complex 3D chemical fluidic systems, and here we demonstrate the construction of 3D milli-fluidic structures for programmable liquid handling and control of biological samples. Basic fluidic operation devices, such as water-in-oil (W/O) droplet generators for producing compartmentalized mono-disperse droplets, sensor-integrated chamber for online monitoring of cellular growth, are presented. In addition, chemical surface treatment techniques are used to construct valve-based flow selector for liquid flow control and inter-connectable modular devices for networking fluidic parts. As such this work paves the way for complex operations, such as mixing, flow control, and monitoring of reaction / cell culture progress can be carried out by constructing both passive and active components in 3D printed structures, which designs can be shared online so that anyone with 3D printers can reproduce them by themselves. PMID:26558389

  14. Inorganic nanotubes and electro-fluidic devices fabricated therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Fan, Rong; Karnik, Rohit

    2011-03-01

    Nanofluidic devices incorporating inorganic nanotubes fluidly coupled to channels or nanopores for supplying a fluid containing chemical or bio-chemical species are described. In one aspect, two channels are fluidly interconnected with a nanotube. Electrodes on opposing sides of the nanotube establish electrical contact with the fluid therein. A bias current is passed between the electrodes through the fluid, and current changes are detected to ascertain the passage of select molecules, such as DNA, through the nanotube. In another aspect, a gate electrode is located proximal the nanotube between the two electrodes thus forming a nanofluidic transistor. The voltage applied to the gate controls the passage of ionic species through the nanotube selected as either or both ionic polarities. In either of these aspects the nanotube can be modified, or functionalized, to control the selectivity of detection or passage.

  15. Thermo-fluidic devices and materials inspired from mass and energy transport phenomena in biological system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian XIAO; Jing LIU

    2009-01-01

    Mass and energy transport consists of one of the most significant physiological processes in nature, which guarantees many amazing biological phenomena and activ-ities. Borrowing such idea, many state-of-the-art thermo-fluidic devices and materials such as artificial kidneys, carrier erythrocyte, blood substitutes and so on have been successfully invented. Besides, new emerging technologies are still being developed. This paper is dedicated to present-ing a relatively complete review of the typical devices and materials in clinical use inspired by biological mass and energy transport mechanisms. Particularly, these artificial thermo-fluidic devices and materials will be categorized into organ transplantation, drug delivery, nutrient transport, micro operation, and power supply. Potential approaches for innovating conventional technologies were discussed, corresponding biological phenomena and physical mechan-isms were interpreted, future promising mass-and-energy-transport-based bionic devices were suggested, and prospects along this direction were pointed out. It is expected that many artificial devices based on biological mass and energy transport principle will appear to better improve vari-ous fields related to human life in the near future.

  16. A New Drop Fluidics Enabled by Magnetic Field Mediated Elasto-Capillary Transduction

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Saheli; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2016-01-01

    This research introduces a new drop fluidics, which uses a deformable and stretchable elastomeric film as the platform, instead of the commonly used rigid supports. Such a soft film impregnated with magnetic particles can be modulated with an external electromagnetic field that produces a vast array of topographical landscapes with varying surface curvature, which, in conjunction with capillarity, can direct and control motion of water droplets efficiently and accurately. When a thin layer of oil is present on this film that is deformed locally, a centrosymmetric wedge is formed. A water droplet placed on this oil laden film becomes asymmetrically deformed thus producing a gradient of Laplace pressure within the droplet setting it to motion. A simple theory is presented that accounts for the droplet speed in terms of such geometric variables as the volume of the droplet and the thickness of the oil film covering the soft elastomeric film, as well as such material variables as the viscosity of the oil and inte...

  17. Open and closed-loop control of transonic buffet on 3D turbulent wings using fluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandois, Julien; Lepage, Arnaud; Dor, Jean-Bernard; Molton, Pascal; Ternoy, Frédéric; Geeraert, Arnaud; Brunet, Vincent; Coustols, Éric

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the work performed recently at ONERA on the control of the buffet phenomenon. This aerodynamic instability induces strong wall pressure fluctuations and as such limits aircraft envelope; consequently, it is interesting to try to delay its onset, in order to enlarge aircraft flight envelop, but also to provide more flexibility during the design phase. Several types of flow control have been investigated, either passive (mechanical vortex generators) or active (fluidic VGs, fluidic trailing-edge device (TED)). It is shown than mechanical and fluidic VGs are able to delay buffet onset in the angle-of-attack domain by suppressing the separation downstream of the shock. The effect of the fluidic TED is different, the separation is not suppressed, but the rear wing loading is increased and consequently the buffet onset is not delayed to higher angles of attack, but only to higher lift coefficient. Then, a closed loop control methodology based on a quasi-static approach is defined and several architectures are tested for various parameters such as the input signal, the objective function or, the tuning of the feedback gain. All closed loop methods are implemented on a dSPACE device calculating in real time the fluidic actuators command from the unsteady pressure sensors data.

  18. Functional integration of PCR amplification and capillary electrophoresis in a microfabricated DNA analysis device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, A T; Hadley, D; Landre, P; deMello, A J; Mathies, R A; Northrup, M A

    1996-12-01

    Microfabricated silicon PCR reactors and glass capillary electrophoresis (CE) chips have been successfully coupled to form an integrated DNA analysis system. This construct combines the rapid thermal cycling capabilities of microfabricated PCR devices (10 degrees C/s heating, 2.5 degrees C/s cooling) with the high-speed (Real-time monitoring of PCR target amplification in these integrated PCR-CE devices is also feasible. Amplification of the beta-globin target as a function of cycle number was directly monitored for two different reactions starting with 4 x 10(7) and 4 x 10(5) copies of DNA template. This work establishes the feasibility of performing high-speed DNA analyses in microfabricated integrated fluidic systems. PMID:8946790

  19. On the applicability of fluidic flexible matrix composite variable impedance materials for prosthetic and orthotic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philen, M.

    2009-10-01

    The applicability of variable impedance fluidic flexible matrix composites (F2MC) is investigated for development of prosthetic and orthotic devices. The F2MC material is an innovative combination of high performance composite tubes containing high bulk modulus fluids. The new material system can potentially achieve a change in stiffness of several orders of magnitude through valve control. The F2MC material system is investigated in this research through analytical studies for active impedance control for load transfer reduction in transtibial prosthetic sockets and impedance joint control for ankle-foot orthoses (AFO). Preliminary analysis results indicate that the variable modulus system can reduce the load transfer between the limb and transtibial socket and can provide impedance tailoring for improving foot-slap in an AFO.

  20. Development of a millimetrically scaled biodiesel transesterification device that relies on droplet-based co-axial fluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, S I; Huang, Y C; Cheng, C H; Cheng, C M; Yang, J T

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated a fluidic system that adheres to new concepts of energy production. To improve efficiency, cost, and ease of manufacture, a millimetrically scaled device that employs a droplet-based co-axial fluidic system was devised to complete alkali-catalyzed transesterification for biodiesel production. The large surface-to-volume ratio of the droplet-based system, and the internal circulation induced inside the moving droplets, significantly enhanced the reaction rate of immiscible liquids used here - soybean oil and methanol. This device also decreased the molar ratio between methanol and oil to near the stoichiometric coefficients of a balanced chemical equation, which enhanced the total biodiesel volume produced, and decreased the costs of purification and recovery of excess methanol. In this work, the droplet-based co-axial fluidic system performed better than other methods of continuous-flow production. We achieved an efficiency that is much greater than that of reported systems. This study demonstrated the high potential of droplet-based fluidic chips for energy production. The small energy consumption and low cost of the highly purified biodiesel transesterification system described conforms to the requirements of distributed energy (inexpensive production on a moderate scale) in the world. PMID:27426677

  1. Development of a millimetrically scaled biodiesel transesterification device that relies on droplet-based co-axial fluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, S. I.; Huang, Y. C.; Cheng, C. H.; Cheng, C. M.; Yang, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated a fluidic system that adheres to new concepts of energy production. To improve efficiency, cost, and ease of manufacture, a millimetrically scaled device that employs a droplet-based co-axial fluidic system was devised to complete alkali-catalyzed transesterification for biodiesel production. The large surface-to-volume ratio of the droplet-based system, and the internal circulation induced inside the moving droplets, significantly enhanced the reaction rate of immiscible liquids used here – soybean oil and methanol. This device also decreased the molar ratio between methanol and oil to near the stoichiometric coefficients of a balanced chemical equation, which enhanced the total biodiesel volume produced, and decreased the costs of purification and recovery of excess methanol. In this work, the droplet-based co-axial fluidic system performed better than other methods of continuous-flow production. We achieved an efficiency that is much greater than that of reported systems. This study demonstrated the high potential of droplet-based fluidic chips for energy production. The small energy consumption and low cost of the highly purified biodiesel transesterification system described conforms to the requirements of distributed energy (inexpensive production on a moderate scale) in the world. PMID:27426677

  2. Numerical study of fluidic device in APR1400 using free surface model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fluidic device (FD) has been adopted in the safety injection tanks (SITs) of APR1400. A flow control mechanism of the FD was used to vary the flow regime in the vortex chamber corresponding to the SITs water level. The flow regime in the vortex chamber has a different pressure loss from low to high in accordance with the SITs water level. Nitrogen at the top of the SIT could be released owing to inertia of discharge flow when changing from a high flow rate to a low flow rate. This phenomenon is important to design improvement perspective because it can affect the performance of the FD. This paper shows a result of a preliminary numerical study to obtain the transient data related to air release in the flow turn down period using a two fluid free surface model provided from ANSYS CFX 13.0. In conclusion, there is no significant effect on the performance of the FD, though a small quantity of air is released during the flow turn down period

  3. Passive fluidic diode for simple fluids using nested nanochannel structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jingwen; Li, Long; Wang, Jun; Li, Zhigang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a moving part-free fluidic diode for simple fluids using nested nanochannels, which contain inner and outer channels of different lengths. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the fluidic diode accepts water flows in the forward direction and blocks flows in the backward direction in a wide range of pressure drops. The anisotropic flow rates are generated by the distinct activation pressures in different directions. In the forward direction, the activation pressure is low, which is determined by the infiltration pressure of the inner channel. In the backward direction, the activation pressure is quite high due to the capillary effects when flows are released from the inner to the outer channel. The pressure drop range for the fluidic diode can be varied by changing the channel size or surface wettability. The fluidic diode offers an alternative way for flow control in integrated micro- and nanofluidic devices.

  4. Manipulating fluids: Advances in micro-fluidics, opto-fluidics and fluidic self assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh

    This dissertation describes work in three inter-related areas---micro-fluidics, opto-fluidics and fluidic self-assembly. Micro-fluidics has gotten a boost in recent years with the development of multilayered elastomeric devices made of poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), allowing active elements like valves and pumps. However, while PDMS has many advantages, it is not resistant to organic solvents. New materials and/or new designs are needed for solvent resistance. I describe how novel fluorinated elastomers can replace PDMS when combined with the three dimensional (3-D) solid printing. I also show how another 3-D fabrication method, multilayer photo-lithography, allows for fabrication of devices integrating filters. In general, 3-D fabrications allow new kinds of micro-fluidic devices to be made that would be impossible to emulate with two dimensional chips. In opto-fluidics, I describe a number of experiments with quantum dots both inside and outside chips. Inside chips, I manipulate quantum dots using hydrodynamic focusing to pattern fine lines, like a barcode. Outside chips, I describe our attempts to create quantum dot composites with micro-spheres. I also show how evaporated gold films and chemical passivation can then be used to enhance the emission of quantum dots. Finally, within fluids, self assembly is an attractive way to manipulate materials, and I provide two examples: first, a DNA-based energy transfer molecule that relies on quantum mechanics and self-assembles inside fluids. This kind of molecular photonics mimics parts of the photosynthetic apparatus of plants and bacteria. The second example of self-assembly in fluids describes a new phenomena---the surface tension mediated self assembly of particles like quantum dots and micro-spheres into fine lines. This self assembly by capillary flows can be combined with photo-lithography, and is expected to find use in future nano- and micro-fabrication schemes. In conclusion, advances in fludics, integrating

  5. Performing chemical reactions in virtual capillary of surface tension-confined microfluidic devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Angshuman Nag; Biswa Ranjan Panda; Arun Chattopadhyay

    2005-10-01

    In this paper we report a new method of fabrication of surface tension-confined microfluidic devices on glass. We have also successfully carried out some well-known chemical reactions in these fluidic channels to demonstrate the usefulness of these wall-less microchannels. The confined flow path of liquid was achieved on the basis of extreme differences in hydrophobic and hydrophilic characters of the surface. The flow paths were fabricated by making parallel lines using permanent marker pen ink or other polymer on glass surfaces. Two mirror image patterned glass plates were then sandwiched one on top of the other, separated by a thin gap - created using a spacer. The aqueous liquid moves between the surfaces by capillary forces, confined to the hydrophilic areas without wetting the hydrophobic lines, achieving liquid confinement without physical side-walls. We have shown that the microfluidic devices designed in such a way can be very useful due to their simplicity and low fabrication cost. More importantly, we have also demonstrated that the minimum requirement of such a working device is a hydrophilic line surrounded by hydrophobic environment, two walls of which are constituted of air and the rest is made of a hydrophobic surface.

  6. A Device for Measurement of Capillary Refilling Time

    OpenAIRE

    Shamsudin, Nebil

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to design, construct and validate a portable prototype of a device that is capable of performing a test to accurately measure Capillary Refilling Time (CRT), and to analyze the results with defined parameters; force, area, pressure (compression) and time. This prototype is dedicated to study and evaluate CRT readouts for different pressure values, collected from healthy subjects.The presented prototype of this study is capable of producing skin compressin...

  7. Lab-on-a-brain: Implantable micro-optical fluidic devices for neural cell analysis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Nagaoka, Akira; Noguchi, Jun; Akagi, Takanori; Kasai, Haruo; Ichiki, Takanori

    2014-10-01

    The high-resolution imaging of neural cells in vivo has brought about great progress in neuroscience research. Here, we report a novel experimental platform, where the intact brain of a living mouse can be studied with the aid of a surgically implanted micro-optical fluidic device; acting as an interface between neurons and the outer world. The newly developed device provides the functions required for the long-term and high-resolution observation of the fine structures of neurons by two-photon laser scanning microscopy and the microfluidic delivery of chemicals or drugs directly into the brain. A proof-of-concept experiment of single-synapse stimulation by two-photon uncaging of caged glutamate and observation of dendritic spine shrinkage over subsequent days demonstrated a promising use for the present technology.

  8. The influence of polydimethylsiloxane curing ratio on capillary pressure in microfluidic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viola, Ilenia, E-mail: ilenia.viola@nano.cnr.it [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita La Sapienza, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Zacheo, Antonella [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Universita del Salento, Dip. Matematica e Fisica ' Ennio De Giorgi' , via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Arima, Valentina [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Arico, Antonino S. [CNR-ITAE Institute, via Salita S. Lucia sopra Contesse, I-98126 Messina (Italy); Cortese, Barbara [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Manca, Michele [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies (Italy); Zocco, Anna [STMicroelectronics, MFD Division, Application Laboratory Lecce, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Taurino, Antonietta [CNR, Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (IMM), via Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Rinaldi, Ross [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Universita del Salento, Dip. Matematica e Fisica ' Ennio De Giorgi' , via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); and others

    2012-08-01

    Investigations on surface properties of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) are justified by its large application ranges especially as coating polymer in fluidic devices. At a micrometer scale, the liquid dynamics is strongly modified by interactions with a solid surface. A crucial parameter for this process is microchannel wettability that can be tuned by acting on surface chemistry and topography. In literature, a number of multi-step, time and cost consuming chemical and physical procedures are reported. Here we selectively modify both wetting and mechanical properties by a single step treatment. Changes of PDMS surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy and the effects of interface properties on the liquid displacement inside a microfluidic system were evaluated. The negative capillary pressure obtained tailoring the PDMS wettability is believed to be promising to accurately control sample leakage inside integrated lab-on-chip by acting on the liquid confinement and thus to reduce the sample volume, liquid drying as well as cross-contamination during the operation.

  9. Design and Application of a New Automated Fluidic Visceral Stimulation Device for Human fMRI Studies of Interoception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrahi, Behnaz; Gassert, Roger; Wanek, Johann; Michels, Lars; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kollias, Spyros S

    2016-01-01

    Mapping the brain centers that mediate the sensory-perceptual processing of visceral afferent signals arising from the body (i.e., interoception) is useful both for characterizing normal brain activity and for understanding clinical disorders related to abnormal processing of visceral sensation. Here, we report a novel closed-system, electrohydrostatically driven master-slave device that was designed and constructed for delivering controlled fluidic stimulations of visceral organs and inner cavities of the human body within the confines of a 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The design concept and performance of the device in the MRI environment are described. In addition, the device was applied during a functional MRI (fMRI) investigation of visceral stimulation related to detrusor distention in two representative subjects to verify its feasibility in humans. System evaluation tests demonstrate that the device is MR-compatible with negligible impact on imaging quality [static signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss programming the proposed device to detect the 5 V transistor-transistor logic (TTL) trigger signals generated by the MRI scanner. The fMRI data analysis using the general linear model analysis with the standard hemodynamic response function showed increased activations in the network of brain regions that included the insula, anterior and mid-cingulate and lateral prefrontal cortices, and thalamus in response to increased distension pressure on viscera. The translation from manually operated devices to an MR-compatible and MR-synchronized device under automatic control represents a useful innovation for clinical neuroimaging studies of human interoception. PMID:27551646

  10. Design and Application of a New Automated Fluidic Visceral Stimulation Device for Human fMRI Studies of Interoception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassert, Roger; Wanek, Johann; Michels, Lars; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kollias, Spyros S.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping the brain centers that mediate the sensory-perceptual processing of visceral afferent signals arising from the body (i.e., interoception) is useful both for characterizing normal brain activity and for understanding clinical disorders related to abnormal processing of visceral sensation. Here, we report a novel closed-system, electrohydrostatically driven master–slave device that was designed and constructed for delivering controlled fluidic stimulations of visceral organs and inner cavities of the human body within the confines of a 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The design concept and performance of the device in the MRI environment are described. In addition, the device was applied during a functional MRI (fMRI) investigation of visceral stimulation related to detrusor distention in two representative subjects to verify its feasibility in humans. System evaluation tests demonstrate that the device is MR-compatible with negligible impact on imaging quality [static signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss <2.5% and temporal SNR loss <3.5%], and has an accuracy of 99.68% for flow rate and 99.27% for volume delivery. A precise synchronization of the stimulus delivery with fMRI slice acquisition was achieved by programming the proposed device to detect the 5 V transistor–transistor logic (TTL) trigger signals generated by the MRI scanner. The fMRI data analysis using the general linear model analysis with the standard hemodynamic response function showed increased activations in the network of brain regions that included the insula, anterior and mid-cingulate and lateral prefrontal cortices, and thalamus in response to increased distension pressure on viscera. The translation from manually operated devices to an MR-compatible and MR-synchronized device under automatic control represents a useful innovation for clinical neuroimaging studies of human interoception. PMID:27551646

  11. A comparative study of SU-8 and wax based paper-fluidic device with respect to channel geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinkee; Jafry, Ali Turab; Lim, Hosub

    2015-11-01

    Although many fabrication techniques of paper fluidic devices have evolved as a result of its broad application spectrum and ease of use, the technology has still barely scratched the surface of its potential in terms of its underlying fundamental principle i.e. fluid flow analysis. In this paper we have studied the comparison of flow profile attained by using two of the most promising techniques of photolithography and wax printing from a hydrodynamic point of view. A modified protocol for synthesizing an SU-8 based channel and wax based channel is created by optimizing few process parameters to our equipment. Water and oil (oleic acid) are chosen as hydrophilic and hydrophobic fluids respectively and their flow is analyzed in straight channels within paper device. A new approach to vary flow velocity is described in detail involving dots as resistance inside the paper channel. Observing the length-time curve for the two fluids, it becomes evident that both follow the Lucas-Washburn equation if the width of channel is large enough. Various configurations of dots reveal different longitudinal flow velocity implying its application in simultaneous addition of chemicals without the need to change channel width or length

  12. Flash μ-fluidics: a rapid prototyping method for fabricating microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Buttner, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidics has advanced in terms of design and structures; however, fabrication methods are time-consuming or expensive relative to facility costs and equipment needed. This work demonstrates a fast and economically viable 2D/3D maskless digital light-projection method based on a stereolithography process. Unlike other fabrication methods, one exposure step is used to form the whole device. Flash microfluidics is achieved by incorporating bonding and channel fabrication of complex structures in just 2.5 s to 4 s and by fabricating channel heights between 25 μm and 150 μm with photopolymer resin. The features of this fabrication technique, such as time and cost saving and easy fabrication, are used to build devices that are mostly needed in microfluidic/lab-on-chip systems. Due to the fast production method and low initial setup costs, the process could be used for point of care applications. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. 3D-Printed Fluidic Devices for Nanoparticle Preparation and Flow-Injection Amperometry Using Integrated Prussian Blue Nanoparticle-Modified Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Gregory W; Satterwhite, Jennifer E; Bhakta, Snehasis; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Gillette, Kelsey M; Chen, Eric; Rusling, James F

    2015-01-01

    A consumer-grade fused filament fabrication (FFF) 3D printer was used to construct fluidic devices for nanoparticle preparation and electrochemical sensing. Devices were printed using poly(ethylene terephthalate) and featured threaded ports to connect polyetheretherketone (PEEK) tubing via printed fittings prepared from acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). These devices included channels designed to have 800 μm × 800 μm square cross sections and were semitransparent to allow visualization of the solution-filled channels. A 3D-printed device with a Y-shaped mixing channel was used to prepare Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) under flow rates of 100 to 2000 μL min(-1). PBNPs were then attached to gold electrodes for hydrogen peroxide sensing. 3D-printed devices used for electrochemical measurements featured threaded access ports into which a fitting equipped with reference, counter, and PBNP-modified working electrodes could be inserted. PBNP-modified electrodes enabled amperometric detection of H2O2 in the 3D-printed channel by flow-injection analysis, exhibiting a detection limit of 100 nM and linear response up to 20 μM. These experiments show that a consumer-grade FFF printer can be used to fabricate low-cost fluidic devices for applications similar to those that have been reported with more expensive 3D-printing methods. PMID:25901660

  14. In situ patterned micro 3D liver constructs for parallel toxicology testing in a fluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skardal, Aleksander; Devarasetty, Mahesh; Soker, Shay; Hall, Adam R

    2015-09-01

    3D tissue models are increasingly being implemented for drug and toxicology testing. However, the creation of tissue-engineered constructs for this purpose often relies on complex biofabrication techniques that are time consuming, expensive, and difficult to scale up. Here, we describe a strategy for realizing multiple tissue constructs in a parallel microfluidic platform using an approach that is simple and can be easily scaled for high-throughput formats. Liver cells mixed with a UV-crosslinkable hydrogel solution are introduced into parallel channels of a sealed microfluidic device and photopatterned to produce stable tissue constructs in situ. The remaining uncrosslinked material is washed away, leaving the structures in place. By using a hydrogel that specifically mimics the properties of the natural extracellular matrix, we closely emulate native tissue, resulting in constructs that remain stable and functional in the device during a 7-day culture time course under recirculating media flow. As proof of principle for toxicology analysis, we expose the constructs to ethyl alcohol (0-500 mM) and show that the cell viability and the secretion of urea and albumin decrease with increasing alcohol exposure, while markers for cell damage increase. PMID:26355538

  15. A capillary pumping device utilizing super-hydrophobic silicon grass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we show that a compact silicon grass surface can be generated by utilizing the induced coupled plasma method with suitably chosen fabrication parameters. This super-hydrophobic structure suspends deionized water on top of the grass and keeps the contact angle at around 153°. The silicon grass is used to improve the driving efficiency of a capillary pumping micro-duct (without sidewalls), which is completely defined by a bottom hydrophilic stripe (adjacent to a Teflon substrate) and a fully top-covered hydrophobic Teflon surface which is coated on a glass substrate. The channel has a height of 3 µm and a width of 100 µm. In this work, the Teflon substrate is replaced with the silicon grass surface. When the fluid is flowing through the micro-duct on the stripe, the interface between the silicon grass and the hydrophilic stripe forms a stable air cushion barrier to the fluid, thus effectively reducing the frictional force. By changing only the interface with this replacement, we demonstrate that the average measured velocities of the new design show improvements of 21% and 17% in the driving efficiency over the original design for transporting deionized water and human blood, respectively. It is also shown that the measured data of the present design are closer to the values predicted by a theoretical analysis which relates the flow velocity to the contact angles, surface tension and fluid viscosity

  16. MEMS fluidic actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.; Johnston, Gabriel A.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Galambos, Paul C.; Okandan, Murat

    2007-07-24

    The present invention comprises a novel, lightweight, massively parallel device comprising microelectromechanical (MEMS) fluidic actuators, to reconfigure the profile, of a surface. Each microfluidic actuator comprises an independent bladder that can act as both a sensor and an actuator. A MEMS sensor, and a MEMS valve within each microfluidic actuator, operate cooperatively to monitor the fluid within each bladder, and regulate the flow of the fluid entering and exiting each bladder. When adjacently spaced in a array, microfluidic actuators can create arbitrary surface profiles in response to a change in the operating environment of the surface. In an embodiment of the invention, the profile of an airfoil is controlled by independent extension and contraction of a plurality of actuators, that operate to displace a compliant cover.

  17. Simple and inexpensive micro-capillary devices for generating composite emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Erqiang; Zhang, Jiaming; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2012-11-01

    All-glass microfluidic devices have attracted recent attention due to their excellent chemical robustness, bio-compatibility, optical properties and the ease of modifying their surface wettability. Herein we report the usage of a single tapered cylindrical glass capillary and microscope slides to fabricate simple and inexpensive all-glass microfluidic devices that are capable of producing monodisperse double emulsions. Triple emulsion droplets of water-in-oil-in-water-in-oil (W/O/W/O) or O/W/O/W phases can also be stably generated by adding another cylindrical capillary next to the outlet of the first capillary. In addition, by careful controlling the wettability of the inner surface of the first capillary, multi-component emulsion droplets of (gas and water)-in-oil-in-water ((G+W)/O/W) phases can also be stably produced. Such gas-laden emulsion drops may be beneficial for bio-related applications where oxygen supply is required. The relationship between the flow parameters and the resulting number of encapsulated droplets and the emulsion droplet sizes, have been investigated, for all of these various higher order emulsions.

  18. Rugged gap reactor device for postcolumn fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H; Li, S F

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, the construction and performance of a rugged device for postcolumn derivatization in capillary electrophoresis (CE) are described. The device was based on a gap design, and a gap with a very small distance (derivatizing reagents into the reaction capillary was attributable to gravity flow. The concentration of derivatizing reagents can be controlled through manipulating the electroosmotic flow in the reaction capillary and the height of the liquid levels from the derivatizing reagents to the buffer reservoirs. The device has been applied in fluorescence detection of amino acids using a mixture of o-phthaldialdehyde/2-mercaptoethanol as derivatizing reagent. Theoretical plate numbers for 11 amino acids separated in a pH 9.5 borate buffer were obtained in the order of 40 000-250 000. The detection limit for glycine (S/N = 2) was found to be 6.7 × 10(-)(7) mol/L using a commercial HPLC fluorescence detector modified for CE. Free amino acids in a wine sample were also determined. Because the device is quite stable, we believe that it can be used routinely in analytical laboratories. PMID:21644687

  19. High Resolution Tracking Devices Based on Capillaries Filled with Liquid Scintillator

    CERN Multimedia

    Bonekamper, D; Vassiltchenko, V; Wolff, T

    2002-01-01

    %RD46 %title\\\\ \\\\The aim of the project is to develop high resolution tracking devices based on thin glass capillary arrays filled with liquid scintillator. This technique provides high hit densities and a position resolution better than 20 $\\mu$m. Further, their radiation hardness makes them superior to other types of tracking devices with comparable performance. Therefore, the technique is attractive for inner tracking in collider experiments, microvertex devices, or active targets for short-lived particle detection. High integration levels in the read-out based on the use of multi-pixel photon detectors and the possibility of optical multiplexing allow to reduce considerably the number of output channels, and, thus, the cost for the detector.\\\\ \\\\New optoelectronic devices have been developed and tested: the megapixel Electron Bombarded CCD (EBCCD), a high resolution image-detector having an outstanding capability of single photo-electron detection; the Vacuum Image Pipeline (VIP), a high-speed gateable pi...

  20. "Master and Slave" fluidic amplifier cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesař Václav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available No-moving-part fluidics recently found interesting application in generation of gas microbubbles by oscillating the inlet flow of the gas into the aerator. The oscillation frequency has to be high and this calls for small size of the oscillator. On the other hand, most microbubble applications require a large total gas flow. This calls for large fluidic device – a les expensive alternative than “numbering up” (several oscillators in parallel. The contradiction of the large and small scale is solved by the “MASTER & SLAVE” fluidic circuit: large output device controlled by a small oscillator. Paper discusses basic problems encountered in designing the circuit which requires matching the characteristics of the two devices.

  1. Tuning fluidic resistance via liquid crystal microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Flow of molecularly ordered fluids, like liquid crystals, is inherently coupled with the average local orientation of the molecules, or the director. The anisotropic coupling-typically absent in isotropic fluids-bestows unique functionalities to the flowing matrix. In this work, we harness this anisotropy to pattern different pathways to tunable fluidic resistance within microfluidic devices. We use a nematic liquid crystalline material flowing in microchannels to demonstrate passive and active modulation of the flow resistance. While appropriate surface anchoring conditions-which imprint distinct fluidic resistances within microchannels under similar hydrodynamic parameters-act as passive cues, an external field, e.g., temperature, is used to actively modulate the flow resistance in the microfluidic device. We apply this simple concept to fabricate basic fluidic circuits, which can be hierarchically extended to create complex resistance networks, without any additional design or morphological patterning of the microchannels. PMID:24256819

  2. Fluidic interconnections for microfluidic systems: A new integrated fluidic interconnection allowing plug 'n' play functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perozziello, Gerardo; Bundgaard, Frederik; Geschke, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    A crucial challenge in packaging of microsystems is microfluidic interconnections. These have to seal the ports of the system, and have to provide the appropriate interface to other devices or the external environment. Integrated fluidic interconnections appear to be a good solution...... for interconnecting polymer microsystems in terms of cost, space and performance. Following this path we propose a new reversible, integrated fluidic interconnection composed of custom-made cylindrical rings integrated in a polymer house next to the fluidic network. This allows plug 'n' play functionality between...... external metal ferrules and the system. Theoretical calculations are made to dimension and model the integrated fluidic interconnection. Leakage tests are performed on the interconnections, in order to experimentally confirm the model, and detect its limits....

  3. Identification of inorganic improvised explosive devices using sequential injection capillary electrophoresis and contactless conductivity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Gustavo A; Nai, Yi H; Hilder, Emily F; Shellie, Robert A; Dicinoski, Greg W; Haddad, Paul R; Breadmore, Michael C

    2011-12-01

    A simple sequential injection capillary electrophoresis (SI-CE) instrument with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) has been developed for the rapid separation of anions relevant to the identification of inorganic improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Four of the most common explosive tracer ions, nitrate, perchlorate, chlorate, and azide, and the most common background ions, chloride, sulfate, thiocyanate, fluoride, phosphate, and carbonate, were chosen for investigation. Using a separation electrolyte comprising 50 mM tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane, 50 mM cyclohexyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid, pH 8.9 and 0.05% poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) in a hexadimethrine bromide (HDMB)-coated capillary it was possible to partially separate all 10 ions within 90 s. The combination of two cationic polymer additives (PEI and HDMB) was necessary to achieve adequate selectivity with a sufficiently stable electroosmotic flow (EOF), which was not possible with only one polymer. Careful optimization of variables affecting the speed of separation and injection timing allowed a further reduction of separation time to 55 s while maintaining adequate efficiency and resolution. Software control makes high sample throughput possible (60 samples/h), with very high repeatability of migration times [0.63-2.07% relative standard deviation (RSD) for 240 injections]. The separation speed does not compromise sensitivity, with limits of detection ranging from 23 to 50 μg·L(-1) for all the explosive residues considered, which is 10× lower than those achieved by indirect absorbance detection and 2× lower than those achieved by C(4)D using portable benchtop instrumentation. The combination of automation, high sample throughput, high confidence of peak identification, and low limits of detection makes this methodology ideal for the rapid identification of inorganic IED residues.

  4. Development and optimization of an integrated capillary-based opto-microfluidic device for chemiluminescence quantitative detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A capillary-action driven device amenable for integration of organic photodiodes (OPDs) was developed for monitoring parallel chemiluminescence (CL) reactions. Device characterization was conducted using finite element method (FEM) simulations. Definition of the simulation setup, dimensional optimization of the reaction chamber and overall geometrical characterization of the microfluidic device were the main simulation results. Furthermore, a non-uniform filling process was observed during the final simulation of the capillary device. Validation of this result and the proposed capillary-driven filling process was later confirmed by experimental results. Experimental testing performed on a single chamber defined an optimal exposure time to the luminescent substrate of 5 min, indicating a quick analyte detection time. Further tests using one chamber presented a linear relation between the signal-to-noise ratio and increasing concentrations of the protein used. A measured limit of detection of 28 nM was obtained for streptavidin. Regarding the tests performed on the whole device, acceptable values of 39 s ± 5 s were obtained for the luminescent substrate total filling times. Also, the microfluidic device showed the capability to perform a quantitative detection of the occurring CL reactions. Weaker optical signals, due to the occurrence of CL reactions, were detected in the chambers with a later filling process, as predicted by simulation results. Notwithstanding these results, the capillary-based device is promising for quantitative detection of proteins in future point-of-care systems, presenting an unprompted filling process and parallel quantitative detection capability. (paper)

  5. Research Progress in Capillary Electrophoresis and Micro-fluidic Chip Electrophoresis Applied in Testing Genetically Modified Food%毛细管电泳与芯片电泳技术在转基因食品检测中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永新; 黎源倩; 何玲; 李灿

    2012-01-01

    大量的转基因生物体作为食品进入人们的生活,灵敏、快速、特异的检测方法对保护消费者的知情权和选择权、保障转基因标签制度的顺利实施起到了举足轻重的作用.毛细管电泳和芯片电泳作为新兴的分离技术,以其高通量、高灵敏度、快捷低耗的优势弥补了传统凝胶电泳的不足.对目前常用的转基因食品检测方法进行归纳和评价,并重点综述了近年来毛细管电泳与芯片电泳技术在转基因食品检测中的研究进展.%In the past few years,genetically modified organs as food ( GMC) have entered into people's daily life. The fast,sensitive and reliable testing methods have played a decisive role in protecting the customers' right to know and to choose,safeguarding the smooth implementation of labeling system for genetically modified food ( GMF) . Capillary electrophoresis and micro-fluidic chip electrophoresis,as relatively new technology has made up the deficiencies of traditional gel eleetrophoTesis with their high flux,high sensitivity,fast and low consumption. This paper summarized and assessed the common methods for testing GMF and laid emphasis in reviewing the research progress made in capillary and micro-fluidic chip electrophoresis for testing GMF in recent years.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Abraham P.; Bachman, Mark G.

    2004-08-24

    A magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system includes a reagent source containing a reagent fluid and a sample source containing a sample fluid that includes a constituent. A reactor is operatively connected to the supply reagent source and the sample source. MHD pumps utilize a magnetohydrodynamic drive to move the reagent fluid and the sample fluid in a flow such that the reagent fluid and the sample fluid form an interface causing the constituent to be separated from the sample fluid.

  7. Micro-fluidic (Lab-on the- Chip) PCR Array Cartridge for Biological Screening in a Hand Held Device: FInal Report for CRADA no 264. PNNL-T2-258-RU with CombiMatrix Corp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainina, Evguenia I.

    2010-10-31

    The worldwide emergence of both new and old diseases resulting from human expansion and also human and materials mobility has and will continue to place stress on both medical and clinical diagnostics. The classical approach to bioagents detection involves the use of differential metabolic assays to determine species type in the case of most bacteria, or the use of cell culture and electron microscopy to diagnose viruses and some bacteria that are intracellular parasites. The long-term goal in bioagent detection is to develop a hand-held instrument featuring disposable cartridges which contain all the necessary reagents, reaction chambers, waste chambers, and micro-fluidics to extract, concentrate, amplify, and analyze nucleic acids. This GIPP project began development of a sensory platform using nucleic-acid based probes. Although research was not completed, initial findings indicated that an advanced sensing device could theoretically be built on a DNA/RNA-based technology platform.

  8. A low-cost, manufacturable method for fabricating capillary and optical fiber interconnects for microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Daniel M; Nevill, J Tanner; Pettigrew, Kenneth I; Votaw, Gregory; Kung, Pang-Jen; Crenshaw, Hugh C

    2008-04-01

    Microfluidic chips require connections to larger macroscopic components, such as light sources, light detectors, and reagent reservoirs. In this article, we present novel methods for integrating capillaries, optical fibers, and wires with the channels of microfluidic chips. The method consists of forming planar interconnect channels in microfluidic chips and inserting capillaries, optical fibers, or wires into these channels. UV light is manually directed onto the ends of the interconnects using a microscope. UV-curable glue is then allowed to wick to the end of the capillaries, fibers, or wires, where it is cured to form rigid, liquid-tight connections. In a variant of this technique, used with light-guiding capillaries and optical fibers, the UV light is directed into the capillaries or fibers, and the UV-glue is cured by the cone of light emerging from the end of each capillary or fiber. This technique is fully self-aligned, greatly improves both the quality and the manufacturability of the interconnects, and has the potential to enable the fabrication of interconnects in a fully automated fashion. Using these methods, including a semi-automated implementation of the second technique, over 10,000 interconnects have been formed in almost 2000 microfluidic chips made of a variety of rigid materials. The resulting interconnects withstand pressures up to at least 800psi, have unswept volumes estimated to be less than 10 femtoliters, and have dead volumes defined only by the length of the capillary. PMID:18369517

  9. Tissue culture on a chip: Developmental biology applications of self-organized capillary networks in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takashi; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    2016-08-01

    Organ culture systems are used to elucidate the mechanisms of pattern formation in developmental biology. Various organ culture techniques have been used, but the lack of microcirculation in such cultures impedes the long-term maintenance of larger tissues. Recent advances in microfluidic devices now enable us to utilize self-organized perfusable capillary networks in organ cultures. In this review, we will overview past approaches to organ culture and current technical advances in microfluidic devices, and discuss possible applications of microfluidics towards the study of developmental biology. PMID:27272910

  10. Integration of fluidic jet actuators in composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueller, Martin; Lipowski, Mathias; Schirmer, Eckart; Walther, Marco; Otto, Thomas; Geßner, Thomas; Kroll, Lothar

    2015-04-01

    Fluidic Actuated Flow Control (FAFC) has been introduced as a technology that influences the boundary layer by actively blowing air through slots or holes in the aircraft skin or wind turbine rotor blade. Modern wing structures are or will be manufactured using composite materials. In these state of the art systems, AFC actuators are integrated in a hybrid approach. The new idea is to directly integrate the active fluidic elements (such as SJAs and PJAs) and their components in the structure of the airfoil. Consequently, the integration of such fluidic devices must fit the manufacturing process and the material properties of the composite structure. The challenge is to integrate temperature-sensitive active elements and to realize fluidic cavities at the same time. The transducer elements will be provided for the manufacturing steps using roll-to-roll processes. The fluidic parts of the actuators will be manufactured using the MuCell® process that provides on the one hand the defined reproduction of the fluidic structures and, on the other hand, a high light weight index. Based on the first design concept, a demonstrator was developed in order to proof the design approach. The output velocity on the exit was measured using a hot-wire anemometer.

  11. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  12. Laser ablation construction of on-column reagent addition devices for capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezenom, Yohannes H; Lancaster, Joseph M; Pittman, Jason L; Gilman, S Douglass

    2002-04-01

    A simple and reproducible technique for constructing perfectly aligned gaps in fused-silica capillaries has been developed for postcolumn reagent addition with capillary electrophoresis. This technique uses laser ablation with the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) at 13.5 mJ/pulse and a repetition rate of 15 Hz to create these gaps. A capillary is glued to a microscope slide and positioned at the focal point of a cylindrical lens using the focused beam from a laser pointer as a reference. Gaps of 14.0 +/- 2.2 microm (n = 33) at the bore of the capillary are produced with a success rate of 94% by ablation with 400 pulses. This simple method of gap construction requires no micromanipulation under a microscope, hydrofluoric acid etching, or use of column fittings. These structures have been used for reagent addition for postcolumn derivatization with laser-induced fluorescence detection and have been tested for the separation of proteins and amino acids. Detection limits of 6 x 10(-7) and 1 x 10(-8) M have been obtained for glycine and tranferrin, respectively. Separation efficiencies obtained using these gap reactors range from 38,000 to 213,000 theoretical plates. PMID:12043598

  13. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Patrick

    Full Text Available The process of connecting genetic parts-DNA assembly-is a foundational technology for synthetic biology. Microfluidics present an attractive solution for minimizing use of costly reagents, enabling multiplexed reactions, and automating protocols by integrating multiple protocol steps. However, microfluidics fabrication and operation can be expensive and requires expertise, limiting access to the technology. With advances in commodity digital fabrication tools, it is now possible to directly print fluidic devices and supporting hardware. 3D printed micro- and millifluidic devices are inexpensive, easy to make and quick to produce. We demonstrate Golden Gate DNA assembly in 3D-printed fluidics with reaction volumes as small as 490 nL, channel widths as fine as 220 microns, and per unit part costs ranging from $0.61 to $5.71. A 3D-printed syringe pump with an accompanying programmable software interface was designed and fabricated to operate the devices. Quick turnaround and inexpensive materials allowed for rapid exploration of device parameters, demonstrating a manufacturing paradigm for designing and fabricating hardware for synthetic biology.

  14. Micro-Cavity Fluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Bjarne; Kristensen, Anders; Menon, Aric Kumaran

    2003-01-01

    We have successfully designed, fabricated and characterized a micro-cavity fluidic dye laser with metallic mirrors, which can be integrated with polymer based lab-on-a-chip microsystems without further processing steps. A simple rate-equation model is used to predict the average pumping power...... threshold for lasing as function of cavity-mirror reflectance, laser dye concentration and cavity length. The laser device is characterized using the laser dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol. Lasing is observed, and the influence of dye concentration is investigated....

  15. An accessible micro-capillary electrophoresis device using surface-tension-driven flow

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanty, Swomitra K; Warrick, Jay; Gorski, Jack; Beebe, David J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a rapidly fabricated micro-capillary electrophoresis chip that utilizes surface-tension-driven flow for sample injection and extraction of DNA. Surface-tension-driven flow (i.e. passive pumping) injects a fixed volume of sample that can be predicted mathematically. Passive pumping eliminates the need for tubing, valves, syringe pumps, and other equipment typically needed for interfacing with microelectrophoresis chips. This method requires a standard micropipette to load samples be...

  16. 全射流喷头压力调节装置损失系数分析及试验%Experiments on loss coefficient of complete fluidic sprinkler pressure regulation device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊萍; 袁寿其; 骆寅; 汤跃; 李红

    2011-01-01

    According to the shortage of resoarch work on pressure loss in pressure regulation device of complete fluidic sprinkler for variable irrigation, the pressure variation of system was analyzed by Bernoulli equation. Based on definition system characteristics the sprinkler changed when working. Thc loss pressure coefficient was put forward with the value that, plus of section area variable coefficient and shape coefficient and then minus axial clearance influence coefficient of the moving chips in relative motion. For the calculation, the maximum loss pressure coefficient value was 0.7414, the minimum value was 0.0204. Virtual instrument and LabVIEW software were adopt to measure the relationships between pressure value, the sprinkler running time, the working conditions of pressure regulation device. The results showed that when the flow rates decreased, the upstream pressure increased, and the downstream pressure decreased, the range of downstream pressure changed was larger relatively. With the flow rate decreased, the loss coefficient increased. The maximum loss coefficient value of pressure regulation device was 0.582, and the minimum value was 0.265. The study can provide a theoretical basis for the design of complete fluidic sprinkler pressure regulation device.%针对变量喷洒全射流喷头工作中压力调节装置压力损失研究不足的情况,根据喷头工作中系统特性发生变化的特点,应用伯努力方程对系统压力变化规律进行了分析.提出压力损失系数为压力调节装置动静片的截面积变化系数及形状系数之和并减去轴向间隙系数,通过计算得到压力损失系数最大值为0.7414,最小值为0.0204.采用虚拟仪器LabVIEW软件测量调节装置前后压力与时间、工作状态之间的关系.结果表明:随着流量的减小,调节装置上游压力增大,下游压力减小,下游压力变化幅度较大.测量得到装置压力损失系数的变化规律,随着流量的

  17. Numerical Studies of a Fluidic Diverter for Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Culley, Dennis E.; Raghu, Surya

    2009-01-01

    The internal flow structure in a specific fluidic diverter is studied over a range from low subsonic to sonic inlet conditions by a time-dependent numerical analysis. The understanding will aid in the development of fluidic diverters with minimum pressure losses and advanced designs of flow control actuators. The velocity, temperature and pressure fields are calculated for subsonic conditions and the self-induced oscillatory behavior of the flow is successfully predicted. The results of our numerical studies have excellent agreement with our experimental measurements of oscillation frequencies. The acoustic speed in the gaseous medium is determined to be a key factor for up to sonic conditions in governing the mechanism of initiating the oscillations as well as determining its frequency. The feasibility of employing plasma actuation with a minimal perturbation level is demonstrated in steady-state calculations to also produce oscillation frequencies of our own choosing instead of being dependent on the fixed-geometry fluidic device.

  18. Picosecond Laser Machining of Metallic and Polymer Substrates for Fluidic Driven Self-Alignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, G.R.B.E.; Arnaldo del Cerro, D.; Pohl, R.; Chang, B.; Liimatainen, V.; Zhou, Q.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Fluidic self-alignment of micro-components relies on creating a receptor site that is able to confine a liquid droplet. When a micro-component is brought in contact with the droplet, capillary forces move the component to its final position. A method to stop the advancing of a liquid from a receptor

  19. Reliable low-cost capillary electrophoresis device for drug quality control and counterfeit medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, R D; Rozet, E; Montes, M L A; Rohrbasser, C; Roht, S; Rhème, D; Bonnabry, P; Schappler, J; Veuthey, J-L; Hubert, Ph; Rudaz, S

    2010-12-15

    The proportion of counterfeit medicines is dramatically increasing these last few years. According to numerous official sources, in some pharmaceutical wholesalers in African countries, the proportion has reached 80%. Unfortunately, this situation is far to be improved due to lack of suitable analytical equipment allowing rapid actions of the Regulatory Agencies based on scientific consideration, at affordable cost and all over the drug supply chain. For that purpose, a network group considered that mater by building a low-cost original capillary electrophoresis (CE) equipment equipped with a new deep UV detector based on LED technology. The generic conditions for analysis were investigated: capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) performed at acidic pH for basic drug molecules (i.e., quinine, highly used as the last antimalarial rampart), basic pH for compounds such as furosemide (a common diuretic drug) and at neutral pH for a well known antibiotic combination, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazol. To evaluate the ability of the CE equipment for quantification, a full validation and a method comparison study were carried out for the CZE method dedicated to quinine determination. The validation involved the use of accuracy profile and total error concept to monitor the adequacy of the results obtained by the new prototype. The method comparison was based on the Bland and Altman approach by comparing results obtained by the low-cost CE and a conventional set-up. Subsequent validation studies were realized with neutral and acidic drug molecules, each focusing on a single concentration level calibration curve in order to maintain as low as possible the expenses due to reagents and thus the cost of analysis, as important advantages of CE for drug quality control. PMID:20719445

  20. Dielectric Elastomers for Fluidic and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoul, David James

    Dielectric elastomers have demonstrated tremendous potential as high-strain electromechanical transducers for a myriad of novel applications across all engineering disciplines. Because their soft, viscoelastic mechanical properties are similar to those of living tissues, dielectric elastomers have garnered a strong foothold in a plethora of biomedical and biomimetic applications. Dielectric elastomers consist of a sheet of stretched rubber, or elastomer, coated on both sides with compliant electrode materials; application of a voltage generates an electrostatic pressure that deforms the elastomer. They can function as soft generators, sensors, or actuators, and this last function is the focus of this dissertation. Many design configurations are possible, such as stacks, minimum energy structures, interpenetrating polymer networks, shape memory dielectric elastomers, and others; dielectric elastomers are already being applied to many fields of biomedicine. The first part of the original research presented in this dissertation details a PDMS microfluidic system paired with a dielectric elastomer stack actuator of anisotropically prestrained VHB(TM) 4910 (3M(TM)) and single-walled carbon nanotubes. These electroactive microfluidic devices demonstrated active increases in microchannel width when 3 and 4 kV were applied. Fluorescence microscopy also indicated an accompanying increase in channel depth with actuation. The cross-sectional area strains at 3 and 4 kV were approximately 2.9% and 7.4%, respectively. The device was then interfaced with a syringe pump, and the pressure was measured upstream. Linear pressure-flow plots were developed, which showed decreasing fluidic resistance with actuation, from 0.192 psi/(microL/min) at 0 kV, to 0.160 and 0.157 psi/(microL/min) at 3 and 4 kV, respectively. This corresponds to an ~18% drop in fluidic resistance at 4 kV. Active de-clogging was tested in situ with the device by introducing ~50 microm diameter PDMS microbeads and

  1. Tubular dielectric elastomer actuator for active fluidic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoul, David; Pei, Qibing

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel low-profile, biomimetic dielectric elastomer tubular actuator capable of actively controlling hydraulic flow. The tubular actuator has been established as a reliable tunable valve, pinching a secondary silicone tube completely shut in the absence of a fluidic pressure bias or voltage, offering a high degree of resistance against fluidic flow, and able to open and completely remove this resistance to flow with an applied low power actuation voltage. The system demonstrates a rise in pressure of ∼3.0 kPa when the dielectric elastomer valve is in the passive, unactuated state, and there is a quadratic fall in this pressure with increasing actuation voltage, until ∼0 kPa is reached at 2.4 kV. The device is reliable for at least 2000 actuation cycles for voltages at or below 2.2 kV. Furthermore, modeling of the actuator and fluidic system yields results consistent with the observed experimental dependence of intrasystem pressure on input flow rate, actuator prestretch, and actuation voltage. To our knowledge, this is the first actuator of its type that can control fluid flow by directly actuating the walls of a tube. Potential applications may include an implantable artificial sphincter, part of a peristaltic pump, or a computerized valve for fluidic or pneumatic control.

  2. Portable integrated micro-fluidic platform for the monitoring and detection of nitrite

    OpenAIRE

    Czugala, Monika; Fay, Cormac; O'Connor, Noel E.; Corcoran, Brian; Benito-Lopez, Fernando; Diamond, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    A wireless, portable integrated micro-fluidic platform is proposed and applied for the determination of nitrite anions in water. The colourimetric analysis of nitrite is based on the Griess reagent, and the colour intensity of nitrite Griess reagent complex is detected using a low cost Paired Emitter Detector Diode technique. The micro-fluidic device employed a photoswitchable micro-valve, controlled by white light and generated using a light emitting diode. This low-cost and low-power detect...

  3. Sampling by Fluidics and Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tesař

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Selecting one from several available fluid samples is a procedure often performed especially in chemical engineering. It is usually done by an array of valves sequentially opened and closed. Not generally known is an advantageous alternative: fluidic sampling units without moving parts. In the absence of complete pipe closure, cross-contamination between samples cannot be ruled out. This is eliminated by arranging for small protective flows that clear the cavities and remove any contaminated fluid. Although this complicates the overall circuit layout, fluidic sampling units with these "guard" flows were successfully built and tested. Recent interest in microchemistry leads to additional problems due very low operating Reynolds numbers. This necessitated the design of microfluidic sampling units based on new operating principles.

  4. Sampling by Fluidics and Microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    V. Tesař

    2002-01-01

    Selecting one from several available fluid samples is a procedure often performed especially in chemical engineering. It is usually done by an array of valves sequentially opened and closed. Not generally known is an advantageous alternative: fluidic sampling units without moving parts. In the absence of complete pipe closure, cross-contamination between samples cannot be ruled out. This is eliminated by arranging for small protective flows that clear the cavities and remove any contaminated ...

  5. Micro-Fluidic Dye Ring Laser - Experimental Tuning of the Wavelength and Numerical Simulation of the Cavity Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Balslev, Søren; Mortensen, Niels Asger;

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate wavelength tuning of a micro-fluidic dye ring laser. Wavelength tunability is obtained by controlling the liquid dye concentration. The device performance is modelled by FEM simulations supporting a ray-tracing view.......We demonstrate wavelength tuning of a micro-fluidic dye ring laser. Wavelength tunability is obtained by controlling the liquid dye concentration. The device performance is modelled by FEM simulations supporting a ray-tracing view....

  6. Opto-mechano-fluidic viscometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kewen, E-mail: khan56@illinois.edu; Zhu, Kaiyuan; Bahl, Gaurav, E-mail: bahl@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    The recent development of opto-mechano-fluidic resonators has provided—by harnessing photon radiation pressure—a microfluidics platform for the optical sensing of fluid density and bulk modulus. Here, we show that fluid viscosity can also be determined through optomechanical measurement of the vibrational noise spectrum of the resonator mechanical modes. A linear relationship between the spectral linewidth and root-viscosity is predicted and experimentally verified in the low viscosity regime. Our result is a step towards multi-frequency measurement of viscoelasticity of arbitrary fluids, without sample contamination, using highly sensitive optomechanics techniques.

  7. Pinched flow fractionation devices for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, A.V.; Poulsen, L.; Birgens, H.;

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a new and flexible micro fluidic based method for genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs). The method relies on size separation of selectively hybridized polystyrene microspheres in a micro fluidic pinched flow fractionation (PFF) device. The micro fluidic PFF devices wi...

