WorldWideScience

Sample records for capamis study effectiveness

  1. Effective Physics Study Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2011-04-01

    We discuss the methods of efficient study habits and how they can be used by students to help them improve learning physics. In particular, we deal with ideas pertaining to the most effective techniques needed to help students improve their physics study skills. These ideas were developed as part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), an outreach grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. This project is motivated by a major pressing local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. In the presentation, focus on topics such as the skills of how to develop long term memory, how to improve concentration power, how to take class notes, how to prepare for and take exams, how to study scientific subjects such as physics. We argue that the student who conscientiously uses the methods of efficient study habits will be able to achieve higher results than the student who does not; moreover, a student equipped with the proper study skills will spend much less time to learn a subject than a student who has no good study habits. The underlying issue here is not the quantity of time allocated to the study efforts by the student, but the efficiency and quality of actions. This work is supported by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education as part of IMPACTSEED grant.

  2. Controlled study of ISA effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    of ISA effects. The second part of the study compared effects of ISA on speeding for ISA-volunteers exposed to different combinations of informative ISA and incentives e.g. speed dependent insurance discounts. Comparisons of amount speeding between treatment groups showed that ISA in combination...

  3. Study of axial magnetic effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braguta, Victor [IHEP, Protvino, Moscow region, 142284 Russia ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya street 25, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Chernodub, M. N. [CNRS, Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique Théorique, Université François-Rabelais Tours, Fédération Denis Poisson, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours, France Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, Krijgslaan 281, S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Goy, V. A. [School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, Sukhanova street 8, Vladivostok, 690950 (Russian Federation); Landsteiner, K. [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC, C/ Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Molochkov, A. V. [School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Ulybyshev, M. [ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya street 25, Moscow, 117218 Russia Institute for Theoretical Problems of Microphysics, Moscow State University, Moscow, 119899 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-22

    The Axial Magnetic Effect manifests itself as an equilibrium energy flow of massless fermions induced by the axial (chiral) magnetic field. Here we study the Axial Magnetic Effect in the quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory with massless overlap fermions at finite temperature. We numerically observe that in the low-temperature hadron phase the effect is absent due to the quark confinement. In the high-temperature deconfinement phase the energy flow is an increasing function of the temperature which reaches the predicted asymptotic T{sup 2} behavior at high temperatures. We find, however, that energy flow is about one order of magnitude lower compared to a theoretical prediction.

  4. Study on Soil Magnetic Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIYAN-LI; LIUXIAO-YI

    1995-01-01

    A study on the effect of applied magnetic field was performed with six types of soils collected from northeastern China.Magnetic field was found to cause changes of soil physico-chemical properties and soil enzyme activities.An appropriate applied magnetic field could cut down soil zeta-potential,soil specific surface,soil water potential and soil swelling capacity;raise the charge density on soil colloids and the activities of invertase,hydrogen peroxidase and amylase in the soils;enhance soil aggregation and improve soil structural status and soil water-releasing capability.

  5. Controlled study of ISA effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Lisbeth; Klarborg, B.; Lahrmann, Harry

    2008-01-01

    part of the study was a driving experiment in which two factors, informative ISA and an economic incentive for not speeding, were manipulated between groups of volunteers. A control group had ISA switched off and received insurance discount independent of their speeding. This group did not reduce......This study is a part of an ongoing ISA project in Denmark. Its aim was to clarify two human factors issues, (1) the difference in attitude between ISA-volunteers and non-volunteers, and (2) the relative impact on speeding of two factors, ISA-information and driver motivation. The first part...... their speeding in the experiment period, whereas another group, also with ISA switched off but with insurance discount dependent on their speeding reduced their speeding by a small amount. Two groups, both driving with ISA switched on showed a substantial reduction in their speeding. The effect of informative...

  6. A Study on Effective Teachers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麦淑玲

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, effective teaching has become an important phrase in English language teaching, and causes great attention. As a result of the emergence of teacher-led initiatives, the need of teacher effectiveness has been given renewed focus. This essay outlines what roles teachers play in effective teaching, and what personal qualities teachers maintain that qualify them as effective teachers.

  7. Fostering Effective Studying and Study Planning with Study Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Pascal; Pieters, Jules M.

    2007-01-01

    In a course on biological psychology and neuropsychology, study questions were provided that also appeared as test questions in the course exam. This method was introduced to support students in active processing and reproduction of the study texts, and study planning. Data were gathered to test the hypothesis that study question use would be…

  8. Study on Effect of Kangyanling(

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical efficacy and mechanism of Kangyanling (KYL) in treating patients with systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome and multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (SIRS/MODS) after abdominal surgery. Methods: Eighty-two patients of SIRS/MODS after abdominal surgery were divided into two groups according to admission time, the KYL treated group (n=35) and the control group (n=47). The levels of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), plasma tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured at the 1st, 3rd and 7th days post-operationally. Results: The levels of CRP, TNFα and IL-6 decreased gradually after surgical operation in both groups, but the reducing velocity was shorter in the KYL group than that in the control group, so the comparison of the levels in the two groups showed significant difference on the 3rd day after operation. Conclusion:KYL could inhibit the release of inflammatory mediator and relieve the inflammatory response so as to treat post-operational SIRS/MODS effectively.

  9. Studies of air pollution effects on vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The report consists of three parts which summarize pollutant-vegetation effects research studies. These include: oxidant effects of primary productivity in ponderosa pine in the San Bernardino National Forest; air pollution effects on vegetation related to geothermal power development; and regional assessment of air pollution impact on vegetation by mathematical modeling. A list of publications that report results of the studies is included in an appendix.

  10. Studying the Greenhouse Effect: A Simple Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, G.; Ouzounis, K.

    2000-01-01

    Studies the parameters involved in a presentation of the greenhouse effect and describes a simple demonstration of this effect. Required equipment includes a 100-120 watt lamp, a 250mL beaker, and a thermometer capable of recording 0-750 degrees Celsius together with a small amount of chloroform. (Author/SAH)

  11. A Study of Curriculum Effectiveness in Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Catherine A.; Feng, Annie Xuemei; VanTassel-Baska, Joyce; Rogers, Karen B.; Avery, Linda D.

    2007-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study examines the effects on student performance of a Javits-funded curriculum designed to respond to the needs of high-ability students in elementary and middle school social studies. The curriculum, implemented with all students in heterogeneous classrooms, addresses state standards while integrating advanced content,…

  12. Study of multipacting effect in superconducting cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Meng; ZHAO Ming-Hua

    2008-01-01

    A number of superconducting cavities of axis-symmetric geometry have been considered to study the effect in order to achieve the desired performance.It is shown that the multipacting effect is strongly dependent on the condition of the RF surface and can be suppressed with reconsideration of the geometry.The simulation result is compared with the result of the semi-analytical model in the end.

  13. Study on Compound Effect of Bonded Magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Ying; Ma Nuo; Yu xiaojun; Li Wei; Liu Changsheng; Lian Fazeng

    2004-01-01

    The compound effect of Nd2Fe14B/Fe3B-Ferrite bonded magnets was studied.The result shows that the value ofβjHC obviously decreases with the ferrite content increasing.In addition, a functional relation between magnetic properties and ferrite content was clearly revealed by the physical relation in the magnetic powders.

  14. [Studying the nootropic effects of betamecil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, E B; Levitskaia, N G; Kamenskiĭ, A A; Lebedeva, A O; Leonidov, N B

    2007-01-01

    Comparative study of the effects of methyluracil and betamecil showed that a fourfold oral administration of betamecil in a dose of 10 mg/kg leads to a considerable increase in the orientation-and-search reaction in the open field test. This drug effect is retained for at least one week. Betamecil in doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg does not virtually alter the rate of conditioning of the food-seeking reflex with respect to the place in the T-shaped maze test (as compared to the control animals. However, certain acceleration of the learning process is observed as compared to the animals treated with methyluracil. The chronic administration of betamecil (for 18 days) results in improved preservation and reproduction of the previously conditioned food-seeking habit. Neither piracetam nor methyluracil produced such effects. The results suggest that betamecil in indicated doses exhibits a nootropic activity.

  15. II. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1948-05-24

    With the completion of the 184 inch cyclotron in Berkeley and the successful construction of a deflector system, it was possible to bring the 190 Mev deuteron and the 380 Mev alpha beams out into the air and to begin a study of the effects of high-energy deuteron beams by direct irradiation of biological specimens. The direct biological use of deuteron beams was attempted earlier in Berkeley by Marshak, MacLeish, and Walker in 1940. These and other investigators have been aware for some time of the potential usefulness of high energy particle beams for radio-biological studies and their suitability for biological investigations. R.R. Wilson advanced the idea of using fast proton beams to deliver radiation and intervening tissues. R.E. Zirkle pointed out that such particle beams may be focused or screened until a cross-section of the beam is small enough to study effects of irradiation under the microscope on single cells or on parts of single cells. This article gives an overview of the radiological use of high energy deuteron beams, including the following topics: potential uses of high energy particle beams; experiments on the physical properties of the beam; lethal effect of the deuteron beam on mice.

  16. Studies of Current Dependent Effects at ANKA

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, A S; Huttel, E; Pérez, F; Pont, M; Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The ANKA electron storage ring is operated at energies between 0.5 and 2.5 GeV. A major requirement for a synchrotron light source, such as ANKA, is to achieve a high beam current. A multitude of mostly impedance related effects depend on either bunch or total beam current. This paper gives an overview over the various beam studies performed at ANKA in this context, specifically the observation of current dependent detuning, the determination of the bunch length change with current from a measurement of the ratio between coherent and incoherent synchrotron tune and an assessment of the effective longitudinal loss factor from the current dependent horizontal closed orbit distortion.

  17. Experimental Setups for Single Event Effect Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Medina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental setups are being prepared to test and to qualify electronic devices regarding their tolerance to Single Event Effect (SEE. A multiple test setup and a new beam line developed especially for SEE studies at the São Paulo 8 UD Pelletron accelerator were prepared. This accelerator produces proton beams and heavy ion beams up to 107Ag. A Super conducting Linear accelerator, which is under construction, may fulfill all of the European Space Agency requirements to qualify electronic components for SEE.

  18. Experimental study of finite Larmor radius effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struve, K.W.

    1980-08-01

    Linear Z-pinches in Ar, Kr, Xe, N/sub 2/, and He are experimentally studied in regimes where strong finite Larmor radius effects could provide a significant stabilizing effect. Scaling arguments show that for deuterium such a pinch has an electron line density of order 2 x 10/sup 15//cm. For higher Z plasmas a higher line density is allowed, the exact value of which depends on the average ion charge. The pinch is formed by puffing gas axially through the cathode towards the anode of an evacuated pinch chamber. When the gas reaches the anode, the pinch bank is fired. The pinch current rises in 2 to 3 ..mu..sec to a maximum of 100 to 200 kA. The pinch bank capacitance is 900 ..mu..F, and the external inductance is 100 nH. Additionally, the bank is fused to increase dI/dt. The primary diagnostics are a framing camera, a spatially resolved Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and X-ray absorption.

  19. A longitudinal study of marijuana effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halikas, J A; Weller, R A; Morse, C L; Hoffmann, R G

    1985-05-01

    One hundred regular marijuana users volunteered to be extensively interviewed in 1968-1970, and 97 were located and reinterviewed 6 to 8 years later. As part of each interview the subjects filled out a checklist review of 105 effects of marijuana. This report focuses on the differential patterns of effects found at the two time intervals. Scores on groupings of items were examined for changes over time. Reports of sensory and hallucinatory items dropped substantially. Reports of appetite effects, sex effects, and intoxication effects on sleep remained stable. Reports of cognitive effects, mood effects, and aftereffects on sleep appeared to be shifting from desirable to undesirable, with the frequency of desirable effects dropping while frequency of undesirable effects remained the same.

  20. Comparative nuclear effects of biomedical interest. Civil effects study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, C.S.; Bowen, I.G.; Richmond, D.R.; Corsbie, R.L.

    1961-01-12

    Selected physical and biological data bearing upon the environmental variations created by nuclear explosions are presented in simplified form. Emphasis is placed upon the ``early`` consequences of exposure to blast, thermal radiation, and ionizing radiation to elucidate the comparative ranges of the major effects as they vary with explosive yield and as they contribute to the total hazard to man. A section containing brief definitions of the terminology employed is followed by a section that utilizes text and tabular material to set forth events that follow nuclear explosions and the varied responses of exposed physical and biological materials. Finally, selected quantitative weapons-effects data in graphic and tabular form are presented over a wide range of explosive yields to show the relative distances from Ground Zero affected by significant levels of blast overpressures, thermal fluxes, and initial and residual penetrating ionizing radiations. However, only the ``early`` rather than the ``late`` effects of the latter are considered.

  1. Effects of curriculum organisation on study progress in engineering studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hulst, M.; Jansen, E.P.W.A.

    2002-01-01

    Procrastination and time investment are important issues in the study of student performance and progress. Previous research on these issues has mainly concentrated upon individual differences between students in personality and time management skills. However, study progress depends not only on stu

  2. Study of ozone "weekend effect" in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG WenYuan; ZHAO ChunSheng; GENG FuHai; PENG Li; ZHOU GuangQiang; GAO Wei; XU JianMing; TIE XueXi

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of observed ozone data in 2006 from five monitoring sites (Xujiahui, Chongming, Baoshan, Pudong, Jinshan) in Shanghai reveals that ozone (O3) concentrations in Xujiahui are higher at weekends than those on weekdays, despite the fact that emissions of ozone precursor substances, such as oxides of nitrogen (NOX), carbon monoxide (CO) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are lower at weekends than those on weekdays.The possible chemical cause of ozone "weekend effect" is that NO2/NO ratio increases at weekends by 25.61% compared with those on weekdays.In addition, because of an average 12.13% reduction in NOx (NO + NO2) in the early morning (05:00-09:00) at weekends compared with that on weekdays, the ozone inhibition period ends 0.5 h earlier at weekends resulting in the longer duration of ozone accumulation and the higher ozone production rate.The rate of ozone production is a function of VOCs and NOx in the atmosphere.VOCs/NOx ratio in Xujiahui is 4.55 at weekends, and 4.37 on weekdays, belonging to the "NOx-limited".The increasing VOCs/NOx ratio at weekends leads to ozone enhancement from 73 ppbv to 80 ppbv, which are consistent with ozone "weekend effect" in Xujiahui.Furthermore, combining with MICAPS cloud amount data, the fact that ozone "weekend effect" in Xujiahui weakens gradually along with the increasing of cloud amount indicates that ozone photochemical production leads to ozone "weekend effect" in Xujiahui of Shanghai.

  3. Studies of the hemolytic effect of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, S.; Katz, E.; Porter, L.M.; Jacobson, L.O.; Watson, C.J.

    1945-07-10

    These studies were aimed at elucidating affects of radiation in inducing hemolysis independent of inhibition of erythropoiesis. Research studies were conducted both on human patients and dogs. Phosphorus-32 in mc amounts were administered either intravenously or orally to patients suffering Polycythemia rubra vera. Dogs were treated with either P-32 or x-radiation. Hemoglobin metabolism was monitored in all test subjects by hematology, blood chemistry, and fecal excretion of hemoglobin catabolites.

  4. A Study on Effective Evaluation Methods for Analyzing Effects of Nature Experiential Study : Through Case Studies on Evaluations of Geological Field Study

    OpenAIRE

    宮下, 治||ミヤシタ, オサム||Miyashita, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, I examined evaluation methods through case studies in order to find out effective methods for analyzing effects of nature experiential study on students. I practiced four evaluation methods, which were often used in previous studies for evaluation of nature experiential study; (1) evaluation by contents of report in texts written by students, (2) evaluation by students'learning activities records, (3) evaluation by students' essays after classes, (4) evaluation by results of pr...

  5. A Meta-analysis of School Effectiveness Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerens, Jaap; Witziers, Bob; Steen, Rien

    2013-01-01

    A meta-analysis was carried out on the basis of 155 research studies on school effectiveness, comprising a total of 1.211 associations between school effectiveness enhancing factors and student outcome variables. The original studies were carried out between 1984 and 2005. The school effectiveness e

  6. Effective ABE Programming: Nine Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, Douglas; Jacobson, Larry

    The document presents an indepth study of nine selected exemplary adult basic education (ABE) programs in Region 8: Volunteers Clearing House, Fort Collins, Colorado; Utah Navajo Development Council, Blanding, Utah; Adult Education Tutorial Program, Denver, Colorado; Project SAVE, Lemmon, South Dakota; Gates Rubber Company, Denver, Colorado;…

  7. Studying Crystal Growth With the Peltier Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, David J., Jr.; Dressler, B.; Silberstein, R. P.; Poit, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Peltier interface demarcation (PID) shown useful as aid in studying heat and mass transfer during growth of crystals from molten material. In PID, two dissimilar "metals" solid and liquid phases of same material. Current pulse passed through unidirectionally solidifying sample to create rapid Peltier thermal disturbance at liquid/solid interface. Disturbance, measured by thermocouple stationed along path of solidification at or near interface, provides information about position and shape of interface.

  8. Study on Effect of Schima superba Fuelbreak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIANXiaorui; ZHANGYouhui; YANGSidao; ZHONGYouhong

    2005-01-01

    Schima superba is widely used for shaded fuelbreaks in southern China. Experiments were done in the laboratory and wild for testing the effects of the shaded fuelbreaks. The cone calorimeter test results indicated that China red pine (Pinus massoniana) needles are easy to burn under the condition of the incident radiant flux at 75 kW/m2 and ignition source, the peak value of heat release rate of pine needles appears earlier (22 s) and higher (146 kW/m2). S. superba leaves burnt slowly and had a lower total heat release. The mass loss curves present that the peak value of pine needle is higher than that of S.superba leaves, which is 0.14 g/s versus S.superba 0.08 g/s. A fire experiment has been done in a suburb of Guangzhou City. It was measured that the fuel loads and their distribution of the stand of pine and fuelbreak before and after the fire experiment. There was almost no grass and litter on the ground of the fuelbreak due to clearing litter every year at the beginning of fire season. In the pine forest, there were shrubs, grasses and litter under the story.During the burning experiment, most of the pine forest has swept by surface fire at a spread speed of 2.2 m/min and fire intensity of 168-2961 kW/m. But in some area along the outside fire line, there occurred crown fire due to the high fuel load on the ground. The flame got 8.0-8.5 m high and fire intensity 24 881~28 379 kW/m. Part crown of several trees of the fuelbreak burnt because the crown fire spread. But the fire had not across the fuelbreak and no spotting fire happened. The fire experiment results indicated that the fuelbreak has effects on mitigating fire intensity and depress fire spread in some degree. The shaded fuelbreak has the ability of fire resistance and its dense crown can block spotting fire resources.

  9. Pollution effects on asthmatic children in Europe: the PEACE study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roemer, W.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis is based upon the 'Pollution Effects on Asthmatic Children in Europe (PEACE)' study. The PEACE study is a multi-centre study of the acute effects of particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 µm (PM 10 ), Black Smoke (BS), SO 2 and NO 2 on re

  10. The Mozart Effect: A quantitative EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrusio, Walter; Ettorre, Evaristo; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Vanacore, Nicola; Cacciafesta, Mauro; Mecarelli, Oriano

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of Mozart's music on brain activity through spectral analysis of the EEG in young healthy adults (Adults), in healthy elderly (Elderly) and in elderly with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). EEG recording was performed at basal rest conditions and after listening to Mozart's K448 or "Fur Elise" Beethoven's sonatas. After listening to Mozart, an increase of alpha band and median frequency index of background alpha rhythm activity (a pattern of brain wave activity linked to memory, cognition and open mind to problem solving) was observed both in Adults and in Elderly. No changes were observed in MCI. After listening to Beethoven, no changes in EEG activity were detected. This results may be representative of the fact that said Mozart's music is able to "activate" neuronal cortical circuits related to attentive and cognitive functions.

  11. Eczema May Leave Some Flu Shots Less Effective, Study Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163564.html Eczema May Leave Some Flu Shots Less Effective, Study ... But a new study suggests that people with eczema should request the vaccine be given into the ...

  12. MOCHA - Multi-Study Ocean Acoustics Human Effects Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Monitoring Program with the following objectives : monitor and assess the effects of Navy activities on protected marine species; ensure that data...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. MOCHA - Multi -Study Ocean Acoustics Human Effects...part of each current Navy-funded BRS project. We aim for synergies by looking at the studies in combination. OBJECTIVES The overall objective

  13. Observed Orbit Effects during Long Range Beam-Beam Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany, R; Buffat, X; Calaga, R; Fitterer, M; Giachino, R; Hemelsoet, GH; Herr, W; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Poyer, M; Schaumann, M; Trad, G; Wollmann, D

    2012-01-01

    Possible limitations due to long range beam-beam effects at the LHC have been studied and are presented in this note. With a larger number of bunches and collisions in all interaction points, the crossing angles were reduced to enhance long range beam-beam effects. The analysis of the effects on the dynamic aperture and losses are documented in [1]. This note concentrates on the bunch-by-bunch orbit effects observed during the experiment.

  14. Motion Sickness: A Study of Its Effects on Human Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    SICKNESS: A STUDY OF ITS EFFECTS ON HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY THESIS Pierre J. Gaudreault Captain, USAF AFIT/GE/ENG/87D- 2 0 TO STEC TEo VN;FB 1 0 1988...ENG/87D-20 MOTION SICKNESS: A STUDY OF ITS EFFECTS ON HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY THESIS Pierre J. Gaudreault Captain, USAF AFIT/GE/ENG/87D-20 Approved for public...SICKNESS: A STUDY OF ITS EFFECTS ON HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology

  15. Study on the Complexity of the Bullwhip Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yingjin; TANG Yong; Tang Xiaowo

    2004-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid growth of interest in the study of the dynamic behavior of replenishment rules of bullwhip effect. We prove that bullwhip effect and butterfly effect share a same the self-oscillation amplifying mechanism that is the ordering decisions the supplier self-oscillation amplify the perturbations brought by the errors in the processing of retailers' demand information. This results as an explicit self-similar structure of the sensitivity of the system to the initial values duty to the nonlinear mechanism. In this paper, the causes process of the bullwhip effect is described as the internal nonlinear mechanism and study on the complexity of bullwhip effect for order-up-to policy under demand signal processing. The methodology is based on fractal and chaotic theory and allows important insights to be gained about the complexity behavior of bullwhip effect.

  16. Study of electrokinetic effects to quantify groundwater flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S.R. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Haupt, R.W. [MIT Lincoln Lab., Lexington, MA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An experimental study of electrokinetic effects (streaming potential) in earth materials was undertaken. The objective was to evaluate the measurement of electrokinetic effects as a method of monitoring and predicting the movement of groundwater, contaminant plumes, and other fluids in the subsurface. The laboratory experiments verified that the electrokinetic effects in earth materials are prominent, repeatable, and can be described well to first order by a pair of coupled differential equations.

  17. Study of the Joule-Thomson effect of Vuktylskiy gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buleyko, M.D.; Buleyko, V.M.; Bytsko, L.L.; Starodubtsev, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Results of studying the effect of the physical chemical-characteristics of formational gas of Vuktylskiy gas-condensate deposit on the integral Joule-Thomson affect and hydraulic resistance in well loops are presented. The effect of the amount of dropping liquid on the value of the integral Joule-Thomson affect is indicated.

  18. A Study of the Effectiveness on Parental Sexuality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Chin; Chu, Yuan-Hsiang; Lin, Helene H.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the effectiveness of sexuality education training on the parents in the group regarding their sex knowledge, awareness of sexuality education, attitude towards sexuality education, self-efficacy in sexuality education, communication effectiveness and communication behavior in the hope that they would be…

  19. Learning word meanings: overnight integration and study modality effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauke van der Ven

    Full Text Available According to the complementary learning systems (CLS account of word learning, novel words are rapidly acquired (learning system 1, but slowly integrated into the mental lexicon (learning system 2. This two-step learning process has been shown to apply to novel word forms. In this study, we investigated whether novel word meanings are also gradually integrated after acquisition by measuring the extent to which newly learned words were able to prime semantically related words at two different time points. In addition, we investigated whether modality at study modulates this integration process. Sixty-four adult participants studied novel words together with written or spoken definitions. These words did not prime semantically related words directly following study, but did so after a 24-hour delay. This significant increase in the magnitude of the priming effect suggests that semantic integration occurs over time. Overall, words that were studied with a written definition showed larger priming effects, suggesting greater integration for the written study modality. Although the process of integration, reflected as an increase in the priming effect over time, did not significantly differ between study modalities, words studied with a written definition showed the most prominent positive effect after a 24-hour delay. Our data suggest that semantic integration requires time, and that studying in written format benefits semantic integration more than studying in spoken format. These findings are discussed in light of the CLS theory of word learning.

  20. Learning word meanings: overnight integration and study modality effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ven, Frauke; Takashima, Atsuko; Segers, Eliane; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2015-01-01

    According to the complementary learning systems (CLS) account of word learning, novel words are rapidly acquired (learning system 1), but slowly integrated into the mental lexicon (learning system 2). This two-step learning process has been shown to apply to novel word forms. In this study, we investigated whether novel word meanings are also gradually integrated after acquisition by measuring the extent to which newly learned words were able to prime semantically related words at two different time points. In addition, we investigated whether modality at study modulates this integration process. Sixty-four adult participants studied novel words together with written or spoken definitions. These words did not prime semantically related words directly following study, but did so after a 24-hour delay. This significant increase in the magnitude of the priming effect suggests that semantic integration occurs over time. Overall, words that were studied with a written definition showed larger priming effects, suggesting greater integration for the written study modality. Although the process of integration, reflected as an increase in the priming effect over time, did not significantly differ between study modalities, words studied with a written definition showed the most prominent positive effect after a 24-hour delay. Our data suggest that semantic integration requires time, and that studying in written format benefits semantic integration more than studying in spoken format. These findings are discussed in light of the CLS theory of word learning.

  1. COMPARATIVE ADVERTISING EFFECTIVENESS: A CROSS-CULTURAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    KONSOLAKI, KALLIOPI

    2015-01-01

    The lucrative world of comparative advertising has been attractive to marketers, who seek economic types of persuasive communication. Nevertheless, research in the actual effectiveness of comparative advertising has been inconclusive, contradicting, and insufficient. The increasing importance of comparative advertising in the current competitive global environment requires immediate findings about how comparative advertising can work effectively. This study is the first study to develop an in...

  2. Epidemiological studies of the respiratory effects of air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, M D

    1996-05-01

    Environmental epidemiological studies of the health effects of air pollution have been major contributors to the understanding of such effects. The chronic effects of atmospheric pollutants have been studied, but, except for the known respiratory effects of particulate matter (PM), they have not been studied conclusively. There are ongoing studies of the chronic effects of certain pollutant classes, such as ozone, acid rain, airborne toxics, and the chemical form of PM (including diesel exhaust). Acute effects on humans due to outdoor and indoor exposures to several gases/fumes and PM have been demonstrated in epidemiological studies. However, the effects of these environmental factors on susceptible individuals are not known conclusively. These acute effects are especially important because they increase the human burden of minor illnesses, increase disability, and are thought to decrease productivity. They may be related to the increased likelihood of chronic disease as well. Further research is needed in this latter area, to determine the contributions of the time-related activities of individuals in different microenvironments (outdoors, in homes, in transit). Key elements of further studies are the assessment of total exposure to the different pollutants (occurring from indoor and outdoor source) and the interactive effects of pollutants. Major research areas include determination of the contributions of indoor sources and of vehicle emissions to total exposure, how to measure such exposures, and how to measure human susceptibility and responses (including those at the cellular and molecular level). Biomarkers of exposures, doses and responses, including immunochemicals, biochemicals and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) adducts, are beginning to promote some basic knowledge of exposure-response, especially the mechanisms. These will be extremely useful additions to standard physiological, immunological, and clinical instruments, and the understanding of biological

  3. Register-based studies of cancer screening effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Von Euler-Chelpin, My; Lynge, Elsebeth; Rebolj, Matejka

    2011-01-01

    registers. RESEARCH TOPICS: The register-based studies on cancer screening in Denmark could be grouped into research concerning effectiveness, in terms of mortality and incidence reduction, short-term indicators, e.g. in relation to recommended quality assurance indicators, and side effects, e.g. as false......-positive results and overdiagnosis. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that registers have proven to be a valuable tool in evaluating the effects of ongoing screening activities. As they cannot be systematically used to test new screening technologies, register-based studies should not be seen as an alternative...

  4. Mixed-effects and fMRI studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friston, K.J; Stephan, K.E; Ellegaard Lund, Torben

    2005-01-01

    This note concerns mixed-effect (MFX) analyses in multisession functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. It clarifies the relationship between mixed-effect analyses and the two-stage 'summary statistics' procedure (Holmes, A.P., Friston, K.J., 1998. Generalisability, random effects...... and population inference. NeuroImage 7, S754) that has been adopted widely for analyses of fMRI data at the group level. We describe a simple procedure, based on restricted maximum likelihood (ReML) estimates of covariance components, that enables full mixed-effects analyses in the context of statistical...

  5. Liraglutide and DPP-4 inhibitors - side effects comparative clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofte, Luminiţa; Stratmann, Bernd; Quester, Wulf; Bojiţă, Marius Traian; Tschoepe, Diethelm

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to monitor the side effects of the GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in comparison to those of DPP-4 inhibitors (sitagliptin and vildagliptin), in order to determine their safety, tolerability and therapeutic efficiency. The study was carried out in the "Heart and Diabetes Center NRW" and included overweight patients with type 2 diabetes whose therapeutic regimen was switched to liraglutide or DPP-4 inhibitors. A validated questionnaire method was used to monitor the side effects during the hospitalization period, then again at 3, and 6 months after the beginning of the therapy. The therapy with liraglutide was associated with more side effects than the one with DPP-4 inhibitors. In general, side effects were declining with time, thus only few patients stopped therapy. The incretin therapy turned out to be a safe and effective therapeutic option for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Principles for Effective Asynchronous Online Instruction in Religious Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Beverley

    2017-01-01

    Asynchronous online instruction has become increasingly popular in the field of religious studies. However, despite voluminous research on online learning in general and numerous articles on online theological instruction, there has been little discussion of how to effectively design and deliver online undergraduate courses in religious studies.…

  7. Study motivation under social temptation; effects of trait procrastination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouwenburg, HC; Groenewoud, J

    2001-01-01

    The present study sought to examine the view that procrastination can be explained as a result of the joint effect of a general discounting mechanism and a personality trait. To demonstrate the discounting mechanism, the process of study motivation prior to an examination was mentally simulated by 3

  8. The Effect of Student Aid on the Duration of Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocker, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I evaluate the effect of student aid on the success of academic studies. I focus on two dimensions, the duration of study and the probability of actually graduating with a degree. To determine the impact of financial student aid, I estimate a discrete-time duration model allowing for competing risks to account for different exit…

  9. Assessing Medication Effects in the MTA Study Using Neuropsychological Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jeffery N.; Conners, C. Keith; Hervey, Aaron S.; Tonev, Simon T.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Abikoff, Howard B.; Elliott, Glen; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Hechtman, Lily; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Hoza, Betsy; Jensen, Peter S.; March, John S.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Pelham, William E.; Severe, Joanne B.; Swanson, James M.; Wells, Karen; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wigal, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    Background: While studies have increasingly investigated deficits in reaction time (RT) and RT variability in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), few studies have examined the effects of stimulant medication on these important neuropsychological outcome measures. Methods: 316 children who participated in the Multimodal…

  10. Tomographic Study of Ionospheric Effects Associated with a Solar Eclipse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuXiong-bin; XuJi-sheng; MaShu-ying; TianMao

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the ionospheric effects associated with the solar eclipse of October 24th, 1995 by means of Computerized Ionospheric Tomography (CIT). Since the reconstructed profiles from experimental CIT are sporadically located in time, a time domain interpolation method based on Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) technique is proposed and applied to extract the ionospheric effects. The effects can be extracted by comparison analysis between the interpolated CIT profiles of the eclipse days and that of the reference day that are time-aligned. A series of figs have been obtained showing the attenuation of photonization effect at low altitudes and the weakening of plasma's transportation process at high altitudes, etc. The photonization effect recovered to normal level soon after the last contact. The maximum electron density diminishing is observed about 2 h after the eclipse maximum and the effects seem vanished in the hours followed. Analysis on vertical TEC's latitudinal-temporal variation gives similar conclusions.

  11. Numerical study of instability of nanofluids: the coagulation effect and sedimentation effect

    OpenAIRE

    Ni Yu; Fan JianRen; Hu YaCai

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This study is a numerical study on the coagulation as well as the sedimentation effect of nanofluids using the Brownian dynamics method. Three cases are simulated, focusing on the effects of the sizes, volume fraction, and ζ potentials of nano-particles on the formation of coagulation and sedimentation of nanofluids. The rms fluctuation of the particle number concentration, as well as the flatness factor of it, is employed to study the formation and variation of the coagulation ...

  12. Study on space charge effects of the CSNS/RCS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shou-Yan; WANG Sheng

    2011-01-01

    The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) is a key component of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS).The space charge effect is one of the most important issues in the CSNS/RCS,which limits the maximum beam intensity,as well as the maximum beam power.Space charge effects are the main source of emittance growth and beam loss in the RCS.Space charge effects have been studied by simulation for the CSNS/RCS.By optimizing the painting orbit,the optimized painting distribution was obtained.The space charge effects during the acceleration are studied and dangerous resonances,which may induce emittance growth and beam loss,are investigated.The results are an important reference for the design and commissioning of the CSNS/RCS.

  13. Experimental study on effects of CBM temperature-rising desorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Dong-min; LIN Ya-bing

    2012-01-01

    To study the effects of CBM (coal bed methane) temperature-rising desorption,isothermal adsorption/desorption experiments on three ranks (anthracite,coking coal and lignite) of coal at different temperatures were designed based on the traditional CBM decompression desorption.The experimental results indicate that temperature-rising desorption is more effective in high-rank coal,and ever-increasing temperature of high-rank coal reservoir can reduce the negative effects of coal matrix shrinkage in the process of production and improve the permeability of the coal reservoir as well.It is also revealed that the technique of temperature-rising desorption applied in higher-rank coal reservoir can enhance CBM recovery ratio.This study provided theoretical support for the application of temperature-rising desorption technique in practical discharging and mining projects,which can effectively tackle the gas production bottleneck problem.

  14. Organizational effectiveness and financial performance: a healthcare study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnis, William; Elmuti, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on approaches to organizational effectiveness and financial performance in the healthcare industry. The purpose of this article is to study the Relationship Between Measures of Perceived Organizational Effectiveness and Actual Financial Performance in the Medical Group Practice Environment. The population in this study came from an annual survey of U.S. medical practices conducted by the Medical Group Managers Association (MGMA). The evaluation instruments developed are a composite of documented and currently active instruments, including components of organizational effectiveness, general demographics, locus of control, and constituent/environmental influences. Statistical analysis of data includes regression analysis and descriptive statistics measures. The three tested hypotheses in the study are not supported. However, the study does support an understanding of industry relationships and reinforces the findings of former studies. Additionally, a new level of confirmation is established indicating that even under greater levels of environmental control, perceived organizational effectiveness and actual financial performance has no significant relationship. This article provides a concise summary and update of a larger and more detailed body of work.