  8. Fluidic Analysis in an Annular Centrifugal Contactor for Fuel Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An annular centrifugal contactor (ACC) is a promising device for fuel reprocessing process, because it offers several advantages—a smaller size, a smaller holdup volume, and a higher separation performance—over conventional contactors such as a mixer-settler and a pulse column. Fluid dynamics and dispersion in an ACC, which has a combined mixer/centrifuge structure, are closely related to its separation performance and capacity, and this information is useful in improving equipment design. In this paper, experimental and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies were conducted to analyze fluidic and dispersion behavior in ACCs. Multiphase mixing (water/TBP-dodecane/air) in the annular zone was observed by Particle Imaging Velocimetry, and the change in the fluidic and dispersion behavior was ascertained under several operational conditions. The results of the CFD studies, which considered multiphase turbulent flow in the annular and rotor interior zones, were in a good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  9. A Programmable MicroFluidic Processor: Integrated and Hybrid Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K A

    2002-05-10

    The Programmable Fluidic Processor (PFP), a device conceived of by researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center, is a reconfigurable and programmable bio-chemical analysis system designed for handheld operation in a variety of applications. Unlike most microfluidic systems which utilize channels to control fluids, the PFP device is a droplet-based system. The device is based on dielectrophoresis; a fluid transport phenomenon that utilizes mismatched polarizability between a droplet and its medium to induce droplet mobility. In the device, sample carrying droplets are polarized by an array of electrodes, individually addressable by subsurface microelectronics. My research focused on the development of a polymer-based microfluidic injection system for injecting these droplets onto the electrode array. The first of two device generations fabricated at LLNL was designed using extensive research and modeling performed by MD Anderson and Coventor. Fabricating the first generation required several iterations and design changes in order to generate an acceptable device for testing. Difficulties in planar fabrication of the fluidic system and a narrow channel design necessitated these changes. The second generation device incorporated modifications of the previous generation and improved on deficiencies discovered during experimentation with the initial device. Extensive modeling of the injection channels and fluid storage chamber also aided in redesigning the device's microfluidic system. A micromolding technique with interlocking features enabled precise alignments and dimensional control, critical requirements for device optimization. Fabrication of a final device will be fully integrated with the polymer-based microfluidics bonded directly to the silicon-based microelectronics. The optimized design and process flow developed in the trial generations will readily transfer to this approach.

  10. Miniaturized unified imaging system using bio-inspired fluidic lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Frank S.; Cho, Sung Hwan; Qiao, Wen; Kim, Nam-Hyong; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2008-08-01

    Miniaturized imaging systems have become ubiquitous as they are found in an ever-increasing number of devices, such as cellular phones, personal digital assistants, and web cameras. Until now, the design and fabrication methodology of such systems have not been significantly different from conventional cameras. The only established method to achieve focusing is by varying the lens distance. On the other hand, the variable-shape crystalline lens found in animal eyes offers inspiration for a more natural way of achieving an optical system with high functionality. Learning from the working concepts of the optics in the animal kingdom, we developed bio-inspired fluidic lenses for a miniature universal imager with auto-focusing, macro, and super-macro capabilities. Because of the enormous dynamic range of fluidic lenses, the miniature camera can even function as a microscope. To compensate for the image quality difference between the central vision and peripheral vision and the shape difference between a solid-state image sensor and a curved retina, we adopted a hybrid design consisting of fluidic lenses for tunability and fixed lenses for aberration and color dispersion correction. A design of the world's smallest surgical camera with 3X optical zoom capabilities is also demonstrated using the approach of hybrid lenses.

  11. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benner, Henry W.; Dzenitis, John M.

    2016-06-21

    Provided herein are fluidics platforms and related methods for performing integrated sample collection and solid-phase extraction of a target component of the sample all in one tube. The fluidics platform comprises a pump, particles for solid-phase extraction and a particle-holding means. The method comprises contacting the sample with one or more reagents in a pump, coupling a particle-holding means to the pump and expelling the waste out of the pump while the particle-holding means retains the particles inside the pump. The fluidics platform and methods herein described allow solid-phase extraction without pipetting and centrifugation.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic actuation of droplets for millimetric planar fluidic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, A., E-mail: ali.ahmadi@ubc.ca; McDermid, C. M.; Markley, L. [School of Engineering, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada)

    2016-01-04

    In this work, a magnetohydrodynamic method is proposed for the actuation of droplets in small-scale planar fluidic systems, providing an alternative to commonly used methods such as electrowetting-on-dielectric. Elementary droplet-based operations, including transport, merging, and mixing, are demonstrated. The forces acting on millimetric droplets are carefully investigated, with a primary focus on the magnetic actuation force and on the unbalanced capillary forces that arise due to hysteresis. A super-hydrophobic channel is 3D printed to guide the droplets, with thin wires installed as contact electrodes and permanent magnets providing a static magnetic field. It is shown that droplet motion is enhanced by increasing the droplet size and minimizing the electrode contact surface. The effects of channel geometry on threshold voltage and minimum moveable droplet volume are characterized. Finally, the presence of electrolysis is investigated and mitigating strategies are discussed.

  13. 微流控毛细管电泳-流动注射联用技术在分离和测定中药制剂中麻黄碱与伪麻黄碱的应用%Micro-fluidic capillary electrophoresis system with flow injection sample introduction applied to separation and determination of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宏丽; 张玉霞; 程玉桥; 陈兴国; 胡之德

    2007-01-01

    In this work, a microfluidic capillary electrophoresis system coupled to a flow injection sample introduction system using short capillary column as separation channel is described. This device contains an H-shaped microchip fixed on a planar plastic base, which utilizes a horizontal separation capillary with tubular side arms on each end that serve as inlet and outlet flow-through electrode reservoirs. Continuous FI introduction of a series of samples containing a standard mixture of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine allows a throughput rate up to 60 h-1 with complete baseline separation and high precision. The limits of detection (S/N=3) are 1.77 μg/mL for ephedrine and 2.03 μg/mL for pseudoephedrine, respectively. The microfluidic system has been applied to analyzing, for the first time, three commercial pharmaceutical preparations containing ephedrine or pseudoephedrine, and the results are satisfactory.%采用较短的毛细管作为分离通道,建立了一种微流控毛细管电泳和流动注射联用的分离测定麻黄碱和伪麻黄碱的新体系.该体系由一个H-型微芯片接口、一个水平放置的毛细管(作为分离通道)、两个竖直放置的Tygon管(作为阳极和阴极的电解质流通储液槽)组成.在最佳实验条件下,麻黄碱和伪麻黄碱标准品的进样频率可达到60 h-1,且完全基线分离,重现性良好,检测限(S/N=3)分别为:麻黄1.77 μg/mL,伪麻黄2.03 μg/mL.该微流控体系已用于3种含有麻黄碱和伪麻黄碱的市售药品的测定,结果令人满意.

  14. A Coupled Cavity Micro Fluidic Dye Ring Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Gersborg-Hansen, M.; Balslev, S.; Mortensen, N. A.; Kristensen, A.

    2004-01-01

    We present a laterally emitting, coupled cavity micro fluidic dye ring laser, suitable for integration into lab-on-a-chip micro systems. The micro-fluidic laser has been successfully designed, fabricated, characterized and modelled. The resonator is formed by a micro-fluidic channel bounded by two isosceles triangle mirrors. The micro-fluidic laser structure is defined using photo lithography in 10 microns thick SU-8 polymer on a glass substrate. The micro fluidic channel is sealed by a glass...

  15. Study on hydrodynamic vibration in fluidic flowmeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of the fluidic flowmeter, which is a combination of impinged concave wall and bistable fluid amplifier, is investigated by experimental studies and numerical simulations. The numerical approaches are utilized to examine the time dependent flow field and pressure field inside the proposed flowmeter. The effect of varying structural parameters on flow characteristics of the proposed fluidic flowmeter is investigated by computational simulations for the optimization. Both the simulation and experimental results disclose that the hydrodynamic vibration, with the same intensity, frequency and 180° phase shift, occurs at axisymmetric points in the feedback channel of the fluidic flowmeter. Using the structural combination of impinged concave wall and bistable fluid amplifier and differential signal processing technique, a novel fluidic flowmeter with excellent immunity and improved sensibility is developed.

  16. Formation and Control of Fluidic Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Darren Roy (Inventor); Weitz, David A. (Inventor); Marquez-Sanchez, Manuel (Inventor); Cheng, Zhengdong (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention generally relates to systems and methods for the formation and/or control of fluidic species, and articles produced by such systems and methods. In some cases, the invention involves unique fluid channels, systems, controls, and/or restrictions, and combinations thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention allows fluidic streams (which can be continuous or discontinuous, i.e., droplets) to be formed and/or combined, at a variety of scales, including microfluidic scales. In one set of embodiments, a fluidic stream may be produced from a channel, where a cross-sectional dimension of the fluidic stream is smaller than that of the channel, for example, through the use of structural elements, other fluids, and/or applied external fields, etc. In some cases, a Taylor cone may be produced. In another set of embodiments, a fluidic stream may be manipulated in some fashion, for example, to create tubes (which may be hollow or solid), droplets, nested tubes or droplets, arrays of tubes or droplets, meshes of tubes, etc. In some cases, droplets produced using certain embodiments of the invention may be charged or substantially charged, which may allow their further manipulation, for instance, using applied external fields. Non-limiting examples of such manipulations include producing charged droplets, coalescing droplets (especially at the microscale), synchronizing droplet formation, aligning molecules within the droplet, etc. In some cases, the droplets and/or the fluidic streams may include colloids, cells, therapeutic agents, and the like.

  17. Flexible fluidic microchips based on thermoformed and locally modified thin polymer films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truckenmüller, R.; Giselbrecht, S.; Blitterswijk, van C.; Dambrowsky, N.; Gottwald, E.; Mappes, T.; Rolletschek, A.; Saile, V.; Trautmann, C.; Weibezahn, K.-F.; Welle, A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a fundamentally new approach for the manufacturing and the possible applications of lab on a chip devices, mainly in the form of disposable fluidic microchips for life sciences applications. The new technology approach is based on a novel microscale thermoforming of thin polymer

  18. Large-scale submicron horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotube surface arrays on various substrates produced by a fluidic assembly method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have been assembled on various substrates over mm-scale surface areas by combining fluidic alignment with soft lithography (micropatterning in capillaries) techniques. The feature size of the nanotube patterns reaches down to submicrometre scale. To this end, tailored substrate surface modification and pre-alignment of chopped CNTs in suspension are highly critical

  19. Fluidic Elements based on Coanda Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin OLIVOTTO

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains first some definitions and classifications regarding the fluidic elements. Thegeneral current status is presented, nominating the main specific elements based on the Coanda effect developedspecially in Romania. In particularly the development of an original bistable element using industrial compressedair at industrial pressure supply is presented. The function of this element is based on the controlled attachmentof the main jet at a curved wall through the Coanda effect. The methods used for particular calculation andexperiments are nominated. The main application of these elements was to develop a specific execution element:a fluidic step–by-step motor based on the Coanda effect.

  20. Investigation of combustion control in a dump combustor using the feedback free fluidic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Eric J.

    The feedback free fluidic oscillator uses the unsteady nature of two colliding jets to create a single oscillating outlet jet with a wide sweep angle. These devices have the potential to provide additional combustion control, boundary layer control, thrust vectoring, and industrial flow deflection. Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics, CFD, was used to analyze the jet oscillation frequency over a range of operating conditions and to determine the effect that geometric changes in the oscillator design have on the frequency. Results presented illustrate the changes in jet oscillation frequency with gas type, gas temperature, operating pressure, pressure ratio across the oscillator, aspect ratio of the oscillator, and the frequency trends with various changes to the oscillator geometry. A fluidic oscillator was designed and integrated into single element rocket combustor with the goal of suppressing longitudinal combustion instabilities. An array of nine fluidic oscillators was tested to mimic modulated secondary oxidizer injection into the dump plane using 15% of the oxidizer flow. The combustor has a coaxial injector that uses gaseous methane and decomposed hydrogen peroxide at an O/F of 11.66. A sonic choke plate on an actuator arm allows for continuous adjustment of the oxidizer post acoustics for studying a variety of instability magnitudes. The fluidic oscillator unsteady outlet jet performance is compared with equivalent steady jet injection and a baseline design with no secondary oxidizer injection. At the most unstable operating conditions, the unsteady outlet jet saw a 60% reduction in the instability pressure oscillation magnitude when compared to the steady jet and baseline data. The results indicate open loop propellant modulation for combustion control can be achieved through fluidic devices that require no moving parts or electrical power to operate. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics, 3-D CFD, was conducted to determine the

  1. Electrochemical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Patrick G.; Einstein, Harry; Bellows, Richard J.

    1988-01-12

    A tunnel protected electrochemical device features channels fluidically communicating between manifold, tunnels and cells. The channels are designed to provide the most efficient use of auxiliary power. The channels have a greater hydraulic pressure drop and electrical resistance than the manifold. This will provide a design with the optimum auxiliary energy requirements.

  2. Picosecond Laser Machining of Metallic and Polymer Substrates for Fluidic Driven Self-Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römer, G. R. B. E.; Cerro, D. Arnaldo Del; Pohl, R.; Chang, B.; Liimatainen, V.; Zhou, Q.; Veld, A. J. Huis In `t.

    Fluidic self-alignment of micro-components relies on creating a receptor site that is able to confine a liquid droplet. When a micro-component is brought in contact with the droplet, capillary forces move the component to its final position. A method to stop the advancing of a liquid from a receptor site, consists of creating geometrical features, such as edges around the site. A picosecond pulsed laser source was used to create suitable edges in a metallic and a polyimide substrate. Subsequently, the self-alignment capabilities of these sites were tested. The receptor sites in polyimide showed the highest success rate.

  3. Picosecond Laser Machining of Metallic and Polymer Substrates for Fluidic Driven Self-Alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Römer, G.R.B.E.; Cerro, D. Arnaldo Del; Pohl, R.; Chang, B.; Liimatainen, V.; Q. Zhou; Veld, A.J. Huis In ‘t

    2012-01-01

    Fluidic self-alignment of micro-components relies on creating a receptor site that is able to confine a liquid droplet. When a micro-component is brought in contact with the droplet, capillary forces move the component to its final position. A method to stop the advancing of a liquid from a receptor site, consists of creating geometrical features, such as edges around the site. A picosecond pulsed laser source was used to create suitable edges in a metallic and a polyimide substrate. Subseque...

  4. Numerical modeling of fluidic flow meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, D.; Patel, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    The transient fluid flow in fluidic flow meters has been modeled using Creare.x's flow modeling computer program FLUENT/BFC that solves the Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates. The numerical predictions of fluid flow in a fluidic flow meter have been compared with the available experimental results for a particular design, termed the PC-4 design. Overall flow structures such as main jet bending, and primary and secondary vortices predicted by FLUENT/BFC are in excellent agreement with flow visualization results. The oscillation frequencies of the PC-4 design have been predicted for a range of flow rates encompassing laminar and turbulent flow and the results are in good agreement with experiments. The details of the flow field predictions reveal that an important factor that determines the onset of oscillations in the fluidic flow meter is the feedback jet momentum relative to the main jet momentum. The insights provided by the analysis of the PC-4 fluidic flow meter design have led to an improved design. The improved design has sustained oscillations at lower flow rates compared with the PC-4 design and has a larger rangeability.

  5. Transport Phenomena of Water in Molecular Fluidic Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Truong Quoc; Kim, BoHung

    2016-01-01

    In molecular-level fluidic transport, where the discrete characteristics of a molecular system are not negligible (in contrast to a continuum description), the response of the molecular water system might still be similar to the continuum description if the time and ensemble averages satisfy the ergodic hypothesis and the scale of the average is enough to recover the classical thermodynamic properties. However, even in such cases, the continuum description breaks down on the material interfaces. In short, molecular-level liquid flows exhibit substantially different physics from classical fluid transport theories because of (i) the interface/surface force field, (ii) thermal/velocity slip, (iii) the discreteness of fluid molecules at the interface and (iv) local viscosity. Therefore, in this study, we present the result of our investigations using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with continuum-based energy equations and check the validity and limitations of the continuum hypothesis. Our study shows that when the continuum description is subjected to the proper treatment of the interface effects via modified boundary conditions, the so-called continuum-based modified-analytical solutions, they can adequately predict nanoscale fluid transport phenomena. The findings in this work have broad effects in overcoming current limitations in modeling/predicting the fluid behaviors of molecular fluidic devices.

  6. Transport Phenomena of Water in Molecular Fluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Truong Quoc; Kim, Bohung

    2016-09-01

    In molecular-level fluidic transport, where the discrete characteristics of a molecular system are not negligible (in contrast to a continuum description), the response of the molecular water system might still be similar to the continuum description if the time and ensemble averages satisfy the ergodic hypothesis and the scale of the average is enough to recover the classical thermodynamic properties. However, even in such cases, the continuum description breaks down on the material interfaces. In short, molecular-level liquid flows exhibit substantially different physics from classical fluid transport theories because of (i) the interface/surface force field, (ii) thermal/velocity slip, (iii) the discreteness of fluid molecules at the interface and (iv) local viscosity. Therefore, in this study, we present the result of our investigations using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with continuum-based energy equations and check the validity and limitations of the continuum hypothesis. Our study shows that when the continuum description is subjected to the proper treatment of the interface effects via modified boundary conditions, the so-called continuum-based modified-analytical solutions, they can adequately predict nanoscale fluid transport phenomena. The findings in this work have broad effects in overcoming current limitations in modeling/predicting the fluid behaviors of molecular fluidic devices.

  7. Variable recruitment fluidic artificial muscles: modeling and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Matthew; Meller, Michael A.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2014-07-01

    We investigate taking advantage of the lightweight, compliant nature of fluidic artificial muscles to create variable recruitment actuators in the form of artificial muscle bundles. Several actuator elements at different diameter scales are packaged to act as a single actuator device. The actuator elements of the bundle can be connected to the fluidic control circuit so that different groups of actuator elements, much like individual muscle fibers, can be activated independently depending on the required force output and motion. This novel actuation concept allows us to save energy by effectively impedance matching the active size of the actuators on the fly based on the instantaneous required load. This design also allows a single bundled actuator to operate in substantially different force regimes, which could be valuable for robots that need to perform a wide variety of tasks and interact safely with humans. This paper proposes, models and analyzes the actuation efficiency of this actuator concept. The analysis shows that variable recruitment operation can create an actuator that reduces throttling valve losses to operate more efficiently over a broader range of its force-strain operating space. We also present preliminary results of the design, fabrication and experimental characterization of three such bioinspired variable recruitment actuator prototypes.

  8. Multijunction Capillary Isoelectric Focusing Device Combined with Online Membrane-Assisted Buffer Exchanger Enables Isoelectric Point Fractionation of Intact Human Plasma Proteins for Biomarker Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirmoradian, Mohammad; Astorga-Wells, Juan; Zubarev, Roman A

    2015-12-01

    Prefractionation of proteins is often employed to improve analysis specificity in proteomics. Prefractionation based on the isoelectric point (pI) is particularly attractive because pI is a well-defined parameter and it is orthogonal to hydrophobicity on which reversed-phase chromatography is based. However, direct capillary electrophoresis of blood proteins is challenging due to its high content of salts and charged small molecules. Here, we couple an online desalinator device to our multijunction capillary isoelectric focusing (MJ-CIEF) instrument and perform direct isoelectric separation of human blood plasma. In a proof-of-principle experiment, pooled samples of patients with progressive mild cognitive impairment and corresponding healthy controls were investigated. Injection of 3 μL of plasma containing over 100 μg of proteins into the desalinator was followed by pI fractionation with MJ-CIEF in less than 1 h. Shotgun proteomics of 12 collected fractions from each of the 5 replicates of pooled samples resulted in the identification and accurate quantification (median CV between the replicates is <4%) of nearly 365 protein groups from 4030 unique peptides (with <1% FDR for both peptides and proteins). The obtained results include several proteins previously reported as AD markers. The isoelectric point of each quantified protein was calculated using a set of 7 synthetic peptides spiked into the samples. Several proteins with a significant pI shift between their isoforms in the patient and control samples were identified. The presented method is straightforward, robust, and scalable; therefore, it can be used in both biological and clinical applications.

  9. Design and testing of micro fluidic chemical analysis chip integrated with micro valveless pump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU; Xin; XIE; Haibo; YANG; Huayong; JIA; Zhijian; FANG; Qun

    2005-01-01

    A new structure and working principle of the chip integrated with micro valveless pump for capillary electrophoresis was proposed in this paper. The micro valveless pump with plane structure has advantages of simple structure, and the process technology is compatible with existing micro chips for capillary electrophoresis. Based upon the mathematical model, simulation study of micro pump was carried out to investigate the influence of structural parameters on flow characteristics, and the performance of the integrated micro pump was also tested with different control parameters. The simulation results agree with the experimental results. Three samples, which are amino acid, fluorescein and buffer solution, have been examined with this chip. The results of the primary experiments showed that the micro valveless pump was promising in the integration and automatization of miniature integrated fluidic systems.

  10. Identification of inorganic improvised explosive devices by analysis of postblast residues using portable capillary electrophoresis instrumentation and indirect photometric detection with a light-emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Joseph P; Evenhuis, Christopher J; Johns, Cameron; Kazarian, Artaches A; Breadmore, Michael C; Macka, Miroslav; Hilder, Emily F; Guijt, Rosanne M; Dicinoski, Greg W; Haddad, Paul R

    2007-09-15

    A commercial portable capillary electrophoresis (CE) instrument has been used to separate inorganic anions and cations found in postblast residues from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) of the type used frequently in terrorism attacks. The purpose of this analysis was to identify the type of explosive used. The CE instrument was modified for use with an in-house miniaturized light-emitting diode (LED) detector to enable sensitive indirect photometric detection to be employed for the detection of 15 anions (acetate, benzoate, carbonate, chlorate, chloride, chlorite, cyanate, fluoride, nitrate, nitrite, perchlorate, phosphate, sulfate, thiocyanate, thiosulfate) and 12 cations (ammonium, monomethylammonium, ethylammonium, potassium, sodium, barium, strontium, magnesium, manganese, calcium, zinc, lead) as the target analytes. These ions are known to be present in postblast residues from inorganic IEDs constructed from ammonium nitrate/fuel oil mixtures, black powder, and chlorate/perchlorate/sugar mixtures. For the analysis of cations, a blue LED (470 nm) was used in conjunction with the highly absorbing cationic dye, chrysoidine (absorption maximum at 453 nm). A nonaqueous background electrolyte comprising 10 mM chrysoidine in methanol was found to give greatly improved baseline stability in comparison to aqueous electrolytes due to the increased solubility of chrysoidine and its decreased adsorption onto the capillary wall. Glacial acetic acid (0.7% v/v) was added to ensure chrysoidine was protonated and to enhance separation selectivity by means of complexation with transition metal ions. The 12 target cations were separated in less than 9.5 min with detection limits of 0.11-2.30 mg/L (calculated at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The anions separation system utilized a UV LED (370 nm) in conjunction with an aqueous chromate electrolyte (absorption maximum at 371 nm) consisting of 10 mM chromium(VI) oxide and 10 mM sodium chromate, buffered with 40 mM tris

  11. Investigation of the dye concentration influence on the lasing wavelength and threshold for a micro-fluidic dye laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Bjarne; Kragh, Søren; Kjeldsen, B.G.;

    2003-01-01

    We investigate a micro-fluidic dye laser, which can be integrated with polymer-based lab-on-a-chip microsystems without further processing steps. A simple rate-equation model is used to predict the lasing threshold. The laser device is characterised using the laser dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved...

  12. The laboratory stand for didactic and research of a Fluidic Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zub

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this work was to design and build a laboratory stand dedicated for didactic and research purposes connected with a Fluidic Muscle. The stand is placed at the Electropneumatic and PLC controllers Laboratory [10,11,12] of the Institute of Engineering Processes Automation and Integrated Manufacturing Systems of the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering of the Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland.Design/methodology/approach: The stand was designed and visualised by utilisation of professional CAD software – CATIA and a fluidic muscle was chosen according to a MuscleSIM programme of FESTO company.Findings: The device integrates the elements which are indispensable determinant of contemporary industry and the main aim of its construction was to bring closer conceptions and ideas connected with the construction and the outworking of the fluidic muscle, problems of proportional pressure control, visualisation and control of the industrial processes as well as making possible of carrying out the investigations and experiments on these elements.Research limitations/implications: The module structure of the research stand gives possibility to make its further development by adding extra modules that can be easily mounted on plates, which will make possible the implementation of series of individual positions controlled by one PLC. Thanks to the applied system of visualisation, switching among synoptic screens is possible. The visualisation represents every separate module of the stand and so, with the help of one operator position, gives possibility to control every chosen module of the whole device.Originality/value: The mechatronic didactic and research device introduced in the paper represents the new approach to the problem of visualisation and control of the fluidic muscle and constitutes the perfect tool of the aided didactic process in the Institute’s laboratory

  13. Interaction of turbulence with flexible beams in fluidic energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh Yazdi, Amir Hossein

    Advances in the development and fabrication of microelectronics have enhanced the energy efficiency of these devices to such an extent that they can now operate at very low power levels, typically on the order of a few microwatts or less. Batteries are primarily thought of as the most convenient source of power for electronic devices, but in instances where a device needs to be deployed in a difficult-to-access location such as under water, the added weight and especially maintenance of such a power source becomes costly. A solution that avoids this problem and is particularly attractive in a "deploy & forget" setting involves designing a device that continuously harvests energy from the surrounding environment. Piezoelectric energy harvesters, which employ the direct piezoelectric effect to convert mechanical strain into electrical energy, have garnered a great deal of attention in the literature. This work presents an overview of the experimental and analytical results related to fluidic energy extraction from vortex and turbulent flow using piezoelectric cantilever beams. In particular, the development of the FTGF (Fourier Transform-Green's Function) solution approach to the coupled, continuous electromechanical equations governing piezoelectric cantilever beams and the associated TFB (Train of Frozen Boxcars) method, which models the flow of vortices and turbulent eddies over the beams, is discussed. In addition, the behavior of fluidic energy harvesters in decaying isotropic, homogeneous grid turbulence generated by passive, semi-passive and active grids is examined and a novel grid-turbulence forcing model is introduced. An expression for the expected power output of the piezoelectric beam is obtained by utilizing this forcing function model in the single degree-of-freedom electromechanical equations. Furthermore, approximate, closed-form solutions to the theoretical expected power are derived from deterministic turbulence forcing models and are compared with

  14. 水射流无损插桩专用机具射流装置设计%Design of the Dedicated Machine Fluidic Device Used for Water Jet Pitching of Pile Without Damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴林峰; 蔡长治; 耿淼蕊

    2014-01-01

    Accordinf to the desifn requirements of Jet equipment used for repeatable assemblinf diversion dike,the Jet device was desifned. This device consisted of thirteen nozzles and Jet board,which could be connected by bolts and prepared concrete pipes. The nozzles contained five straifht nozzles and eifht oblique nozzles,and the exit diameter of nozzle was 16 mm,the lenfth to diameter ratio was 4 and the entrance anfle was 20 defrees. Besides,the thickness of the Jet board was 30 mm and the material chose Q235A. The application results show that it really has an ap-propriately desifn and hifh efficiency of drivinf piles.%根据重复组装式导流桩坝专用射流机具的要求,对其射流装置进行了设计。该射流装置由13个喷嘴和射流板通过螺栓与混凝土预制管桩组成,其中5个直喷嘴、8个斜喷嘴,喷嘴出口直径为16 mm、长径比为4、入口角取20°;射流板厚30 mm,材料为Q235A。应用结果表明:该射流装置设计合理,插桩效率较高。

  15. A universal label-free biosensing platform based on opto-fluidic ring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; White, Ian M.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Gohring, John; Fan, Xudong

    2009-02-01

    Rapid and accurate detection of biomolecules is important for medical diagnosis, pharmaceuticals, homeland security, food quality control, and environmental protection. A simple, low cost and highly sensitive label-free optical biosensor based on opto-fluidic ring resonator (OFRR) has been developed that naturally integrates microfluidics with ring resonators. The OFRR employs a piece of fused silica capillary with a diameter around 100 micrometers. The circular cross section of the capillary forms the ring resonator and light repeatedly travels along the resonator circumference in the form of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) through total internal reflection. When the capillary wall is as thin as a couple of micrometers (detect the target molecules with high specificity, the OFRR inner surface is functionalized with receptors, such as antibodies, peptide-displayed bacteriophage or oligonucleotide DNA probes. The WGM spectral position shifts when biomolecules bind to the OFRR inner surface and change the local refractive index, which provides quantitative and kinetic information about the biomolecule interaction near the OFRR inner surface. The OFRR has been successfully demonstrated for detection of various types of biomoelcuels. Here, we will first introduce the basic operation principle of the OFRR as a sensor and then application examples of the OFRR in the detection of proteins, disease biomarkers, virus, DNA molecules, and cells with high sensitivities will be presented.

  16. A universal label-free biosensing platform based on opto-fluidic ring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; White, Ian M.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Gohring, John; Fan, Xudong

    2009-02-01

    Rapid and accurate detection of biomolecules is important for medical diagnosis, pharmaceuticals, homeland security, food quality control, and environmental protection. A simple, low cost and highly sensitive label-free optical biosensor based on opto-fluidic ring resonator (OFRR) has been developed that naturally integrates microfluidics with ring resonators. The OFRR employs a piece of fused silica capillary with a diameter around 100 micrometers. The circular cross section of the capillary forms the ring resonator and light repeatedly travels along the resonator circumference in the form of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) through total internal reflection. When the capillary wall is as thin as a couple of micrometers (interacts with the sample when it flows through the OFRR. In order to detect the target molecules with high specificity, the OFRR inner surface is functionalized with receptors, such as antibodies, peptide-displayed bacteriophage or oligonucleotide DNA probes. The WGM spectral position shifts when biomolecules bind to the OFRR inner surface and change the local refractive index, which provides quantitative and kinetic information about the biomolecule interaction near the OFRR inner surface. The OFRR has been successfully demonstrated for detection of various types of biomoelcuels. Here, we will first introduce the basic operation principle of the OFRR as a sensor and then application examples of the OFRR in the detection of proteins, disease biomarkers, virus, DNA molecules, and cells with high sensitivities will be presented.

  17. Improving acoustic streaming effects in fluidic systems by matching SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarino, S O; Minas, G; Miranda, J M

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the use of acoustic waves for promoting and improving streaming in tridimensional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cuvettes of 15mm width×14mm height×2.5mm thickness. The acoustic waves are generated by a 28μm thick poly(vinylidene fluoride) - PVDF - piezoelectric transducer in its β phase, actuated at its resonance frequency: 40MHz. The acoustic transmission properties of two materials - SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - were numerically compared. It was concluded that PDMS inhibits, while SU-8 allows, the transmission of the acoustic waves to the propagation medium. Therefore, by simulating the acoustic transmission properties of different materials, it is possible to preview the acoustic behavior in the fluidic system, which allows the optimization of the best layout design, saving costs and time. This work also presents a comparison between numerical and experimental results of acoustic streaming obtained with that β-PVDF transducer in the movement and in the formation of fluid recirculation in tridimensional closed domains. Differences between the numerical and experimental results are credited to the high sensitivity of acoustic streaming to the experimental conditions and to limitations of the numerical method. The reported study contributes for the improvement of simulation models that can be extremely useful for predicting the acoustic effects of new materials in fluidic devices, as well as for optimizing the transducers and matching layers positioning in a fluidic structure.

  18. Improving acoustic streaming effects in fluidic systems by matching SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarino, S O; Minas, G; Miranda, J M

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the use of acoustic waves for promoting and improving streaming in tridimensional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cuvettes of 15mm width×14mm height×2.5mm thickness. The acoustic waves are generated by a 28μm thick poly(vinylidene fluoride) - PVDF - piezoelectric transducer in its β phase, actuated at its resonance frequency: 40MHz. The acoustic transmission properties of two materials - SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - were numerically compared. It was concluded that PDMS inhibits, while SU-8 allows, the transmission of the acoustic waves to the propagation medium. Therefore, by simulating the acoustic transmission properties of different materials, it is possible to preview the acoustic behavior in the fluidic system, which allows the optimization of the best layout design, saving costs and time. This work also presents a comparison between numerical and experimental results of acoustic streaming obtained with that β-PVDF transducer in the movement and in the formation of fluid recirculation in tridimensional closed domains. Differences between the numerical and experimental results are credited to the high sensitivity of acoustic streaming to the experimental conditions and to limitations of the numerical method. The reported study contributes for the improvement of simulation models that can be extremely useful for predicting the acoustic effects of new materials in fluidic devices, as well as for optimizing the transducers and matching layers positioning in a fluidic structure. PMID:27044029

  19. Stability of flowing open fluidic channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue Nee Tan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Open fluidic systems have a distinct advantage over enclosed channels in that the fluids exposed nature makes for easy external interaction, this finds uses in introduction of samples by adding liquid droplets or from the surrounding gaseous medium. This work investigates flowing open channels and films, which can potentially make use of the open section of the system as an external interface, before bringing the sample into an enclosed channel. Clearly, in this scenario a key factor is the stability of the flowing open fluid. The open channels investigated include a straight open channel defined by a narrow strip of solid surface, the edges of which allow large contact angle hysteresis, and a wider structure allowing for multiple inputs and outputs. A model is developed for fluid flow, and the findings used to describe the process of failure in both cases.

  20. Fluidic Oscillator Having Decoupled Frequency and Amplitude Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koklu, Mehti (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A fluidic oscillator having independent frequency and amplitude control includes a fluidic-oscillator main flow channel having a main flow inlet, a main flow outlet, and first and second control ports disposed at opposing sides thereof. A fluidic-oscillator controller has an inlet and outlet. A volume defined by the main flow channel is greater than the volume defined by the controller. A flow diverter coupled to the outlet of the controller defines a first fluid flow path from the controller's outlet to the first control port and defines a second fluid flow path from the controller's outlet to the second control port.

  1. Compact Fluidic Actuator Arrays for Flow Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the proposed research is to design, develop and demonstrate fluidic actuator arrays for aerodynamic separation control and drag reduction....

  2. Compact Fluidic Actuator Arrays For Flow Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the proposed research is to design, develop and demonstrate fluidic actuator arrays for aerodynamic separation control and drag reduction....

  3. Electronics plus fluidics for V/STOL flight control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The redundant digital fly by wire flight control system coupled with a fluidic system, which uses hydraulic pressure as its signal transmission means to provide pilot and feedback sensor control of airframe forcing functions is considered for application to the V/STOL aircraft. A potential fluidics system is introduced, and anticipated performance, weight, and reliability is discussed. Integration with the redundant electronic channels is explored, with the safety and mission reliability of alternate configurations estimated.

  4. A Coupled Cavity Micro Fluidic Dye Ring Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Gersborg-Hansen, M; Mortensen, N A; Kristensen, A

    2004-01-01

    We present a laterally emitting, coupled cavity micro fluidic dye ring laser, suitable for integration into lab-on-a-chip micro systems. The micro-fluidic laser has been successfully designed, fabricated, characterized and modelled. The resonator is formed by a micro-fluidic channel bounded by two isosceles triangle mirrors. The micro-fluidic laser structure is defined using photo lithography in 10 microns thick SU-8 polymer on a glass substrate. The micro fluidic channel is sealed by a glass lid, using PMMA adhesive bonding. The laser is characterized using the laser dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol or ethylene glycol as the active gain medium, which is pumped through the micro-fluidic channel and laser resonator. The dye laser is optically pumped normal to the chip plane at 532 nm by a pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser and lasing is observed with a threshold pump pulse energy flux of around 55 micro-Joule/square-milimeter. The lasing is multi-mode, and the laser has switchable output coupling into...

  5. Tubular astigmatism-tunable fluidic lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Daniel; Zappe, Hans

    2016-06-15

    We demonstrate a new means to fabricate three-dimensional liquid lenses which may be tuned in focal length and astigmatism. Using actuation by electrowetting-on-dielectrics, astigmatism in arbitrary directions may be tuned independently, with almost no cross talk between orthogonal orientations. The lens is based on electrodes structured on planar polyimide foils and subsequently rolled, enabling high-resolution patterning of complex electrodes along the azimuthal and radial directions of the lens. Based on a design established through fluidic and optical simulations, the astigmatism tuning is experimentally verified by a change of the corresponding Zernike coefficients measured using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. It was seen that the back focal length can be tuned by 5 mm and 0° and 45° astigmatism by 3 μm through application of voltages in the range of 50  Vrms. It was observed that the cross talk with other aberrations is very low, suggesting a novel means for astigmatism control in imaging systems.

  6. Tubular astigmatism-tunable fluidic lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Daniel; Zappe, Hans

    2016-06-15

    We demonstrate a new means to fabricate three-dimensional liquid lenses which may be tuned in focal length and astigmatism. Using actuation by electrowetting-on-dielectrics, astigmatism in arbitrary directions may be tuned independently, with almost no cross talk between orthogonal orientations. The lens is based on electrodes structured on planar polyimide foils and subsequently rolled, enabling high-resolution patterning of complex electrodes along the azimuthal and radial directions of the lens. Based on a design established through fluidic and optical simulations, the astigmatism tuning is experimentally verified by a change of the corresponding Zernike coefficients measured using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. It was seen that the back focal length can be tuned by 5 mm and 0° and 45° astigmatism by 3 μm through application of voltages in the range of 50  Vrms. It was observed that the cross talk with other aberrations is very low, suggesting a novel means for astigmatism control in imaging systems. PMID:27304276

  7. Fluidic energy harvesting beams in grid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh-Yazdi, A. H.; Goushcha, O.; Elvin, N.; Andreopoulos, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Much of the recent research involving fluidic energy harvesters based on piezoelectricity has focused on excitation through vortex-induced vibration while turbulence-induced excitation has attracted very little attention, and virtually no previous work exists on excitation due to grid-generated turbulence. The present experiments involve placing several piezoelectric cantilever beams of various dimensions and properties in flows where turbulence is generated by passive, active, or semi-passive grids, the latter having a novel design that significantly improves turbulence generation compared to the passive grid and is much less complex than the active grid. We experimentally show for the first time that the average power harvested by a piezoelectric cantilever beam placed in decaying isotropic, homogeneous turbulence depends on mean velocity, velocity and length scales of turbulence as well as the electromechanical properties of the beam. The output power can be modeled as a power law with respect to the distance of the beam from the grid. Furthermore, we show that the rate of decay of this power law closely follows the rate of decay of the turbulent kinetic energy. We also introduce a forcing function used to model approximately the turbulent eddies moving over the cantilever beam and observe that the feedback from the beam motion onto the flow is virtually negligible for most of the cases considered, indicating an effectively one-way interaction for small-velocity fluctuations.

  8. Capillary detectors for high resolution tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Annis, P

    1997-01-01

    We present a new tracking device based on glass capillary bundles or layers filled with highly purified liquid scintillator and read out at one end by means of image intensifiers and CCD devices. A large-volume prototype consisting of 5 × 105 capillaries with a diameter of 20 μm and a length of 180 cm and read out by a megapixel CCD has been tested with muon and neutrino beams at CERN. With this prototype a two track resolution of 33 μm was achieved with passing through muons. Images of neutrino interactions in a capillary bundle have also been acquired and analysed. Read-out chains based on Electron Bombarded CCD (EBCCD) and image pipeline devices are also investigated. Preliminary results obtained with a capillary bundle read out by an EBCCD are presented.

  9. Laser-based capillary polarimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, K; Hankins, J; Bornhop, D J

    1999-01-01

    A laser-based capillary polarimeter has been configured to allow for the detection of optically active molecules in capillary tubes with a characteristic inner diameter of 250 microm and a 39-nL (10(-9)) sample volume. The simple optical configuration consists of a HeNe laser, polarizing optic, fused-silica capillary, and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera in communication with a laser beam analyzer. The capillary scale polarimeter is based on the interaction between a polarized laser beam and a capillary tube, which results in a 360 degree fan of scattered light. This array of scattered light contains a set of interference fringe, which respond in a reproducible manner to changes in solute optical activity. The polarimetric utility of the instrument will be demonstrated by the analysis of two optically active solutes, R-mandelic acid and D-glucose, in addition to the nonoptically active control, glycerol. The polarimetric response of the system is quantifiable with detection limits facilitating 1.7 x 10(-3) M or 68 x 10(-12) nmol (7 psi 10(-9) g) sensitivity. PMID:11315158

  10. Experimental and analytical investigation of a fluidic power generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarohia, V.; Bernal, L.; Beauchamp, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation was performed to understand the various fluid processes associated with the conversion of flow energy into electric power in a fluidic generator. Experiments were performed under flight-simulated laboratory conditions and results were compared with those obtained in the free-flight conditions. It is concluded that the mean mass flow critically controlled the output of the fluidic generator. Cross-correlation of the outputs of transducer data indicate the presence of a standing wave in the tube; the mechanism of oscillation is an acoustic resonance tube phenomenon. A linearized model was constructed coupling the flow behavior of the jet, the jet-layer, the tube, the cavity, and the holes of the fluidic generator. The analytical results also show that the mode of the fluidic power generator is an acoustical resonance phenomenon with the frequency of operation given by f approx = a/4L, where f is the frequency of jet swallowing, a is the average speed of sound in the tube, and L is the length of the tube. Analytical results further indicated that oscillations in the fluidic generator are always damped and consequently there is a forcing of the system in operation.

  11. Viscosity measurement in the capillary tube viscometer under unsteady flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present study is to develop a new device that the viscous characteristics of fluids are determined by applying the unsteady flow concept to the traditional capillary tube viscometer. The capillary tube viscometer consists of a small cylindrical reservoir, capillary tube, a load cell system that measures the mass flow rate, interfaces, and computer. Due to the small size of the reservoir the height of liquid in the reservoir decreases as soon as the liquid in the reservoir drains out through the capillary and the mass flow rate in the capillary decreases as the hydrostatic pressure in the reservoir decreases resulting in a decrease of the shear rate in the capillary tube. The instantaneous shear rate and driving force in the capillary tube are determined by measuring the mass flow rate through the capillary, and the fluid viscosity is determined from the measured flow rate and the driving force

  12. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benner, W. Henry; Dzenitis, John M.; Bennet, William J.; Baker, Brian R.

    2014-08-19

    Herein provided are fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis. The fluidics platform is capable of analyzing DNA from blood samples using amplification assays such as polymerase-chain-reaction assays and loop-mediated-isothermal-amplification assays. The fluidics platform can also be used for other types of assays and analyzes. In some embodiments, a sample in a sealed tube can be inserted directly. The following isolation, detection, and analyzes can be performed without a user's intervention. The disclosed platform may also comprises a sample preparation system with a magnetic actuator, a heater, and an air-drying mechanism, and fluid manipulation processes for extraction, washing, elution, assay assembly, assay detection, and cleaning after reactions and between samples.

  13. Fabrication of resonant micro cantilevers with integrated transparent fluidic channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Faheem; Schmid, Silvan; Davis, Zachary James;

    2011-01-01

    be visually observed through the transparent fluidic channel. The resonant frequency of the cantilever is changed by the fluid inside the channel, due to the change in mass. The shift in the resonant frequency can be translated into a density of the fluid or into the presence of macro/micro molecules......Microfabricated cantilevers are proving their potential as excellent tools for analysis applications. In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication and testing of resonant micro cantilevers with integrated transparent fluidic channels. The cantilevers have been devised to measure the density...

  14. Fluidic Self-Assembly Using Molten Ga Bumps and Its Application to Resonant Tunneling Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Jun; Shibata, Tomoaki; Morita, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Mori, Masayuki; Maezawa, Koichi

    2013-11-01

    Fluidic self-assembly (FSA) using molten metal bumps is one of the most promising heterogeneous integration (HI) technologies, which enable us to integrate devices made of various materials on various substrates. We can fabricate the metal bumps using Ga having diameters of 24, 18, 12, and 8 µm with good yield. Using Ga has significant advantages; especially, it includes no toxic metals. These bumps were used for the FSA process of the metal dummy blocks having a diameter of 18 µm, and a good yield of 84% was obtained all over the substrate of about 1×1 cm2. Finally, we applied this method to the resonant tunneling diode (RTD) to verify good electrical, mechanical, and thermal contacts. The RTD device blocks having a diameter of 24 µm have been successfully assembled using the molten Ga bumps. This method is promising for high-performance RTD integration.

  15. Silicon micro-fluidic cooling for NA62 GTK pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Romagnoli, G; Brunel, B; Catinaccio, A; Degrange, J; Mapelli, A; Morel, M; Noel, J; Petagna, P

    2015-01-01

    Silicon micro-channel cooling is being studied for efficient thermal management in application fields such as high power computing and 3D electronic integration. This concept has been introduced in 2010 for the thermal management of silicon pixel detectors in high energy physics experiments. Combining the versatility of standard micro-fabrication processes with the high thermal efficiency typical of micro-fluidics, it is possible to produce effective thermal management devices that are well adapted to different detector configurations. The production of very thin cooling devices in silicon enables a minimization of material of the tracking sensors and eliminates mechanical stresses due to the mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion between detectors and cooling systems. The NA62 experiment at CERN will be the first high particle physics experiment that will install a micro-cooling system to perform the thermal management of the three detection planes of its Gigatracker pixel detector.

  16. Design and simulation of bio fluidic sensor based on photonic crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini Gaddam Kesava Reddy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystals are materials patterned with a periodicity in dielectric constant in one, two and three dimensions and associated with Bragg scattering which can create range of forbidden frequencies called Photonic Band Gap (PBG. By optimizing various parameters and creating defects, we will review the design and characterization of waveguides, optical cavities and multi-fluidic channel devices. We have used such waveguides and laser nanocavities as Biosensor, in which field intensity is strongly dependent on the type of biofliud and its refractive index. This design and simulation technique leads to development of a nanophotonic sensor for detection of biofluids.  In this paper, we have simulated sensing of biofliud in various photonic defect structures with the help of a numerical algorithm called Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD method. The simulation result shows the high sensitivity for the change in the bio-molecular structure. For developing the complete sensor system, we have to use the MEMS technologies to integrate on-chip fluidic transport components with sensing systems. The resulting biofluidic system will have the capability to continuously monitor the concentration of a large number of relevant biological molecules continuously from ambulatory patients.   Keywords: FDTD, Photonic Crystals, Bio fluid Sensor, Optical Cavity.

  17. Proton beam writing of long, arbitrary structures for micro/nano photonics and fluidics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udalagama, Chammika, E-mail: chammika@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Teo, E.J. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Chan, S.F. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); NUS Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 (Singapore); Department of Chemistry, NUS, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 (Singapore); Kumar, V.S.; Bettiol, A.A.; Watt, F. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2011-10-15

    The last decade has seen proton beam writing maturing into a versatile lithographic technique able to produce sub-100 nm, high aspect ratio structures with smooth side walls. However, many applications in the fields of photonics and fluidics require the fabrication of structures with high spatial resolution that extends over several centimetres. This cannot be achieved by purely magnetic or electrostatic beam scanning due to the large off-axis beam aberrations in high demagnification systems. As a result, this has limited us to producing long straight structures using a combination of beam and stage scanning. In this work we have: (1) developed an algorithm to include any arbitrary pattern into the writing process by using a more versatile combination of beam and stage scanning while (2) incorporating the use of the ubiquitous AutoCAD DXF (drawing exchange format) into the design process. We demonstrate the capability of this approach in fabricating structures such as Y-splitters, Mach-Zehnder modulators and microfluidic channels that are over several centimetres in length, in polymer. We also present optimisation of such parameters as scanning speed and scanning loops to improve on the surface roughness of the structures. This work opens up new possibilities of using CAD software in PBW for microphotonics and fluidics device fabrication.

  18. A microscope automated fluidic system to study bacterial processes in real time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Ducret

    Full Text Available Most time lapse microscopy experiments studying bacterial processes ie growth, progression through the cell cycle and motility have been performed on thin nutrient agar pads. An important limitation of this approach is that dynamic perturbations of the experimental conditions cannot be easily performed. In eukaryotic cell biology, fluidic approaches have been largely used to study the impact of rapid environmental perturbations on live cells and in real time. However, all these approaches are not easily applicable to bacterial cells because the substrata are in all cases specific and also because microfluidics nanotechnology requires a complex lithography for the study of micrometer sized bacterial cells. In fact, in many cases agar is the experimental solid substratum on which bacteria can move or even grow. For these reasons, we designed a novel hybrid micro fluidic device that combines a thin agar pad and a custom flow chamber. By studying several examples, we show that this system allows real time analysis of a broad array of biological processes such as growth, development and motility. Thus, the flow chamber system will be an essential tool to study any process that take place on an agar surface at the single cell level.

  19. Proton beam writing of long, arbitrary structures for micro/nano photonics and fluidics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udalagama, Chammika; Teo, E. J.; Chan, S. F.; Kumar, V. S.; Bettiol, A. A.; Watt, F.

    2011-10-01

    The last decade has seen proton beam writing maturing into a versatile lithographic technique able to produce sub-100 nm, high aspect ratio structures with smooth side walls. However, many applications in the fields of photonics and fluidics require the fabrication of structures with high spatial resolution that extends over several centimetres. This cannot be achieved by purely magnetic or electrostatic beam scanning due to the large off-axis beam aberrations in high demagnification systems. As a result, this has limited us to producing long straight structures using a combination of beam and stage scanning. In this work we have: (1) developed an algorithm to include any arbitrary pattern into the writing process by using a more versatile combination of beam and stage scanning while (2) incorporating the use of the ubiquitous AutoCAD DXF (drawing exchange format) into the design process. We demonstrate the capability of this approach in fabricating structures such as Y-splitters, Mach-Zehnder modulators and microfluidic channels that are over several centimetres in length, in polymer. We also present optimisation of such parameters as scanning speed and scanning loops to improve on the surface roughness of the structures. This work opens up new possibilities of using CAD software in PBW for microphotonics and fluidics device fabrication.

  20. Automated micro fluidic system for PCR applications in the monitoring of drinking water quality; Aplicacion de sistemas bionaliticos integrados sobre plataformas de microfluidica en el control de la calidad microbiologica del agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria Soria, E.; Yanez Amoros, A.; Murtula Corbi, R.; Catalan Cuenca, V.; Martin-Cisneros, C. S.; Ymbern, O.; Alonso-Chamorro, J.

    2009-07-01

    Microbiological laboratories present a growing interest in automated, simple and user-friendly methodologies able to perform simultaneous analysis of a high amount of samples. Analytical tools based on micro-fluidic could play an important role in this field. In this work, the development of an automated micro fluidic system for PCR applications and aimed to monitoring of drinking water quality is presented. The device will be able to determine, simultaneously, fecal pollution indicators and water-transmitted pathogens. Further-more, complemented with DNA pre-concentration and extraction modules, the device would present a highly integrated solution for microbiological diagnostic laboratories. (Author) 13 refs.

  1. Characteristics and fluidic properties of porous monoliths prepared by radiation-induced polymerization for Lab-on-a-Chip applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porous polymer monoliths were prepared by UV- or EB-induced polymerization of hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) as network precursors dissolved in porogenic solvent mixtures composed of methanol and n-hexane. The fluidic properties and the pressure resistance of porous monoliths synthesized into 1 mm i.d. capillaries and in 100 μm-wide microchannels were investigated. The influence of photopolymerization time (or electron beam dose) and monomer content on flow properties is discussed on the basis of morphological features. The two types of radiation can be used to achieve the in situ fabrication of monolith inside microsystems. The permeability of the porous monoliths can be adjusted by tuning compositional and processing parameters

  2. Multichannel microchip electrophoresis device fabricated in polycarbonate with an integrated contact conductivity sensor array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadpour, Hamed; Hupert, Mateusz L; Patterson, Donald; Liu, Changgeng; Galloway, Michelle; Stryjewski, Wieslaw; Goettert, Jost; Soper, Steven A

    2007-02-01

    A 16-channel microfluidic chip with an integrated contact conductivity sensor array is presented. The microfluidic network consisted of 16 separation channels that were hot-embossed into polycarbonate (PC) using a high-precision micromilled metal master. All channels were 40 microm deep and 60 microm wide with an effective separation length of 40 mm. A gold (Au) sensor array was lithographically patterned onto a PC cover plate and assembled to the fluidic chip via thermal bonding in such a way that a pair of Au microelectrodes (60 microm wide with a 5 microm spacing) was incorporated into each of the 16 channels and served as independent contact conductivity detectors. The spacing between the corresponding fluidic reservoirs for each separation channel was set to 9 mm, which allowed for loading samples and buffers to all 40 reservoirs situated on the microchip in only five pipetting steps using an 8-channel pipettor. A printed circuit board (PCB) with platinum (Pt) wires was used to distribute the electrophoresis high-voltage to all reservoirs situated on the fluidic chip. Another PCB was used for collecting the conductivity signals from the patterned Au microelectrodes. The device performance was evaluated using microchip capillary zone electrophoresis (mu-CZE) of amino acid, peptide, and protein mixtures as well as oligonucleotides that were separated via microchip capillary electrochromatography (mu-CEC). The separations were performed with an electric field (E) of 90 V/cm and were completed in less than 4 min in all cases. The conductivity detection was carried out using a bipolar pulse voltage waveform with a pulse amplitude of +/-0.6 V and a frequency of 6.0 kHz. The conductivity sensor array concentration limit of detection (SNR = 3) was determined to be 7.1 microM for alanine. The separation efficiency was found to be 6.4 x 10(4), 2.0 x 10(3), 4.8 x 10(3), and 3.4 x 10(2) plates for the mu-CEC of the oligonucleotides and mu-CZE of the amino acids, peptides

  3. An all-glass 12 μm ultra-thin and flexible micro-fluidic chip fabricated by femtosecond laser processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalikun, Yaxiaer; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Iino, Takanori; Tanaka, Yo

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated and established a method, using femtosecond laser processing, to fabricate a 100%-glass-based 12 μm ultra-thin and flexible micro-fluidic chip. First we investigated the suitable pulse energy of the laser to fabricate ultra-thin glass sheets and then we fabricated a prototype glass micro-fluidic chip. Two 1 mm-in-diameter orifices for facilitating alignment in the bonding step and one channel with a width of 20 μm and a length of 25 mm were fabricated in a 4 μm thickness ultra-thin glass sheet using the femtosecond laser; this forms layer 2 in the completed device. Next, the glass sheet with the channel was sandwiched between another glass sheet having an inlet hole and an outlet hole (layer 1) and a base glass sheet (layer 3); the three sheets were bonded to each other, resulting in a flexible, 100%-glass micro-fluidic chip with a thickness of approximately 12 μm and a weight of 3.6 mg. The basic function of the glass micro-fluidic chip was confirmed by flowing 1 and 2 μm in-diameter bead particles through the channel. The fabrication method clearly scales down the thickness limitation of flexible glass devices and offers a possible element technology for fabricating ultra-thin glass devices that can be applied to convection-enhanced delivery, implantable medical devices, wearable devices, and high-resolution imaging of small biological objects such as bacteria and proteins in the channel. PMID:27225521

  4. Compound-fluidic electrospray:An efficient method for the fabrication of microcapsules with multicompartment structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN HongYan; ZHAO Yong; JIANG Lei

    2009-01-01

    Microcapsules with multiple compartments are of significant importance in many applications such as smart drug delivery,microreactor,complicated sensor,end so on. Here we report a novel compound-fluidic electrospray method that could fabricate multicompartment microcapsules in a single step. The as-prepared microcapsules have multiple compartments inside. The compartments are separated from each other by inner walls made from shell materials,and different content can be independently loaded in each of them without any contact. We assemble a hierarchical compound nozzle by inserting certain numbers of metallic inner capillaries separately into a blunt metal needle. The particular configuration of the compound nozzle induces a completely and independently envelope of core fluids by shell fluid,as a result of which mulicomponent microcapsules with multicompartment structure can be obtained. And also,the number of inner compartments and the corresponding encapsulated components can be controlled by rationally designing the configuration of the compound nozzle.This general method can be readily extended to many other functional materials,especially for the effective encapsulation of active ingredients,such as sensitive and reactive materials.

  5. Modeling and bonding-free fabrication of flexible fluidic microactuators with a bending motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorissen, Benjamin; Vincentie, Wannes; Al-Bender, Farid; Reynaerts, Dominiek; De Volder, Michaël

    2013-04-01

    Flexible fluidic actuators recently attracted the interest of the microsystem community, especially for soft robotic applications including minimally invasive surgery. These actuators, based on a well-known actuator design where a void is surrounded by an asymmetric elastic structure, can achieve large bending strokes when pressurized. Miniaturized versions of these actuators typically fail due to poor bonding of constituting components, and further, there is little theoretical understanding of these devices. This paper presents a new actuator design which does not require any bonding and provides new insights into the modeling of these actuators. The newly developed production process of the actuators is based on out-of-plane high aspect ratio micromolding, which enables high-throughput bonding-free fabrication. Furthermore, a mathematical model based on Euler-Bernoulli's beam equation with a deformable cross section is developed that shows good agreement with validation experiments on prototypes. These theoretical insights greatly facilitate the design and optimization of flexible bending actuators.

  6. The precise self-assembly of individual carbon nanotubes using magnetic capturing and fluidic alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Joon S; Rust, Michael J; Do, Jaephil; Ahn, Chong H [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microsystems and BioMEMS Laboratory, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Yun, Yeo-Heung; Schulz, Mark J [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cincinnati, 45221 (United States); Shanov, Vesselin, E-mail: chong.ahn@uc.ed [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Cincinnati, 45221 (United States)

    2009-08-12

    A new method for the self-assembly of a carbon nanotube (CNT) using magnetic capturing and fluidic alignment has been developed and characterized in this work. In this new method, the residual iron (Fe) catalyst positioned at one end of the CNT was utilized as a self-assembly driver to attract and position the CNT, while the assembled CNT was aligned by the shear force induced from the fluid flow through the assembly channel. The self-assembly procedures were successfully developed and the electrical properties of the assembled multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) were fully characterized. The new assembly method developed in this work shows its feasibility for the precise self-assembly of parallel CNTs for electronic devices and nanobiosensors.

  7. Soft x-ray amplification in an ablative capillary discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soft x-ray amplification in CVI 18.2 nm line is observed in an ablative UHMW-PE capillary discharge. The gain coefficient is measured to be 1.9 cm-1. The electron density is about 2 x 1019 cm-3. This indicates that capillary discharge pumping device can be a source for a compact soft x-ray laser. (author)

  8. Development of a continuous-flow fluidic pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of a fluidic pump which utilizes gas pistons, a venturi-like reverse-flow-diverter, and a planar Y-type flow junction to produce a continuous flow of liquid from a system containing no moving parts. The study included an evaluation of the system performance and of methods for controlling the stability of the fluidic system. A mathematical model of the system was developed for steady-state operation using accepted theories of fluid mechanics. Although more elaborate models are needed for detailed design and optimization of specific systems, the model determined some of the main factors controlling the system performance and will be used in the development of more accurate models. 49 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs

  9. Venturi-type fluidic sampler for liquid-solid mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong Xu; Binbin Liu

    2012-01-01

    Static-type samplers are required for sampling corrosive,toxic,high-temperature,or radioactive liquid-solid fluids.We have designed a compact reverse flow diverter pumping system for transferring liquid-solid mixtures.In accordance with the Venturi principle,an acceptable volume of liquid-solid fluid is automatically collected into a sampling bottle.The effects of sampling needle sizes,sectional area of the T-section,solid concentration,and liquid viscosity on the performance of fluidic samplers were experimentally investigated.The sample volume increased upon the reduction of the sampling needle length and the increase of the sectional area of the T-section,but decreased with the increase of solid concentration and liquid viscosity.Unbiased samples of acceptable volume were produced by the proposed fluidic sampler,even at 10.21 mPa s liquid viscosity,35 wt% solid concentration,and 6.74 m sampling height.

  10. Fluidic Oscillator Array for Synchronized Oscillating Jet Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koklu, Mehti (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A fluidic oscillator array includes a plurality of fluidic-oscillator main flow channels. Each main flow channel has an inlet and an outlet. Each main flow channel has first and second control ports disposed at opposing sides thereof, and has a first and a second feedback ports disposed at opposing sides thereof. The feedback ports are located downstream of the control ports with respect to a direction of a fluid flow through the main flow channel. The system also includes a first fluid accumulator in fluid communication with each first control port and each first feedback port, and a second fluid accumulator in fluid communication with each second control port and each second feedback port.

  11. pH-Sensitive Hydrogel for Micro-Fluidic Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengzhi Yang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The deformation behavior of a pH-sensitive hydrogel micro-fluidic valve system is investigated using inhomogeneous gel deformation theory, in which the fluid-structure interaction (FSI of the gel solid and fluid flow in the pipe is considered. We use a finite element method with a well adopted hydrogel constitutive equation, which is coded in commercial software, ABAQUS, to simulate the hydrogel valve swelling deformation, while FLUENT is adopted to model the fluid flow in the pipe of the hydrogel valve system. The study demonstrates that FSI significantly affects the gel swelling deformed shapes, fluid flow pressure and velocity patterns. FSI has to be considered in the study on fluid flow regulated by hydrogel microfluidic valve. The study provides a more accurate and adoptable model for future design of new pH-sensitive hydrogel valves, and also gives a useful guideline for further studies on hydrogel fluidic applications.

  12. Understanding thermo-fluidic characteristics of a glass tube closed loop pulsating heat pipe: flow patterns and fluid oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, V. K.; Ramachandran, K.; Pillai, B. C.; Brusly Solomon, A.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental program has been carried out to understand the thermo-fluidic characterization of deionized (DI) water charged closed loop pulsating heat pipe (CLPHP) with flow patterns and fluid oscillations. The CLPHP is examined under vertical and horizontal heating modes with varying heat power. The flow patterns along with fluid oscillations are correlated with thermal performance of the CLPHP. Further, the CLPHP with copper oxide nanofluid study is carried out to understand operational behavior of the device. Fast Fourier frequencies, average frequency of the internal fluid temperature are investigated. Several important features of CLPHP operation are identified by the visual study.

  13. Micro-fluidic flow cells for studies of electrochemical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ingdal, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Micro fluidic flow cells (MFFCs) are a relatively new technique for characterization of electrochemical reactions. This work includes both techniques for manufacturing the cells and electrochemical characterization of them.Improvements to a previously established procedure for the manufacturing MFFCs included change of template for PDMS-masters from glass slides to silicon wafers and the change from electrodes consisting of titanium gold and platinum to only titanium and platinum. The changes...

  14. Intramedullary capillary haemangioma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, T

    2012-02-03

    Intramedullary capillary haemangioma is extremely rare and only four cases have been previously reported. We describe a further case, outlining the clinical, radiological, surgical and pathological features.

  15. High Performance Wafer-Based Capillary Electrochromatography Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop wafer-based capillary electrochromatography for lab-on-a-chip (LOC) applications. These microfluidic devices will be...

  16. An axial approach to detection in capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    Our approach involves on-axis illumination of the compounds inside the capillary detection region and is applied to absorbance and fluorescence detection. Absorbance measurements were made by focussing an incident laser beam into one capillary end; by using signals collected over the entire length of analyte band, this enhances the analytical path length of conventional absorbance detection 60x. This instrument offers a 15x improvement in detection limits. Three fluorescence detection experiments are discussed, all of which involve insertion of an optical fiber into capillary. The first uses a high refractive index liquid phase to obtain total internal reflectance along capillary axis, this reducing light scatter. The second uses a charge-coupled device camera for simultaneous imaging of a capillary array (this may be useful in genome sequencing, etc.). The third is a study of fluid motion inside the capillary under pressure-driven and electroosmotic flow. The thesis is divided into four parts. Figs, tabs.

  17. Integrated hybrid polystyrene-polydimethylsiloxane device for monitoring cellular release with microchip electrophoresis and electrochemical detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alicia S.; Mehl, Benjamin T.; Martin, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a polystyrene (PS)-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) hybrid device was developed to enable the integration of cell culture with analysis by microchip electrophoresis and electrochemical detection. It is shown that this approach combines the fundamental advantages of PDMS devices (the ability to integrate pumps and valves) and PS devices (the ability to permanently embed fluidic tubing and electrodes). The embedded fused-silica capillary enables high temporal resolution measurements from off-chip cell culture dishes and the embedded electrodes provide close to real-time analysis of small molecule neurotransmitters. A novel surface treatment for improved (reversible) adhesion between PS and PDMS is described using a chlorotrimethylsilane stamping method. It is demonstrated that a Pd decoupler is efficient at handling the high current (and cathodic hydrogen production) resulting from use of high ionic strength buffers needed for cellular analysis; thus allowing an electrophoretic separation and in-channel detection. The separation of norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) in highly conductive biological buffers was optimized using a mixed surfactant system. This PS-PDMS hybrid device integrates multiple processes including continuous sampling from a cell culture dish, on-chip pump and valving technologies, microchip electrophoresis, and electrochemical detection to monitor neurotransmitter release from PC 12 cells. PMID:25663849

  18. Dielectric elastomer strain and pressure sensing enable reactive soft fluidic muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Sheng Q.

    2016-04-01

    Wearable assistive devices are the future of rehabilitation therapy and bionic limb technologies. Traditional electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators can provide the precise and powerful around-the-clock assistance that therapists cannot deliver. However, they do so in the confines of highly controlled factory environments, resulting in actuators too rigid, heavy, and immobile for wearable applications. In contrast, biological skeletal muscles have been designed and proven in the uncertainty of the real world. Bioinspired artificial muscle actuators aim to mimic the soft, slim, and self-sensing abilities of natural muscle that make them tough and intelligent. Fluidic artificial muscles are a promising wearable assistive actuation candidate, sharing the high-force, inherent compliance of their natural counterparts. Until now, they have not been able to self-sense their length, pressure, and force in an entirely soft and flexible system. Their use of rigid components has previously been a requirement for the generation of large forces, but reduces their reliability and compromises their ability to be comfortably worn. We present the unobtrusive integration of dielectric elastomer (DE) strain and pressure sensors into a soft Peano fluidic muscle, a planar alternative to the relatively bulky McKibben muscle. Characterization of these DE sensors shows they can measure the full operating range of the Peano muscle: strains of around 18% and pressures up to 400 kPa with changes in capacitance of 2.4 and 10.5 pF respectively. This is a step towards proprioceptive artificial muscles, paving the way for wearable actuation that can truly feel its environment.

  19. pH-Sensitive Hydrogel for Micro-Fluidic Valve

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengzhi Yang; Haiyan Miao; Zhiwei Ding; Somsak Swaddiwudhipong; Yan Zhang; Zishun Liu

    2012-01-01

    The deformation behavior of a pH-sensitive hydrogel micro-fluidic valve system is investigated using inhomogeneous gel deformation theory, in which the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of the gel solid and fluid flow in the pipe is considered. We use a finite element method with a well adopted hydrogel constitutive equation, which is coded in commercial software, ABAQUS, to simulate the hydrogel valve swelling deformation, while FLUENT is adopted to model the fluid flow in the pipe of the hy...

  20. Fluidic vortices generated from optical vortices in a microdroplet cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Bar-David, Daniel; Martin, Leoplodo L; Carmon, Tal

    2016-01-01

    We harness the momentum of light resonating inside a micro-droplet cavity, to experimentally generate micro-flows within the envelope of the drop. We 3D map these optically induced flows by using fluorescent nanoparticles; which reveals circular micro-streams. The flows are parametrically studied and, as expected, exhibit an increase of rotation speed with optical power. The flow is non-circular only when we intentionally break the axial symmetry of the droplet. Besides the fundamental interest in light-flow interactions including in opto-fluidic cavities, the optically controlled flows can serve in bringing analytes into the maximum-power region of the microcavity.

  1. Fluidic Force Discrimination Assays: A New Technology for Tetrodotoxin Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cy R. Tamanaha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxin (TTX is a low molecular weight (~319 Da neurotoxin found in a number of animal species, including pufferfish. Protection from toxin tainted food stuffs requires rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnostic tests. An emerging technique for the detection of both proteins and nucleic acids is Fluidic Force Discrimination (FFD assays. This simple and rapid method typically uses a sandwich immunoassay format labeled with micrometer-diameter beads and has the novel capability of removing nonspecifically attached beads under controlled, fluidic conditions. This technique allows for near real-time, multiplexed analysis at levels of detection that exceed many of the conventional transduction methods (e.g., ELISAs. In addition, the large linear dynamic range afforded by FFD should decrease the need to perform multiple sample dilutions, a common challenge for food testing. By applying FFD assays to an inhibition immunoassay platform specific for TTX and transduction via low magnification microscopy, levels of detection of ~15 ng/mL and linear dynamic ranges of 4 to 5 orders of magnitude were achieved. The results from these studies on the first small molecule FFD assay, along with the impact to detection of seafood toxins, will be discussed in this manuscript.

  2. Capillary saturation and desaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfer, R; Armstrong, R T; Berg, S; Georgiadis, A; Ott, H

    2015-12-01

    Capillary desaturation experiments produce disconnected (trapped) ganglia of mesoscopic sizes intermediate between pore size and system size. Experimental evidence for interactions between these mesoscale clusters during desaturation is analyzed and discussed within the established microscopic and macroscopic laws of Newton, Young-Laplace, and Darcy. A theoretical expression for capillary number correlations is introduced that seems to have remained unnoticed. It expresses capillary desaturation curves in terms of stationary capillary pressures and relative permeabilities. The theoretical expression shows that the plateau saturation in capillary desaturation curves may in general differ from the residual nonwetting saturation defined through the saturation limit of the main hysteresis loop. Hysteresis effects as well as the difference between wetting and nonwetting fluids are introduced into the analysis of capillary desaturation experiments. The article examines experiments with different desaturation protocols and discusses the existence of a mesoscopic length scale intermediate between pore scale and sample scale. The theoretical expression is derived entirely within the existing traditional theory of two-phase flow in porous media and compared to a recent experiment. PMID:26764820

  3. Cryogenic Capillary Screen Heat Entrapment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshinskiy, L.G.; Hastings, L.J.; Stathman, G.

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic liquid acquisition devices (LADs) for space-based propulsion interface directly with the feed system, which can be a significant heat leak source. Further, the accumulation of thermal energy within LAD channels can lead to the loss of sub-cooled propellant conditions and result in feed system cavitation during propellant outflow. Therefore, the fundamental question addressed by this program was: "To what degree is natural convection in a cryogenic liquid constrained by the capillary screen meshes envisioned for LADs.?"Testing was first conducted with water as the test fluid, followed by LN2 tests. In either case, the basic experimental approach was to heat the bottom of a cylindrical column of test fluid to establish stratification patterns measured by temperature sensors located above and below a horizontal screen barrier position. Experimentation was performed without barriers, with screens, and with a solid barrier. The two screen meshes tested were those typically used by LAD designers, "200x1400" and "325x2300", both with Twill Dutch Weave. Upon consideration of both the water and LN2 data it was concluded that heat transfer across the screen meshes was dependent upon barrier thermal conductivity and that the capillary screen meshes were impervious to natural convection currents.

  4. Modeling Microscopic Chemical Sensors in Capillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Hogg, Tad

    2008-01-01

    Nanotechnology-based microscopic robots could provide accurate in vivo measurement of chemicals in the bloodstream for detailed biological research and as an aid to medical treatment. Quantitative performance estimates of such devices require models of how chemicals in the blood diffuse to the devices. This paper models microscopic robots and red blood cells (erythrocytes) in capillaries using realistic distorted cell shapes. The models evaluate two sensing scenarios: robots moving with the cells past a chemical source on the vessel wall, and robots attached to the wall for longer-term chemical monitoring. Using axial symmetric geometry with realistic flow speeds and diffusion coefficients, we compare detection performance with a simpler model that does not include the cells. The average chemical absorption is quantitatively similar in both models, indicating the simpler model is an adequate design guide to sensor performance in capillaries. However, determining the variation in forces and absorption as cells...

  5. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration — Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment.

  6. Analysis of cantilever NEMS in centrifugal-fluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen-Nia, Mohsen; Abadian, Fateme; Abadian, Naeime; Dehkordi, Keivan Mosaiebi; Keivani, Maryam; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2016-07-01

    Electromechanical nanocantilevers are promising for using as sensors/detectors in centrifugal-fluidic systems. For this application, the presence of angular speed and electrolyte environment should be considered in the theoretical analysis. Herein, the pull-in instability of the nanocantilever incorporating the effects of angular velocity and liquid media is investigated using a size-dependent continuum theory. Using d’Alembert principle, the angular speed is transformed into an equivalent centrifugal force. The electrochemical and dispersion forces are incorporated considering the corrections due to the presence of electrolyte media. Two different approaches, i.e., the Rayleigh-Ritz method (RRM) and proposing a lumped parameter model (LPM), were applied to analyze the system. The models are validated with the results presented in literature. Impacts of the angular velocity, electrolyte media, dispersion forces, and size effect on the instability characteristics of the nanocantilever are discussed.

  7. Shape memory alloy microvalves for a fluidic control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megnin, Christof; Kohl, Manfred

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and performance of shape memory alloy (SMA) microvalves with a novel plug-in interface that enable arbitrary combinations and interchange of individual valve components in order to realize customized fluidic control systems. Actuation of the valves relies on a micromachined SMA foil, which is prestrained in order to adjust for a given flow, and pressure requirement. A demonstrator system is presented consisting of up to nine microvalves, flow channels and control electronics arranged in different functional layers that are stacked onto each other. The microvalves are designed for flow rates of 12.5 ml min-1 (water) in open state at a pressure difference of 200 kPa. Flow regulation is tested in closed-loop control mode using a flow sensor with a short time constant. The accuracy of flow control is in the order of 1.5%. The response times are below 24 ms.

  8. Fluidic Control of Aerodynamic Forces on an Axisymmetric Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Philip; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2007-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a wind tunnel model of an axisymmetric bluff body are modified by induced local vectoring of the separated base flow. Control is effected by an array of four integrated aft-facing synthetic jets that emanate from narrow, azimuthally-segmented slots, equally distributed around the perimeter of the circular tail end within a small backward facing step that extends into a Coanda surface. The model is suspended in the wind tunnel by eight thin wires for minimal support interference with the wake. Fluidic actuation results in a localized, segmented vectoring of the separated base flow along the rear Coanda surface and induces asymmetric aerodynamic forces and moments to effect maneuvering during flight. The aerodynamic effects associated with quasi-steady and transitory differential, asymmetric activation of the Coanda effect are characterized using direct force and PIV measurements.

  9. Quantum dot conjugates in a sub-micrometer fluidic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavis, Samuel M.; Edel, Joshua B.; Samiee, Kevan T.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2010-04-13

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  10. Thin-walled compliant plastic structures for mesoscale fluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R.; Schumann, Daniel L.

    1999-06-01

    Thin-walled, compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems were fabricated, tested and used to demonstrate valving, pumping, metering and mixing. These structures permit the isolation of actuators and sensors form the working fluid, thereby reducing chemical compatibility issues. The thin-walled, compliant plastic structures can be used in either a permanent, reusable system or as an inexpensive disposable for single-use assay systems. The implementation of valving, pumping, mixing and metering operations involve only an elastic change in the mechanical shape of various portions of the structure. Advantages provided by the thin-walled plastic structures include reduced dead volume and rapid mixing. Five different methods for fabricating the thin-walled plastic structures discussed including laser welding, molding, vacuum forming, thermal heat staking and photolithographic patterning techniques.

  11. Computation of transient flow rates in passive pumping micro-fluidic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, I-Jane; Eckstein, Eugene C.; Lindner, Ernő

    2008-01-01

    Motion in micro-channels of passive flow micro-fluidic systems can be controlled by proper design and estimated by careful modeling. We report on methods to describe the flow rate as function of time in a passive pump driven micro-fluidic systems. The model considers the surface energy present in small droplets, which prompts their shrinkage and induces flow. The droplet geometries are controlled by the micro-fluidic system geometry and hydrophilicity of the droplet channel contact area so th...

  12. How Capillary Rafts Sink

    CERN Document Server

    Protiere, S; Aristoff, J; Stone, H

    2010-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video showing how capillary rafts sink. Small objects trapped at an interface are very common in Nature (insects walking on water, ant rafts, bubbles or pollen at the water-air interface, membranes...) and are found in many multiphase industrial processes. Thanks to Archimedes principle we can easily predict whether an object sinks or floats. But what happens when several small particles are placed at an interface between two fluids. In this case surface tension also plays an important role. These particles self-assemble by capillarity and thus form what we call a "capillary raft". We show how such capillary rafts sink for varying sizes of particles and define how this parameter affects the sinking process.

  13. Derivatization in Capillary Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, M Luisa; Castro-Puyana, María

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis is a well-established separation technique in analytical research laboratories worldwide. Its interesting advantages make CE an efficient and potent alternative to other chromatographic techniques. However, it is also recognized that its main drawback is the relatively poor sensitivity when using optical detection. One way to overcome this limitation is to perform a derivatization reaction which is intended to provide the analyte more suitable analytical characteristics enabling a high sensitive detection. Based on the analytical step where the CE derivatization takes place, it can be classified as precapillary (before separation), in-capillary (during separation), or postcapillary (after separation). This chapter describes the application of four different derivatization protocols (in-capillary and precapillary modes) to carry out the achiral and chiral analysis of different compounds in food and biological samples with three different detection modes (UV, LIF, and MS). PMID:27645730

  14. Dual-wavelength optical fluidic glucose sensor using time series analysis of d(+)-glucose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing-Yau; Chen, Nan-Yueh; Chen, Ming-Kun; Wang, Min-Haw; Jang, Ling-Sheng

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a rising-edge time-series analysis (TSA) method that can be applied to a dual-wavelength optical fluidic glucose sensor (DWOFGS). In the experiment, the concentration of glucose in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was determined by measuring the absorbance of the solution as determined by variation in the rising edge of the photodiode (PD) voltage response waveform. The DWOFGS principle is based on near-infrared (NIR) absorption spectroscopy at selected dual wavelengths (1450 and 1650 nm) in the first overtone band. The DWOFGS comprises two light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and two PD detectors. No additional fibers or lenses are required in our device. The output light level of the LEDs is adjusted to a light intensity suitable to the glucose absorption rate in an electronic circuit. Four light absorbance paths enable detection of d(+)-glucose concentrations from 0 to 20 wt % in steps of 5 wt %. The glucose light absorbance process was calculated based on the rising edge of the PD waveform under a low-intensity light source using TSA. The TSA method can be used to obtain the glucose level in PBS and reduce measurement background noise. The application of the rising-edge TSA method improves sensor sensitivity, increases the accuracy of the data analysis, and lowers measurement equipment costs.

  15. Improved micromachined column design and fluidic interconnects for programmed high-temperature gas chromatography separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddes, David; Westland, Jessica; Dorman, Frank L; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2014-07-01

    This work focuses on the development and experimental evaluation of micromachined chromatographic columns for use in a commercial gas chromatography (GC) system. A vespel/graphite ferrule based compression sealing technique is presented using which leak-proof fluidic interconnection between the inlet tubing and the microchannel was achieved. This sealing technique enabled separation at temperatures up to 350°C on a μGC column. This paper reports the first high-temperature separations in microfabricated chromatographic columns at these temperatures. A 2m microfabricated column using a double Archimedean spiral design with a square cross-section of 100μm×100μm has been developed using silicon microfabrication techniques. The microfabricated column was benchmarked against a 2m 100μm diameter commercial column and the performance between the two columns was evaluated in tests performed under identical conditions. High temperature separations of simulated distillation (ASTM2887) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (EPA8310) were performed using the μGC column in temperature programmed mode. The demonstrated μGC column along with the high temperature fixture offers one more solution toward potentially realizing a portable μGC device for the detection of semi-volatile environmental pollutants and explosives without the thermal limitations reported to date with μGC columns using epoxy based interconnect technology.

  16. LES-based characterization of a suction and oscillatory blowing fluidic actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeonglae; Moin, Parviz

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a novel fluidic actuator using steady suction and oscillatory blowing was developed for control of turbulent flows. The suction and oscillatory blowing (SaOB) actuator combines steady suction and pulsed oscillatory blowing into a single device. The actuation is based upon a self-sustained mechanism of confined jets and does not require any moving parts. The control output is determined by a pressure source and the geometric details, and no additional input is needed. While its basic mechanisms have been investigated to some extent, detailed characteristics of internal turbulent flows are not well understood. In this study, internal flows of the SaOB actuator are simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES). Flow characteristics within the actuator are described in detail for a better understanding of the physical mechanisms and improving the actuator design. LES predicts the self-sustained oscillations of the turbulent jet. Switching frequency, maximum velocity at the actuator outlets, and wall pressure distribution are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The computational results are used to develop simplified boundary conditions for numerical experiments of active flow control. Supported by the Boeing company.

  17. The time-resolved natural flow field of a fluidic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woszidlo, Rene; Ostermann, Florian; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2015-06-01

    The internal and external flow field of a fluidic oscillator with two feedback channels are examined experimentally within the incompressible flow regime. A scaled-up device with a square outlet nozzle is supplied with pressurized air and emits a spatially oscillating jet into quiescent environment. Time-resolved information are obtained by phase-averaging pressure and PIV data based on an internal reference signal. The temporal resolution is better than a phase angle of 3°. A detailed analysis of the internal dynamics reveals that the oscillation mechanism is based on fluid feeding into a separation bubble between the jet and mixing chamber wall which pushes the jet to the opposite side. The total volume of fluid transported through one feedback channel during one oscillation cycle matches the total growth of the separation bubble from its initial size to its maximum extent. Although the oscillation frequency increases linearly with supply rate, sudden changes in the internal dynamics are observed. These changes are caused by a growth in reversed flow through the feedback channels. The time-resolved properties of the emitted jet such as instantaneous jet width and exit velocity are found to oscillate substantially during one oscillation cycle. Furthermore, the results infer that the jet's oscillation pattern is approximately sinusoidal with comparable residence and switching times.

  18. Capillary permeability in adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paaske, W P; Nielsen, S L

    1976-01-01

    of about 7 ml/100 g-min. This corresponds to a capillary diffusion capacity of 2.0 ml/100 g-min which is half the value reported for vasodilated skeletal muscle having approximately twice as great capillary surface area. Thus, adipose tissue has about the same capillary permeability during slight metabolic...

  19. Capillary electrophoresis - electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in small diameter capillaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, J.H.; Goodlett, D.R.; Udseth, H.R.; Smith, R.D.

    1992-06-01

    Methods (such as small inner diameter capillaries) are being explored to increase analyte sensitivity in capillary electrophoresis- electrospray ionization/mass spectroscopy(CE-ESI/MS). Results are reported for melittin in a protein mixture, with 10 to 100 {mu}m ID capillaries; and for a mixture of aprotinin, cytochrome c, myoglobin, and carbonic anhydrase, with 5 to 50 {mu}m ID capillaries. It is shown that an increase in solute sensitivity occurs when small ID capillaries ({lt} 20 {mu}m) are used in CE-ESI/MS for both a peptide and a protein mixture. 3 figs. (DLC)

  20. Imbibition of ``Open Capillary'': Fundamentals and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Marie; Kawano, Ryuji; Kamiya, Koki; Okumura, Ko

    2015-11-01

    Control or transportation of small amount of liquid is one of the most important issues in various contexts including medical sciences or pharmaceutical industries to fuel delivery. We studied imbibition of ``open capillary'' both experimentally and theoretically, and found simple scaling laws for both statics and dynamics of the imbibition, similarly as that of imbibition of capillary tubes. Furthermore, we revealed the existence of ``precursor film,'' which developed ahead of the imbibing front, and the dynamics of it is described well by another scaling law for capillary rise in a corner. Then, to show capabilities of open capillaries, we demonstrated two experiments by fabricating micro mixing devices to achieve (1) simultaneous multi-color change of the Bromothymol blue (BTB) solution and (2) expression of the green florescent protein (GFP). This research was partly supported by ImPACT Program of Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (Cabinet Office, Government of Japan). M. T. is supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Research Fellowships for Young Scientists.

  1. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials. PMID:25646688

  2. Disposable micro-fluidic biosensor array for online parallelized cell adhesion kinetics analysis on quartz crystal resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cama, G.; Jacobs, T.; Dimaki, Maria;

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution we present a new disposable micro-fluidic biosensor array for the online analysis of adherent Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK-II) cells on quartz crystal resonators (QCRs). The device was conceived for the parallel cultivation of cells providing the same experimental conditions...... among all the sensors of the array. As well, dedicated sensor interface electronics were developed and optimized for fast spectra acquisition of all 16 QCRs with a miniaturized impedance analyzer. This allowed performing cell cultivation experiments for the observation of fast cellular reaction kinetics...... with focus on the comparison of the resulting sensor signals influenced by different cell distributions on the sensor surface. To prove the assumption of equal flow circulation within the symmetric micro-channel network and support the hypothesis of identical cultivation conditions for the cells living above...

  3. A comparative study of Raman enhancement in capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Fatemeh; Irizar, Juan; Hulbert, Laila; Helmy, Amr S.

    2011-06-01

    This work reports on the comparative studies of Raman enhancement in liquid core waveguides (LCWs). The theoretical considerations that describe Raman enhancement in LCWs is adapted to analyze and compare the performance of hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HCPCFs) to conventional Teflon capillary tubes. The optical losses in both platforms are measured and used to predict their performance for different lengths. The results show that for an optimal waveguide length, two orders of magnitude enhancement in the Raman signal can be achieved for aqueous solutions using HCPCFs. This length, however, cannot be achieved using normal capillary effects. By integrating the interface of the fluidic pump and the HCPCF into a microfluidic chip, we are able to control fluid transport and fill longer lengths of HCPCFs regardless of the viscosity of the sample. The long-term stability and reproducibility of Raman spectra attained through this platform are demonstrated for naphthalenethiol, which is a well-studied organic compound. Using the HCPCF platform, the detection limit of normal Raman scattering in the range of micro-molars has been achieved. In addition to the higher signal-to-noise ratio of the Raman signal from the HCPCF-platform, more Raman modes of naphthalenethiol are revealed using this platform.

  4. A novel highly flexible, simple, rapid and low-cost fabrication tool for paper-based microfluidic devices (μPADs) using technical drawing pens and in-house formulated aqueous inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuchtavorn, Nantana; Macka, Mirek

    2016-05-01

    Paper-based microfluidic devices (μPADs) are capable of achieving rapid quantitative measurements of a variety of analytes inexpensively. μPADs rely on patterning hydrophilic-hydrophobic regions on a sheet of paper in order to create capillary channels within impermeable fluidic brakes on the paper. Here, we present a novel, highly flexible and low-cost fabrication method using a desktop digital craft plotter/cutter and technical drawing pens with tip size of 0.5 mm. The pens were used with either commercial black permanent ink for drawing fluidic brakes, or with specialty in-house formulated aqueous inks. With the permanent marker ink it was possible to create barriers on paper rapidly and in a variety of designs in a highly flexible manner. For instance, a design featuring eight reservoirs can be produced within 10 s for each μPAD with a consistent line width of brakes (%RSD < 1.5). Further, we investigated the optimal viscosity range of in-house formulated inks controlled with additions of poly(ethylene glycol). The viscosity was measured by capillary electrophoresis and the optimal viscosity was in the range of ∼3-6 mPa s. A functional test of these μPADs was conducted by the screening of antioxidant activity. Colorimetric measurements of flavonoid, phenolic compounds and DPPH free radical scavenging activity were carried out on μPADs. The results can be detected by the naked eye and simply quantified by using a camera phone and image analysis software. The fabrication method using technical drawing pens provides flexibility in the use of in-house formulated inks, short fabrication time, simplicity and low cost. PMID:27086101

  5. Surface Tension Directed Fluidic Self-Assembly of Semiconductor Chips across Length Scales and Material Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantonu Biswas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This publication provides an overview and discusses some challenges of surface tension directed fluidic self-assembly of semiconductor chips which are transported in a liquid medium. The discussion is limited to surface tension directed self-assembly where the capture, alignment, and electrical connection process is driven by the surface free energy of molten solder bumps where the authors have made a contribution. The general context is to develop a massively parallel and scalable assembly process to overcome some of the limitations of current robotic pick and place and serial wire bonding concepts. The following parts will be discussed: (2 Single-step assembly of LED arrays containing a repetition of a single component type; (3 Multi-step assembly of more than one component type adding a sequence and geometrical shape confinement to the basic concept to build more complex structures; demonstrators contain (3.1 self-packaging surface mount devices, and (3.2 multi-chip assemblies with unique angular orientation. Subsequently, measures are discussed (4 to enable the assembly of microscopic chips (10 μm–1 mm; a different transport method is introduced; demonstrators include the assembly of photovoltaic modules containing microscopic silicon tiles. Finally, (5 the extension to enable large area assembly is presented; a first reel-to-reel assembly machine is realized; the machine is applied to the field of solid state lighting and the emerging field of stretchable electronics which requires the assembly and electrical connection of semiconductor devices over exceedingly large area substrates.

  6. Fluidic Control of Nozzle Flow: Some Performance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspiel, John; Bangert, Linda; Wing, David; Hawkes, Tim

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental program that investigated the use of a secondary air stream to control the amount of flow through a convergent-divergent nozzle. These static tests utilized high pressure, ambient temperature air that was injected at the throat of the nozzle through an annular slot. Multiple injection slot sizes and injection angles were tested. The introduction of secondary flow was made in an opposing direction to the primary flow and the resulting flow field caused the primary stream to react as though the physical throat size had been reduced. The percentage reduction in primary flow rate was generally about twice the injected flow rate. The most effective throttling was achieved by injecting through the smallest slot in an orientation most nearly opposed to the approaching primary flow. Thrust edliciency, as measured by changes in nozzle thrust coefficient, was highest at high nozzle pressure ratios, NPR. The static test results agreed with predictions obtained prior from PABSD, a fully viscous computational fluid dynamics program. Since use of such an injection system on gas turbine engine exhaust nozzles would be primarily at high NPRs, it was concluded that fluidic control holds promise for reducing nozzle weight and complexity on future systems.

  7. Experimental Observation of Bohr's Nonlinear Fluidic Surface Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Songky; Shin, Younghoon; Kwak, Hojeong; Yang, Juhee; Lee, Sang-Bum; Kim, Soyun; An, Kyungwon

    2016-01-01

    Niels Bohr in the early stage of his career developed a nonlinear theory of fluidic surface oscillation in order to study surface tension of liquids. His theory includes the nonlinear interaction between multipolar surface oscillation modes, surpassing the linear theory of Rayleigh and Lamb. It predicts a specific normalized magnitude of 0.416η(2) for an octapolar component, nonlinearly induced by a quadrupolar one with a magnitude of η much less than unity. No experimental confirmation on this prediction has been reported. Nonetheless, accurate determination of multipolar components is important as in optical fiber spinning, film blowing and recently in optofluidic microcavities for ray and wave chaos studies and photonics applications. Here, we report experimental verification of his theory. By using optical forward diffraction, we measured the cross-sectional boundary profiles at extreme positions of a surface-oscillating liquid column ejected from a deformed microscopic orifice. We obtained a coefficient of 0.42 ± 0.08 consistently under various experimental conditions. We also measured the resonance mode spectrum of a two-dimensional cavity formed by the cross-sectional segment of the liquid jet. The observed spectra agree well with wave calculations assuming a coefficient of 0.414 ± 0.011. Our measurements establish the first experimental observation of Bohr's hydrodynamic theory. PMID:26803911

  8. Fluidic actuators for active flow control on airframe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueller, M.; Weigel, P.; Lipowski, M.; Meyer, M.; Schlösser, P.; Bauer, M.

    2016-04-01

    One objective of the European Projects AFLoNext and Clean Sky 2 is to apply Active Flow Control (AFC) on the airframe in critical aerodynamic areas such as the engine/wing junction or the outer wing region for being able to locally improve the aerodynamics in certain flight conditions. At the engine/wing junction, AFC is applied to alleviate or even eliminate flow separation at low speeds and high angle of attacks likely to be associated with the integration of underwing- mounted Ultra High Bypass Ratio (UHBR) engines and the necessary slat-cut-outs. At the outer wing region, AFC can be used to allow more aggressive future wing designs with improved performance. A relevant part of the work on AFC concepts for airframe application is the development of suitable actuators. Fluidic Actuated Flow Control (FAFC) has been introduced as a Flow Control Technology that influences the boundary layer by actively blowing air through slots or holes out of the aircraft skin. FAFC actuators can be classified by their Net Mass Flux and accordingly divided into ZNMF (Zero Net Mass Flux) and NZNMF (Non Zero Net-Mass-Flux) actuators. In the frame of both projects, both types of the FAFC actuator concepts are addressed. In this paper, the objectives of AFC on the airframe is presented and the actuators that are used within the project are discussed.

  9. Experimental Observation of Bohr's Nonlinear Fluidic Surface Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Songky; Shin, Younghoon; Kwak, Hojeong; Yang, Juhee; Lee, Sang-Bum; Kim, Soyun; An, Kyungwon

    2016-01-25

    Niels Bohr in the early stage of his career developed a nonlinear theory of fluidic surface oscillation in order to study surface tension of liquids. His theory includes the nonlinear interaction between multipolar surface oscillation modes, surpassing the linear theory of Rayleigh and Lamb. It predicts a specific normalized magnitude of 0.416η(2) for an octapolar component, nonlinearly induced by a quadrupolar one with a magnitude of η much less than unity. No experimental confirmation on this prediction has been reported. Nonetheless, accurate determination of multipolar components is important as in optical fiber spinning, film blowing and recently in optofluidic microcavities for ray and wave chaos studies and photonics applications. Here, we report experimental verification of his theory. By using optical forward diffraction, we measured the cross-sectional boundary profiles at extreme positions of a surface-oscillating liquid column ejected from a deformed microscopic orifice. We obtained a coefficient of 0.42 ± 0.08 consistently under various experimental conditions. We also measured the resonance mode spectrum of a two-dimensional cavity formed by the cross-sectional segment of the liquid jet. The observed spectra agree well with wave calculations assuming a coefficient of 0.414 ± 0.011. Our measurements establish the first experimental observation of Bohr's hydrodynamic theory.

  10. Experimental Observation of Bohr’s Nonlinear Fluidic Surface Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Songky; Shin, Younghoon; Kwak, Hojeong; Yang, Juhee; Lee, Sang-Bum; Kim, Soyun; An, Kyungwon

    2016-01-01

    Niels Bohr in the early stage of his career developed a nonlinear theory of fluidic surface oscillation in order to study surface tension of liquids. His theory includes the nonlinear interaction between multipolar surface oscillation modes, surpassing the linear theory of Rayleigh and Lamb. It predicts a specific normalized magnitude of 0.416η2 for an octapolar component, nonlinearly induced by a quadrupolar one with a magnitude of η much less than unity. No experimental confirmation on this prediction has been reported. Nonetheless, accurate determination of multipolar components is important as in optical fiber spinning, film blowing and recently in optofluidic microcavities for ray and wave chaos studies and photonics applications. Here, we report experimental verification of his theory. By using optical forward diffraction, we measured the cross-sectional boundary profiles at extreme positions of a surface-oscillating liquid column ejected from a deformed microscopic orifice. We obtained a coefficient of 0.42 ± 0.08 consistently under various experimental conditions. We also measured the resonance mode spectrum of a two-dimensional cavity formed by the cross-sectional segment of the liquid jet. The observed spectra agree well with wave calculations assuming a coefficient of 0.414 ± 0.011. Our measurements establish the first experimental observation of Bohr’s hydrodynamic theory.

  11. due to Capillary Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassen M. Ouakad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present modeling and analysis for the static behavior and collapse instabilities of doubly-clamped and cantilever microbeams subjected to capillary forces. These forces can be as a result of a volume of liquid trapped underneath the microbeam during the rinsing and drying process in fabrication. The model considers the microbeam as a continuous medium, the capillary force as a nonlinear function of displacement, and accounts for the mid-plane stretching and geometric nonlinearities. The capillary force is assumed to be distributed over a specific length underneath the microbeam. The Galerkin procedure is used to derive a reduced-order model consisting of a set of nonlinear algebraic and differential equations that describe the microbeams static and dynamic behaviors. We study the collapse instability, which brings the microbeam from its unstuck configuration to touch the substrate and gets stuck in the so-called pinned configuration. We calculate the pull-in length that distinguishes the free from the pinned configurations as a function of the beam thickness and gap width for both microbeams. Comparisons are made with analytical results reported in the literature based on the Ritz method for linear and nonlinear beam models. The instability problem, which brings the microbeam from a pinned to adhered configuration is also investigated. For this case, we use a shooting technique to solve the boundary-value problem governing the deflection of the microbeams. The critical microbeam length for this second instability is also calculated.

  12. An integrated multiple capillary array electrophoresis system for high-throughput DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, X.

    1998-03-27

    A capillary array electrophoresis system was chosen to perform DNA sequencing because of several advantages such as rapid heat dissipation, multiplexing capabilities, gel matrix filling simplicity, and the mature nature of the associated manufacturing technologies. There are two major concerns for the multiple capillary systems. One concern is inter-capillary cross-talk, and the other concern is excitation and detection efficiency. Cross-talk is eliminated through proper optical coupling, good focusing and immersing capillary array into index matching fluid. A side-entry excitation scheme with orthogonal detection was established for large capillary array. Two 100 capillary array formats were used for DNA sequencing. One format is cylindrical capillary with 150 {micro}m o.d., 75 {micro}m i.d and the other format is square capillary with 300 {micro}m out edge and 75 {micro}m inner edge. This project is focused on the development of excitation and detection of DNA as well as performing DNA sequencing. The DNA injection schemes are discussed for the cases of single and bundled capillaries. An individual sampling device was designed. The base-calling was performed for a capillary from the capillary array with the accuracy of 98%.

  13. Microchip device for liquid phase analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, j.m.

    2000-05-01

    The lab-on-a-chip concept has enabled miniature instruments to be developed that allow the rapid execution and automation of fluidic operations such as valving, separation, dilution, mixing, and flow splitting upon the proper application of a motive (driving) force. The integration of these simple operations to perform complete, multiple-step chemical assays is rapidly becoming a reality. Such compact, monolithic devices potentially enjoy advantages in speed, cost, automation, reagent consumption, and waste generation compared to existing laboratory-scale instruments. Initial reports of these microfluidic devices focused on combining various electrokinetically driven separation methods including microchip electrophoresis, gel electrophoresis, micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) and open channel electrochromatography (OCEC) with fluidic valving to introduce sample plugs into the separation channel. Other operations have quickly been integrated with the separations and fluidic valving on these microchips. For example, integrated devices with mixers/diluters for precolumn and postcolumn analyte derivatization, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) restriction digests, enzyme assays, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification have been added to the basic design. Integrated mixers that can perform solvent programming for both MEKC and OCEC have also been demonstrated. These examples are simple, yet powerful, demonstrations of the potential for lab-on-a-chip devices. In this report, three key areas for improved performance of these devices are described: on-chip calibration techniques, enhanced separative performance, and enhanced detection capabilities.

  14. Bacterial adhesion force quantification by fluidic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2015-02-01

    Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many cells. The contact time and setpoint dependence of the adhesion forces of E. coli and Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as the sequential detachment of bacteria out of a chain, are shown, revealing distinct force patterns in the detachment curves. This study demonstrates the potential of the FluidFM technology for quantitative bacterial adhesion measurements of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions that are relevant in biofilms and infection biology.Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many

  15. A micro-fluidic study of whole blood behaviour on PMMA topographical nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsud Nataliya

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymers are attractive materials for both biomedical engineering and cardiovascular applications. Although nano-topography has been found to influence cell behaviour, no established method exists to understand and evaluate the effects of nano-topography on polymer-blood interaction. Results We optimized a micro-fluidic set-up to study the interaction of whole blood with nano-structured polymer surfaces under flow conditions. Micro-fluidic chips were coated with polymethylmethacrylate films and structured by polymer demixing. Surface feature size varied from 40 nm to 400 nm and feature height from 5 nm to 50 nm. Whole blood flow rate through the micro-fluidic channels, platelet adhesion and von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen adsorption onto the structured polymer films were investigated. Whole blood flow rate through the micro-fluidic channels was found to decrease with increasing average surface feature size. Adhesion and spreading of platelets from whole blood and von Willebrand factor adsorption from platelet poor plasma were enhanced on the structured surfaces with larger feature, while fibrinogen adsorption followed the opposite trend. Conclusion We investigated whole blood behaviour and plasma protein adsorption on nano-structured polymer materials under flow conditions using a micro-fluidic set-up. We speculate that surface nano-topography of polymer films influences primarily plasma protein adsorption, which results in the control of platelet adhesion and thrombus formation.

  16. Generation of emulsion droplets and micro-bubbles in microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jiaming

    2016-04-01

    Droplet-based microfluidic devices have become a preferred versatile platform for various fields in physics, chemistry and biology to manipulate small amounts of liquid samples. In addition to microdroplets, microbubbles are also needed for various pro- cesses in the food, healthcare and cosmetic industries. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, the mainstay for fabricating microfluidic devices, usually requires the usage of expensive apparatus and a complex manufacturing procedure. In ad- dition, current methods have the limited capabilities for fabrication of microfluidic devices within three dimensional (3D) structures. Novel methods for fabrication of droplet-based microfluidic devices for the generation microdroplets and microbubbles are therefore of great interest in current research. In this thesis, we have developed several simple, rapid and low-cost methods for fabrication of microfluidic devices, especially for generation of microdroplets and mi- crobubbles. We first report an inexpensive full-glass microfluidic devices with as- sembly of glass capillaries, for generating monodisperse multiple emulsions. Different types of devices have been designed and tested and the experimental results demon- strated the robust capability of preparing monodisperse single, double, triple and multi-component emulsions. Second, we propose a similar full-glass device for generation of microbubbles, but with assembly of a much smaller nozzle of a glass capillary. Highly monodisperse microbubbles with diameter range from 3.5 to 60 microns have been successfully produced, at rates up to 40 kHz. A simple scaling law based on the capillary number and liquid-to-gas flow rate ratio, successfully predicts the bubble size. Recently, the emergent 3D printing technology provides an attractive fabrication technique, due to its simplicity and low cost. A handful of studies have already demonstrated droplet production through 3D-printed microfluidic devices. However, two

  17. Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media: Predicting Its Dependence on Capillary Number and Viscosity Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferer, M. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Anna, Shelley L. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tortora, Paul [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kadambi, J. R. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Oliver, M. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Bromhal, Grant S. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Smith, Duane H. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the need to determine the dependencies of two-phase flow in a wide range of applications from carbon dioxide sequestration to enhanced oil recovery, we have developed a standard two-dimensional, pore-level model of immiscible drainage, incorporating viscous and capillary effects. This model has been validated through comparison with several experiments. For a range of stable viscosity ratios (M=μinjected,nwfdefending,wf ≥ 1), we had increased the capillary number, Nc and studied the way in which the flows deviate from fractal capillary fingering at a characteristic time and become compact for realistic capillary numbers. This crossover has enabled predictions for the dependence of the flow behavior upon capillary number and viscosity ratio. Our results for the crossover agreed with earlier theoretical predictions, including the universality of the leading power-law indicating its independence of details of the porous medium structure. In this article, we have observed a similar crossover from initial fractal viscous fingering (FVF) to compact flow, for large capillary numbers and unstable viscosity ratios M < 1. In this case, we increased the viscosity ratio from infinitesimal values, and studied the way in which the flows deviate from FVF at a characteristic time and become compact for non-zero viscosity ratios. This crossover has been studied using both our pore-level model and micro-fluidic flow-cell experiments. The same characteristic time, τ = 1/M0.7, satisfactorily describes both the pore-level results.

  18. Experimental investigation of the noise reduction of supersonic exhaust jets with fluidic inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Russell William Walter

    The noise produced by the supersonic, high temperature jets that exhaust from military aircraft is becoming a hazard to naval personnel and a disturbance to communities near military bases. Methods to reduce the noise produced from these jets in a practical full-scale environment are difficult. The development and analysis of distributed nozzle blowing for the reduction of radiated noise from supersonic jets is described. Model scale experiments of jets that simulate the exhaust jets from typical low-bypass ratio military jet aircraft engines during takeoff are performed. Fluidic inserts are created that use distributed blowing in the divergent section of the nozzle to simulate mechanical, hardwall corrugations, while having the advantage of being an active control method. This research focuses on model scale experiments to better understand the fluidic insert noise reduction method. Distributed blowing within the divergent section of the military-style convergent divergent nozzle alters the shock structure of the jet in addition to creating streamwise vorticity for the reduction of mixing noise. Enhancements to the fluidic insert design have been performed along with experiments over a large number of injection parameters and core jet conditions. Primarily military-style round nozzles have been used, with preliminary measurements of hardwall corrugations and fluidic inserts in rectangular nozzle geometries also performed. It has been shown that the noise reduction of the fluidic inserts is most heavily dependent upon the momentum flux ratio between the injector and core jet. Maximum reductions of approximately 5.5 dB OASPL have been observed with practical mass flow rates and injection pressures. The first measurements with fluidic inserts in the presence of a forward flight stream have been performed. Optimal noise reduction occurs at similar injector parameters in the presence of forward flight. Fluidic inserts in the presence of a forward flight stream were

  19. Tapered capillary optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    A metal or glass wire is etched with great precision into a very narrowly tapering cone which has the shape of the desired final capillary-optics bore. By controlling the rate of removal of the wire from an etchant bath, a carefully controlled taper is produced. A sensor measures the diameter of the wire as it leaves the surface of the etchant. This signal is used for feedback control of the withdrawal speed. The etched wire undergoes a treatment to produce an extremely low surface-roughness. The etched and smoothed wire is coated with the material of choice for optimizing the reflectivity of the radiation being focused. This could be a vacuum evaporation, sputtering, CVD or aqueous chemical process. The coated wire is either electroplated, built up with electroless plating, or encapsulated in a polymer cylinder such as epoxy to increase the diameter of the wire for easier handling and greater robustness. During this process, the wire is vertically oriented and tensioned to assure that the wire is absolutely straight. The coated and electroformed wire is bonded to a flat, rigid substrate and is then periodically segmented by cutting or etching a series of narrow slits or grooves into the wire. The wire is vertically oriented and tensioned during the bonding process to assure that it is straight. The original wire material is then chemically etched away through the slits or otherwise withdrawn to leave the hollow internal bore of the final tapered-capillary optical element.

  20. Open Tubular Microreactor with Enzyme Functionalized Micro- fluidic Channel for Amperometric Detection of Glucose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蕾; 曲平; 盛金; 雷建平; 鞠烷先

    2012-01-01

    A simple and efficient method using enzyme immobilized microfluidic channel as open tubular microreactor was designed for amperometric detection of glucose. The microreactor was composed of a polydimethylsilicone/ glass hybrid device with three reservoirs, a cooling cave and a 6 cm capillary with a sampling fracture as micro-channel. The microchannel was further modified by thermal polymerization, followed by covalently attaching with glucose oxidase. Through fracture sampling and electrochromatography separation, the production via enzymatic reaction was determinated by Pt electrode at the end of capillary. The linear range for the detection of glucose was 0.05--7.5 mmol·L-1 with detection limit of 23μmol.L-1 The inter-and intra-chip reproducibilities for determination of 2.5 mmol-L-1 glucose were 98.5% (n=5) and 96.0% (n=5), respectively. With the advantage of flexible assembly, rapid efficiency, good stability and low-cost, this microreactor provided a potential platform for estab- lishing a portable enzyme-based chemical detection system in practical application.