  15. Study on evaluation of photoelectric jamming effectiveness on ranging lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Jinxi; Yang, Haiqiang; Gao, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Lidar (Light Detection and Range) is a brand-new field and research hotspot. Ranging lidar is studied in this paper. Specifically, its basic working principle and photoelectric jamming mechanism are introduced. Then, the ranging error jamming success rate rule is developed for laser distance deception jamming. And the effectiveness evaluation of laser blinding jamming is based on the influence level on ranging accuracy and ranging function. The results have some reference value to evaluation of jamming test effectiveness.

  16. Environmental effects consideration: A case study - Lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, William W.; Anderson, B. J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance for serious consideration of environmental effects and associated risks by management early in the development cycle of a facility. A case study on the Space Shuttle provides information with regard to some of the environmental effects issues encountered and the lesson learned. The importance of early management action to enable the acceptance of known environmental risks, or to make program adjustments to avoid their potential consequences, is emphasized.

  17. Numerical studies of transverse curvature effects on transonic flow stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaraeg, M. G.; Daudpota, Q. I.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study of transverse curvature effects on compressible flow temporal stability for transonic to low supersonic Mach numbers is presented for axisymmetric modes. The mean flows studied include a similar boundary-layer profile and a nonsimilar axisymmetric boundary-layer solution. The effect of neglecting curvature in the mean flow produces only small quantitative changes in the disturbance growth rate. For transonic Mach numbers (1-1.4) and aerodynamically relevant Reynolds numbers (5000-10,000 based on displacement thickness), the maximum growth rate is found to increase with curvature - the maximum occurring at a nondimensional radius (based on displacement thickness) between 30 and 100.

  18. Effect of Teaching Behavior on Study Motivation in Generative Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄玉梅; 薛小莹

    2014-01-01

    Teaching behavior plays a vital role in students’study and has a great effect on their academic achievement.Study moti-vation is one of key essentials for students to focus themselves on their study. As a teacher,how to arouse students ’motivation and inspire students to study actively is a critical teaching behavior.How to change default teaching into generative teaching is al-so one of necessary teaching behaviors in English teaching.This paper will illustrate what measures should be taken and what prin-ciples should be followed in generative teaching.

  19. Exposure assessment in studies on health effects of traffic exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setaelae, S. [Association for the Pulmonary Disabled, Helsinki (Finland); Jaakkola, J.J.K. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Public Health

    1995-12-31

    A main source of outdoor air pollution is road traffic, which produces a complex mixture of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile hydrocarbons, airborne particles and some other compounds. Traffic exhaust affects also the concentrations of ozone and other photo chemical oxidants. In earlier studies those components have had remarkable health effects. Several studies on occupational exposure to automobile exhaust have been published and several studies have been observed an association between both outdoor and indoor pollutant levels and health outcomes. However, there are only a few epidemiological studies in which traffic exhaust, a complex mixture, has been studied in its entirety. During recent years, interesting epidemiological studies of the health effects of this complex mixture have been published. Human exposure assessment for traffic exhaust can be categorized according to the environment of exposure (indoors, outdoors, in-traffic) or to the method of exposure assessment (direct or indirect methods). In this presentation the methods are further categorized into (1) traffic activity, (2) air concentration measurements, and (3) dispersion models, in order to better understand the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches. The objective of this presentation is to make a critical review of exposure assessments in the epidemiological studies on health effects of traffic exhaust. (author)

  20. Studying laser radiation effect on steel structure and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Gazaliyev

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There was studied the effect of laser radiation on the structure and properties of annealed and tempered steel with different content of carbon. For surface hardening there was used a laser complex equipped with Nd: YAG pulse laser with power density up to 30 kW/сm2. As a result of the carried-out studies there were calculated characteristics of laser, steel microstructure and properties.

  1. A Study of the effect of sound on EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Bhoria,

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a brief study of various effects of sound on the human brain activity. This can be shown through the study of EEG signal recorded. The effect is in the form of variation in either frequency or in the power of different EEG bands. A biomedical signal electroencephalography (EEG reflects the state of mind and is often used to verify the influence of music on human brain activity. In fact EEG signals are related to the characteristic parameters of brain electrical activity. Moreover as our mind state changes EEG changes accordingly. The raw EEG cannot be observed or used efficiently. Hence various techniques like time frequency analysis has been employed to read the effects.

  2. Study of radiation effects on mammalian cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, W. K.

    1968-01-01

    Radiation effect on single cells and cell populations of Chinese hamster lung tissue is studied in vitro. The rate and position as the cell progresses through the generation cycle shows division delay, changes in some biochemical processes in the cell, chromosomal changes, colony size changes, and loss of reproductive capacity.

  3. DSC Study on Brain Tubulin and the Effect of Cisplatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The thermal property of the polymerization of brain tubulin was studied by a high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimeter. The phenomenon that heat flows increased and decreased consistently and obviously was observed. This phenomenon was called heat flow oscillation. It was probably correlated to the dynamic instability of microtubules. The effect of cisplatin on it was reported, too.

  4. Bauschinger effect in thin metal films: Discrete dislocation dynamics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davoudi, K.M.; Nicola, L.; Vlassak, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of dislocation climb on plastic deformation during loading and unloading are studied using a two-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics model. Simulations are performed for polycrystalline thin films passivated on both surfaces. Dislocation climb lowers the overall level of the stress

  5. Effectiveness study of atropine for progressive myopia in Europeans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polling, J.R.; Kok, R.G.; Tideman, J.W.; Meskat, B.; Klaver, C.C.W.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeRandomized controlled trials have shown the efficacy of atropine for progressive myopia, and this treatment has become the preferred pattern for this condition in Taiwan. This study explores the effectiveness of atropine 0.5% treatment for progressive high myopia and adherence to therapy in a

  6. Study Sheds Light on Effects of Hate Crimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Megan, N.; Harper, Shaun R.; Hildebrand, Emily S.; Burns, Shannon L.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of effects of hate crime on college campuses reports findings of a survey taken three months after a fatal hate crime. The study found that students in the targeted group, especially females and organizational leaders, had increased extracurricular involvement in campus organizations. Also provides statistics on racist acts on campus…

  7. Integrating Professional Development across the Curriculum: An Effectiveness Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarocco, Natalie J.; Dinella, Lisa M.; Hatchard, Christine J.; Valosin, Jayde

    2016-01-01

    The current study empirically tested the effectiveness of a modular approach to integrating professional development across an undergraduate psychology curriculum. Researchers conducted a two-group, between-subjects experiment on 269 undergraduate psychology students assessing perceptions of professional preparedness and learning. Analysis…

  8. The Impact of OER on Instructional Effectiveness: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islim, Omer Faruk; Cagiltay, Kursat

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study aims to investigate the instructional effectiveness of Open Educational Resources (OER). It was conducted with 1196 university students who were enrolled in a general chemistry course with an experimental laboratory section. These students voluntarily used OER for their lab activities. Data were collected via a printed,…

  9. Measuring Effects of Reflection on Learning – A Physiological Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, Wen; Verpoorten, Dominique; Westera, Wim

    2014-01-01

    As an economical and feasible intervention, reflection demands learners using critical thinking to examine presented information, questioning its validity, and drawing conclusions based on the resulting ideas during a learning process. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the effects of pra

  10. Measuring Effects of Reflectionon Learning: A Physiological Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, Wen

    2014-01-01

    As an economical and feasible intervention, reflection demands learners using critical thinking to examine presented information, questioning its validity, and drawing conclusions based on the resulting ideas during a learning process. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the effects of pra

  11. Evaluating effectiveness of project start-ups: an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halman, J.I.M.; Burger, G.T.N.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper an exploratory study is reported about the effectiveness of project start-up (PSU) practices within a world-scale operating, high technology innovating and manufacturing company. The emphasis is on the focal position of both project owner and project manager. To uncover potential diffe

  12. Effective Single-Parent Training Group Program: Three System Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Harold E.; Miller, Keva M.; Orellana, E. Roberto; Briggs, Adam C.; Cox, Wendell H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study highlights Dr. Elsie Pinkston and colleagues' research on the effectiveness of behavior parent training and examines the application of single-parent training group (SPG) programs to three parent-child dyads exposed to distressed family circumstances. Methods: Single-system evaluation designs were conducted with two…

  13. The Effect of Background Music on Bullying: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Naomi; Dolev, Einat

    2013-01-01

    School bullying is a source of growing concern. A number of intervention programs emphasize the importance of a positive school climate in preventing bullying behavior. The aim of the presented pilot study was to examine whether calming background music, through its effect on arousal and mood, could create a pleasant atmosphere and reduce bullying…

  14. HRD Interventions, Employee Competencies and Organizational Effectiveness: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potnuru, Rama Krishna Gupta; Sahoo, Chandan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to examine the impact of human resource development (HRD) interventions on organizational effectiveness by means of employee competencies which are built by some of the selected HRD interventions. Design/methodology/approach: An integrated research model has been developed by combining the principal factors…

  15. Theoretical Study of Irradiation Effects in Close Binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao, M.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of irradiation is studied in a close binary systemassuming that the secondary component is a point source, moving in a circularorbit. The irradiation effects are calculatedon the atmosphere of the primary component in a 3-dimensional Cartesiancoordinate geometry. In treating the reflection effect theoretically, the totalradiation $(S_mathrm{T}$ is obtained as the sum of the radiation of 1 the effect ofirradiation on the primary component which is calculated by using onedimensional rod model $(S_mathrm{r}$ and 2 the self radiation of the primarycomponent which is calculated by using the solution of radiative transferequation in spherical symmetry $(S_mathrm{s}$. The radiation field is estimated alongthe line of sight of the observer at infinity. It is shown how the radiationfield changes depending on the position of the secondary component.

  16. Physician leadership styles and effectiveness: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Samuels, Michael E; Stoskopf, Carleen H

    2005-12-01

    The authors study the association between physician leadership styles and leadership effectiveness. Executive directors of community health centers were surveyed (269 respondents; response rate = 40.9 percent) for their perceptions of the medical director's leadership behaviors and effectiveness, using an adapted Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (43 items on a 0-4 point Likert-type scale), with additional questions on demographics and the center's clinical goals and achievements. The authors hypothesize that transformational leadership would be more positively associated with executive directors' ratings of effectiveness, satisfaction with the leader, and subordinate extra effort, as well as the center's clinical goal achievement, than transactional or laissez-faire leadership. Separate ordinary least squares regressions were used to model each of the effectiveness measures, and general linear model regression was used to model clinical goal achievement. Results support the hypothesis and suggest that physician leadership development using the transformational leadership model may result in improved health care quality and cost control.

  17. Trial Study of Vibration-Induced Effects on Spontaneous Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunWeibin; QiuWeiting; HeZhanxiang

    2003-01-01

    Vibratory excitation generates not only reflections and refractions of wave fields on the subsurface interfaces but also electromagnetic waves with different frequencies. In this paper we address the vibration-induced effects on the spontaneous potential field. The effects of controllable vibration on the spontaneous potential field were studied under real field geologic conditions. Experimental data confirmed that the vibration-induced effects on the spontaneous potential field do exist under field conditions. Monitoring records over a long time interval showed that there existed three information zones in the vibration-induced effects on spontaneous potential field:These are the signal-variant zone, the extreme-stable zone and the relaxation-recovery zone. Combined with different well-site data, it was concluded that the time-variant features of the anomalies in the information zones was closely related to the properties of the subsurface liquid (oil and water).

  18. Study on Thickness Effect of Three-Point-Bend Specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masanori; Ishihara, Takehito

    The thickness effect of a three-point-bend (3PB) specimen on dimple fracture behavior is studied experimentally and numerically. At first, fracture toughness tests were conducted using 3PB specimens of different thicknesses. Fracture toughness values and R-curves are obtained, and the thickness effect is discussed. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dimple fracture surfaces are observed precisely. It is found that the thickness effect appears clearly in the void growth process. Finite element (FEM) analyses are conducted based on these experimental data. Using Gurson’s constitutive equation, the nucleation and growth of voids during the dimple fracture process are simulated. The distribution patterns of stress triaxiality and the crack growth process are obtained. The results show a good agreement with experimental ones qualitatively. The effects of specimen thickness on R-curves are explained well on the basis of these numerical simulations.

  19. Study on effects of longwall mining on the underground water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Wen-bing; Syd S. Peng

    2007-01-01

    It is very important for secure mining under water bodies to study the effects of Iongwall mining on the underground water. In order to study this problem, piezometers for monitoring underground water levels were established in an American coalmine. Large amounts of pre-mining and post-mining monitoring data were collected. Based on the data,the effects of Iongwall mining on the underground water was studied. The results demonstrate that when the piezometer monitoring wells have an interburden thickness less than 72.7 m, the groundwater level decreases immediately to immeasurable levels and go dry after undermining. The height of the fractured zone in is 72.7~85.3 m in this geological and mining conditions. The results also show that the calculated value of fractured zone by the empirical formulae used in China is smaller than the actual results. Therefore, it is not always safe to use them in analysis of mining under water bodies.

  20. Study of Gamification Effectiveness in Online e-Learning Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya V. Osipov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Online distance e-learning systems allow introducing innovative methods in pedagogy, along with studying their effectiveness. Assessing the system effectiveness is based on analyzing the log files to track the studying time, the number of connections, and earned game bonus points. This study is based on an example of the online application for practical foreign language speaking skills training between random users, which select the role of a teacher or a student on their own. The main features of the developed system include pre-defined synchronized teaching and learning materials displayed for both participants, along with user motivation by means of gamification. The actual percentage of successful connects between specifically unmotivated and unfamiliar with each other users was measured. The obtained result can be used for gauging the developed system success and the proposed teaching methodology in general.

  1. Bayesian modeling of cost-effectiveness studies with unmeasured confounding: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamey, James D; Beavers, Daniel P; Faries, Douglas; Price, Karen L; Seaman, John W

    2014-01-01

    Unmeasured confounding is a common problem in observational studies. Failing to account for unmeasured confounding can result in biased point estimators and poor performance of hypothesis tests and interval estimators. We provide examples of the impacts of unmeasured confounding on cost-effectiveness analyses using observational data along with a Bayesian approach to correct estimation. Assuming validation data are available, we propose a Bayesian approach to correct cost-effectiveness studies for unmeasured confounding. We consider the cases where both cost and effectiveness are assumed to have a normal distribution and when costs are gamma distributed and effectiveness is normally distributed. Simulation studies were conducted to determine the impact of ignoring the unmeasured confounder and to determine the size of the validation data required to obtain valid inferences.

  2. Role of emotional intelligence in managerial effectiveness: An empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Sahidur Rahman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Emotional intelligence is very critical to the managerial effectiveness. The present study intends to explore the relationships between emotional intelligence and the three roles such as, interpersonal, informational, and decision of managerial effectiveness. Emotional intelligence is measured by using the Emotional Quotient Index (Rahim et al., 2002 [Rahim, M., Psenicka, C., Polychroniou, P., Zhao, J., Yu, C., Chan, K., Susana, K., Alves, M., Lee, C., Rahman, M.S., Ferdausy, S., & Wyk, R. (2002. A model of emotional intelligence and conflict management strategies: a study in seven countries. International Journal of Organizational Analysis, 10(4, 302-326.] while managerial effectiveness is assessed by using Tsui’s (1984 scale [Tsui, A.S. (1984. A role set analysis of managerial reputation. Organizational Behavior and Human Performance, 34, 64-96.]. Data were collected by distributing self-administered questionnaires among the working MBA students using a convenience sampling technique. Respondents are asked to rate their emotional intelligence and managerial effectiveness scales. Finally 127 usable responses are received and, then, analyzed by using the descriptive statistics, bivariate correlation, and regression analysis. Analysis shows that emotional intelligence was positively related with interpersonal role, informational role, and decision role. The main implication is that emotional intelligence could enhance managerial effectiveness guiding the managers, academics, and professionals. The limitations are the sample size and the sampling technique which might limit the generalizability of the findings. Future directions are also discussed.

  3. Age Effects in a Study Abroad Context: Children and Adults Studying Abroad and at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanes, Angels; Munoz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the effects of learning context and age on second language development by comparing the language gains, measured in terms of oral and written fluency, lexical and syntactic complexity, and accuracy, experienced by four groups of learners of English: children in a study abroad setting, children in their at-home school, adults in…

  4. Effective Teaching Strategies: Case Studies from the Alphabetic Braille and Contracted Braille Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Lizbeth; Herlich, Stephanie A.; Sacks, Sharon Zell

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses some of the qualitative data that were documented during the Alphabetic Braille and Contracted Braille Study. Two case studies of students are described, highlighting many effective teaching strategies used by their teachers of students with visual impairments that resulted in the students' successful academic progress.…

  5. Numerical study of instability of nanofluids: the coagulation effect and sedimentation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yu; Fan, Jianren; Hu, Yacai

    2011-02-28

    This study is a numerical study on the coagulation as well as the sedimentation effect of nanofluids using the Brownian dynamics method. Three cases are simulated, focusing on the effects of the sizes, volume fraction, and ζ potentials of nano-particles on the formation of coagulation and sedimentation of nanofluids. The rms fluctuation of the particle number concentration, as well as the flatness factor of it, is employed to study the formation and variation of the coagulation process. The results indicate a superposition of coagulation and sedimentation effect of small nano-particles. Moreover, it is stable of nanofluids with the volume fraction of particles below the limit of "resolution" of the fluids. In addition, the effect of ζ potentials is against the formation of coagulation and positive to the stability of nanofluids.

  6. Numerical study of instability of nanofluids: the coagulation effect and sedimentation effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Yu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study is a numerical study on the coagulation as well as the sedimentation effect of nanofluids using the Brownian dynamics method. Three cases are simulated, focusing on the effects of the sizes, volume fraction, and ζ potentials of nano-particles on the formation of coagulation and sedimentation of nanofluids. The rms fluctuation of the particle number concentration, as well as the flatness factor of it, is employed to study the formation and variation of the coagulation process. The results indicate a superposition of coagulation and sedimentation effect of small nano-particles. Moreover, it is stable of nanofluids with the volume fraction of particles below the limit of "resolution" of the fluids. In addition, the effect of ζ potentials is against the formation of coagulation and positive to the stability of nanofluids.

  7. Numerical study of instability of nanofluids: the coagulation effect and sedimentation effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yu; Fan, Jianren; Hu, Yacai

    2011-12-01

    This study is a numerical study on the coagulation as well as the sedimentation effect of nanofluids using the Brownian dynamics method. Three cases are simulated, focusing on the effects of the sizes, volume fraction, and ζ potentials of nano-particles on the formation of coagulation and sedimentation of nanofluids. The rms fluctuation of the particle number concentration, as well as the flatness factor of it, is employed to study the formation and variation of the coagulation process. The results indicate a superposition of coagulation and sedimentation effect of small nano-particles. Moreover, it is stable of nanofluids with the volume fraction of particles below the limit of "resolution" of the fluids. In addition, the effect of ζ potentials is against the formation of coagulation and positive to the stability of nanofluids.

  8. Studies of atmospheric refraction effects on laser data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, P. J.; Pearce, W. A.; Johnson, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    The refraction effect from three perspectives was considered. An analysis of the axioms on which the accepted correction algorithms were based was the first priority. The integrity of the meteorological measurements on which the correction model is based was also considered and a large quantity of laser observations was processed in an effort to detect any serious anomalies in them. The effect of refraction errors on geodetic parameters estimated from laser data using the most recent analysis procedures was the focus of the third element of study. The results concentrate on refraction errors which were found to be critical in the eventual use of the data for measurements of crustal dynamics.

  9. Preliminary Studies on Chlorimuron Degradation in Soil by Effective Microogranisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yaguang

    2006-01-01

    A wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) bioassay method was used for preliminary determination of chlorimuron degradation in soil by EM (effective microorganisms). Under the conditions of this study, chlorimuron half-life was greater than 30-50 days in soil containing different initial concentrations of chlorimuron. After adding EM, chlorimuron degradation half-life ranged from 10-15 days, which was about 15-30 days shorter than without EM. Chlorimuron phate and urea enhanced the ability of EM to degrade chlorimuron, but brown sugar had no significant effect.

  10. Studies on EB radiation effect on PA610

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Kebin; Zhang Huaming; Li Xiurong; Xiong Ruilin [Sichuan Forever Group Co. Ltd., China Academy of Engineering Physics, Miangany (China)

    2000-03-01

    Radiation effect of PA610 with polyfunctional monomer trially isocyanurate (TAIC) was studied, the results show that crosslinking effect of EB radiation on PA610 is obvious. After the PA610 samples were radiated by EB with dosage 75KGY, the physical characters of PA610 materials were greatly improved, especially their tensile strength being increased about 18% and their impact strength about 50%, but their water and oil absorption were decreased. So, EB radiation can enhance PA610 materials physical strength, resistance to solvents and water and increase their thermal-deformation temperature. (author)

  11. Misuse of topical corticosteroids: A clinical study of adverse effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Dey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Misuse of topical corticosteroids is a widespread phenomenon among young people in India, especially women. The practice is associated with significant adverse effects and poor awareness of these effects among the general public. Aim: This study was conducted to examine the misuse and adverse effects of topical corticosteroids among the people in Bastar region in Chhattisgarh state of India. Materials and Methods: Data collected from patients presenting with at least one of the adverse effects of topical corticosteroids as the chief complaint, from November 2010 to October 2011. Results: Out of the 6723 new patients, 379 (5.63% had presented with misuse and adverse effects of topical corticosteroids, of whom 78.89% were females. More than 65% of the patients were in the age group 10-29 years. The main reason for using the topical corticosteroids was to lighten skin colour and treat melasma and suntan. Acne (37.99% and telangiectasia (18.99% were the most common adverse effects noted. Conclusions: Misuse of topical corticosteroids has a huge impact on dermatological practice, leading to a significant proportion of visits to the dermatologist. This hydra-headed problem needs multi-dimensional interventions, involving educational, legal and managerial approaches with cooperation from different sectors of society.

  12. Tomographic Study of Ionospheric Effects Associated with a Solar Eclipse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xiong-bin; Xu Ji-sheng; Ma Shu-ying; Tian Mao

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the ionospheric effects associ-ated with the solar eclipse of October 24th, 1995 by means of Computerized Ionospheric Tomography (CIT). Since the re-constructed profiles from experimental CIT are sporadically located in time, a time domain interpolation method based onSingular Value Decomposition (SVD) technique is proposed and applied to extract the ionospheric effects. The effects canbe extracted by comparison analysis between the interpolated CIT profiles of the eclipse days and that of the reference day that are time-aligned. A series of figs have been obtained showing the attenuation of photonization effect at low alti-tudes and the weakening of plasma's transportation process athigh altitudes, etc. The photonization effect recovered to nor-mal level soon after the last contact. The maximum electron density diminishing is observed about 2 h after the eclipse maximum and the effects seem vanished in the hours fol-lowed. Analysis on vertical TEC's latitudinal temporal variation gives similar conclusions.

  13. Experimental Study of Effect of Vents in Thermal Ventilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dong; LIU Xiao-yu; ZHUANG Jiang-ting; SHEN Hui

    2009-01-01

    The effects of vents on thermal ventilation to save energy in the cold roUing workshop of Baosteel were investigated.According to the scale modeling theory,a small chamber was established.The details about construction of experiment On thermal ventilation and the preparation and arrangement of apparatus were dis-cussed,and then the effects of vents on thermal ventilation were studied through experiments,which includes the temperature distribution,the volume of ventilation,the temperature difference between inlets and outlets,the neutral plane,and the effective thermal coefficient of thermal natural ventilation.Based on this,the effects of natural ventilation based on varied area of inlets and oudets and those of vents on one side and on different sides were compared.According to the experiments,the area of inlet vents and outlet vents affect the tempera-ture distribution in chamber, and their effects on ventilation volume are difierent,but the effects of vents in sin-gle side or different sides aare the same under the condition that only thermal ventilation is considered.

  14. Magnetic field effects on humans: epidemiological study design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budinger, T.F.; Wong, P.; Yen, C.K.

    1978-10-01

    This report presents details of the study design and methods for a retrospective epidemiological study on the health effects, if any, of stationary and alternating magnetic fields produced by man-made devices such as cyclotrons, controlled thermonuclear reactors (CTR), high voltage-high current transmission lines, magnetohydrodynamic devices (MHD), energy storage systems, and isotope separation facilities. The magnetic fields to which the workers can be exposed are as high as 10,000 gauss and the anticipated increase in magnetic fields associated with the environment and transmission lines near these devices is a few times the natural earth magnetic field. Thus the objectives include acquisition of low exposure data which can be used to evaluate any risks to the population incidentally exposed to environmental increases in magnetic fields, as well as an acquisition of high exposure data to be used in determining allowable exposure standards for the technical personnel working at CTR and MHD facilities. From the present status of knowledge on biological effects of magnetic fields, it is not possible to extrapolate or rationally conclude maximum permissible exposure levels for magnetic device workers and the population at large. There are no known previous studies of the effects of long-term exposure to magnetic fields involving large samples and matched controls. Thus this human epidemiological study was commenced in 1977 in parallel with experimental studies on biological and medical effects of magnetic fields being conducted by Dr. T. Tenforde and co-workers at LBL, by investigators at Battelle Northwest, and smaller projects at a number of laboratories around the world. The data base for the exposed population is comprised of approximately 1,000 cyclotron and bubble chamber workers.

  15. A study on the effects of personality traits on building effective relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Shahab Mousavi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to measure the effects of five big personality traits on development of effective communication among middle level managers of the first private Iranian bank, Bank Eghtesade Novin, in city of Tehran, Iran. To measure the effects of five big personality traits, the study uses a questionnaire developed by Jackson (1974 [Jackson, D. N. (1974. Personality research form manual. Research Psychologists Press.]. In addition, to measure the impacts of effective communication we use another questionnaire. All questions are designed in Likert scale and Cronbach alphas for two mentioned questionnaires were calculated as 0.92 and 0.74, respectively. The implementation of Pearson test as well as regression analysis have revealed that there were some positive and meaningful relationship between four personality traits, openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and effective communication. In addition, there was a negative and meaningful relationship between neuroticism and effective communication.

  16. Defining Effectiveness Using Finite Sets A Study on Computability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macedo, Hugo Daniel dos Santos; Haeusler, Edward H.; Garcia, Alex

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies effectiveness in the domain of computability. In the context of model-theoretical approaches to effectiveness, where a function is considered effective if there is a model containing a representation of such function, our definition relies on a model provided by functions between...... finite sets and uses category theory as its mathematical foundations. The model relies on the fact that every function between finite sets is computable, and that the finite composition of such functions is also computable. Our approach is an alternative to the traditional model-theoretical based works...... which rely on (ZFC) set theory as a mathematical foundation, and our approach is also novel when compared to the already existing works using category theory to approach computability results. Moreover, we show how to encode Turing machine computations in the model, thus concluding the model expresses...

  17. Effect of Operating Conditions on CSTR performance: an Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Danish

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Saponification reaction of ethyl acetate by sodium hydroxide is studied experimentally in a continuous stirred tank reactor at 1 atmospheric pressure. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of operating conditions on the conversion and specific rate constant. The parameters considered for analysis are temperature, feed flow rate, residence time, volume of reactor and stirrer rate. The steady state conversion of 0.45 achieved after a period of 30 minutes. Conversion decreases with increase of reactant flow rate due to decrease of residence time. The stirrer rate has a positive effect on the conversion and rate constant. Specific rate constant and conversion increase with temperature within the studied temperature range. Within the range of reactor volume selected for analysis, conversion increases with increase in reactor volume. The results obtained in this study may be helpful in maximizing the conversion of ethyl acetate saponification reaction at industrial scale in a CSTR.

  18. Psychological effects of abortion (a study of 1739 cases).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, W F; Cheng, M C; Vengadasalam, D; Seng, K M

    1976-06-01

    A 6-month prospective study was conducted among 1739 women who underwent therapeutic abortion at Kandang Kerbau Hospital in Singapore to ascertain the aftereffects of abortion. Results of the study indicate that induced abortion has no observable bad effects on the mental health of the patients. In fact, somatic and psychiatric complaints were reduced and sexual adjustment increased 6 months postoperative. Those who were also sterilized at the time of the abortion showed a slightly lower rate of somatic symptom reduction than the rest of the group.

  19. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ROCK BREAKING EFFECT OF STEEL PARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Meng; ZHAI Ying-hu; JI Guo-dong

    2011-01-01

    Particle impact drilling is an efficient drilling technology for deep-well hard formation, With this technology, the rock is cut mainly by high-speed spherical particle impact under hydraulic action. In this article, the influence of jet flow factors, hydraulic factors and abrasive factors on rock breaking is studied through indoor experiments of impact by steel particles. The results indicate that the particle water jet has an optimal standoff distance and particle concentration; the rock breaking effect declines with the increase of the confining pressure and the decrease of the pump pressure and particle diameter. This study will provide some food of thought for the development of particle impact drilling technology.

  20. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-05-27

    Carbonaceous aerosol components, which include black carbon (BC), urban primary organic aerosols (POA), biomass burning aerosols, and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from both urban and biogenic precursors, have been previously shown to play a major role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. The primary objective of the CARES 2010 intensive field study is to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their effects on optical and cloud formation properties.

  1. Numerical study of reservoir cooling by means of peltier effect

    OpenAIRE

    Farias, Rodrigo Martins; Santos, Elizaldo Domingues dos; Isoldi, Liércio André; Rocha, Luiz Alberto Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    The present work studies numerically and experimentally the water cooling process by means of natural convection inside a closed reservoir. The cooling process is performed by Peltier or Thermoelectric effect. The purpose here is to obtain the thermal gradient inside the reservoir and to search for the best point where the coldest water can be extracted from the reservoir, which can be considered a geometric optimization of the device thermal design. The analyzed flow is incompressible, lamin...

  2. Comprehensive Study of Acute Effects and Recovery After Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    impact exposure characteristics for different football positions and between games and practices, and highlighted the effects of head impact history on...project, as appropriate and indicated, not necessary waiting until full study completion. 21 • Website(s) or other Internet site(s) Nothing to...disability 2.0% Note. WTAR = Wechsler Test of Adult Reading standard score; ADHD = attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder .

  3. CONVECTIVE DRYING OF CHERRY TOMATO: STUDY OF SKIN EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. KHAMA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A whole single cherry tomato was dried in a forced convective micro-dryer. The experiments were carried out at constant air velocity and humidity and temperatures of 50, 60, 70 °C. In order to study the effect of the skin, two sets of experiments were performed using a tomato with and without skin (easily removed. Shorter drying times were obtained when increasing drying temperatures as well as when removing sample skin. X-ray microtomography, a non-destructive 3D imaging technique was used to follow shrinkage of the samples. This phenomenon was introduced in the modelling part of this study. Analytical solutions of the Fick’law were used to determine the diffusion coefficient at the three temperatures studied, and then the activation energy was obtained through fitting the Arrhenius equation. The skin effect was clearly evidenced by showing that the mass transfer parameter values of an original tomato with skin were largely smaller than the one without skin. Indeed, the moisture effective diffusivity ranged from 2.56×10-11 to 7.67×10-11 m2·s-1 with activation energy of 50430 J·mol-1 for tomato with skin an ranged from 4.59×10-10 m2·s-1 to 6.73×10-10 m2·s-1 with activation energy of 17640 J.mol-1 for tomato without skin.

  4. Effective factors in providing holistic care: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Zamanzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Holistic care is a comprehensive model of caring. Previous studies have shown that most nurses do not apply this method. Examining the effective factors in nurses′ provision of holistic care can help with enhancing it. Studying these factors from the point of view of nurses will generate real and meaningful concepts and can help to extend this method of caring. Materials and Methods: A qualitative study was used to identify effective factors in holistic care provision. Data gathered by interviewing 14 nurses from university hospitals in Iran were analyzed with a conventional qualitative content analysis method and by using MAXQDA (professional software for qualitative and mixed methods data analysis software. Results: Analysis of data revealed three main themes as effective factors in providing holistic care: The structure of educational system, professional environment, and personality traits. Conclusion: Establishing appropriate educational, management systems, and promoting religiousness and encouragement will induce nurses to provide holistic care and ultimately improve the quality of their caring.

  5. Partial volume effects in dynamic contrast magnetic resonance renal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, D. Rodriguez, E-mail: drodriguez@biotronics3d.co [CVSSP, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Wells, K., E-mail: k.wells@surrey.ac.u [CVSSP, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Diaz Montesdeoca, O., E-mail: o.diaz.montesdeoca@gmail.co [EUITT, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Moran Santana, A. [EUITT, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Mendichovszky, I.A., E-mail: iosifm@hotmail.co [Radiology and Physics Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, London WC1N 1EH (United Kingdom); Gordon, I., E-mail: i.gordon@ich.ucl.ac.u [Radiology and Physics Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, London WC1N 1EH (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    This is the first study of partial volume effect in quantifying renal function on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Dynamic image data were acquired for a cohort of 10 healthy volunteers. Following respiratory motion correction, each voxel location was assigned a mixing vector representing the 'overspilling' contributions of each tissue due to the convolution action of the imaging system's point spread function. This was used to recover the true intensities associated with each constituent tissue. Thus, non-renal contributions from liver, spleen and other surrounding tissues could be eliminated from the observed time-intensity curves derived from a typical renal cortical region of interest. This analysis produced a change in the early slope of the renal curve, which subsequently resulted in an enhanced glomerular filtration rate estimate. This effect was consistently observed in a Rutland-Patlak analysis of the time-intensity data: the volunteer cohort produced a partial volume effect corrected mean enhancement of 36% in relative glomerular filtration rate with a mean improvement of 7% in r{sup 2} fitting of the Rutland-Patlak model compared to the same analysis undertaken without partial volume effect correction. This analysis strongly supports the notion that dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of kidneys is substantially affected by the partial volume effect, and that this is a significant obfuscating factor in subsequent glomerular filtration rate estimation.

  6. A Case Study of Allelopathic Effect on Weeds in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaveya T. Petrova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Most powerful and effective method of weed control is by chemical substances called herbicides. In recent years, they were published quite data on different side effects of herbicides on humans, animals, crops and the environment as a whole. Therefore, the increased interest for biological weed control lately is reasonable, since its improvement and expansion will contribute to limiting excessive use of herbicides, respectively their harmful effects and will support the successful implementation of complex weed control. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of selected plant species, containing allelopathic active substances, on germination, growth and biomass of some widespread weeds in wheat. Experiments were carried out at laboratory conditions using seeds of wheat (Triticum aestivum L., sort Sadovo 1 and most common weeds therein: Johnson grass (Sorghum halepense (L Pers, white pigweed (Chenopodium album L., twitch (Cynodon dactylon L. and curly dock (Rumex crispus L.. Allelopathic substances were extracted with distilled water from flowers of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill., leaves of basil (Ocimum basilicum L., leaves of spearmint (Mentha longifolia (L Huds., and leaves of peppermint (Mentha piperita L.. Of the tested active allelopathic plants, the most negative impact on germination of all weeds seeds (including wheat, as well as on the development of plants exhibited the water extract of lavender. Lavender and basil had a stronger negative effect on white pigweed and twitch compared with both mint species. A significant inhibitory effect of spearmint even at low concentrations was recorded on the germination of all weed species tested while the wheat was slightly affected, which manifests this plant as a potential effective species in strategies for weed control management.

  7. The Study of Teaching Effective Strategies on Student's Math Achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Hassan Behzadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors in student's learning weakness and academic failure, is their unfamilarity or low awareness of the learning strategies and studying in mathematics. This study is performed to examine the students' math and reading skills and their study skills that impact on their academic progress. The main objective of the research is to study with emphasis on training study strategies versus ususal method (teaching without emphasis on training study strategies to increase the learning of mathematical concepts. The present method is quasi-experimental that via quasi-cluster sampling to adopt 17 guidance girly schools in grade 3th, to gauge effects of teaching reading skills on math learning of the students.The results of T-test showed that students who were taught with emphasis on study skills versus students who have been traditionally trained, had better math performance and higher academic achievement.Therefore it seems that teaching reading stratefies such as cognitive and meta-cognitive will ease mathematical learning process.

  8. Studies towards assessing the effects of aviation on climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodayari, Arezoo

    Emissions from aviation are an important component in the overall concerns about the effects of human activities on climate. Aviation emissions modify the chemical and physical properties of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) in various ways. Aircraft emit gases and particles that can either directly or indirectly affect climate and air quality, including: carbon dioxide (CO2); nitrogen oxides (NOx) that can increase ozone (O3) production and increase the destruction of methane (CH4); water vapor that under certain atmospheric conditions can lead to contrail formation; and soot and other particles that along with contrails can affect the amount and characteristics of cirrus clouds. Soot and sulfate particles can also change the cloudiness by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. Due to the high growth in air traffic that is projected to continue, it is important to understand the effects of aviation on air quality and climate. Based on then existing analyses of the emissions and their effects, the aviation contribution in changing the radiative forcing on the climate system was about 5% of the total human-related emissions (relative to 1750) in 2005 (Lee et al., 2009). This contribution is a result of various effects, especially the direct effects of CO2, NOx-induced effects, aerosol direct and indirect effects, and increased cloudiness from contrail formation and aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei. One of the main challenges of the aviation scientific community has been to increase the level of scientific understanding of these effects, especially with respect to those most uncertain (i.e. NOx effects, contrail-cirrus and aerosol effects). Another challenge has been to develop a simple climate model (SCM) that has the level of sophistication necessary to accurately assess aviation induced climate effects while being easy to use by policy makers for use in policy considerations. The main objectives in this study were: (1) to evaluate the

  9. Resident physicians' perspectives on effective outpatient teaching: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiel, John B; Bundrick, John B; Beckman, Thomas J

    2010-08-01

    Learning theories, which suggest that experienced faculty use collaborative teaching styles, are reflected in qualitative studies of learners in hospital settings. However, little research has used resident focus groups to explore characteristics of successful teachers in outpatient clinics. Therefore, focus group discussions with first through third-year internal medicine residents at a large academic medical center were conducted to better understand residents' perspectives on effective outpatient teaching. A group facilitator solicited residents' reflections, based on their lived experiences, on teaching domains from previous factor analytic studies: interpersonal, clinical-teaching, and efficiency. Researchers coded focus group transcripts and identified themes within the domains. Final themes were determined by consensus. Leading themes were "kindness" and "teacher-learner relationships." Junior residents were sensitive to faculty who were brusque, harsh, and degrading. Senior residents respected faculty who were humble, collaborative, and allowed residents to co-manage teaching encounters. Seniors emphasized the importance of faculty role-modelling and preferentially staffed with experts to "gain wisdom from experience." Overall, residents expressed that effective learning requires grounded teacher-learner relationships. These findings support learning theories and previous factor analytic studies. However, this qualitative study provided insights that could not be gleaned from assessment scores alone.

  10. Effectiveness of Using Online Discussion Forum for Case Study Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Seethamraju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Business schools are exploring new pedagogical approaches to learning in order to deal with challenges such as increased class sizes, limited funding support, and difficulties in facilitating and encouraging active participation and learning among a diverse cohort of students. This paper reports on a study of the effectiveness of a pedagogical approach that blends online discussion board and case study. Analysing quantity and quality of online postings and comparing accounting students’ performance with previous cohort, this study observes a significant improvement in student learning. Appropriate design and delivery strategies and clear assessment criteria for assessment and use have provided an effective learning vehicle for students, helped them overcome their own language related barriers, and encouraged them to participate in a nonthreatening environment. This approach further complemented the benefits of peer-to-peer learning and case study pedagogy. Reported increase in workload for students and marking load for academics and measuring the value of learning, however, are some of the challenges that need further attention by researchers.

  11. HISTOLOGICAL STUDIES OF THE EFFECTS OF ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARTESUNATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O.Eweka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The histological effect of oral administration of artesunate, commonly used for the treatment of Malaria on the medial geniculate body (MGB of adult wistar rat was carefully studied. The rats of both sexes (n=24, average weight of 210g were randomly assigned into three treatment (n=18 and control (n6 groups.The rats in the treatment group 'A' received 4mg/kg body weight of artesunate base dissolved in distilled water for 3 days. The animals in groups 'B' and 'C' received 4mg/kg body weight of artesunate dissolved in distilled water for the first day and thereafter received 2mg/kg body weight daily for six and thirteen day respectively. The control group D, received equal volume of distilled water daily using the Orogastric tube. The rats were fed with grower's mash obtained from Edo Feeds and Flour Mill Ltd, Ewu, Edo State, Nigeria and were given water liberally. The rats were sacrificed on day fourth, eight and fifteenth of the experiment. The medial geniculate body was carefully dissected out and quickly fixed in 10% formal saline for histological studies.The histological findings after H&E method indicated that the treated section of the medial geniculate body showed some decreased cellular population, degenerative changes, cellular hypertrophy, with some vacuolations appearing in the stroma.Varying dosage and long administration of artesunate may have some deleterious effects on the neurons of the Medial geniculate body and this may probably have some adverse effects on auditory sensibilities by its deleterious effects on the cells of the medial geniculate body of adult wistar rats. It is therefore recommended that further studies aimed at corroborating these observations be carried out.

  12. Comments on scaling effect of reciprocity in BRDF study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hongrui; WANG Jindi

    2004-01-01

    Reciprocity principle is a common theory in electromagnetics and optics. It is also one of the general principles of the radiation transformation theory. However, in many remote sensing studies, this principle cannot be always supported by experimental data, especially when the scaling effect of the remote sensing image pixel is considered. The debate over the issue of whether the reciprocity principle can be used as a fundamental standard in evaluating the effectiveness of remote sensing observations has lasted for years. Using geometrical optics model, Li and Wan proved the existence of the scaling effect in applying the reciprocity principle to a remote sensing image pixel in 1998. In 2002, Snyder challenged Li's proof, and attempted to prove that reciprocity principle is universally valid without any scale limitation. In this paper, we will argue with Snyder's theory and point out that Snyder's theory had neglected an important condition used in Li's proof and, as a result, drawn the wrong conclusion. Here we will restate Li's condition in his demonstration and offer a further proof to verify that reciprocity principle cannot be applied unconditionally to the study of bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of land surfaces in field or satellite remote sensing observation scale.

  13. Size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics: an integrated computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H [Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan); Aono, H [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI48109 (United States)], E-mail: hliu@faculty.chiba-u.jp, E-mail: aonoh@umich.edu

    2009-03-01

    Hovering is a miracle of insects that is observed for all sizes of flying insects. Sizing effect in insect hovering on flapping-wing aerodynamics is of interest to both the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community and also of importance to comparative morphologists. In this study, we present an integrated computational study of such size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics, which is performed using a biology-inspired dynamic flight simulator that integrates the modelling of realistic wing-body morphology, the modelling of flapping-wing and body kinematics and an in-house Navier-Stokes solver. Results of four typical insect hovering flights including a hawkmoth, a honeybee, a fruit fly and a thrips, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from O(10{sup 4}) to O(10{sup 1}) are presented, which demonstrate the feasibility of the present integrated computational methods in quantitatively modelling and evaluating the unsteady aerodynamics in insect flapping flight. Our results based on realistically modelling of insect hovering therefore offer an integrated understanding of the near-field vortex dynamics, the far-field wake and downwash structures, and their correlation with the force production in terms of sizing and Reynolds number as well as wing kinematics. Our results not only give an integrated interpretation on the similarity and discrepancy of the near- and far-field vortex structures in insect hovering but also demonstrate that our methods can be an effective tool in the MAVs design.

  14. A study on effective factors on employee motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ghodrati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Management is often considered as collaboration with others and this requires knowing about employers' behavior and the factors influencing their behaviors to motivate them for obtaining some predicted aims. This paper presents a study to detect important factors influencing motivation of some employees who work for a public offices in city of Kashan, Iran. The study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale and distributes it among 160 randomly selected participants. The questions are divided into two groups of management performance and motivational factors. To evaluate the effect of demographic factors on the quality of respondents' statements, a rating analysis based on Kruskal–Wallis test is used. To measure the effective vote, the motivation levels are divided into three groups of highly motivated, motivated and not motivated and they are analyzed based on rating mean variance with freedman scale. The results indicate that interesting job, job security, good salary and benefits and promotions, etc. are important factors to impact on the employers' motivation. For the newly – employed personal, job security is the most important motivation factor and for old – established employees, job attractive and sense of being considered is the most effective factor.

  15. Keys to success: Ten case studies of effective weatherization programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Kolb, J.O.; White, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F.; Wilson, T. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1993-11-01

    In 1990, DOE initiated a nationwide evaluation of its Weatherization Program, with assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an advisory group of 40 weatherization professionals, program managers, and researchers. The evaluation is comprised of three impact studies covering the Program`s major market segments: Single-family homes, mobile homes, and dwellings in small (2 to 4-unit) multifamily buildings (the Single-Family Study), Single-family homes heated primarily with fuel oil (the Fuel-Oil Study), and Dwellings in buildings with five or more units (the Multifamily Study). The Single-Family Study, the subject of this report, is a critical part of this coordinated evaluation effort. Its focus on single-family dwellings, mobile homes, and dwellings in small multifamily buildings covers 83% of the income-eligible population and 96% of the dwellings weatherized during Program Year 1989. The first phase of the Single-Family Study involved the analysis of a massive data base of information collected from 368 local weatherization agencies and 543 electric and gas utilities. This analysis resulted in energy-saving and cost-effectiveness estimates for the Weatherization Program and the identification of a set of ten high-performing agencies located throughout the country. The second phase, which is the subject of this report, involves a ``process`` evaluation of these ten high performers, aimed at identifying those weatherization practices that explain their documented success.

  16. Quantum Monte Carlo studies of relativistic effects in light nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, J. L.; Pandharipande, V. R.; Arriaga, A.

    1999-07-01

    Relativistic Hamiltonians are defined as the sum of relativistic one-body kinetic energy, two- and three-body potentials, and their boost corrections. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo method to study two kinds of relativistic effects in 3H and 4He, using relativistic Hamiltonians. The first is due to the nonlocalities in the relativistic kinetic energy and relativistic one-pion exchange potential (OPEP), and the second is from boost interaction. The OPEP contribution is reduced by ~15% by the relativistic nonlocality, which may also have significant effects on pion exchange currents. However, almost all of this reduction is canceled by changes in the kinetic energy and other interaction terms, and the total effect of the nonlocalities on the binding energy is very small. The boost interactions, on the other hand, give repulsive contributions of ~0.4 (1.9) MeV in 3H (4He) and account for ~37% of the phenomenological part of the three-nucleon interaction needed in the nonrelativistic Hamiltonians. The wave functions of nuclei are not significantly changed by these effects.

  17. Effect of urine pH on the effectiveness of shock wave lithotripsy: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Majzoub; Ammar Al-Ani; Tawiz Gul; Hatem Kamkoum; Khalid Al-Jalham

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is a well-established modality in the treatment of urolithiasis. Studying the effect of urine pH on SWL success is appealing as pH can be manipulated before SWL to insure a better outcome. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study performed at a tertiary medical center. Patients presenting to the SWL unit with a single renal stone

  18. Studying the effects of dynamical parameters on reactor core temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Khodabakhsh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase productivity, reduce depreciation, and avoid possible accidents in a system such as fuel rods' melting and overpressure, control of temperature changes in the reactor core is an important factor. There are several methods for solving and analysing the stability of point kinetics equations. In most previous analyses, the effects of various factors on the temperature of the reactor core have been ignored. In this work, the effects of various dynamical parameters on the temperature of the reactor core and stability of the system in the presence of temperature feedback reactivity with external reactivity step, ramp and sinusoidal for six groups of delayed neutrons were studied using the method of Lyapunov exponent. The results proved to be in good agreement with other works

  19. An ``Anatomic approach" to study the Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Haakh, Harald; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-03-01

    The Casimir effect, in its simplest definition, is a quantum mechanical force between two objects placed in vacuum. In recent years the Casimir force has been the object of an exponentially growing attention both from theorists and experimentalists. A new generation of experiments paved the way for new challenges and spotted some shadows in the comparison to theory. Here we are going to isolate different contributions to the Casimir interaction and perform a detailed study to shine new light on this phenomenon. As an example, the contributions of Foucault (eddy current) modes will be discussed in different configurations. This ``anatomic approach'' allows to clearly put into evidence special features and to explain unusual behaviors. This brings new physical understanding on the undergoing physical mechanisms and suggests new ways to engineer the Casimir effect.

  20. Remote sensing study of Maumee River effects of Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svehla, R.; Raquet, C.; Shook, D.; Salzman, J.; Coney, T.; Wachter, D.; Gedney, R.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of river inputs on boundary waters were studied in partial support of the task to assess the significance of river inputs into receiving waters, dispersion of pollutants, and water quality. The effects of the spring runoff of the Maumee River on Lake Erie were assessed by a combination of ship survey and remote sensing techniques. The imagery obtained from a multispectral scanner of the west basin of Lake Erie is discussed: this clearly showed the distribution of particulates throughout the covered area. This synoptic view, in addition to its qualitative value, is very useful in selecting sampling stations for shipboard in situ measurements, and for extrapolating these quantitative results throughout the area of interest.

  1. Studying Effective Factors on Corporate Entrepreneurship: Representing a Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Soleimani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Development and advancement of current organizations depends on Corporate Entrepreneurship (CE and its anticipants considerably. Therefore purpose of conducting this survey is to study effective factors on corporate entrepreneurship (personal characteristics of entrepreneurship, human resource practices, organizational culture and employees' satisfaction. This survey was conducted using descriptive-field methodology. Statistical population included managers and experts of Hexa Consulting Engineers Company (Tehran/Iran and the sample consisted of forty seven of them. Questionnaire was tool of data collection. Data was collected in cross-sectional form in July-August 2011. Descriptive and inferential (spearman correlation statistics methods were used for data analysis. According to results, there is a positive significant relationship among all factors (personal characteristics of entrepreneurship, human resource practices, organizational culture and employees' satisfaction and corporate entrepreneurship. In other words, the proposed variables as effective factors on corporate entrepreneurship were confirmed in conceptual model of survey.

  2. Study on Analgesic Effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Shan; XU Ling; WEI Pin-kang; QIN Zhi-feng; LI Jun; PENG Hai-dong

    2008-01-01

    Chinese medicine has been used in treating pain for a long time.Much progress has been made in studies on the mechanism of the analgesic effect of Chinese medicine in animal experiments.It is found that the analgesic action may be related to the following actions:(1)Reducing the secretion of peripheral algogenic substances and inducing the secretion of pain-sensitive substances;(2)Alleviating the accumulation of local algogenic substances;(3)Increasing the release of endogenous analgesic substances;(4)Regulating c-fos gene and increasing the secretion of such substances in the central newous system,etc.In this paper,the experimental methods and analgesic effect of Chinese medicines are reviewed.

  3. Study of removal effect on Mesocyclops leukarti with oxidants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Cyclops of zooplankton propagates prolifically in eutrophic waterbody and it cannot be exterminated by conventional disinfection process. The mutagenicity of Mesocyclops leukarti and its extermination with oxidants in a drinking waterworks in China were studied. Among five oxidants for use in bench-scale, chlorine dioxide is the most effective and the potassium permanganate is the weakest against Mesocyclops leukarti under the same conditions. Full-scale results showed that Mesocyclops leukarti could be effectively removed from water by 1.0 mg/L chlorine dioxide preoxidation combined with conventional removal physical process. After filtration, chlorite, a by-product of prechlorine dioxide, is stable at 0.45 mg/L, which is lower than the critical value of the USEPA. GC-MS examination and Ames test further showed that the quantity of organic substance and the mutagenicity in water treated by chlorine dioxide preoxidation are obviously less than those of prechlorination.

  4. Study of the radiation effect in breast implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno T, L. R.; Ramirez R, A., E-mail: lumor2000@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco, Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Av. San Pablo No. 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas, 02200 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-01

    This breast cancer is one of the most important death causes in women. Among the more frequently medical treatment for advanced breast cancer is the mastectomy. This situation leads to silicone implants as an esthetic option. There have been cases in patients with implants where cancer was frequently detected, in which a conventional radiotherapy is required. In this work is presented a study of the probable adverse effects caused by the application of high power X-rays (6-10 MV) to the silicone implants and to the surrounding tissues. In the research carried out at the clinic, none Bolus effect was detected in patients with implants. Our results prescribe that in the case of patients with implants and frequent breast cancer, the removal of implants is not necessary due radiotherapy works directly in the damaged tissues. (Author)

  5. A proteomics study of auxin effects in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiqing Xing; Hongwei Xue

    2012-01-01

    Many phytohormones regulate plant growth and development through modulating protein degradation.In this study,a proteome study based on multidimensional non-gel shotgun approach was performed to analyze the auxin-induced protein degradation via ubiquitinproteasome pathway of Arabidopsis thaliana,with the emphasis to study the overall protein changes after auxin treatment (1 nM or 1 μM indole-3-acetic acid for 6,12,or 24 h).More than a thousand proteins were detected by using label-free shotgun method,and 386 increased proteins and 370 decreased ones were identified after indole-3-acetic acid treatment.By using the auxin receptor-deficient mutant,tir1-1,as control,comparative analysis revealed that 69 and 79 proteins were significantly decreased and increased,respectively.Detailed analysis showed that among the altered proteins,some were previously reported to be associated with auxin regulation and others are potentially involved in mediating the auxin effects on specific cellular and physiological processes by regulating photosynthesis,chloroplast development,cytoskeleton,and intracellular signaling.Our results demonstrated that label-free shotgun proteomics is a powerful tool for large-scale protein identification and the analysis of the proteomic profiling of auxin-regulated biological processes will provide informative clues of underlying mechanisms of auxin effects.These results will help to expand the understanding of how auxin regulates plant growth and development via protein degradation.

  6. Study on the Clinical Effectiveness of Thymectomy for Myasthenia Gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANTiecheng; YANHua; ZHANGNi; PANYouming; TANGYingxiong; WENXiang; SONGDingwei; HUMing; LIULigang; LIUZixiong; YANGMingshan; XUJinzhi; PUBitao; GAOBoting

    2002-01-01

    Objectiv:To investigate the theoretical basis and clinical significance of thymectomy in the treatment of myasthenia gravis (MG). Methods:Analyze the changes in the contents of serum AchRab and sIL-2R, lymphocyte subtypes in Peripheral blood lymphocytes before and after thymectomy in 69 patients. Results:In the study group significant changes were found in serum contents of AchRab and sIL-2R before and after operation and there was also remarkable change in the number and constitution of peripheral blood lymphocyte subtypes. Conclusion:Thymectomy is an effective therapy for MG.

  7. Study of Climate effect on evapotranspiration change procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asady, A.; Sharifan, H.

    2009-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the most important of parameters in water cycle. This parameter changes in climate different conditions. In this manner the probability of ET is important for design of irrigation systems. This study investigated climate effect on evapotranspiration changes procedure. Thus ET was estimated by Hargreaves-Samani (H-S) method in the some of regions: Gorgan(semi wet,), Gonbad (semi dry) , Maraveh-Tappeh (semi dry to dry). Then diagrams of ET were drawn for different probabilities. Investigation shown that if climate was drier, irrigation periods increased and difference of ET averages decreased. Keyword : Evapotranspiration, Probability, Hargreave-Samani method, Climate, water use.

  8. Cost-effectiveness studies as part of an ALARA program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies of cost effectiveness of engineering modifications for dose reduction at nuclear power plants conducted at BNL will be considered in this report. Since each of these items has the potential for a 50% to 60% reduction in collective dose, it appears there is large potential for dose reduction from engineering type modifications. The question that must be answered for each plant is ''which modifications or improvements are required for optimization (ALARA). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that quantified optimization need not be costly and can often be highly beneficial.

  9. Simulation study of the parallax effect of gaseous detectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Hu; WU Jun-Long; LI Jiang-Bo

    2012-01-01

    A simulation study of the parallax effect of gaseous detectors using the Garfield program is reported.A method that mainly uses non-uniform cathode potentials to reduce the parallax error of planar type gas detectors is described.By applying it to MWPC and Micro-pattern gas detectors,the method reduces the parallax broadening with very good results.For a 13° incidence track,the width (FWHM) of the parallax broadening is reduced to less than 20% of the normal one after using the special cathode potentials.

  10. Studies on the Effects of Epimedium Extract on Erythrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Yu ZHANG; Feng Hua CHEN; Ping Hui WEI; Jia Zuan NI

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Epimedium extract (EE) on erythrocytes was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The images of the surface structures showed clear concave and progressive increase of surface roughness of erythrocyte after incubation with EE at concentration of 0.2 or 0.05 g/L, far below its critical hemolytic levels. The AFM results also indicated that the granules of the fine surface structure increased, which caused by aggregation of membrane protein. Further study showed that the change in surface topography of erythrocyte membrane might be connected with the increase of intracellular free Ca2+ induced by EE.

  11. Measles Vaccine : A Study On Seroconversion And Side Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Abida

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: 1. What is the extent of immune response of Edmonston Zagreb Strain in children? 2. What are the side effects of this vaccine? Objectives: 1. To follow up children after Edmonston Zagreb strain vaccination for evaluation of seroconverstion. Study: Cross sectional Setting: Well Baby Clinic of pediatrics OPD at J.N. Medical College, A.M.U., Aigarh (U.P participants: Children between 9-15 months. Sample Size: 100 consecutive children coming for routine immunization. Study variable: Malnourished and poor socio-economic status Outcome variable: Extent of seroconversion with no statistical significant difference between malnourished and socio-economically poor children. 26% showed minor self-limiting post vaccination reactions in all age groups. Recommendations: Edmonston Zagreb measles vaccine is recommended since it has very good immunogenic activity and post vaccination reactions.

  12. Results of the Study of Mutagenic Effects of Microbial Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya A. Sidorova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a study of mutagenic effects of Pseudomonas alcaligenеs polysaccharides. Pseudomonas genus – non-fermentative ubiquitous bacteria, having specific metabolic cycles and unique physical, chemical and biological properties was used as a producer of natural exopolysaccharides. In an experiment using the Ames test, three variants of test compounds were studied: 1. a compound of the Pseudomonas alcaligenes biofilm, 2. exopolysaccharide matrix and the microorganism cell wall compound, and 3. actually the microbial exopolysaccharide. In all cases the lack of mutagen action of polysaccharides of Pseudomonas alcaligenes is proved that make them perspective for use as nanomaterials of new generation – alternative wound coverings.

  13. Comparative study on the effect of zopiclone and flurazepam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *R. Najam

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are among most frequent mental disorders encountered by Clinicians. Untreated anxiety may result in increase health care utilization, morbidity, mortality and poorer quality of life. Individual with GAD, social phobias and panic disorder show less satisfaction with their quality of life. Basolateral amygdale has been implicated in anxiety generations. Mutations in Sk3 (calcium channel are suspected to be underlying cause of severe neurological disorder including anxiety. Therapeutic effects of benzodiazepine are usually or often sustained over months or years, with the need for increased dosage in the treatment of GAD and panic disorders. Flurazepam is a hypnotic agent useful for the treatment of insomnia characterized by frequent nocturnal awakening and other insomnia symptoms such as trouble falling or staying sleep. It acts on BZ1 and BZ2 receptor sites. The mechanism of action of zopiclone is similar to benzodiazepines, but it wines more selectively to BZ1 receptor with similar effects on locomotor activity and on dopamine and serotonin turnover. Zopiclone although molecularly different from benzodiazepines, shares an almost identical pharmacological profile as benzodiazepines including anxiolytic properties. The present study is designed to assess two drugs of different classes that act through same receptor against control for their effects on some of the behavioral activities. Results indicated that zopiclone produced reduction in anxiety more than flurazepam.

  14. Exploratory study on performance measures as indicators of IS effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Peter C.; Yoes, Cissy

    1992-01-01

    The Information Systems Directorate at JSC/NASA has undertaken the reevaluation of its performance measures process and measures. Under the direction of a quality approach it is essential to identify an external perspective of how well an organization is performing. This study was conducted with two major objectives: (1) survey and summarize the academic literature on performance measures as indicators of information systems (IS) effectiveness; and (2) survey organizations for their experience in measuring for IS effectiveness. Four approaches to measuring the effectiveness of IS performance were identified: (1) listen to the customer for the things they need; (2) align with corporate goals; (3) benchmark against well-respected organizations; and (4) ask yourself what critical factors lead to success. The list of known methods for soliciting customer feedback are as follows: (1) executive visit; (2) survey, interview, and focus group; (3) complaints and compliments; and (4) service level agreements. A common set of characteristics that satisfy customers was identified from the literature. The list includes elements such as the following: accuracy, timeliness, relevance, understandability, reliability, and completeness. Future research in this topic area should prove beneficial to determine the metrics for external validity.

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo Studies of Relativistic Effects in Light Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Forest, J L; Arriaga, A

    1999-01-01

    Relativistic Hamiltonians are defined as the sum of relativistic one-body kinetic energy, two- and three-body potentials and their boost corrections. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo method to study two kinds of relativistic effects in the binding energy of 3H and 4He. The first is due to the nonlocalities in the relativistic kinetic energy and relativistic one-pion exchange potential (OPEP), and the second is from boost interaction. The OPEP contribution is reduced by about 15% by the relativistic nonlocality, which may also have significant effects on pion exchange currents. However, almost all of this reduction is canceled by changes in the kinetic energy and other interaction terms, and the total effect of the nonlocalities on the binding energy is very small. The boost interactions, on the other hand, give repulsive contributions of 0.4 (1.9) MeV in 3H (4He) and account for 37% of the phenomenological part of the three-nucleon interaction needed in the nonrelativistic Hamiltonians.

  16. Effective thermal diffusivity study of powder biocomposites via photoacoustic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariucci, V.V.G.; Cruz, J.A. da; Bonadio, T.G.M.; Picolloto, A.M.; Weinand, W.R.; Lima, W.M.; Medina, A.N.; Bento, A.C., E-mail: vgmariucci@hotmail.com, E-mail: pg51508@uem.br [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica

    2015-10-15

    The effective thermal diffusivity for biocomposites of hydroxyapatite (HAp), and niobium pentoxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) on powder form was studied via photoacoustic method adapted for porous materials. The concentration of each element was accompanied with the results of X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A theoretical model for the thermal coupling of a three layered sample, designed to contain the powder material is proposed. The method for mixtures obeyed the formula [(1 - x)HAp + (x)Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}] for 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 1.0. Experimental results for effective thermal diffusivity ranged between (6.4 ± 0.3) x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} and (9.8 ± 0.4) x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} for x ≤ 0.7. Values of the effective thermal diffusivity have decreased sharply to (0.70 ± 0.03) x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} for x > 0.7. SEM micrographs showed a coating of HAp over the particles of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} for some mixtures. (author)

  17. Adverse effect profile of trichlormethiazide: a retrospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Yayoi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trichlormethiazide, a thiazide diuretic, was introduced in 1960 and remains one of the most frequently used diuretics for treating hypertension in Japan. While numerous clinical trials have indicated important side effects of thiazides, e.g., adverse effects on electrolytes and uric acid, very few data exist on serum electrolyte levels in patients with trichlormethiazide treatment. We performed a retrospective cohort study to assess the adverse effects of trichlormethiazide, focusing on serum electrolyte and uric acid levels. Methods We used data from the Clinical Data Warehouse of Nihon University School of Medicine obtained between Nov 1, 2004 and July 31, 2010, to identify cohorts of new trichlormethiazide users (n = 99 for 1 mg, n = 61 for 2 mg daily dosage and an equal number of non-users (control. We used propensity-score matching to adjust for differences between users and control for each dosage, and compared serum chemical data including serum sodium, potassium, uric acid, creatinine and urea nitrogen. The mean exposure of trichlormethiazide of 1 mg and 2 mg users was 58 days and 64 days, respectively. Results The mean age was 66 years, and 55% of trichlormethiazide users of the 1 mg dose were female. In trichlormethiazide users of the 2 mg dose, the mean age was 68 years, and 43% of users were female. There were no statistically significant differences in all covariates (age, sex, comorbid diseases, past drugs, and current antihypertensive drugs between trichlormethiazide users and controls for both doses. In trichlormethiazide users of the 2 mg dose, the reduction of serum potassium level and the elevation of serum uric acid level were significant compared with control, whereas changes of mean serum sodium, creatinine and urea nitrogen levels were not significant. In trichlormethiazide users of the 1 mg dose, all tests showed no statistically significant change from baseline to during the exposure period in

  18. Effects of milnacipran on binge eating – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun’ichi Noma

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Shun’ichi Noma1, Teruhisa Uwatoko1, Haruka Yamamoto2, Takuji Hayashi11Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatry, Toyooka Hospital, Hyogo, JapanAbstract: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are effective in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. There have been relatively few studies of the efficacy of specific serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in the treatment of eating disorders. Twenty-five outpatients with binge eating episodes, diagnosed as anorexia nervosa, binge-eating/purging type, bulimia nervosa/purging type, or bulimia nervosa/non-purging type, were treated with milnacipran and 20 patients completed the 8-week study. Symptom severity was evaluated using the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh (BITE self-rating scale before administration of milnacipran and after 1, 4, and 8 weeks treatment. The scores improved after 8 weeks, especially drive to, and regret for, binge eating. Milnacipran was more effective in patients without purging and in younger patients, while there was no difference in the efficacy of milnacipran among subtypes of eating disorders.Keywords: milnacipran, specific serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, binge eating, vomiting, eating disorder, pharmacotherapy

  19. Effect of fault jogs on frictional behavior: An experimental study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA ShengLi; CHEN ShunYun; LIU PeiXun; HU XiaoYan; WANG KaiYing; HUANG YuanMin

    2008-01-01

    Studying the effect of geometrically irregular bodies on the mechanical behavior of fault activity is of significance in understanding the seismic activity along a fault zone. By using rock mechanics experiment with medium-scale samples, we have studied the effect of fault jogs, the most common irregularity along fault zones, on frictional behavior. The research indicates that extensional fault jog can be easily fractured because of its low strength and the fractured jog has no obvious resistance to fault sliding, and the micro-fractures occurring in the jog are indicative of stick-slip along the faults. The fault zone containing extensional jogs is characterized by velocity weakening and can be described by rate and state friction law. Compressional fault jog makes fault sliding more difficult because of its high fracturing strength, but the micro-fractures occurring in the tensile areas around fault ends at higher stress level can provide necessary condition for occurrence of stick-slip along the faults before the jog is fractured and thus act as precursors of fault instability. Compression jog can be taken as a stable indicator of fault segmentation until the jog is completely fractured and two faults are linked.

  20. Effect of fault jogs on frictional behavior: An experimental study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Studying the effect of geometrically irregular bodies on the mechanical behavior of fault activity is of significance in understanding the seismic activity along a fault zone. By using rock mechanics ex- periment with medium-scale samples, we have studied the effect of fault jogs, the most common irregularity along fault zones, on frictional behavior. The research indicates that extensional fault jog can be easily fractured because of its low strength and the fractured jog has no obvious resistance to fault sliding, and the micro-fractures occurring in the jog are indicative of stick-slip along the faults. The fault zone containing extensional jogs is characterized by velocity weakening and can be described by rate and state friction law. Compressional fault jog makes fault sliding more difficult because of its high fracturing strength, but the micro-fractures occurring in the tensile areas around fault ends at higher stress level can provide necessary condition for occurrence of stick-slip along the faults before the jog is fractured and thus act as precursors of fault instability. Compression jog can be taken as a stable indicator of fault segmentation until the jog is completely fractured and two faults are linked.

  1. A Study on the Effectiveness of In-Game Advertisements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LENG Ho Keat

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, commercial organizations have shown an increasing interest in advertising their products in video games. While there is some research in this area, the complexities of product placement research, with in-game advertisement research in particular, suggest that more research is needed in this area. The aim of this paper is to add to the literature on the effectiveness of in-game advertisements through recognition and recall tests. By using the same survey instrument for three different games from the same genre, this research allows for comparison across games and findings can be generalized to games in the same genre. The sampling strategy adopted allows for the findings to be compared between genders and addresses one of the common criticisms of earlier studies. In addition, this research also examines whether gamer experience and perceptions of game can influence recall and recognition rates of in-game advertisements. The findings concur with earlier studies that recall rates of in-game advertisements are low, and that gender and gamer experience had no effect on recall rates. The research also suggests that the relationship between perceptions of game in affecting recall rates is complicated and require further research.

  2. Prospect Theory: A Study of the Endowment Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurandir Sell Macedo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral Finance is a recent field of study which contradicts the presupposition supported by Modern Finance that decision makers act rationally. Prospect Theory, developed by Kahneman and Tversky (1979, is presented as an alternative model to the Theory of Expected Utility in relation to the way people decide in face of possibilities of risk. According to Prospect Theory, people define gains and losses based on a given point of reference, which can be established on grounds of a given level of expected gain. This fact leads to the Endowment Effect - a behavioral trend investigated in this study – whereby investors are influenced by a portfolio which they have received as an inheritance or endowment. The reason this occurs is that individuals usually define their expectations of gain according to the future profitability of the portfolio received, and not according to the future profitability of the market. Using an investment simulation, the Endowment Effect was tested among 226 university students taking courses in the subject of capital markets. The results demonstrate that the students were influenced by the different initial portfolios, which were randomly assigned.

  3. Urbanization effects on the microclimate of Manaus: A modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Diego Oliveira de; Alvalá, Regina Célia dos Santos; Nascimento, Marília Guedes do

    2016-01-01

    Activities associated with land use and land cover changes and urbanization induce local impacts, such as changes in atmospheric composition in water and energy balances and changes in the ecosystem. Therefore, more studies are needed to evaluate the possible relationship between urban growth and local and regional changes. In the last 30 years, the population of Manaus grew by over 500%, with approximately 1.9 million inhabitants in 2010. Trying to understand the effects of the urban growth of the city of Manaus on its microclimate and atmospheric processes, the present study aims to evaluate the possible physical mechanisms related to the urbanization process observed through a study of atmospheric modeling. The results allowed to assess that the presence of the urban area significantly modifies the surface energy balance (SEB), generating a thermal gradient between the city and the surrounding regions, favoring the formation and intensification of local atmospheric circulations. The results indicated that with urban growth there is an increase in temperature, decrease in the atmospheric water content and significant changes in the flow at low levels, mainly in the breeze circulations, with significant changes observed in the structure and characteristic of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over the study area. A positive correlation between the increase of the urban area and increased rainfall was also observed. From the results, it was possible to observe that there is a direct relationship between urban growth and changes in the local microclimate in Manaus.