  1. Determining DfT Hardware by VHDL-AMS Fault Simulation for Biological Micro-Electronic Fluidic Arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoff, H.G.; Zhang, X.; Liu, H.; Richardson, A.; Nouet, P.; Azais, F.

    2005-01-01

    The interest of microelectronic fluidic arrays for biomedical applications, like DNA determination, is rapidly increasing. In order to evaluate these systems in terms of required Design-for-Test structures, fault simulations in both fluidic and electronic domains are necessary. VHDL-AMS can be used

  2. Capillary-driven flow in tub es connected to the containers under microgravity condition%微重力条件下与容器连通的毛细管中的毛细流动研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周宏伟; 王林伟; 徐升华; 孙祉伟

    2015-01-01

    theoretical model. Compared with the extensively studied system in which tubes are directly immersed into liquid, the container/tube system studied in this paper is more similar to many actual systems such as fluid transfer systems in the microgravity condition and in micro-fluidic devices. Therefore, this study is useful for predicting and analyzing the capillary flows of these actual systems.

  3. An Experimental Comparison of the Refrigerant Flow through Adiabatic and Non-Adiabatic Helical Capillary Tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Javidmand, Puya; Zareh, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Capillary tubes are used as refrigerant controlling devices, expansion devices and also as heart of a small vapor compression refrigeration cycle. It connects outlet condenser to the inlet evaporator and balances the refrigeration cycle pressure and controls the refrigerant mass flux. Capillary tubes are relatively cheap, resulting in extensive implementations in small household refrigerators and freezers with nearly constant refrigeration load. In general, the inner diameter and length of a ...

  4. Algebraic and numerical analysis of imaging properties of thin tunable-focus fluidic membrane lenses with parabolic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miks, Antonin; Novak, Jiri; Novak, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    The theory of third-order aberrations for a system of rotationally symmetric thin tunable-focus fluidic membrane lenses with parabolic surfaces is described. A complex analysis of the third-order design of tunable fluidic lenses is performed considering all types of primary aberrations. Moreover, formulas are derived for the calculation of the change of aberration coefficients of the parabolic tunable fluidic membrane lens with respect to the wavelength. It is shown that spherical aberration of a simple tunable-focus fluidic membrane lens with parabolic surfaces can be corrected, which is not possible with a classical spherical lens. The presented analysis is explained on examples. Derived formulas make possible to calculate parameters of optical systems with fluidic membrane lenses with small residual aberrations.

  5. Capillary optics for radiation focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peurrung, A.J.; Reeder, P.L.; Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Lepel, E.A.; Stromswold, D.C.; Stoffels, J.; Sunberg, D.S.; Tenny, H.

    1996-11-01

    Capillary lens technology may ultimately bring benefits to neutron and x-ray-based science like conventional lenses with visible light. Although the technology is not yet 10 years old, these lenses have already had a significant impact in engineering, science, and medicine. Capillary lenses are advantageous when it is desirable to increase the radiation flux at a location without regard to its angular divergence. PNNL has worked to improve the technology in several ways. A single, optimally tapered capillary was manufactured, which allows intensity gains of a factor of 270 for an initially parallel, incident x-ray beam. Feasibility of constructing neutron lenses using {sup 58}Ni (particularly effective at reflecting neutrons) has been explored. Three applications for capillary optics have been identified and studied: neutron telescope, Gandolphi x-ray diffractometry, and neutron radiotherapy. A brief guide is given for determining which potential applications are likely to be helped by capillary optics.

  6. Ion guiding in alumina capillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhász, Z.; Sulik, B.; Biri, S.;

    2009-01-01

    Transmission of a few keV impact energy Ne ions through capillaries in anodic alumina membranes has been studied with different ion counting methods using an energy dispersive electrostatic spectrometer, a multichannel plate (MCP) array and sensitive current-measurement. In the present work, we...... focus our attention to the measurements with the MCP array. The alumina capillaries were prepared by electro-chemical oxidation of aluminium foils. For the present experiments guiding of 3-6 keV Ne ions has been studied in two samples with capillary diameter of about 140 nm and 260 nm and with capillary...... length of about 15 μm. At these energies, the ions have been efficiently guided by the capillaries up to few degrees tilt angle. In this work, we compare the results obtained by the energy dispersive spectrometer to those studied by the MCP array. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  7. Biomedical applications of capillary electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartsova, L. A.; Bessonova, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    The review deals with modern analytical approaches used in capillary electrophoresis for solving medical and biological problems: search for biomarkers of various diseases and rapid diagnosis based on characteristic profiles of biologically active compounds by capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometric detection; monitoring of the residual drugs in biological fluids for evaluating the efficiency of drug therapy; testing of the enantiomeric purity of pharmaceutical products; the use of novel materials as components of stationary and pseudo-stationary phases in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography to increase the selectivity of separation of components of complex matrices; and identification of various on-line preconcentration techniques to reduce the detection limits of biologically active analytes. A topical trend in capillary electrophoresis required in clinical practice, viz., the design of microfluidic systems, is discussed. The bibliography includes 173 references.

  8. Geometrical and fluidic tuning of periodically modulated thin metal films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilardi, Giovanni; Xiao, Sanshui; Beccherelli, Romeo;

    2012-01-01

    We numerically demonstrate near-zero transmission of light through two-dimensional arrays of isolated gold rings. The analysis of the device as an optofluidic sensor is presented to demonstrate the tuning of the device in relation to variations of volume and refractive index of an isotropic fluid...

  9. Capillary Array Waveguide Amplified Fluorescence Detector for mHealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2013-09-01

    Mobile Health (mHealth) analytical technologies are potentially useful for carrying out modern medical diagnostics in resource-poor settings. Effective mHealth devices for underserved populations need to be simple, low cost, and portable. Although cell phone cameras have been used for biodetection, their sensitivity is a limiting factor because currently it is too low to be effective for many mHealth applications, which depend on detection of weak fluorescent signals. To improve the sensitivity of portable phones, a capillary tube array was developed to amplify fluorescence signals using their waveguide properties. An array configured with 36 capillary tubes was demonstrated to have a ~100X increase in sensitivity, lowering the limit of detection (LOD) of mobile phones from 1000 nM to 10 nM for fluorescein. To confirm that the amplification was due to waveguide behavior, we coated the external surfaces of the capillaries with silver. The silver coating interfered with the waveguide behavior and diminished the fluorescence signal, thereby proving that the waveguide behavior was the main mechanism for enhancing optical sensitivity. The optical configuration described here is novel in several ways. First, the use of capillaries waveguide properties to improve detection of weak florescence signal is new. Second we describe here a three dimensional illumination system, while conventional angular laser waveguide illumination is spot (or line), which is functionally one-dimensional illumination, can illuminate only a single capillary or a single column (when a line generator is used) of capillaries and thus inherently limits the multiplexing capability of detection. The planar illumination demonstrated in this work enables illumination of a two dimensional capillary array (e.g. x columns and y rows of capillaries). In addition, the waveguide light propagation via the capillary wall provides a third dimension for illumination along the axis of the capillaries. Such an

  10. Development of a novel concept for performing multiple assays on clinical samples using fluidic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Martin Jensen

    . Nye histologiske teknikker som er mere følsomme og i stand til at detekterer multiple miRNAer samtidigt eller i kombination med protein biomarkører, anses for at være nødvendige i udviklingen af nye diagnostiske analyser. På trods af disse lovende udsigter har implementering af miRNA detektion i......RNA-130a sammenlignet med konventionelle teknikker, hvor der benyttes prober af DNA og LNA. Desuden kunne multiple miRNAer detekteres ved brug af sekventielle inkuberinger af TSA reagens. Dette tillod detektion af to miRNA og et protein på samme vævssnit. Den anden model involverede design og konstruktion...... analysetiden sammenlignet med konventionelle teknikker. De to løsningsmodeller har vist sig at muliggøre udførelse af følsomme, multiple analyser for in situ detektion af biomarkører i vævssnit. Dette har potentielt relevans indenfor udvikling og implementering af diagnostiske analyser....

  11. Graphene and permalloy integration in functional fluidic and solid-state devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beld, van den Wesley Theodorus Eduardus

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a promising carbon material that has received much attention last decade because of its unique properties such as mechanical strength and impermeable to gasses. The core of a pencil exists for the majority out of graphite. This graphite is composed out of stacked layers of carbon and rec

  12. Instability of the capillary bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pare, Gounseti; Hoepffner, Jerome

    2014-11-01

    Capillary adhesion is a physical mechanism that maintains two bodies in contact by capillarity through a liquid ligament. The capillary bridge is an idealization of this capillary adhesion. In this study we first focus on the classical case of the stability of the capillary bridge. Secondly we study a slightly more complex configuration, imagining a flow in the capillary bridge as in the case of the dynamics of the neck of a liquid ligament, in its withdrawal under the effect of capillarity. Inspired by the experiments on soap films of Plateau, the configuration analyzed consists of an initially axisymmetric, mass of fluid held by surface tension forces between two parallel, coaxial, solid pipes of the same diameter. The results presented are obtained by numerical simulations using the free software, Gerris Flow Solver. We first focus on the capillary Venturi. In the static configuration the stability diagram of the capillary bridge obtained is in perfect agreement with the results of Lev A. Slobozhanin. In the dynamic case we develop a matlab code based on the one dimensional equations of Eggers and Dupont. The comparison of the bifurcation diagram obtained and the numerical simulations shows a good agreement.

  13. Development of a Photo-Fluidic Control Valve without Mechanical Moving Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Tetsuya; Dohta, Shujiro

    An optical servo system is a new control system which can be used in hazardous environments; such as those with electromagnetic influence, radiation and so on. The purpose of our study is to develop such an optical control system. In our previous study, an optical servo valve in which the output differential pressure was proportional to input optical power had been developed. However, the dynamics of the valve depended on the time required to move the flapper membrane of a fluid booster amplifier using the lower flow rate from the photo-fluidic interface. In addition, the lifetime of the valve depends on that of the fluid booster amplifier that has mechanical moving parts. As a next step, we need to improve the dynamics and to get longer lifetime of the optical servo valve and try to develop another type of optical servo valve whose elements have no mechanical moving parts. In this paper, a photo-fluidic control valve which consists of the photo-fluidic interface and fluid amplifier only using fluidics is proposed. As a result, we found that the tested valve generated output differential pressure of + 80 kPa or -80 kPa according to applied optical power. By driving a pneumatic cylinder whose inner diameter is 16 mm with a stroke of 100 mm using the tested valve, we also confirmed that the tested valve has enough output fluid power to drive a small-sized pneumatic cylinder on the market.

  14. A Computational Study of a New Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deere, Karen A.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2005-01-01

    A computational investigation of a two-dimensional nozzle was completed to assess the use of fluidic injection to manipulate flow separation and cause thrust vectoring of the primary jet thrust. The nozzle was designed with a recessed cavity to enhance the throat shifting method of fluidic thrust vectoring. Several design cycles with the structured-grid, computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D and with experiments in the NASA Langley Research Center Jet Exit Test Facility have been completed to guide the nozzle design and analyze performance. This paper presents computational results on potential design improvements for best experimental configuration tested to date. Nozzle design variables included cavity divergence angle, cavity convergence angle and upstream throat height. Pulsed fluidic injection was also investigated for its ability to decrease mass flow requirements. Internal nozzle performance (wind-off conditions) and thrust vector angles were computed for several configurations over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 2 to 7, with the fluidic injection flow rate equal to 3 percent of the primary flow rate. Computational results indicate that increasing cavity divergence angle beyond 10 is detrimental to thrust vectoring efficiency, while increasing cavity convergence angle from 20 to 30 improves thrust vectoring efficiency at nozzle pressure ratios greater than 2, albeit at the expense of discharge coefficient. Pulsed injection was no more efficient than steady injection for the Dual Throat Nozzle concept.

  15. Fluidic system for long-term in vitro culturing and monitoring of organotypic brain slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakmand, Tanya; Troels-Smith, Ane R.; Dimaki, Maria;

    2015-01-01

    Brain slice preparations cultured in vitro have long been used as a simplified model for studying brain development, electrophysiology, neurodegeneration and neuroprotection. In this paper an open fluidic system developed for improved long term culturing of organotypic brain slices is presented. ...

  16. Fluidic origami: a plant-inspired adaptive structure with shape morphing and stiffness tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suyi; Wang, K. W.

    2015-10-01

    Inspired by the physics behind the rapid plant movements and the rich topologies in origami folding, this research creates a unique class of multi-functional adaptive structure through exploring the innovation of fluidic origami. The idea is to connect multiple Miura folded sheets along their crease lines into a space-filling structure, and fill the tubular cells in-between with working fluids. The pressure and fluid flow in these cells can be strategically controlled much like in plants for nastic movements. The relationship between the internal fluid volume and the overall structure deformation is primarily determined by the kinematics of folding. This relationship can be exploited so that fluidic origami can achieve actuation/morphing by actively changing the internal fluid volume, and stiffness tuning by constraining the fluid volume. In order to characterize the working principles and performance potentials of these two adaptive functions, this research develops an equivalent truss frame model on a fluidic origami unit cell to analyze its fundamental elastic characteristics. Eigen-stiffness analysis based on this model reveals the primary modes of deformation and their relationships with initial folding configurations. Performances of the adaptive functions are correlated to the crease pattern design. In parallel to analytical studies, the feasibility of the morphing and stiffness tuning is also examined experimentally via a 3D printed multi-material prototype demonstrator. The research reported in this paper could lead to the synthesis of adaptive fluidic origami cellular metastructures or metamaterial systems for various engineering applications.

  17. A capability study of micro moulding for nano fluidic system manufacture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaon, Matteo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tosello, Guido;

    2013-01-01

    With the present paper the authors analysed process capability of ultra-precision moulding used for producing nano crosses with the same critical channels dimensions of a nano fluidic system for optical mapping of genomic length DNA. The process variation focused on product tolerances is quantified...

  18. Combination of Micro-fluidic Chip with Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy for Single Molecule Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A single molecule detection technique was developed by the combination of a single channel poly (dimethylsiloxane)/glass micro-fluidic chip and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). This method was successfully used to determine the proportion of two model components in the mixture containing fluorescein and the rhodamine-green succinimidyl ester.

  19. Micro Machining of Injection Mold Inserts for Fluidic Channel of Polymeric Biochips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeong-Woo Cho

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the polymeric micro-fluidic biochip, often called LOC (lab-on-a-chip, has been focused as a cheap, rapid and simplified method to replace the existing biochemical laboratory works. It becomes possible to form miniaturized lab functionalities on a chip with the development of MEMS technologies. The micro-fluidic chips contain many micro-channels for the flow of sample and reagents, mixing, and detection tasks. Typical substrate materials for the chip are glass and polymers. Typical techniques for micro-fluidic chip fabrication are utilizing various micro pattern forming methods, such as wet-etching, micro-contact printing, and hot-embossing, micro injection molding, LIGA, and micro powder blasting processes, etc. In this study, to establish the basis of the micro pattern fabrication and mass production of polymeric micro-fluidic chips using injection molding process, micro machining method was applied to form micro-channels on the LOC molds. In the research, a series of machining experiments using micro end-mills were performed to determine optimum machining conditions to improve surface roughness and shape accuracy of designed simplified micro-channels. Obtained conditions were used to machine required mold inserts for micro-channels using micro end-mills. Test injection processes using machined molds and COC polymer were performed, and then the results were investigated.

  20. Proposal for an electro/fluidic no-moving-part transducer based on wall-jet separation from a heated curved surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesař Václav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transducers for varying output flow from a fluidic device in dependence on electric input signal are increasing in importance – and yet no their design has been so far fully satisfactory. Except those that handle very extraordinary liquids (e.g. electro-rheologic, the transducers operate in two stages. The first stage is conversion into a motion or deformation of a mechanical component. In the second stage this mechanical effect acts on the output fluid flow. This signal conversion involving mechanical movements is a weak link between no-moving-parts electronics as well as no-moving-parts fluidics. Mechanical components complicate manufacturing, have tendency to get stuck or become worn – or, if deformed, may break (e.g. due to material fatigue. Their inertia limits the frequency range. Author here proposes a new transducer idea. The electric input heats the wall to which is attached a fluid jet, causing separation of the jet from the surface. Preliminary experiments show that relatively small heating suffices to change the flowfield substantially — and the reduction of the attachment wall to a thin metal foil can make the frequency range quite acceptable.

  1. Rapid fabrication of supercapacitor electrodes using bionanoscaffolds in capillary microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, F.; Chu, S.; Gerasopoulos, K.; Culver, J. N.; Ghodssi, R.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the utilization of capillary microfluidics to rapidly create nanostructure-patterned electrodes for energy storage applications. Using patterned photoresist as open-channel capillary microfluidics, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) bio-nanoscaffolds suspended in solution are autonomously delivered onto planar gold electrodes over a 1 cm2 area. The TMVs assemble on the electrode and form a dense bio-nanoscaffold layer due to enhanced evaporation-assisted assembly in the open-channel capillary microfluidic device within an hour. The TMV structures are coated with Ni/NiO through electroless plating and thermal oxidation to form supercapacitor electrodes. The galvanostatic charge/discharge cycle showed a 3.6-fold increase in areal capacitance for the nanostructured electrode compared to planar structures.

  2. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  3. Capillary Condensation in Confined Media

    CERN Document Server

    Charlaix, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    We review here the physics of capillary condensation of liquids in confined media, with a special regard to the application in nanotechnologies. The thermodynamics of capillary condensation and thin film adsorption are first exposed along with all the relevant notions. The focus is then shifted to the modelling of capillary forces, to their measurements techniques (including SFA, AFM and crack tips) and to their influence on AFM imaging techniques as well as on the static and dynamic friction properties of solids (including granular heaps and sliding nanocontacts). A great attention is spent in investigating the delicate role of the surface roughness and all the difficulties involved in the reduction of the probe size to nanometric dimensions. Another major consequence of capillary condensation in nanosystems is the activation of several chemical and corrosive processes that can significantly alter the surface properties, such as dissolution/redeposition of solid materials and stress-corrosion crack propagati...

  4. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  5. Precision manufacturing of polymer micro-nano fluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnæs, Jørgen; Calaon, Matteo; Tosello, Guido;

    2015-01-01

    Lab-on-a-Chip (LoC) technologies require the possibility of fabricating devices which include micro down to sub-micrometre features with high production rate and low cost. In the present study precision injection moulding is performed using a COC Topas 5013 L10 polymer to produce LoC devices...... for DNA barcoding with functional features in the 100 nm to 10 μm range. Replication quality of produced features (from nickel to polymer) was assessed by calibrated atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements performed on multiple nanochannels test structures arrays placed at different positions...

  6. Triple-channel portable capillary electrophoresis instrument with individual background electrolytes for the concurrent separations of anionic and cationic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Thanh Duc; Le, Minh Duc; Sáiz, Jorge; Duong, Hong Anh; Koenka, Israel Joel; Pham, Hung Viet; Hauser, Peter C

    2016-03-10

    The portable capillary electrophoresis instrument is automated and features three independent channels with different background electrolytes to allow the concurrent optimized determination of three different categories of charged analytes. The fluidic system is based on a miniature manifold which is based on mechanically milled channels for injection of samples and buffers. The planar manifold pattern was designed to minimize the number of electronic valves required for each channel. The system utilizes pneumatic pressurization to transport solutions at the grounded as well as the high voltage side of the separation capillaries. The instrument has a compact design, with all components arranged in a briefcase with dimensions of 45 (w) × 35 (d) × 15 cm (h) and a weight of about 15 kg. It can operate continuously for 8 h in the battery-powered mode if only one electrophoresis channel is in use, or for about 2.5 h in the case of simultaneous employment of all three channels. The different operations, i.e. capillary flushing, rinsing of the interfaces at both capillary ends, sample injection and electrophoretic separation, are activated automatically with a control program featuring a graphical user interface. For demonstration, the system was employed successfully for the concurrent separation of different inorganic cations and anions, organic preservatives, additives and artificial sweeteners in various beverage and food matrices. PMID:26893094

  7. Experimental and simulation investigation of ion transfer in different sampling capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Quan; Jiang, Tao; Ni, Kai; Qian, Xiang; Tang, Fei; Wang, Xiaohao

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure interfaces were a fundamental structure for transferring air generated ions into the vacuum manifold of a mass spectrometer. This work is devoted to the characterization of ion transfer in metal capillaries through both experimental and simulated investigations. The impact of capillary configurations on ion transmission efficiency was evaluated using an electrospray mass spectrometer with various bent capillaries as the transfer devices. In addition, a numerical model has been set up by coupling the SIMION 8.0 and the computational flow dynamics for simulation study of ion migration in the complex atmospheric system. The transfer efficiency was found to be highly affected by the variation in electric field and the capillary geometry, revealing that the hydrodynamic and electric force were both dominant and interactional during the transmission process. The consistency of the results from the experimental analysis and simulation modeling proved the validity of the model, which was helpful for understanding ion activity in transfer capillaries. PMID:26634970

  8. All-organic electrostrictive polymer composites with low driving electrical voltages for micro-fluidic pump applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Minh Quyen; Capsal, Jean-Fabien; Galineau, Jérémy; Ganet, Florent; Yin, Xunqian; Yang, Mingchia (Dawn); Chateaux, Jean-François; Renaud, Louis; Malhaire, Christophe; Cottinet, Pierre-Jean; Liang, Richard

    2015-07-01

    This paper focuses on the improvement of a relaxor ferroelectric terpolymer, i.e., poly (vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene-chlorofluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE-CFE)], filled with a bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). The developed material gave rise to a significantly increased longitudinal electrostrictive strain, as well as an increased mechanical energy density under a relatively low electric field. These features were attributed to the considerably enhanced dielectric permittivity and a decreased Young modulus as a result of the introduction of only small DEHP plasticizer molecules. In addition, the plasticizer-filled terpolymer only exhibited a slight decrease of the dielectric breakdown strength, which was a great advantage with respect to the traditional polymer-based electrostrictive composites. More importantly, the approach proposed herein is promising for the future development and scale-up of new high-performance electrostrictive dielectrics under low applied electrical fields through modification simply by blending with a low-cost plasticizer. An experimental demonstration based on a flexible micro-fluidic application is described at the end of this paper, confirming the attractive characteristics of the proposed materials as well as the feasibility of integrating them as micro-actuators in small-scale devices.

  9. Micro-patterning and actuation of phosphonium-based photo-responsive ionogels for micro-fluidic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Blin, Candice; Byrne, Robert; Diamond, Dermot; Benito-Lopez, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    The concept of “Micro-total-analysis-Systems” or “Lab-on-chip” has emerged over the past 20-years but, despite of the fact their incredible potential to revolutionise analytical science few outputs have reached the market so far[1]. Moreover, important issues like durability, disposability and cost of manufacture slow down the process of the integration of micro-fluidics into commercially relevant analytical products[2]. We believe that the next breakthroughs on micro-fluidic technology will ...

  10. Fluidic and air-stable supported lipid bilayer and cell-mimicking microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yang; Wang, Yini; Holtz, Bryan; Li, Jingyi; Traaseth, Nathan; Veglia, Gianluigi; Stottrup, Benjamin J; Elde, Robert; Pei, Duanqing; Guo, Athena; Zhu, X-Y

    2008-05-14

    As drug delivery, therapy, and medical imaging are becoming increasingly cell-specific, there is a critical need for high fidelity and high-throughput screening methods for cell surface interactions. Cell membrane-mimicking surfaces, i.e., supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), are currently not sufficiently robust to meet this need. Here we describe a method of forming fluidic and air-stable SLBs through tethered and dispersed cholesterol groups incorporated into the bottom leaflet. Achieving air stability allows us to easily fabricate SLB microarrays from direct robotic spotting of vesicle solutions. We demonstrate their application as cell membrane-mimicking microarrays by reconstituting peripheral as well as integral membrane components that can be recognized by their respective targets. These demonstrations establish the viability of the fluidic and air-stable SLB platform for generating content microarrays in high throughput studies, e.g., the screening of drugs and nanomedicine targeting cell surface receptors.

  11. Numerical Studies of a Supersonic Fluidic Diverter Actuator for Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Culley, Dennis e.; Raghu, Surya

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of the internal flow structure and performance of a specific fluidic diverter actuator, previously studied by time-dependent numerical computations for subsonic flow, is extended to include operation with supersonic actuator exit velocities. The understanding will aid in the development of fluidic diverters with minimum pressure losses and advanced designs of flow control actuators. The self-induced oscillatory behavior of the flow is successfully predicted and the calculated oscillation frequencies with respect to flow rate have excellent agreement with our experimental measurements. The oscillation frequency increases with Mach number, but its dependence on flow rate changes from subsonic to transonic to supersonic regimes. The delay time for the initiation of oscillations depends on the flow rate and the acoustic speed in the gaseous medium for subsonic flow, but is unaffected by the flow rate for supersonic conditions

  12. Evaluation of the threshold trimming method for micro inertial fluidic switch based on electrowetting technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The switch based on electrowetting technology has the advantages of no moving part, low contact resistance, long life and adjustable acceleration threshold. The acceleration threshold of switch can be fine-tuned by adjusting the applied voltage. This paper is focused on the electrowetting properties of switch and the influence of microchannel structural parameters, applied voltage and droplet volume on acceleration threshold. In the presence of process errors of micro inertial fluidic switch and measuring errors of droplet volume, there is a deviation between test acceleration threshold and target acceleration threshold. Considering the process errors and measuring errors, worst-case analysis is used to analyze the influence of parameter tolerance on the acceleration threshold. Under worst-case condition the total acceleration threshold tolerance caused by various errors is 9.95%. The target acceleration threshold can be achieved by fine-tuning the applied voltage. The acceleration threshold trimming method of micro inertial fluidic switch is verified.

  13. Induced fluid rotation and bistable fluidic turn-down valves (a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesař Václav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper surveys engineering applications of an unusual fluidic principle — momentum transfer through a relatively small communicating window into a vortex chamber, where the initially stationary fluid is put into rotation. The transfer is often by shear stress acting in the window plane, but may be enhanced and perhaps even dominated by fluid flow crossing the boundary. The case of zero-time-mean fluid transport through the window has found use in experimental fluid mechanics: non-invasive measurement of wall shear stress on objects by evaluating the induced rotation in the vortex chamber. The case with the non-zero flow through the interface became the starting point in development of fluidic valves combining two otherwise mutually incompatible properties: bistability and flow turning down.

  14. Wind tunnel tests of the dynamic characteristics of the fluidic rudder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsterling, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The fourth phase is given of a continuing program to develop the means to stabilize and control aircraft without moving parts or a separate source of power. Previous phases have demonstrated the feasibility of (1) generating adequate control forces on a standard airfoil, (2) controlling those forces with a fluidic amplifier and (3) cascading non-vented fluidic amplifiers operating on ram air supply pressure. The foremost objectives of the fourth phase covered under Part I of this report were to demonstrate a complete force-control system in a wind tunnel environment and to measure its static and dynamic control characteristics. Secondary objectives, covered under Part II, were to evaluate alternate configurations for lift control. The results demonstrate an overall response time of 150 msec, confirming this technology as a viable means for implementing low-cost reliable flight control systems.

  15. Impacts on oil recovery from capillary pressure and capillary heterogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bognoe, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    The main conclusions drawn from this thesis are; 7 scientific papers are published on a broad variety of subjects, and describes in detail the experiments and research treated in this thesis. Scientific research has been performed, investigating the subjects of capillary pressure and capillary heterogeneities from different angles. This thesis discusses the findings in this study and aims to illustrate the benefits of the results obtained for further development of other experiments, and/or even the industrial benefits in field development. The methods for wettability alteration have developed throughout the work. From producing heterogeneous wettability alterations, the methods have improved to giving both radial and lateral uniform wettability alterations, which also remains unaltered throughout the duration of the experimental work. The alteration of wettability is dependent on initial water saturation, flow rate, aging time and crude oil composition. Capillary pressure and relative permeability curves have been measured for core plugs at different wettabilities using conventional centrifuge methods. The trends observed are mostly consistent with theory. The production mechanisms of strongly and moderately water wet chalk has been investigated. At strongly water wet conditions in fractured chalk; the flow is governed by capillary forces, showing strong impact from the fractures. At moderately water wet conditions, the impact of the fractures are absent, and a dispersed water front is observed during the displacement. The oil recovery is about the same, at the two wettabilities. Fracture crossing mechanisms at the same wettability conditions have been mapped. And the observations are consistent with those of the water floods. During strongly water wet displacement, the fracture crossing is occurring once the inlet core has reached endpoint of spontaneous imbibition. At moderately water wet conditions the fracture crossing is less abrupt, and creation of wetting

  16. Investigation of pressure drop in capillary tube for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, MS 400 076 India and S. S. G. M. College of Engineering Shegaon, MS 444 203 (India); Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, MS 400 076 (India)

    2014-01-29

    A capillary tube is commonly used in small capacity refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. It is also a preferred expansion device in mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers, since it is inexpensive and simple in configuration. However, the flow inside a capillary tube is complex, since flashing process that occurs in case of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems is metastable. A mixture of refrigerants such as nitrogen, methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane expands below its inversion temperature in the capillary tube of MR J-T cryocooler and reaches cryogenic temperature. The mass flow rate of refrigerant mixture circulating through capillary tube depends on the pressure difference across it. There are many empirical correlations which predict pressure drop across the capillary tube. However, they have not been tested for refrigerant mixtures and for operating conditions of the cryocooler. The present paper assesses the existing empirical correlations for predicting overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the MR J-T cryocooler. The empirical correlations refer to homogeneous as well as separated flow models. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the cooler. Three different compositions of refrigerant mixture are used to study the pressure drop variations. The predicted overall pressure drop across the capillary tube is compared with the experimentally obtained value. The predictions obtained using homogeneous model show better match with the experimental results compared to separated flow models.

  17. Analysis of neuropeptides using capillary zone electrophoresis with multichannel fluorescence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Shear, Jason B.; Fishman, Harvey A.; Zare, Richard N.; Scheller, Richard H.

    1991-12-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis is fast becoming one of the most sensitive separation schemes for sampling complex microenvironments. A unique detection scheme is developed in which a charge-coupled device (CCD) detects laser induced fluorescence from an axially illuminated electrophoresis capillary. The fluorescence from an analyte band is measured over a several centimeter section of the capillary, greatly increasing the observation time of the fluorescently tagged band. The sensitivity of the system is in the 1-8 X 10-20 mol range for derivatized amino acids and peptides. Subattomole quantities of bag cell neuropeptides collected from the giant marine mollusk Aplysia californica can be measured.

  18. Fabrication of Biochips with Micro Fluidic Channels by Micro End-milling and Powder Blasting

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Sam Park; Tae Il Seo; Dae Jin Yun

    2008-01-01

    For microfabrications of biochips with micro fluidic channels, a large number of microfabrication techniques based on silicon or glass-based Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technologies were proposed in the last decade. In recent years, for low cost and mass production, polymer-based microfabrication techniques by microinjection molding and micro hot embossing have been proposed. These techniques, which require a proper photoresist, mask, UV light exposure, developing, and electroplati...

  19. Research of Confocal Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection System for Micro-fluidic Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Jin-yuan; WANG Xiu-hua; ZHANG Hua-feng

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics such as signal noise ratio(SNR)[1-2] and sensitivity of the fluorescence detection system for micro-fluidic chip influence the performance of the whole system extremely.The confocal laser induced fluorescence detection system is presented.Based on the debugging of optical and circuit modules, the results of detecting the samples are given and analyzed theoretically,and the improved project is put forward.

  20. Non-Aqueous Capillary Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumski, Michał; Buszewski, Bogusław

    Non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography are special variants of these techniques. Here, organic solvents or their mixtures with or without dissolved electrolytes are used as separation buffer or mobile phase, respectively. The most important features of non-aqueous systems are: better solubility of more hydrophobic ionic substances (many natural products) than in water, much less current and Joule heating allows for using highly concentrated buffers and/or larger capillary internal diameters, polar interactions are enhanced in organic solvents which is often highly advantageous in chiral separation systems. This chapter presents most frequently used solvents, their properties, as well as shows pH* scale which is often used in non-aqueous systems.

  1. Modeling of low-capillary number segmented flows in microchannels using OpenFOAM

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, D.A.; Van Steijn V.; Portela, L.M.; Kreutzer, M.T.; Kleijn, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of low-Capillary number segmented flows in microchannels is important for the design of microfluidic devices. We present numerical validations of microfluidic flow simulations using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method as implemented in OpenFOAM. Two benchmark cases were investigated to ensure the reliability of OpenFOAM in modeling complex physical phenomena in microfluidics, viz. 1) the steady motion of bubbles in capillaries, and 2) the formation of bubbles in T-junctions. We found th...

  2. Gas Dynamical Capillary Flowmeters of Small and Micro Flowrates of Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Stasiuk, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of application of glass capillary tubes (CTs) as sensors of small and micro flowrates of gases was justified. The accuracy of a number of CTs flowrate equations was analyzed on the basis of experimental studies of CTs flowrate characteristics. It was shown that CTs can be applied as primary devices of small and micro flowrates of gases without individual calibration. The results of studies on the dynamic properties of gas dynamical capillary flowmeters of small and micro flowr...

  3. Characterization of printable cellular micro-fluidic channels for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yahui; Yu, Yin; Chen, Howard; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2013-06-01

    Tissue engineering has been a promising field of research, offering hope of bridging the gap between organ shortage and transplantation needs. However, building three-dimensional (3D) vascularized organs remains the main technological barrier to be overcome. One of the major challenges is the inclusion of a vascular network to support cell viability in terms of nutrients and oxygen perfusion. This paper introduces a new approach to the fabrication of vessel-like microfluidic channels that has the potential to be used in thick tissue or organ fabrication in the future. In this research, we investigate the manufacturability of printable micro-fluidic channels, where micro-fluidic channels support mechanical integrity as well as enable fluid transport in 3D. A pressure-assisted solid freeform fabrication platform is developed with a coaxial needle dispenser unit to print hollow hydrogel filaments. The dispensing rheology is studied, and effects of material properties on structural formation of hollow filaments are analyzed. Sample structures are printed through the developed computer-controlled system. In addition, cell viability and gene expression studies are presented in this paper. Cell viability shows that cartilage progenitor cells (CPCs) maintained their viability right after bioprinting and during prolonged in vitro culture. Real-time PCR analysis yielded a relatively higher expression of cartilage-specific genes in alginate hollow filament encapsulating CPCs, compared with monolayer cultured CPCs, which revealed that printable semi-permeable micro-fluidic channels provided an ideal environment for cell growth and function. PMID:23458889

  4. Automation of column-based radiochemical separations. A comparison of fluidic, robotic, and hybrid architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two automated systems have been developed to perform column-based radiochemical separation procedures. These new systems are compared with past fluidic column separation architectures, with emphasis on using disposable components so that no sample contacts any surface that any other sample has contacted, and setting up samples and columns in parallel for subsequent automated processing. In the first new approach, a general purpose liquid handling robot has been modified and programmed to perform anion exchange separations using 2 mL bed columns in 6 mL plastic disposable column bodies. In the second new approach, a fluidic system has been developed to deliver clean reagents through disposable manual valves to six disposable columns, with a mechanized fraction collector that positions one of four rows of six vials below the columns. The samples are delivered to each column via a manual 3-port disposable valve from disposable syringes. This second approach, a hybrid of fluidic and mechanized components, is a simpler more efficient approach for performing anion exchange procedures for the recovery and purification of plutonium from samples. The automation architectures described can also be adapted to column-based extraction chromatography separations. (orig.)

  5. High-Throughput Proteomics Using High Efficiency Multiple-Capillary Liquid Chromatography With On-Line High-Performance ESI FTICR Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yufeng (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Tolic, Nikola (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Zhao, Rui (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Li, Lingjun (Illinois Univ Of-Urbana/Champa); Berger, Scott J.(ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Harkewicz, Richard (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Anderson, Gordon A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Belov, Mikhail E.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Smith, Richard D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2000-12-01

    We report on the design and application of a high-efficiency multiple-capillary liquid chromatography (LC) system for high-throughput proteome analysis. The multiple-capillary LC system was operated at the pressure of 10,000 psi using commercial LC pumps to deliver the mobile phase and newly developed passive feedback valves to switch the mobile phase flow and introduce samples. The multiple-capillary LC system was composed of several serially connected dual-capillary column devices. The dual-capillary column approach was designed to eliminate the time delay for regeneration (or equilibrium) of the capillary column after its use under the mobile phase gradient condition (i.e. one capillary column was used in separation and the other was washed using mobile phase A). The serially connected dual-capillary columns and ESI sources were operated independently, and could be used for either''backup'' operation or with other mass spectrometer(s). This high-efficiency multiple-capillary LC system uses switching valves for all operations and is highly amenable to automation. The separations efficiency of dual-capillary column device, optimal capillary dimensions (column length and packed particle size), suitable mobile phases for electrospray, and the capillary re-generation were investigated. A high magnetic field (11.5 tesla) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was coupled on-line with this high-efficiency multiple-capillary LC system through an electrospray ionization source. The capillary LC provided a peak capacity of {approx}600, and the 2-D capillary LC-FTICR provided a combined resolving power of > 6 x 10 7 polypeptide isotopic distributions. For yeast cellular tryptic digests, > 100,000 polypeptides were typically detected, and {approx}1,000 proteins can be characterized in a single run.

  6. Powder-blasting technology as an alternative tool for microfabrication of capillary electrophoresis chips with integrated conductivity sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlautmann, Stefan; Wensink, Henk; Schasfoort, Richard; Elwenspoek, Miko; Berg, van den Albert

    2001-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of a microfluidic device for capillary electrophoresis applications is presented. The device consists of a glass chip which contains a single separation channel as well as an integrated conductivity detection cell. In contrast to most microfluidic glass devices t

  7. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole

    1998-01-01

    The capillary thinning of a polymeric filament is analysed experimentally as well as by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially a liquid sample is kept between two cylindrical plates. Then the bottom plate is lowered under gravity to yield a given strain...

  8. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  9. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  10. Solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapala, Markus; Teppo, Jaakko; Ollikainen, Elisa; Kiiski, Iiro; Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2015-03-17

    A new ambient mass spectrometry method, solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization (DCPI), is described. The method uses a solvent jet generated by a coaxial nebulizer operated at ambient conditions with nitrogen as nebulizer gas. The solvent jet is directed onto a sample surface, from which analytes are extracted into the solvent and ejected from the surface in secondary droplets formed in collisions between the jet and the sample surface. The secondary droplets are directed into the heated capillary photoionization (CPI) device, where the droplets are vaporized and the gaseous analytes are ionized by 10 eV photons generated by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) krypton discharge lamp. As the CPI device is directly connected to the extended capillary inlet of the MS, high ion transfer efficiency to the vacuum of MS is achieved. The solvent jet DCPI provides several advantages: high sensitivity for nonpolar and polar compounds with limit of detection down to low fmol levels, capability of analyzing small and large molecules, and good spatial resolution (250 μm). Two ionization mechanisms are involved in DCPI: atmospheric pressure photoionization, capable of ionizing polar and nonpolar compounds, and solvent assisted inlet ionization capable of ionizing larger molecules like peptides. The feasibility of DCPI was successfully tested in the analysis of polar and nonpolar compounds in sage leaves and chili pepper. PMID:25715054

  11. Fabricating PFPE Membranes for Capillary Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael C.; Willis, Peter A.; Greer, Frank; Rolland, Jason

    2009-01-01

    A process has been developed for fabricating perfluoropolyether (PFPE) membranes that contain microscopic holes of precise sizes at precise locations. The membranes are to be incorporated into laboratory-on-a-chip microfluidic devices to be used in performing capillary electrophoresis. The present process is a modified version of part of the process, described in the immediately preceding article, that includes a step in which a liquid PFPE layer is cured into solid (membrane) form by use of ultraviolet light. In the present process, one exploits the fact that by masking some locations to prevent exposure to ultraviolet light, one can prevent curing of the PFPE in those locations. The uncured PFPE can be washed away from those locations in the subsequent release and cleaning steps. Thus, holes are formed in the membrane in those locations. The most straightforward way to implement the modification is to use, during the ultraviolet-curing step, an ultraviolet photomask similar to the photomasks used in fabricating microelectronic devices. In lieu of such a photomask, one could use a mask made of any patternable ultraviolet-absorbing material (for example, an ink or a photoresist).

  12. Capillary Pumped Heat Transfer (CHT) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinan, Kevin P.; Allen, J. S.

    1998-01-01

    The operation of Capillary Pumped Loops (CPL's) in low gravity has generally been unable to match ground-based performance. The reason for this poorer performance has been elusive. In order to investigate the behavior of a CPL in low-gravity, an idealized, glass CPL experiment was constructed. This experiment, known as the Capillary-driven Heat Transfer (CHT) experiment, was flown on board the Space Shuttle Columbia in July 1997 during the Microgravity Science Laboratory mission. During the conduct of the CHT experiment an unexpected failure mode was observed. This failure mode was a result of liquid collecting and then eventually bridging the vapor return line. With the vapor return line blocked, the condensate was unable to return to the evaporator and dry-out subsequently followed. The mechanism for this collection and bridging has been associated with long wavelength instabilities of the liquid film forming in the vapor return line. Analysis has shown that vapor line blockage in present generation CPL devices is inevitable. Additionally, previous low-gravity CPL tests have reported the presence of relatively low frequency pressure oscillations during erratic system performance. Analysis reveals that these pressure oscillations are in part a result of long wavelength instabilities present in the evaporator pores, which likewise lead to liquid bridging and vapor entrapment in the porous media. Subsequent evaporation to the trapped vapor increases the vapor pressure. Eventually the vapor pressure causes ejection of the bridged liquid. Recoil stresses depress the meniscus, the vapor pressure rapidly increases, and the heated surface cools. The process then repeats with regularity.

  13. Design Enhancements of the Two-Dimensional, Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Deere, Karen A.; Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2006-01-01

    A Dual Throat Nozzle fluidic thrust vectoring technique that achieves higher thrust-vectoring efficiencies than other fluidic techniques, without sacrificing thrust efficiency has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle concept was designed with the aid of the structured-grid, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluidic dynamics code PAB3D. This new concept combines the thrust efficiency of sonic-plane skewing with increased thrust-vectoring efficiencies obtained by maximizing pressure differentials in a separated cavity located downstream of the nozzle throat. By injecting secondary flow asymmetrically at the upstream minimum area, a new aerodynamic minimum area is formed downstream of the geometric minimum and the sonic line is skewed, thus vectoring the exhaust flow. The nozzle was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Jet Exit Test Facility. Internal nozzle performance characteristics were defined for nozzle pressure ratios up to 10, with a range of secondary injection flow rates up to 10 percent of the primary flow rate. Most of the data included in this paper shows the effect of secondary injection rate at a nozzle pressure ratio of 4. The effects of modifying cavity divergence angle, convergence angle and cavity shape on internal nozzle performance were investigated, as were effects of injection geometry, hole or slot. In agreement with computationally predicted data, experimental data verified that decreasing cavity divergence angle had a negative impact and increasing cavity convergence angle had a positive impact on thrust vector angle and thrust efficiency. A curved cavity apex provided improved thrust ratios at some injection rates. However, overall nozzle performance suffered with no secondary injection. Injection holes were more efficient than the injection slot over the range of injection rates, but the slot generated larger thrust vector angles for injection rates less than 4 percent of the primary flow rate.

  14. Wetting micro- and nanofluidic devices using supercritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehn, Robert; Austin, Robert H

    2006-08-15

    We describe a method for wetting micro- and nanofluidic devices with water or any other pure liquid. The process is performed by enclosing the fluidic device in a liquid-filled cell, heating the cell to a temperature above the critical point of the liquid, and subsequent cooling of the cell to room temperature. Because the process liquid is essentially a gas during wetting, arbitrary shapes can be wetted. We demonstrate wetting of micro- and nanostructures in a fused-silica device with only a single inlet. The process is low-cost, fast, safe, and very reliable. PMID:16906743

  15. Exponential asymptotics and capillary waves

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, S. J.; Vanden-Broeck, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recently developed techniques in exponential asymptotics beyond all orders are employed on the problem of potential flows with a free surface and small surface tension, in the absence of gravity. Exponentially small capillary waves are found to be generated on the free surface where the equipotentials from singularities in the flow (for example, stagnation points and corners) meet it. The amplitude of these waves is determined, and the implications are considered for many quite general flows....

  16. Capillary electrophoresis in food authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvasnicka, Frantisek

    2005-06-01

    Food authenticity is a term which simply refers to whether the food purchased by the consumer matches its description. False description can occur in many forms, from the undeclared addition of water or other cheaper materials, or the wrong declaration of the amount of a particular ingredient in the product, to making false statements about the source of ingredients i.e., their geographic, plant, or animal origin. The aim of this review is to summarize applications of capillary electrophoresis in food authentication.

  17. Inertial Rise in Short Capillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Shardt, Orest; Derksen, J J; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2013-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show capillary rise experiments with diethyl ether in short tubes. The height of each short tube is less than the maximum height the liquid can achieve, and therefore the liquid reaches the top of the tube while still rising. Over a narrow range of heights, the ether bulges out from the top of the tube and spreads onto the external wall.

  18. Performance of capillary discharge guided laser plasma wakefieldaccelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kei; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Gonsalves,Anthony J.; Leemans, Wim P.; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Schroeder, Carl B.; Toth, Csaba; Hooker, S.M.

    2007-06-25

    A GeV-class laser-driven plasma-based wakefield acceleratorhas been realized at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).The device consists of the 40TW high repetition rate Ti:sapphire LOASISlaser system at LBNL and a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguidedeveloped at Oxford University. The operation of the capillary dischargeguided laser plasma wakefield accelerator with a capillaryof 225 mu mdiameter and 33 mm in length was analyzed in detail. The input intensitydependence suggests that excessive self-injection causes increased beamloading leading to broadband lower energy electron beam generation. Thetrigger versus laser arrival timing dependence suggests that the plasmachannel parameters can be tuned to reduce beam divergence.

  19. Atom guiding in single mode optical fiber capillary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Dorosz, Jan

    2006-10-01

    A relatively new method of atomic DeBroglie wave transmission in a hollow single mode optical fiber is presented. A slightly blue-detuned, from the atomic resonance, optical evanescent wave in the ring core of the capillary optical fiber creates a potential barrier for co-propagating or counter-propagating DeBroglie wave. The applied optical wavelength, associated with the used atomic transitions, was in the range 1100-400nm. Excited, metastable atoms of chromium, rubidium, cesium, helium, alkalis, etc., were transmitted in the capillary optical fiber. Initially the transmission was multimode and then single mode, with increasing efficiency. There are considered initial application perspectives of this transmission technology of DeBroglie wave for building of coherent cold sources of atoms, atom interferometers, and devices of the inverse lithography, which may possibly compete with the short-wave photo-lithography. The paper is a tutorial and has a teaching and technology review character.

  20. Fluidic harvesters in free stream turbulence undergoing flow-induced vibrations or flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Joan; Azadeh Ranjbar, Vahid; Goushcha, Oleg; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Elvin, Niell

    2015-11-01

    In the present experimental work we investigated the performance of fluidic harvesters consisting of cylindrical body mounted of the tip of a flexible beam in the presence of nearly homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. Circular, semi-circular and square shapes have been tested. It was found that turbulence interferes with resonance conditions between the flow and the structure in the case of vortex induced vibrations and has absolutely no effect in flutter dominated case. As a result, turbulence increases the power output of non-linear harvesters subjected to vortex induces vibration and it has no effect in harvester under flutter conditions. Supported by NSF Grant: CBET #1033117.

  1. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  2. Critical Capillary Number of Interfacial Film Displacement in a Capillary Tube

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Changfei

    2016-01-01

    The role of surface tension and wettability in the dynamics of air-liquid interfaces during immiscible fluid displacement flows in capillary tube driven by pressure has been investigated. The contact angle and capillary number drive the force wetting processes which is controlled by the balance between the capillary and the viscous lubrication forces. The dynamic wetting condition with the critical capillary number is studied analytically and validated experimentally, which demonstrates that the critical capillary number is associated with the contact angle, slip length and capillary radius.

  3. Progression of Diabetic Capillary Occlusion: A Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Fu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An explanatory computational model is developed of the contiguous areas of retinal capillary loss which play a large role in diabetic maculapathy and diabetic retinal neovascularization. Strictly random leukocyte mediated capillary occlusion cannot explain the occurrence of large contiguous areas of retinal ischemia. Therefore occlusion of an individual capillary must increase the probability of occlusion of surrounding capillaries. A retinal perifoveal vascular sector as well as a peripheral retinal capillary network and a deleted hexagonal capillary network are modelled using Compucell3D. The perifoveal modelling produces a pattern of spreading capillary loss with associated macular edema. In the peripheral network, spreading ischemia results from the progressive loss of the ladder capillaries which connect peripheral arterioles and venules. System blood flow was elevated in the macular model before a later reduction in flow in cases with progression of capillary occlusions. Simulations differing only in initial vascular network structures but with identical dynamics for oxygen, growth factors and vascular occlusions, replicate key clinical observations of ischemia and macular edema in the posterior pole and ischemia in the retinal periphery. The simulation results also seem consistent with quantitative data on macular blood flow and qualitative data on venous oxygenation. One computational model applied to distinct capillary networks in different retinal regions yielded results comparable to clinical observations in those regions.

  4. A Paper-Based "Pop-up" Electrochemical Device for Analysis of Beta-Hydroxybutyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chien-Chung; Hennek, Jonathan W; Ainla, Alar; Kumar, Ashok A; Lan, Wen-Jie; Im, Judy; Smith, Barbara S; Zhao, Mengxia; Whitesides, George M

    2016-06-21

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a "pop-up" electrochemical paper-based analytical device (pop-up-EPAD) to measure beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB)-a biomarker for diabetic ketoacidosis-using a commercial combination BHB/glucometer. Pop-up-EPADs are inspired by pop-up greeting cards and children's books. They are made from a single sheet of paper folded into a three-dimensional (3D) device that changes shape, and fluidic and electrical connectivity, by simply folding and unfolding the structure. The reconfigurable 3D structure makes it possible to change the fluidic path and to control timing; it also provides mechanical support for the folded and unfolded structures that enables good registration and repeatability on folding. A pop-up-EPAD designed to detect BHB shows performance comparable to commercially available plastic test strips over the clinically relevant range of BHB in blood when used with a commercial glucometer that integrates the ability to measure glucose and BHB (combination BHB/glucometer). With simple modifications of the electrode and the design of the fluidic path, the pop-up-EPAD also detects BHB in buffer using a simple glucometer-a device that is more available than the combination BHB/glucometer. Strategies that use a "3D pop-up"-that is, large-scale changes in 3D structure and fluidic paths-by folding/unfolding add functionality to EPADs (e.g., controlled timing, fluidic handling and path programming, control over complex sequences of steps, and alterations in electrical connectivity) and should enable the development of new classes of paper-based diagnostic devices. PMID:27243791

  5. Microwave bonding of poly(methylmethacrylate) microfluidic devices using a conductive polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, R.J.; McDonagh, C.; McLaughlin, J.A.D.; Mohr, S.; Goddard, N J; Fielden, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Component binding within microfluidic devices is a problem that has long been seeking a solution. In this investigation, the use of microwave radiation to seal PMMA components has been investigated using polyaniline as an absorber capable of inducting interfacial bonding. Straight microchannels were machined into PMMA using a Datron CAT3DM6 CNC machine with widths and depths across a range of 100 to 1000 microns. Prototype fluidic devices were prepared with channel pattern...

  6. Capillary pumped loop body heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wren, deceased, Paul (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop for transferring heat from one body part to another body part, the capillary pumped loop comprising a capillary evaporator for vaporizing a liquid refrigerant by absorbing heat from a warm body part, a condenser for turning a vaporized refrigerant into a liquid by transferring heat from the vaporized liquid to a cool body part, a first tube section connecting an output port of the capillary evaporator to an input of the condenser, and a second tube section connecting an output of the condenser to an input port of the capillary evaporator. A wick may be provided within the condenser. A pump may be provided between the second tube section and the input port of the capillary evaporator. Additionally, an esternal heat source or heat sink may be utilized.

  7. Computational Study of an Axisymmetric Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle for a Supersonic Aircraft Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deere, Karen A.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2007-01-01

    A computational investigation of an axisymmetric Dual Throat Nozzle concept has been conducted. This fluidic thrust-vectoring nozzle was designed with a recessed cavity to enhance the throat shifting technique for improved thrust vectoring. The structured-grid, unsteady Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver PAB3D was used to guide the nozzle design and analyze performance. Nozzle design variables included extent of circumferential injection, cavity divergence angle, cavity length, and cavity convergence angle. Internal nozzle performance (wind-off conditions) and thrust vector angles were computed for several configurations over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 1.89 to 10, with the fluidic injection flow rate equal to zero and up to 4 percent of the primary flow rate. The effect of a variable expansion ratio on nozzle performance over a range of freestream Mach numbers up to 2 was investigated. Results indicated that a 60 circumferential injection was a good compromise between large thrust vector angles and efficient internal nozzle performance. A cavity divergence angle greater than 10 was detrimental to thrust vector angle. Shortening the cavity length improved internal nozzle performance with a small penalty to thrust vector angle. Contrary to expectations, a variable expansion ratio did not improve thrust efficiency at the flight conditions investigated.