  4. A Statistical study of effects of bacterial Decaffeination on Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naina Thangaraj

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine degradation has been popularized due to its promising scope in food applications and environmental safety. Hence we conducted a study of bacterial caffeine degradation and its effect on sensory qualities through a survey and reported the data using Correspondence Analysis- Symmetrical Model of SPSS software to identify key sensory attributes and study what factors could lead to them. The decaffeinated beverages showed undesirable sensory attributes, especially those containing milk and other extraneous substances and hence it was concluded that decaffeination is most desirable during raw material processing. Also a background study of the bacterial growth curve and its relation with caffeine degradation and N-Methyl Urea formation was done using Origin software and ways to ensure the release of non-toxic products were hypothesized. An alternate glyoxylate pathway was considered to avoid the release of toxic metabolites, which is possible by media starvation. Thus avoiding degradation of sensory qualities and alternating the production of N-methylurea would reflect positively on human consumption and acceptance and this can be a scope of future study.

  5. Microstructural Studies of Space Weathering Effects in Lunar Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.

    2002-01-01

    Space weathering is a term used to include all of the processes which act on material exposed at the surface of a planetary or small body. In the case of the moon, it includes a variety of processes which have formed the lunar regolith, caused the maturation of lunar soils, and formed patina on rock surfaces. The processes include micrometeorite impact and reworking, implantation of solar wind and flare particles, radiation damage and chemical effects from solar particles and cosmic rays, interactions with the lunar atmosphere, and sputtering erosion and deposition. Space weathering effects collectively result in a reddened continuum slope, lowered albedo, and attenuated absorption features in reflectance spectra of lunar soils as compared to finely comminuted rocks from the same Apollo sites. However, the regolith processes that cause these effects are not well known, nor is the petrographic setting of the products of these processes fully understood. An interesting confluence of events occurred in the early 1990s. First, came the discovery of vapor deposited coatings on lunar regolith grains by Keller and McKay, who showed that amorphous coatings from 50-100 nm thick containing fine-grained Fe metal (1-10 nm in diameter) were common in the fine size fraction of several mature lunar soils. The other discovery was the recognition that the optical properties of lunar soils were dominated by fine grain sized material (less than 45 micrometer fraction) by Pieters and coworkers. These discoveries led to coordinated studies that looked at the mineralogy, chemistry, and optical properties of lunar soils as function of composition, maturity, and grain size fraction. One of the major revelations from these studies was the recognition that much of the nanophase Fe metal is surface-correlated especially in the finest size fractions, and that it was this nanophase Fe that dominated the optical properties of the soil.

  6. A Comparative Study on the Therapeutic Effect of Astragaloside (

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xiang-jian

    2001-01-01

    [1]Anandasabapathy S, Frishman W.H. Innovative drug treatments for viral and autoimmune myocarditis. J Clin Pharmacol 1998;38∶295-308.[2]ZHANG JN, YANG GP, SU EB, et al. The study of serum cardiac troponin I in diagnosing acute myocardial infarction. J of Chin Cardiovas Disea 1997;25(5)∶379-382.[3]ZHU BH, ZHANG JN, LIU NF, et al. The experimental study of relationship between left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertension and cardiac sarcoplasmic calcium-regulated protein. J of Chin Med 1999;79(4)∶286-288.[4]ZHANG JN, SU EB, WEI J, et al. Elevation of cardiac troponin I and its association with diagnosis and progress of viral myocarditis. Clin J Cardiol 1999;27(6)∶1-4.[5]Arai M, Matsui H, Periasamy M. Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Gene Expression in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure. Circ Res 1994;74∶555-564.[6]LU S, ZHANG JN. The study on progress of cardiovascular pharmacological effects of Astragalus. Chin Herbs 1998;29(1)∶59-61.

  7. Spatial Temporal Modelling of Particulate Matter for Health Effects Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, N. A. S.

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological studies of the health effects of air pollution require estimation of individual exposure. It is not possible to obtain measurements at all relevant locations so it is necessary to predict at these space-time locations, either on the basis of dispersion from emission sources or by interpolating observations. This study used data obtained from a low-cost sensor network of 32 air quality monitoring stations in the Dutch city of Eindhoven, which make up the ILM (innovative air (quality) measurement system). These stations currently provide PM10 and PM2.5 (particulate matter less than 10 and 2.5 m in diameter), aggregated to hourly means. The data provide an unprecedented level of spatial and temporal detail for a city of this size. Despite these benefits the time series of measurements is characterized by missing values and noisy values. In this paper a space-time analysis is presented that is based on a dynamic model for the temporal component and a Gaussian process geostatistical for the spatial component. Spatial-temporal variability was dominated by the temporal component, although the spatial variability was also substantial. The model delivered accurate predictions for both isolated missing values and 24-hour periods of missing values (RMSE = 1.4 μg m-3 and 1.8 μg m-3 respectively). Outliers could be detected by comparison to the 95% prediction interval. The model shows promise for predicting missing values, outlier detection and for mapping to support health impact studies.

  8. Differential Effects: Are the Effects Studied by Psychologists Really Linear and Homogeneous?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Beller

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Linear regression and its variants like analysis of variance are arguably the most widely used statistical techniques in psychology. By using linear regression it is merely assumed rather than empirically tested that the effects of the predictor variables are linear and homogeneous across the distribution of the dependent variable. This is problematic because it biases a scientist’s reasoning and hinders possible practical and theoretical insights. Thus an important question to ask is: Are the effects studied by psychologists really linear and homogeneous? Generalized additive models (GAMs and quantile regression can be used to pursue this question. Benefits of complementing linear regression with these approaches include the ability to tailor actions on the specific individual in practice and the opportunity to gain more advanced scientific knowledge, for example about non-linear effects. The use of GAMs and quantile regression is furthermore empirically demonstrated in an analysis of risk-seeking and criminal peer networks as predictors of violent crime in a representative sample of German youth (N = 44.610. Practical and theoretical consequences of the results are discussed. Psychological science could immensely benefit from studying non-linear and heterogeneous effects.

  9. Butterfly Effect-The Effects That English Study Exerts on Art Learners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiang

    2014-01-01

    In the history of human beings, every choice we make is the birth of the next. Even something simple can completely reshape one’s life. It's just like the Butterfly Effect-one never knows what is at the end. English study, also, may produce pro-found influences on the creation of art works. This passage aims at proving English study, as a disputable topic in present educa-tion in art schools, has its importance for art learners to enhance their creative thinking in the process of art creation.

  10. Study of Plume Impingement Effects in the Lunar Lander Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marichalar, Jeremiah; Prisbell, A.; Lumpkin, F.; LeBeau, G.

    2010-01-01

    Plume impingement effects from the descent and ascent engine firings of the Lunar Lander were analyzed in support of the Lunar Architecture Team under the Constellation Program. The descent stage analysis was performed to obtain shear and pressure forces on the lunar surface as well as velocity and density profiles in the flow field in an effort to understand lunar soil erosion and ejected soil impact damage which was analyzed as part of a separate study. A CFD/DSMC decoupled methodology was used with the Bird continuum breakdown parameter to distinguish the continuum flow from the rarefied flow. The ascent stage analysis was performed to ascertain the forces and moments acting on the Lunar Lander Ascent Module due to the firing of the main engine on take-off. The Reacting and Multiphase Program (RAMP) method of characteristics (MOC) code was used to model the continuum region of the nozzle plume, and the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) Analysis Code (DAC) was used to model the impingement results in the rarefied region. The ascent module (AM) was analyzed for various pitch and yaw rotations and for various heights in relation to the descent module (DM). For the ascent stage analysis, the plume inflow boundary was located near the nozzle exit plane in a region where the flow number density was large enough to make the DSMC solution computationally expensive. Therefore, a scaling coefficient was used to make the DSMC solution more computationally manageable. An analysis of the effectiveness of this scaling technique was performed by investigating various scaling parameters for a single height and rotation of the AM. Because the inflow boundary was near the nozzle exit plane, another analysis was performed investigating three different inflow contours to determine the effects of the flow expansion around the nozzle lip on the final plume impingement results.

  11. Study Of Performance Parameters Effects On OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Mohamed

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The actual and next communication schemes tend to use OFDM systems in order to provide high baud rates, less intercarrier interference, and less intersymbol interference. OFDM has become the core of most 4G communication systems as fixed Wi-Fi system (IEEE802.11a standard, mobile Wi-Fi system (IEEE802.11b standard, fixed WiMAX system (IEEE802.16a standard, mobile WiMAX system (IEEE802.16e standard, and Long Term Evolution (LTE system. In this paper the detailed simulation of different OFDM systems with different constellation mapping schemes will be obtained using MATLAB-2011 program to study the effect of various design parameters on the system performance.

  12. A Simulation Study of Hall Effect on Double Tearing Modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chenglong; MA Zhiwei; DONG Jiaqi

    2008-01-01

    A Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation is carried out to study the dy-namic process of double tearing mode. The results indicated that the growth rates in the earlier nonlinear and transition phases agree with the previous results. With further development of reconnection, the current sheet thickness is much smaller than the ion inertia length, which leads to a strong influence of the Hall effects. As a result, the reconnection in the late nonlinear phase exhibits an explosive nature with a time scale nearly independent of resistivity. A localized and severely intensified current density is observed and the maximum kinetic energy is over one order of magnitude higher in Hall MHD than that in resistive MHD.

  13. Spermatotoxic effect of diethanolamine:An in vitro study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sneha R. Panchal; Ramtej J. Verma

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine in vitro spermatotoxic effect of diethanolamine on human spermatozoa.Methods:For this study, samples were collected from normal healthy donors. After liquefaction, samples were used for preparation of sperm suspension. Sperm suspension was incubated with different concentrations (100-500 µg/mL) of diethanolamine to evaluate sperm parameters such as sperm motility, sperm viability and sperm morphology. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey’s test and the level of significance was accepted with P<0.05. Results: The results showed that diethanolamine caused significant decrease in sperm motility and sperm viability which was concentration and time-dependent. Microscopic analysis revealed concentration-dependent increase in various kinds of sperm morphological abnormalities. Conclusion: DEA is spermatotoxic which alters structure and function of human spermatozoa and may affect male reproductive health.

  14. Study of Purchase Process Modeling and Reengineering Effects Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhenhuanJiang; LiangQuan; PeiwuDong

    2004-01-01

    Purchase process is an important part in the process of running an enterprise.For reengineering the process of'enterprise, raise business efficiency of enterprise , make enterprise competitive among complicated and changeable market environment. Use the method of planning to evaluate the technology modeling and method to set up evaluation index, based on the basic principle business process reengineering, studied the methods of modeling and evaluating of the reengineering of the purchase process. Given the intact method of modeling process. Give the mathematics express method and figure express method of the process, propose using PT reducing rate to evaluate the effect of the process reengineer, and has analysed three kinds of situations that affect the reducing rate of PT.

  15. Study on Effect of Compounding Sulfurized Isobutylene with Thioester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hongjun; Qiu Yansheng

    2002-01-01

    Oxygen is introduced into the sulfurized isobutylene by compounding the sulfurized isobutylene with thioester. This paper studies the synergistic effect of commingling the sulfurized isobutylene with thioester during testing in the four-ball machine and the high-speed Timken machine. Tests in the four-ball machine and the high-speed Timken machine have revealed an improvement in EP performance of sulfurized isobutylene in admixture with thioester. The interfacial tension test and electrochemical analysis of anodic polarization have discovered increase of adsorptive force of the additive package on metal surface following compounding sulfurized isobutylene with thioester. The XPS and AES analyses indicate to the formation of FeS, Fe203 and FeSO4 on the metal surface. The sulfurized film formed by the additive package on the metal surface is thicker than that formed by simple sulfurized isobutylene.

  16. Experimental study of periodic flow effects on spanwise vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Molina, Cruz Daniel; Lopez Sanchez, Erick Javier; Ruiz Chavarria, Gerardo; Medina Ovando, Abraham

    2014-11-01

    We present an experimental study about the spanwise vortex produced in a flow going out of a channel in shallow waters. This vortex travels in front of the dipole. The velocity field measurement was done using the PIV technique, and DPIVsoft (https://www.irphe.fr/ ~meunier/) was used for data processing. In this case the flow has a periodic forcing to simulate ocean tides. The experiment was conducted in a channel with variable width and the measurements were made using three different values of the aspect ratio width-depth. We present results of the position, circulation of this spanwise vortex and the flow inversion effect. The change of flow direction modify the intensity of the vortex, but it does not destroy it. The vertical components of the velocity field contributes particle transport. G. Ruiz Chavarria, E. J. Lopez Sanchez and C. D. Garcia Molina acknowledge DGAPA-UNAM by support under project IN 116312 (Vorticidad y ondas no lineales en fluidos).

  17. Alcohol effects on family relations: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinaldo, Amanda Márcia Dos Santos; Pillon, Sandra Cristina

    2008-01-01

    Problems related to alcohol abuse have been associated to different factors, regardless of the causes attributed to this phenomenon. Alcohol consumption and dependence is considered a public health problem and deserve attention because of the social, work, family, physical, legal and violence-related risks it represents. This study aimed to identify the effects of alcoholism on family relations and, by means of case management, to encourage the recovery of these relationships. The results show that the problems caused by alcohol abuse impose profound suffering to family members, which contributes to high levels of interpersonal conflict, domestic violence, parental inadequacy, child abuse and negligence, financial and legal difficulties, in addition to clinical problems associated to it.

  18. Study of the Effects of Globalization on Iranian Caviar Export

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasem Barghandan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Globalization is integration of national economies in globaleconomy and infers on increasing the flow of goods andservices. In this study the consequences of globalization werestudied through the analysis of Level of International Tradeindex (LIT in the caviar export equation. The required datawere gathered from Statistical Yearbook of Foreign Trade,Statistical Yearbook of fisheries, Statistical Yearbook of the International Monetary Fund, United Nations Food and AgricultureOrganization and different issues of Central Bank of Iran over1974-2007. The results showed that domestic production ofcaviar have significant and positive effects on its export. Inaddition, sign of level of international trade variable in theestimated model is positive and indicates trade restrictionsremove lead to increase in caviar export.

  19. The Study of Frequency Effects in Syntactic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    پهلوان نژاد پهلوان نژاد

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The writers of this paper introduce two kinds of linguistic frequency, type frequency and token frequency. Then, the effects of each kind of frequency on syntactic structures are analyzed. The token frequency effects are divided into two main types: conserving effect and reduction effect. The type frequency is mainly effective in syntactic productivity. The two effects of token frequency on syntax and their interaction with type frequency over time allows us to explain many situations in language that otherwise appear very arbitrary. Keywords: Token frequency, type frequency, reduction effect, conserving effect, syntactic productivity

  20. Neurotrophic effects of perfluorocarbon emulsion gel: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaacs Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Positive neurotrophic effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment may be more easily achieved by applying a Perflourocarbon (PFC emulsion gel to the repair site. PFCs are halogen substituted carbon oils with unique oxygen transport potentials that are capable of increasing oxygen availability in local tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine if the application of a PFC emulsion to a repaired nerve would improve recovery. Materials and methods The left tibial nerve of 21 immature female Sprague-Dawley rats was transected, immediately repaired, and then circumferentially coated with PFC gel (Group A, n = 7, PFC-less gel (Group B, n = 7, or nothing (suture only, Group C, n = 7. At eight weeks post surgery, electrophysiological testing and histological and morphological analysis was performed. Results No statistically significant differences between experimental groups were found for muscle size and weight, axon counts, or nerve conduction velocity. Group A had a significantly smaller G-ratio than Groups B and C (p Conclusion Overall results do not indicate a functional benefit associated with application of a PFC emulsion gel to rodent tibial nerve repairs. A positive effect on myelination was seen.

  1. Feasibility study of effect of ultrasound on water chestnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junru; Wu, Meiyin

    2006-04-01

    Water chestnut (Trapa natans L.), an annual aquatic plant with floating leaves was first introduced into North America in 1874. Since then, wild populations have quickly become established in many locations within Northeastern USA. Due to its detrimental effects on the overall health of aquatic ecosystems, millions of dollars have been spent to control the water chestnut infestations in the North America through mechanical harvesting and manual removal, with limited success. The potential for continued expansion of the infestations demonstrates an urgent need for an effective control method. This study examined the potential of ultrasound application as an alternative control strategy for water chestnut management. Various frequencies and amplitudes of ultrasound generated by submerged transducers were applied directly to water chestnuts harvested from Lake Champlain. Substantial damages on water chestnut cells as well as penetrated petitoles were observed at the following tested frequencies of ultrasound, 20 kHz, 187 kHz, 469 kHz, 519 kHz and 2.34 MHz. Among them, 20 kHz ultrasound of 1.9 MPa acoustic pressure amplitude demonstrated the most significant damages within 10 s of ultrasound exposure. The treated plants started to die within 72 h and the mortality rate of water chestnut plants treated with the ultrasound application was 100%.

  2. [Experimental study of protective effect of solcoseryl on cisplatin nephrotoxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, H; Mori, Y

    1992-01-01

    Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin) is known to possess nephrotoxicity. Recently, it is said that the nephrotoxicity closely correlated with active oxygen. In the present study, an attempt was made to examine, whether or not solcoseryl, antioxidant like scavenger, decreases the nephrotoxicity. Three groups of Sprague-dawley rats were injected cisplatin (3mg/kg) only (C group), cisplatin and 2 times solcoseryl (8mg/kg), (CS2 group), and cisplatin and 5 times solcoseryl (CS5 group). BUN levels in C and CS2 groups were elevated compared to CS5 group. In the light microscopy, 62.5% to 100% in C and CS2 groups revealed massive necrosis in straight part of the proximal tubules, while the damage in CS5 group was only 25%. In the electron microscopy, these findings were similar to the light microscopic observations. Solcoseryl is known to have several antioxidative effects such as inhibition of superoxide producing and hyperperoxidation. It is suggested that these effects of solcoseryl might decrease the nephrotoxicity. Solcoseryl seems to be a useful drug for reducing nephrotoxicity and also it is a safe drug. Therefore, solcoseryl can be used for the prevention of cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

  3. Effects of aerosols on tropospheric oxidants: A global model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Xuexi; Brasseur, Guy; Emmons, Louisa; Horowitz, Larry; Kinnison, Douglas

    2001-10-01

    The global distributions of sulfate and soot particles in the atmosphere are calculated, and the effect of aerosol particles on tropospheric oxidants is studied using a global chemical/transport/aerosol model. The model is developed in the framework of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) global three-dimensional chemical/transport model (Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART)). In addition to the gas-phase photochemistry implemented in the MOZART model, the present study also accounts for the formation of sulfate and black carbon aerosols as well as for heterogeneous reactions on particles. The simulated global sulfate aerosol distributions and seasonal variation are compared with observations. The seasonal variation of sulfate aerosols is in agreement with measurements, except in the Arctic region. The calculated vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol agree well with the observations over North America. In the case of black carbon the calculated surface distribution is in fair agreement with observations. The effects of aerosol formation and heterogeneous reactions on the surface of sulfate aerosols are studied. The model calculations show the following: (1) The concentration of H2O2 is reduced when sulfate aerosols are formed due to the reaction of SO2 + H2O2 in cloud droplets. The gas-phase reaction SO2 + OH converts OH to HO2, but the reduction of OH and enhancement of HO2 are insignificant (<3%). (2) The heterogeneous reaction of HO2 on the surface of sulfate aerosols produces up to 10% reduction of hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) with an uptake coefficient of 0.2. However, this uptake coefficient could be overestimated, and the results should be regard as an upper limit estimation. (3) The N2O5 reaction on the surface of sulfate aerosols leads to an 80% reduction of NOx at middle to high latitudes during winter. Because ozone production efficiency is low in winter, ozone decreases by only 10% as a result of this reaction. However

  4. Sensitivity analysis in multiple imputation in effectiveness studies of psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crameri, Aureliano; von Wyl, Agnes; Koemeda, Margit; Schulthess, Peter; Tschuschke, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The importance of preventing and treating incomplete data in effectiveness studies is nowadays emphasized. However, most of the publications focus on randomized clinical trials (RCT). One flexible technique for statistical inference with missing data is multiple imputation (MI). Since methods such as MI rely on the assumption of missing data being at random (MAR), a sensitivity analysis for testing the robustness against departures from this assumption is required. In this paper we present a sensitivity analysis technique based on posterior predictive checking, which takes into consideration the concept of clinical significance used in the evaluation of intra-individual changes. We demonstrate the possibilities this technique can offer with the example of irregular longitudinal data collected with the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (OQ-45) and the Helping Alliance Questionnaire (HAQ) in a sample of 260 outpatients. The sensitivity analysis can be used to (1) quantify the degree of bias introduced by missing not at random data (MNAR) in a worst reasonable case scenario, (2) compare the performance of different analysis methods for dealing with missing data, or (3) detect the influence of possible violations to the model assumptions (e.g., lack of normality). Moreover, our analysis showed that ratings from the patient's and therapist's version of the HAQ could significantly improve the predictive value of the routine outcome monitoring based on the OQ-45. Since analysis dropouts always occur, repeated measurements with the OQ-45 and the HAQ analyzed with MI are useful to improve the accuracy of outcome estimates in quality assurance assessments and non-randomized effectiveness studies in the field of outpatient psychotherapy. PMID:26283989

  5. Effect of Piroxicam on ART Outcome: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Sohrabvand

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most important factors affecting success rates in assisted reproductive techniques (ART besides the number of oocytes retrieved and high quality embryos derived from them is the technical aspects of embryo transfer. It seems that pretreatement with uterine relaxants can be helpful in preventing unpleasant cramps which can have an adverse effect on ART outcome. In this respect, some drugs such as prostaglandin inhibitors or sedatives have been evaluated but not confirmed yet remain controversial. This study was performed in order to assess the effect of administrating Piroxicam prior to embryo transfer on pregnancy rates in ART cycles. Materials and Methods: This pilot study was performed from August 2010 through December 2011 on 50 infertile women in ART cycles. Recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH with a long gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH analogue protocol were used for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. The subjects were randomly allocated into two groups of 25 patients after obtaining written consent. Group A received a 10 mg Piroxicam capsule 30 minutes before embryo transfer and group B was the control group with no treatment. Data were analyzed by Chi-square and analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: Pregnancy rate was 34% (n=17 totally, with 32% (n=8 in group A and 36% (n=9 in group B (p=0.75. Uterine cramps were experienced by 4 women (16% in group B, while none were reported by women in group A (p=0.037. Conclusion: It seems that Piroxicam administration 30 minutes prior to embryo transfer cannot increase pregnancy rates, but can prevent or reduce uterine cramps after the procedure.

  6. Effectiveness of Iphone’s Touch ID: KSA Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad A. Al-Daraiseh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new trend of incorporating Touch ID sensors in mobile devices is appearing. Last year, Apple released a new model of its famous iPhone (5s. One of the most anticipated and hailed features of the new device was its Touch ID. Apple advertised that the new technology will increase the security of its device, and it will also be used in different applications as a proof of identity. To make the issue more controversial, Apple announced a new financial service (Apple Pay that allows iPhone 6 users to use their iPhone as a replacement to credit cards. The minute the new technology was introduced; many questions appeared that needed immediate answers. Users were concerned about how it will work? Is it easy to use? Is it really safe? And whether it will be effective in protecting their private data or not? In this paper we provide a comprehensive study of this feature. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using it. Then we analyze and share the results of a survey that we conducted to measure the effectiveness of such feature in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. In this study, we only focus on users from KSA, because if the device fails to protect mobile’s data, severe consequences might happen. Due to cultural believes in KSA, releasing mobile contents to unauthorized people could lead to crimes. Survey analysis revealed somewhat controversial results, while 76% of all participants believe that this technology will improve the device security, only 33% use it to lock/unlock their devices, and even a smaller percentage use it to make purchases.

  7. A DFT study of substituent effects in corannulene dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josa, Daniela; Rodríguez Otero, Jesús; Cabaleiro Lago, Enrique M

    2011-12-21

    Corannulene dimers made up of corannulene monomers with different curvature and substituents were studied using M06-2X, B97D and ωB97XD functionals and 6-31+G* basis set. Corannulene molecules were substituted with five alternating Br, Cl, CH(3), C(2)H or CN units. Geometric results showed that substituents gave rise to small changes in the curvature of corannulene bowls. So, there was not a clear relationship between the curvature of bowls and the changes on interaction energy generated by addition of substituents in the bowl. Electron withdrawing substituents gave rise to a more positive molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) of the bowl, which was able to get a strong interaction with the negative MEP at the surface of a fullerene. Substitution with CN caused the largest effect, giving rise to the most positive MEP and to a large interaction energy of -24.64 kcal mol(-1), at the ωB97XD/6-31+G* level. Dispersive effects must be taken into account to explain the catching ability of the different substituted corannulenes. For unsubstituted dimers, calculations with DFT-D methods employing ωB97XD and B97D functionals led to similar results to those previously reported at the SCS-MP2/cc-pVTZ level for corannulene dimers (A. Sygula and S. Saebø, Int. J. Quant. Chem., 2009, 109, 65). In particular, the ωB97XD functional led to a difference of only 0.35 kcal mol(-1), regarding MP2 interaction energy for corannulene dimers. On the other hand, the M06-2X functional showed a general considerable underestimation of interaction energies. This functional worked quite well to study trends, but not to obtain absolute interaction energies.

  8. The theoretical studies of piezoresistive effect in diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG; Chunyang

    2002-01-01

    [1]Jiang, X., Schiffmann, K., Klages, C. P., Nucleation and initial growth phase of diamond thin films on(100)silicon, Phys. Rev., 1994, B50(12): 8402-8410.[2]Jiang, X., Klages, C. P., Zachai, R. et al., Epitaxial diamond thin films on(100)silicon substrate, Appl. Phys. Lett., 1993, 62(26): 3438-3440.[3]Deguchi, M., Kitabatake, M., Hirao, T. et al., PR properties of chemical-vapor-deposited p-type diamond strain-gauges fabricared on diaphragm structure, Diamond Relat. Mater., 1996,5: 728-731.[4]Wang, W. L., Liao, K. J., Feng, B. et al., PR of p-type heteroepitaxial diamond films on Si(100), Diamond Relat. Matet., 1998, 7: 528-532.[5]Wang, W. L., Jiang, X., Taube, K. et al., PR of polycrystalline p-type diamond films of various doping levels at different temperatures, J. Appl. Phys., 1997, 82(2): 729-732.[6]Fang, L., Wang, W. L., Ding, P. D. et al., Study on the PR effect of crystalline and polycrystalline diamond under uniaxial strains, J. Appl. Phys., 1999, 86(9): 5185-5193.[7]Fang, L., Wang, W. L., Ding, P. D. et al., Study on the PR effect in p-type polycrystalline diamond, Science in China, 1999, 42(7): 769-778.[8]Aslam, M., Taher, I., Masood, A., Piezoresistivity invapor deposited diamond films, Appl. Phys. Lett., 1992, 60: 2923-2925.[9]Sondheimer, E. H., The mean free path of electrons in metals, Advan. Phys., 1952, 1: 1-42.[10]Fuchs, K., The conductivity of thin metallic films according to the electron theory of metals, Proc. Cambridge Phil. Soc., 1938, 34: 100-108.[11]Xue, Z. Q., Wu, Q. D., Li, J., Physics of Thin Films(in Chinese), 2nd ed., Beijing: Publishing House of Electronics Industry, 1991, 282-284.[12]Beer, A. C., Willardson, R. K., Hall and transverse magnetoresistance effects for warped bands and mixed scattering, Phys. Rev., 1958, 110: 1286-1294.[13]Kenneth, J. R., William, J. L., High-field magnetoresistance of semiconducting diamond, Phys. Rev., 1972, B6: 4588-4592.

  9. Effects of vibrotactile vestibular substitution on vestibular rehabilitation - preliminary study,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Brugnera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Some patients with severe impairment of body balance do not obtain adequate improvement from vestibular rehabilitation (VR. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of Vertiguard(tm biofeedback equipment as a sensory substitution (SS of the vestibular system in patients who did not obtain sufficient improvement from VR. METHODS: This was a randomized prospective clinical study. Thirteen patients without satisfactory response to conventional VR were randomized into a study group (SG, which received the vibrotactile stimulus from Vertiguard(tm for ten days, and a control group (CG, which used equipment without the stimulus. For pre- and post-treatment assessment, the Sensory Organization Test (SOT protocol of the Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP and two scales of balance self-perception, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, were used. RESULTS: After treatment, only the SG showed statistically significant improvement in C5 (p = 0.007 and C6 (p = 0.01. On the ABC scale, there was a significant difference in the SG (p= 0.04. The DHI showed a significant difference in CG and SG with regard to the physical aspect, and only in the SG for the functional aspect (p = 0.04. CONCLUSION: The present findings show that sensory substitution using the vibrotactile stimulus of the Vertiguard(tm system helped with the integration of neural networks involved in maintaining posture, improving the strategies used in the recovery of body balance.

  10. Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Bellifa; L Pirault-Roy; C Kappenstein; A Choukchou-Braham

    2014-05-01

    MTi samples with different atomic chromium percentages were synthesized by sol–gel method and calcined at 400 °C under air. The effects of Cr and temperature on titanium dioxide phase transition were studied. In situ measurement showed the presence of anatase phase for all samples at temperature < 500 °C. Without Cr content, the anatase–rutile transition takes place at 600 °C and the rutile fraction increases with increase of temperature. In the presence of Cr content, rutile phase appeared at 700 °C. Cr2O3 phase was shown only in the case of CrTi20 content at 800 °C which indicates that the segregation remains modest. We have also studied the anatase–rutile transition kinetics by using in situ X-ray measurements. It was found that the anatase phase stability increases as the chromium content increases. Results confirm that the transformation of anatase–rutile is of first order.

  11. Effects of gamma radiation on bee venom: preliminary studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, H.; Boni-Mitake, M.; Souza, C.F.; Rogero, J.R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Radiobiologia

    1999-11-01

    Africanized honeybees are very common insects in Brazil and frequently cause accidents followed by important immunological reactions and even deaths. Their venoms are composed of a complex mixture of substances of general biological actions. several works utilizing ionizing radiation showed that it is able to modify protein structures, and successfully detoxify snake venoms toxins, although maintaining its immunological properties. The main objective of this paper was to study the effects of gamma radiation on bee venom, regarding some biochemical and toxicological aspects. Africanized Apis melllifera whole venom (2 mg/ml) in 0.15 M Na Cl solution was irradiated with 2 kGy in a {sup 60} Co source. Preliminary studies has been carried out in order to identify some biochemical changes after irradiation. Concerning this, irradiated and native venom were submitted to a molecular exclusion chromatography (Sephadex G-100), UV absorption spectrum and protein concentration analysis. It could be seen that irradiated bee venom spectrum presented differences when compared to native bee venom, suggesting that some structural alterations has occurred. Protein concentration and chromatography profiles were not changes after irradiation. In order to evaluate the toxicity a lethality assay (L D{sub 50}) has been performed with both venoms, and irradiated venom showed to be less toxic than native one. (author) 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Effect of Tabs on a Rectangular Nozzle Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    In a continuing research program, jets from nozzles of different geometries are being investigated with the aim of increasing mixing and spreading in those flows. Flow fields from nozzles with elliptic, rectangular, and other more complex cross-sectional shapes are being studied in comparison to circular nozzles over a wide Mach number range. As noted by previous researchers, noncircular jets usually spread faster than circular jets. Another technique being investigated to increase jet spreading even further for a given nozzle is the use of "tabs" to generate vortices. A typical tab is a triangular-shaped protrusion placed at the nozzle exit, with the base of the triangle touching the nozzle wall and the apex leaning downstream at 45 to the stream direction. This geometry was determined by a parametric study to produce the optimum effect for a given area blockage. The tabs can increase jet spreading significantly. The underlying mechanism traces to a pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices originating from each tab. These vortex pairs persist in the flow; and with the appropriate number and strength, they can increase spreading.

  13. Proteomic Study to Survey the CIGB-552 Antitumor Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielis Rodríguez-Ulloa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CIGB-552 is a cell-penetrating peptide that exerts in vitro and in vivo antitumor effect on cancer cells. In the present work, the mechanism involved in such anticancer activity was studied using chemical proteomics and expression-based proteomics in culture cancer cell lines. CIGB-552 interacts with at least 55 proteins, as determined by chemical proteomics. A temporal differential proteomics based on iTRAQ quantification method was performed to identify CIGB-552 modulated proteins. The proteomic profile includes 72 differentially expressed proteins in response to CIGB-552 treatment. Proteins related to cell proliferation and apoptosis were identified by both approaches. In line with previous findings, proteomic data revealed that CIGB-552 triggers the inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, proteins related to cell invasion were differentially modulated by CIGB-552 treatment suggesting new potentialities of CIGB-552 as anticancer agent. Overall, the current study contributes to a better understanding of the antitumor action mechanism of CIGB-552.

  14. A study on effects of organizational learning on organizational innovation: A case study of insurance industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Marvasti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the relationship between organization learning and organization innovation in one of Iranian insurance firm. The proposed study selects a sample of 300 employees who work for different positions for the case study of this paper and using Pearson correlation as well as Freedman tests determines the relationship and ranks different components of the survey. The results of this implementation have indicated that organization innovation influences on organizational learning, data distribution, interpretation and memory significantly but the effect of organizational innovation on data collection cannot be confirmed when the level of significance is five or even ten percent. The implementation of Freedman test has also indicated that Information interpretation is number priority followed by information learning, organizational distribution and organizational memory.

  15. Hall Effect Thruster Plume Contamination and Erosion Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the Hall effect thruster plume contamination and erosion study was to evaluate the impact of a xenon ion plume on various samples placed in the vicinity of a Hall effect thruster for a continuous 100 hour exposure. NASA Glenn Research Center was responsible for the pre- and post-test evaluation of three sample types placed around the thruster: solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone, and Kapton(R). Mass and profilometer), were used to identify the degree of deposition and/or erosion on the solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone, and Kapton@ samples. Transmittance, reflectance, solar absorptance, and room temperature emittance were used to identify the degree of performance degradation of the solar cell cover glass samples alone. Auger spectroscopy was used to identify the chemical constituents found on the surface of the exposed solar cell cover glass samples. Chemical analysis indicated some boron nitride contamination on the samples, from boron nitride insulators used in the body of the thruster. However, erosion outweighted contamination. All samples exhibited some degree of erosion. with the most erosion occurring near the centerline of the plume and the least occurring at the +/- 90 deg positions. For the solar cell cover glass samples, erosion progressed through the antireflective coating and into the microsheet glass itself. Erosion occurred in the solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone and Kapton(R) at different rates. All optical properties changed with the degree of erosion, with solar absorptance and room temperature emittance increasing with erosion. The transmittance of some samples decreased while the reflectance of some samples increased and others decreased. All results are consistent with an energetic plume of xenon ions serving as a source for erosion.

  16. Appraisal of electromagnetic induction effects on magnetic pulsation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Arora

    Full Text Available The quantification of wave polarization characteristics of ULF waves from the geomagnetic field variations is done under ‘a priori’ assumption that fields of internal induced currents are in-phase with the external inducing fields. Such approximation is invalidated in the regions marked by large lateral conductivity variations that perturb the flow pattern of induced currents. The amplitude and phase changes that these perturbations produce, in the resultant fields at the Earth’s surface, make determination of polarization and phase of the oscillating external signals problematic. In this paper, with the help of a classical Pc5 magnetic pulsation event of 24 March 1991, recorded by dense network of magnetometers in the equatorial belt of Brazil, we document the nature and extent of the possible influence of anomalous induction effects in the wave polarization of ULF waves. The presence of anomalous induction effects at selected sites lead to an over estimation of the equatorial enhancement at pulsation period and also suggest changes in the azimuth of ULF waves as they propagate through the equatorial electrojet. Through numerical calculations, it is shown that anomalous horizontal fields, that result from induction in the lateral conductivity distribution in the study region, vary in magnitude and phase with the polarization of external source field. Essentially, the induction response is also a function of the period of external inducing source field. It is further shown that when anomalous induction fields corresponding to the magnitude and polarization of the 24 March 1991 pulsation event are eliminated from observed fields, corrected amplitude in the X and Y horizontal components allows for true characterisation of ULF wave parameters.

    Key words. Geomagnetism and paleomagnetism (geomagnetic induction – Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere – Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions

  17. Experimental and computational study of the effect of shocks on film cooling effectiveness in scramjet combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Pradeep S.; Holden, Michael S.; Mcclinton, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents results from a study conducted to investigate the effect of incident oblique shocks on the effectiveness of a coolant film at Mach numbers, typical of those expected in a scramjet combustor at Mach 15 to 20 flight. Computations with a parabolic code are in good agreement with the measured pressures and heat fluxes, after accounting for the influence of the shock upstream of its point of impingement on the plate, and the expansion from the trailing edge of the shock generator. The test data shows that, for the blowing rates tested, the film is rendered largely ineffective by the shock. Computations show that coolant blowing rates five to ten times those tested are required to protect against shock-induced heating. The implications of the results to scramjet combustor design are discussed.

  18. [PROFAMILIA studies the effectiveness of contraceptive marketing programs in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    A recent study by PROFAMILIA, the private Colombian family planning organization, indicates that community based distribution programs and social marketing programs are not totally interchangeable forms of contraceptive distribution. Comparison of the efficacy of different systems in making contraceptives more accessible to the low income population led the researchers to conclude that social marketing programs work as well as community based distribution programs in rural areas which already have high rates of contraceptive usage. Community based distribution programs appear more effective than social marketing programs in areas where contraceptive usage is not yet well established. PROFAMILIA researchers conducted operational studies in 3 different states, each of which had a community based distribution program. In the first state the community based distribution program was suspended and a vender who had previously supplied only urban outlets added rural pharmacies to his route. The vender handled 3 kinds of pills, 2 types of spermicidal suppositories, and condoms. In a neighboring state, 3 instructors belonging to the community based distribution program were offered commissions of about 10% of the value of the products if the distributors they supervised met monthly sales quotas. The community based distribution program was left unchanged in the third state but a 2-member mobile team was trained to travel through the region by jeep, talking to community groups about the advantage of contraception. At the end of 18 months, sales of contraceptives had declined in the state where the community based distribution program was replaced by the social marketing program. The decline was believed to be related to unforeseen price increases for pills and devaluation of the Colombian peso. The social marketing project was however much more cost effective than the other 2, which continued to require PROFAMILIA subsidies. Contraceptive usage increased in the other 2 areas

  19. DNA protective effect of ginseng and the antagonistic effect of Chinese turnip: A supplementation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Yim Tong; Wong, Kam Shing; Han, Andrea; Pak, Sok Cheon; Kalle, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this clinical study is to provide scientific evidence for supporting traditional Chinese application and usage to the patients. For this purpose, we tested the ability if Panax ginseng extract to lower oxidative damage to nuclear DNA in human lymphocytes by comparing the effect of cooked Chinese turnip on this effect. Materials and Methods: Seven healthy subjects (4 males and 3 females from 37 to 60 years) participated two occasions which were at least 2 weeks apart. About 2 mL of fasting blood sample for baseline measurement was taken on arrival. They were requested to ingest the content of 5 ginseng capsules in 200 mL water. The subject remained fasting for 2 h until the second blood sample taken. In the other occasion, the experiment was repeated except a piece of cooked turnip (10 g) was taken with the ginseng extract. The two occasions could be interchanged. Comet assay was performed on two specimens on the same day for the evaluation of lymphocytic DNA damage with or without oxidative stress. Results: For the group with ginseng supplementation, there was a significant decrease in comet score for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment over the 2-h period while no change in DNA damage for unstressed sample. For the group with ginseng together with turnip supplementation, there was no significant difference in comet score for both H2O2 treatment and phosphate-buffered saline treatment. Ginseng extract could reduce DNA damage mediated by H2O2 effectively, but this protection effect was antagonized by the ingestion of cooked turnip at the same time. Conclusion: In the current study, commercial ginseng extract was used for supplementing volunteers. Ginseng extract could protect DNA from oxidative stress in vivo while turnip diminished the protection.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of powered wheelchairs: findings of a study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrich, Renzo; Salatino, Claudia; Converti, Rosa Maria; Saruggia, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    This study surveyed a sample of 79 wheelchair users who had obtained powered wheelchairs from the National Health Service in an Italian Region in the period 2008-2013. The wheelchair prescriptions had been done on the basis of an assessment protocol agreed with the Local Health Authority. Follow-up interviews were carried out at the users' homes, in order to collect information about the wheelchair use and its effectiveness, usefulness and economic impact. The instruments used in the interviews included an introductory questionnaire (describing the wheelchair use), the QUEST (measuring the user's satisfaction), the PIADS (measuring the psychosocial impact, in terms of perceived changes in ability, adaptability and self-esteem), the FABS/M (detecting environmental facilitators and barriers) and the SCAI (estimating the economic impact). Overall, positive outcomes were detected for most users, especially in relation to their satisfaction and the psychosocial impact. A number of barriers were identified in various settings (at home, in public places, in natural spaces, in public transportation) that sometimes restrict the user mobility and thus may claim for corrective actions. Several environmental factors acting as facilitators were also identified. In relation to the economic impact, the provision of a powered wheelchair generated remarkable savings in social costs for most of the users, on average about 36.000 Euros per person on a projected 5-years span. This estimate results from the comparison between the social cost of the intervention (sum of the costs of all material and human resources involved in the provision and usage of the wheelchair) and the cost of non-intervention (the presumed social cost incurred in case no powered wheelchair had been provided and the user had to carry on with just a manual wheelchair). The study was also an opportunity to develop and try out a follow-up method that proved applicable within service delivery practice.

  1. Neural effects of prolonged mental fatigue: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Akira; Tanaka, Masaaki; Shigihara, Yoshihito; Kanai, Etsuko; Funakura, Masami; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-09-05

    Mental fatigue, manifest as a reduced efficiency for mental work load, is prevalent in modern society. It is important to understand the neural mechanisms of mental fatigue and to develop appropriate methods for evaluating mental fatigue. In this study we quantified the effect of a long-duration mental fatigue-inducing task on neural activity. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine the time course change of neural activity over the long duration of the task trials. Nine healthy male volunteers participated in this study. They performed two mental fatigue-inducing tasks on separate days. The order of task presentation was randomized in a single-blinded, crossover fashion. Each task consisted of 25-min mental fatigue-inducing 0- or 2-back task session for three times. Subjective rating of mental fatigue sensation and electrocardiogram, and resting state MEG measurements were performed just before and after each task session. MEG data were analyzed using narrow-band adaptive spatial filtering methods. Alpha band (8-13 Hz) power in the visual cortex decreased after performing the mental fatigue-inducing tasks, and the decrease of alpha power was greater when they performed 2-back task trials. The decrease in alpha power was positively associated with the self-reported level of mental fatigue sensation and sympathetic nerve activity level. These results demonstrate that performing the prolonged mental fatigue-inducing task causes overactivation of the visual cortex, manifest as decreased alpha power in this brain region. Our results increase understanding of the neural mechanisms of mental fatigue and can be used to develop new quantitative methods to assess mental fatigue.

  2. Performance Study of optical Modulator based on electrooptic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palodiya, V.; Raghuwanshi, S. K.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we have studied and derive performance parameter of highly integrated Lithium Niobate optical modulator. This is a chirp free modulator having low switching voltage and large bandwidth. For an external modulator in which travelling-wave electrodes length L imposed the modulating switching voltage, the product of Vπ and L is fixed for a given electro optic material Lithium Niobate. We investigate to achieve a low Vπ by both magnitude of the electro-optic coefficient for a wide variety of electro-optic materials. A Sellmeier equation for the extraordinary index of congruent lithium niobate is derived. For phase-matching, predictions are accmate for temperature between room temperature 250°C and wavelength ranging from 0.4 to 5µm. The Sellmeier equations predict more accmately refractive indices at long wavelengths. Theoretical result is confirmed by simulated results. We have analysed the various parameters such as switching voltage, device performance index, time constant, transmittance, cut-off frequency, 3-dB bandwidth, power absorption coefficient and transmission bit rate of Lithium Niobate optical Modulator based on electro -optic effect.

  3. The effect of temperature of fluorescence: an animal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Alex; Masters, Bart; Jansen, Duco; Welch, A. J.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-02-01

    The effect of temperature on the fluorescence of enucleated porcine eyes and rat skin was studied. The fluorescence peak intensity was found to decrease as the tissue temperature increased. A dual-excitation, fiber-based system was used to collect fluorescence and diffuse-reflectance spectra from the samples. A thermal camera was used to determine the temperature of the tissue at the time of fluorescence measurement. The samples were mounted in a saline bath and measurements were made as the tissue temperature was increased from -20°C to 70°C. Results indicate that temperature affects several fluorescence spectra characteristics. The peak height decreased as temperature increased. At temperatures above 60°C, the peak position shifted to lower wavelengths. Heating and cooling experiments of the rat skin demonstrate the recovery of the loss in fluorescence. The diffuse reflectance spectra indicated a change in optical properties past 60°C, but prior to the denaturation temperature for collagen at 57°C, no change in optical properties was observed. Results suggest that the decrease in fluorescence is both a property of fluorescence and a result of altering optical properties.

  4. Stochastic nonlinear mixed effects: a metformin case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzuka, Brett; Chittenden, Jason; Monteleone, Jonathan; Tran, Hien

    2016-02-01

    In nonlinear mixed effect (NLME) modeling, the intra-individual variability is a collection of errors due to assay sensitivity, dosing, sampling, as well as model misspecification. Utilizing stochastic differential equations (SDE) within the NLME framework allows the decoupling of the measurement errors from the model misspecification. This leads the SDE approach to be a novel tool for model refinement. Using Metformin clinical pharmacokinetic (PK) data, the process of model development through the use of SDEs in population PK modeling was done to study the dynamics of absorption rate. A base model was constructed and then refined by using the system noise terms of the SDEs to track model parameters and model misspecification. This provides the unique advantage of making no underlying assumptions about the structural model for the absorption process while quantifying insufficiencies in the current model. This article focuses on implementing the extended Kalman filter and unscented Kalman filter in an NLME framework for parameter estimation and model development, comparing the methodologies, and illustrating their challenges and utility. The Kalman filter algorithms were successfully implemented in NLME models using MATLAB with run time differences between the ODE and SDE methods comparable to the differences found by Kakhi for their stochastic deconvolution.

  5. Learning approaches and studies of effect of environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirkov Snežana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a presentation of 3P model of learning (Presage-Process-Product, which comprises learning approaches placed in a wider context of the set of variables related to personality, environment, process and outcomes of learning. Three approaches to learning - surface, deep and achievement-oriented - consist of motives and the corresponding learning strategies. There is a discussion of the findings and implications of a great deal of research using the instruments based on this model. We analyzed research findings about the effect of instruction on learning approaches acquired by pupils, and especially students. It is shown how based on learning approach employed by pupils it is possible to draw conclusions about the quality of instruction. Testing the instruments on various samples indicates that the model is applicable in different cultures. Cross-cultural research opened up the problem of relation between memorising and understanding. Further research is necessary, both empirical and theoretical, that is, development of conceptualization of these constructs, and especially their role in education. Perspectives for further research also open up in the direction of studying various factors connected with personality and their relations with learning approaches. The role of learning approaches of teachers in developing the learning approaches of pupils is yet to be examined.

  6. Psychological effects of amputation: A review of studies from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika Sahu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amputation is a major health burden on the families, society, and on medical services as well. Traumatic limb amputation is a catastrophic injury and an irreversible act which is sudden and emotionally devastating for the victims. In addition, it causes inability to support self and the family and driving many patients toward various psychiatric disorders. Extensive information regarding the effects of amputation has not been ascertained and therefore it was decided to do a systematic review. The goal of this review was to provide comprehensive information of peer-reviewed papers examining the psychological distress among amputees in India. A search of the literature resulted in a total of 12 articles with varied sample size from 16 to 190. The sample has been largely comprised males with lower limb amputation caused by primarily traumatic ones, i.e., motor vehicle accident, railway track accidents, machinery injury, blasts, etc., The prevalence of psychiatric disorders among amputees has been found to be in the range of 32% to 84% including depression rates 10.4%–63%, posttraumatic stress disorder 3.3%–56.3%, and phantom limb phenomenon 14%–92%. Although the studies reported that symptoms of anxiety and depression become better over the course of time, however surgical treatment providers need to liaise with psychiatrists and psychologists to support and deal with the psychological disturbances.

  7. Effects of Paliperidone Palmitate on Coagulation: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enver Demirel Yılmaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of a new antipsychotic drug paliperidone palmitate on hemogram and coagulation parameters in rats. Materials and Methods. Experiments were performed on 22 female albino Wistar rats (8–12 weeks old. Control group was given drinking water as vehicle (0.3 mL. PAL-1 rats were given 1 mg/kg paliperidone palmitate (in 0.3 mL drinking water by oral gavage once a day for ten days and PAL-3 rats received 3 mg/kg paliperidone palmitate (in 0.3 mL drinking water by oral gavage for ten days. Blood samples were drawn from the heart 24 hours after the last drug dose, and hemogram and coagulation parameters were measured with automated analyzers. Results. Hemogram did not change in the paliperidone treated groups compared to the controls. Factor VIII levels decreased in the PAL-1 and PAL-3 groups; and this decrease was significantly greater in the PAL-3. Factor IX levels decreased in PAL-3 rats, but its levels also increased in PAL-1 rats compared to the control. Discussion. Paliperidone has led to changes in the serum levels of coagulation factors VIII and IX in rats. As a result, paliperidone may be causing thromboembolism or bleeding in a dose-independent manner.

  8. Atomic size effects studied by transport in single silicide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccoli, I.; Edler, F.; Pfnür, H.; Appelfeller, S.; Dähne, M.; Holtgrewe, K.; Sanna, S.; Schmidt, W. G.; Tegenkamp, C.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrathin metallic silicide nanowires with extremely high aspect ratios can be easily grown, e.g., by deposition of rare earth elements on semiconducting surfaces. These wires play a pivotal role in fundamental research and open intriguing perspectives for CMOS applications. However, the electronic properties of these one-dimensional systems are extremely sensitive to atomic-sized defects, which easily alter the transport characteristics. In this study, we characterized comprehensively TbSi2 wires grown on Si(100) and correlated details of the atomic structure with their electrical resistivities. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as all transport experiments were performed in situ using a four-tip STM system. The measurements are complemented by local spectroscopy and density functional theory revealing that the silicide wires are electronically decoupled from the Si template. On the basis of a quasiclassical transport model, the size effect found for the resistivity is quantitatively explained in terms of bulk and surface transport channels considering details of atomic-scale roughness. Regarding future applications the full wealth of these robust nanostructures will emerge only if wires with truly atomically sharp interfaces can be reliably grown.

  9. Prosthetic alignment effects on gait symmetry: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, R O; Stimmel, S K

    1990-05-01

    The loss of a significant portion of a lower extremity causes changes in the usual pattern of human ambulation. These changes have been documented kinematically, kinetically and metabolically, giving insight into the costs of limb amputation relative to ambulatory efforts. The role of the prosthetist is to provide a limb substitute to achieve the best gait performance, while assuring maximum comfort for the patient. This case study examined the effects of antero-posterior alignment of a below-knee prosthesis on sagittal plane gait kinematics by comparing the anatomical side with the prosthetic side. The greatest changes due to variations of alignment were found during the prosthetic stance phase; knee angles showed the greatest asymmetry between anatomical and prosthetic sides. The stance phase on the prosthetic side was reduced with anterior socket displacement due to early knee flexion and toe-off. Posterior socket displacement caused a greater maximum centre of gravity height, but anterior socket displacement caused greater knee flexion which decreased the maximum centre of gravity height. Asymmetries in temporal and other kinematic parameters were not always minimal at the optimal alignment subjectively selected by a certified prosthetist. Comparisons of asymmetry ratios with prosthetic side data revealed the subclinical sensitivity of this amputee to antero-posterior alignment discrepancies.

  10. Histophysiological study of aluminum chloride effect on male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Al-Mallah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to detect the effects of aluminum chloride AlCl3 on some pathophysiological features of adult male rats. Eighteen rats were divided to 3 groups of 6 animals each. These included untreated control and 2 treated groups received AlCl3 at the doses 40 and 80 mg/kg of body weight, orally and daily for 30 days. The following parameters were recorded: Body weight (weekly, central nervous system activity tests (weekly, hematological examinations at 15 and 30 days of experimentally and gross and histopathology for brain, liver, kidneys and heart at the day (30. The results showed a significant decrease in body weight mean of 3rd group (80 mg/kg at 4th week, a significant decrease in the activity associated with time progress in experiment by recording (moving onset, square crossed and rearing in 3 minutes, negative geotaxis tests, there were no significant differences between groups at pack cell volume and hemoglobin concentration with a significant decrease in total leukocyte count at 2nd group (40 mg/kg. Differential leukocyte count revealed significant increase in lymphocyte at day 30. Histopathological changes were neuronal vaculation and proliferation of microgelial cells in brain, vacular degeneration and lymphocytic infiltrations in hepatic parenchyma with mild portal fibrosis in liver, at kidneys there were cloudy swelling, coagulative necrosis to the renal tubular epithelium, more severely noticed at 3rd group, no pathological changes were noticed at myocardium and coronary arteries at both treated groups.

  11. AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS EFFECTIVENESS IN SLOVENIAN MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjana Jerman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the value or more specifically, the contribution of marketing communications strategy to effectiveness of marketing communications and hypothesizes that marketing communications strategy correlate with the effectiveness of marketing communications. The paper consists of two parts: the theoretical framework for the role of marketing communications strategy for the effectiveness of the marketing communications and the empirical analysis, based on the primary data collected. The concept of the marketing communication effectiveness assumes that there are variables that can have a positive influence on the effectiveness of marketing communications, which incorporates facets of the marketing communication strategy and bidirectional communications. The results suggest that Slovenian organisations which design and implement marketing communication strategy, also have more effective marketing communications. The development of marketing communications strategy was correlated with increased effectiveness of marketing communications in their organisation. Managerial implications are discussed along with directions for further research.

  12. Functional renormalization group study of fluctuation effects in fermionic superfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberlein, Andreas

    2013-03-22

    This thesis is concerned with ground state properties of two-dimensional fermionic superfluids. In such systems, fluctuation effects are particularly strong and lead for example to a renormalization of the order parameter and to infrared singularities. In the first part of this thesis, the fermionic two-particle vertex is analysed and the fermionic renormalization group is used to derive flow equations for a decomposition of the vertex in charge, magnetic and pairing channels. In the second part, the channel-decomposition scheme is applied to various model systems. In the superfluid state, the fermionic two-particle vertex develops rich and singular dependences on momentum and frequency. After simplifying its structure by exploiting symmetries, a parametrization of the vertex in terms of boson-exchange interactions in the particle-hole and particle-particle channels is formulated, which provides an efficient description of the singular momentum and frequency dependences. Based on this decomposition of the vertex, flow equations for the effective interactions are derived on one- and two-loop level, extending existing channel-decomposition schemes to (i) the description of symmetry breaking in the Cooper channel and (ii) the inclusion of those two-loop renormalization contributions to the vertex that are neglected in the Katanin scheme. In the second part, the superfluid ground state of various model systems is studied using the channel-decomposition scheme for the vertex and the flow equations. A reduced model with interactions in the pairing and forward scattering channels is solved exactly, yielding insights into the singularity structure of the vertex. For the attractive Hubbard model at weak coupling, the momentum and frequency dependence of the two-particle vertex and the frequency dependence of the self-energy are determined on one- and two-loop level. Results for the suppression of the superfluid gap by fluctuations are in good agreement with the literature

  13. Preliminary study of diffusion effects in Fricke gel dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiroga, A. [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios de Matematica de Cordoba, Oficina 318 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Vedelago, J. [Laboratorio de Investigaciones e Instrumentacion en Fisica Aplicada a la Medicina e Imagenes por Rayos X, Laboratorio 448 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Valente, M., E-mail: aiquiroga@famaf.unc.edu [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Oficina 102 FaMAF - UNC, Av. Luis Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    Diffusion of ferric ions in ferrous sulfate (Fricke) gels represents one of the main drawbacks of some radiation detectors, like Fricke gel dosimeters. In practice, this disadvantage can be overcome by prompt dosimeter analysis, constraining strongly the time between irradiation and analysis. Due to required integral accuracy levels, special dedicated protocols are implemented with the aim of minimizing signal blurring due to diffusion effects. This work presents dedicated analytic modelling and numerical calculations of diffusion coefficients in Fricke gel radiation sensitive material. Samples are optically analysed by means of visible light transmission measurements capturing images with a Ccd camera provided with a monochromatic 585 nm filter corresponding to the X O-infused Fricke solution absorbance peak. Dose distributions in Fricke gels are suitably delivered in order to assess specific initial conditions further studied by periodical sample image acquisitions. In a first analytic approach, experimental data are fit with linear models in order to achieve a value for the diffusion coefficient. The second approach to the problem consists on a group of computational algorithms based on inverse problem formulation, along with suitable 2D diffusion model capable of estimating diffusion coefficients by fitting the obtained algorithm numerical solutions with the corresponding experimental data. Comparisons are performed by introducing an appropriate functional in order to analyse both experimental and numerical values. Solutions to second order diffusion equation are calculated in the framework of a dedicated method that incorporates Finite Element Method. Moreover, optimised solutions can be attained by gradient type minimisation algorithms. Knowledge about diffusion coefficient for Fricke gel radiation detector might be helpful in accounting for effects regarding elapsed time between dosimeter irradiation and further analysis. Hence, corrections might be included

  14. Chemical mixtures and environmental effects: a pilot study to assess ecological exposure and effects in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Herbert T.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Bradley, Paul M.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Mills, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment and management of the risks of exposure to complex chemical mixtures in streams are priorities for human and environmental health organizations around the world. The current lack of information on the composition and variability of environmental mixtures and a limited understanding of their combined effects are fundamental obstacles to timely identification and prevention of adverse human and ecological effects of exposure. This report describes the design of a field-based study of the composition and biological activity of chemical mixtures in U.S. stream waters affected by a wide range of human activities and contaminant sources. The study is a collaborative effort by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Scientists sampled 38 streams spanning 24 States and Puerto Rico. Thirty-four of the sites were located in watersheds impacted by multiple contaminant sources, including industrial and municipal wastewater discharges, crop and animal agricultural runoff, urban runoff, and other point and nonpoint contaminant sources. The remaining four sites were minimally development reference watersheds. All samples underwent comprehensive chemical and biological characterization, including sensitive and specific direct analysis for over 700 dissolved organic and inorganic chemicals and field parameters, identification of unknown contaminants (environmental diagnostics), and a variety of bioassays to evaluate biological activity and toxicity.

  15. Theoretical study of magnetoelectric effects in noncentrosymmetric and cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Manoj K.

    A century after the discovery of superconductivity at the lab of Kamerlingh Onnes in 1911, it is noticeable that the phenomenon is quite ubiquitous in nature. In addition to a long list of superconducting alloys and compounds, almost half the elements in the periodic table superconduct. By the late seventies, superconductivity was thought to be well understood. This turned out to be a myth, with the discovery of unconventional superconductors that defied Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory. Cuprates have been the most prominent example among them ever since their discovery in 1986 by Bednorz and Muller. Another example of non-compliance with BCS theory lie among noncentrosymmetric superconductors. In this dissertation, magnetoelectric (ME) effects in these two classes of superconductors have been studied from different perspectives, utilizing Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory. Even though GL theory was proposed before the BCS theory, it was not given much importance due to its phenomenological nature until Gor'kov proved that it is a limiting form of the microscopic BCS theory. However today, in the absence of any complete microscopic theory to explain superconductivity in unconventional superconductors, Ginzburg-Landau theory is an important tool to move ahead and qualitatively understand the behavior of varied superconducting systems. Noncentrosymmetric superconductors have generated much theoretical interest since 2004 despite been known for long. The absence of inversion symmetry in non- centrosymmetric superconductors allows for extra terms called Lifshitz invariants in the Ginzburg-Landau functional. This leads to magnetoelectric effects that do not exist in centrosymmetric superconductors. One manifestation of this is in the vortex structure in materials with a cubic point group O. In particular, a current is predicted to flow parallel to the applied magnetic field in such a vortex in addition to the usual vortex supercurrents. In this work, we present both

  16. AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS EFFECTIVENESS IN SLOVENIAN MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    Damjana Jerman; Bruno ZavršniK

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the value or more specifically, the contribution of marketing communications strategy to effectiveness of marketing communications and hypothesizes that marketing communications strategy correlate with the effectiveness of marketing communications. The paper consists of two parts: the theoretical framework for the role of marketing communications strategy for the effectiveness of the marketing communications and the empirical analysis, based on the primary data collected...

  17. STUDY ON THE EFFECTS OF ACID ETCHING ON AFFECTED ENAMEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Stoleriu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to establish and compare the effects of ortophosphoric and hydrochloric acids on the enamel affected by incipient carious lesions with different evolution. Materials and method. 20 teeth with acute and chronic non-cavitary carious lesions were considered for the study. The teeth were sectioned in two halves through the middle of the non-cavitary lesions. The halves of 5 white spot-type lesions and of 5 brown spot-type ones were analyzed as to their surface roughness, on an atomic force microscope (AFM. 5 halves with white spot-type lesions and 5 halves with brown spot-type ones were subjected to acid etching with 37% ortophosphoric acid (Scotchbond etchant gel, 3M ESPE, and an equal number of samples was subjected to the action of 15% hydrochloric acid (ICON-etch, DMG Dental Products Ltd for 2 min, then washed with water and analyzed by AFM. Results. The initial surface roughness of the enamel was higher in the white spot–type carious lesions, comparatively with the brown spot-type ones. For both types of carious non-cavitary lesions, acid etching with phosphoric and hydrochloric acid significantly increased the surface roughness of the enamel, comparatively with the status of the enamel surface prior to etching. The hydrochloric acid led to a surface roughness significantly higher than in the case of ortophosphoric acid, in both acute and chronic non-cavitary carious lesions. The roughness values obtained through etching with ortophosphoric and hydrochloric acid were higher in the white spot-type carious lesions, comparatively with the brown spot-type ones. Conclusions. Both the 37% ortophosphoric acid and the 15% hydrochloric acid determined a significantly higher surface roughness of the enamel affected by acute and chronic non-cavitary carious lesions. The surface condition of the brown spot-type carious lesions was less significantly modified, comparatively with that of the white spot-type lesions, by the

  18. Attenuation correction effects on SPECT/CT procedures: phantoms studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, M L; Seren, M E G; Rocha, F C; Brunetto, S Q; Ramos, C D; Button, V L S N

    2013-01-01

    Attenuation correction is widely used in SPECT/CT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) procedures, especially for imaging of the thorax region. Different compensation methods have been developed and introduced into clinical practice. Most of them use attenuation maps obtained using transmission scanning systems. However, this gives extra dose of radiation to the patient. The purpose of this study was to identify when attenuation correction is really important during SPECT/CT procedures.For this purpose, we used Jaszczak phantom and phantom with three line sources, filled with technetium ((99m)-Tc), with scattering materials, like air, water and acrylic, in different detectors configurations. In all images acquired were applied analytic and iterative reconstruction algorithms; the last one with or without attenuation correction. We analyzed parameters such as eccentricity, contrast and spatial resolution in the images.The best reconstruction algorithm on average was iterative, for images with 128 × 128 and 64 × 64 matrixes. The analytical algorithm was effective only to improve eccentricity in 64 × 64 matrix and matrix in contrast 128 × 128 with low statistics. Turning to the clinical routine examinations, on average, for 128 × 128 matrix and low statistics counting, the best algorithm was the iterative, without attenuation correction,improving in 150% the three parameters analyzed and, for the same matrix size, but with high statistical counting, iterative algorithm with attenuation correction was 25% better than that without correction. We can conclude that using the iterative algorithm with attenuation correction in the water, and its extra dose given, is not justified for the procedures of low statistic counting, being relevant only if the intention is to prioritize contrast in acquisitions with high statistic counting.

  19. Disorder effects in pnictides: a tunneling spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noat, Y; Cren, T; Dubost, V; Lange, S; Debontridder, F; Roditchev, D [Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, CNRS UMR 7588, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Campus Boucicaut, 140 rue de Lourmel, F-75015 Paris (France); Toulemonde, P; Marcus, J; Sulpice, A [Institut Neel, CNRS et Universite Joseph Fourier, 25 rue des Martyrs, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Sacks, W, E-mail: yves.noat@insp.jussieu.f [Institut de Mineralogie et de Physique des Milieux Condenses, CNRS UMR 7590, Campus Boucicaut, 140 rue de Lourmel, F-75015 Paris (France)

    2010-11-24

    We present the synthesis and the tunneling spectroscopy study of superconducting FeSe{sub 0.5}Te{sub 0.5} (T{sub c} = 14 K), SmFeAsO{sub 0.85} (T{sub c} = 54 K) and SmFeAsO{sub 0.9}F{sub 0.1} (T{sub c} = 45 K). The samples were characterized by Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction patterns and transport as well as temperature-dependent magnetic measurements. Tunneling experiments on FeSe{sub 0.5}Te{sub 0.5} revealed a single superconducting gap {approx} 1 meV in BCS-like tunneling conductance spectra. In SmFeAsO{sub 0.85} and SmFeAsO{sub 0.9}F{sub 0.1}, however, more complex spectra were observed, characterized by two gap-like structures at {approx} 4 and {approx} 10 meV. These spectra are qualitatively understood assuming a two-band superconductor with a 's {+-}' order parameter. We show that, depending on the sign relation between the pairing amplitudes in the two bands, the interband quasiparticle scattering has a crucial effect on the shape of the tunneling spectra. On the other hand, single-gap spectra found in FeSe{sub 0.5}Te{sub 0.5} are more compatible with a disorder-induced 's '-wave gap, due to the Se-Te substitution.

  20. Improving outpatient safety through effective electronic communication: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espadas Donna

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health information technology and electronic medical records (EMRs are potentially powerful systems-based interventions to facilitate diagnosis and treatment because they ensure the delivery of key new findings and other health related information to the practitioner. However, effective communication involves more than just information transfer; despite a state of the art EMR system, communication breakdowns can still occur. 123 In this project, we will adapt a model developed by the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS to understand and improve the relationship between work systems and processes of care involved with electronic communication in EMRs. We plan to study three communication activities in the Veterans Health Administration's (VA EMR: electronic communication of abnormal imaging and laboratory test results via automated notifications (i.e., alerts; electronic referral requests; and provider-to-pharmacy communication via computerized provider order entry (CPOE. Aim Our specific aim is to propose a protocol to evaluate the systems and processes affecting outcomes of electronic communication in the computerized patient record system (related to diagnostic test results, electronic referral requests, and CPOE prescriptions using a human factors engineering approach, and hence guide the development of interventions for work system redesign. Design This research will consist of multiple qualitative methods of task analysis to identify potential sources of error related to diagnostic test result alerts, electronic referral requests, and CPOE; this will be followed by a series of focus groups to identify barriers, facilitators, and suggestions for improving the electronic communication system. Transcripts from all task analyses and focus groups will be analyzed using methods adapted from grounded theory and content analysis.

  1. A Study of the Creep Effect in Loudspeaker Suspension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerkvist, Finn T.; Thorborg, Knud; Tinggaard, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the creep effect, the visco elastic behaviour of loudspeaker suspension parts, which can be observed as an increase in displacement far below the resonance frequency. The creep effect means that the suspension cannot be modelled as a simple spring. The need for an accurate...

  2. Experimental studies of surface plasmon polariton band gap effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkov, V. S.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Leosson, K.;

    2003-01-01

    the dependence of the SPP band gap (SPPBG) effect manifested via the SPP reflection and guiding (along line defects) on the parameters of the surface structures (period, filling factor and lattice orientation). We find that the SPPBG effect is stronger along &ggr;K direction for all investigated periodic...

  3. Advances in the study of lunar opposition effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian; OUYANG Ziyuan; LI Chunlai; ZOU Yongliao

    2005-01-01

    Photometry is one of the main methods of planetary remote sensing. The opposition effect is a sharp surge in brightness around zero phase angles. Research on opposition effect is an important branch of photometry and also is an important tool in remote sensing of the Moon. In this paper, we reviewed the main laboratory experiments, which depend on simulate samples, lunar soil samples, telescope observations and spacecraft data, performed by all kinds of work on the lunar opposition effect. And we also reviewed the theoretical development of the lunar opposition effect (i.e., the major causes of the lunar opposition effect): the shadow hiding mechanism causes the lunar opposition effect, which includes the famous models (Hapke model and Lumme & Bowell model); then, the coherent backscatter mechanism; and now, the model combining the shadow hiding and coherent backscatter. China has sponsored the Chang'e plan of lunar exploration, and the plan along with the SMART-1 gives a good chance to lunar opposition effect research when the data on the opposition surge at very small phase angles are obtained by the spacecrafts.

  4. Simulators as tools to study effects on ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hau, B.

    1984-01-01

    Three examples of possible effects on agro-ecosystems are simulated and the advantages of simulation models to investigate the behavior of ecosystems are discussed. The first example is an investigation of the effects of fungicides on epidemics of barley powdery mildew in dependence on different efficacies, and persistences of the chemicals. With the same fungus the effect of environmental pollution by SO/sub 2/ is simulated which reduces the infection efficiency of Erysiphe graminis. In the third case the negative prognosis for late blight of potato is examined under the influence of increased temperature and relative humidity as caused by cooling towers of power stations.

  5. Effects of three types of retirement preparation program: A qualitative study of civil servants in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leandro-França, C.; van Solinge, H.; Henkens, K.; Giardini Murta, S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the effectiveness of retirement planning programs are relatively scarce. Retirement preparation and planning programs may assist individuals to smooth the transition to retirement and subsequent adjustment. This qualitative study examines the effects of three retirement preparation progra

  6. A Brief Study of Body Language in Effective Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡梦蓉

    2008-01-01

    Body language is a key note of non-verbal communication and shaped by culture. The article illustrates sign meaning of bodylanguage and devotes to a comparison and contrast of body language so as to achieve effective communication.

  7. Experimental study of the thermoacoustic effect in magnetoacoustic tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoacoustic tomography (MAT is an emerging noninvasive electrical conductivity imaging that combines the high dielectric contrast of tissues and excellent resolutions of ultrasonography. In this paper, we have found the thermoacoustic (TA effect in the measurement of MAT. Several materials with different conductivities have been measured by a MAT system with and without a static magnetic field. The acoustic signals have been analyzed and compared in the time domain and the frequency domain, respectively. It is found that the TA effect is related to the material characteristics. For the tissue-like materials with low conductivities, the TA signals caused by the TA effect are observable and cannot be ignored in the time and frequency domains. It means that the TA effect of biological tissues should be considered in MAT system in the future.