  8. Micro-fluidic module for blood cell separation for gene expression radiobiological assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in molecular techniques have improved discovery of biomarkers associated with radiation exposure. Gene expression techniques have been demonstrated as effective tools for biodosimetry, and different assay platforms with different chemistries are now available. One of the main challenges is to integrate the sample preparation processing of these assays into micro-fluidic platforms to be fully automated for point-of-care medical countermeasures in the case of a radiological event. Most of these assays follow the same workflow processing that comprises first the collection of blood samples followed by cellular and molecular sample preparation. The sample preparation is based on the specific reagents of the assay system and depends also on the different subsets of cells population and the type of biomarkers of interest. In this article, the authors present a module for isolation of white blood cells from peripheral blood as a prerequisite for automation of gene expression assays on a micro-fluidic cartridge. For each sample condition, the gene expression platform can be adapted to suit the requirements of the selected assay chemistry (authors)

  9. Fabrication of Biochips with Micro Fluidic Channels by Micro End-milling and Powder Blasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Sam Park

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available For microfabrications of biochips with micro fluidic channels, a large number of microfabrication techniques based on silicon or glass-based Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS technologies were proposed in the last decade. In recent years, for low cost and mass production, polymer-based microfabrication techniques by microinjection molding and micro hot embossing have been proposed. These techniques, which require a proper photoresist, mask, UV light exposure, developing, and electroplating as a preprocess, are considered to have some problems. In this study, we propose a new microfabrication technology which consists of micro end-milling and powder blasting. This technique could be directly applied to fabricate the metal mold without any preprocesses. The metal mold with micro-channels is machined by micro end-milling, and then, burrs generated in the end-milling process are removed by powder blasting. From the experimental results, micro end-milling combined with powder blasting could be applied effectively for fabrication of the injection mold of biochips with micro fluidic channels.

  10. Measurement of Liquid Viscosities in Tapered or Parabolic Capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershov; Zorin; Starov

    1999-08-01

    The possibility of using tapered or parabolic capillaries for measurement of liquid viscosities is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. It is demonstrated that even small deviations in capillary radius from a constant value may substantially affect measurement results. Equations are derived which allow correct analysis of the measurement results in tapered or parabolic capillaries. The following cases are analyzed: a water imbibition into a tapered or parabolic capillary and displacement of one liquid by another immiscible liquid in tapered or parabolic capillaries. Two possibilities are considered: (a) the narrow end of the capillary as capillary inlet and (b) the wide end of the capillary as capillary inlet. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  11. Analysis of Small Ions with Capillary Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulakh, Jatinder Singh; Kaur, Ramandeep; Malik, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Small inorganic ions are easily separated through capillary electrophoresis because they have a high charge-to-mass ratio and suffer little from some of the undesired phenomenon affecting higher molecular weight species like adsorption to the capillary wall, decomposition, and precipitation. This chapter is focused on the analysis of small ions other than metal ions using capillary electrophoresis. Methods are described for the determination of ions of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine. PMID:27645739

  12. A New Conductivity Detector for Capillary Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new conductivity detector for capillary electrophoresis consisting of an electrochemical cell and a conductive meter was developed. In the cell, the microelectrode and capillary were inserted through the cell wall and fixed by screws and sealing ring, the ends of microelectrode and capillary were located by a guide with two cross holes. LOD for K+ was 1.5×10-5 mol/L.

  13. Serum proteins analysis by capillary electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Uji, Yoshinori; Okabe, Hiroaki

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of multi-capillary electrophoresis instrument in clinical laboratory. An automated clinical capillary electrophoresis system was evaluated for performing serum proteins electrophoresis and immuno-fixation electrophoresis by subtraction. In this study the performance of capillary electrophoresis was compared with the cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis and agarose gel immunofixation electrophoresis for serum proteins. The results of...

  14. Configurable 3D-Printed millifluidic and microfluidic 'lab on a chip' reactionware devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitson, Philip J; Rosnes, Mali H; Sans, Victor; Dragone, Vincenza; Cronin, Leroy

    2012-09-21

    We utilise 3D design and 3D printing techniques to fabricate a number of miniaturised fluidic 'reactionware' devices for chemical syntheses in just a few hours, using inexpensive materials producing reliable and robust reactors. Both two and three inlet reactors could be assembled, as well as one-inlet devices with reactant 'silos' allowing the introduction of reactants during the fabrication process of the device. To demonstrate the utility and versatility of these devices organic (reductive amination and alkylation reactions), inorganic (large polyoxometalate synthesis) and materials (gold nanoparticle synthesis) processes were efficiently carried out in the printed devices. PMID:22875258

  15. Slope wavenumber spectrum models of capillary and capillary-gravity waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾永君; 张杰; 王岩峰

    2010-01-01

    Capillary and capillary-gravity waves possess a random character, and the slope wavenumber spectra of them can be used to represent mean distributions of wave energy with respect to spatial scale of variability. But simple and practical models of the slope wavenumber spectra have not been put forward so far. In this article, we address the accurate definition of the slope wavenumber spectra of water surface capillary and capillary-gravity waves. By combining the existing slope wavenumber models and using th...

  16. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The capillary thinning of filaments of a Newtonian polybutene fluid and a viscoelastic polyisobutylene solution are analyzed experimentally and by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially, a liquid sample is placed between two cylindrical plates. Then......, the bottom plate is lowered under gravity to produce a specified strain. The sample is thereby stretched into a filament. Provided the filament is sufficiently long, surface tension will induce a thinning of the filament until breakup in finite time. The numerical simulations are performed with a Lagrangian...

  17. Electromigration dispersion in Capillary Electrophoresis

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhen; 10.1007/s11538-011-9708-7

    2012-01-01

    In a previous paper (S. Ghosal and Z. Chen Bull. Math. Biol. 2010, vol. 72, pg. 2047) it was shown that the evolution of the solute concentration in capillary electrophoresis is described by a nonlinear wave equation that reduced to Burger's equation if the nonlinearity was weak. It was assumed that only strong electrolytes (fully dissociated) were present. In the present paper it is shown that the same governing equation also describes the situation where the electrolytic buffer consists of a single weak acid (or base). A simple approximate formula is derived for the dimensionless peak variance which is shown to agree well with published experimental data.

  18. Capillary electrophoresis theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Paul D

    1992-01-01

    This book is designed to be a practical guide, used by wide audience, including those new to CE, those more experienced, routine users, those interested in technology development, and those involved with applications research. References have been emphasized to allow the reader to explore the detailed specifics and theoretical foundations.This book draws together the rapidly evolving, diverse, and multidisciplinary subject of capillary electrophoresis (CE). It is designed as a practical guide to be used by a wide audience, including those new to CE as well as more experienced users. T

  19. Freeform fluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehoff, Ryan R; Lind, Randall F; Love, Lonnie L; Peter, William H; Richardson, Bradley S

    2015-02-10

    A robotic, prosthetic or orthotic member includes a body formed of a solidified metallic powder. At least one working fluid cylinder is formed in the body. A piston is provided in the working fluid cylinder for pressurizing a fluid in the cylinder. At least one working fluid conduit receives the pressurized fluid from the cylinder. The body, working fluid cylinder and working fluid conduit have a unitary construction. A method of making a robotic member is also disclosed.

  20. Numerical and experimental study of capillary-driven flow of PCR solution in hybrid hydrophobic microfluidic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Naveen; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Ramalingam, Neevan; Keshavarzi, Gholamreza; Hao-Bing, Liu; Hai-Qing, Thomas Gong

    2016-08-01

    Capillary-driven microfluidics is essential for development of point-of-care diagnostic micro-devices. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based micro-devices are widely developed and used in such point-of-care settings. It is imperative to characterize the fluid parameters of PCR solution for designing efficient capillary-driven microfluidic networks. Generally, for numeric modelling, the fluid parameters of PCR solution are approximated to that of water. This procedure leads to inaccurate results, which are discrepant to experimental data. This paper describes mathematical modeling and experimental validation of capillary-driven flow inside Poly-(dimethyl) siloxane (PDMS)-glass hybrid micro-channels. Using experimentally measured PCR fluid parameters, the capillary meniscus displacement in PDMS-glass microfluidic ladder network is simulated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD), and experimentally verified to match with the simulated data. PMID:27432321

  1. Loop Heat Pipes and Capillary Pumped Loops: An Applications Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Swanson, Theodore; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLS) and loop heat pipes (LHPS) are versatile two-phase heat transfer devices which have recently gained increasing acceptance in space applications. Both systems work based on the same principles and have very similar designs. Nevertheless, some differences exist in the construction of the evaporator and the hydro-accumulator, and these differences lead to very distinct operating characteristics for each loop. This paper presents comparisons of the two loops from an applications perspective, and addresses their impact on spacecraft design, integration, and test. Some technical challenges and issues for both loops are also addressed.

  2. STUDY OF CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS ON MICROCHIP BASED ON MEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangMing; LiWei; 等

    2002-01-01

    Using a standard photolithographical procedure,chenmical wet etching and thermal diffusion bonding technology,a chemical analysis device for Capillary Electrophoresis(CE) has been microfabricated on a planar glass substrate with a cross-column geometry.The channels on the microchip substrate are about 50um deep and 150um wide.By employing amino acids derived from 2,4-DiNitroFluoroBenzen(DNFB) on CE chip channels,the sample manipulating system is studied based on the principle of electrodynamics.

  3. 3D printed metal columns for capillary liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandron, S; Heery, B; Gupta, V; Collins, D A; Nesterenko, E P; Nesterenko, P N; Talebi, M; Beirne, S; Thompson, F; Wallace, G G; Brabazon, D; Regan, F; Paull, B

    2014-12-21

    Coiled planar capillary chromatography columns (0.9 mm I.D. × 60 cm L) were 3D printed in stainless steel (316L), and titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloys (external dimensions of ~5 × 30 × 58 mm), and either slurry packed with various sized reversed-phase octadecylsilica particles, or filled with an in situ prepared methacrylate based monolith. Coiled printed columns were coupled directly with 30 × 30 mm Peltier thermoelectric direct contact heater/cooler modules. Preliminary results show the potential of using such 3D printed columns in future portable chromatographic devices. PMID:25285334

  4. Nonaqueous Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klampfl, Christian W; Himmelsbach, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The term nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE) commonly refers to capillary electrophoresis with purely nonaqueous background electrolytes (BGE). Main advantages of NACE are the possibility to analyze substances with very low solubility in aqueous media as well as separation selectivity that can be quite different in organic solvents (compared to water)-a property that can be employed for manipulation of separation selectivities. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become more and more popular as a detector in CE a fact that applies also for NACE. In the present chapter, the development of NACE-MS since 2004 is reviewed. Relevant parameters like composition of BGE and its influence on separation and detection in NACE as well as sheath liquid for NACE-MS are discussed. Finally, an overview of the papers published in the field of NACE-MS between 2004 and 2014 is given. Applications are grouped according to the field (analysis of natural products, biomedical analysis, food analysis, analysis of industrial products, and fundamental investigations). PMID:27645734

  5. Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Aaron; Yeshua, Talia; Palchan, Mila; Lovsky, Yulia; Taha, Hesham

    2010-03-01

    Lithography based on scanning probe microscopic techniques has considerable potential for accurate & localized deposition of material on the nanometer scale. Controlled deposition of metallic features with high purity and spatial accuracy is of great interest for circuit edit applications in the semiconductor industry, for plasmonics & nanophotonics and for basic research in surface enhanced Raman scattering & nanobiophysics. Within the context of metal deposition we will review the development of fountain pen nanochemistry and its most recent emulation Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis (ACCE). Using this latter development we will demonstrate achievement of unprecedented control of nanoparticle deposition using a three-electrode geometry. Three electrodes are attached: one on the outside of a metal coated glass probe, one on the inside of a hollow probe in a solution containing Au nanoparticles in the capillary, and a third on the surface where the writing takes place. The three electrodes provide electrical pulses for accurate control of deposition and retraction of the liquid from the surface overcoming the lack of control seen in both dip pen lithography & fountain pen nanochemistry when the tip contacts the surface. With this development, we demonstrate depositing a single 1.3 nm Au nanoparticle onto surfaces such as semiconductors.

  6. Development of Two Color Fluorescent Imager and Integrated Fluidic System for Nanosatellite Biology Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Diana Terri; Ricco, Antonio Joseph; Lera, Matthew P.; Timucin, Linda R.; Parra, Macarena P.

    2012-01-01

    Nanosatellites offer frequent, low-cost space access as secondary payloads on launches of larger conventional satellites. We summarize the payload science and technology of the Microsatellite in-situ Space Technologies (MisST) nanosatellite for conducting automated biological experiments. The payload (two fused 10-cm cubes) includes 1) an integrated fluidics system that maintains organism viability and supports growth and 2) a fixed-focus imager with fluorescence and scattered-light imaging capabilities. The payload monitors temperature, pressure and relative humidity, and actively controls temperature. C. elegans (nematode, 50 m diameter x 1 mm long) was selected as a model organism due to previous space science experience, its completely sequenced genome, size, hardiness, and the variety of strains available. Three strains were chosen: two green GFP-tagged strains and one red tdTomato-tagged strain that label intestinal, nerve, and pharyngeal cells, respectively. The integrated fluidics system includes bioanalytical and reservoir modules. The former consists of four 150 L culture wells and a 4x5 mm imaging zone the latter includes two 8 mL fluid reservoirs for reagent and waste storage. The fluidic system is fabricated using multilayer polymer rapid prototyping: laser cutting, precision machining, die cutting, and pressure-sensitive adhesives it also includes eight solenoid-operated valves and one mini peristaltic pump. Young larval-state (L2) nematodes are loaded in C. elegans Maintenance Media (CeMM) in the bioanalytical module during pre-launch assembly. By the time orbit is established, the worms have grown to sufficient density to be imaged and are fed fresh CeMM. The strains are pumped sequentially into the imaging area, imaged, then pumped into waste. Reagent storage utilizes polymer bags under slight pressure to prevent bubble formation in wells or channels. The optical system images green and red fluorescence bands by excitation with blue (473 nm peak

  7. Diagnostics of a high current capillary discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated that thin (10 to 25 μm diameter) capillaries can be fabricated in suitably configured insulators for use in pulse power machines. Large currents can be used to heat these capillaries which produce photons with an energies greater than 1 keV

  8. Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis in a premature infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PCH) is a rare disorder characterized by widespread capillary proliferation in the lung, infiltrating the interstitium and the alveolar walls. We present the HRCT features of PCH in a surviving ex-premature infant. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of the radiological features of PCH in a young living infant. (orig.)

  9. Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis in a premature infant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Cicero J.T.A.; Massie, John; Mandelstam, Simone A. [University of Melbourne, Royal Children' s Hospital, Parkville, VIC (Australia)

    2005-06-01

    Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PCH) is a rare disorder characterized by widespread capillary proliferation in the lung, infiltrating the interstitium and the alveolar walls. We present the HRCT features of PCH in a surviving ex-premature infant. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of the radiological features of PCH in a young living infant. (orig.)

  10. Sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenchen; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-06-17

    A sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) with mass spectrometry is disclosed. The sheathless interface includes a separation capillary for performing CE separation and an emitter capillary for electrospray ionization. A portion of the emitter capillary is porous or, alternatively, is coated to form an electrically conductive surface. A section of the emitter capillary is disposed within the separation capillary, forming a joint. A metal tube, containing a conductive liquid, encloses the joint.

  11. Visualization and measurement of capillary-driven blood flow using spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Cito, Salvatore; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Pallares, Jordi; Duarte, Rodrigo Martinez; Chen, Zhongping; Madou, Marc; Katakis, Ioanis

    2012-01-01

    Capillary-driven flow (CD-flow) in microchannels plays an important role in many microfluidic devices. These devices, the most popular being those based in lateral flow, are becoming increasingly used in health care and diagnostic applications. CD-flow can passively pump biological fluids as blood, serum or plasma, in microchannels and it can enhance the wall mass transfer by exploiting the convective effects of the flow behind the meniscus. The flow behind the meniscus has not been experimen...

  12. Fundamental Study on New Micro Fluidic Drive Method Based on Liquid Crystalline Backflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunbo Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose a one-dimensional simple model for predicting the performance of the new micro fluidic drive and then we have a research of the control method based on liquid crystalline backflow by combining the motion of the upper plate of a liquid crystal cell and the flow of a liquid crystal. Comparison of the numerical predictions and the experimental results shows that the proposed model is useful to predict qualitatively the motion the upper plate. The drive efficiency is affected by applied voltage, the frequency, the duty ratio and the gap of the cell. The ideal drive quality can be achieved when the rotation range of the molecules at the center of the cell is controlled within 50-80°.

  13. High frequency fluidic and microfluidic sensors for contactless dielectric and in vitro cell culture measurement applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacke, T.; Barthel, A.; Cahill, B. P.; Meister, M.; Zaikou, Y.

    2013-04-01

    There is a widespread need for highly-sensitive robust sensors that operate without direct contact to the fluid for analysis of fluids in bioprocess technology. Measuring the variation of dielectric properties (conductivity and permittivity) in the microwave frequency band can be used as an approach to investigate biological and chemical matter and processes such as, cell growth, cell metabolism and the concentration of large aqueous based molecules. In comparison to measurement at lower frequencies, DC conductivity (σ) effects on material properties (permittivity ε) can be neglected with increasing of the frequency. This presentation describes a high frequency sensor, which combines detection in macro- or microfluidic networks with quick and precise analysis. It is composed of a fluidic channel placed contactless between a micro-strip line waveguide combined with resonant properties.

  14. Acousto-fluidic system assisting in-liquid self-assembly of microcomponents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present the theoretical background, design, fabrication and characterization of a micromachined chamber assisting the fluidic self-assembly of micro-electro-mechanical systems in a bulk liquid. Exploiting bubble-induced acoustic microstreaming, several structurally-robust driving modes are excited inside the chamber. The modes promote the controlled aggregation and disaggregation of microcomponents relying on strong and reproducible fluid mixing effects achieved even at low Reynolds numbers. The functionality of the microfluidic chamber is demonstrated through the fast and repeatable geometrical pairing and subsequent unpairing of polymeric microcylinders. Relying only on drag and radiation forces and on the natural hydrophobicity of SU-8 in aqueous solutions, assembly yields of approximately 50% are achieved in no longer than ten seconds of agitation. The system can stochastically control the assembly process and significantly reduce the time-to-assembly of building blocks. (paper)

  15. Accelerating a hybrid continuum-atomistic fluidic model with on-the-fly machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Stephenson, David; Lockerby, Duncan A

    2016-01-01

    We present a hybrid continuum-atomistic scheme which combines molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with on-the-fly machine learning techniques for the accurate and efficient prediction of multiscale fluidic systems. By using a Gaussian process as a surrogate model for the computationally expensive MD simulations, we use Bayesian inference to predict the system behaviour at the atomistic scale, purely by consideration of the macroscopic inputs and outputs. Whenever the uncertainty of this prediction is greater than a predetermined acceptable threshold, a new MD simulation is performed to continually augment the database, which is never required to be complete. This provides a substantial enhancement to the current generation of hybrid methods, which often require many similar atomistic simulations to be performed, discarding information after it is used once. We apply our hybrid scheme to nano-confined unsteady flow through a high-aspect-ratio converging-diverging channel, and make comparisons between the new s...

  16. A variable transverse stiffness sandwich structure using fluidic flexible matrix composites (F2MC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suyi; Lotfi, Amir; Shan, Ying; Wang, K. W.; Rahn, Christopher D.; Bakis, Charles E.

    2008-03-01

    Presented in this paper is the development of a novel honeycomb sandwich panel with variable transverse stiffness. In this structure, the traditional sandwich face sheets are replaced by the fluidic flexible matrix composite (F2MC) tube layers developed in recent studies. The F2MC layers, combined with the anisotropic honeycomb core material properties, provide a new sandwich structure with variable stiffness properties for transverse loading. In this research, an analytical model is derived based on Lekhitskii's anisotropic pressurized tube solution and Timoshenko beam theory. Experimental investigations are also conducted to verify the analytical findings. A segmented multiple-F2MC-tube configuration is synthesized to increase the variable stiffness range. The analysis shows that the new honeycomb sandwich structure using F2MC tubes of 10 segments can provide a high/low transverse stiffness ratio of 60. Segmentation and stiffness control can be realized by an embedded valve network, granting a fast response time.

  17. Variable stiffness actuator based on fluidic flexible matrix composites and piezoelectric-hydraulic pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gi-Woo; Li, Suyi; Wang, K. W.

    2010-04-01

    Recently, a new biological-inspired fluidic flexible matrix composite (in short, F2MC) concept has been developed for linear/torsional actuation and structural stiffness tailoring. Although the actuation and the variable stiffness features of the F2MC have been successfully demonstrated individually, their combined functions and full potentials were not yet manifested. In addition, the current hydraulic pressurization systems are bulky and heavy, limiting the potential of the F2MC actuator. To address these issues, we synthesize a new variable stiffness actuator concept that can provide both effective actuation and tunable stiffness (dual-mode), incorporating the F2MC with a compact piezoelectric-hydraulic pump (in short, PHP). This dual-mode mechanism will significantly enhance the potential of the F2MC adaptive structures.

  18. Autonomous undulatory serpentine locomotion utilizing body dynamics of a fluidic soft robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onal, Cagdas D; Rus, Daniela

    2013-06-01

    Soft robotics offers the unique promise of creating inherently safe and adaptive systems. These systems bring man-made machines closer to the natural capabilities of biological systems. An important requirement to enable self-contained soft mobile robots is an on-board power source. In this paper, we present an approach to create a bio-inspired soft robotic snake that can undulate in a similar way to its biological counterpart using pressure for actuation power, without human intervention. With this approach, we develop an autonomous soft snake robot with on-board actuation, power, computation and control capabilities. The robot consists of four bidirectional fluidic elastomer actuators in series to create a traveling curvature wave from head to tail along its body. Passive wheels between segments generate the necessary frictional anisotropy for forward locomotion. It takes 14 h to build the soft robotic snake, which can attain an average locomotion speed of 19 mm s(-1).

  19. High frequency fluidic and microfluidic sensors for contactless dielectric and in vitro cell culture measurement applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a widespread need for highly-sensitive robust sensors that operate without direct contact to the fluid for analysis of fluids in bioprocess technology. Measuring the variation of dielectric properties (conductivity and permittivity) in the microwave frequency band can be used as an approach to investigate biological and chemical matter and processes such as, cell growth, cell metabolism and the concentration of large aqueous based molecules. In comparison to measurement at lower frequencies, DC conductivity (σ) effects on material properties (permittivity ε) can be neglected with increasing of the frequency. This presentation describes a high frequency sensor, which combines detection in macro- or microfluidic networks with quick and precise analysis. It is composed of a fluidic channel placed contactless between a micro-strip line waveguide combined with resonant properties.

  20. Acousto-fluidic system assisting in-liquid self-assembly of microcomponents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldowsky, J.; Mastrangeli, M.; Jacot-Descombes, L.; Gullo, M. R.; Mermoud, G.; Brugger, J.; Martinoli, A.; Nelson, B. J.; Knapp, Helmut F.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present the theoretical background, design, fabrication and characterization of a micromachined chamber assisting the fluidic self-assembly of micro-electro-mechanical systems in a bulk liquid. Exploiting bubble-induced acoustic microstreaming, several structurally-robust driving modes are excited inside the chamber. The modes promote the controlled aggregation and disaggregation of microcomponents relying on strong and reproducible fluid mixing effects achieved even at low Reynolds numbers. The functionality of the microfluidic chamber is demonstrated through the fast and repeatable geometrical pairing and subsequent unpairing of polymeric microcylinders. Relying only on drag and radiation forces and on the natural hydrophobicity of SU-8 in aqueous solutions, assembly yields of approximately 50% are achieved in no longer than ten seconds of agitation. The system can stochastically control the assembly process and significantly reduce the time-to-assembly of building blocks.

  1. Modelling the nonlinear response of fibre-reinforced bending fluidic actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacucciolo, Vito; Renda, Federico; Poccia, Ernesto; Laschi, Cecilia; Cianchetti, Matteo

    2016-10-01

    Soft actuators are receiving increasing attention from the engineering community, not only in research but even for industrial applications. Among soft actuators, fibre-reinforced bending fluidic actuators (BFAs) became very popular thanks to features such as robustness and easy design and fabrication. However, an accurate modelling of these smart structures, taking into account all the nonlinearities involved, is a challenging task. In this effort, we propose an analytical mechanical model to capture the quasi-static response of fibre-reinforced BFAs. The model is fully 3D and for the first time includes the effect of the pressure on the lateral surface of the chamber as well as the non-constant torque produced by the pressure at the tip. The presented model can be used for design and control, while providing information about the mechanics of these complex actuators.

  2. A Fluidic Cell Embedded Electromagnetic Wave Sensor for Online Indication of Neurological Impairment during Surgical Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lactate is known to be an indicator of neurological impairment during aortic aneurysm surgery. It is suggested that cerebrospinal fluid removed during such surgery could provide useful information in this regard. Medical professionals find the prospect of online detection of such analytes exciting, as current practice is time consuming and leads to multiple invasive procedures. Advancing from the current laboratory based analysis techniques to online methods could provide the basis for improved treatment regimes, better quality of care, and enhanced resource efficiency within hospitals. Accordingly, this article considers the use of a low power fluidic system with embedded electromagnetic wave sensor to detect varying lactate concentrations. Results are promising over the physiological range of 0 − 20 mmol/L with a calibration curve demonstrating an R2 value > 0.98.

  3. A membrane-based serpentine-shape pneumatic micropump with pumping performance modulated by fluidic resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a new membrane-based pneumatic micropump with new serpentine-shape (S-shape) pneumatic channels intended for achieving high-throughput pumping in a microfluidic system at a relatively low pumping rate and a board flow rate range. The key feature of this design is the ability to modulate the pumping rates by fine-tuning the fluidic resistance of injected compressed air in the designed pneumatic microchannels and the chambers of the micropump. In the study, several S-shape pneumatic micropumps with various layouts were designed and fabricated based on thick-film photoresist lithography and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replication processes. To investigate designs with a suitable pumping performance, S-shape pneumatic micropumps with varied lengths (1000, 5000 and 10 000 µm), varied widths (20, 40 and 200 µm) of the pneumatic microchannel bridging two rectangular pneumatic chambers, and different numbers of pneumatic channel bends (two and four U-shape bends) were designed and evaluated experimentally by using high-speed CCD-coupled microscopic observation of the movement of PDMS membrane pulsation and pumping rate measurements. The results revealed that under the experimental conditions studied, the layout of the S-shape pneumatic micropump with three rectangular pneumatic chambers, 5000 µm long and 40 µm wide pneumatic microchannel and four U-shape bends in the pneumatic microchannel was found to be capable of providing a broader pumping rate range from 0 to 539 µl h−1 compared to the other designs. As a whole, the experimental results demonstrate the use of fluidic resistance of injected air in a pneumatic micropump with S-shape layout to control its pumping performance, which largely expands the flexibility of its pumping application in a microfluidic system

  4. New Drop Fluidics Enabled by Magnetic-Field-Mediated Elastocapillary Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Saheli; Pomeau, Yves; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2016-07-12

    This research introduces a new drop fluidics that uses a deformable and stretchable elastomeric film as the platform instead of the commonly used rigid supports. Such a soft film impregnated with magnetic particles can be modulated with an external electromagnetic field that produces a vast array of topographical landscapes with varying surface curvature, which, in conjunction with capillarity, can direct and control the motion of water droplets efficiently and accurately. When a thin layer of oil is present on this film that is deformed locally, a centrosymmetric wedge is formed. A water droplet placed on this oil-laden film becomes asymmetrically deformed, thus producing a gradient of Laplace pressure within the droplet and setting it in motion. A simple theory is presented that accounts for the droplet speed in terms of such geometric variables as the volume of the droplet and the thickness of the oil film covering the soft elastomeric film as well as material variables such as the viscosity of the oil and the interfacial tension of the oil-water interfaces. Following the verification of the theoretical result using well-controlled model systems, we demonstrate how the electromagnetically controlled elastocapillary force can be used to manipulate the motion of single and/or multiple droplets on the surface of the elastomeric film and how elementary operations such as drop fusion and thermally addressed chemical transformation can be carried out in aqueous droplets. It is expected that the resulting drop fluidics would be suitable for the digital control of drop motion by simply switching on and off the electromagnetic fields applied at different positions underneath the elastomeric film in a Boolean sequence. We anticipate that this method of directing and manipulating water droplets is poised for application in various biochemical reaction engineering situations, an example of which is the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PMID:27300489

  5. Design and implementation of fluidic micro-pulleys for flow control on centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroori, Salar; Kulinsky, Lawrence; Kido, Horacio; Madou, Marc

    2014-06-01

    Microfluidic discs have been employed in a variety of applications for chemical analyses and biological diagnostics. These platforms offer a sophisticated fluidic toolbox, necessary to perform processes that involve sample preparation, purification, analysis, and detection. However, one of the weaknesses of such systems is the uni-directional movement of fluid from the disc center to its periphery due to the uni-directionality of the propelling centrifugal force. Here we demonstrate a mechanism for fluid movement from the periphery of a hydrophobic disc toward its center that does not rely on the energy supplied by any peripheral equipment. This method utilizes a ventless fluidic network that connects a column of working fluid to a sample fluid. As the working fluid is pushed by the centrifugal force to move toward the periphery of the disc, the sample fluid is pulled up toward the center of the disc analogous to a physical pulley where two weights are connected by a rope passed through a block. The ventless network is analogous to the rope in the pulley. As the working fluid descends, it creates a negative pressure that pulls the sample fluid up. The sample and working fluids do not come into direct contact and it allows the freedom to select a working fluid with physical properties markedly different from those of the sample. This article provides a demonstration of the "micro-pulley" on a disc, discusses underlying physical phenomena, provides design guidelines for fabrication of micro-pulleys on discs, and outlines a vision for future micro-pulley applications.

  6. In Vivo Imaging of Intraocular Fluidics in Vitrectomized Swine Eyes Using a Digital Fluoroscopy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Tandogan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the characteristics of intraocular fluidics during cataract surgery in swine eyes with prior vitrectomy. Methods. We prepared three groups of enucleated swine eyes (nonvitrectomized, core, and totally vitrectomized. Irrigation and aspiration were performed (2.7 mm conventional sleeved phacosystem using a balanced saline solution mixed with a water-soluble radiopaque contrast medium at 1 : 1 ratio. We imaged the eyes using a digital fluoroscopy system (DFS during phacoemulsification and compared the characteristics of the intraocular fluid dynamics between the groups. Results. The anterior chamber depth (ACD after the commencement of irrigation differed between groups (2.25±0.06 mm; 2.33±0.06 mm; 3.17±0.11 mm, as well as the height of the fluid flowing from the anterior chamber into the posterior cavity that was identified by lifting up the iris to correct the infusion deviation syndrome (0.00±0.00 mm; 0.41±0.04 mm; 2.19±0.35 mm. Conclusions. DFS demonstrated differences in fluid dynamics during phacoemulsification in swine eyes with or without prior vitrectomy. In completely vitrectomized eyes, the large ACD, which developed during phacoemulsification, could be reduced by lifting the iris and allowing the fluid to shift to the posterior cavity. Recognizing the differences in fluidics of vitrectomized eyes as compared to those of the nonvitrectomized eyes may reduce the frequency of intraoperative complications.

  7. High resolution mosaic image of capillaries in human retina by adaptive optics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Ling; Yudong Zhang; Xuejun Rao; Cheng Wang; Yiyun Hu; Wenhan Jiang

    2005-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) has been proved as a powerful means for high resolution imaging of human retina.Because of the pixel number of charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, the field of view is limited to 1°.In order to have image of capillaries around vivo human fovea, we use mosaic method to obtain high resolution image in area of 6°× 6°. Detailed structures of capillaries around fovea with resolution of 2.3μm are clearly shown. Comparison shows that this method has a much higher resolution than current clinic retina imaging methods.

  8. Cfd Simulation of Capillary Rise of Liquid in Cylindrical Container with Lateral Vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolin; Huang, Yiyong; Li, Guangyu

    2016-06-01

    Orbit refueling is one of the most significant technologies, which has vital strategic meaning. It can enhance the flexibility and prolong the lifetime of the spacecrafts. Space propellant management is one of the key technologies in orbit refueling. Based on the background of space propellant management, CFD simulations of capillary rise of liquid in Cylindrical container with lateral vanes in space condition were carried out in this paper. The influence of the size and the number of the vanes to the capillary flow were analyzed too. The results can be useful to the design and optimization of the propellant management device in the vane type surface tension tank.

  9. Capillary Self-Alignment of Microchips on Soft Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Chang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Soft micro devices and stretchable electronics have attracted great interest for their potential applications in sensory skins and wearable bio-integrated devices. One of the most important steps in building printed circuits is the alignment of assembled micro objects. Previously, the capillary self-alignment of microchips driven by surface tension effects has been shown to be able to achieve high-throughput and high-precision in the integration of micro parts on rigid hydrophilic/superhydrophobic patterned surfaces. In this paper, the self-alignment of microchips on a patterned soft and stretchable substrate, which consists of hydrophilic pads surrounded by a superhydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS background, is demonstrated for the first time. A simple process has been developed for making superhydrophobic soft surface by replicating nanostructures of black silicon onto a PDMS surface. Different kinds of PDMS have been investigated, and the parameters for fabricating superhydrophobic PDMS have been optimized. A self-alignment strategy has been proposed that can result in reliable self-alignment on a soft PDMS substrate. Our results show that capillary self-alignment has great potential for building soft printed circuits.

  10. A new beamstop for microfocus X-ray capillary beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englich, Ulrich, E-mail: ue22@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Macromolecular Diffraction at CHESS (MacCHESS), Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, 200L Wilson Laboratory, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Revesz, Peter [Cornell University, Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Miller, William [Cornell University, Macromolecular Diffraction at CHESS (MacCHESS), Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, 200L Wilson Laboratory, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    In order to accurately measure the photon flux and to assist in aligning the beam, we have designed a modified beamstop device based on a photo diode integrated with the beamstop. The beamstop contains a small CdWO{sub 4} crystal that completely stops the X-rays and at the same time produces photoluminescence proportional to the X-ray flux. The light is then guided to a photosensitive diode using a flexible light pipe to monitor the flux. With this device we achieve the goal of stopping the primary X-ray beam and simultaneously monitoring the X-ray intensity, thus eliminating the need for integrating ion-chambers into the capillary or collimator mount.

  11. Rapid, single-molecule assays in nano/micro-fluidic chips with arrays of closely spaced parallel channels fabricated by femtosecond laser machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Brian K; King, Jason K; Robinson, William N; Hofmeister, William H; Davis, Lloyd M

    2014-08-20

    Cost-effective pharmaceutical drug discovery depends on increasing assay throughput while reducing reagent needs. To this end, we are developing an ultrasensitive, fluorescence-based platform that incorporates a nano/micro-fluidic chip with an array of closely spaced channels for parallelized optical readout of single-molecule assays. Here we describe the use of direct femtosecond laser machining to fabricate several hundred closely spaced channels on the surfaces of fused silica substrates. The channels are sealed by bonding to a microscope cover slip spin-coated with a thin film of poly(dimethylsiloxane). Single-molecule detection experiments are conducted using a custom-built, wide-field microscope. The array of channels is epi-illuminated by a line-generating red diode laser, resulting in a line focus just a few microns thick across a 500 micron field of view. A dilute aqueous solution of fluorescently labeled biomolecules is loaded into the device and fluorescence is detected with an electron-multiplying CCD camera, allowing acquisition rates up to 7 kHz for each microchannel. Matched digital filtering based on experimental parameters is used to perform an initial, rapid assessment of detected fluorescence. More detailed analysis is obtained through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Simulated fluorescence data is shown to agree well with experimental values.

  12. Rapid, Single-Molecule Assays in Nano/Micro-Fluidic Chips with Arrays of Closely Spaced Parallel Channels Fabricated by Femtosecond Laser Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K. Canfield

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cost-effective pharmaceutical drug discovery depends on increasing assay throughput while reducing reagent needs. To this end, we are developing an ultrasensitive, fluorescence-based platform that incorporates a nano/micro-fluidic chip with an array of closely spaced channels for parallelized optical readout of single-molecule assays. Here we describe the use of direct femtosecond laser machining to fabricate several hundred closely spaced channels on the surfaces of fused silica substrates. The channels are sealed by bonding to a microscope cover slip spin-coated with a thin film of poly(dimethylsiloxane. Single-molecule detection experiments are conducted using a custom-built, wide-field microscope. The array of channels is epi-illuminated by a line-generating red diode laser, resulting in a line focus just a few microns thick across a 500 micron field of view. A dilute aqueous solution of fluorescently labeled biomolecules is loaded into the device and fluorescence is detected with an electron-multiplying CCD camera, allowing acquisition rates up to 7 kHz for each microchannel. Matched digital filtering based on experimental parameters is used to perform an initial, rapid assessment of detected fluorescence. More detailed analysis is obtained through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Simulated fluorescence data is shown to agree well with experimental values.

  13. Rapid, single-molecule assays in nano/micro-fluidic chips with arrays of closely spaced parallel channels fabricated by femtosecond laser machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Brian K; King, Jason K; Robinson, William N; Hofmeister, William H; Davis, Lloyd M

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective pharmaceutical drug discovery depends on increasing assay throughput while reducing reagent needs. To this end, we are developing an ultrasensitive, fluorescence-based platform that incorporates a nano/micro-fluidic chip with an array of closely spaced channels for parallelized optical readout of single-molecule assays. Here we describe the use of direct femtosecond laser machining to fabricate several hundred closely spaced channels on the surfaces of fused silica substrates. The channels are sealed by bonding to a microscope cover slip spin-coated with a thin film of poly(dimethylsiloxane). Single-molecule detection experiments are conducted using a custom-built, wide-field microscope. The array of channels is epi-illuminated by a line-generating red diode laser, resulting in a line focus just a few microns thick across a 500 micron field of view. A dilute aqueous solution of fluorescently labeled biomolecules is loaded into the device and fluorescence is detected with an electron-multiplying CCD camera, allowing acquisition rates up to 7 kHz for each microchannel. Matched digital filtering based on experimental parameters is used to perform an initial, rapid assessment of detected fluorescence. More detailed analysis is obtained through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Simulated fluorescence data is shown to agree well with experimental values. PMID:25140634

  14. "Getting the best sensitivity from on-capillary fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis" - A tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galievsky, Victor A; Stasheuski, Alexander S; Krylov, Sergey N

    2016-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection is being applied to new analytical problems which challenge both the power of CE separation and the sensitivity of LIF detection. On-capillary LIF detection is much more practical than post-capillary detection in a sheath-flow cell. Therefore, commercial CE instruments utilize solely on-capillary CE-LIF detection with a Limit of Detection (LOD) in the nM range, while there are multiple applications of CE-LIF that require pM or lower LODs. This tutorial analyzes all aspects of on-capillary LIF detection in CE in an attempt to identify means for improving LOD of CE-LIF with on-capillary detection. We consider principles of signal enhancement and noise reduction, as well as relevant areas of fluorophore photochemistry and fluorescent microscopy. PMID:27543015

  15. A new simple and fast thermally-solvent assisted method to bond PMMA–PMMA in micro-fluidics devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamshad, Arshya; Nikfarjam, Alireza; Khaleghi, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    A rapid and simple thermally-solvent assisted method of bonding was introduced for poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) based microfluidic substrates. The technique is a low-temperature (68 {}^\\circ \\text{C} ), and rapid (15 \\min ) bonding technique; in addition, only a fan-assisted oven with some paper clamps are used. Two different solvents (ethanol and isopropyl alcohol) with two different methods of cooling (one-step and three steps) were employed to determine the best solvent and method of cooling (residual stresses may be released in different cooling methods) by considering bonding strength and quality. In this bonding technique, a thin film of solvent between two PMMA sheets disperses tends to dissolve a thin film of PMMA sheet surface, then evaporate, and finally reconnect monomers of the PMMA sheets at the specific operating temperature. The operating temperature of this method comes from the coincidence of the solubility parameter graph of PMMA with the solubility parameter graph of the solvents. Different tests such as tensile strength test, deformation test, leakage tests, and surface characteristics tests were performed to find the optimum conditions for this bonding strategy. The best bonding quality and the highest bonding strength (28.47 \\text{MPa} ) occurred when 70% isopropyl alcohol solution was employed with the one-step cooling method. Furthermore, the bonding reversibility was taken into account and critical percentages for irreversible bonding were obtained for both of the solvents and methods. This method provides a perfect bonding quality for PMMA substrates, and can be used in laboratories without needing any expensive and special instruments, because of its merits such as lower bonding time, lower-cost, and higher strength etc in comparison with the majority of other common bonding techniques.

  16. Burst behavior at a capillary tip: Effect of low and high surface tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agonafer, Damena D; Lopez, Ken; Palko, James W; Won, Yoonjin; Santiago, Juan G; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-10-01

    Liquid retention in micron and millimeter scale devices is important for maintaining stable interfaces in various processes including bimolecular separation, phase change heat transfer, and water desalination. There have been several studies of re-entrant geometries, and very few studies on retaining low surface tension liquids such as fluorocarbon-based dielectric liquids. Here, we study retention of a liquid with very low contact angles using borosilicate glass capillary tips. We analyzed capillary tips with outer diameters ranging from 250 to 840 μm and measured Laplace pressures up to 2.9 kPa. Experimental results agree well with a numerical model that predicts burst pressure (the maximum Laplace pressure for liquid retention), which is a function of the outer diameter (D) and capillary exit edge radius of curvature (r). PMID:26046980

  17. An Oxidase-Based Electrochemical Fluidic Sensor with High-Sensitivity and Low-Interference by On-Chip Oxygen Manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Chang-Soo Kim; Jongwon Park; Nitin Radhakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing a simple fluidic structure, we demonstrate the improved performance of oxidase-based enzymatic biosensors. Electrolysis of water is utilized to generate bubbles to manipulate the oxygen microenvironment close to the biosensor in a fluidic channel. For the proper enzyme reactions to occur, a simple mechanical procedure of manipulating bubbles was developed to maximize the oxygen level while minimizing the pH change after electrolysis. The sensors show improved sensitivities based on ...

  18. Review on the development of truly portable and in-situ capillary electrophoresis systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, A. P.; Cranny, A.; Harris, N. R.; Green, N. G.; Wharton, J. A.; Wood, R. J. K.; Stokes, K. R.

    2013-04-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a technique which uses an electric field to separate a mixed sample into its constituents. Portable CE systems enable this powerful analysis technique to be used in the field. Many of the challenges for portable systems are similar to those of autonomous in-situ analysis and therefore portable systems may be considered a stepping stone towards autonomous in-situ analysis. CE is widely used for biological and chemical analysis and example applications include: water quality analysis; drug development and quality control; proteomics and DNA analysis; counter-terrorism (explosive material identification) and corrosion monitoring. The technique is often limited to laboratory use, since it requires large electric fields, sensitive detection systems and fluidic control systems. All of these place restrictions in terms of: size, weight, cost, choice of operating solutions, choice of fabrication materials, electrical power and lifetime. In this review we bring together and critique the work by researchers addressing these issues. We emphasize the importance of a holistic approach for portable and in-situ CE systems and discuss all the aspects of the design. We identify gaps in the literature which require attention for the realization of both truly portable and in-situ CE systems.

  19. Nanoparticle-based capillary electroseparation of proteins in polymer capillaries under physiological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, C.; Harwigsson, I.; Becker, K.;

    2010-01-01

    Totally porous lipid-based liquid crystalline nanoparticles were used as pseudostationary phase for capillary electroseparation with LIF detection of proteins at physiological conditions using unmodified cyclic olefin copolymer capillaries (Topas (R), 6.7 cm effective length). In the absence of n...... at protein friendly conditions. The developed capillary-based method facilitates future electrochromatography of proteins on polymer-based microchips under physiological conditions and enables the initial optimization of separation conditions in parallel to the chip development....

  20. Capillary electrochromatography using fibers as stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, K; Watanabe, H; Saito, Y; Takeichi, T

    2001-10-01

    Fiber-packed capillary columns have been evaluated in chromatographic performance in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The change of electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity and selectivity using different kinds of fiber materials was examined. Although the EOF velocity among the different fiber packed columns was almost the same, retention of parabens was larger on the Kevlar-packed column than on the Zylon-packed one, and was larger on the as-span-type fiber-packed column than on the high-modulus-type packed one. Using 200 microm ID x 5 cm Kevlar packed column combined with a 100 microm ID x 20 cm precolumn capillary and a 530 microm ID x 45 cm postcolumn capillary, the separation of three parabens within 30 s was achieved. Other compounds were also separated in a few minutes by the fiber-packed CEC method.

  1. Capillary electrochromatography using fibers as stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, K; Watanabe, H; Saito, Y; Takeichi, T

    2001-10-01

    Fiber-packed capillary columns have been evaluated in chromatographic performance in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The change of electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity and selectivity using different kinds of fiber materials was examined. Although the EOF velocity among the different fiber packed columns was almost the same, retention of parabens was larger on the Kevlar-packed column than on the Zylon-packed one, and was larger on the as-span-type fiber-packed column than on the high-modulus-type packed one. Using 200 microm ID x 5 cm Kevlar packed column combined with a 100 microm ID x 20 cm precolumn capillary and a 530 microm ID x 45 cm postcolumn capillary, the separation of three parabens within 30 s was achieved. Other compounds were also separated in a few minutes by the fiber-packed CEC method. PMID:11669512

  2. Capillary Optics generate stronger X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    NASA scientist, in the Space Sciences lab at Marshall, works with capillary optics that generate more intense X-rays than conventional sources. This capability is useful in studying the structure of important proteins.

  3. Selectivity and detection in capillary electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Khaled, Maha Yehia

    1994-01-01

    This work is a contribution to the minimization of some of the selectivity and detection limitations in capillary electrophoresis. A more practical design of an electrochemical detector is introduced with simultaneous on-line UV detection (1), for the selective detection of a number of pungent and neurological compounds, the piperines and the capsacinoids. Commercially available microelectrodes together with large 25 μm id fused silica capillary columns are used for the fir...

  4. Capillary fracture of soft gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Joshua B.; Daniels, Karen E.

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L∝t3/4. We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent.

  5. Blood Perfusion in Microfluidic Models of Pulmonary Capillary Networks: Role of Geometry and Hematocrit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, Hagit; Waisman, Dan; Sznitman, Josue; Technion-IIT Team; Department of Neonatology Carmel Medical Center; Faculty of Medicine-Technion IIT Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Microfluidic platforms are increasingly used to study blood microflows at true physiological scale due to their ability to overcome manufacturing obstacle of complex anatomical morphologies, such as the organ-specific architectures of the microcirculation. In the present work, we utilize microfluidic platforms to devise in vitro models of the underlying pulmonary capillary networks (PCN), where capillary lengths and diameters are similar to the size of RBCs (~ 5-10 μm). To better understand flow characteristics and dispersion of red blood cells (RBCs) in PCNs, we have designed microfluidic models of alveolar capillary beds inspired by the seminal ``sheet flow'' model of Fung and Sobin (1969). Our microfluidic PCNs feature confined arrays of staggered pillars with diameters of ~ 5,7 and 10 μm, mimicking the dense structure of pulmonary capillary meshes. The devices are perfused with suspensions of RBCs at varying hematocrit levels under different flow rates. Whole-field velocity patterns using micro-PIV and single-cell tracking using PTV are obtained with fluorescently-labelled RBCs and discussed. Our experiments deliver a real-scale quantitative description of RBC perfusion characteristics across the pulmonary capillary microcirculation.

  6. Engineering of in vitro 3D capillary beds by self-directed angiogenic sprouting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana M Chan

    Full Text Available In recent years, microfluidic systems have been used to study fundamental aspects of angiogenesis through the patterning of single-layered, linear or geometric vascular channels. In vivo, however, capillaries exist in complex, three-dimensional (3D networks, and angiogenic sprouting occurs with a degree of unpredictability in all x,y,z planes. The ability to generate capillary beds in vitro that can support thick, biological tissues remains a key challenge to the regeneration of vital organs. Here, we report the engineering of 3D capillary beds in an in vitro microfluidic platform that is comprised of a biocompatible collagen I gel supported by a mechanical framework of alginate beads. The engineered vessels have patent lumens, form robust ~1.5 mm capillary networks across the devices, and support the perfusion of 1 µm fluorescent beads through them. In addition, the alginate beads offer a modular method to encapsulate and co-culture cells that either promote angiogenesis or require perfusion for cell viability in engineered tissue constructs. This laboratory-constructed vascular supply may be clinically significant for the engineering of capillary beds and higher order biological tissues in a scalable and modular manner.

  7. Characteristics of ac capillary discharge produced in electrically conductive water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBaerdemaeker, F.; Simek, M.; Schmidt, J.; Leys, C.

    2007-05-01

    Basic electrical, optical and calorimetric characteristics of an ac (50 Hz) driven capillary discharge produced in a water solution were studied for initial water solution conductivity in the range 50-1000 µS cm-1. Typical current and voltage waveforms and emission intensities produced by several electronically excited species were recorded with high time resolution. The evolution of the electrical current, power and capillary resistance was inspected during positive ac half-cycle for various operational regimes. A fast relaxation of the discharge following a breakdown event was observed. Optical measurements indicate that radiative species are mostly generated during the first few hundreds of nanoseconds of plasma generation and that the average duration of plasma emission induced by a discharge pulse is of the order of a few microseconds. Results of calorimetric measurements are in good agreement with average electrical measurements and support the assumption that the discharge is a constant source of heat delivered to the liquid. Assuming that only a fraction of the heat released inside the capillary can be transported by conduction through the capillary wall and via its orifices, the processes of bubble formation, expulsion and re-filling the capillary with 'fresh' water must play a key role in maintaining a thermal balance during long-time steady-state operation of the device. Furthermore, a simplified numerical model and a first order energy deposition calculation prove the plausibility of the bubble breakdown mechanism.

  8. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis.

  9. Robust and Optimal Control of Magnetic Microparticles Inside Fluidic Channels with Time-varying Flow Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam S.M. Khalil

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapy using magnetic microparticles and nanoparticles has the potential to mitigate the negative side-effects associated with conventional medical treatment. Major technological challenges still need to be addressed in order to translate these particles into in vivo applications. For example, magnetic particles need to be navigated controllably in vessels against flowing streams of body fluid. This paper describes the motion control of paramagnetic microparticles in the flowing streams of fluidic channels with time-varying flow rates (maximum flow is 35 ml.hr-1. This control is designed using a magnetic-based proportional-derivative (PD control system to compensate for the time-varying flow inside the channels (with width and depth of 2 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively. First, we achieve point-to-point motion control against and along flow rates of 4 ml.hr-1, 6 ml.hr-1, 17 ml.hr-1, and 35 ml.hr-1. The average speeds of single microparticle (with average diameter of 100 μm against flow rates of 6 ml.hr-1 and 30 ml.hr-1 are calculated to be 45 μm.s-1 and 15 μm.s-1, respectively. Second, we implement PD control with disturbance estimation and compensation. This control decreases the steady-state error by 50%, 70%, 73%, and 78% at flow rates of 4 ml.hr-1, 6 ml.hr-1, 17 ml.hr-1, and 35 ml.hr-1, respectively. Finally, we consider the problem of finding the optimal path (minimal kinetic energy between two points using calculus of variation, against the mentioned flow rates. Not only do we find that an optimal path between two collinear points with the direction of maximum flow (middle of the fluidic channel decreases the rise time of the microparticles, but we also decrease the input current that is supplied to the electromagnetic coils by minimizing the kinetic energy of the microparticles, compared to a PD control with disturbance compensation.

  10. Simulation of the fluidic features for diffuser/nozzle involved in a PZT-based valveless micropump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HouWensheng; Zheng Xiaolin; Biswajit Das; Jiang Yingtao; Qian Shizhi; Wu Xiaoying; Zheng Zhigao

    2008-01-01

    PZT-based valveless micropump is a microactuator that can be used for controlling and delivering tiny amounts of fluids, and diffuser/nozzle plays an important role when this type of micropump drives the fluid flowing along a specific direction. In this paper, a numerical model of micropump has been proposed, and the fluidic properties of diffuser/nozzle have been simulated with ANSYS. With the method of finite-element analysis, the increased pressure drop between inlet and outlet of diffuser/nozzle induces the increment of flow rate in both diffuser and nozzle simultaneously, but the increasing rate of diffuser is faster than that of nozzle. The L/R, ratio of L (length of cone pipe) and R (radius of minimal cross section of cone pipe) plays an important role in fluidic performance of diffuser and nozzle as well, and the mean flow rate will decrease with increment of L/R. The mean flow rate reaches its peak value when L/R with the value of 10 regardless the divergence angle of diffuser or nozzle. The simulation results indicate that the fluidic properties of diffuser/nozzle can be defined by its geometric structure, and accordingly determine the efficiency of micropump.

  11. Three-dimensional printing-based electro-millifluidic devices for fabricating multi-compartment particles

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qiu Lan; Liu, Zhou; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the use of stereolithographic 3D printing to fabricate millifluidic devices, which are used to engineer particles with multiple compartments. As the 3D design is directly transferred to the actual prototype, this method accommodates 3D millimeter-scaled features that are difficult to achieve by either lithographic-based microfabrication or traditional macrofabrication techniques. We exploit this approach to produce millifluidic networks to deliver multiple fluidic...

  12. Design and operation of a portable scanner for high performance microchip capillary array electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, James R.; Liu, Peng; Mathies, Richard A.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a compact, laser-induced fluorescence detection scanner, the multichannel capillary array electrophoresis portable scanner (McCAEPs) as a platform for electrophoretic detection and control of high-throughput, integrated microfluidic devices for genetic and other analyses. The instrument contains a confocal optical system with a rotary objective for detecting four different fluorescence signals, a pneumatic system consisting of two pressure/vacuum pumps and 28 individual addressable solenoid valves for control of on-chip microvalves and micropumps, four Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) temperature control systems, and four high voltage power supplies for electrophoresis. The detection limit of the instrument is ˜20 pM for on-chip capillary electrophoresis of fluorescein dyes. To demonstrate the system performance for forensic short tandem repeat (STR) analysis, two experiments were conducted: (i) electrophoretic separation and detection of STR samples on a 96-lane microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis microchip. Fully resolved PowerPlex® 16 STR profiles amplified from 1 ng of 9947A female standard DNA were successfully obtained; (ii) nine-plex STR amplification, sample injection, separation, and fluorescence detection of 100-copy 9948 male standard DNA in a single integrated PCR- capillary electrophoresis microchip. These results demonstrate that the McCAEPs can be used as a versatile control and detection instrument that operates integrated microfluidic devices for high-performance forensic human identification.

  13. Capillary fracture of soft gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L[proportional]t(3/4). We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent. PMID:24229192

  14. Evaluation of fluidic thrust vectoring nozzle via thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Hirota, M.; Ouchi, K.; Saito, T.

    2016-03-01

    Shock vector control (SVC) in a converging-diverging nozzle with a rectangular cross-section is discussed as a fluidic thrust vectoring (FTV) method. The interaction between the primary nozzle flow and the secondary jet is examined using experiments and numerical simulations. The relationships between FTV parameters [nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and secondary jet pressure ratio (SPR)] and FTV performance (thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment) are investigated. The experiments are conducted with an NPR of up to 10 and an SPR of up to 2.7. Numerical simulations of the nozzle flow are performed using a Navier-Stokes solver with input parameters set to match the experimental conditions. The thrust pitching angle and moment computed from the force-moment balance are used to evaluate FTV performance. The experiment and numerical results indicate that the FTV parameters (NPR and SPR) directly affect FTV performance. Conventionally, FTV performance evaluated by the common method using thrust pitching angle is highly dependent on the location of evaluation. Hence, in this study, we show that the thrust pitching moment, a parameter which is independent of the location, is the appropriate figure of merit to evaluate the performance of FTV systems.

  15. Bioengineering bacteriophages to enhance the sensitivity of phage amplification-based paper fluidic detection of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaine, S D; Law, K; Ho, S; Kinchla, A J; Sela, D A; Nugen, S R

    2016-08-15

    Bacteriophage (phage) amplification is an attractive method for the detection of bacteria due to a narrow phage-host specificity, short amplification times, and the phages' ability to differentiate between viable and non-viable bacterial cells. The next step in phage-based bacteria detection is leveraging bioengineered phages to create low-cost, rapid, and easy-to-use detection platforms such as lateral flow assays. Our work establishes the proof-of-concept for the use of bioengineered T7 phage strains to increase the sensitivity of phage amplification-based lateral flow assays. We have demonstrated a greater than 10-fold increase in sensitivity using a phage-based protein reporter, maltose-binding protein, over the detection of replicated T7 phage viron itself, and a greater then 100-fold increase in sensitivity using a phage-based enzymatic reporter, alkaline phosphatase. This increase in sensitivity enabled us to detect 10(3)CFU/mL of Escherichia coli in broth after 7h, and by adding a filter concentration step, the ability to detect a regulatory relevant E. coli concentration of 100CFU/100mL in inoculated river water after 9h, where the current standard requires days for results. The combination of the paper fluidic format with phage-based detection provides a platform for the development of novel diagnostics that are sensitive, rapid, and easy to use.

  16. An angular fluidic channel for prism-free surface-plasmon-assisted fluorescence capturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Fukuda, Nobuko; Wang, Xiaomin; Fujimaki, Makoto

    2013-12-01

    Surface plasmon excitation provides stronger enhancement of the fluorescence intensity and better sensitivity than other sensing approaches but requires optimal positioning of a prism to ensure optimum output of the incident light. Here we describe a simple, highly sensitive optical sensing system combining surface plasmon excitation and fluorescence to address this limitation. V-shaped fluidic channels are employed to mimic the functions of a prism, sensing plate, and flow channel in a single setup. Superior performance is demonstrated for different biomolecular recognition reactions on a self-assembled monolayer, and the sensitivity reaches 100 fM for biotin-streptavidin interactions. Using an antibody as a probe, we demonstrate the detection of intact influenza viruses at 0.2 HA units ml-1 levels. The convenient sensing system developed here has the advantages of being prism-free and requiring less sample (1-2 μl), making this platform suitable for use in situations requiring low sample volumes.

  17. Shear wave attenuation and micro-fluidics in water-saturated sand and glass beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotiros, Nicholas P; Isakson, Marcia J

    2014-06-01

    An improvement in the modeling of shear wave attenuation and speed in water-saturated sand and glass beads is introduced. Some dry and water-saturated materials are known to follow a constant-Q model in which the attenuation, expressed as Q(-1), is independent of frequency. The associated loss mechanism is thought to lie within the solid frame. A second loss mechanism in fluid-saturated porous materials is the viscous loss due to relative motion between pore fluid and solid frame predicted by the Biot-Stoll model. It contains a relaxation process that makes the Q(-1) change with frequency, reaching a peak at a characteristic frequency. Examination of the published measurements above 1 kHz, particularly those of Brunson (Ph.D. thesis, Oregon State University, Corvalis, 1983), shows another peak, which is explained in terms of a relaxation process associated with the squirt flow process at the grain-grain contact. In the process of deriving a model for this phenomenon, it is necessary to consider the micro-fluidic effects associated with the flow within a thin film of water confined in the gap at the grain-grain contact and the resulting increase in the effective viscosity of water. The result is an extended Biot model that is applicable over a broad band of frequencies. PMID:24907791

  18. Autonomous undulatory serpentine locomotion utilizing body dynamics of a fluidic soft robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onal, Cagdas D; Rus, Daniela

    2013-06-01

    Soft robotics offers the unique promise of creating inherently safe and adaptive systems. These systems bring man-made machines closer to the natural capabilities of biological systems. An important requirement to enable self-contained soft mobile robots is an on-board power source. In this paper, we present an approach to create a bio-inspired soft robotic snake that can undulate in a similar way to its biological counterpart using pressure for actuation power, without human intervention. With this approach, we develop an autonomous soft snake robot with on-board actuation, power, computation and control capabilities. The robot consists of four bidirectional fluidic elastomer actuators in series to create a traveling curvature wave from head to tail along its body. Passive wheels between segments generate the necessary frictional anisotropy for forward locomotion. It takes 14 h to build the soft robotic snake, which can attain an average locomotion speed of 19 mm s(-1). PMID:23524383

  19. Nanobiomimetic Active Shape Control - Fluidic and Swarm-Intelligence Embodiments for Planetary Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoli, S.

    The concepts of Active Shape Control ( ASC ) and of Generalized Quantum Holography ( GQH ), respectively embodying a closer approach to biomimicry than the current macrophysics-based attempts at bioinspired robotic systems, and realizing a non-connectionistic, life-like kind of information processing that allows increasingly depths of mimicking of the biological structure-function solidarity, which have been formulated in physical terms in previous papers, are here further investigated for application to bioinspired flying or swimming robots for planetary exploration. It is shown that nano-to-micro integration would give the deepest level of biomimicry, and that both low and very low Reynolds number ( Re ) fluidics would involve GQH and Fiber Bundle Topology ( FBT ) for processing information at the various levels of ASC bioinspired robotics. While very low Re flows lend themselves to geometrization of microrobot dynamics and to FBT design, the general design problem is geometrized through GQH , i.e. made independent of dynamic considerations, thus allowing possible problems of semantic dyscrasias in highly complex hierarchical dynamical chains of sensing information processing actuating to be overcome. A roadmap to near- and medium-term nanostructured and nano-to-micro integration realizations is suggested.

  20. Numerical Simulation of a High-Lift Configuration Embedded with High Momentum Fluidic Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Duda, Benjamin; Fares, Ehab; Lin, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a vertical tail configuration with deflected rudder. The suction surface of the main element of this configuration, just upstream of the hinge line, is embedded with an array of 32 fluidic actuators that produce oscillating sweeping jets. Such oscillating jets have been found to be very effective for flow control applications in the past. In the current paper, a high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code known as the PowerFLOW R code is used to simulate the entire flow field associated with this configuration, including the flow inside the actuators. A fully compressible version of the PowerFLOW R code valid for high speed flows is used for the present simulations to accurately represent the transonic flow regimes encountered in the flow field due to the actuators operating at higher mass flow (momentum) rates required to mitigate reverse flow regions on a highly-deflected rudder surface. The computed results for the surface pressure and integrated forces compare favorably with measured data. In addition, numerical solutions predict the correct trends in forces with active flow control compared to the no control case. The effect of varying the rudder deflection angle on integrated forces and surface pressures is also presented.

  1. Alternative approach in 3D MEMS-IC integration using fluidic self-assembly techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, industries are investigating new, original and appropriate solutions to address challenges in 3D MEMS-IC large-scale integration. Self-assembly techniques are among those. We report on an alternative approach inspired from fluidic self-assembly and using the flip-chip method. Here, solder bumps are directly formed onto a MEMS chip using liquid solder solution in a bath. The self-alignment process is operated after surface treatment by plasma deposition to form high and low wettability selective patterns. Finally, MEMS and electronic chips are permanently bonded after low thermal heating without any pressure. Electrical contact is established and electromechanisms of the microsystems are proven. Compared to classic MEMS-IC flip-chip methods, this strategy presents many advantages: it is a low-cost and fast fabrication process requiring no specific equipment for deposition of solder bumps. Furthermore, it can be applied on different substrates and it does not require a specific pressure method during the bonding process. This strategy is also an appropriate fabrication method for large-scale MEMS integration where electronic connection density is high

  2. Psychicones: Visual Traces of the Soul in Late Nineteenth-Century Fluidic Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethes, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    The article discusses attempts to visualise the soul on photographic plates at the end of the nineteenth century, as conducted by the French physician Hippolyte Baraduc in Paris. Although Baraduc refers to earlier experiments on fluidic photography in his book on The Human Soul (1896) and is usually mentioned as a precursor to parapsychological thought photography of the twentieth century, his work is presented as a genuine attempt at photographic soul-catching. Rather than producing mimetic representations of thoughts and imaginations, Baraduc claims to present the vital radiation of the psyche itself and therefore calls the images he produces psychicones. The article first discusses the difference between this method of soul photography and other kinds of occult media technologies of the time, emphasising the significance of its non-mimetic, abstract character: since the soul itself was considered an abstract entity, abstract traces seemed all the more convincing to the contemporary audience. Secondly, the article shows how the technological agency of photography allowed Baraduc's psychicones to be tied into related discourses in medicine and psychology. Insofar as the photographic plates displayed actual visual traces, Baraduc and his followers no longer considered hallucinations illusionary and pathological but emphasised the physical reality and normality of imagination. Yet, the greatest influence of soul photography was not on science but on art. As the third part of the paper argues, the abstract shapes on Baraduc's plates provided inspiration for contemporary avant-garde aesthetics, for example, Kandinsky's abstract paintings and the random streams of consciousness in surrealistic literature.

  3. Bioengineering bacteriophages to enhance the sensitivity of phage amplification-based paper fluidic detection of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaine, S D; Law, K; Ho, S; Kinchla, A J; Sela, D A; Nugen, S R

    2016-08-15

    Bacteriophage (phage) amplification is an attractive method for the detection of bacteria due to a narrow phage-host specificity, short amplification times, and the phages' ability to differentiate between viable and non-viable bacterial cells. The next step in phage-based bacteria detection is leveraging bioengineered phages to create low-cost, rapid, and easy-to-use detection platforms such as lateral flow assays. Our work establishes the proof-of-concept for the use of bioengineered T7 phage strains to increase the sensitivity of phage amplification-based lateral flow assays. We have demonstrated a greater than 10-fold increase in sensitivity using a phage-based protein reporter, maltose-binding protein, over the detection of replicated T7 phage viron itself, and a greater then 100-fold increase in sensitivity using a phage-based enzymatic reporter, alkaline phosphatase. This increase in sensitivity enabled us to detect 10(3)CFU/mL of Escherichia coli in broth after 7h, and by adding a filter concentration step, the ability to detect a regulatory relevant E. coli concentration of 100CFU/100mL in inoculated river water after 9h, where the current standard requires days for results. The combination of the paper fluidic format with phage-based detection provides a platform for the development of novel diagnostics that are sensitive, rapid, and easy to use. PMID:27031186

  4. A Novel Polybrene/Chondroitin Sulfate C Double Coated Capillary and Its Application in Capillary Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU,Ying-Xiang(杜迎翔); HONDA,Susumu; TAGA,Atsushi; LIU,Wen-Ying(刘文英); SUZUKI,Shigeo

    2002-01-01

    A new capillary coated by double polymer, polybrene/chondroitin sulfate C (P/CC), was developed using a simple procedure. The P/CC double coated capillary showed long lifetime,strong chemical stability and good reproducibility. It endured during more than 100 replicated analyses and was also tolerant to HCl (1 mol/L), NaOH (0.01 mol/L), CH3OH and CH3CN. The P/CC double coated capillary can be applied to basic drug analyses. The adsorption of basic drugs to the capillary wall was suppressed and the peak tailing greatly decreased. The use of the P/CC double coated capillary allowed excelent separation of the enantiomers of some basic drugs by using chondroitin sulfate C as the chiral selector, ami the peak symmetry of basic drugs was further improved under these conditions.

  5. Capillary-Tube Model and Experiment of Multiphase Flow in Capillary Fringes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武晓峰; 唐杰; 吕贤弼

    2002-01-01

    Contamination of soil and groundwater by organic substances is causing more and more problems worldwide. Analysis of the movement and distribution of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in subsurface domain is critical for contaminant remediation. Two-dimensional experiments were conducted in a transparent plexiglass trough (105.0 cm×70.0 cm×1.5 cm) to simulate the release and redistribution of gasoline and kerosene in porous media. The results show that before the contaminant distribution reaches equilibrium, the movement of light NAPLs (LNAPLs) can be divided into four sub-stages. After the contaminant front reaches the upper boundary of the capillary fringe, contaminant movement along the upper boundary of the capillary fringe is the primary transport process. Most of the contaminants then move into the capillary fringe except for the residual part. One-dimensional and two-dimensional capillary tube models were developed to analyze the movement of LNAPLs in the capillary fringe.

  6. Directional transport of impinging capillary jet on wettability engineered surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2015-11-01

    Impingement of capillary jet on a surface is important for applications like heat transfer, or for liquid manipulation in bio-microfluidic devices. Using wettability engineered surfaces, we demonstrate pump-less and directional transport of capillary jet on a flat surface. Spatial contrast of surface energy and a wedge-shape geometry of the wettability confined track on the substrate facilitate formation of instantaneous spherical bulges upon jet impingement; these bulges are further transported along the superhydrophilic tracks due to Laplace pressure gradient. Critical condition warranted for formation of liquid bulge along the varying width of the superhydrophilic track is calculated analytically and verified experimentally. The work throws light on novel fluid phenomena of unidirectional jet impingement on wettability confined surfaces and provides a platform for innovative liquid manipulation technique for further application. By varying the geometry and wettability contrast on the surface, one can achieve volume flow rates of ~ O(100 μL/sec) and directionally guided transport of the jet liquid, pumplessly at speeds of ~ O(10cm/sec).

  7. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-02-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100-1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function.

  8. EUV radiation from nitrogen capillary discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav

    2014-08-01

    In the last decade EUV sources attract interest from researchers over the world. One of the main motivations is EUV lithography, which could lead to further miniaturization in electronics. Nitrogen recombination laser at wavelength of 13.4 nm based on capillary discharge Z-pinch configuration could be used in experiments with testing of resolution of photoresist for EUV lithography (close to wavelength of 13.5 nm Si/Mo multilayer mirrors have a high reflectivity at normal incidence angles). In this work, pinching of nitrogen-filled capillary discharge is studied for the development of EUV laser, which is based on recombination pumping scheme. The goal of this study is achieving the required plasma conditions using a capillary discharge Z-pinch apparatus. In experiments with nitrogen, the capillary length was shortened from 232 mm to 90 mm and current quarter-period was changed from 60 ns to 50 ns in contrast with early experiments with Ne-like argon laser. EUV radiation from capillary discharge was registered by X-ray vacuum diode for different pressure, amplitude and duration of pre-pulse and charging voltage of the Marx generator.

  9. A capillary optical fiber modulator derivates from magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghua; Liu, Yanxin; Zheng, Yao; Li, Shouzhu; Yuan, Libo; Yuan, Tingting; Tong, Chengguo

    2013-09-01

    A novel in-fiber integrated modulator based on magnetic fluid is proposed. The Fe3O4 magnetic fluid is encapsulated into a specially designed capillary optical fiber with a circular waveguide. Experimental results show that the light at 632.8 nm in the circular waveguide can be modulated by only 2.17×10-2 μL of the magnetic fluid under magnetic field. A wide range of modulation-depth from 44% to 75% can be obtained by adjusting the external magnetic field strength, temperature and the concentration of the magnetic fluid. In addition, the modulator shows good stability and repeatability. This work has great potentials in the integrated optical devices such as tunable in-fiber modulators, optical switches and magnetic sensors.

  10. Capillary rise of water in hydrophilic nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Gruener, Simon; Wallacher, Dirk; Kityk, Andriy V; Huber, Patrick; 10.1103/PhysRevE.79.067301

    2009-01-01

    We report on the capillary rise of water in three-dimensional networks of hydrophilic silica pores with 3.5nm and 5nm mean radii, respectively (porous Vycor monoliths). We find classical square root of time Lucas-Washburn laws for the imbibition dynamics over the entire capillary rise times of up to 16h investigated. Provided we assume two preadsorbed strongly bound layers of water molecules resting at the silica walls, which corresponds to a negative velocity slip length of -0.5nm for water flow in silica nanopores, we can describe the filling process by a retained fluidity and capillarity of water in the pore center. This anticipated partitioning in two dynamic components reflects the structural-thermodynamic partitioning in strongly silica bound water layers and capillary condensed water in the pore center which is documented by sorption isotherm measurements.

  11. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Y.

    1994-07-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the {mu}M level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  12. Mach-like capillary-gravity wakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisy, Frédéric; Rabaud, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We determine experimentally the angle α of maximum wave amplitude in the far-field wake behind a vertical surface-piercing cylinder translated at constant velocity U for Bond numbers Bo(D)=D/λ(c) ranging between 0.1 and 4.2, where D is the cylinder diameter and λ(c) the capillary length. In all cases the wake angle is found to follow a Mach-like law at large velocity, α∼U(-1), but with different prefactors depending on the value of Bo(D). For small Bo(D) (large capillary effects), the wake angle approximately follows the law α≃c(g,min)/U, where c(g,min) is the minimum group velocity of capillary-gravity waves. For larger Bo(D) (weak capillary effects), we recover a law α∼√[gD]/U similar to that found for ship wakes at large velocity [Rabaud and Moisy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 214503 (2013)]. Using the general property of dispersive waves that the characteristic wavelength of the wave packet emitted by a disturbance is of order of the disturbance size, we propose a simple model that describes the transition between these two Mach-like regimes as the Bond number is varied. We show that the new capillary law α≃c(g,min)/U originates from the presence of a capillary cusp angle (distinct from the usual gravity cusp angle), along which the energy radiated by the disturbance accumulates for Bond numbers of order of unity. This model, complemented by numerical simulations of the surface elevation induced by a moving Gaussian pressure disturbance, is in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  13. Capillary Rise of Liquids in Nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Patrick; Kityk, Andriy V

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements on the spontaneous imbibition (capillary rise) of water, a linear hydrocarbon (n-C16H34) and a liquid crystal (8OCB) into the pore space of monolithic, nanoporous Vycor glass (mean pore radius 5 nm). Measurements on the mass uptake of the porous hosts as a function of time, m(t), are in good agreement with the Lucas-Washburn square root of time prediction, typical of imbibition of liquids into porous hosts. The relative capillary rise velocities scale as expected from the bulk fluid parameters.

  14. A lymph nodal capillary-cavernous hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellachà, A; Fulcheri, E; Campisi, C

    1999-09-01

    A capillary-cavernous hemangioma in an obturator lymph node was found incidentally in a 64 year-old woman who had undergone unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and lymphadenectomy for an ovarian neoplasm. Vascular tumors of lymph nodes are briefly reviewed including eight previously described nodal capillary-cavernous hemangiomas. The association with other splanchnic hemangiomas is pointed out and the likelihood that the lesion is a hamartoma rather than a true neoplasm is addressed. Despite its rarity, this entity needs to be recognized by lymphologists who image lymph nodes by lymphangiography as well as by lymph nodal pathologists. PMID:10494525

  15. Intracerebral Capillary Hemangioma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, In Young; Kim, Jae Kyun; Byun, Jun Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Chung Ang University Medical Center, Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eon Sub [Dept. of Radiology, Chung Ang University Medical Center, Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Intracerebral capillary hemangiomas are very rare benign vascular tumors that mostly occur during infancy. We described a 69-year-old man with generalized tonic-clonic seizures who was diagnosed with an intracranial mass. Multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography studies were performed for evaluation of brain, and there was a well-enhancing mass found in the right temporal lobe without a definite feeding vessel. The patient underwent surgery and the pathologic examination demonstrated marked proliferation of small vessels with a lobular pattern in the brain parenchyma, which was confirmed to be capillary hemangioma.

  16. Psychicones: Visual Traces of the Soul in Late Nineteenth-Century Fluidic Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethes, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    The article discusses attempts to visualise the soul on photographic plates at the end of the nineteenth century, as conducted by the French physician Hippolyte Baraduc in Paris. Although Baraduc refers to earlier experiments on fluidic photography in his book on The Human Soul (1896) and is usually mentioned as a precursor to parapsychological thought photography of the twentieth century, his work is presented as a genuine attempt at photographic soul-catching. Rather than producing mimetic representations of thoughts and imaginations, Baraduc claims to present the vital radiation of the psyche itself and therefore calls the images he produces psychicones. The article first discusses the difference between this method of soul photography and other kinds of occult media technologies of the time, emphasising the significance of its non-mimetic, abstract character: since the soul itself was considered an abstract entity, abstract traces seemed all the more convincing to the contemporary audience. Secondly, the article shows how the technological agency of photography allowed Baraduc's psychicones to be tied into related discourses in medicine and psychology. Insofar as the photographic plates displayed actual visual traces, Baraduc and his followers no longer considered hallucinations illusionary and pathological but emphasised the physical reality and normality of imagination. Yet, the greatest influence of soul photography was not on science but on art. As the third part of the paper argues, the abstract shapes on Baraduc's plates provided inspiration for contemporary avant-garde aesthetics, for example, Kandinsky's abstract paintings and the random streams of consciousness in surrealistic literature. PMID:27292323

  17. Psychicones: Visual Traces of the Soul in Late Nineteenth-Century Fluidic Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethes, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses attempts to visualise the soul on photographic plates at the end of the nineteenth century, as conducted by the French physician Hippolyte Baraduc in Paris. Although Baraduc refers to earlier experiments on fluidic photography in his book on The Human Soul (1896) and is usually mentioned as a precursor to parapsychological thought photography of the twentieth century, his work is presented as a genuine attempt at photographic soul-catching. Rather than producing mimetic representations of thoughts and imaginations, Baraduc claims to present the vital radiation of the psyche itself and therefore calls the images he produces psychicones. The article first discusses the difference between this method of soul photography and other kinds of occult media technologies of the time, emphasising the significance of its non-mimetic, abstract character: since the soul itself was considered an abstract entity, abstract traces seemed all the more convincing to the contemporary audience. Secondly, the article shows how the technological agency of photography allowed Baraduc’s psychicones to be tied into related discourses in medicine and psychology. Insofar as the photographic plates displayed actual visual traces, Baraduc and his followers no longer considered hallucinations illusionary and pathological but emphasised the physical reality and normality of imagination. Yet, the greatest influence of soul photography was not on science but on art. As the third part of the paper argues, the abstract shapes on Baraduc’s plates provided inspiration for contemporary avant-garde aesthetics, for example, Kandinsky’s abstract paintings and the random streams of consciousness in surrealistic literature. PMID:27292323

  18. Nano-textured fluidic biochip as biological filter for selective survival of neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hsieh-Cheng; Lo, Hung-Chun; Wu, Chia-Yu; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong; Ou, Keng-Liang; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2015-06-01

    This is an innovative study to engineer biological filter to evaluate the effect of template surface structure and physiochemical properties that can be used for wide variety of applications in biological, health care as well as environmental protection. Specifically, planar silicon (Si) wafer and arrayed Si nano-tips (SiNT) templates were fabricated and coated with gold for various lengths of time to study the effect of surface charge, surface roughness, and hydrophilicity on biological activity of rat pheochromocytoma cell lines PC12. The initial growth and proliferation of PC12 cells on Si and SiNT templates showed an antipathy for the ultra-sharp SiNTs templates. In contrast, the same cells demonstrated a preferable adherence to and proliferation on planar Si templates, resulting in higher cell densities by three orders of magnitude than those on SiNT templates. It is hypothesized that SiNTs array does generate nano-fluidic effect such that the effective contact region for aqueous solution on SiNTs is lower than that on planar Si templates, thus decreasing adsorbable area for cell viability and survival. Moreover, the effect of the gold coating on cell number density was analyzed in terms of the surface roughness, zeta potential and wetting properties of the templates. It was determined that surface charge, as measured by the zeta potential, strongly correlated with the trend observed in the surface cell density, whereas no such correlation was observed for surface roughness or wetting properties in the ranges of our experiment conditions. PMID:25256631

  19. Multi-sample immunoassay inside optical fiber capillary enabled by evanescent wave detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel evanescent wave-based (EW microfluidic capillary fiber-optic biosensor (MCFOB has been developed using capillaries as a transducer embedded in a multichannel device to enhance the collection efficiency of the fluorescence signal. The capillary serves dual roles as a waveguide and a container, enabling more straightforward, consistent, and compact biosensor packaging compared to conventional optical fiber biosensors and microfluidic systems. In order to detect multiple samples in one device, the biosensor incorporates a polydimethysiloxane (PDMS multi-channel device, which also serves as cladding for the biosensor. In addition, this biosensor only consumes 10 μl of a sample and does not require hydrofluoric acid etching in the fabrication process. The orientation for signal collection is optimized by comparing the lateral and normal signal directions for detected glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH. C-reactive protein (CRP is used to validate the MCFOB, and the limit of detection (LOD for CRP in the MCFOB is 1.94 ng/ml (74 pM. Moreover, the real-time measurement is demonstrated to verify that the evanescent wave is the only exciting light source in the MCFOB, which gives the potential for real-time measurement applications.

  20. Water jet rebounds on hydrophobic surfaces : a first step to jet micro-fluidics.

    OpenAIRE

    Celestini, Franck; Kofman, R.; Noblin, Xavier; Pellegrin, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    International audience When a water jet impinges upon a solid surface it produces a so called hydraulic jump that everyone can observe in the sink of its kitchen. It is characterized by a thin liquid sheet bounded by a circular rise of the surface due to capillary and gravitational forces. In this phenomenon, the impact induces a geometrical transition, from the cylindrical one of the jet to the bi-dimensional one of the film. A true jet rebound on a solid surface, for which the cylindrica...

  1. A Rare Association of Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalgia: Pontine Capillary Telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Gocmen, Rahsan; Kurt, Erdal; Arslan, Sabina; Unal-Cevik, Isin; Karli Oguz, Kader; Tezer, F Irsel

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of pontine capillary telangiectasia in a 43-year-old woman with a clinical diagnosis of trigeminal autonomic cephalgia. The possible association with pontine capillary telangiectasia and trigeminal autonomic cephalgia is discussed.

  2. High-frequency capillary waves excited by oscillating microbubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Pommella, Angelo; Poulichet, Vincent; Garbin, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video shows high-frequency capillary waves excited by the volumetric oscillations of microbubbles near a free surface. The frequency of the capillary waves is controlled by the oscillation frequency of the microbubbles, which are driven by an ultrasound field. Radial capillary waves produced by single bubbles and interference patterns generated by the superposition of capillary waves from multiple bubbles are shown.

  3. Chemical modification of polymeric microchip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muck, Alexander; Svatos, Ales

    2007-12-15

    Analytical polymeric microchips in both fluidic and array formats offer short analysis times, coupling of many sample processing and chemical reaction steps on one platform with minimal sample and reagent consumption, as well as low cost, minimal fabrication times and disposability. However, the invariable bulk properties of most commercial polymers have driven researchers to develop new modification strategies. This article critically reviews the scope and development of chemical modifications of such polymeric chips since 2003. Surface modifications were based on chemical derivatization or activation of surface layers with reagent solutions, reactive gases and irradiation. Bulk modification of polymer chips used newly incorporation of monomers with selective chemical functionalities throughout the bulk polymer material and integrated the chip modification and fabrication into a single step. Such modifications hold a great promise for establishing a true 'lab-on-chip' as can be seen from many novel applications for modulating electroosmosis, suppressing protein adsorption in microchip capillary electrophoretic separations, extraction of analytes and for zone-specific binding of enzymes and other biomolecules. PMID:18371647

  4. Application of CHESS single-bounce capillaries at synchrotron beamlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R.; Szebenyi, T.; Pfeifer, M.; Woll, A.; Smilgies, D.-M.; Finkelstein, K.; Dale, D.; Wang, Y.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Gillilan, R.; Cook, M.; Bilderback, D. H.

    2014-03-01

    Single-bounce capillaries are achromatic X-ray focusing optics that can provide efficient and high demagnification focusing with large numerical apertures. Capillary fabrication at CHESS can be customized according to specific application requirements. Exemplary applications are reviewed in this paper, as well as recent progress on condensers for high-resolution transmission X-ray microscopy and small focal size capillaries.

  5. Cyclodextrin-Functionalized Monolithic Capillary Columns: Preparation and Chiral Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adly, Frady G; Antwi, Nana Yaa; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2016-02-01

    In this review, the recently reported approaches for the preparation of cyclodextrin-functionalized capillary monolithic columns are highlighted, with few applications in chiral separations using capillary liquid chromatography (CLC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Chirality 28:97-109, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. An oxidase-based electrochemical fluidic sensor with high-sensitivity and low-interference by on-chip oxygen manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Nitin; Park, Jongwon; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing a simple fluidic structure, we demonstrate the improved performance of oxidase-based enzymatic biosensors. Electrolysis of water is utilized to generate bubbles to manipulate the oxygen microenvironment close to the biosensor in a fluidic channel. For the proper enzyme reactions to occur, a simple mechanical procedure of manipulating bubbles was developed to maximize the oxygen level while minimizing the pH change after electrolysis. The sensors show improved sensitivities based on the oxygen dependency of enzyme reaction. In addition, this oxygen-rich operation minimizes the ratio of electrochemical interference signal by ascorbic acid during sensor operation (i.e., amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide). Although creatinine sensors have been used as the model system in this study, this method is applicable to many other biosensors that can use oxidase enzymes (e.g., glucose, alcohol, phenol, etc.) to implement a viable component for in-line fluidic sensor systems. PMID:23012527

  7. An Oxidase-Based Electrochemical Fluidic Sensor with High-Sensitivity and Low-Interference by On-Chip Oxygen Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Soo Kim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing a simple fluidic structure, we demonstrate the improved performance of oxidase-based enzymatic biosensors. Electrolysis of water is utilized to generate bubbles to manipulate the oxygen microenvironment close to the biosensor in a fluidic channel. For the proper enzyme reactions to occur, a simple mechanical procedure of manipulating bubbles was developed to maximize the oxygen level while minimizing the pH change after electrolysis. The sensors show improved sensitivities based on the oxygen dependency of enzyme reaction. In addition, this oxygen-rich operation minimizes the ratio of electrochemical interference signal by ascorbic acid during sensor operation (i.e., amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide. Although creatinine sensors have been used as the model system in this study, this method is applicable to many other biosensors that can use oxidase enzymes (e.g., glucose, alcohol, phenol, etc. to implement a viable component for in-line fluidic sensor systems.

  8. Design criteria for SW-205 capillary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, W.J.

    1989-04-01

    This design criteria covers the converting of the SW-250 Capillary System from fumehood manual operation to sealed glovebox automated operation. The design criteria contains general guidelines and includes drawings reflecting a similar installation at another site. Topics include purpose and physical description, architectural-engineering requirements, reference document, electrical, fire protection, occupational safety and health, quality assurance, and security.

  9. Planetary In Situ Capillary Electrophoresis System (PISCES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, P. A.; Stockton, A. M.; Mora, M. F.; Cable, M. L.; Bramall, N. E.; Jensen, E. C.; Jiao, H.; Lynch, E.; Mathies, R. A.

    2012-10-01

    We propose to develop PISCES, a 3-kg, 2W, flight-capable microfluidic lab-on-a-chip capillary electrophoresis analyzer capable of ingesting solid, liquid, or gas samples and performing a suite of chemical analyses with parts per trillion sensitivity.

  10. Shift dynamics of capillary self-alignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arutinov, G.; Mastrangeli, M.; Smits, E.C.P.; Heck, G.V.; Schoo, H.F.M.; Toonder, J.J.M. den; Dietzel, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the dynamics of capillary self-alignment of components with initial shift offsets from matching receptor sites. The analysis of the full uniaxial self-alignment dynamics of foil-based mesoscopic dies from pre-alignment to final settling evidenced three distinct, sequential regim

  11. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, C.E. [Univ. of Wollongong (Australia); Stormont, J.C. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  12. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior

  13. Gold nanoparticle incorporated inverse opal photonic crystal capillaries for optofluidic surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangwei; Xue, Jiangyang; Mu, Zhongde; Huang, Yin; Lu, Meng; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-10-15

    Novel transducers are needed for point of care testing (POCT) devices which aim at facile, sensitive and quick acquisition of health related information. Recent advances in optofluidics offer tremendous opportunities for biological/chemical analysis using extremely small sample volumes. This paper demonstrates nanostructured capillary tubes for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) analysis in a flow-through fashion. The capillary tube integrates the SERS sensor and the nanofluidic structure to synergistically offer sample delivery and analysis functions. Inside the capillary tube, inverse opal photonic crystal (IO PhC) was fabricated using the co-assembly approach to form nanoscale liquid pathways. In the nano-voids of the IO PhC, gold nanoparticles were in situ synthesized and functioned as the SERS hotspots. The advantages of the flow-through SERS sensor are multifold. The capillary effect facilities the sample delivery process, the nanofluidic channels boosts the interaction of analyte and gold nanoparticles, and the PhC structure strengthens the optical field near the SERS hotspots and results in enhanced SERS signals from analytes. As an exemplary demonstration, the sensor was used to measure creatinein spiked in artificial urine samples with detection limit of 0.9 mg/dL.

  14. Gold nanoparticle incorporated inverse opal photonic crystal capillaries for optofluidic surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangwei; Xue, Jiangyang; Mu, Zhongde; Huang, Yin; Lu, Meng; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-10-15

    Novel transducers are needed for point of care testing (POCT) devices which aim at facile, sensitive and quick acquisition of health related information. Recent advances in optofluidics offer tremendous opportunities for biological/chemical analysis using extremely small sample volumes. This paper demonstrates nanostructured capillary tubes for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) analysis in a flow-through fashion. The capillary tube integrates the SERS sensor and the nanofluidic structure to synergistically offer sample delivery and analysis functions. Inside the capillary tube, inverse opal photonic crystal (IO PhC) was fabricated using the co-assembly approach to form nanoscale liquid pathways. In the nano-voids of the IO PhC, gold nanoparticles were in situ synthesized and functioned as the SERS hotspots. The advantages of the flow-through SERS sensor are multifold. The capillary effect facilities the sample delivery process, the nanofluidic channels boosts the interaction of analyte and gold nanoparticles, and the PhC structure strengthens the optical field near the SERS hotspots and results in enhanced SERS signals from analytes. As an exemplary demonstration, the sensor was used to measure creatinein spiked in artificial urine samples with detection limit of 0.9 mg/dL. PMID:25988995

  15. Recent advances of ionic liquids and polymeric ionic liquids in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sheng; Liu, Shujuan; Guo, Yong; Liu, Xia; Jiang, Shengxiang

    2014-08-29

    Ionic liquids (ILs) and polymeric ionic liquids (PILs) with unique and fascinating properties have drawn considerable interest for their use in separation science, especially in chromatographic techniques. In this article, significant contributions of ILs and PILs in the improvement of capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography are described, and a specific overview of the most relevant examples of their applications in the last five years is also given. Accordingly, some general conclusions and future perspectives in these areas are discussed.

  16. ANALYSES OF QUINOLONE ANTIMICROBIALS IN HUMAN PLASMA BY CAPILLARY HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/FAST ATOM BOMBARDMENT MASS SPECTROMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    Hattori, Hideki; Suzuki, Osamu; Seno, Hiroshi; Ishii, Akira; Yamada, Takamichi

    1993-01-01

    Capillary high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was combined with frit fast atom bombardment (FAB)-mass spectrometry (MS) , and a detailed procedure has been established for on-line analysis of ten quinolone antimicrobials in human plasma by the HPLC/FAB-MS. A special column switching device for concentration enabled injection of as large as a 500 μl sample; and the capillary column (0.5 mm i. d.) enabled introduction of its entire effluent to the frit interface of FAB-MS. These condi...

  17. A complete soil hydraulic model accounting for capillary and adsorptive water retention, capillary and film conductivity, and hysteresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakai, Masaru; Van Genuchten, Martinus Th; Alazba, A. A.; Setiawan, Budi Indra; Minasny, Budiman

    2015-01-01

    A soil hydraulic model that considers capillary hysteretic and adsorptive water retention as well as capillary and film conductivity covering the complete soil moisture range is presented. The model was obtained by incorporating the capillary hysteresis model of Parker and Lenhard into the hydraulic

  18. Advanced fluidic handling and use of two-phase flow for high throughput structural investigation of proteins on a microfluidic sample preparation platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Snakenborg, Detlef; Møller, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Research on the structure of proteins can bring forth a wealth of information about biological function and can be used to better understand the processes in living cells. This paper reports a new microfluidic sample preparation system for the structural investigation of proteins by Small Angle X......-ray Scattering (SAXS). The system includes hardware and software features for precise fluidic control, synchrotron beamline control, UV absorbance measurements and automated data analysis. The precise fluidic handling capabilities are used to transport and precisely position samples as small as 500 nL into the...

  19. Time-resolved two-wavelength contouring of adaptive fluidic PDMS-lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Thomas; Grunwald, Ruediger; Steinmeyer, Günter; Griebner, Uwe; Schneider, Florian; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2009-05-01

    We present a synthesized sub-ps dual-wavelength laser source for digital holographic interferometry with a wide reconstruction range. The developed laser source generates two spectrally separated parts within one pulse. The sub-ps pulse duration desensitizes the holographic setup to environmental impacts. A center wavelength distance of only 12 nm with a high contrast was demonstrated by spectral shaping of the 50 nm broad seed spectrum of a CPA Ti:sapphire laser system centered at 800 nm. Time-resolved two-wavelength contouring requires the simultaneous and separable recording of two holograms. In general, a single CCD-camera is applied, and the spectral separation is realized by different reference wave tilts, which requires ambitious interferometric setups. Contrary to this, we introduce two CCD-cameras for digital holographic recording, thus essentially simplifying the interferometric setup by the need of only one propagation direction of the reference wave. To separate the holograms for the simultaneous recording process, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer was extended by a polarization encoding sequence. To study our approach of time-resolved digital holographic two-wavelength contouring, an adaptive fluidic PDMS-lens with integrated piezoelectric actuator served as test object. The PDMS-lens consists of an oil-filled lens chamber and a pump actuator. If a voltage is applied to the piezoelectric bending actuator the fluid is pumped into the lens chamber which causes a curvature change of the 60-μm thick lens membrane and thus a shift of the focal length. The dynamic behavior of the PDMS-lens, driven at a frequency of 1 Hz, was investigated at a frame rate of 410 frames per second. The measured temporal change of the lens focal length between 98 and 44 mm followed the modulation of the piezoelectric voltage with a 30 V peak-to-peak amplitude. Due to the performed time-resolved two wavelength contouring, we are able to extract the optical path length differences

  20. Method of making tapered capillary tips with constant inner diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-02-17

    Methods of forming electrospray ionization emitter tips are disclosed herein. In one embodiment, an end portion of a capillary tube can be immersed into an etchant, wherein the etchant forms a concave meniscus on the outer surface of the capillary. Variable etching rates in the meniscus can cause an external taper to form. While etching the outer surface of the capillary wall, a fluid can be flowed through the interior of the capillary tube. Etching continues until the immersed portion of the capillary tube is completely etched away.

  1. The butterfly proboscis as a fiber-based, self-cleaning, micro-fluidic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, Kostantin G.; Monaenkova, Daria; Adler, Peter H.; Beard, Charles E.; Lee, Wah-Keat

    2016-04-01

    The butterfly proboscis is a unique, naturally engineered device for acquiring liquid food, which also minimizes concerns for viscosity and stickiness of the fluids. With a few examples, we emphasize the importance of the scale-form functionality triangle of this feeding device and the coupling through capillarity.

  2. Integrated optic/nanofluidic fluorescent detection device with plasmonic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsanik, J. S.; Bernstein, J. J.

    2013-09-01

    Integrated optic/microfluidic devices have proven to be useful tools in many sensing applications. However, the resolution and sensitivity of existing devices is limited by the processes and materials chosen for their fabrication. A procedure for the production of a new family of low-noise, high-resolution integrated microfluidic optical detection devices is presented, along with results from a prototype device. The device architecture is presented, highlighting design choices made in fluidics and optical integration to minimize scattered light. Diffused waveguides were fabricated, characterized, and modeled. A plasmonic resonator is designed, simulated, and integrated into the system to achieve electric field enhancement and localization to sub-micron dimensions. The device was tested to demonstrate both field enhancement and localization. The procedure that was developed enables the creation of integrated devices capable of high-resolution detection of fluorescent samples. The interrogation region was 200 nm long in the direction of flow, achieving sub-wavelength resolution in an integrated device. Furthermore, discrete fluorescent particles 20 nm in diameter were individually detected, demonstrating the high resolution and sensitivity capabilities of this family of devices.

  3. Capillary Interactions between a Probe Tip and a Nanoparticle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-Ning; WANG Le-Feng; RONG Wei-Bin

    2008-01-01

    To understand capillary interactions between probe tips and nanoparticles under ambient conditions,a theoretical model of capillary forces between them is developed based on the geometric relations. It is found that the contribution of surface tension force to the total capillary force attains to similar order of magnitude as the capillary pressure force in many cases.It is also shown that the tip shape and the radial distance of the meniscus have great influence on the capillary force.The capillary force decreases with the increasing separation distances,and the variance of the contact angles may change the magnitudes of capillary forces several times at large radial distances.The applicability of the symmetric meniscus approximation is discussed.

  4. Dynamics and density distributions in a capillary-discharge waveguide with an embedded supersonic jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlis, N. H., E-mail: nmatlis@gmail.com; Gonsalves, A. J.; Steinke, S.; Tilborg, J. van; Shaw, B.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Geddes, C. G. R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Matlis, E. H. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-11-28

    We present an analysis of the gas dynamics and density distributions within a capillary-discharge waveguide with an embedded supersonic jet. This device provides a target for a laser plasma accelerator which uses longitudinal structuring of the gas-density profile to enable control of electron trapping and acceleration. The functionality of the device depends sensitively on the details of the density profile, which are determined by the interaction between the pulsed gas in the jet and the continuously-flowing gas in the capillary. These dynamics are captured by spatially resolving recombination light from several emission lines of the plasma as a function of the delay between the jet and the discharge. We provide a phenomenological description of the gas dynamics as well as a quantitative evaluation of the density evolution. In particular, we show that the pressure difference between the jet and the capillary defines three regimes of operation with qualitatively different longitudinal density profiles and show that jet timing provides a sensitive method for tuning between these regimes.

  5. Evaluation of pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow in capillaries of goat skeletal muscle using intravital microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J J; Tyml, K; Menkis, A H; Novick, R J; Mckenzie, F N

    1994-11-01

    It is commonly believed that pulsatile flow generated by the pumping action of the heart is dampened out by the time it reaches the microcirculation. In clinical practice, most of the cardiopulmonary bypass pumps and ventricular assist devices are nonpulsatile. To test the hypothesis that pulsatile flow generated by the heart does exist at the microvascular level, intravital microscopy of a large animal model (goat) was developed to visualize and to videorecord the surface microcirculation of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle from the right forelimb. Density of perfused capillaries and red blood cell velocity in capillaries were measured in five goats during pulsatile perfusion provided by the heart and during a subsequent 3-hr period of nonpulsatile perfusion provided by a centrifugal ventricular assist device (Centrimed, Sarns 3M) that bypassed the heart. Throughout the experiment, the heart rate, innominate artery mean blood pressure, and flow remained unchanged. During the pulsatile regimen, velocities showed regular fluctuations that coincided with the period of the cardiac cycle (range of periods: 0.5-0.8 sec). The peak velocity amplitudes (range: 0.25-0.55 mm/sec) correlated directly with the amplitude of the pulse pressure. During the nonpulsatile regimen, no such correlations were seen. During pulsatile flow and during the 3-hr nonpulsatile period, capillary density remained stable at 24 capillaries/mm of test line but there were significant increases in red cell velocity, from 0.8 to 1.2 mm/sec (P < 0.05), and in coefficient of variation of velocity (used as an index of flow heterogeneity), from 19 to 34% (P < 0.05). We conclude that (1) pulsatility exists in the capillary bed and that it directly correlates with the pumping action of the heart and (2) nonpulsatile flow produced by the ventricular assist device does not cause an acute deterioration in microvascular perfusion. We interpret the increase in heterogeneity of flow as an early sign of

  6. The geometry and wetting of capillary folding

    CERN Document Server

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Capillary forces are involved in a variety of natural phenomena, ranging from droplet breakup to the physics of clouds. The forces from surface tension can also be exploited in industrial application provided the length scales involved are small enough. Recent experimental investigations showed how to take advantage of capillarity to fold planar structures into three-dimensional configurations by selectively melting polymeric hinges joining otherwise rigid shapes. In this paper we use theoretical calculations to quantify the role of geometry and fluid wetting on the final folded state. Considering folding in two and three dimensions, studying both hydrophilic and hydrophobic situations with possible contact angle hysteresis, and addressing the shapes to be folded to be successively infinite, finite, curved, kinked, elastic, we are able to derive an overview of the geometrical parameter space available for capillary folding.

  7. Capillary flow through heat-pipe wicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are obtained for the capillary-pressure limit and permeability of a fibrous wick in terms of the porosity and fiber diameter. Hysteresis in capillary pressure is included through the introduction of an empirical hysteresis constant. A partial-saturation model based on the statistical distribution of local porosity requires an additional empirical constant, the standard deviation. The theory is compared to results of a beta-ray absorption experiment that measured the liquid content of a partially saturated wick and to results of permeability measurements on partially and fully saturated wicks. A simple wick-weighing experiment is described that yields values for the empirical hysteresis constant and the standard deviation. Theoretical results are used to design an optimum wick.

  8. Capillary Electrophoresis in Food and Foodomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Clara; Acunha, Tanize; Valdés, Alberto; García-Cañas, Virginia; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Simó, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Quality and safety assessment as well as the evaluation of other nutritional and functional properties of foods imply the use of robust, efficient, sensitive, and cost-effective analytical methodologies. Among analytical technologies used in the fields of food analysis and foodomics, capillary electrophoresis (CE) has generated great interest for the analyses of a large number of compounds due to its high separation efficiency, extremely small sample and reagent requirements, and rapid analysis. The introductory section of this chapter provides an overview of the recent applications of capillary electrophoresis (CE) in food analysis and foodomics. Relevant reviews and research articles on these topics are tabulated including papers published in the period 2011-2014. In addition, to illustrate the great capabilities of CE in foodomics the chapter describes the main experimental points to be taken into consideration for a metabolomic study of the antiproliferative effect of carnosic acid (a natural diterpene found in rosemary) against HT-29 human colon cancer cells. PMID:27645749

  9. Electrokinetic Flow and Dispersion in Capillary Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Sandip

    2006-01-01

    Electrophoretic separation of a mixture of chemical species is a fundamental technique of great usefulness in biology, health care, and forensics. In capillary electrophoresis (which has evolved from its predecessor, slab-gel electrophoresis), the sample migrates through a single microcapillary instead of through the network of pores in a gel. A fundamental design problem is to minimize dispersion in the separation direction. Molecular diffusion is inevitable and sets a theoretical limit on the best separation that can be achieved. But in practice, there are a number of effects arising out of the interplay between fluid flow, chemistry, thermal effects, and electric fields that result in enhanced dispersion. This paper reviews the subject of fluid flow in such capillary microchannels and examines the various causes of enhanced dispersion that limit the efficiency of separation.

  10. Transversally periodic solitary gravity-capillary waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Paul A; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravity-capillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravity-capillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles. PMID:24399922

  11. Capillary solitons on a levitated medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrard, S; Deike, L; Duchêne, C; Pham, C-T

    2015-07-01

    A water cylinder deposited on a heated channel levitates on its own generated vapor film owing to the Leidenfrost effect. This experimental setup permits the study of the one-dimensional propagation of surface waves in a free-to-move liquid system. We report the observation of gravity-capillary waves under a dramatic reduction of gravity (up to a factor 30), leading to capillary waves at the centimeter scale. The generated nonlinear structures propagate without deformation and undergo mutual collisions and reflections at the boundaries of the domain. They are identified as Korteweg-de Vries solitons with negative amplitude and subsonic velocity. The typical width and amplitude-dependent velocities are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on a generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation adapted to any substrate geometry. When multiple solitons are present, they interact and form a soliton turbulencelike spectrum. PMID:26274114

  12. Capillary Hemangioma of the Fallopian Tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Richa; Patne, Shashikant C U; Bharti, Shreekant; Jain, Madhu

    2016-04-01

    Neoplastic lesions of the fallopian tube are rarely seen by surgical pathologists. Haemangioma of the fallopian tube is an extremely rare benign neoplasm. A 30-year-old lady with polymenorrhea and dysmenorrhea underwent hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Her left fallopian tube showed a 2mm sized solid nodule in the wall. Histopathological examination revealed a well-defined vascular lesion in the left fallopian tube, consistent with capillary haemangioma. The vascular endothelium was highlighted by CD34 immunostaining. Our literature review has identified 10 cases of cavernous haemangioma of the fallopian tube. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first ever case of capillary haemangioma of the fallopian tube. This is also the smallest detected haemangioma in the fallopian tube. PMID:27190899

  13. Metal Ions Analysis with Capillary Zone Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ashok Kumar; Aulakh, Jatinder Singh; Kaur, Varinder

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis has recently attracted considerable attention as a promising analytical technique for metal ion separations. Significant advances that open new application areas for capillary electrophoresis in the analysis of metal species occurred based on various auxiliary separation principles. These are mainly due to complexation, ion pairing, solvation, and micellization interactions between metal analytes and electrolyte additives, which alter the separation selectivity in a broad range. Likewise, many separation studies for metal ions have been concentrated on the use of preelectrophoresis derivatization methodology. Approaches suitable for manipulation of selectivity for different metal species including metal cations, metal complexes, metal oxoanions, and organometallic compounds, are discussed, with special attention paid to the related electrophoretic system variables using illustrative examples. PMID:27645740

  14. Capillary droplets on Leidenfrost micro-ratchets

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Alvaro G; Römer, Gertwillem R B E; Pathiraj, B; Veld, Albertus Huis in 't; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Leidenfrost ratchets are structures with the ability of transporting liquid droplets when heated over the critical Leidenfrost temperature. Once this temperature is reached, the droplet levitates over the surface and moves in the direction marked by the slope of the ratchet at terminal velocities around 10 cm/s. Here we provide new experiments with micron-sized ratchets, which have been produced with picosecond pulse laser ablation. In the following work, we use a simple method to measure the thrust driving droplets of capillary size over the micro-ratchets. The mechanism responsible for the force acting on the drop on superheated ratchets has been recently under debate. We extend the recently proposed 'viscous mechanism' proposed by Dupeaux et al. [Europhys. Lett., 96, 58001 (2011)] to capillary droplets and find good agreement with our measurements.

  15. Chemical Power for Microscopic Robots in Capillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Hogg, Tad

    2009-01-01

    The power available to microscopic robots (nanorobots) that oxidize bloodstream glucose while aggregated in circumferential rings on capillary walls is evaluated with a numerical model using axial symmetry and time-averaged release of oxygen from passing red blood cells. Robots about one micron in size can produce up to several tens of picowatts, in steady-state, if they fully use oxygen reaching their surface from the blood plasma. Robots with pumps and tanks for onboard oxygen storage could collect oxygen to support burst power demands two to three orders of magnitude larger. We evaluate effects of oxygen depletion and local heating on surrounding tissue. These results give the power constraints when robots rely entirely on ambient available oxygen and identify aspects of the robot design significantly affecting available power. More generally, our numerical model provides an approach to evaluating robot design choices for nanomedicine treatments in and near capillaries.

  16. Electrical resistance of muscle capillary endothelium.

    OpenAIRE

    Olesen, S P; Crone, C

    1983-01-01

    A recently developed technique for in vivo determination of the electrical resistance of vascular endothelium in microvessels was applied to the vessels in a thin frog muscle, m. cutaneus pectoris. The technique consists of injection of current via a glass micropipette into a capillary and measurement of the resulting intra- and extravascular potential profiles with another micropipette placed at various distances from the current source. The theory of Peskoff and Eisenberg (1974) was used to...

  17. Separation of Peptides by Pressurized Capillary Electrochromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel gradient pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC) instrument wasdeveloped to separate peptides. Two gradient elution modes, hydrophobic and hydrophilicinteraction mode in pCEC, were performed on this instrument. Baseline separation of sixpeptides was obtained on two gradient modes with C18 column and strong cationic exchangecolumn respectively. The effects of mixer volume and total flow rate of pumps on resolutionwere also discussed.

  18. Capillary Electrophoresis in the Presence of Fosfomycin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Fosfomyein, a sodim salt of cis-(3-methyloxiranyl) phosphonic acid, was used as electrolyte in binary methanol-water media for capillary electrophoresis. The variety of electroosmotic flow with pH*,methanol concentration and ionic strength was investigated. The migration behavior of nine bases was examined under various conditions, and the separation of thymine, cytosine, 5-flurouracil, 4,6-diamino-pyrimidine, purine was accomplished.