  8. Study IDs Effective Rx for Burned-Out Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out don't have to suffer, researchers report. Burnout affects more than half of U.S. doctors, according ... the effectiveness of interventions across a range of burnout outcomes," review lead author Dr. Colin West said ...

  9. The theoretical studies of piezoresistive effect in diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the Fuchs and Sondheimer thin film theory (F-S film theory) and a revised valence band split-off model, considering a mixed scattering by lattice vibrations, ionized impurities and surfaces, a theoretical description of the piezoresistive effect (PR effect) in p-type heteroepitaxial diamond films was presented by solving the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation and using the parallel connection resistance model. A calculating expression of the PR effect was given. The main characteristics that were identical with the experiment were obtained by theoretical calculation. Giving out a model to show that the energy level interval between the split-off band and the heavy-hole band was changed by strain, a reasonable explanation was presented for the error between experimental results and theoretical values of saturated PR effect under big strain.

  10. The Social Norm to Study Abroad: Determinants and Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Knut; Peter, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of intercultural skills by studies abroad is often considered as desirable. But although we can observe a steady increase of studies abroad in the last two decades, the vast majority of students can, obviously, compete on the labor market also without study abroad experience. This leads to the consideration that it could be…

  11. The Effect of the Cherry Hill Study Skills Program on Eighth Grade Students' Reading Comprehension and Study Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marca, Marilyn Tierney

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of the "Cherry Hill Study Skills Program" on eighth grade students' reading comprehension and study skills. The "Cherry Hill Study Skills Program" is a process oriented course dealing with the sequential development of nine specific skills deemed essential to the retrieval and retention of information…

  12. STUDY OF WING SHIELDING EFFECT OF PROPELLER AIRCRAFT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The calculation of wing shielding effect starts from solving Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation without quadrupole source in time domain. The sound scattering of the wing and fuselage which are surrounded by a multi-propeller sound field is modeled as a second sound source. A program is developed to calculate the acoustical effects of the rigid fuselage as well as wings with arbitrary shape in motion at low Mach number. As an example, the numerical calculation of the wing shielding of Y12 aircraft with an approximate shape is presented. The result manifests clearly the shielding effect of the wing on the fuselage and the approach is more efficient than that published before.

  13. Theoretical study of phosphorene tunneling field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jiwon; Hobbs, Chris [SEMATECH, 257 Fuller Rd #2200, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    In this work, device performances of tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) based on phosphorene are explored via self-consistent atomistic quantum transport simulations. Phosphorene is an ultra-thin two-dimensional (2-D) material with a direct band gap suitable for TFETs applications. Our simulation shows that phosphorene TFETs exhibit subthreshold slope below 60 mV/dec and a wide range of on-current depending on the transport direction due to highly anisotropic band structures of phosphorene. By benchmarking with monolayer MoTe{sub 2} TFETs, we predict that phosphorene TFETs oriented in the small effective mass direction can yield much larger on-current at the same on-current/off-current ratio than monolayer MoTe{sub 2} TFETs. It is also observed that a gate underlap structure is required for scaling down phosphorene TFETs in the small effective mass direction to suppress the source-to-drain direct tunneling leakage current.

  14. Study of size effect using digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. A. SANTOS

    Full Text Available Size effect is an important issue in concrete structures bearing in mind that it can influence many aspects of analysis such as strength, brittleness and structural ductility, fracture toughness and fracture energy, among others. Further this, ever more new methods are being developed to evaluate displacement fields in structures. In this paper an experimental evaluation of the size effect is performed applying Digital Image Correlation (DIC technique to measure displacements on the surface of beams. Three point bending tests were performed on three different size concrete beams with a notch at the midspan. The results allow a better understanding of the size effect and demonstrate the efficiency of Digital Image Correlation to obtain measures of displacements.

  15. Studies of Non-Targeted Effects of Ionising Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleg V Belyakov; Heli Mononen; Marjo Peraelae [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The discovery of ionising radiation induced non-targeted effects is important for understanding the dose-response mechanisms relevant to low dose irradiation in vivo. One important question is whether the non-targeted effects relates to a protective mechanism or whether, conversely, it amplifies the number of cells damaged by the isolated radiation tracks of low dose exposures leading to an increased risk of carcinogenesis. One theory supported by the experimental data obtained during this project is that the main functions of the non-targeted effects are to decrease the risk of transformation in a multicellular organism exposed to radiation. Differences in the gene expression profiles, temporal and spatial patterns of key proteins expressed in directly irradiated and bystander cells may determine how the cells ultimately respond to low doses of radiation. Such a mechanism of co-operative response would make the tissue system much more robust. (N.C.)

  16. An fMRI study on sunk cost effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianmin; Zhang, Qinglin; Chen, Changming; Yu, Rongjun; Gong, Qiyong

    2013-06-26

    Sunk cost effect (also called escalation of commitment, etc) is a pervasive, interesting and famous decision bias, which has been intensively discussed in psychology, economics, management, political science, zoology, etc. To date, little has been known about the neural basis of this phenomenon. We investigated it by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to monitor healthy subjects' brain activities when they made decisions in a task wherein sunk cost and incremental cost were systematically manipulated. Higher sunk cost only increased activity of some brain areas (mainly lateral frontal and parietal cortices, which are involved in risk-taking), whereas lower incremental cost mainly increased activity of some brain areas (including striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, which are sensitive to rewards). No overlapping brain areas were found to respond to both sunk cost and incremental cost. These results favor certainty effect over self-justification or diminishing sensitivity as account of sunk cost effect.

  17. Study on Rural Poverty Reduction Effect of Traffic Infrastructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junping; GUO; Bin; ZHANG; Xiyan; ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    To systematically comb and explore the rural poverty reduction effect of traffic infrastructure,the author analyzed the mechanism,main channels and actual effect of rural traffic infrastructure on poverty reduction.It revealed that rural traffic infrastructure exerts positive or negative effect on poverty reduction directly or indirectly.The positive channel includes increasing non-agricultural employment opportunities,reducing costs for agricultural production,transportation and labor transfer,increasing availability of social service,and promoting adjustment of agricultural industrial structure and development of rural tourism resources.On the whole,traffic infrastructure has significant positive influence on rural poverty reduction.Finally,it summarized policy recommendations for building pro-poor traffic infrastructure,and came up with vacancy of related research field and future exploration direction.

  18. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Assistant Tool Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Melissa; Malin, Jane T.

    2013-01-01

    An effort to determine the feasibility of a software tool to assist in Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) has been completed. This new and unique approach to FMEA uses model based systems engineering concepts to recommend failure modes, causes, and effects to the user after they have made several selections from pick lists about a component s functions and inputs/outputs. Recommendations are made based on a library using common failure modes identified over the course of several major human spaceflight programs. However, the tool could be adapted for use in a wide range of applications from NASA to the energy industry.

  19. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Assistant Tool Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Melissa D.; Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land D.

    2013-09-01

    An effort to determine the feasibility of a software tool to assist in Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) has been completed. This new and unique approach to FMEA uses model based systems engineering concepts to recommend failure modes, causes, and effects to the user after they have made several selections from pick lists about a component's functions and inputs/outputs. Recommendations are made based on a library using common failure modes identified over the course of several major human spaceflight programs. However, the tool could be adapted for use in a wide range of applications from NASA to the energy industry.

  20. Effects of Team and Organizational Commitment--A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neininger, Alexandra; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Kauffeld, Simone; Henschel, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Retention management, i.e., keeping qualified employees, is a top priority for contemporary organizations. Commitment, and especially team commitment, can be the key to mastering this challenge. There is a lack of longitudinal research concerning the development and the direction of the effects of team commitment over time. In a longitudinal…

  1. Effects of organizational and team commitment - a longitudinal study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neininger, A.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Kauffeld, S.; Henschel, A.

    2010-01-01

    Retention management, i.e., keeping qualified employees, is a top priority for contemporary organizations. Commitment, and especially teamcommitment, can be the key to mastering this challenge. There is a lack of longitudinal research concerning the development and the direction of the effects of te

  2. Brain Connectivity Studies in Schizophrenia: Unravelling the Effects of Antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nejad, A.B.; Ebdrup, Bjørn Hylsebeck; Glenthøj, Birte Yding;

    2012-01-01

    Impaired brain connectivity is a hallmark of schizophrenia brain dysfunction. However, the effect of drug treatment and challenges on the dysconnectivity of functional networks in schizophrenia is an understudied area. In this review, we provide an overview of functional magnetic resonance imaging...

  3. How to Study the Doppler Effect with Audacity Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Marco Adriano; Carvalho, Paulo Simeão; Ventura, Daniel Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect is one of the recurring themes in college and high school classes. In order to contextualize the topic and engage the students in their own learning process, we propose a simple and easily accessible activity, i.e. the analysis of the videos available on the internet by the students. The sound of the engine of the vehicle…

  4. Study of microwave effects on the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Chen; Reddy, P Muralidhar; Devi, C Shobha; Chang, Po-Chi; Ho, Yen-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The effect of microwave heating on lipase-catalyzed reaction remains controversial. It is not clear whether the reaction rate enhancements are purely due to thermal/heating effects or to non-thermal effects. Therefore, quantitative mass spectrometry was used to conduct accurate kinetic analysis of lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of triolein by microwave and conventional heating. Commercial lipases from Candida rugosa (CRL), Porcine Pancreas (PPL), and Burkholderia cepacia (BCL) were used. Hydrolysis reactions were performed at various temperatures and pH levels, along with various amounts of buffer and enzymes. Hydrolysis product yields at each time point using an internal-standard method showed no significant difference between microwave and conventional heating conditions when the reaction was carried out at the same temperature. CRL showed optimum catalytic activity at 37 °C, while PPL and BCL had better activities at 50 °C. The phosphate buffer was found to give a better hydrolysis yield than the Tris-HCl buffer. Overall results prove that a non-thermal effect does not exist in microwave-assisted lipase hydrolysis of triolein. Therefore, conventional heating at high temperatures (e.g., 50 °C) can be also used to accelerate hydrolysis reactions.

  5. Primary study of muscone's effect on cardiovascular system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xue-jing; WU Qi-biao; LI Hai-tao

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of muscone on cardiovascular system. Methods Experimental animals to divide muscone high、middle、low dose group(the mouse is 20 mg·kg-1, 10 mg·kg-1, 5.0 mg·kg-1; the rat is 10 mg·kg-1, 5.0 mg·kg-1, 2.5 mg·kg-1), GT group( the mouse is 1/12 mg·kg-1; the rat is 1/24 mg·kg-1) and NS group. Intragastrie administration in a week, do the mouse ant-hypoxia experiment,the drug (Pit.) produce the rat myocardial ischemia experiment and obstruct coronary artery to produce the rat myocardial ischemia experiment. The mice's survival time (t), the rat's variation of T in electrocardiogram, creatinkinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were recorded, respectively. Results The effect of Muscone is significant difference between GT and NS in a dose variation manner. Conclusions Muscone has the effect of ant-hypoxia, cutting down T peak value, reducing CK and LDH. The muscone has effect to inhibiting myocardial ischemia.

  6. Study of anti-inflammatory effect of simvastatin in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranga Satya Venkatesh

    2016-08-01

    Results: At a dose of 40 mg Simvastatin showed anti-inflammatory effect which is statically highly significant. Conclusions: However, the above preclinical experiments only give us an idea about the anti-inflammatory activity, but large scale clinical trials are necessary for final assessment. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(4.000: 1520-1523

  7. Studies on Male Antifertilitic and Immunomodulatory Effects of TW19

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王作鹏; 王晓凤; 曹霖; 陆荣发; 赵世兴; 李晓玉; 顾芝萍

    2000-01-01

    TW 19 is a diterpene compound isolated from the root cortex of Tripterygium Wilfordii Hood. F. . Its effects on the immune function in ICR mice and the male fertility in SD rats, ICR mice and Kunming mice were evaluated. TW19 was given orally for 5 weeks. Then the antifertilitic effect was assessed by mating test. The results showed that EDso for anti-fertilitic were 332 μg/kg, 369. 9 μg/kg and 286. 8 μg/kg per day in SD rats, ICR mice and Kunming mice respectively. After the treatment of TW 19 at anti fertility dose for 5 weeks consecutively, the spermatozoa density and motility of trial animals reduced significantly. The weight of testis also declined in SD rats and Kunming mice, but no effects were observed in ICR mice. TW 19 inhibited proliferation of splenic T and B-lymphocytes of ICR mice in vitro and hence inhibited the antibody formation in vivo, but compared with T 4, the immunosuppressive effect of TW 19 was less obvious.

  8. Chronic Juvenile Delinquency and the "Suppression Effect": An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Mark; Norman, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Notes that fear of apprehension and punishment have been reported to suppress juvenile crime. Discusses suppression effect in regard to the correlates of chronic juvenile delinquency and exploratory evidence that youth who commit large volume of crime do not fear sanctions imposed by juvenile court any more than youth who commit only one offense…

  9. Microscopic models for the study of taxpayer audit effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertotti, Maria Letizia; Modanese, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    A microscopic dynamic model is here constructed and analyzed, describing the evolution of the income distribution in the presence of taxation and redistribution in a society in which also tax evasion and auditing processes occur. The focus is on effects of enforcement regimes, characterized by different choices of the audited taxpayer fraction and of the penalties imposed to noncompliant individuals. A complex systems perspective is adopted: society is considered as a system composed by a large number of heterogeneous individuals. These are divided into income classes and may as well have different tax evasion behaviors. The variation in time of the number of individuals in each class is described by a system of nonlinear differential equations of the kinetic discretized Boltzmann type involving transition probabilities. A priori, one could think that audits and fines should have a positive effect on the reduction of economic inequality and correspondingly of the Gini index G. According to our model, however, such effect is rather small. In contrast, the effect on the increase of the tax revenue may be significant.

  10. Study of Nuclear Effects in the Computation of the 0{\

    CERN Document Server

    Neacsu, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the effects that different nuclear structure approximations associated with the short range correlations (SRC), finite nucleon size (FNS), higher order terms in the nucleon currents (HOC) and with some nuclear input parameters, have on the values of the nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) for the neutrinoless double beta (0{\

  11. The Effect of Strategy on Problem Solving: An FMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Sharlene D.; Pruce, Benjamin; Rusia, Akash; Burns, Thomas, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    fMRI was used to examine the differential effect of two problem-solving strategies. Participants were trained to use both a pictorial/spatial and a symbolic/algebraic strategy to solve word problems. While these two strategies activated similar cortical regions, a number of differences were noted in the level of activation. These differences…

  12. The Asch Conformity Effect: A Study in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Taha

    1984-01-01

    Investigated whether conformity in the experimental setting suggested by Asch was related to American culture and less likely to be replicable elsewhere. Kuwaiti subjects (N=200) were used in replicating the original experiment. Obtained an 'Asch effect' of a comparable magnitude to that of Asch. Individual differences in conformity were evident.…

  13. A Study of the Effects of Air Pollution on Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Irene B.

    1970-01-01

    An investigation of the possible effects of air pollution on the absenteeism of elementary school children showed that a greater percent of absences occurred in the test group than in a comparable group. There is little question as to the importance that such information should have for educators, informed parents, and other adults in community…

  14. Study Confirms Demonstrator Horses Can Have Calming Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørvang, Maria Vilain; Leste-Lasserre, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Naive horses that watched an experienced demonstrator horse perform a scary task—crossing a tarp, in this study's case—were less spooked when it was their turn.......Naive horses that watched an experienced demonstrator horse perform a scary task—crossing a tarp, in this study's case—were less spooked when it was their turn....

  15. Lesson study: the effect on teachers' professional development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, Nellie C.; Tall, David O.

    2011-01-01

    This study combines elements of the Japanese Lesson Study approach and teachers’ professional development. An explorative research design is conducted with three upper level high school teachers in the light of educational design research, whereby design activities will be cyclically evaluated. The

  16. The Effects of Affect on Study Abroad Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savicki, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Being a study abroad student is not all sweetness and light. By definition, study abroad students are faced with acculturative stress (Berry, 2005) by virtue of encountering differences in assumptions, values, and expectations of daily living in their host culture. Add to that the usual challenge of hearing and speaking a different language, and…

  17. Using a Case-Study Article to Effectively Introduce Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoewyk, Doug

    2007-01-01

    Community college students in a nonmajors biology class are introduced to mitosis by reading a case-study article that allows them to gauge how many times various parts of their bodies have been regenerated. The case-study article allows students to develop a conceptual framework of the cell cycle prior to a lecture on mitosis. (Contains 1 figure.)

  18. Detuning effect study of High-Q Mobile Phone Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahramzy, Pevand; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2015-01-01

    Number of frequency bands that have to be covered by smart phones, are ever increasing. This broadband coverage can be obtained either by using a low-Q antenna or a high-Q tunable antenna. This study investigates high-Q antennas performance when placed in proximity of the user. This study...

  19. Arts-Based Self-Study: Documenting the Ripple Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Like all forms of inquiry, arts-based self-study research can have unexpected consequences. Although we may start out with a fairly clear objective, the data we generate through arts-based methods might address other questions that are even more important than the ones we thought to ask initially, and our study might have an impact that extends…

  20. Study on the ionospheric effects with different heat-conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Fang; ZHAO Zhengyu; NI Binbin; ZHANG Yuannong

    2007-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed.Based on the numerical simulation results,the spatial effects of the ionosphere,mainly consisting of the change on electron density(ED)and electron temperature(ET),heated by the high frequency(HF)pump wave have been analyzed quantitatively.Results are presented as the space-time evolution regulation on the main parameters of the ionosphere resulted by the HF heating waves under the different heat-conditions,iust as different regions,such as high latitude and mid-low latitude;different heating power or frequency,such as underdense heating and over-dense heating and regions at different altitudes.The heating effects in different regions with different heating conditions have been presented in figures.Finally,some primary conclusions are given by comparing the simulation results with experimental observation.

  1. Experimental and numerical study of short pulse effects in FELs

    CERN Document Server

    Khodyachykh, S; Genz, H; Hessler, C; Richter, A; Asgekar, V

    2004-01-01

    We report the experimental and numerical investigations of the influence of short pulse effects occurring in FELs in different operational regimes for electron bunch lengths which are of the order of the slippage distance. Several observables such as the small signal gain, the macropulse power and the spectral distribution of the FEL radiation were determined experimentally within the constraints of the stable focus regime at the infrared FEL at the S- DALINAC and for the limit cycle regime at the Dutch near infrared FEL FELIX. The experimental findings were compared to predictions of numerical simulations based on the 1D time dependent code FEL1D-OSC. The agreement between experiment and simulation is good. Furthermore, the simulations reveal a chaotic behavior of the macropulses for specific values of the slippage as well as period-doubling, two effects that are predicted to show up in the spectral distribution.

  2. Study of a model equation in detonation theory: multidimensional effects

    CERN Document Server

    Faria, Luiz M; Rosales, Rodolfo R

    2015-01-01

    We extend the reactive Burgers equation presented in Kasimov et al. Phys. Rev. Lett., 110 (2013) and Faria et al. SIAM J. Appl. Maths, 74 (2014), to include multidimensional effects. Furthermore, we explain how the model can be rationally justified following the ideas of the asymptotic theory developed in Faria et al. JFM (2015). The proposed model is a forced version of the unsteady small disturbance transonic flow equations. We show that for physically reasonable choices of forcing functions, traveling wave solutions akin to detonation waves exist. It is demonstrated that multidimensional effects play an important role in the stability and dynamics of the traveling waves. Numerical simulations indicate that solutions of the model tend to form multi-dimensional patterns analogous to cells in gaseous detonations.

  3. Experimental Study of Effect of Perfluorohexyloctane to Retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunfang Li; Xiaoyan Ding; Lin Lu; Guanguang Feng; Huling Zheng

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of perfluorohexvloctane to the retina of rabbit eyes.Methods: Perfluoroh-exyloctane (experimental group) or BSS(control group) intovitreous cavities of fifteen vitrectomized New Zealand white rabbits. A slit-lampbiomicroscope and an indirect ophthalmoscope were used to examine all the eyes pre- andpostoperation. Histopathological examination was performed after the rabbits weresacrificed. Results:Perfluorohexyloctane was injected into the vitreous cavity forming a single largeclear globe. No retinal detachment and cataract were found. The edema of outer plexiformlayer was significant, and then get thin, inner nuclear layer and ganglion cell bodies hada darker cytop: lasm and nucleoplasm. Conclusions: Perfluorohexyloctane in vitreous cavity had significant side effects on retinaAs a silicone solvent, it should be removed out completely after injection. We don′trecommend to use it as a new intraocular temponade.

  4. Experimental and numerical study of short pulse effects in FELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodyachykh, S.; Brunken, M.; Genz, H.; Hessler, C.; Richter, A.; Asgekar, V.

    2004-09-01

    We report the experimental and numerical investigations of the influence of short pulse effects occurring in FELs in different operational regimes for electron bunch lengths which are of the order of the slippage distance. Several observables such as the small signal gain, the macropulse power and the spectral distribution of the FEL radiation were determined experimentally within the constraints of the stable focus regime at the infrared FEL at the S-DALINAC and for the limit cycle regime at the Dutch near infrared FEL FELIX. The experimental findings were compared to predictions of numerical simulations based on the 1D time dependent code FEL1D-OSC. The agreement between experiment and simulation is good. Furthermore, the simulations reveal a chaotic behavior of the macropulses for specific values of the slippage as well as period-doubling, two effects that are predicted to show up in the spectral distribution.

  5. Computational Study on Effect of Synthetic Jet Design Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Okada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of amplitude and frequency of synthetic jet on the characteristics of induced jet are investigated. To estimate effects of the parameters, flow inside the synthetic jet cavity and orifice and the outer flow is simultaneously simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES. Comparison of the present LES result with the experimental data shows that three-dimensional LES of the flow inside the cavity is essential for accurate estimation of the velocity and velocity fluctuation of the synthetic jet. Comparison of the present results under various flow conditions shows that amplitude and frequency can control profiles of time-averaged vertical velocity and fluctuation of the vertical velocity as well as damping rate of the induced velocity and fluctuation.

  6. How to study the Doppler effect with Audacity software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriano Dias, Marco; Simeão Carvalho, Paulo; Rodrigues Ventura, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    The Doppler effect is one of the recurring themes in college and high school classes. In order to contextualize the topic and engage the students in their own learning process, we propose a simple and easily accessible activity, i.e. the analysis of the videos available on the internet by the students. The sound of the engine of the vehicle passing by the camera is recorded on the video; it is then analyzed with the free software Audacity by measuring the frequency of the sound during approach and recede of the vehicle from the observer. The speed of the vehicle is determined due to the application of Doppler effect equations for acoustic waves.

  7. A study of the heated length to diameter effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Ho; Baek, Won Pil; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    An analytical and experimental investigation has been performed on the heated length-to-diameter effect on critical heat flux exit conditions. A L/D correction factor is developed by applying artificial neural network and conventional regression techniques to the KAIST CHF data base. In addition, experiment is being performed to validate the developed L/D correction factor with independent data. Assessment shows that the developed correction factor is promising for practical applications. 6 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  8. Study of the Geometric Stiffening Effect: Comparison of Different Formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayo, Juana M., E-mail: juana@us.es; Garcia-Vallejo, Daniel; Dominguez, Jaime [Universidad de Sevilla, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y de los Materiales (Spain)

    2004-05-15

    This paper reviews different formulations to account for the stress stiffening or geometric stiffening effect arising from deflections large enough to cause significant changes in the configuration of the system The importance of such effect on many engineering applications, such as the dynamic behavior of helicopter blades, flexible rotor arms, turbine blades, etc., is well known. The analysis is carried out only for one-dimensional elements in 2D.Formulations based on the floating frame of reference approach are computationally very efficient, as the use of the component synthesis method allows for a reduced number of coordinates. However, something must be done for them to account for the geometric stiffening effect. The easiest method is the application of the substructuring technique, because the formulation is not modified. This, however, is not the most efficient approach. In problems where deformation is moderated, the simple inclusion of the geometric stiffness matrix is enough. On the other hand, if the deformation is large, higher-order terms must be included in the strain energy. In order to achieve an efficient and stable formulation, an explicit geometrically nonlinear beam element was developed. The formulations that use absolute coordinates are, generally, computationally more costly than the previous ones, as they must use a large number of degrees of freedom. However, the geometric stiffening effect can be automatically accounted for with these formulations. The aim of this work is to investigate the applicability of the different existing formulations in order to help the user select the right one for his particular application.

  9. Study of the Effects of Globalization on Iranian Caviar Export

    OpenAIRE

    Abolghasem Barghandan; Kamran Barghandan; Mohammadreza Naeemi; Abdolghafoor Mohammadzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Globalization is integration of national economies in global economy and infers on increasing the flow of goods and services. In this study the consequences of globalization were studied through the analysis of Level of International Trade index (LIT) in the caviar export equation. The required data were gathered from Statistical Yearbook of Foreign Trade, Statistical Yearbook of fisheries, Statistical Yearbook of the International Monetary Fund, United Nations Food and Agriculture Organizati...

  10. Effects of study design and trends for EVAR versus OSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hopkins

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Robert Hopkins1, James Bowen1, Kaitryn Campbell1, Gord Blackhouse4, Guy De Rose2,3, Teresa Novick2, Daria O’Reilly1,4, Ron Goeree1,4, Jean-Eric Tarride1,41Programs for the Assessment of Technology in Health (PATH Research Institute, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics; 2Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada; 3Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada; 4Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaPurpose: To investigate if study design factors such as randomization, multi-centre versus single centre evidence, institutional surgical volume, and patient selection affect the outcomes for endovascular repair (EVAR versus open surgical repair (OSR. Finally, we investigate trends over time in EVAR versus OSR outcomes.Methods: Search strategies for comparative studies were performed individually for: OVID’s MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, HAPI, and Evidence Based Medicine (EBM Reviews (including Cochrane DSR, ACP Journal Club, DARE and CCTR, limited to 1990 and November 2006.Results: Identified literature: 84 comparative studies pertaining to 57,645 patients. These include 4 randomized controlled trials (RCTs, plus 2 RCTs with long-term follow-up. The other 78 comparative studies were nonrandomized with 75 reporting perioperative outcomes, of which 16 were multi-centre, and 59 single-centre studies. Of the single-centre studies 31 were low-volume and 28 were high-volume centres. In addition, 5 studies had all patients anatomically eligible for EVAR, and 8 studies included high-risk patients only. Finally, 25 long term observational studies reported outcomes up to 3 years.Outcomes: Lower perioperative mortality and rates of complications for EVAR versus OSR varied across study designs and patient

  11. [Epidemiological study on respiratory effects of smoking in college students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozu, Y

    1993-06-01

    To study the influence of smoking on the respiratory system in adolescents, we conducted a prospective study to look into the respiratory symptoms, changes in ventilatory function, and levels of expired CO of both smoking and nonsmoking college students. The subjects were 56 male students who entered Akita University in 1986. Thirty of the participants were smokers at entrance whereas the rest who were nonsmokers, served as controls. The smokers started smoking at an average age of 17.6 +/- 0.9 years. Physical examinations at 8 points during the study were performed periodically in May and November for four years, from 1986 to 1989. From these studies, the following conclusions were obtained. 1) The prevalence of respiratory symptoms, especially phlegm, was higher among the smokers compared with the nonsmokers; the differences not being significant. Among both the smokers and nonsmokers, no prevalence of persistent cough and phlegm was observed during the study period. 2) There were no differences in the levels of %FVC and %V50 between the smokers and the nonsmokers at any point during the study period. The FEV1% levels for smokers were decreased progressively, and the differences became significant at the 7th and 8th tests (p significant at the 7th test (p statistically significant in any levels at the 7th and 8th tests. However, %V25 levels of the heavy smokers (15 significant at the 7th and 8th tests (p < 0.05). 4) Average expired CO concentrations of the smokers were 2.5-3.5 times higher than those of the nonsmokers during the study period, confirming exposure to tobacco smoke. These observations suggest that young smokers may develop obstructive changes, especially narrowed small airways during the first 5 years of exposure to tobacco smoke.

  12. Study on effects of environmental regulation on competitiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Man Ok; Lim, Hyun Jeong [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    For Korea, the claim that the enhancement of environmental regulation is worsening the international competitiveness of the business is dominant. However, it is too early to reestablish a relationship between environmental regulation and competitiveness with the above new aspect. In fact, the economic development, which is brought a quantitative growth, and the maintenance of environmental quality, which is brought a qualitative growth, are very important on decision making in economic and social policy. In this study, it represents the results of existing positive studies on the relationship between the enhancement of environmental regulation, trade and productivity. Moreover, the objective of this study is on applying it based on the data of Korea. 86 refs., 13 figs., 35 tabs.

  13. A study on the effects of advertisement on brand equity: Evidence from mobile industry

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Samiei Nasr; Seyed Mohsen Seyed Ali Akbar; Elham Aghaalikhani

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the effects of advertisement on brand equity. The study has accomplished on two well-known brands in mobile providers in city of Tehran, Iran. The study uses Aaker’s model to examine the effects of advertisement on various factors such as brand awareness, quality perception, brand loyalty and brand associate. The study also investigates the effects of brand awareness, quality perception and brand associate on brand loyalty. The results o...

  14. Effects of Carbohydrate Consumption Case Study: carbohydrates in Bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neacsu N.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates perform numerous roles in living organisms; they are an important source of energy. The body uses carbohydrates to make glucose which is the fuel that gives it energy and helps keep everything going. However, excess carbohydrate consumption has negative health effects. Bread is a basic product in our nutrition and it also is a product with a high content of carbohydrates. So, it is important to find out more information on bread and on the recommended bread type best for consumption.

  15. Studies of Copper Nanoparticles Effects on Micro-organisms

    CERN Document Server

    Theivasanthi, T

    2011-01-01

    We discuss about the antibacterial activities of copper nanoparticles on both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria in this investigation. First time, we increase its antibacterial activities by using electrical power while on electrolysis synthesis and it is confirmed from its more antibacterial activities (For Escherichia coli bacteria). We investigate the changes of surface area to volume ratio of copper nanoparticles prepared in two different methods and its effects on antibacterial activities. We note that slight change of surface area to volume ratio results in the enhancement of its antibacterial activities.

  16. Study on Disturbances and Its Effects on Nature Reserves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Linying; Zhou Yongzhang; Xu Songjun

    2006-01-01

    As a widespread natural phenomenon,disturbances are considered a discrete event occurring in a natural ecosystem within various spatial and temporal scales. The present paper discusses the types of disturbances and their influence on the ecologic system in nature reserves. It is shown that nature reserves are facing a great challenge dealing with these disturbances.A rational control for disturbances should be improved in order to promote the healthy development of nature reserves this could be done by enhancing the publicity and training of environment protection, coupling management. with communities around and other nature reserves, effective management methods, rational planning, and supporting nature servers.

  17. An Effective Approach to Flash Vacuum Thermolytic Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars; Egsgaard, Helge

    1980-01-01

    Flash vacuum thermolysis in combination with field ionization mass spectrometry, supplementary with collision activated spectra of the single field ionized molecules, is shown to be a facile and highly informative method for studying even very complex mixtures of primarily formed products...... in the gas phase thermolysis of organic molecules. The method allows quantitative detection of substances with half lifes t1/2 > 10−3 sec. A detailed description of the apparatus, which offers the possibility of studying gas phase thermolyses over a wide range of temperatures (300—1400 K), and the method...

  18. A Study of Effectiveness of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) over Classroom Lecture (CRL) at ICS Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaousar, Tayyeba; Choudhry, Bushra Naoreen; Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of CAI vs. classroom lecture for computer science at ICS level. The objectives were to compare the learning effects of two groups with classroom lecture and computer-assisted instruction studying the same curriculum and the effects of CAI and CRL in terms of cognitive development. Hypotheses of…

  19. The effectiveness of side marker lamps: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeuwes, J; Alferdinck, J W

    1997-03-01

    The present experiment investigated the effect of small amber lamps mounted near the front and rear on each side of a passenger car-so called side marker lamps-on visual detection and recognition of passenger cars in complex nighttime environments. It was determined whether cars equipped with side marker lamps are detected and recognized earlier and more accurately than cars without side marker lamps. Subjects were presented with slides of natural nighttime scenes in which a car, either with or without side marker lamps, viewed from its side, approaching from a side street, was either present or not. Subjects determined as fast as possible whether a car was present or not. Reaction time measures (speed and accuracy) indicated that both under clear and fog visibility conditions, a car equipped with side marker lamps was detected and recognized earlier and more accurately than a car without side marker lamps. The results indicate that side marker lamps increase both lateral conspicuity and recognizability suggesting that side marker lamps may be effective in reducing the number of nighttime angle collisions.

  20. Study the effect of cryogenic cooling on orthogonal machining Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Kaushal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In present scenario , all the manufacturing organization aims to maximize the productivity of organization in respect of all the aspect of manufacturing process, in case of machining process, it associated with various factors which affect the productivity directly in sense of tool life . Temperature, cutting forces, shear angle, work-piece surface finishing & accuracy, amount of power consumed in machining process and other thing also. All the factors might be optimized by applying effective and efficient amount of coolant throughout the process, to get desired efficiency of process. A coolant play a vital role in machining operation but which must have specific properties which have been reviewed in previous article of various student , research scholars , scientist and industrial candidates .in this research paper , we were focusing on the effect of cryogenic cooling on cutting temperature , cutting forces , chip behavior , shear angle , when alloy steel EN-8 and aluminum alloy 6061-T89 was machined by carbide cutting tool (coated & uncoated & applying liquid nitrogen as a coolant and observed that temperature was decreased during the machining process about 16% to 27% and cutting forces improved to 13%when the machining was performed , the same without cooling of EN-8 alloy, similarly on the other hand in case of aluminum alloy 6061-T89 , temperature was decreased to 25% to 37% and cutting force improved to 9% .

  1. Correlation effects in ruthenates: LDA+DMFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelov, Evgeny; Pavarini, Eva [IAS-3, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The ruthenates of the Ruddlesden-Popper family A{sub n+1}Ru{sub n} O{sub 3n+1} where A=(Sr,Ca) are unique among transition-metal oxides, because the change of cation A and/or in the number n of RuO{sub 2} layers leads to a variety of collective phenomena, ranging from multi-band Mott transitions to ferro- and meta-magnetism. To understand these systems, it is necessary to disentangle the effects of Coulomb repulsion in the 4d{sup 4}Ru shell from those of lattice distortions and chemistry. By using the LDA+DMFT approach, we show how such disentanglement explains the nature of the metal-insulator transition in single-layered Ca ruthenates and the evolution of electronic structure in n-layered Sr ruthenates. We use LDA+DMFT scheme based on the N-th Order Muffin-Tin Orbital approach and the weak-coupling CT-quantum Monte Carlo method as impurity solver. This method allows us to take into account the full rotationally-invariant Coulomb interaction, as well as full on-site self-energy matrix in orbital space with spin-orbit coupling. We discuss changes in effective mass and orbital polarization as a result of spin-flip processes and spin-orbit interaction.