  19. Subsidence and capillary effects in chalks

    OpenAIRE

    Delage, Pierre; Schroeder, Christian; Cui, Yu-Jun

    1996-01-01

    Based on the concepts of the mechanics of unsaturated soils where capillary phenomena arise between the wetting fluid (water) and the non-wetting one (air), the subsidence of chalks containing oil (non-wetting fluid) during water injection (wetting fluid) is analysed. It is shown that the collapse phenomenon of unsaturated soils under wetting provides a physical explanation and a satisfactory prediction of the order of magnitude of the subsidence of the chalk. The use of a well established co...

  20. Familial Pulmonary Capillary Hemangiomatosis Early in Life

    OpenAIRE

    Speer, Christian P.; Mark, Eugene J.; Johannes Wirbelauer; Alexander Marx; Helge Hebestreit

    2011-01-01

    Background. Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH) is a rare disease, especially in infancy. Four infants have been reported up to the age of 12 months. So far, no familial patients are observed at this age. Patients. We report three siblings, two female newborns and a foetus of 15-week gestation of unrelated, healthy parents suffering from histologically proven PCH. The first girl presented with increased O2 requirements shortly after birth and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). She subseque...

  1. Study of Pinching Capillary Discharge for Nitrogen H-like Recombination Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer model of EUV nitrogen laser pumped by pinching capillary discharge is presented. The model consists of magneto-hydrodynamics plasma description and subsequent ion kinetic evaluation. Quick changes of electron temperature during the pinch decay lead to ionisation and excitation non-equilibrium and result in inversion population on Balmer alpha transition. Validity of our model was proved via comparison of measured and evaluated spectra of our device with 15.5 kA peak current. High gain lasing system is predicted for 2 mm diam. capillary filled by 0.2 kPa nitrogen if 80 kA peak current and 30 ns pulse duration are taken into account

  2. Capillary-scale polarimetry for flowing streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, K; Nodorft, J; Bornhop, D J

    2001-05-01

    A micro-polarimeter with a 40 nL probe volume was configured so that it is compatible with capillary-scale flowing stream analysis. The optical configuration consists of two polarizing optics, a capillary, a laser source and a photodetector which is very simple to configure with low cost components. This unique polarimeter is based upon the interaction of a linearly polarized laser beam and a capillary tube, in this case one with an inner diameter of 250 microns. Side illumination of the tube results in a 360 degrees fan of scattered light, which contains a set of interference fringes that change in response to optically active solutes. Solutes that exhibit optical activity are quantifiable and are detected by analyzing the polarization state of the backscattered light. The ability of the instrument to make extremely sensitive optical activity measurements in flowing streams is shown by the determination of (R)-mandelic acid, with a detection limit of 66 x 10(-6) M (507 x 10(-12) g), and the non-optically active control, glycerol. Additionally, the detector was configured to minimize refractive index perturbations. PMID:11394312

  3. Spatial reconstruction of facial skin capillaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarchuk O.I.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To define structural and functional changes of skin capillaries in women of different age groups in this work intraoperational biopsy material of skin of 205 women at the age from 19 to 75 years, that was taken during standard surgery instrumentations for different defects of face and neck skin correction, was investigated. Skin material of cheek face region, temple region of head and anterior neck region was morphologically processed. To define parameters of dermal capillars and spatial reconstruction of intrapapillary capillary loops, serial sections was investigated with the help of morphometry. It was determined, that microcirculation age changes include structural disorders of intrapapillary capillary loops. Essential struc-tural and functional changes observed in skin of cheek region in women of 33-40 years and in temple region of head and anterior neck region in women of 41-50 years. It is typical at the patients with nicotinic dependence, ischemic heart disease, hypertonic disease, a diabetes, and also adiposity of a different degree essential infringement of microvessels bed structure of a skin that gives the basis for allocation of the given contingent of patients as group high intraoperative and postoperative risk at carrying out of operative interventions for correction of face skin involutive changes.

  4. Drinking in Space: The Capillary Beverage Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Andrew; Weislogel, Mark; Jenson, Ryan; Graf, John; Pettit, Donald; Kelly, Scott; Lindgren, Kjell; Yui, Kimiya

    2015-11-01

    A selection from as many as 50 different drinks including coffees, teas, and fruit smoothies are consumed daily by astronauts aboard the International Space Station. For practical reasons, the drinks are generally sipped through straws inserted in sealed bags. We present the performance of a special cup designed to allow the drinking operation in much the same manner as on earth, only with the role of gravity replaced by the combined effects of surface tension, wetting, and special container geometry. One can finally `smell the coffee.' Six so-called Space Cups are currently in orbit as part of the Capillary Beverage Experiment which aims to demonstrate specific passive control of poorly wetting aqueous capillary systems through a fun mealtime activity. The mathematical fluid mechanical design process with full numerical simulations is presented alongside experimental results acquired using a drop tower and low-g aircraft before complete characterization aboard the Space Station. Astronaut commentary is both humorous and informative, but the insightful experimental results of the potable space experiment testify to the prospects of new no-moving-parts capillary solutions for certain water-based life support operations aboard spacecraft.

  5. The order of condensation in capillary grooves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascón, Carlos; Parry, Andrew O; Nürnberg, Robert; Pozzato, Alessandro; Tormen, Massimo; Bruschi, Lorenzo; Mistura, Giampaolo

    2013-05-15

    We consider capillary condensation in a deep groove of width L. The transition occurs at a pressure p(co)(L) described, for large widths, by the Kelvin equation p(sat) - p(co)(L) = 2σ cosθ/L, where θ is the contact angle at the side walls and σ is the surface tension. The order of the transition is determined by the contact angle of the capped end θcap; it is continuous if the liquid completely wets the cap, and first-order otherwise. When the transition is first-order, corner menisci at the bottom of the capillary lead to a pronounced metastability, determined by a complementary Kelvin equation Δp(L) = 2σ sinθcap/L. On approaching the wetting temperature of the capillary cap, the corner menisci merge and a single meniscus unbinds from the bottom of the groove. Finite-size scaling shifts, crossover behaviour and critical singularities are determined at mean-field level and beyond. Numerical and experimental results showing the continuous nature of condensation for θcap = 0 and the influence of corner menisci on adsorption isotherms are presented. PMID:23611878

  6. Highly conductive, printable pastes from capillary suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Monica; Koos, Erin; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2016-08-01

    We have used the capillary suspension phenomenon to design conductive pastes for printed electronic applications, such as front side metallization of solar cells, without non-volatile, organic additives that often deteriorate electrical properties. Adding a small amount of a second, immiscible fluid to a suspension creates a network of liquid bridges between the particles. This capillary force-controlled microstructure allows for tuning the flow behavior in a wide range. Yield stress and low-shear viscosity can be adjusted such that long-term stability is provided by inhibiting sedimentation, and, even more importantly, narrow line widths and high aspect ratios are accessible. These ternary mixtures, called capillary suspensions, exhibit a strong degree of shear thinning that allows for conventional coating or printing equipment to be used. Finally, the secondary fluid, beneficial for stability and processing of the wet paste, completely evaporates during drying and sintering. Thus, we obtained high purity silver and nickel layers with a conductivity two times greater than could be obtained with state-of-the-art, commercial materials. This revolutionary concept can be easily applied to other systems using inorganic or even organic conductive particles and represents a fundamental paradigm change to the formulation of pastes for printed electronics.

  7. A Capillary-Based Static Phase Separator for Highly Variable Wetting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan A.; Graf, John C.; Weislogel, Mark M.

    2010-01-01

    The invention, a static phase separator (SPS), uses airflow and capillary wetting characteristics to passively separate a two-phase (liquid and air) flow. The device accommodates highly variable liquid wetting characteristics. The resultant design allows for a range of wetting properties from about 0 to over 90 advancing contact angle, with frequent complete separation of liquid from gas observed when using appropriately scaled test conditions. Additionally, the design accommodates a range of air-to-liquid flow-rate ratios from only liquid flow to over 200:1 air-to-liquid flow rate. The SPS uses a helix input section with an ice-cream-cone-shaped constant area cross section (see figure). The wedge portion of the cross section is on the outer edge of the helix, and collects the liquid via centripetal acceleration. The helix then passes into an increasing cross-sectional area vane region. The liquid in the helix wedge is directed into the top of capillary wedges in the liquid containment section. The transition from diffuser to containment section includes a 90 change in capillary pumping direction, while maintaining inertial direction. This serves to impinge the liquid into the two off-center symmetrical vanes by the airflow. Rather than the airflow serving to shear liquid away from the capillary vanes, the design allows for further penetration of the liquid into the vanes by the air shear. This is also assisted by locating the air exit ports downstream of the liquid drain port. Additionally, any droplets not contained in the capillary vanes are re-entrained downstream by a third opposing capillary vane, which directs liquid back toward the liquid drain port. Finally, the dual air exit ports serve to slow the airflow down, and to reduce the likelihood of shear. The ports are stove-piped into the cavity to form an unfriendly capillary surface for a wetting fluid to carryover. The liquid drain port is located at the start of the containment region, allowing for

  8. Circumventing Imprecise Geometric Information and Development of a Unified Modeling Technique for Various Flow Regimes in Capillary Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Bahman

    2012-11-01

    Owing to their manufacturability and reliability, capillary tubes are the most common expansion devices in household refrigerators. Therefore, investigating flow properties in the capillary tubes is of immense appeal in the said business. The models to predict pressure drop in two-phase internal flows invariably rely upon highly precise geometric information. The manner in which capillary tubes are manufactured makes them highly susceptible to geometric imprecisions, which renders geometry-based models unreliable to the point of obsoleteness. Aware of the issue, manufacturers categorize capillary tubes based on Nitrogen flow rate through them. This categorization method presents an opportunity to substitute geometric details with Nitrogen flow data as the basis for customized models. The simulation tools developed by implementation of this technique have the singular advantage of being applicable across flow regimes. Thus the error-prone process of identifying compatible correlations is eliminated. Equally importantly, compressibility and chocking effects can be incorporated in the same model. The outcome is a standalone correlation that provides accurate predictions, regardless of any particular fluid or flow regime. Thereby, exploratory investigations for capillary tube design and optimization are greatly simplified. Bahman Abbasi, Ph.D., is Lead Advanced Systems Engineer at General Electric Appliances in Louisville, KY. He conducts research projects across disciplines in the household refrigeration industry.

  9. Photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  10. Concentration device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A concentration device (2) for filter filtration concentration of particles (4) from a volume of a fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises a filter (8) configured to filter particles (4) of a predefined size in the volume of the fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises...

  11. A covalent modified hydrophilic capillary for enhanced capillary electrophoresis of biopolymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian Guo Shan; Xue Yu; Yin Mao Wei; Xiao Hui Zheng; Jian Bin Zheng

    2009-01-01

    δ-Gluconolactone was covalently coupled to aminopropyl derivatized capillary,which created hydrophilic brushes on the inner wall of the capillary.The coated capillary was shown to generate a stable electroosmotic flow(EOF)in the investigated pH range of 2.0-9.0 and to suppress effectively the adsorption of proteins.And it enabled separation of some biopolymer mixtures including basic proteins,DNA and tryptic digested bovine serum albumin(BSA)within 15 min with efficiencies up to 450,000 plates/m.The intra-and inter-day reproducibility of the coating referring to the retention times of proteins were satisfactory with mean relative standard deviations(R.S.D.)of 0.8 and 1.7%,respectively.

  12. In-capillary derivatization and capillary electrophoresis separation of amino acid neurotransmitters from brain microdialysis samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoroy, Luc; Parrot, Sandrine; Renaud, Louis; Renaud, Bernard; Zimmer, Luc

    2008-09-26

    A new in-capillary derivatization method with naphtalene-2,3-dicarboxyaldehyde (NDA)/CN(-) has been developed for capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection of brain microdialysate amino acids. Samples are sandwiched between two plugs of reagent mixture at the capillary inlet and subsequently separated. Highest derivatization yields are obtained by using a reagent to sample plug length ratio equal to 4, performing a first electrophoretic mixing followed by a zero potential amplification step before applying the separation voltage and using a NaCN to NDA concentration ratio equal to 1. This new single-step methodology allows the analysis of amino acid neurotransmitters in rat brain microdialysis samples.

  13. Quality Control Method for a Micro-Nano-Channel Microfabricated Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattoni, Alessandro; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Xuewu

    2012-01-01

    A variety of silicon-fabricated devices is used in medical applications such as drug and cell delivery, and DNA and protein separation and analysis. When a fluidic device inlet is connected to a compressed gas reservoir, and the outlet is at a lower pressure, a gas flow occurs through the membrane toward the outside. The method relies on the measurement of the gas pressure over the elapsed time inside the upstream and downstream environments. By knowing the volume of the upstream reservoir, the gas flow rate through the membrane over the pressure drop can be calculated. This quality control method consists of measuring the gas flow through a device and comparing the results with a standard curve, which can be obtained by testing standard devices. Standard devices can be selected through a variety of techniques, both destructive and nondestructive, such as SEM, AFM, and standard particle filtration.

  14. Generation of arbitrary monotonic concentration profiles by a serial dilution microfluidic network composed of microchannels with a high fluidic-resistance ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Koji; Sugiura, Shinji; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2009-06-21

    This paper reports a serial dilution microfluidic network composed of microchannels with a high fluidic-resistance ratio for generating linear concentration profiles as well as logarithmic concentration profiles spanning 3 and 6 orders of magnitude. The microfluidic networks were composed of thin fluidic-resistance microchannels with 160 to 730 microm(2) cross-sectional areas and thick diffusion-mixing microchannels with 3,600 to 17,000 microm(2) cross-sectional areas, and were fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane by multilayer photolithography and replica molding. We proposed a design algorithm of the microfluidic network for an arbitrary monotonic concentration profile by means of a hydrodynamic calculation. Because of the high fluidic-resistance ratio of the fluidic-resistance microchannels to the diffusion-mixing microchannels, appropriate geometry and dimensions of the fluidic-resistance microchannels allowed us to obtain desired concentration profiles. The fabricated microfluidic network was compact, occupying a 8 x 18 to 21.0 x 13.5 mm(2) area on the microchip. Both the linear and the logarithmic concentration profiles were successfully generated with the error less than 15% for the linear concentration profile, 22% and 35% for the logarithmic concentration profiles of 3 and 6 orders of magnitude, respectively. The generated linear concentration profiles of the small molecule, calcein, were independent of the flow rate within the range of 0.009 to 0.23 microL/min. The concentration profiles of the large molecules, dextrans, depended on the flow rate and molecular weight. The required residence time of large molecules in the diffusion-mixing microchannel was correlated with dimensionless diffusion time, Fick number, and was discussed based on the scaling law. These compact, stable serial dilution microfluidic networks are expected to be applied to various integrated on-chip analyses. PMID:19495461

  15. Flow control using audio tones in resonant microfluidic networks: towards cell-phone controlled lab-on-a-chip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Reid H; Jain, Rahil; Browning, Yoni; Shah, Rachana; Kauffman, Peter; Dinh, Doan; Lutz, Barry R

    2016-08-16

    Fluid control remains a challenge in development of portable lab-on-a-chip devices. Here, we show that microfluidic networks driven by single-frequency audio tones create resonant oscillating flow that is predicted by equivalent electrical circuit models. We fabricated microfluidic devices with fluidic resistors (R), inductors (L), and capacitors (C) to create RLC networks with band-pass resonance in the audible frequency range available on portable audio devices. Microfluidic devices were fabricated from laser-cut adhesive plastic, and a "buzzer" was glued to a diaphragm (capacitor) to integrate the actuator on the device. The AC flowrate magnitude was measured by imaging oscillation of bead tracers to allow direct comparison to the RLC circuit model across the frequency range. We present a systematic build-up from single-channel systems to multi-channel (3-channel) networks, and show that RLC circuit models predict complex frequency-dependent interactions within multi-channel networks. Finally, we show that adding flow rectifying valves to the network creates pumps that can be driven by amplified and non-amplified audio tones from common audio devices (iPod and iPhone). This work shows that RLC circuit models predict resonant flow responses in multi-channel fluidic networks as a step towards microfluidic devices controlled by audio tones. PMID:27416111

  16. Flow control using audio tones in resonant microfluidic networks: towards cell-phone controlled lab-on-a-chip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Reid H; Jain, Rahil; Browning, Yoni; Shah, Rachana; Kauffman, Peter; Dinh, Doan; Lutz, Barry R

    2016-08-16

    Fluid control remains a challenge in development of portable lab-on-a-chip devices. Here, we show that microfluidic networks driven by single-frequency audio tones create resonant oscillating flow that is predicted by equivalent electrical circuit models. We fabricated microfluidic devices with fluidic resistors (R), inductors (L), and capacitors (C) to create RLC networks with band-pass resonance in the audible frequency range available on portable audio devices. Microfluidic devices were fabricated from laser-cut adhesive plastic, and a "buzzer" was glued to a diaphragm (capacitor) to integrate the actuator on the device. The AC flowrate magnitude was measured by imaging oscillation of bead tracers to allow direct comparison to the RLC circuit model across the frequency range. We present a systematic build-up from single-channel systems to multi-channel (3-channel) networks, and show that RLC circuit models predict complex frequency-dependent interactions within multi-channel networks. Finally, we show that adding flow rectifying valves to the network creates pumps that can be driven by amplified and non-amplified audio tones from common audio devices (iPod and iPhone). This work shows that RLC circuit models predict resonant flow responses in multi-channel fluidic networks as a step towards microfluidic devices controlled by audio tones.

  17. A neuron-in-capillary platform for facile collection and mass spectrometric characterization of a secreted neuropeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Young; Fan, Yi; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Yoon, Sook; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2016-06-01

    The integration of microfluidic devices—which efficiently handle small liquid volumes—with separations/mass spectrometry (MS) is an effective approach for profiling the neurochemistry occurring in selected neurons. Interfacing the microfluidic cell culture to the mass spectrometer is challenging because of geometric and scaling issues. Here we demonstrate the hyphenation of a neuron-in-capillary platform to a solid phase extraction device and off-line MS. A primary neuronal culture of Aplysia californica neurons was established directly inside a cylindrical polyimide capillary. The approach also uses a particle-embedded monolith to condition neuropeptide releasates collected from several Aplysia neurons cultured in the capillary, with the subsequent characterization of released peptides via MS. This system presents a number of advances compared to more traditional microfluidic devices fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane. These include low cost, easy access to cell culture, rigidity, ease of transport, and minimal fluid handling. The cylindrical geometry of the platform allows convenient interface with a wide range of analytical tools that utilize capillary columns.

  18. Three-dimensional paper-based slip device for one-step point-of-care testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kwi Nam; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kwon, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we developed a new type of paper-based analytical device (PAD), the three-dimensional (3D) slip-PAD, to detect infectious human norovirus for global healthcare. The 3D configuration of the papers combined with a slip design provides unique features and versatility that overcome the limitations of fluidic manipulation and sensitivity in point-of-care (POC) tests. The assay can be carried out in a single step based on a moveable slip design, making it suitable for unskilled users. The 3D fluidic network developed by layered construction of wax-patterned papers provides different fluidic paths for the sequential delivery of multiple fluids without the need for peripheral equipment. The release and mixing of enhancement reagents on the device improved the sensitivity and detection limit. The assay results could be visualized by naked eye within 10 min, with subsequent amplification of the signal over time (human norovirus. These results demonstrate that the 3D slip-PAD is a sensitive diagnostic assay for detecting human norovirus infection that is particularly suitable for POC testing in regions where resources are scarce.

  19. A constrained particle dynamics for continuum-particle hybrid method in micro-and nano-fluidics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Cui; GuoWei He; Dewei Qi

    2006-01-01

    A hybrid method of continuum and particle dynamics is developed for micro- and nano-fluidics,where fluids are described by a molecular dynamics (MD) in one domain and by the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations in another domain.In order to ensure the continuity of momentum flux,the continuum and molecular dynamics in the overlap domain are coupled through a constrained particle dynamics.The constrained particle dynamics is constructed with a virtual damping force and a virtual added mass force.The sudden-start Couette flows with either non-Slip or slip boundary condition are used to test the hybrid method.It is shown that the results obtained are quantitatively in agreement with the analytical solutions under the non-slip boundary conditions and the full MD simulations under the slip boundary conditions.

  20. A High-Voltage Integrated Circuit Engine for a Dielectrophoresis-based Programmable Micro-Fluidic Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current, K. Wayne; Yuk, Kelvin; McConaghy, Charles; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Schwartz, Jon A.; Vykoukal, Jody V.; Andrews, Craig

    2010-01-01

    A high-voltage (HV) integrated circuit has been demonstrated to transport droplets on programmable paths across its coated surface. This chip is the engine for a dielectrophoresis (DEP)-based micro-fluidic lab-on-a-chip system. This chip creates DEP forces that move and help inject droplets. Electrode excitation voltage and frequency are variable. With the electrodes driven with a 100V peak-to-peak periodic waveform, the maximum high-voltage electrode waveform frequency is about 200Hz. Data communication rate is variable up to 250kHz. This demonstration chip has a 32×32 array of nominally 100V electrode drivers. It is fabricated in a 130V SOI CMOS fabrication technology, dissipates a maximum of 1.87W, and is about 10.4 mm × 8.2 mm. PMID:23989241

  1. Fast, label-free tracking of single viruses and weakly scattering nanoparticles in a nano-fluidic optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Faez, Sanli; Weidlich, Stefan; Garmann, Rees F; Wondraczek, Katrin; Zeisberger, Matthias; Schmidt, Markus A; Orrit, Michel; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2015-01-01

    High-speed tracking of single particles is a gateway to understanding physical, chemical, and biological processes at the nanoscale. It is also a major experimental challenge, particularly for small, nanometer-scale particles. Although methods such as confocal or fluorescence microscopy offer both high spatial resolution and high signal-to-background ratios, the fluorescence emission lifetime limits the measurement speed, while photobleaching and thermal diffusion limit the duration of measurements. Here we present a tracking method based on elastic light scattering that enables long-duration measurements of nanoparticle dynamics at rates of thousands of frames per second. We contain the particles within a single-mode silica fiber containing a sub-wavelength, nano-fluidic channel and illuminate them using the fiber's strongly confined optical mode. The diffusing particles in this cylinderical geometry are continuously illuminated inside the collection focal plane. We show that the method can track unlabeled d...

  2. Label-free tracking of single extracellular vesicles in a nano-fluidic optical fiber (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pol, Edwin; Weidlich, Stefan; Lahini, Yoav; Coumans, Frank A. W.; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk; Schmidt, Markus A.; Faez, Sanli; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-03-01

    Background: Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes, are abundantly present in human body fluids. Since the size, concentration and composition of these vesicles change during disease, vesicles have promising clinical applications, including cancer diagnosis. However, since ~70% of the vesicles have a diameter <70 nm, detection of single vesicles remains challenging. Thus far, vesicles <70 nm have only be studied by techniques that require the vesicles to be adhered to a surface. Consequently, the majority of vesicles have never been studied in their physiological environment. We present a novel label-free optical technique to track single vesicles <70 nm in suspension. Method: Urinary vesicles were contained within a single-mode light-guiding silica fiber containing a 600 nm nano-fluidic channel. Light from a diode laser (660 nm wavelength) was coupled to the fiber, resulting in a strongly confined optical mode in the nano-fluidic channel, which continuously illuminated the freely diffusing vesicles inside the channel. The elastic light scattering from the vesicles, in the direction orthogonal to the fiber axis, was collected using a microscope objective (NA=0.95) and imaged with a home-built microscope. Results: We have tracked single urinary vesicles as small as 35 nm by elastic light scattering. Please note that vesicles are low-refractive index (n<1.4) particles, which we confirmed by combining data on thermal diffusion and light scattering cross section. Conclusions: For the first time, we have studied vesicles <70 nm freely diffusing in suspension. The ease-of-use and performance of this technique support its potential for vesicle-based clinical applications.

  3. Capillary remodeling in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schraufnagel, D. E.; Mehta, D.; Harshbarger, R.; Treviranus, K.; Wang, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    Lung fibrosis is a process in which collagen is laid down and the delicate capillary-alveolar relationship is disturbed. The architectural changes which occur in the capillaries, a main element of the oxygen transferring unit, are difficult to illustrate without a three-dimensional tool, such as scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, a scanning electron microscopic study was undertaken to show the capillary changes of lung fibrosis. Fibrosis was induced in rats by intratracheal instillation...

  4. Nicked-sleeve interface for two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Flaherty, Ryan J.; Huge, Bonnie J.; Bruce, Spencer M.; Dada, Oluwatosin O.; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2013-01-01

    We report an improved interface for two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis. This interface is based on capillary tubing and a Plexiglas chip, both of which were milled using a micro-dicing saw. The interface was evaluated and compared to a traditional interface design for both pseudo one-dimensional and two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis. We observe less than 70% transfer efficiency for the traditional design and greater than 90% transfer efficiency with this new interface.

  5. Modified monolithic silica capillary for preconcentration of catecholamines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chang; Tusyo-shi Komazu

    2009-01-01

    Preconcentration of catecholamines by the modified monolithic silica in the capillary was investigated in this study. In order to achieve a microchip-based method for determining catecholamines in the saliva, the monolithic silica was fabricated in the capillary and the monolithic silica was chemically modified by on-column reaction with phenylboronate. Different modified methods were compared. The concentration conditions were optimized. This study indicates the applicability of the modified monolithic silica capillary when it was used to concentrate catecholamines.

  6. High Performance Wafer-Based Capillary Electrochromatography Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II research comprises designing, constructing, and testing a chip-based capillary electrochromatography (CEC) prototype for separation and analysis of...

  7. A Prediction Model of the Capillary Pressure J-Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W. S.; Luo, P. Y.; Sun, L.; Lin, N.

    2016-01-01

    The capillary pressure J-function is a dimensionless measure of the capillary pressure of a fluid in a porous medium. The function was derived based on a capillary bundle model. However, the dependence of the J-function on the saturation Sw is not well understood. A prediction model for it is presented based on capillary pressure model, and the J-function prediction model is a power function instead of an exponential or polynomial function. Relative permeability is calculated with the J-function prediction model, resulting in an easier calculation and results that are more representative. PMID:27603701

  8. Novel Micro-Capillary Electrochromatography for Mars Organic Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a powerful new technology - next generation Micro-Capillary Electrochromatography ? a high performance and low power...

  9. Capillary-Condenser-Pumped Heat-Transfer Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Calvin C.

    1989-01-01

    Heat being transferred supplies operating power. Capillary-condenser-pumped heat-transfer loop similar to heat pipe and to capillary-evaporator-pumped heat-transfer loop in that heat-transfer fluid pumped by evaporation and condensation of fluid at heat source and sink, respectively. Capillary condenser pump combined with capillary evaporator pump to form heat exchanger circulating heat-transfer fluids in both loops. Transport of heat more nearly isothermal. Thermal stress in loop reduced, and less external surface area needed in condenser section for rejection of heat to heat sink.

  10. Capillary Micro-Flow Through a Fiber Bundle(Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ying-dan; WANG Ji-hui; TAN Hua; GAO Guo-qiang

    2004-01-01

    The present work considered the capillary micro-flow through a fiber bundle. The resin heights in the fiber bundle as a function of time were used to determine the experimental values of capillary pressure and the permeability by the nonlinear regression fitting method. The fitting curves showed a good agreement with experiments. However, these values of capillary pressure from short- time experiments were much lower than the theoretical results from the Yang-Laplace Equation. More accurate capillary pressure was predicted from the presented long-run experiment.

  11. Novel Micro-Capillary Electrochromatography for Mars Organic Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a powerful new technology - next generation Micro-Capillary Electrochromatography - a high performance and low power...

  12. Capillary pericytes regulate cerebral blood flow in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Catherine N; Reynell, Clare; Gesslein, Bodil;

    2014-01-01

    Increases in brain blood flow, evoked by neuronal activity, power neural computation and form the basis of BOLD (blood-oxygen-level-dependent) functional imaging. Whether blood flow is controlled solely by arteriole smooth muscle, or also by capillary pericytes, is controversial. We demonstrate...... blood flow, capillaries dilate before arterioles and are estimated to produce 84% of the blood flow increase. In pathology, ischaemia evokes capillary constriction by pericytes. We show that this is followed by pericyte death in rigor, which may irreversibly constrict capillaries and damage the blood-brain...

  13. Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  14. Electroviscous effects in capillary filling of nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Kristensen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    maximum in the mesoscopic regime where the channel height (or more generally the hydraulic radius) is comparable to the screening length. However, for realistic estimates of central parameters, we find that the electroviscous contribution to the apparent viscosity is at most a 1% effect.......We theoretically examine the widespread hypothesis of an electroviscous origin of the increase in apparent viscosity observed in recent experiments on capillary filling of nanochannels. Including Debye-layer corrections to the hydraulic resistance, we find that the apparent viscosity reaches a...

  15. Capillary-Pumped Heat-Transfer Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    New type of capillary-pumped heat-transfer loop primes itself at startup. Removes substantial quantities of heat like that generated by people and equipment in rooms and vehicles. Creates continuous path for its working fluid; both vapor and liquid move in same direction. Key element in operation of loop is formation of slugs of liquid, condensed from vapor and moved along loop by vapor bubbles before and after it. Both evaporator and condenser contain axial arteries carrying water. Heat entering evaporator from heat source provides energy for transport of fluid and heat. Dimensions in inches.

  16. Capillary Network, Cancer and Kleiber Law

    CERN Document Server

    Dattoli, G; Licciardi, S; Guiot, C; Deisboeck, T S

    2014-01-01

    We develop a heuristic model embedding Kleiber and Murray laws to describe mass growth, metastasis and vascularization in cancer. We analyze the relevant dynamics using different evolution equations (Verhulst, Gompertz and others). Their extension to reaction diffusion equation of the Fisher type is then used to describe the relevant metastatic spreading in space. Regarding this last point, we suggest that cancer diffusion may be regulated by Levy flights mechanisms and discuss the possibility that the associated reaction diffusion equations are of the fractional type, with the fractional coefficient being determined by the fractal nature of the capillary evolution.

  17. Experimental study on capillary filling in nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Cao, Bing-Yang; Wang, Wei; Yun, He-Ming; Chen, Bao-Ming

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the capillary filling kinetics of deionized water in nanochannels with heights of 50-120 nm. The measured position of the moving meniscus was proportional to the square root of time, as predicted by the LW equation. However, the extracted slopes were significantly smaller than the predictions based on the bulk properties. This unusual behavior was found to be mainly caused by the electro-viscous effect and dynamic contact angle, which was significantly larger than the static angle. In addition, when the filling distance reached about 600 μm, bubbles tended to be formed, leading to the main meniscus was almost immobile.

  18. Capillary zone electrophoresis and packed capillary column liquid chromatographic analysis of recombinant human interleukin-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, J

    1993-02-24

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and packed capillary column liquid chromatography (micro-LC) have been applied to the analysis of the recombinant human protein interleukin-4 (rhIL-4). Separations for both the parent protein and its enzymatic digest were developed for the purpose of characterizing protein purity and identity. CZE separations of the intact protein were investigated over the pH range of 4.5 to 8.0 using uncoated fused silica capillaries. Gradient reversed-phase micro-LC was performed using 0.32 mm packed capillary columns at flow-rates of 5-6 microliters/min. Emphasis was placed on the ability of these methods to separate close structural variants and degradation products of the protein. Peptide mapping of the tryptic digest of rhIL-4 using a combination of CZE and micro-LC provided complimentary high resolution methods for establishing protein identity. Reproducible separations were achieved using sub-picomol amounts of sample. The advantages and problems encountered with these two techniques for characterizing rhIL-4 were assessed. PMID:8450025

  19. Capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection and sequential injection analysis in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electro-chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, Thanh Duc

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the applications of capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C4D) in capillary electrophoresis (CE) hybridized with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), i.e. in capillary electrochromatography and pressure-assisted capillary electrophoresis, as well as on the development and applications of an extension of CE-C4D with sequential injection analysis (SIA). At first, the in-house built C4D was used for electro-chromatographic determinations of...

  20. Sapphire capillaries for laser-driven wakefield acceleration in plasma. Fs-laser micromachining and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwinkendorf, Jan-Patrick

    2012-08-15

    Plasma wakefields are a promising approach for the acceleration of electrons with ultrahigh (10 to 100 GV/m) electric fields. Nowadays, high-intensity laser pulses are routinely utilized to excite these large-amplitude plasma waves. However, several detrimental effects such as laser diffraction, electron-wake dephasing and laser depletion may terminate the acceleration process. Two of these phenomena can be mitigated or avoided by the application of capillary waveguides, e.g. fabricated out of sapphire for longevity. Capillaries may compensate for laser diffraction like a fiber and allow for the creation of tapered gas-density profiles working against the dephasing between the accelerating wave and the particles. Additionally, they offer the possibility of controlled particle injection. This thesis is reporting on the set up of a laser for fs-micromachining of capillaries of almost arbitrary shapes and a test stand for density-profile characterization. These devices will permit the creation of tailored gas-density profiles for controlled electron injection and acceleration inside plasma.

  1. Nanoscale Capillary Flows in Alumina: Testing the Limits of Classical Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wenwen; McKenzie, David R

    2016-07-21

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes have well-formed cylindrical channels, as small as 10 nm in diameter, in a close packed hexagonal array. The channels in AAO membranes simulate very small leaks that may be present for example in an aluminum oxide device encapsulation. The 10 nm alumina channel is the smallest that has been studied to date for its moisture flow properties and provides a stringent test of classical capillary theory. We measure the rate at which moisture penetrates channels with diameters in the range of 10 to 120 nm with moist air present at 1 atm on one side and dry air at the same total pressure on the other. We extend classical theory for water leak rates at high humidities by allowing for variable meniscus curvature at the entrance and show that the extended theory explains why the flow increases greatly when capillary filling occurs and enables the contact angle to be determined. At low humidities our measurements for air-filled channels agree well with theory for the interdiffusive flow of water vapor in air. The flow rate of water-filled channels is one order of magnitude less than expected from classical capillary filling theory and is coincidentally equal to the helium flow rate, validating the use of helium leak testing for evaluating moisture flows in aluminum oxide leaks. PMID:27336652

  2. Engineering anastomosis between living capillary networks and endothelial cell-lined microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Phan, Duc T T; Sobrino, Agua; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher C W; Lee, Abraham P

    2016-01-21

    This paper reports a method for generating an intact and perfusable microvascular network that connects to microfluidic channels without appreciable leakage. This platform incorporates different stages of vascular development including vasculogenesis, endothelial cell (EC) lining, sprouting angiogenesis, and anastomosis in sequential order. After formation of a capillary network inside the tissue chamber via vasculogenesis, the adjacent microfluidic channels are lined with a monolayer of ECs, which then serve as the high-pressure input ("artery") and low pressure output ("vein") conduits. To promote a tight interconnection between the artery/vein and the capillary network, sprouting angiogenesis is induced, which promotes anastomosis of the vasculature inside the tissue chamber with the EC lining along the microfluidic channels. Flow of fluorescent microparticles confirms the perfusability of the lumenized microvascular network, and minimal leakage of 70 kDa FITC-dextran confirms physiologic tightness of the EC junctions and completeness of the interconnections between artery/vein and the capillary network. This versatile device design and its robust construction methodology establish a physiological transport model of interconnected perfused vessels from artery to vascularized tissue to vein. The system has utility in a wide range of organ-on-a-chip applications as it enables the physiological vascular interconnection of multiple on-chip tissue constructs that can serve as disease models for drug screening. PMID:26616908

  3. Focusing cold neutrons using capillary optics for analytical nuclear methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors demonstrate improved detection limits and lateral resolution for prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) by using a neutron focusing device to increase the neutron intensity. The neutron lens, made of glass fibers with hollow polycapillaries, was designed and constructed by X-Ray Optical Systems, Inc. It has been characterized and used for preliminary experiments at the PGAA station of the Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF) at NIST. The lens accepts a polychromatic cold neutron beam (wavelengths longer than 0.4 run) from a neutron guide 50 mm x 45 mm in cross section, and delivers a focused beam of 0.5 mm in diameter (full width at half maximum) at 52 mm from the exit of the capillaries. The average neutron current density at the focus within the FWHM is 80 times higher than that of the direct incident beam. Test samples of 2% gadolinium glass particles of size about 0.1 to 0.2 mm, and cylindrical glass samples of 0.5 mm and 1 mm in diameter containing 15 % boron have been scanned across the focal plane to determine the spatial response as well as the peak count rate. Results from both sets of measurements show promise for higher detection sensitivity on small samples, and for two-dimensional mapping of samples with lateral compositional variation. Problems associated with neutron background will be addressed

  4. Water Tank with Capillary Air/Liquid Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Smith, Frederick; Edeen, Gregg; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A bladderless water tank (see figure) has been developed that contains capillary devices that allow it to be filled and emptied, as needed, in microgravity. When filled with water, the tank shields human occupants of a spacecraft against cosmic radiation. A membrane that is permeable by air but is hydrophobic (neither wettable nor permeable by liquid water) covers one inside surface of the tank. Grooves between the surface and the membrane allow air to flow through vent holes in the surface as the tank is filled or drained. A margin of wettable surface surrounds the edges of the membrane, and all the other inside tank surfaces are also wettable. A fill/drain port is located in one corner of the tank and is covered with a hydrophilic membrane. As filling begins, water runs from the hydrophilic membrane into the corner fillets of the tank walls. Continued filling in the absence of gravity will result in a single contiguous air bubble that will be vented through the hydrophobic membrane. The bubble will be reduced in size until it becomes spherical and smaller than the tank thickness. Draining the tank reverses the process. Air is introduced through the hydrophobic membrane, and liquid continuity is maintained with the fill/drain port through the corner fillets. Even after the tank is emptied, as long as the suction pressure on the hydrophilic membrane does not exceed its bubble point, no air will be drawn into the liquid line.

  5. A new injection method for soil nutrient analysis in capillary electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolka, M.; Puchberger-Enengl, D.; Bipoun, M.; Fercher, G.; Klasa, A.; Krutzler, C.; Keplinger, F.; Vellekoop, M. J.

    2013-05-01

    We present a new method for the direct injection of liquid sample into a capillary electrophoresis (CE) device. Instead of a double-T injection mechanism, a single inlet provided with a membrane filter is used. From a reservoir on top of this inlet, the liquid directly enters the separation channel through the membrane. The driving force is a short electrical pulse. This avoids an additional sample channel, so that the chip needs only three microfluidic connects and no mechanical sample pumping is demanded. The high injection reproducibility and the comparatively simple setup open up the way for mobile application of soil analysis.

  6. A neuron-in-capillary platform for facile collection and mass spectrometric characterization of a secreted neuropeptide

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Young Lee; Yi Fan; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sook Yoon; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of microfluidic devices—which efficiently handle small liquid volumes—with separations/mass spectrometry (MS) is an effective approach for profiling the neurochemistry occurring in selected neurons. Interfacing the microfluidic cell culture to the mass spectrometer is challenging because of geometric and scaling issues. Here we demonstrate the hyphenation of a neuron-in-capillary platform to a solid phase extraction device and off-line MS. A primary neuronal culture of Aplysia...

  7. Miniaturized tools and devices for bioanalytical applications: an overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chudy, M.; Grabowska, I.; Ciosek, P.;

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an overview of various miniaturized devices and technologies developed by our group. Innovative, fast and cheap procedures for the fabrication of laboratory microsystems based on commercially available materials are reported and compared with well-established microfabricatio...... optic detectors, potentiometric sensors platforms, microreactors and capillary electrophoresis (CE) microchips as well as integrated microsystems e. g. double detection microanalytical systems, devices for studying enzymatic reactions and a microsystem for cell culture and lysis....

  8. Capillary surface discontinuities above reentrant corners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korevaar, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    A particular configuration of a vertical capillary tube for which S is the equilibrium interface between two fluids in the presence of a downward pointing gravitational field was investigated. S is the graph a function u whose domain is the (horizontal) cross section gamma of the tube. The mean curvature of S is proportional to its height above a fixed reference plane and lambda is a prescribed constant and may be taken between zero and pi/2. Domains gamma for which us is a bounded function but does not extend continuously to d gamma are sought. Simple domains are found and the behavior of u in those domains is studied. An important comparison principle that has been used in the literature to derive many of the results in capillarity is reviewed. It allows one to deduce the approximate shape of a capillary surface by constructing comparison surfaces with mean curvature and contact angle close to those of the (unknown) solution surface. In the context of nonparametric problems the comparison principle leads to height estimates above and below for the function u. An example from the literature where these height estimates have been used successfully is described. The promised domains for which the bounded u does not extend continuously to the boundary are constructed. The point on the boundary at which u has a jump discontinuity will be the vertext of a re-entrant corner having any interior angle theta pi. Using the comparison principle the behavior of u near this point is studied.

  9. Critical Velocity in Open Capillary Channel Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendahl, Uwe; Dreyer, Michael E.; Rath, Hans J.; Motil, Brian; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We investigate forced liquid flows through open capillary channels with free surfaces experimentally. The experiments were performed under low gravity conditions in the Bremen Drop Tower and on board the sounding rocket TEXUS-37. Open capillary channels (vanes) are used in surface tension tanks to transport the propellant and to provide a flow path for the bubble-free liquid supply to the thrusters. Since the free surfaces can only withstand a certain pressure differential between the liquid and ambient, the flow rate in the channel is limited. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the surfaces collapse and gas is ingested into the outlet. Since experimental and theoretical data of this flow rate limitation is lacking, the safety factors for the application of vanes in surface tension tanks must be unnecessary high. The aim of the investigation is to determine the maximum liquid flow rate and the corresponding critical flow velocity. The characteristic nondimensional parameters, OHNESORGE number, and gap ratio, cover a wide range of usual vanes. For the theoretical approach a one-dimensional momentum balance was set up. The numerical solution yields the maximum volume flux and the position of the free surface in good agreement with the experiments.

  10. CMOS absorbance detection system for capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a cost-effective portable photodetection system for capillary electrophoresis absorptiometry. By using a CMOS BDJ (buried double p-n junction) detector, a dual-wavelength method for absorbance measurement is implemented. This system includes associated electronics for low-noise pre-amplification and A/D conversion, followed by digital signal acquisition and processing. Two signal processing approaches are adopted to enhance the signal to noise ratio. One is variable time synchronous detection, which optimizes the sensitivity and measuring rate compared to a conventional synchronous detection technique. The other is a statistical approach based on principal component analysis, which allows optimal estimation of detected signal. This system has been designed and tested in capillary electrophoresis conditions. Its operation has been verified with performances comparable to those of a commercialized spectrophotometric system (HP-3D CE). With potential on-chip integration of associated electronics, it may be operated as an integrable detection module for microchip electrophoresis and other microanalysis systems

  11. Capillary wrinkling of thin bilayer polymeric sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jooyoung; Menon, Narayanan; Russell, Thomas

    We have investigated capillary force induced wrinkling on a floated polymeric bilayer thin sheet. The origin of the wrinkle pattern is compressional hoop stress caused by the capillary force of a water droplet placed on the floated polymeric thin sheet afore investigated. Herein, we study the effect of the differences of surface energy arising from the hydrophobicity of Polystyrene (PS Mw: 97 K, Contact Angle: 88 º) and the hydrophilicity of Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA Mw: 99K, Contact Angle: 68 º) on two sides of a bilayer film. We measure the number and the length of the wrinkles by broadly varying the range of thicknesses of top (9 nm to 550 nm) and bottom layer (25 nm to 330 nm). At the same, there is only a small contrast in mechanical properties of the two layers (PS E = 3.4 GPa, and PMMA E = 3 GPa). The number of the wrinkles is not strongly affected by the composition (PS(Top)/PMMA(Bottom) or PMMA(Top)/PS(Bottom)) and the thickness of each and overall bilayer system. However, the length of the wrinkle is governed by the contact angle of the drop on the top layer of bilayer system. We also compare this to the wrinkle pattern obtained in monolayer systems over a wide range of thickness from PS and PMMA (7 nm to 1 μm). W.M. Keck Foundation.

  12. Using capillary electrophoresis to characterize polymeric particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Kathryn R; Liu, Sophia; Yu, Guo; Libby, Kara; Cubicciotti, Roger; Colyer, Christa L

    2016-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used for the characterization of a variety of polymeric micron and sub-micron particles based on size, surface functionality, and binding properties. First, a robust capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method was developed for the baseline separation and quantitation of commercially available polystyrene particles with various surface modifications (including amino, carboxylate, and sulfate functional groups) and various sizes (0.2, 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0μm). The separation of DNA-templated polyacrylamide particles from untemplated particles (as used for the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine) was demonstrated. Finally, using the 29-base thrombin aptamer and thrombin protein as a model system, a study was undertaken to determine dissociation constants for the aptamer and protein in free solution and when the aptamer was conjugated to a particle, with the goal of better understanding how the use of solid substrates, like particles, affects selection and binding processes. Dissociation constants were determined and were found to be approximately 5-fold higher for the aptamer conjugated to a particle relative to that in free solution. PMID:27543386

  13. A fast and reliable way to establish fluidic connections to planar microchips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snakenborg, Detlef; Perozziello, Gerardo; Geschke, Oliver;

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we present a non-permanent method to connect microfluidic devices. The approach uses short flexible tubes that are plugged into bottom-flat holes and ensure fast and reliable interconnections. The small available dimensions allow the tube to be directly attached to the side of plana...... microchips. A theoretical model to estimate the maximum applicable pressure was developed, and verified with experimental data. Furthermore, the tube connections were compared to other non-permanent interconnection types....

  14. Advances in Automation and Throughput of the Mars Organic Analyzer Microchip Capillary Electrophoresis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldeman, B. J.; Skelley, A. M.; Scherer, J. R.; Jayarajah, C.; Mathies, R. A.

    2005-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated the design, construction and testing of a portable microchip capillary electrophoresis (CE) instrument called the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA) for analysis of amino acids and amine containing organic molecules (1). This instrument is designed to accept organic compounds isolated from samples by sublimation or by subcritical water extraction, to label the amine groups with fluorescamine, and to perform high resolution electrophoretic analysis. The CE instrument has shown remarkable robustness during successful field tests last year in the Panoche Valley, CA (1) and more recently in the Atacama Desert, Chile (2). For successful operation on Mars, however, it is necessary to operate autonomously and to analyze large numbers of samples, blanks, and standards. Toward this end we present here two advances in the MOA system that test key aspects of an eventual flight prototype. First, we have developed an automated microfluidic system and method for the autonomous loading, running and cleaning of the CE chip on the single channel MOA instrument. The integration of microfabricated PDMS valves and pumps with all-glass separation channels in a multilayer design enabled creation of structures for complex fluidic routing. Twenty sequential analyses of an amino acid standard were performed with an automated cleaning procedure between runs. In addition, dilutions were performed on-chip, and blanks were run to demonstrate the elimination of carry-over from run to run. These results demonstrate an important advance of the technology readiness level of the MOA. Second, we have designed, constructed and successfully tested a lab version of the multichannel instrument we initially proposed for the MSL opportunity. The portable Multi-Channel Mars Organic Analyzer (McMOA, 25 by 30 by 15 cm), was designed to sequentially interrogate eight radially oriented CE separation channels on a single wafer. Since each channel can be used to analyze 20 or more

  15. Laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy in capillary electrophoresis as an possible instrument for extraterrestrial life signs detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Gorlenko; Cheptcov, Vladimir; Anton, Maydykovskiy; Eugeniy, Vasilev

    The one of a significant aims in extraterrestrial exploration is a seeking for a life traces in a open space and planetary objects. Complex composition and unknown origin of suspected signs of life required у new analytical approaches and technical solutions. The promising assai here can be Laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy methods. The combined instrument developed by our team reveal the advantage of capillary electrophoresis assays in a junction with laser induced fluorescence detection technology. We optimized excitation configuration of fluorescence in capillary electrophoresis to reduce pumping laser power up to 1 mW and decrease background scattering. The improvement of the device sensitivity at poor sample concentration we achieved by incorporating fluorescence flow-through cuvette into spectrometer. That allows to simplify setup, to minimize weight and increase reproducibility of measurements. The device has been tasted in complex organic chemical mixes and microbial strains differentiation tasks. 3d multinational spectra allow us to increase the spectra information loads in comparison with ordinary capillary electrophoresis approaches. Possible updating the device with Raman approach can even furthermore multiple the differentiation power of the instrument. The analytical module developed using this approach can be potentially effectively used in extraterrestrial researches as a payload of the future spacecraft.

  16. A Simple Double-Source Model for Interference of Capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhibo; Zhao, Xiaohong; Xiao, Jinghua

    2012-01-01

    A simple but physically intuitive double-source model is proposed to explain the interferogram of a laser-capillary system, where two effective virtual sources are used to describe the rays reflected by and transmitted through the capillary. The locations of the two virtual sources are functions of the observing positions on the target screen. An…

  17. Potential of capillary electrophoresis for the profiling of propolis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, M.J; Somsen, G.W; de Jong, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    The usefulness of capillary electrophoresis (CE) with diode array detection for the profiling of Propolis, a hive product, is investigated. Water extracts of Propolis were analyzed with both capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) at pH 7.0 and 9.3, and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) wit

  18. Analysis of organic acids in Macedonian wines by capillary electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Jancovska, Maja; Ivanova, Violeta; Gulaboski, Rubin; Belder, Detlev

    2013-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis as a separation technique can be applied for analysis of organic acids in white and red wines, providing high resolution separation of the analytes. Organic acids such as of tartaric, malic, lactic citric and succinic acids have been analysed in many Macedonian red and white wines by capillary electrophoresis, and results have been discussed.

  19. Blepharospasm in a patient with pontine capillary telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, AL; Dillon, WP; Horton, JC

    2012-01-01

    Blepharospasm is rarely due to an identifiable etiology. In the majority of cases, imaging fails to reveal any structural lesion. Here we describe an otherwise healthy patient with blepharospasm who was found to have pontine capillary telangiectasia. We propose a potential association between blepharospasm and pontine capillary telangiectasia. © 2012 The American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc.

  20. Pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Shicai; LIU Changling; YE Yuguang; LIU Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between the pore capillary pressure and hydrate saturation in sedi-ments, a new method was proposed. First, the phase equilibria of methane hydrate in fine-grained silica sands were measured. As to the equilibrium data, the pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate were calculated. The results showed that the phase equilibria of methane hydrates in fine-grained silica sands changed due to the depressed activity of pore water caused by the surface group and negatively charged characteristic of silica particles as well as the capillary pressure in small pores together. The capil-lary pressure increased with the increase of methane hydrate saturation due to the decrease of the available pore space. However, the capillary-saturation relationship could not yet be described quantitatively because of the stochastic habit of hydrate growth.

  1. Validation of STR typing by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, T R; Baumstark, A L; Defenbaugh, D A; Keys, K M; Brown, A L; Budowle, B

    2001-05-01

    With the use of capillary electrophoresis (CE), high-resolution electrophoretic separation of short tandem repeat (STR) loci can be achieved in a semiautomated fashion. Laser-induced detection of fluorescently labeled PCR products and multicolor analysis enable the rapid generation of multilocus DNA profiles. In this study, conditions for typing PCR-amplified STR loci by capillary electrophoresis were investigated using the ABI Prism 310 Genetic Analyzer (Applied Biosystems). An internal size standard was used with each run to effectively normalize mobility differences among injections. Alleles were designated by comparison to allelic ladders that were run with each sample set. Multiple runs of allelic ladders and of amplified samples demonstrate that allele sizes were reproducible, with standard deviations typically less than 0.12 bases for fragments up to 317 bases in length (largest allele analyzed) separated in a 47 cm capillary. Therefore, 99.7% of all alleles that are the same length should fall within the measurement error window of +/- 0.36 bases. Microvariants of the tetranucleotide repeats were also accurately typed by the analytical software. Alleles differing in size by one base could be resolved in two-donor DNA mixtures in which the minor component comprised > or = 5% of the total DNA. Furthermore, the quantitative data format (i.e., peak amplitude) can in some instances assist in determining individual STR profiles in mixed samples. DNA samples from previously typed cases (typed for RFLP, AmpliType PM+DQA1, and/or D1S80) were amplified using AmpFlSTR Profiler Plus and COfiler and were evaluated using the ABI Prism 310. Most samples yielded typable results. Compared with previously determined results for other loci, there were no discrepancies as to the inclusion or exclusion of suspects or victims. CE thus provides efficient separation, resolution, sensitivity and precision, and the analytical software provides reliable genotyping of STR loci. The

  2. On-line gas-free electrodialytic eluent generator for capillary ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bingcheng; Takeuchi, Masaki; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2008-01-01

    Both low- and high-pressure, gas-free, capillary-scale electrodialytic generators for eluents in ion chromatography are described. While the low-pressure devices rely on planar or tubular membranes, the high-pressure devices rely on ion-exchange beads used both as one-way ionic gates and as ball-on-seat valves to provide sealing. The high-pressure device is easily implemented in the form of a commercial cross fitting and can withstand at least 1400 psi. By design these devices do not produce gas in the eluent channel; hence, it is not necessary to remove gas afterward. With appropriate electrolytes and electrode polarities, such devices can produce either acid or base or salt. In regard to ionic transport, the behavior of these devices fully corresponds to that of a semiconductor diode. To our knowledge, this is the first time such complete equivalence of ion transport through ion-exchange media and with the more familiar example of electron transport through a semiconductor diode under both forward- and reverse-biased conditions have been demonstrated. Reverse bias can be applied to minimize/prevent Donnan-forbidden leakage or ion exchange. Even with 4 M KOH in the electrode compartments and 4 microL/min water flowing through the eluent channel, with a reverse bias of -12 V, the leakage KOH concentration is monolithic columns. PMID:18062705

  3. Determination of Amino Acids in Single Human Lymphocytes after On-capillary Derivatization by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis with Electrochemical Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Amino acids in individual human lymphocytes were determined by capillary zone electrophoresis with electrochemical detection after on-capillary derivatization. In order to inject cells easily, a cell injector was designed. Four amino acids (serine, alanine, taurine, and glycine) in single human lymphocytes have been identified. Quantitation has been accomplished through the use of calibration curves.

  4. The thermal-hydraulic for the new technologies: the micro-fluidics; La thermohydraulique au service des nouvelles technologies: la microfluidique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crecy, F. de; Gruss, A.; Bricard, A.; Excoffon, J

    2000-07-01

    The micro-fluidics can be defined as the fluid flow in little canals. This scale offers a great interest for the biotechnology type. In this paper, the authors present this fluids form and detail the researches performed at the Department of Physics and Thermal-hydraulics of the CEA, in the domain of the physical properties characterization and of the numerical two-phase direct simulation. (A.L.B.)

  5. Design of an optical and micro-fluidic sensor for concentration measurement by photo-thermal effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work has been done in the context of fuel reprocessing in the nuclear industry. In fact, the handling of nuclear waste is one of the major issues in the nuclear industry. Its implications reach from economical to political to ecological dimensions. Since used nuclear fuel consists of 97% of recyclable substances, many countries have chosen to reprocess used fuel, not only for economical reasons but also to limit the quantity of nuclear waste. The most widely employed extraction technique is the PUREX process where the used fuel is diluted in nitric acid. The recyclable compounds can then be extracted by solvent techniques. Such processes need to be monitored crucially. However, nowadays, the process supervision is carried out by manually sampling the radioactive effluents and analyzing them in external laboratories. Not only prone to potential risks, this approach is little responsive and produces radio-toxic samples that cannot be reintroduced in the nuclear fuel cycle. In this study, we therefore present the developpement of a micro-fluidic glass sensor, based on the detection of a photothermal effect induced in the sample fluid. Micro-fluidic allows fluid handling on a microliter-scale and can therefore significantly reduce the sample volume and thereby the radio-toxicity of the analyzed fluids. Photothermal spectrometry is well suited for small-scale sample analysis since its sensitivity does not rely on the length of optical interaction with the analyte. The photothermal effect is a local refractive index variation due to the absorption of photons by the analyte species which are contained in the sample. On the sensor chip, the index refraction change is being sensed by an integrated Young interferometer made by ion-exchange in glass. The probed volume in the channel was (33.5± 3.5) pl. The interferometric system can sense refractive index changes as low as Δn(min)=7.5*10-6, allowing to detect a minimum concentration of cobalt(II) in ethanol c

  6. Measurement of Solution Impedance with Micro-Fluidic Chip%基于微流控芯片的液体电导测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胥飞; Md Shehadul Islam

    2012-01-01

    A conductance micro-fluidic chip was fabricated by electrochemistry corrosion. Based on the traditional fabrication method of micro-fluidic chip, thin brass wire is etched and broken into two elec- trodes for impedance measurement. Conductance of polystyrene beads solutions with densities of 21.0 %, 28. 1%, 37.50% and 50% are measured with the micro-fluidic chip. The measured results conform to the theory, showing effectiveness of the chip in liquid conductance measurement.%在传统微流控芯片制作方法的基础上,利用电化学腐蚀来制作电导式微流控芯片。对浓度分别为21.0%、28.1%、37.5%、50%的聚苯乙烯溶于去离子水的微粒混悬液进行实验测量,实验表明,该芯片测量与理论基本符合,芯片适用于液体溶液的阻抗测量。

  7. Gravity-capillary free-surface flows

    CERN Document Server

    Vanden-Broeck, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Free surface problems occur in many aspects of science and of everyday life such as the waves on a beach, bubbles rising in a glass of champagne, melting ice, pouring flows from a container and sails billowing in the wind. Consequently, the effect of surface tension on gravity-capillary flows continues to be a fertile field of research in applied mathematics and engineering. Concentrating on applications arising from fluid dynamics, Vanden-Broeck draws upon his years of experience in the field to address the many challenges involved in attempting to describe such flows mathematically. Whilst careful numerical techniques are implemented to solve the basic equations, an emphasis is placed upon the reader developing a deep understanding of the structure of the resulting solutions. The author also reviews relevant concepts in fluid mechanics to help readers from other scientific fields who are interested in free boundary problems.

  8. Capillary Electrophoresis Analysis of Conventional Splicing Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Acedo, Alberto; García-Casado, Zaida;

    2014-01-01

    Rare sequence variants in "high-risk" disease genes, often referred as unclassified variants (UVs), pose a serious challenge to genetic testing. However, UVs resulting in splicing alterations can be readily assessed by in vitro assays. Unfortunately, analytical and clinical interpretation...... of these assays is often challenging. Here, we explore this issue by conducting splicing assays in 31 BRCA2 genetic variants. All variants were assessed by RT-PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and direct sequencing. If assays did not produce clear-cut outputs (Class-2 or Class-5 according to analytical...... International Agency for Research on Cancer guidelines), we performed qPCR and/or minigene assays. The latter were performed with a new splicing vector (pSAD) developed by authors of the present manuscript (patent #P201231427 CSIC). We have identified three clinically relevant Class-5 variants (c.682-2A>G, c...

  9. Current opinions of capillary leak syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Jun; WANG Jin-quan; ZHANG Ying

    2012-01-01

    Capillary leak syndrome(CLS) in critically ill patients is common, and the clinical manifestations of CLS include systemic edema, hypoproteinemia, effective circulating blood volume reduction and blood concentrated.The common pathogenesy is sepsis, severe trauma, cardiopulmonary bypass and so on.CLS is divided into leakage period and recovery period usually. Clinical manifestation and treatment in different period are different in each pathophysiologic process.Although the methods of treatment are more, effective treatment measures are in shortage. More therapeutic measures are studied currently which include improvement of endothelial cell function, macromolecular colloidal solution application, continuous blood purification and so on. It is a guiding value to understand the pathological mechanism, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of the CLS.

  10. Ferroelectric devices

    CERN Document Server

    Uchino, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Updating its bestselling predecessor, Ferroelectric Devices, Second Edition assesses the last decade of developments-and setbacks-in the commercialization of ferroelectricity. Field pioneer and esteemed author Uchino provides insight into why this relatively nascent and interdisciplinary process has failed so far without a systematic accumulation of fundamental knowledge regarding materials and device development.Filling the informational void, this collection of information reviews state-of-the-art research and development trends reflecting nano and optical technologies, environmental regulat

  11. Integrated elastomeric components for autonomous regulation of sequential and oscillatory flow switching in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosadegh, Bobak; Kuo, Chuan-Hsien; Tung, Yi-Chung; Torisawa, Yu-Suke; Bersano-Begey, Tommaso; Tavana, Hossein; Takayama, Shuichi

    2010-06-01

    A critical need for enhancing the usability and capabilities of microfluidic technologies is the development of standardized, scalable and versatile control systems. Electronically controlled valves and pumps typically used for dynamic flow regulation, although useful, can limit convenience, scalability and robustness. This shortcoming has motivated the development of device-embedded non-electrical flow-control systems. Existing approaches to regulate operation timing on-chip, however, still require external signals such as timed generation of fluid flow, bubbles, liquid plugs or droplets or an alteration of chemical compositions or temperature. Here, we describe a strategy to provide device-embedded flow switching and clocking functions. Physical gaps and cavities interconnected by holes are fabricated into a three-layer elastomer structure to form networks of fluidic gates that can spontaneously generate cascading and oscillatory flow output using only a constant flow of Newtonian fluids as the device input. The resulting microfluidic substrate architecture is simple, scalable and should be applicable to various materials. This flow-powered fluidic gating scheme brings the autonomous signal processing ability of microelectronic circuits to microfluidics where there is the added diversity in current information of having distinct chemical or particulate species and richness in current operation of having chemical reactions and physical interactions.

  12. Manipulating particles for micro- and nano-fluidics via floating electrodes and diffusiophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Sinan Eren

    a nanopore by the superimposed diffusiophoresis. Based on the results demonstrated in the present study, it is entirely conceivable to extend the development to design devices for the following objectives: (1) to enrich the concentration of, say, DNA or RNA, and to increase their concentrations at a desired location. (2) to act as a filtration device, wherin the filtration can be achieved without blocking the microfluidic channel and without any porous material. (3) to act as a microfluidic valve, where the particles can be locally trapped in any desired location and the direction can be switched as desired. (4) to create nanocomposite material formation or even a thin nanocomposite film formation on the floating electrode. (5) to create a continuous concentration-gradient-generator nanofluidic device that may be obtained for nanoparticle translocation process. This may achieve nanometer-scale spatial accuracy sample sequencing by simultaneously controlling the electric field and concentration gradient.

  13. Guiding of charged particles through capillaries in insulating materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolterfoht, Nikolaus; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2016-04-01

    Studies of charged particle guiding through capillaries in insulating materials, performed during the last decade, are reviewed in a comprehensive manner. First, the principles of capillary guiding of slow highly charged ions are introduced describing the self-organized formation of charge patches. Basic quantities are defined, such as the guiding power characterizing a capillary. Challenges of the guiding experiments are pointed out. Then, experiments are described with emphasis on the guiding of highly charged ions in the keV energy range. Samples with an array of nanocapillaries as well as single macrocapillaries are treated. Emission profiles of transmitted ions are analyzed to establish scaling laws for the guiding angle, which quantifies the guiding power. Oscillations of the mean ion emission angle reveal the temporal dynamics of the charge patch formation. Next, experiments with ions of high (MeV) energies are focused on single tapered capillaries allowing for the production of a microbeam for various applications. Experiments concerning electrons are presented showing that apart from being elastically scattered these negative particles may enter into the capillary surface where they suffer energy losses. Finally, theoretical concepts of the capillary guiding are discussed. Simulations based on different charge transport methods clearly support the understanding of the guiding mechanisms. Altogether, capillary guiding involves several novel phenomena for which understanding have progressed far beyond their infancy.

  14. Capillary bundle model of hydraulic conductivity for frozen soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kunio; Flury, Markus

    2008-12-01

    We developed a capillary bundle model to describe water flow in frozen soil. We assume that the soil can be represented as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries. We consider that the freezing point in the capillaries is depressed according to the Gibbs-Thomson effect and that when stable ice forms in a capillary, the ice forms in the center of the capillaries, leaving a circular annulus open for liquid water flow. We use the model to demonstrate how the hydraulic conductivity changes as a function of temperature for both saturated and unsaturated soils, using a sand and two silt loam soils as examples. As temperature decreases, more and more ice forms, and the water flux consequently decreases. In frozen soil near 0°C, water predominantly flows through ice-free capillaries, so that the hydraulic conductivity of frozen soil is similar to that of an unfrozen soil with a water content equal to the unfrozen water content of the frozen soil. At low temperatures, however, ice forms in almost all capillaries, and the hydraulic conductivity of frozen soil is greater than that of unfrozen soil with the same water potential.

  15. Trapped liquid drop at the end of capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengjia; Yen, Hung-Yu; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2013-10-01

    The liquid drop captured at the capillary end, which is observed in capillary valve and pendant drop technique, is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Because of contact line pinning of the lower meniscus, the lower contact angle is able to rise from the intrinsic contact angle (θ*) so that the external force acting on the drop can be balanced by the capillary force. In the absence of contact angle hysteresis (CAH), the upper contact angle remains at θ*. However, in the presence of CAH, the upper contact angle can descend to provide more capillary force. The coupling between the lower and upper contact angles determines the equilibrium shape of the captured drop. In a capillary valve, the pinned contact line can move across the edge as the pressure difference exceeds the valving pressure, which depends on the geometrical characteristic and wetting property of the valve opening. When CAH is considered, the valving pressure is elevated because the capillary force is enhanced by the receding contact angle. For a pendant drop under gravity, the maximal capillary force is achieved as the lower contact angle reaches 180° in the absence of CAH. However, in the presence of CAH, four regimes can be identified by three critical drop volumes. The lower contact angle can exceed 180°, and therefore the drop takes on the shape of a light bulb, which does not exist in the absence of CAH. The comparisons between Surface Evolver simulations and experiments are quite well. PMID:24004041

  16. Capillary electrophoresis-electrochemistry microfluidic system for the determination of organic peroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joseph; Escarpa, Alberto; Pumera, Martin; Feldman, Jason; Svehla, D. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    A microfluidic analytical system for the separation and detection of organic peroxides, based on a microchip capillary electrophoresis device with an integrated amperometric detector, was developed. The new microsystem relies on the reductive detection of both organic acid peroxides and hydroperoxides at -700 mV (vs. Ag wire/AgCl). Factors influencing the separation and detection processes were examined and optimized. The integrated microsystem offers rapid measurements (within 130 s) of these organic-peroxide compounds, down to micromolar levels. A highly stable response for repetitive injections (RSD 0.35-3.12%; n = 12) reflects the negligible electrode passivation. Such a "lab-on-a-chip" device should be attractive for on-site analysis of organic peroxides, as desired for environmental screening and industrial monitoring.

  17. A reconfigurable continuous-flow fluidic routing fabric using a modular, scalable primitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ryan; Bhatia, Swapnil; Densmore, Douglas

    2016-07-01

    Microfluidic devices, by definition, are required to move liquids from one physical location to another. Given a finite and frequently fixed set of physical channels to route fluids, a primitive design element that allows reconfigurable routing of that fluid from any of n input ports to any n output ports will dramatically change the paradigms by which these chips are designed and applied. Furthermore, if these elements are "regular" regarding their design, the programming and fabrication of these elements becomes scalable. This paper presents such a design element called a transposer. We illustrate the design, fabrication and operation of a single transposer. We then scale this design to create a programmable fabric towards a general-purpose, reconfigurable microfluidic platform analogous to the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) found in digital electronics.

  18. Bio-Inspired Micro-Fluidic Angular-Rate Sensor for Vestibular Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambos M. Andreou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an alternative approach for angular-rate sensing based on the way that the natural vestibular semicircular canals operate, whereby the inertial mass of a fluid is used to deform a sensing structure upon rotation. The presented gyro has been fabricated in a commercially available MEMS process, which allows for microfluidic channels to be implemented in etched glass layers, which sandwich a bulk-micromachined silicon substrate, containing the sensing structures. Measured results obtained from a proof-of-concept device indicate an angular rate sensitivity of less than 1 °/s, which is similar to that of the natural vestibular system. By avoiding the use of a continually-excited vibrating mass, as is practiced in today’s state-of-the-art gyroscopes, an ultra-low power consumption of 300 μW is obtained, thus making it suitable for implantation.

  19. Laser-machined components for microanalytical and chemical separation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Dean W.; Martin, Peter M.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    1998-10-01

    Excimer lasers have proven to be powerful tools for machining polymeric components used in microanalytical and microchemical separation devices. We report the use of laser machining methods to produce microfluidic channels and liquid/liquid contact membranes for a number of devices fabricated at our laboratory. Microchannels 50- to 100- micrometers -wide have been produced directly in bulk polycarbonate chips using a direct-write laser micromachining system. Wider microchannels have been produced by laser machining paths through sheets of polyimide film, then sandwiching the patterned piece between solid chips of polycarbonate stock. A comparison of direct-write and mask machining processes used to produce some of the microfluidic features is made. Examples of microanalytical devices produced using these methods are presented. Included are microdialysis units used to remove electrolytes from liquid samples and electrophoretic separation devices, both used for extremely low volume samples intended for mass spectrometric analysis. A multilayered microfluidic device designed to analyze low volume groundwater samples for hazardous metals and a fluidics motherboard are also described. Laser machining processes have also been explored for producing polymeric membranes suitable for use in liquid/liquid contactors used for removal of soluble hazardous components from waste streams. A step-and-repeat mask machining process was used to produce 0.5 X 8 cm membranes in 25- and 50-micrometers -thick polyimide. Pore diameters produced using this method were five and ten micrometers. The laser machined membranes were sputter coated with PTFE prior to use to improve fluid breakthrough characteristics.

  20. Static investigation of two fluidic thrust-vectoring concepts on a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, David J.

    1994-01-01

    A static investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel of two thrust-vectoring concepts which utilize fluidic mechanisms for deflecting the jet of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. One concept involved using the Coanda effect to turn a sheet of injected secondary air along a curved sidewall flap and, through entrainment, draw the primary jet in the same direction to produce yaw thrust vectoring. The other concept involved deflecting the primary jet to produce pitch thrust vectoring by injecting secondary air through a transverse slot in the divergent flap, creating an oblique shock in the divergent channel. Utilizing the Coanda effect to produce yaw thrust vectoring was largely unsuccessful. Small vector angles were produced at low primary nozzle pressure ratios, probably because the momentum of the primary jet was low. Significant pitch thrust vector angles were produced by injecting secondary flow through a slot in the divergent flap. Thrust vector angle decreased with increasing nozzle pressure ratio but moderate levels were maintained at the highest nozzle pressure ratio tested. Thrust performance generally increased at low nozzle pressure ratios and decreased near the design pressure ratio with the addition of secondary flow.

  1. Effect of fluidics on corneal endothelial cell density, central corneal thickness, and central macular thickness after phacoemulsification with torsional ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeep Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the relative effects of high and low fluidic parameters on endothelial cell density (ECD, central corneal thickness (CCT, and central macular thickness (CMT after phacoemulsification with torsional ultrasound. Settings and Design: Prospective, randomized clinical trial based on a tertiary eye hospital. Subjects and Methods: The study included 65 patients in each group. Patients were randomized to either the high or the low flow group using a computerized random number table. The study was patient and examiner masked. All patients underwent phacoemulsification with torsional ultrasound. Visual acuity, ECD, CCT, and CMT were measured for all patients preoperatively at 2 weeks and 6 weeks postoperatively. Statistical Analysis Used: The Shapiro–Wilks test was used to assess the normality of the data. Mann–Whitney U-test with the P value set at 0.05 was used to compare the two groups. Results: Cumulative dissipated energy was significantly higher in the low flow group (16.44 ± 9.07 vs. 11.74 ± 6.68; P = 0.002. No statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups in the ECD, CCT, CMT, or corrected distance visual acuity at the end of 6 weeks. Conclusions: No significant difference was noted in the postoperative outcome between high and low flow groups. Parameters can be modified to suit the surgeon's preference, as both high and low flow parameters were found to have comparable postoperative outcomes.

  2. Automated derivatization and fluorimetric determination of biogenic amines in milk by zone fluidics coupled to liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notou, Maria; Zotou, Anastasia; Tzanavaras, Paraskevas D; Themelis, Demetrius G

    2014-08-22

    A novel zone-fluidics/high pressure liquid chromatographic (ZF-HPLC) method is described for the simultaneous determination of six biogenic monoamines, in the presence of hexylamine as internal standard. Automated on-line derivatization of the analytes with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde/cyanide ions was performed using the ZF concept and the derivatives were injected on the HPLC column for separation/detection. The influence of the ZF operation conditions on the derivatization reaction was investigated. The isoindoles formed were separated on a Kromasil C18 column (250 mm × 4 mm i.d., 5 μm), using an isocratic mobile phase of methanol/water (80:20, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1). Monitoring and quantification was carried out by fluorescence detection at 424/494 nm. The limits of detection were at the pg level with a sample volume of 20 μL. The whole procedure was evaluated and fully validated for the determination of biogenic amines in milk samples. PMID:24986070

  3. Renewable Surface Fluorescence Sandwich Immunoassay Biosensor for Rapid Sensitive Botulinum Toxin Detection in an Automated Fluidic Format

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Warner, Marvin G.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Miller, Keith D.; Colburn, Heather A.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Anheier, Norman C.; Lind, Michael A.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2009-03-05

    A renewable surface biosensor for rapid detection of botulinum toxin is described based on fluidic automation of a fluorescence sandwich immunoassay, using a recombinant fragment of the toxin heavy chain as a structurally valid simulant. Monoclonal antibodies AR4 and RAZ1 bind to separate epitopes of both this fragment and the holotoxin. The AR4 antibody was covalently bound to Sepharose beads and used as the capture antibody. A rotating rod flow cell was used to capture these beads delivered as a suspension by the sequential injection flow system, creating a 3.6 microliter column. After perfusing the bead column with sample and washing away the matrix, the column was perfused with Alexa 647 dye-labeled RAZ1 antibody as the reporter. Optical fibers coupled to the rotating rod flow cell at a 90 degree angle to one another delivered excitation light from a HeNe laser and collected fluorescent emission light for detection. After each measurement, the used sepharose beads are released and replaced with fresh beads. In a rapid screening approach to sample analysis, the toxin simulant was detected to concentrations of 10 pM in less than 20 minutes.

  4. Modeling the Peano fluidic muscle and the effects of its material properties on its static and dynamic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Allan Joshua; Xie, Sheng Quan; Anderson, Iain Alexander

    2016-06-01

    The promise of wearable assistive robotics cannot be realized without the development of actuators that mimic the behavior and form of biological muscles. Planar fluidic muscles known as Peano muscles or pouch motors have the potential to provide the high force and compliance of McKibben pneumatic artificial muscles with the low threshold pressure of pleated pneumatic artificial muscles. Yet they do so in a soft and slim form that can be discreetly distributed over the human body. This work is an investigation into the empirical modeling of the Peano muscle, the effect of its material on its performance, and its capabilities and limitations. We discovered that the Peano muscle could provide responsive and discreet actuation of soft and rigid bodies requiring strains between 15% and 30%. Ideally, they are made of non-viscoelastic materials with high tensile and low bending stiffnesses. While Sarosi et al’s empirical model accurately captures its static behavior with an root mean square error of 10.2 N, their dynamic model overestimates oscillation frequency and damping. We propose that the Peano muscle be modeled by a parallel ideal contractile unit and viscoelastic element, both in series with another viscoelastic element.

  5. Capillary-Driven Flow in Liquid Filaments Connecting Orthogonal Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    Capillary phenomena plays an important role in the management of product water in PEM fuel cells because of the length scales associated with the porous layers and the gas flow channels. The distribution of liquid water within the network of gas flow channels can be dramatically altered by capillary flow. We experimentally demonstrate the rapid movement of significant volumes of liquid via capillarity through thin liquid films which connect orthogonal channels. The microfluidic experiments discussed provide a good benchmark against which the proper modeling of capillarity by computational models may be tested. The effect of surface wettability, as expressed through the contact angle, on capillary flow will also be discussed.

  6. Demonstration of a high repetition rate capillary discharge waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, A. J., E-mail: ajgonsalves@lbl.gov; Pieronek, C.; Daniels, J.; Bulanov, S. S.; Waldron, W. L.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Liu, F.; Antipov, S.; Butler, J. E. [Euclid TechLabs, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20879 (United States); Bobrova, N. A.; Sasorov, P. V. [Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-21

    A hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide operating at kHz repetition rates is presented for parameters relevant to laser plasma acceleration (LPA). The discharge current pulse was optimized for erosion mitigation with laser guiding experiments and MHD simulation. Heat flow simulations and measurements showed modest temperature rise at the capillary wall due to the average heat load at kHz repetition rates with water-cooled capillaries, which is promising for applications of LPAs such as high average power radiation sources.

  7. Separation and quantification of cellulases and hemicellulases by capillary electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henning; Kutter, Jörg Peter; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    . Current methods are limited in their ability to quantify all of these enzymes when all are present simultaneously in a mixture. Five different cellulases (two cellobiohydrolases and three endoglucanases) and one hemicellulase (endoxylanase) were separated using capillary electrophoresis (CE) in a fused...... silica capillary at pH values close to neutral. The improvement of the separation of these six proteins by the addition of alpha, omega-diaminoalkanes with chain lengths from three to seven carbon units was investigated. Dynamically coating the capillary with 1,3-diaminopropane resulted in separation of...

  8. Optofluidic devices and applications in photonics, sensing and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Lin; Chen, H Matthew; Freeman, Lindsay M; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2012-10-01

    Optofluidics integrates the fields of photonics and microfluidics, providing new freedom to both fields and permitting the realization of optical and fluidic property manipulations at the chip scale. Optofluidics was formed only after many breakthroughs in microfluidics, as understanding of fluid behaviour at the micron level enabled researchers to combine the advantages of optics and fluids. This review describes the progress of optofluidics from a photonics perspective, highlighting various optofluidic aspects ranging from the device's property manipulation to an interactive integration between optics and fluids. First, we describe photonic elements based on the functionalities that enable fluid manipulation. We then discuss the applications of optofluidic biodetection with an emphasis on nanosensing. Next, we discuss the progress of optofluidic lenses with an emphasis on its various architectures, and finally we conceptualize on where the field may lead.

  9. Experimental verification of the capillary plasma triggered long spark gap under the extremely low working coefficient in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper has proposed a new triggering method for long spark gap based on capillary plasma ejection and conducted the experimental verification under the extremely low working coefficient, which represents that the ratio of the spark gap charging voltage to the breakdown voltage is particularly low. The quasi-neutral plasma is ejected from the capillary and develops through the axial direction of the spark gap. The electric field in the spark gap is thus changed and its breakdown is incurred. It is proved by the experiments that the capillary plasma ejection is effective in triggering the long spark gap under the extremely low working coefficient in air. The study also indicates that the breakdown probabilities, the breakdown delay, and the delay dispersion are all mainly determined by the characteristics of the ejected plasma, including the length of the plasma flow, the speed of the plasma ejection, and the ionization degree of the plasma. Moreover, the breakdown delay and the delay dispersion increase with the length of the long spark gap, and the polarity effect exists in the triggering process. Lastly, compared with the working patterns of the triggering device installed in the single electrode, the working pattern of the devices installed in both the two electrodes, though with the same breakdown process, achieves the ignition under longer gap distance. To be specific, at the gap length of 14 cm and the working coefficient of less than 2%, the spark gap is still ignited accurately

  10. Experimental verification of the capillary plasma triggered long spark gap under the extremely low working coefficient in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, D.; Yang, L. J., E-mail: yanglj@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Ma, J. B.; Liu, S.; Wang, W.; Ding, W. D. [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Huo, P.; Li, G.; Yao, S. L. [Xi' an High Voltage Apparatus Research Institute Co., Ltd., Xi' an 710077 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The paper has proposed a new triggering method for long spark gap based on capillary plasma ejection and conducted the experimental verification under the extremely low working coefficient, which represents that the ratio of the spark gap charging voltage to the breakdown voltage is particularly low. The quasi-neutral plasma is ejected from the capillary and develops through the axial direction of the spark gap. The electric field in the spark gap is thus changed and its breakdown is incurred. It is proved by the experiments that the capillary plasma ejection is effective in triggering the long spark gap under the extremely low working coefficient in air. The study also indicates that the breakdown probabilities, the breakdown delay, and the delay dispersion are all mainly determined by the characteristics of the ejected plasma, including the length of the plasma flow, the speed of the plasma ejection, and the ionization degree of the plasma. Moreover, the breakdown delay and the delay dispersion increase with the length of the long spark gap, and the polarity effect exists in the triggering process. Lastly, compared with the working patterns of the triggering device installed in the single electrode, the working pattern of the devices installed in both the two electrodes, though with the same breakdown process, achieves the ignition under longer gap distance. To be specific, at the gap length of 14 cm and the working coefficient of less than 2%, the spark gap is still ignited accurately.

  11. Organic Light Emitting Device as a fluorescence spectroscopy's light source : one step towards the lab-on-a-chip device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camou, S.; Kitamura, M.; Gouy, Jean-Philippe; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko; Fujii, Teruo

    2003-02-01

    Many papers were recently dedicated to the lab-on-a-chip applications, where all the basic elements should be integrated directly onto the microchip. The fluorescence spectroscopy is mostly used as a detection method due to its high reliability and sensitivity, but requires light source and photo-detector. For the first time, we then propose to use Organic material Light Emitting Diode (OLED) to supply a light source for the optical detection based on fluorescence spectroscopy. By combining this OLED with micro-fluidic channels patterned in PDMS layer, the integration of light source on the chip is then achieved. First, the ability of Organic Material to excite fluorescent response from dye is demonstrated. Then, some configurations are described in order to decrease the major drawbacks that have to be solved before applying such kind of devices.

  12. Surface fluorination of rutile-TiO2 thin films deposited by reactive sputtering for accelerating response of optically driven capillary effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Taizo; Maeda, Hironobu; Konishi, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    We report the acceleration of photoresponsive wettability switching by applying surface fluorination to rutile-TiO2 thin films deposited by reactive sputtering. Photoresponsive wettability switchable surfaces can be applied to optically driven liquid manipulation to enable the elimination of the electrical wiring and pneumatic tubing from fluidic systems. In this work, surface fluorination using CF4 plasma treatment is applied to rutile-TiO2 thin films, which exhibit a wider switching range of wettability than that of anatase-TiO2 thin films. Fluorine termination of TiO2 thin films increases the surface acidity and enhances its photocatalytic performance. TiO2 thin films with and without surface fluorination respectively exhibited the transition of contact angles ranging from 73.7 to 12.3°, and from 70.2 to 32° under UV irradiation for 15 min. Liquid introduction into a microchannel is also demonstrated, utilizing the developed TiO2 surface, which can generate a negative capillary pressure difference under ultraviolet light irradiation.

  13. Ventricular assist device

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAD; RVAD; LVAD; BVAD; Right ventricular assist device; Left ventricular assist device; Biventricular assist device; Heart pump; Left ventricular assist system; LVAS; Implantable ventricular assist device

  14. Stress-Free Bonding Technology with Pyrex for Highly Integrated 3D Fluidic Microsystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Thoma

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a novel Pyrex reflow bonding technology is introduced which bonds two functional units made of silicon via a Pyrex reflow bonding process. The practical application demonstrated here is a precision dosing system that uses a mechanically actuated membrane micropump which includes passive membranes for fluid metering. To enable proper functioning after full integration, a technique for device assembly must be established which does not introduce additional stress into the system, but fulfills all other requirements, like pressure tolerance and chemical stability. This is achieved with a stress-free thermal bonding principle to bond Pyrex to silicon in a five-layer stack: after alignment, the silicon-Pyrex-silicon stack is heated to 730 °C. Above the glass transition temperature of 525 °C Pyrex exhibits viscoelastic behavior. This allows the glass layer to come into close mechanical contact with the upper and lower silicon layers. The high temperature and the close contact promotes the formation of a stable and reliable Si-O-Si bond, without introducing mechanical stress into the system, and without deformation upon cooling due to thermal mismatch.

  15. Effect of dynamic contact angle in a volume of fluid (VOF) model for a microfluidic capillary flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashish Saha, Auro; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2009-11-15

    We perform three-dimensional numerical and experimental study of the dynamic contact angle using volume of fluid (VOF) method applied to microfluidic channels with integrated pillars. Initially, we evaluated different dynamic contact angle models (hydrodynamic, molecular kinetic and empirical) for capillary filling of a two-dimensional microchannel using analytical formulation. Further, the models which require a minimum prescription of adjustable parameters are only used for the study of capillary filling of microchannels with integrated pillars using different working fluids such as DI water, ethanol and isopropyl alcohol. Different microchannel geometry with varying diameter/height/spacing were studied for circular pillars. Effect of square pillars and changing the overall number of pillars on the capillary phenomena were also simulated. Our study demonstrated that the dynamic contact angle models modifies the transient response of the meniscus displacement and also the observed trends are model specific for the various microchannel geometries and working fluids. However, the different models have minimal effect on the meniscus profile. Different inlet boundary conditions were applied to observe the effect of grid resolution selected for numerical study on the capillary filling time. A grid dependent dynamic contact angle model which incorporates effective slip in the model was also used to observe the grid convergence of the numerical results. The grid independence was shown to improve marginally by applying the grid dependent dynamic contact angle model. Further we did numerical experiments of capillary filling considering variable surface wettability on the top and bottom walls of the microchannel with alternate hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns. The meniscus front pinning was noticed for a high wetting contrast between the patterns. Non uniform streamline patterns indicated mixing of the fluid when using patterned walls. Such a microfluidic device with

  16. Use of electrospinning and dynamic air focusing to create three-dimensional cell culture scaffolds in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chengpeng; Mehl, Benjamin T; Sell, Scott A; Martin, R Scott

    2016-09-21

    Organs-on-a-chip has emerged as a powerful tool for pharmacological and physiological studies. A key part in the construction of such a model is the ability to pattern or culture cells in a biomimetic fashion. Most of the reported cells-on-a-chip models integrate cells on a flat surface, which does not accurately represent the extracellular matrix that they experience in vivo. Electrospinning, a technique used to generate sub-micron diameter polymer fibers, has been used as an in vitro cell culture substrate and for tissue engineering applications. Electrospinning of fibers directly into a fully sealed fluidic channel using a conventional setup has not been possible due to issues of confining the fibers into a discrete network. In this work, a dynamic focusing method was developed, with this approach enabling direct deposition of electrospun fibers into a fully sealed fluidic channel, to act as a matrix for cell culture and subsequent studies under continuous flowing conditions. Scanning electron microscopy of electrospun polycaprolactone fibers shows that this method enables the formation of fibrous layers on the inner wall of a 3D-printed fluidic device (mean fiber size = 1.6 ± 0.6 μm and average pore size = 113 ± 19 μm(2)). Cells were able to be cultured in this 3D scaffold without the addition of adhesion proteins. Media was pumped through the channel at high flow rates (up to 400 μL min(-1)) during a dynamic cell culture process and both the fibers and the cells were found to be strongly adherent. A PDMS fluidic device was also prepared (from a 3D printed mold) and coated with polycaprolactone fibers. The PDMS device enables optical detection and confocal imaging of cultured cells on the fibers. Finally, macrophages were cultured in the devices to study how the fibrous scaffold can affect cell behavior. It was found that under lipopolysaccharide stimulation, macrophages cultured on PCL fibers inside of a channel secreted significantly more cytokines than

  17. Plasma Dynamics of Capillary Discharges for the BELLA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, Peter; Hakim, Ammar; Loverich, John; Fillmore, David; Johnson, Jeffrey; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Mittelberger, Daniel; Bulanov, Stepan; Gonsalves, Anthony; Leemans, Wim

    2010-11-01

    Capillary discharges to form a meter-scale plasma waveguide are important for 10 GeV scale laser plasma accelerator experiments on the BELLA laser in progress at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. We present simulation results of capillary plasma properties, including radial density and temperature profiles, using the Nautilus code. An effect known to play a dominant role is the transfer of heat from the plasma to the capillary wall. We present benchmark results for heat transfer modeling with Nautilus in the regime of interest to capillary discharges. We also discuss the relative importance of diffusion, Ohm's law, and applied solenoidal fields on the radial profiles needed for experiments. For instance, some previous models estimate applied solenoidal fields could increase on-axis temperatures by roughly a factor of two, and we compare with these estimates. Finally, we compare radial profile results with other simulation results and with recent measurements made at LBNL.

  18. Study of a heat rejection system using capillary pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, L. G.; Wanous, D. J.; Clausen, O. W.

    1971-01-01

    Results of an analytical study investigating the application of capillary pumping to the heat rejection loop of an advanced Rankine cycle power conversion system are presented. The feasibility of the concept of capillary pumping as an alternate to electromagnetic pumping is analytically demonstrated. Capillary pumping is shown to provide a potential for weight and electrical power saving and reliability through the use of redundant systems. A screen wick pump design with arterial feed lines was analytically developed. Advantages of this design are high thermodynamic and hydrodynamic efficiency, which provide a lightweight easily packaged system. Operational problems were identified which must be solved for successful application of capillary pumping. The most important are the development of start up and shutdown procedures, and development of a means of keeping noncondensibles from the system and of earth-bound testing procedures.

  19. Improved Refrigerant Characteristics Flow Predictions in Adiabatic Capillary Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shodiya Sulaimon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents improved refrigerant characteristics flow predictions using homogenous flow model in adiabatic capillary tube, used in small vapor compression refrigeration system. The model is based on fundamental equations of mass, momentum and energy. In order to improve the flow predictions, the inception of vaporization in the capillary tube is determined by evaluating initial vapor quality using enthalpy equation of refrigerant at saturation point and the inlet entrance effect of the capillary tube is also accounted for. Comparing this model with experimental data from open literature showed a reasonable agreement. Further comparison of this new model with earlier model of Bansal showed that the present model could be use to improve the performance predictions of refrigerant flow in adiabatic capillary tube.

  20. Giant congenital capillary hemangioma of pericranium--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Y; Uozumi, T; Sakoda, K; Yamada, K; Yamanaka, M; Nomura, S; Hamasaki, T

    1990-12-01

    The authors report a newborn male infant with a giant congenital capillary hemangioma of the pericranium. An elastic mass, measuring 6.5 x 6.9 x 3.9 cm, was located in the parieto-occipital region. Neurological examination revealed no abnormality. Angiographically, the tumor was fed symmetrically by the bilateral superficial temporal, occipital, and middle meningeal arteries. At surgery, the encapsulated tumor appeared to have arisen from the periosteum and was removed completely. Histological diagnosis was capillary hemangioma. Capillary hemangioma is a common benign tumor in infancy and usually present as a strawberry mark or port-wine stain. However, when the tumors seat relatively deeply as in the present case, they produce little or no discoloration in the overlying skin. Angiography is then useful to differentiate capillary hemangioma from other lesions and to choose an appropriate treatment. PMID:1714050

  1. Optical emission spectroscopy observations of fast pulsed capillary discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avaria, G.; Ruiz, M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E. S.; Chuaqui, H.; Bhuyan, H.

    2014-05-01

    We present time resolved optical emission spectroscopic (OES) observations of a low energy, pulsed capillary discharage (PCD). The optical emission from the capillary plasma and plasma jets emitted from the capillary volume was recorded with with a SpectraPro 275 spectrograph, fitted with a MCP gated OMA system, with 15 ns time resolution. The discharge was operated with different gases, including argon, nitrogen, hydrogen and methane, in a repetitive pulsed discharge mode at 10-50 Hz, with, 10-12 kV pulses applied at the cathode side. The time evolution of the electron density was measured using Stark broadening of the Hβ line. Several features of the capillary plasma dynamics, such as ionization growth, wall effects and plasma jet evolution, are inferred from the time evolution of the optical emission.

  2. Targeted Functionalization of Nanoparticle Thin Films via Capillary Condensation

    KAUST Repository

    Gemici, Zekeriyya

    2009-03-11

    Capillary condensation, an often undesired natural phenomenon in nanoporous materials, was used advantageously as a universal functionalization strategy in nanoparticle thin films assembled layer-by-layer. Judicious choice of nanoparticle (and therefore pore) size allowed targeted capillary condensation of chemical vapors of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules across film thickness. Heterostructured thin films with modulated refractive index profiles produced in this manner exhibited broadband antireflection properties with an average reflectance over the visible region of the spectrum of only 0.4%. Capillary condensation was also used to modify surface chemistry and surface energy. Photosensitive capillary-condensates were UV-cross-linked in situ. Undesired adventitious condensation of humidity could be avoided by condensation of hydrophobic materials such as poly(dimethyl siloxane). © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  3. A capillary based chemiluminscent multi-target immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuan-Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Renewed interest in capillary format immunoassays has lead to increasingly costly and complex approaches to preparation and readout. This study describes a simple multi-target method based on a capillary platform using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labelled IgG to visualize an antibody antigen complex. When goat-anti-human IgG was employed as the probe and human IgG as target, the system allowed detection of target to less than 1 ng/mL using a standard detection approach. The capillaries were read visually or with a commercial grade CCD camera. Multi-target detection was demonstrated using a model system of rat-anti-mouse, goat-anti-human and mouse-anti-rat IgG. These probes were encoded to different locations in the capillary, providing a simple inexpensive approach to achieve multi-target assays. PMID:25731812

  4. Separating device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, T.P.R.

    2001-01-01

    A sorting device (1) suitable for sorting wire from a waste stream, comprising a body (2) that moves when in use, and provided with spikes or similar projections. The body is embodied as a rotatable roll (2), which oscillates axially during its rotation. The roll is coupled to an oscillation engine

  5. Printing Device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den M.J.; Markies, P.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2014-01-01

    An ink jetprinting device includes a pressure chamber formed by a plurality of wall segments, a first aperture extending through a wall segment and communicating with an ink jet orifice and a second aperture extending through a wall segment and communicating with an ink supply duct. The pressure cha

  6. Stratification devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon

    2008-01-01

    results in longer operation periods and improved utilization of the solar collector. Thermal stratification can be achieved, for example by using inlet stratification devices at all inlets to the storage tank. This paper presents how thermal stratification is established and utilized by means of inlet...

  7. Stability of capillary gels for automated sequencing of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerdlow, H; Dew-Jager, K E; Brady, K; Grey, R; Dovichi, N J; Gesteland, R

    1992-08-01

    Recent interest in capillary gel electrophoresis has been fueled by the Human Genome Project and other large-scale sequencing projects. Advances in gel polymerization techniques and detector design have enabled sequencing of DNA directly in capillaries. Efforts to exploit this technology have been hampered by problems with the reproducibility and stability of gels. Gel instability manifests itself during electrophoresis as a decrease in the current passing through the capillary under a constant voltage. Upon subsequent microscopic examination, bubbles are often visible at or near the injection (cathodic) end of the capillary gel. Gels have been prepared with the polyacrylamide matrix covalently attached to the silica walls of the capillary. These gels, although more stable, still suffer from problems with bubbles. The use of actual DNA sequencing samples also adversely affects gel stability. We examined the mechanisms underlying these disruptive processes by employing polyacrylamide gel-filled capillaries in which the gel was not attached to the capillary wall. Three sources of gel instability were identified. Bubbles occurring in the absence of sample introduction were attributed to electroosmotic force; replacing the denaturant urea with formamide was shown to reduce the frequency of these bubbles. The slow, steady decline in current through capillary sequencing gels interferes with the ability to detect other gel problems. This phenomenon was shown to be a result of ionic depletion at the gel-liquid interface. The decline was ameliorated by adding denaturant and acrylamide monomers to the buffer reservoirs. Sample-induced problems were shown to be due to the presence of template DNA; elimination of the template allowed sample loading to occur without complications.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Pulmonary Surfactant Surface Tension Influences Alveolar Capillary Shape and Oxygenation

    OpenAIRE

    Ikegami, Machiko; Weaver, Timothy E.; Grant, Shawn N.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    Alveolar capillaries are located in close proximity to the alveolar epithelium and beneath the surfactant film. We hypothesized that the shape of alveolar capillaries and accompanying oxygenation are influenced by surfactant surface tension in the alveolus. To prove our hypothesis, surfactant surface tension was regulated by conditional expression of surfactant protein (SP)-B in Sftpb−/− mice, thereby inhibiting surface tension–lowering properties of surfactant in vivo within 24 hours after d...

  9. Optimized photonic crystal fibers supporting efficient capillary electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcerrada, M.; García-Ruiz, C.; Roy, P.; Gonzalez-Herraez, M.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results on the use of Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs) in a conventional capillary electrophoresis system to separate and detect fluorescent species. PCFs show interesting advantages over conventional capillaries for this application, including larger surface-to-volume ratio and potential for higher resolution with comparable sensitivity. Our results illustrate some of these advantages, and we point out the need for stringent tolerances in the fabrication of specific PCFs for this application.

  10. Spatiotemporal phase-matching in capillary high-harmonic generation

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Edward T.F.; Stebbings, Sarah L; de Paula, Ana M.; Froud, Christopher A.; Praeger, Matthew; Mills, Benjamin; Grant-Jacob, James; Brocklesby, William S; Frey, Jeremy G

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple phase-matching model that takes into account the full spatiotemporal nature of capillary high-harmonic generation. Spectra predicted from the model are compared to experimental results for a number of gases and are shown to reproduce the spectral envelope of experimentally generated harmonics. The model demonstrates that an ionization-induced phase mismatch is limiting the energy of the generated harmonics in current capillary high-harmonic generation experiments. The succ...

  11. Modified monolithic silica capillary for preconcentration of catecholamines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Preconcentration of catecholamines by the modified monolithic silica in the capillary was investigated in this study. In order to achieve a microchip-based method for determining catecholamines in the saliva,the monolithic silica was fabricated in the capillary and the monolithic silica was chemically modified by on-column reaction with phenylboronate. Different modified methods were compared. The concentration conditions were optimized. This study indicates the applicability of the modified monolithic sili...

  12. Fabrication and Visualization of Capillary Bridges in Slit Pore Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Broesch, David J.; Frechette, Joelle

    2014-01-01

    A procedure for creating and imaging capillary bridges in slit-pore geometry is presented. High aspect ratio hydrophobic pillars are fabricated and functionalized to render their top surfaces hydrophilic. The combination of a physical feature (the pillar) with a chemical boundary (the hydrophilic film on the top of the pillar) provides both a physical and chemical heterogeneity that pins the triple contact line, a necessary feature to create stable long but narrow capillary bridges. The subst...

  13. Capillary Flow in an Interior Corner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weislogel, Mark Milton

    1996-01-01

    The design of fluids management processes in the low-gravity environment of space requires an accurate model and description of capillarity-controlled flow in containers of irregular geometry. Here we consider the capillary rise of a fluid along an interior corner of a container following a rapid reduction in gravity. The analytical portion of the work presents an asymptotic formulation in the limit of a slender fluid column, slight surface curvature along the corner, small inertia, and low gravity. New similarity solutions are found and a list of closed form expressions is provided for flow rate and column length. In particular, it is found that the flow is proportional to t(exp 1/2) for a constant height boundary condition, t(exp 2/5) for a spreading drop, and t(exp 3/5) for constant flow. In the experimental portion of the work, measurements from a 2.2s drop tower are reported. An extensive data set, collected over a previously unexplored range of flow parameters, includes estimates of repeatability and accuracy, the role of inertia and column slenderness, and the effects of corner angle, container geometry, and fluid properties. Comprehensive comparisons are made which illustrate the applicability of the analytic results to low-g fluid systems design.

  14. Idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Peter; Xie, Zhihui; Frith, Katie; Wong, Melanie; Kakakios, Alyson; Stone, Kelly D; Druey, Kirk M

    2015-03-01

    Adult subjects with systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS) present with acute and recurrent episodes of vascular leak manifesting as severe hypotension, hypoalbuminemia, hemoconcentration, and generalized edema. We studied clinical disease characteristics, serum cytokine profiles, and treatment modalities in a cohort of children with documented SCLS. Six children with SCLS were recruited from the United States, Australia, Canada, and Italy. Serum cytokines from SCLS subjects and a group of 10 healthy children were analyzed. Children with SCLS (aged 5-11 years old) presented with at least 1 acute, severe episode of hypotension, hypoalbuminemia, and hemoconcentration in the absence of underlying causes for these abnormalities. In contrast to what is observed in adult SCLS, identifiable infectious triggers precipitated most episodes in these children, and none of them had a monoclonal gammopathy. We found elevated levels of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor α in baseline SCLS sera compared with the control group. All patients are alive and well on prophylactic therapy, with 4 patients receiving intravenous or subcutaneous immunoglobulins at regular intervals. The clinical manifestations of pediatric and adult SCLS are similar, with the notable exceptions of frequent association with infections and the lack of monoclonal gammopathy. Prophylactic medication, including high dose immunoglobulins or theophylline plus verapamil, appears to be safe and efficacious therapy for SCLS in children. PMID:25713284

  15. Dramatic nano-fluidic properties of carbon nanotube membranes as a platform for protein channel mimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Bruce

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have three key attributes that make them of great interest for novel membrane applications: 1) atomically flat graphite surface allows for ideal fluid slip boundary conditions and extremely fast flow rates 2) the cutting process to open CNTs inherently places functional chemistry at CNT core entrance for chemical selectivity and 3) CNT are electrically conductive allowing for electrochemical reactions and application of electric fields gradients at CNT tips. Pressure driven flux of a variety of solvents (H2O, hexane, decane ethanol, methanol) are 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than conventional Newtonian flow [Nature 2005, 438, 44] due to atomically flat graphite planes inducing nearly ideal slip conditions. However this is eliminated with selective chemical functionalization [ACS Nano 2011 5(5) 3867-3877] needed to give chemical selectivity. These unique properties allow us to explore the hypothesis of producing ``Gatekeeper'' membranes that mimic natural protein channels to actively pump through rapid nm-scale channels. With anionic tip functionality strong electroosmotic flow is induced by unimpeded cation flow with similar 10,000 fold enhancements [Nature Nano 2012 7(2) 133-39]. With enhanced power efficiency, carbon nanotube membranes were employed as the active element of a switchable transdermal drug delivery device that can facilitate more effective treatments of drug abuse and addiction. Recently methods to deposit Pt monolayers on CNT surface have been developed making for highly efficient catalytic platforms. Discussed are other applications of CNT protein channel mimetics, for large area robust engineering platforms, including water purification, flow battery energy storage, and biochemical/biomass separations. DOE EPSCoR (DE-FG02-07ER46375) and DARPA, W911NF-09-1-0267

  16. THE CAPILLARY PATTERN IN HUMAN MASSETER MUSCLE DURING AGEING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Cvetko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ageing on the capillary network in skeletal muscles has produced conflicting results in both, human and animals studies. Some of the inconsistencies are due to non-comparable and biased methods that were applied on thin transversal sections, especially in muscles with complicated morphological structures, such as in human masseter muscle. We present a new immunohistochemical method for staining capillaries and muscle fibres in 100 µm thick sections as well as novel approach to 3D visualization of capillaries and muscle fibres. Applying confocal microscopy and virtual 3D stereological grids, or tracing capillaries in virtual reality, length of capillaries within a muscle volume or length of capillaries adjacent to muscle fibre per fibre length, fibre surface or fibre volume were evaluated in masseter muscle of young and old subjects by an unbiased approach. Our findings show that anatomic capillarity is well maintained in masseter muscle in old subjects; however, vascular remodelling occurs with age, which could be a response to changed muscle function and age-related muscle fibre type transformations.

  17. Principles of Micellar Electrokinetic Capillary Chromatography Applied in Pharmaceutical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Árpád Gyéresi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction capillary electrophoresis has shown great potential in areas where electrophoretic techniques have rarely been used before, including here the analysis of pharmaceutical substances. The large majority of pharmaceutical substances are neutral from electrophoretic point of view, consequently separations by the classic capillary zone electrophoresis; where separation is based on the differences between the own electrophoretic mobilities of the analytes; are hard to achieve. Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, a hybrid method that combines chromatographic and electrophoretic separation principles, extends the applicability of capillary electrophoretic methods to neutral analytes. In micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, surfactants are added to the buffer solution in concentration above their critical micellar concentrations, consequently micelles are formed; micelles that undergo electrophoretic migration like any other charged particle. The separation is based on the differential partitioning of an analyte between the two-phase system: the mobile aqueous phase and micellar pseudostationary phase. The present paper aims to summarize the basic aspects regarding separation principles and practical applications of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, with particular attention to those relevant in pharmaceutical analysis.

  18. Temperature control of ion guiding through tapered capillaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Elisabeth, E-mail: egruber@iap.tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien – Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Stolterfoht, Nikolaus [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Allinger, Peter; Wampl, Stefan [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien – Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Wang, Yuyu [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien – Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu (China); Simon, Marius J. [Labor für Ionenstrahlphysik, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Aumayr, Friedrich, E-mail: aumayr@iap.tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien – Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the guiding of Ar{sup 7+} ions (kinetic energy of 4.5 keV) through a single macroscopic tapered glass capillary of conical shape as a function of capillary tilt angle with respect to the incident ion beam direction. At room temperature a minimum in the transmitted ion intensity appears around the forward direction, which was previously observed and interpreted by a blocking of the transmission by repulsive Coulomb forces due to a uniformly charged ring shaped region in the centre part of the capillary. By heating the tapered capillary to temperatures around 100 °C and thus drastically increasing the electrical conductivity of the capillary material we no longer observe a minimum in the transmission curve but the transmission curve now has its maximum in forward direction. Since the maximum transmission at high temperature in forward direction is still smaller than the minimum in transmitted intensity at room temperature, we conclude that even at room temperature and in forward direction the focusing effect due to guiding is dominant and only partially weakened by blocking. Our experimental results are well reproduced in simulations using a theoretical model originally developed for straight nano-capillaries.

  19. A Fractal Model for Capillary Pressure of Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boqi Xiao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Capillary pressure is a basic parameter in the study of the behavior of porous media containing two or more immiscible fluid phases. In this study, the capillary pressure of porous media is predicted based on based on fractal property of pore in porous media. The formula of calculating the capillary pressure of porous media is given. The capillary pressure of porous media is expressed as a function of porosity, fractal dimension of pore and saturation. Based on the parametric effect analysis, we conclude that the capillary pressure of porous media is negatively correlated with the porosity and saturation. Besides, it is shown that the capillary pressure of unsaturated porous media decreases with the increase of saturation. No additional empirical constant is introduced. This model contains less empirical constants than the conventional correlations. The model predictions are compared with the existing experimental data and good agreement between the model predictions and experimental data is found. The validity of the present fractal model is thus verified.

  20. Fabrication and visualization of capillary bridges in slit pore geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broesch, David J; Frechette, Joelle

    2014-01-01

    A procedure for creating and imaging capillary bridges in slit-pore geometry is presented. High aspect ratio hydrophobic pillars are fabricated and functionalized to render their top surfaces hydrophilic. The combination of a physical feature (the pillar) with a chemical boundary (the hydrophilic film on the top of the pillar) provides both a physical and chemical heterogeneity that pins the triple contact line, a necessary feature to create stable long but narrow capillary bridges. The substrates with the pillars are attached to glass slides and secured into custom holders. The holders are then mounted onto four axis microstages and positioned such that the pillars are parallel and facing each other. The capillary bridges are formed by introducing a fluid in the gap between the two substrates once the separation between the facing pillars has been reduced to a few hundred micrometers. The custom microstage is then employed to vary the height of the capillary bridge. A CCD camera is positioned to image either the length or the width of the capillary bridge to characterize the morphology of the fluid interface. Pillars with widths down to 250 µm and lengths up to 70 mm were fabricated with this method, leading to capillary bridges with aspect ratios (length/width) of over 100(1). PMID:24457446