  2. Study of multiple scattering effects in heavy ion RBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Z.; O`Connor, D.J. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Multiple scattering effect is normally neglected in conventional Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) analysis. The backscattered particle yield normally agrees well with the theory based on the single scattering model. However, when heavy incident ions are used such as in heavy ion Rutherford backscattering (HIRBS), or the incident ion energy is reduced, multiple scattering effect starts to play a role in the analysis. In this paper, the experimental data of 6MeV C ions backscattered from a Au target are presented. In measured time of flight spectrum a small step in front of the Au high energy edge is observed. The high energy edge of the step is about 3.4 ns ahead of the Au signal which corresponds to an energy {approx} 300 keV higher than the 135 degree single scattering energy. This value coincides with the double scattering energy of C ion undergoes two consecutive 67.5 degree scattering. Efforts made to investigate the origin of the high energy step observed lead to an Monte Carlo simulation aimed to reproduce the experimental spectrum on computer. As a large angle scattering event is a rare event, two consecutive large angle scattering is extremely hard to reproduce in a random simulation process. Thus, the simulation has not found a particle scattering into 130-140 deg with an energy higher than the single scattering energy. Obviously faster algorithms and a better physical model are necessary for a successful simulation. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Dispersion model studies for Space Shuttle environmental effects activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The NASA/MSFC REED computer code was developed for predicting concentrations, dosage, and deposition downwind from rocket vehicle launches. The calculation procedures and results of nine studies using the code are presented. Topics include plume expansion, hydrazine concentrations, and hazard calculations for postulated fuel spills.

  4. The effect of chemotherapy on rat brain PET: preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Su; Kim, Il Han; Yu, A Ram; Park, Ji Ae; Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Jong Guk; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Byeong Il; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Hee Joung; Kim, Kyeong Min [Korea Institute Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Chemotherapy was widely used for the therapy of cancer patients. When chemotherapy was performed, transient cognitive memory problem was occurred. This cognitive problem in brain was called as chemobrain. In this study, we have developed rat model for chemobrain. Cerebral glucose metabolism after chemotherapy was assessed using animal PET and voxel based statistical analysis method

  5. The Effect of Accent on Listening Comprehension: A Singapore Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, George K.

    1978-01-01

    A study was conducted at Nanyang University in Singapore with Chinese-educated students who supposedly received 12 years of instruction in English but who were still deficient in the language. Comprehension of four different English accents were tested, and two tests of measuring aural comprehension were compared. (SW)

  6. Case Studies of Effects of Artificial Food Colors on Hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Carl; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A double blind, double crossover study with six hyperactive boys (8 to 13 years old) tested B. Feingold's hypothesis that synthetic food colors cause hyperactivity in some children. All Ss were on the Feingold diet, eliminating artificial colors and flavors. The authors conclude that evidence for Feingold's hypothesis is weak. (Author)

  7. Learning word meanings: Overnight integration and study modality effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, F. van der; Takashima, A.; Segers, P.C.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2015-01-01

    According to the complementary learning systems (CLS) account of word learning, novel words are rapidly acquired (learning system 1), but slowly integrated into the mental lexicon (learning system 2). This two-step learning process has been shown to apply to novel word forms. In this study, we inves

  8. A Predictive Validity Study of Creative and Effective Managerial Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffie, D. J.; Goodner, Susan

    This study tests the following hypotheses concerning the job creativity of managers: (1) There is a significant relationship between psychological test scores secured on subjects 15 to 20 years ago and creative performance on the job today, (2) there is a significant relationship between biographical information secured from subjects at the time…

  9. Non-Returning Student Interview Study and RSC's Institutional Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Suzi; Slark, Julie

    In 1989, staff from Rancho Santiago College's (RSC's) research office conducted telephone interviews with a random sample of 255 out of the 17,359 former students who attended RSC in spring 1989 but did not return for the next semester. The study was conducted to determine why students did not return, whether they accomplished their educational…

  10. Effectively Integrating an International Field Study into the EMBA Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, John; Jones, Raymond; Kashlak, Roger

    2003-01-01

    An international field study (IFS) is an integral part of the EMBA program because of the various critical roles it plays. This international travel experience is a value-added activity not only as "stand alone" vehicle for understanding macro-level environments and firm-level strategic initiatives, but also as a tool that integrates other pieces…

  11. The Effects of Macroglossia on Speech: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Abebayehu Messele

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a case study of speech production in a 14-year-old Amharic-speaking boy. The boy had developed secondary macroglossia, related to a disturbance of growth hormones, following a history of normal speech development. Perceptual analysis combined with acoustic analysis and static palatography is used to investigate the specific…

  12. Experimental and Numerical Study of Spoiler Effect on Ship Stability: Effect of Spoiler Inclination Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy Mohammed Abou Rayan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Ship stability is studied experimentally and numerically. The injection of air or exhaust gas stabilizes cavities behind spoilers. The spoiler system is tested experimentally to understand the parameters affecting the flow field and bubble formation around the spoiler. These parameters are the spoiler inclination angle, rise of floor angle and injected air position. The spoiler inclination angle effect is studied in this paper. The images of flow field variation and bubble formation are recorded with scientific video camera and compared with the computed flow field at different conditions and time sequence. The two-phase flow field around a ship spoiler with the free surface simulation in Piecewise Linear Interface Construction method is modeled numerically using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code. The bubbles shape, the three-dimensional flow field around the spoiler body and the pressure variation on the wake of the spoiler body are computed. The comparison between the numerical and experimental results shows a good matching of bubble formation and the difference may be attributed to the laminar flow computation without including turbulence effects. The moment around the 90° inclined spoiler fixation line is 1.651 times that around the 30A Survey Based Study on Factors Effecting Communication in GSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Ali Khan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Presently, most of software development companies are trying to globalize their work throughout the world in order to get the various benefits. The phenomenon of this software globalization is called Global Software Development (GSD. However, GSD is not a simple job and the software companies face various challenges. In GSD Communication is a main issue and it became more complicated during Requirements Change Management (RCM. This research will result to explore different factors that can negatively affect communication during the RCM process by conducting a survey in GSD industry. A framework is proposed for the factors effecting communication and total nine hypotheses are developed. A quantitative research method has been used to collect and analyse the data. The results show that total seven out of nine hypotheses are supported and two hypotheses are rejected.

  13. Substituent effects of iron porphyrins: Structural, kinetic, and theoretical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Xiaoquan, E-mail: luxq@nwnu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry and Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, 730070 (China); Ma Junying; Sun Ruiping; Nan Mina; Meng Fanfu; Du Jie; Wang Xiaoyan; Shang Hui [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry and Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, 730070 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Substituent effects of iron porphyrin complexes on the structures and kinetic processes have been examined for the first time. Basing on the premise that iron porphyrin is functional analogous to heme, a series of iron porphyrin derivatives bearing different substituents at the meso positions of the corrole ring are investigated as to their electrochemistry, the relationships among the electron transfer (ET) processes, their structures, and orbital energies. The good coherence between the experiment and theory indicates that the ET rate can be accelerated when electron-donating substituents are introduced to the iron porphyrin ring. Finally, the implications of the results are discussed in the influence of stability of iron porphyrin complexes on the ability to carry molecular oxygen, which may suggest it possible to dominate the biological activity of heme by selecting the appropriate substituents to iron porphyrin ring.

  14. Effect of coordination on bond properties: A first principles study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jaita Paul; Shobhana Narasimhan

    2008-06-01

    We have used density functional theory to obtain the binding curves for a variety of hypothetical periodic structures of Al, Si, Pb, Sn and Au. Upon examining the resulting database of results for equilibrium bond lengths and radial force constants (within a nearest-neighbour model), we find that both decrease smoothly as coordination is reduced. The effect of dimensionality appears to be small. We find that the force constants at equilibrium vary as the inverse eighth power of the equilibrium bond length. We also find evidence that the force constants are sensitive only to the bond length, and not to the coordination number. We believe these results will be useful in formulating interatomic potentials, e.g., for nanosystems.

  15. Effects of carbon dioxide on Penicillium chrysogenum: an autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, A.G.; Ho, C.S.

    1988-06-20

    Previous research has shown that dissolved carbon dioxide causes significant changes in submerged penicillin fermentations, such as stunted, swollen hyphae, increased branching, lower growth rates, and lower penicillin productivity. Influent carbon dioxide levels of 5 and 10% were shown through the use of autoradiography to cause an increase in chitin synthesis in submerged cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum. At an influent 5% carbon dioxide level, chitin synthesis is ca. 100% greater in the subapical region of P. chrysogenum hyphae than that of the control, in which there was no influent carbon dioxide. Influent carbon dioxide of 10% caused an increase of 200% in chitin synthesis. It is believed that the cell wall must be plasticized before branching can occur and that high amounts of dissolved carbon dioxide cause the cell to lose control of the plasticizing effect, thus the severe morphological changes occur.

  16. A social work study to measure the effect of unemployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Iravani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Unemployment is believed as one of most important issues in today's economy around the world. The recent economic turmoil in European countries, for instance, has created some troubles such as increase in rate of depression, divorce, etc. In this paper, we present a social study work in one of regions of Iran. The proposed study of this paper designs and distributes a questionnaire among 80 experts who live in the region and tries to understand whether there is a correlation between unemployment and rubbery, immigration, drug addiction and non-value jobs. The survey uses Pearson correlation to test four hypotheses and the results indicate that although there is no strong correlation between unemployment and rubbery and immigration but there is a strong evidence to believe that unemployment can increase drug addiction and non-value added jobs.

  17. Effects of Humanitarian Aid: A Cuban Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    impact on the flow of medicine and medical supplies into the country. Cuba’s biotechnology industry could manufacture life saving vaccines but not the...to study in Cuba in order to return to their own country to practice medicine. Fourth, Cuba’s biotechnology industry is able to produce life-saving...medical diplomacy is biotechnology assistance. Heavy investment in the biotechnology industry has made it an appealing export for hard currency and a

  18. Outsourcing and Innovation: An Empirical Study of Causes and Effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Sasan Bakhtiari; Robert Breunig

    2012-01-01

    We study the implications of vertical integration on innovation performance using firm-level data on Australian manufacturing. We use the data to distinguish between low-cost-oriented and innovation-oriented outsourcing. Outsourcing without innovation lowers costs at the expense of damaging the future chances of innovation, while innovation-oriented outsourcing leads to higher costs but increases the likelihood of future innovation. For firms that innovate and outsource, the probability of fu...

  19. Study on Synergy Effect in Dimethyl Ether Synthesis from Syngas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志良; 刁杰; 王金福; 金涌

    2001-01-01

    Influence of reaction temperature, pressure and space velocity on the direct synthesis of dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas is studied in an isothermal fixed-bed reactor. The catalyst is a physical mixture of C30 copper-based methanol (MeOH) synthesis catalyst and ZSM-5 dehydration catalyst. The experimental results show that the chemical synergy between methanol synthesis reaction and methanol dehydration reaction is evident. The conversion of carbon monoxide is over 90%.

  1. Learning word meanings: Overnight integration and study modality effects

    OpenAIRE

    Frauke van der Ven; Atsuko Takashima; Eliane Segers; Ludo Verhoeven

    2015-01-01

    According to the complementary learning systems (CLS) account of word learning, novel words are rapidly acquired (learning system 1), but slowly integrated into the mental lexicon (learning system 2). This two-step learning process has been shown to apply to novel word forms. In this study, we investigated whether novel word meanings are also gradually integrated after acquisition by measuring the extent to which newly learned words were able to prime semantically related words at two differe...

  2. Software piracy: A study of causes, effects and preventive measures

    OpenAIRE

    Khadka, Ishwor

    2015-01-01

    Software piracy is a serious issue that has been affecting software companies for decades. According to Business Software Alliance (BSA), the global software piracy rate in 2013 was 43 percent and the commercial value of unlicensed software installations was $62.7 billion, which resulted in millions of revenues and jobs lost in software companies. The goal of this study was to better understand the software piracy behaviours, how it happens, how it affects to individuals and software compani...

  3. Physiological techniques in the study of rapid aldosterone effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusef, Yamil R; Thomas, Warren; Harvey, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging and electrophysiological techniques are powerful tools to analyze the responses stimulated by aldosterone and other hormones in target tissues. Studies with Ussing-type chambers can be used to measure and characterize changes in transepithelial currents resulting from hormone treatment. Confocal imaging techniques can be used in real time or in fixed preparations to evaluate the localization of receptors, signalling intermediates, and transporters.

  4. Taking the Time. Studying language effects in the translation class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Brusasco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract – The current translation market places growing emphasis on technological tools that assist or even replace the translator in quickly producing adequate target texts. As a person involved in cultural processes that affect public discourse and society at large, both as a practising literary translator and as a teacher of translation, I feel that academia should not only pursue market-oriented translation skills, such as procedural knowledge of computer-assisted translation (CAT-tools and machine translation (MT, but also aim at strengthening would-be translators' processes of interpretation and making them autonomous language experts, aware of both the effects generated by language and their responsibility in using it. To support my position, I will draw on cognitive linguistics and critical discourse analysis (CDA. Adopting a constructivist approach, I will then refer to works by Kiraly (2000, Venuti (2013 and Laviosa (2014, and add some methodological proposals. Students will initially work individually and in groups, focusing on source texts, their translations and comparable texts in order to identify key language items and work toward meaning. By deploying CDA analytical tools, they will discuss the role played by individual items as well as the overall effect of both STs and TTs. New source texts will then be analysed in preparation for translation. The actual translation, effect analysis and final editing, carried out as team work, will complete a cycle aimed at 1 helping students to build knowledge through experience; 2 sensitising them to the complexity of the translation process and the paramount value of meaning-making within every single context.Riassunto – Il settore della traduzione attribuisce crescente importanza a strumenti tecnologici che aiutano o sostituiscono il traduttore nella rapida produzione di testi adeguati. In qualità di traduttrice letteraria e docente, coinvolta quindi in processi culturali che possono

  5. The Differential Effects of Two Vocabulary Instruction Methods on EFL Word Learning: A Study into Task Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Elke

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effect of two vocabulary instruction treatments on word retention by 56 EFL learners. In particular, it focuses on the differential effects of a message-oriented treatment (reading text and answering comprehension questions) and a vocabulary-oriented treatment (reading text and performing two vocabulary tasks) on learners'…

  6. A MORPHOMETRIC STUDY OF THE SELLA TURCICA; GENDER EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Mohamed Elsayed Ali SAKRAN *1, Mohammad Afzal KHAN 2, Faris Mohammed Nour ALTAF 3, Hassan Elsiddig Hassan FARAGALLA 4, Amal Yousif Ahmed Elhaj MUSTAFA 5, Muhammad Mazhar HIJAZI 6, Rayan Abdulshakur NIYAZI 7, Abrar Jamal TAWAKUL 8, Abeer Zubair MALEBARI 9, Amal AbdulAziz SALEM 10.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Precise anatomical knowledge of the sella turcica is important for neurologists and surgeons operating in the region of cavernous sinus or the surrounding structures. The current study was undertaken to record normal morphometric parameters for future reference and to determine if there is any significance difference in the sella turcica morphometry regarding the gender. Methodology: A Morphometric analysis of the Sella Turcica and structures in vicinity were done in thirty six adults’ formalin fixed cadaver's skulls (22 male and 14 female. Results: The pituitary stalk positions were middle in majority of male cases (72.7%, the remaining 27.3% were posterior. Among female; 57.1% were middle and the remaining 42.9% were posterior, no anterior position was detected among both genders with no different between male and female (p = 0.494 Normal Optic chiasma position was detected in all female cases and in 63.6% of male cases with no significant differences regarding gender (p= 0.070. No significant different in diaphragma sella shape and opening regarding gender (p.value = 0.170 and 0.914 respectively No significant difference between males and females concerning linear dimensions of sella turcica (length, depth and Anteroposterior diameters. Concerning diaphragma sella opening; no significant different regarding gender in transverse diameter (p.value= 0.316 while significant different was detected in anteroposterior diameter (p.value= 0.046 For interclinoid (anterior, posterior diameters, which represented statistically significant different regarding gender in both right and left sides (p.value = 0.004 and 0.001 respectively. Conclusion: The current study will provide normal morphometric data for future reference and further studies.

  7. Laboratory studies on electrical effects during volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Büttner

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This laboratory study reports on electrical phenomena during the explosive eruption of a basaltoid silicate melt. Contact electricity is produced in the phase of thermo-hydraulic fracturing of magma during the explosive interaction with water. The electrical charge produced is directly proportional to the force of the explosion, as the force of explosion is linearly proportional to the surface generated by the thermo-hydraulic fracturing. Simulation of the ejection history using inerted gas as a driving medium under otherwise constant conditions did not result in significant electric charging. The results have the potential to explain in nature observed lightening in eruption clouds of explosive volcanic events.

  8. Army Training Study: Training Effectiveness Analysis (TEA) Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-08

    la In parallel with step 1 develop by analysis a list of areas in which learning is expected to occur by playing BATTLE. lb Take union of step 1 and...development of team proficiency and espirit , both of which are essential to Improve the generally unsatisfactory performance of the test sample. A 1 L’- "A...III model conducted using the mid-1980 European scenario modified for the study based upon the RED air raid expected over a division size ground force

  9. A study on some psychological health effects of cell-phone usage amongst college going students

    OpenAIRE

    Jayanti P Acharya, Indranil Acharya, Divya Waghrey

    2013-01-01

    Cell phones have come to stay. Their use without any knowledge of their harmful effects like cancers and other health effects is not ‘quite’ safe. Studies on cancers due to electromagnetic radiations from cell phones are available but there is a need to research on the detrimental physical and psychological effects esp. on rampant users like college-goers. This study focused on certain psychological or mental health effects of cell phone usage amongst students pursuing professional courses in...

  10. Modeling and study of nonlinear effects in electrodynamic shakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Abhishek; Tiwari, Nachiketa

    2017-02-01

    An electrodynamic shaker is inherently a nonlinear electro-mechanical system. In this work, we have developed a lumped parameter model for the entire electromechanical system, developed an approach to non-destructively determine these parameters, and predict the nonlinear response of the shaker. This predicted response has been validated using experimental data. Through such an approach, we have been able to accurately predict the resulting distortions in the response of the shaker and other nonlinear effects like DC offset in the displacement response. Our approach offers a key advantage vis-à-vis other approaches which rely on techniques involving Volterra Series expansions or techniques based on blackbox models like neural networks, which is that in our approach, apart from predicting the response of the shaker, the model parameters obtained have a physical significance and changes in the parameters can be directly mapped to modification in key design parameters of the shaker. The proposed approach is also advantageous in one more way: it requires measurement of only four parameters, voltage, current, displacement and acceleration for estimating shaker model parameters non-destructively. The proposed model can be used for the design of linearization controllers, prototype testing and simulation of new shaker designs as well as for performance prediction of shakers under testing conditions.

  11. Experimental study of controlled tip disturbance effect on flow asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degani, David; Tobak, Murray

    1992-01-01

    The effect on the asymmetric mean flow observed on pointed bodies of revolution at incidence of changing the size and location of a controlled disturbance as well as changes in angle of attack and flow conditions are evaluated experimentally. Flow visualization and side-force measurements are carried out for a generic ogive-cylinder body inclined at high angle of attack in a low-speed wind tunnel. For all angles of attack tested (30-60 deg), minute changes in the size or location of the controlled disturbance result in finite changes in the asymmetric flow field, even to the extent of reversing the sign of the side force or becoming almost symmetric. The process is reversible; returning the wire to an original position likewise restores the corresponding flow field and mean side force. The variation of side force with continuous variation of a perturbation's size or location remains continuous and single valued, even in the incidence range of 50 to 60 deg, where 'bistable' behavior of the asymmetric flow field is observed.

  12. A numerical study of aerosol effects on electrification of thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Y. B.; Shi, Z.; Chen, Z. L.; Peng, L.; Yang, Y.; Guo, X. F.; Chen, H. R.

    2017-02-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the effect of aerosol on microphysical and electrification in thunderstorm clouds. A two-dimensional (2-D) cumulus model with electrification scheme including non-inductive and inductive charge separation is used. The concentration of aerosol particles with distribution fitted by superimposing three log-normal distributions rises from 50 to 10,000 cm-3. The results show that the response of charge separation rate to the increase of aerosol concentration is nonmonotonic. When aerosol concentration is changed from 50 to 1000 cm-3, a stronger formation of cloud droplet, graupel and ice crystal results in increasing charge separation via non-inductive and inductive mechanism. However, in the range of 1000-3000 cm-3, vapor competition arises in the decrease of ice crystal mixing ratio and the reduction of ice crystals size leads to a slightly decrease in non-inductive charge rate, while inductive charging rate has no significant change in magnitude. Above aerosol concentration of 3000 cm-3, the magnitude of charging rate which keeps steady is insensitive to the increase in aerosol concentration. The results also suggest that non-inductive charge separation between ice crystal and graupel contributes to the main upper positive charge region and the middle negative charge region. Inductive graupel-cloud droplet charge separation, on the other hand, is found to play an important role in the development of lower charge region.

  13. Experimental studies on the effects of pipeflow on throughflow partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidle, R. C.; Kitahara, H.; Terajima, T.; Nakai, Y.

    1995-02-01

    Recent research has revealed that natural soil pipes provide important pathways for sub-surface movement of water and solutes, as well as contributing to landslide initiation. A benchscale experiment (in a sloping box 1 m in length) was conducted with a uniform sand to evaluate the effect of pipeflow on the overall hydrologic regime. A single drainage pipe (13 mm inside diameter (ID)) composed of five 20 cm segments, each with a different roughness coefficient (Manning's n), was placed 5 cm above the base of the 12.8° sloping box. Roughness elements were arranged in four different spatial combinations during hydraulic experiments. Piezometric levels were highest and pipeflow was lowest when the high-roughness (n = 0.325) portion of the pipe was located at the downslope end of the box. Measured values of pipeflow for different hydraulic gradients in each experiment were related to piezometric head above the pipe raised to the 0.32-0.42 power. Pipeflow was proportional to matrix flow in the soil above the pipe raised to the power of 0.4-0.6. These findings may be useful in estimating pipeflow in uniform soils and in validating two-domain models involving preferential flow in soils.

  14. A computational study of golfball aerodynamics: effects of rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beratlis, Nikolaos; Squires, Kyle; Balaras, Elias

    2010-11-01

    An efficient finite-difference Navier-Stokes solver is used to carry out a series of simulations of a spinning golfball at three distinct flow regimes: subcritical, critical and super-critical. The golfball is treated using an embedded boundary formulation, where the velocity near the surface is locally reconstructed to satisfy the proper boundary conditions. All scales down to the dimples are resolved by means of direct numerical simulations. Results exhibit all the qualitative flow features that are unique in each regime, namely the drag crisis and the alternation of the Magnus effect. In particular, the key features in each regime are captured and the correct trends are reproduced in all cases, namely a significant drop in the drag coefficient from the sub-critical to the critical regime and a subsequent drop as the Reynolds number gets into the super- critical regime. In addition, the lift exhibits a change in sign from positive to negative values when the Reynolds number increases from sub-critical to critical values. These phenomena are explained in terms of the distinct boundary layer dynamics present in each regime and are further illuminated by flow visualizations.

  15. Effect of Sea buckthorn on liver fibrosis: A clinical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze-Li Gao; Xiao-Hong Gu; Feng-Tao Cheng; Fo-Hu Jiang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To appraise the effect of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) on cirrhotic patients.METHODS: Fifty cirrhotic patients of Child-Pugh grade A and B were randomly divided into two groups: Group A as the treated group (n=30), taking orally the sea buckthom extract, 15 g 3 times a day for 6 months. Group B as the control group (n=18), taking vitamin B complex one tablet,3 times a day for 6 months. The following tests were performed before and after the treatment in both groups to determine LN, HA, collagens types Ⅲ and IV, cytokines IL6 and TNFα, liver serum albumin, total bile acid, ALT, AST and prothrombin time.RESULTS: The serum levels of TNFα, IL-6, laminin and type IV collagen in group A were significantly higher than those in the control group. After a course of sea buckthorn treatment, the serum levels of LN, HA, collagen types Ⅲand IV, total bile acid (TBA) decreased significantly as compared with those before and after treatment in the control group. The sea buckthorn notably shortened the duration for normalization of aminotransferases.CONCLUSION: Sea buckthom may be a hopeful drug for prevention and treatment of liver fibrosis.

  16. An experimental study on the self-reference effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Ying(朱滢); ZHANG; Li(张力)

    2002-01-01

    Self-reference at encoding increases the probability of recollective experience in recognition memory. Self-reference effect (SRE) in memory is observed when the degree of self-refer- ence of to-be-remembered materials is varied. Usually items encoded in terms of self-reference are associated with significantly higher recall performance relative to items encoded in other ways, including semantic encoding. In our three experiments, four orientating tasks formed four levels in a between-subjects design. The conditions were rating personality traits with reference to self, mother, Lu Xun (a famous Chinese writer) or rating the traits on a negative-positive dimension. In a recognition test, subjects first identified old items and then indicated which of these were accompanied by recollective experience ('remember' responses) and which were recognized on some other basis ('know' responses). Our results showed that both the self-reference condition and mother condition were associated with the same highest proportion of correct remember responses and the same lowest proportion of correct know responses. In contrast, for Western subjects, the self-reference condition, relative to the mother condition, was associated with a higher proportion of correct remember responses and a lower proportion of correct know responses. We discussed the results with reference to the HERA model (hemispheric encoding/retrieval asymmetry).

  17. Experiment Study of Effect of Perfiuorohexyloctane on Corneal Endothelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyan Ding; Chunfang Li; Lin Lu; Guanguang Feng; Huling Zheng

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of Perfluorohexyloctane (F6H8)on corneal endothelial celIs(CEC) of rabbit eyes. Methods: Fifteen New Zealand white rabbits were devided into two groups:experimental group(F6H8) and control group(BSS) . All rabbits underwent anterior chamber injection of 0. 15ml F6H8 or BSS. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy and corneal endothelium photography were performed pre-operatively and postoperatively. Histopathological examination and Transmission electron microscopy(TEM) were done after the rabbits were sacrificed. Results: All the corneas were clear. Since 4 weeks after operation, the endothelial cells were markedly irregular in size and shape and the number of endothelial cells was markedly decreased. Multilayered retrocorneal membranes (RCM)grew gradually 2 weeks after surgery. Vacuolar degeneration was seen in some endothelial cells. Nuclear degeneration and edema of plasma were seen in TEM. Conclusion: Corneal endothelial cell degenerated after contacting with F6H8 for 2 ~4weeks. As a silicone solvent, it should be removed completely after injection. We don't recommend it to be used as a new intraocular temponade. Eye Science 2001: 17:21 ~ 26.

  18. An Eye Tracking Study into the Effects of Graph Layout

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Weidong

    2008-01-01

    Graphs are typically visualized as node-link diagrams. Although there is a fair amount of research focusing on crossing minimization to improve readability, little attention has been paid on how to handle crossings when they are an essential part of the final visualizations. This requires us to understand how people read graphs and how crossings affect reading performance. As an initial step to this end, a preliminary eye tracking experiment was conducted. The specific purpose of this experiment was to test the effects of crossing angles and geometric-path tendency on eye movements and performance. Sixteen subjects performed both path search and node locating tasks with six drawings. The results showed that small angles can slow down and trigger extra eye movements, causing delays for path search tasks, whereas crossings have little impact on node locating tasks. Geometric-path tendency indicates that a path between two nodes can become harder to follow when many branches of the path go toward the target node...

  19. UVB radiation induced effects on cells studied by FTIR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Di Giambattista, Lucia; Gaudenzi, S; Pozzi, D; Grandi, M; Morrone, S; Silvestri, I; Castellano, A Congiu; 10.1007/s00249-009-0446-9

    2010-01-01

    We have made a preliminary analysis of the results about the eVects on tumoral cell line (lymphoid T cell line Jurkat) induced by UVB radiation (dose of 310 mJ/cm^2) with and without a vegetable mixture. In the present study, we have used two techniques: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and flow cytometry. FTIR spectroscopy has the potential to provide the identiWcation of the vibrational modes of some of the major compounds (lipid, proteins and nucleic acids) without being invasive in the biomaterials. The second technique has allowed us to perform measurements of cytotoxicity and to assess the percentage of apoptosis. We already studied the induction of apoptotic process in the same cell line by UVB radiation; in particular, we looked for correspondences and correlations between FTIR spetroscopy and flow cytometry data finding three highly probable spectroscopic markers of apoptosis (Pozzi et al. in Radiat Res 168:698-705, 2007). In the present work, the results have shown significant changes ...

  20. Study of Antioxidant Effectiveness of Kraft Lignin in HDPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Piña

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymers are subject to oxidative degradation during all steps of their useful cycle. This degradative process is prevented using stabilizers like antioxidant of the type sterically hindered phenols or amines. Lignin, due to the presence of phenolic groups in their structure, can present characteristic as antioxidant agent, in a similar way to the additives used in polymers. Therefore, in this work, the antioxidant capacity of the lignin in a sample of polyethylene is studied. For this reason, in this paper, a method based on nonisothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC to evaluate this property is used. The samples studied were subjected to heat treatment at different scan rates and in presence of oxygen to promote thermooxidation of the material. The antioxidant capacity of different formulations of lignin and additives in the polymer resin was determined from the temperature of onset of oxidation (Ti at different heating rates and adjusting Arrhenius model prediction. The results indicate that the procedure can predict the antioxidant capacity of antioxidant additives in HDPE with good reproducibility and accuracy, according to the Arrhenius model prediction.

  1. EFFECTIVENESS OF OPEN DISCECTOMY FOR IVDP – A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganath

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Low back pain (LBP results in loss in productivity than any other medical condition. Approximately 70 - 80% of all people will develop LBP in their life . There are various causes of LBP , out of which the lumber disc herniation is one of the most frequent reason for physical , functional restriction in patients. Patients who have u ndergone surgical treatment are found to possess increased short term outcome instead of conservative treated patients. Surgically treated patients experienced fast pain relief , improvement of function & satisfaction in comparison to conservative patients. The comparative results of patients treated with surgery and conservatively treated patients have revealed that surgical treatment is much better at short term follow up (upto 1 year however no variations have been shown among treatment at long term foll ow up. Some patients operated for spine diseases are still left with poor results. The present study aims to evaluate the efficiency of open discectomy for L 4 – L 5 IVDP prospectively. METHODS : 30 cases of lumbar disc prolapse , above 18 years of age admitte d at KIMS hospital , Bangalore with MRI showing conclusive disc prolapsed were taken for the study. They were pre operatively evaluated for their ODI score. Only those patients who have scored 40% and above in ODI were included in the study. They underwent dis c ectomy. Methods of surgery used were fenestration , extended fenestration , hemilaminectomy & total laminectomy as per operative requirement. Follow - ups were carried out at 6 , 12 and 24weeks on selected areas. Pre and post of ODI total and sub scale scor es were compared at the end of 24 weeks. RESULTS : There was a significant reduction of post operative ODI score indicating good success rate in open disectomy. The pre operative mean ODI score was 58.28 , SD was 5.06 and the post operative mean ODI score wa s 15.28 and SD was 2.40 with t value of 38.56 and p value of

  2. Study of irradiation effects in non-metallic conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atobe, Kozo; Fukuoka, Noboru; Honda, Makoto; Kondo, Tadashi; Morishima, Kouichi [Naruto Univ. of Education, Naruto, Tokushima (Japan). Faculty of Science; Okada, Moritami; Nakagawa, Masuo

    1998-01-01

    The production of point defects induced by reactor and the thermal behavior of defects in sintered AlN and c-BN have been investigated using the optical absorption and electron spin resonance (ESR) methods. The absorption band at 370 nm (AlN) and the structureless absorption over the visible region are observed. These specimens also show ESR signals with g-value 2.007 (AlN), 2.006 (BN), which are probably caused by N vacancies with a trapped electron. In addition to these experiments, the difference of the photoluminescence(PL) lines on neutron irradiated CZ-Si and FZ-Si has been also studied. The models of the defect associated with neutron irradiation are discussed. (author)

  3. Experimental study of effect of stenosis geometry on flow parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselý Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A stenosis is a narrowing in a tubular organ or structure. In medicine, vessel stenosis poses health risks for people. In this work, experimental investigations of pressure loss coefficient for varying stenosis eccentricity and shape were performed. Five models of different geometry were studied; all models were stenosis of 75 % area reduction. The flow conditions approximate physiological flow. The measuring range of Reynolds number was from 130 to 2730, measured values of pressure loss coefficient were from 12 to 20. The steady experimental results indicated that static pressure loss coefficient is affected by the shape of stenosis, but it was affected more significantly by the eccentricity. Visualization experiments have been performed in Polycarbonate models.

  4. A Moessbauer effect study of the Soledade meteorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paduani, C. [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Samudio Perez, C.A. [Universidade de Passo Fundo, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas; Ardisson, J.D. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2005-09-15

    We performed a Moessbauer spectroscopy study of the iron meteorite Soledade. This meteorite, which consists of a metallic matrix, is an octahedrite with polycrystalline troilite, cohenite, schreibersite and rhabdites as major constituents. A chemical analysis indicates 6.78 % Ni, 0.46% Co, besides traces of Cu, Cr, Ga, Ge, As, Sb, W, Re, Ir and Au. No traces of silicates have been found and no oxygen was detected. Iron is appearing in the austenitic phase and alloyed with nickel. An analysis of the Moessbauer spectra at room temperature indicates that the Fe-Ni phase is homogeneously distributed in the matrix, although variations in the composition between different regions are observed. (author)

  5. Study the Factors Effecting on Welding Joint of Dissimilar Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esam J. Ebraheam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the factors that affect the welding joint of dissimilar metals. Austenitic stainless steel-type AISI (316L with a thickness of (2mm was welded to carbon steel (1mm using an MIG spot welding. The filler metal is a welding wire of the type E80S-G (according to AWS is used with (1.2mm diameter and CO2 is used as shielding gas with flow rate (7L/min for all times was used in this work. The results indicate that the increase of the welding current tends to increase the size of spot weld, and also increases the sheer force. Whereas the sheer force increased inversely with the time of welding. Furthermore, the results indicate that increasing the current and time of welding increases the diameter of weld zone, and decreases the sheer force.

  6. Study of the Protective Effects in PEPC Transgenic Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qian; JIAO De-mao; LING Li-li; ZHANG Yun-hua; HUANG Xue-qing

    2005-01-01

    The diurnal course of chlorophyll fluorescence parameter and active oxygen metabolism of flag leaves in PEPC transgenic and untransformed rice Kitaake were studied. The results showed that the photosynthetic rate under high light intensity has been increased by 50% and photoinhibition of photosynthesis in PEPC transgenic was alleviated after the introduction of PEPC gene from maize into rice. It was demonstrated that the increment of photosynthesis in PEPC transgenic was related to the introduction of PEPC gene using specific inhibitor of PEPC. Photoinhibition of photosynthesis in different genotypes exists at noon under natural condition. PEPC transgenic rice exhibited a less decrease in Fv/Fm, a less photoinhibition and a higher efficiency of light energy conversion to chemical energy and lower thermal energy dissipation.These results provided the physiological basis on the mechanism of tolerance to photoinhibition and rice breeding with high photosynthetic efficiency.

  7. In vitro study of immunosuppressive effect of apoptotic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-jin; ZHENG Shu-sen

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies revealed that apoptotic cells are actively involved in immunosuppression and anti-inflammation. After being phagocytosed by macrophages, apoptotic cells can actively regulate cytokines secretion from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages, in which the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10) is increased while the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and leukin-8 (IL-8) are suppressed. In this paper, we first present evidence that phagocytosed apoptotic cells regulate cytokine secretion of LPS-stimulated macrophages, but also inhibit the activation of T lymphocytes stimulated by ConA. These data suggest that apoptotic cells can alter the biological behavior of macrophages which gain immunosuppressive property.

  8. Comparative study of interfacial effects in photovoltaic diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavakolian, H.

    1988-01-01

    Several different type of photodiodes (NASA standard n-p, p-on-n single crystal silicon, GaAs homojunction, ITO/p-Si, Au/n-GaAs Schottky diode and CdS/CuInSe{sub 2}) have been examined. Measurements of current vs. voltage as a function of temperature and light intensity, plus capacitance vs. voltage and frequency were an attempt to identify the causes on non-ideal behavior. An automatic, computer controlled system greatly enhanced the precision of measurements and the ability to separate non-ideal effects. No dispersion in capacitance with frequency was observed in single crystal homojunction diodes and Au/n-GaAs Schottky barrier, indicating near zero interfacial states for these devices. CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} cells from ARCO Solar, Boeing and IEC all showed interfacial states with a wide range of time constants and zero bias densities at the Fermi level in the junction of 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 11} states/cm{sup 2}-eV. In reverse bias, however, the density of states, decreased by an order of magnitude. Under illumination, this number increased with increasing light intensity and saturated near 100 mW/cm{sup 2}. The CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} solar cell was modeled as a heterojunction diode with charge at the junction interface. The low open-circuit voltage and the shift to lower voltage (about 125 mV) observed in some photodiodes is explained by this model.

  9. A preliminary study of material homogeneity for size effect investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krompholz, K.; Kamber, J.; Kalkhof, D.

    1999-06-01

    The forged material 20 MnMoNi 55, material number 1.6310 (heat number 69906) with a heat treatment of 900 {sup o}C, water quenched, 730 {sup o}C, air cooled, was subjected to an intensive quality control consisting of chemical analysis, metallography, hardness tests, tensile tests, and impact tests. Six plates of the material were investigated, and all specimens were taken from a diagonal of each plate in three positions, outer margins and the centre of the plates. The quality control exhibits the following results: (1) The material fulfill the material specification in all respects. (2) This material is a fine grained homogeneous ferritic material of bainitic structure; neither from the chemical analysis, metallography, nor from hardness tests influences from the position of the specimens taken from the plates could be derived. (3) The tensile tests clearly revealed position dependent material properties. With the exception of one plate, one of the selected positions exhibits no natural yield strength, higher rupture strength, and lower elongation to fracture compared with the other two positions at 293 K and 573 K. (4) Many of the data obtained from the impact tests at room temperature were larger than the capacity of the impact machine, i.e. 225 Joule; the experimental condition was changed from tests at 573 K to tests at 253 K to obtain data from the transition region. The main conclusions drawn for the size effect experiments where that all the tensile test results for different specimen sizes have to be discussed with respect of the specimen positions within the plates, and that for all bend bar as well as impact experiments with different specimen sizes the notch depth to specimen width ratio a/w has to be changed from a/w = 0.2 to a/w = 0.3 to get reasonable results within the frame of the available test equipment. (author)

  10. Effects of magnesium ions on ribosomes: a fluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonincontro, A; Briganti, G; Giansanti, A; Pedone, F; Risuleo, G

    1993-07-18

    Fluorescence intensity measurements of ethidium bromide (EB) bound to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in suspensions of 30S and 50S subunits, of 70S ribosomal particles and of protein-free extracted rRNA are presented. Changes in the intercalation of EB reflect changes in conformation and degree of exposure of rRNA. The effect of removal of magnesium ions on the binding of EB is compared in protein-free rRNA and in ribosomal particles by a Scatchard plot analysis. In free ribosomal RNA the number of bound EBs do not depend on magnesium content, only the association constant is affected. In intact 70S particles and both in the separated 50S and 30S subunits the presence of magnesium greatly reduces binding of EB and no saturation of the fluorescence intensity with rRNA concentration is observed, preventing a Scatchard plot analysis. Removal of magnesium restores a strong EB intercalation. Then magnesium ions induce a conformational change in the 70S particles as well as in the separated subunits. The different behavior of the free-rRNA and of the ribosomal particles indicates that ribosomal proteins are relevant to the structural changes induced by magnesium ions. The comparison of the number of excluded sites and of the association constant in the 30S, 50S subunits and in the 70S particles indicates that even without Mg2+ ions the two subunits still interact, at variance with the commonly shared opinion that subunits dissociation takes place at low magnesium concentration.

  11. Effects of Using Case-Study Method in Social Studies on Students' Attitudes towards Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akengin, Hamza; Aydemir, Gökhan

    2012-01-01

    This study has aimed to inquired whether there was a significant difference between academic achievement and attitudes of 6th grade students who learned "The Resources of Our Country" unit of social studies through case studies and students who learned this unit with teaching based on existing unit. Besides it was aimed to present…

  12. SWOT--Study Without Tears: A Guide to Effective Study Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Peter; And Others

    This workbook helps students identify those study practices that are ineffective and suggests ways in which existing study habits may be modified and improved. At the beginning of each of the workbook's seven sections is a set of questions concerning the reader's usual study practices. The second part of each section contains advice about the…

  13. Surface effect vehicles and surface effect: General studies. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habercom, G. E., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The bibliography contains 180 citations in which the design of surface effect vehicles, their utilization, and their aerodynamic characteristics are investigated. Vehicles or ships in marine environments are not included.

  14. Effect of maternal age on pregnancy: a retrospective cohort study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiaoli; Zhang Weiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Background In the last few decades,there has been a delay in first-time pregnancies,and the average age of women at the time of delivery has increased in many countries.Advanced maternal age is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.This study aimed to determine the present trends and pregnancy outcomes related to maternal age in China.Methods Data were collected from 39 hospitals in mainland of China.All deliveries were performed after 28 completed weeks of gestation and between January 1 and December 31,2011.In total,110 450 of 112 441 cases were included in the study.All enrolled cases were divided into 6 age groups with 5-year intervals.The x2 test or Fisher's exact test and unadjusted binary-Logistic regression were used for statistical analysis.Results The mean age at the time of delivery was 28.18±4.70 years (range,14-52 years).The teenage group (15-19 years) had a higher risk than the 25-29-year old group for anemia (odds ratio (OR),1.4),preeclampsia (OR,1.6),preterm birth (OR,2.1),low birth weight neonates (OR,2.3),and perinatal mortality (OR,3.6).The 35-39-year old group and ≥40-year-old group had a higher risk than the 25-29-year-old group for leiomyoma (OR,4.2 vs.5.8),pregestational diabetes (OR,2.2 vs.3.8),chronic hypertension (OR,4.6 vs.6.5),gestational diabetes (OR,2.6 vs.3.5),preeclampsia (OR,2.5 vs.3.6),premature delivery (OR,1.8 vs.2.4),postpartum hemorrhage (OR,1.5 vs.1.7),placenta previa (OR,2.7 vs.4.0),placental abruption (OR,1.4 vs.2.5),cesarean delivery (OR,2.1 vs.2.5),macrosomia (OR,1.2 vs.1.2),low birth weight neonates (OR,1.6 vs.2.3),and perinatal mortality (OR,1.6 vs.3.7).Conclusion Maternal and neonatal risks are higher during the teenage years and at an advanced maternal age; 20-30 years of age is the lowest risk period for pregnancy and delivery.

  15. [Study on relationship of dose-effect and time-effect of APA microencapsulated bovine chromaffin cells on pain treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Jianfeng; Li, Tao; Du, Zhi; Song, Jichang

    2011-12-01

    This study was to investigate the relationship of dose-effect and time-effect of Alginate-Polylysine-Alginate (APA) microencapsulated bovine chromaffin cells on the treatment of pain model rats. Using a rat model of painful peripheral neuropathy, the antinociceptive effects of APA microencapsulated bovine cells transplanted into the subarachnoid space was evaluated by cold allodynia test and hot hyperalgesia test. Compared with control group, the withdrawal difference with cell number 50 thousands groups, 100 thousands groups and 200 thousands groups was reduced (P APA microencapsulated bovine chromaffin cells which were transplanted to treat pain model rats, and the effective antinociception remained longer than 12 weeks.

  16. Biological and psychosocial effects of space travel: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Robert Edward Tien Ming

    This dissertation interviewed a single astronaut to explore psychosocial issues relevant to long-duration space travel and how these issues relate to the astronaut's training. It examined the psychological impact of isolation, crew interaction, and the experience of microgravity with the goal of increasing understanding of how to foster crew survivability and positive small group interactions in space (Santy, 1994). It also focused on how to develop possible treatments for crews when they transition back to Earth from the extreme environment of space missions. The astronaut's responses agreed with the literature and the predictions for long-duration space missions except the participant reported no temporary or permanent cognitive or memory deficits due to microgravity exposure. The dissertation identified five frequently endorsed themes including communication, environmental stressors, personal strengths, un-researched problems, and other. The agreement found between the literature and astronaut's responses offer a strong foundation of questions and data that needs to be further studied before conducting research in space or long-duration space missions.

  17. Moessbauer effect studies of disordered Fe-Ru alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poettker, W.E.; Paduani, C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, UFSC, Florianopolis, CEP 88040-900, SC (Brazil); Ardisson, J.D. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, CDTN, Belo Horizonte, CEP 30123-970, MG (Brazil); Ioshida, M.I. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, ICEX-UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Caixa Postal 702, CEP 31270-901, MG (Brazil)

    2004-09-01

    The bcc and hcp phases of disordered Fe{sub 100-x}Ru{sub x} alloys are investigated with several experimental techniques to study the composition dependence of the magnetic properties in these structures. With an appropriate annealing the prepared samples are single phase. The iron rich alloys are ferromagnetic at room temperature with the bcc structure. However, an antiferromagnetic coupling is introduced with the addition of ruthenium. Above 30 at% Ru a paramagnetic behavior is observed at 300 K and 77 K, where the alloys have the hcp structure. In the ferromagnetic phase the Curie temperature decreases steadily with the increase of the ruthenium concentration. In the paramagnetic hcp phase the mean volume per atom is al-most triplicated as compared to the bcc phase, which brings out the breakdown of the magnetization and the collapse of the hyperfine field at the iron sites simultaneously with the crystallographic phase transition. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Studies of the Efimov Effect in 7 Li

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, D.; Nguyen, J. H. V.; Hulet, R. G.

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold atomic gases provide an ideal environment to study few body physics in the universal regime. Passive techniques, such as monitoring loss of the atomic sample while varying the hold time allows us to explore properties such as the scaling behavior of Efimov trimers. In our experiment, we explore how the Efimov states are affected by non-zero temperature. We measure the three-body loss rate for a 7 Li atom gas at different scattering lengths and extract the location and width of an Efimov recombination minimum for various temperatures. Alternatively, we may perform more active experiments such as creating dimers using RF-field modulation as a probe of molecular binding energies. We use RF-association to form Feshbach dimers and Efimov trimers, and find a strong enhancement of the dimer formation rate at the atom-dimer resonance, which could be explained by an avalanche mechanism. In the past the enhancement in the three-body recombination rate at the same location had also been observed, and attributed to the avalanche. We explore the link between these findings with a side-by-side comparison of the dimer-formation rate and the three-body loss rate. Work supported by the NSF, an ARO MURI Grant, and the Welch Foundation.

  19. Magnetisation studies of the integer and fractional quantum hall effects

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, A J

    2001-01-01

    range (10- 1000 mK) where as the low mobility samples have a constant critical current at low temperatures (< 400 mK). This is explained as being due to the balance between the thermal broadening of the Landau levels and the intrinsic broadening due to disorder. The decay of induced currents has been studied and, by using a simple model, a value for the diagonal resistivity can be obtained from the characteristic decay time. The values extracted are consistent with previous contactless measurements of the resistivity. These experiments have also been performed on hole gas systems. In the hole gas systems the odd filling factors are more robust than the even ones. This is the opposite of the electron systems. This is attributed to the larger spin splitting on the Landau levels in the hole gas systems and the possibility of 'spin-flip' tunnelling. The equilibrium magnetisation can be analysed to yield information about the density of states in the two-dimensional system. Although no detailed analysis of any ...

  20. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-07-12

    The CARES field campaign is motivated by the scientific issues described in the CARES Science Plan. The primary objectives of this field campaign are to investigate the evolution and aging of carbonaceous aerosols and their climate-affecting properties in the urban plume of Sacramento, California, a mid-size, mid-latitude city that is located upwind of a biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emission region. Our basic observational strategy is to make comprehensive gas, aerosol, and meteorological measurements upwind, within, and downwind of the urban area with the DOE G-1 aircraft and at strategically located ground sites so as to study the evolution of urban aerosols as they age and mix with biogenic SOA precursors. The NASA B-200 aircraft, equipped with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), digital camera, and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), will be flown in coordination with the G-1 to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties, and to provide the vertical context for the G-1 and ground in situ measurements.

  1. A study into the effectiveness of unqualified GP assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Marilyn; Turnbull, Betty

    This article aims to address the potential shortfall in care provision offered by general practitioners (GPs) resulting from pending retirement and the retention and recruitment crisis. An educational module was developed that offered both theory and practise to unqualified general practice assistants. The module content was determined following discussion with local GPs. A small qualitative study of six students was carried out to review efficacy of participants in their new role. Using a grounded theory approach, participant and supervisor views of course content and delivery, role preparation diversity were analysed and compared. Tape-recorded interviews were conducted and analysis carried out employing the constant comparative method. Data were coded and emergent themes categorized. Overall, participants agreed that the module had strengthened their knowledge, added new skills, heightened their job satisfaction, added significant diversity to their role and enhanced their employability potential. Five participants communicated that they were more confident in performing clinical skills and advising health improvement techniques. Supervisors also reported that participants displayed a more competent and professional approach to health care, which was complementary to the role of the GP and practice nurse. Ultimately this allowed both GP and practice nurse to focus on dealing with chronic illness targets, as required in the new directive (Scottish Executive, 2004).

  2. Laboratory Studies on the Effects of Shear on Fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Moursund, Russell A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Guensch, Greg R.

    2000-09-20

    The overall objective of our studies was to specify an index describing the hydraulic force that fish experience when subjected to a shear environment. Fluid shear is a phenomenon that is important to fish. However, elevated levels of shear may result in strain rates that injure or kill fish. At hydroelectric generating facilities, concerns have been expressed that strain rates associated with passage through turbines, spillways, and fish bypass systems may adversely affect migrating fish. Development of fish friendly hydroelectric turbines requires knowledge of the physical forces (injury mechanisms) that impact entrained fish and the fish's tolerance to these forces. It requires up-front, pre-design specifications for the environmental conditions that occur within the turbine system, in other words, determining or assuming that those conditions known to injure fish will provide the descriptions of conditions that engineers must consider in the design of a turbine system. These biological specifications must be carefully and thoroughly documented throughout the design of a fish friendly turbine. To address the development of biological specifications, we designed and built a test facility where juvenile fish could be subjected to a range of shear environments and quantified their biological response.

  3. Social Studies in the Modern Era: A Case Study of Effective Teachers' Use of Literacy and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Kristal; Cherner, Todd

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to highlight the practices and philosophies of two effective--but different--social studies teachers who balance the demands of teaching in the modern era while honoring their own philosophies for teaching social studies. This project was ground in the theoretical framework provided by TPACK and used a case…

  4. Examining the Effectiveness of Primary Sources during Close Reading in Social Studies: A Case Study of Middle School Resource Rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of using primary sources to support close reading in social studies among students with disabilities in grade 7 middle school resource rooms. The setting is a middle school in a suburban school district located in Western New York. Two resource rooms of 10 students with reading or writing difficulties were…

  5. A Study of Developing a System Dynamics Model for the Learning Effectiveness Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Syung Lan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used the research method of system dynamics and applied the Vensim software to develop a learning effectiveness evaluation model. This study developed four cause-and-effect chains affecting learning effectiveness, including teachers’ teaching enthusiasm, family involvement, school’s implementation of scientific activities, and creative teaching method, as well as the system dynamics model based on the four cause-and-effect chains. Based on the developed system dynamic model, this study performed simulation to investigate the relationship among family involvement, learning effectiveness, teaching achievement, creative teaching method, and students’ learning interest. The results of this study verified that there are positive correlations between family involvement and students’ learning effectiveness, as well as students’ learning effectiveness and teachers’ teaching achievements. The results also indicated that the use of creative teaching method is able to increase students’ learning interest and learning achievement.

  6. The effect of comorbidities on COPD assessment: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinreich UM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ulla Møller Weinreich,1–3 Lars Pilegaard Thomsen,2 Barbara Bielaska,4 Vania Helbo Jensen,5,6 Morten Vuust,4 Stephen Edward Rees2 1Department of Respiratory Diseases, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 2Respiratory and Critical Care Group (RCARE, Centre for Model-Based Medical Decision Support Systems, Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; 3The Clinical Institute, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 4Department of Radiology, Vendsyssel Hospital, Hjørring, Denmark; 5Department of Radiology, Horsens Regional Hospital, Horsens, Denmark; 6Department of Radiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark Introduction: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD frequently suffer from comorbidities. COPD severity may be evaluated by the Global initiative for chronic ­Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD combined risk assessment score (GOLD score. Spirometry, body plethysmography, diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO, and high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT measure lung function and elucidate pulmonary pathology. This study assesses associations between GOLD score and measurements of lung function in COPD patients with and without (≤1 comorbidities. It evaluates whether the presence of comorbidities influences evaluation by GOLD score of COPD severity, and questions whether GOLD score describes morbidity rather than COPD severity.Methods: In this prospective study, 106 patients with stable COPD were included. Patients treated for lung cancer were excluded. Demographics, oxygen saturation (SpO2, modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale, COPD exacerbations, and comorbidities were recorded. Body plethysmography and DLCO were measured, and HR-CT performed and evaluated for emphysema and airways disease. COPD severity was stratified by the GOLD score. Correlation analyses: 1 GOLD score, 2 emphysema grade, and 3 airways disease and lung

  7. [Study on allelopathy effect of pericarp extract of Phellodendron amurense].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhao; Xia, Tianrui; Tao, Yuehong; Dai, Lingchao; Liu, Yanlu; Zhang, Bengang

    2011-02-01

    Through the study of allelopathy of the pericarp of Phellodendron amurense, the role of self-regeneration barriers was investigated in order to find ways and means for the protection of wild populations of P. amurense. Solution preparation: soaked pericarp of P. amurense in distilled water at 4 degrees C to get solution A, and reflux extraction of pericarp with distilled water at 100 degrees C to get solution B. Both of the solution A and solution B were used in the experiment of seed germination and seedling growth with the seeds of cabbage and wheat. The results showed that 20 g x L(-1) concentration of solution A and solution B inhibited significantly seed germination of cabbage and wheat, while 100 g x L(-1) concentration of solution A even completely inhibited the seed germination of wheat. 20 g x L(-1) concentration of solution A significantly inhibited the cabbage and wheat seedling growth, completely inhibited the root growth of cabbage, while 100 g x L(-1) concentrations of solution A completely inhibited seedling growth of cabbage and wheat. Comparing to solution A, the intensity of solution B are diminished on seed germination and seedling growth. It is concluded that the allelopathy of pericarp of P. amurense is multi-material role in the results, some of allelochemicals are easily degradable when exposed to heat. Overall, the allelopathy of pericarp of P. amurense can affect the seed germination and seedling growth. It is supposed that allelochemicals existed in the pericarp of P. amurense is one of the reason leading to difficulties in self-regeneration of its population.

  8. Effect of hyaluronan on periodontitis: A clinical and histological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Gontiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventional, non-surgical periodontal therapy consists of supra- and subgingival tooth debridement. However, it is a technically demanding procedure and is not always efficient at eradicating all periodontal pathogens and in reducing inflammation. Therefore, local subgingival application of other chemotherapeutic agents may be used as an adjunct to non-surgical therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and histological outcomes of local subgingival application of 0.2% hyaluronic acid gel (GENGIGEL® as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP in chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty sites were chosen from 26 patients with chronic periodontitis (criteria being periodontal pockets ≥5mm. Experimental sites additionally received HA gel subgingivally at baseline, 1 st , 2 nd , and 3 rd week. Clinical parameters were re-assessed at 4 th , 6 th , and 12 th week. At 4 th week recall, a gingival biopsy was obtained from test and control site for histologic examination. Results: Intra-group analysis of all the clinical parameters at all sites from baseline to 4 th , 6 th , and 12 th week showed statistically significant changes. Experimental sites showed statistically significant improvement in Gingival index and Bleeding index at 6 th and 12 th week when compared with control sites. However, no statistically significant differences were observed in the PPD and RAL between control and experimental sites at 4 th , 6 th , and 12 th week time interval. No statistically significant association was found between the histological grading of the sites that received HA treatment. Conclusion: Subgingival placement of 0.2% HA gel along with SRP provided a significant improvement in gingival parameters. However, no additional benefit was found in periodontal parameters. Histologically, experimental sites showed reduced inflammatory infiltrate, but it was not statistically significant.

  9. Scale effects in sliding friction: An experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    1991-07-24

    Solid friction is considered by some to be a fundamental property of two contacting materials, while others consider it to be a property of the larger tribosystem in which the materials are contained. A set of sliding friction experiments were designed to investigate the hypothesis that the unlubricated sliding friction between two materials is indeed a tribosystems-related property and that the relative influence of the materials properties or those of the machine on friction varies from one situation to another. Three tribometers were used: a friction microprobe (FMP), a typical laboratory-scale reciprocating pin-on-flat device, and a heavy-duty commercial wear tester. The slider material was stainless steel (AISI 440C) and the flat specimen material was an ordered alloy of Ni{sub 3}Al (IC-50). Sphere-on-flat geometry was used at ambient conditions and at normal forces ranging from 0.01 N to 100 N and average sliding velocities of 0.01 to 100.0 mm/s. The nominal, steady-state sliding friction coefficient tended to decrease with increases in normal force for each of the three tribometers, and the steady state value of sliding friction tended to increase as the mass of the machine increased. The variation of the friction force during sliding was also a characteristic of the test system. These studies provide further support to the idea that the friction of both laboratory-scale and engineering tribosystems should be treated as a parameter which may take on a range of characteristic values and not conceived as having a single, unique value for each material pair.

  10. A 4-study replication of the moderating effects of greed on socioeconomic status and unethical behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Anjana; Palma, Paolo A; Patenaude, Joshua; Campbell, Lorne

    2017-01-31

    Four replications of Piff and colleagues' study examined the moderating effects of greed attitudes on the relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and unethical behaviour (Study 7). In the original study, the researchers found that both greed and SES predicted increased propensity to engage in unethical behavior. Furthermore, this association was moderated such that the effects of SES on unethical behaviour were no longer present in the greed prime condition versus the neutral condition. In replication 1 of the original study main effects of greed attitudes and SES were found, but no interaction was found. Main effects for greed emerged in replications 3 and 4. However no main effects for SES or interactions emerged for replications 2-4. A meta-analysis was conducted with all replications and the original study, and found no moderating effect of greed on the relationship between SES and unethical behavior.

  11. The effect of terrorism on public confidence : an exploratory study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, M. S.; Baldwin, T. E.; Samsa, M. E.; Ramaprasad, A.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-10-31

    A primary goal of terrorism is to instill a sense of fear and vulnerability in a population and to erode confidence in government and law enforcement agencies to protect citizens against future attacks. In recognition of its importance, the Department of Homeland Security includes public confidence as one of the metrics it uses to assess the consequences of terrorist attacks. Hence, several factors--including a detailed understanding of the variations in public confidence among individuals, by type of terrorist event, and as a function of time--are critical to developing this metric. In this exploratory study, a questionnaire was designed, tested, and administered to small groups of individuals to measure public confidence in the ability of federal, state, and local governments and their public safety agencies to prevent acts of terrorism. Data were collected from the groups before and after they watched mock television news broadcasts portraying a smallpox attack, a series of suicide bomber attacks, a refinery bombing, and cyber intrusions on financial institutions that resulted in identity theft and financial losses. Our findings include the following: (a) the subjects can be classified into at least three distinct groups on the basis of their baseline outlook--optimistic, pessimistic, and unaffected; (b) the subjects make discriminations in their interpretations of an event on the basis of the nature of a terrorist attack, the time horizon, and its impact; (c) the recovery of confidence after a terrorist event has an incubation period and typically does not return to its initial level in the long-term; (d) the patterns of recovery of confidence differ between the optimists and the pessimists; and (e) individuals are able to associate a monetary value with a loss or gain in confidence, and the value associated with a loss is greater than the value associated with a gain. These findings illustrate the importance the public places in their confidence in government

  12. Studies on Radiation Protection Effect of the Beer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Jong Gi; Ha, Tae Young; Hwang, Chul; Hyan; Lee, Young Hwa [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Busan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    In this study, it was investigated whether commercially produced beer is able to prevent a lymphocyte from radiation induced apoptosis. Whole blood samples were acquired from 5 healthy volunteers (male, 26-38 years old) and the lymphocyte were isolated by density gradient centrifugation. Radiation induced apoptosis of the lymphocyte were investigated by 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy, 2.0 Gy, 3.0 Gy to 5.0 Gy irradiation. In some experiments, the donor drunk beer and then blood samples were collected. In other experiments, melatonin or glycine betain was added to lymphocyte culture medium. Treated or untreated lymphocytes were cultured for 60 hours and radiation induced apoptosis of the lymphocyte was analyzed by annexin-V staining through flow cytometery. Relative radiation induced apoptosis ratio of the untreated lymphocytes is 1.22{+-}1.1, 1.22{+-}1.1, 1.38{+-}1.0, 1.47{+-}1.1, 1.50{+-}1.2 by radiation dose of 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy, 2.0 Gy, 3.0 Gy and 5.0 Gy respectively. Relative radiation induced apoptosis ratio of lymphocytes is isolated from beer drunken donors is 0.971.0, 0.991.0, 1.11{+-}0.9, 1.29{+-}1.1, 1.15{+-}1.1 by radiation doses respectively which are reduced 21.5% compared with untreated lymphocyte. Relative radiation induced apoptosis ratio of the lymphocytes is isolated from non-alcohol beer drunken donors is 1.22{+-}1.1, 1.17{+-}1.1, 1.13{+-}1.3, 1.38{+-}1.2, 1.32{+-}1.1 by radiation dose of 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy, 2.0 Gy, 3.0 Gy and 5.0 Gy respectively which are reduced 10.8% compared with the untreated lymphocyte. As a result, it is suggested that beer may protect the lymphocyte from radiation damage and inhibit apoptosis.

  13. Effect of unilateral and simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation on tinnitus: A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zon, A. van; Smulders, Y.E.; Ramakers, G.G.; Stegeman, I.; Smit, A.L.; Zanten, G.A.; Stokroos, R.J.; Hendrice, N.; Free, R.H.; Maat, B.; Frijns, J.H.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Huinck, W.J.; Topsakal, V.; Tange, R.A.; Grolman, W.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To determine the effect of cochlear implantation on tinnitus perception in patients with severe bilateral postlingual sensorineural hearing loss and to demonstrate possible differences between unilateral and bilateral cochlear implantation. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study. MET

  14. Are larger effect sizes in experimental studies good predictors of higher citation rates?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Jesper Wiborg; Henriksen, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    Effect sizes are perhaps the most important quantitative information in statistical inferential studies. Recently, the hypothesis that rational citation behaviour in general ought to give credit to studies that successfully apply a treatment and detect greater effects, resulting in such studies...... areas and with a more credible model selection procedure. Using meta-analyses, we identify comparable individual experimental studies (n=259) from five different research specialties. Effect sizes are compared to the citation rates of the individual studies and impact factors for the journals where...

  15. The Effect of Trade Unionism on Workers : A Case Study on PAM

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Bishal

    2012-01-01

    The study aims at finding out the effects of trade unionism on workers in Finland. The main objectives of this study were to first identify how the practices of trade union PAM effects on workers. Another aim was to determine how union PAM works in offering benefit for its members. In addition other functions of trade union that aim towards benefiting both organization and employees were highlighted in the study. The study also examined how to settle industrial conflicts in organization in Fi...

  16. The Effects of a Midbrain Glioma on Memory and Other Functions: A Longitudinal Single Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weddell, Rodger A.

    2008-01-01

    Our understanding of the effects of midbrain damage on cognition is largely based on animal studies, though there have been occasional investigations of the effects of human midbrain lesions on cognition. This investigation of a rare case of a glioma initially confined to the dorsal midbrain explores the effects of disease progression on IQ,…

  17. Teaching cause-effect text structure through social studies content to at-risk second graders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joanna P; Nubla-Kung, Abigail M; Pollini, Simonne; Stafford, K Brooke; Garcia, Amaya; Snyder, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a comprehension program integrated with social studies instruction designed for at-risk second graders. The program included instruction in cause-effect text structure, emphasizing clue words, generic questions, graphic organizers, and the close analysis of specially constructed cause-effect target paragraphs. This program was compared (a) to a content-only program that focused only on social studies and did not include text structure instruction and (b) to a no-instruction control. Fifteen classroom teachers, randomly assigned to treatment, provided the instruction. The program improved the comprehension of instructional cause-effect texts, and there were transfer effects on some comprehension measures. The performance of the 2 instructed groups did not differ on any of the content measures, indicating that such integrated instruction can be accomplished without a loss in the amount of content acquired. This study supports our previous findings on the effectiveness of explicit instruction at the primary-grade level.

  18. An Experimental Study on the Effectiveness of Multimedia in College English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Based on empirical research and qualitative analysis, this paper aims to explore the effectiveness of multimedia assisted methods in college English teaching. It seems and has been proved by some studies that multimedia assisted methods can effectively promote students' English learning. But the results of this study do not positively contribute…

  19. Effect of smoking and periodontal treatment on the subgingival microflora : A retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Velden, U; Varoufaki, A; Hutter, JW; Xu, L; Timmerman, MF; Van Winkelhoff, AJ; Loos, BG

    2003-01-01

    Background: The effect of smoking on the prevalence of periodontal pathogens after periodontal treatment is still not clear. Some studies found no effect of the smoking status on the prevalence of periodontal pathogens after therapy, whereas others did. The aim of this retrospective study was to inv

  20. The effects of Psychotropic drugs On Developing brain (ePOD) study : methods and design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottelier, Marco A.; Schouw, Marieke L. J.; Klomp, Anne; Tamminga, Hyke G. H.; Schrantee, Anouk G. M.; Bouziane, Cheima; de Ruiter, Michiel B.; Boer, Frits; Ruhe, Henricus G.; Denys, Damiaan; Rijsman, Roselyne; Lindauer, Ramon J. L.; Reitsma, Hans B.; Geurts, Hilde M.; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Background: Animal studies have shown that methylphenidate (MPH) and fluoxetine (FLX) have different effects on dopaminergic and serotonergic system in the developing brain compared to the developed brain. The effects of Psychotropic drugs On the Developing brain (ePOD) study is a combination of dif

  1. Effectiveness of Computer-Assisted Mathematics Education (CAME) over Academic Achievement: A Meta-Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Seda; Basol, Gülsah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to determine the overall effects of Computer-Assisted Mathematics Education (CAME) on academic achievement. After an extensive review of the literature, studies using Turkish samples and observing the effects of Computer-Assisted Education (CAE) on mathematics achievement were examined. As a result of this…

  2. Effects of Distance Coaching on Teachers' Use of Pyramid Model Practices: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artman-Meeker, Kathleen; Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Snyder, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the effects of 2 professional development approaches on teachers' implementation of the "Pyramid" model, a classroom-wide approach for fostering social-emotional development and addressing challenging behavior. The study had 2 goals: (a) to examine the differential effects of workshop…

  3. The Effect of Scientific Studies on Students' Scientific Literacy and Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genç, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of scientific studies on students' scientific literacy and attitude towards science course. For the study, a middle school science study group was established by randomly selecting 30 students from the 6th, 7th, and 8th grades. Participating students were given information about the…

  4. The evaluator effect in usability studies: Problem detection and severity judgments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels Ebbe; Hertzum, Morten; John, Bonnie E.

    1998-01-01

    Usability studies are commonly used in industry and applied in research as a yardstick for other usability evaluation methods. Though usability studies have been studied extensively, one potential threat to their reliability has been left virtually untouched: the evaluator effect. In this study, ...

  5. The effect of learning styles and study behavior on success of preclinical students in pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asci, Halil; Kulac, Esin; Sezik, Mekin; Cankara, F. Nihan; Cicek, Ekrem

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of learning styles and study behaviors on preclinical medical students’ pharmacology exam scores in a non-Western setting. Materials and Methods: Grasha–Reichmann Student Learning Study Scale and a modified Study Behavior Inventory were used to assess learning styles and study behaviors of preclinical medical students (n = 87). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the independent effect of gender, age, learning style, and study behavior on pharmacology success. Results: Collaborative (40%) and competitive (27%) dominant learning styles were frequent in the cohort. The most common study behavior subcategories were study reading (40%) and general study habits (38%). Adequate listening and note-taking skills were associated with pharmacology success, whereas students with adequate writing skills had lower exam scores. These effects were independent of gender. Conclusions: Preclinical medical students’ study behaviors are independent predictive factors for short-term pharmacology success. PMID:26997716

  6. Study of the ionizing radiation effects on the swedish telecommunications network. Studie av telekommunikationernas talighet mot joniserande stralning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeransson, G.; Liljegren, T.

    1992-11-01

    The aim of the study is to form a basis for decisions on possible protective measures concerning the ionizing radiation effects on the Swedish telecommunications from nuclear weapon explosions outside Sweden. The report contains a brief survey of analysis and the experimental investigations of the ionizing radiation effects on optical fibers, repeaters and microwave radio-link equipments. It also deals with the Swedish Telecommunication Network buildings and their ionizing radiation protection as well as with some specially selected telecommunication objects.

  7. Study on Spatial Spillover Effects of Infrastructures Investment: A Case Study on Cities along Shanghai-Kunming Railway Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Using the economic development of regions and cities along the Shanghai-Kunming railway line as an example, the paper carries out an empirical study on the spatial spillover effects of infrastructure investment in China. It has been found that the infrastructure investment along Shang-Kunming line not only produces positive spatial spillover effects, such as promoting the region’s transportation capacity, expanding trading volume, adjusting industrial structure, and facilitating economic development, but also leads to certain negative spatial spillover effects like unbalanced flow of production elements among the region, and unbalanced economic growth.

  8. [Contrast effects of background stimulus person on attitude similarity judgement and interpersonal attraction: a study of topic familiarity effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, T

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a background stimulus person on attitude similarity judgement and interpersonal attraction. Mascaro and Graves (1973) argued that a contrast effect on perception of similarity mediated interpersonal attraction. In the present experiment, it was hypothesized that topic familiarity moderated the effects of a background stimulus person on attitude similarity judgement and interpersonal attraction. One hundred twenty-two (122) female students were randomly assigned to four groups, formed by two levels of topic familiarity and two levels of similarity for the background stimulus person. They saw the attitudes of two stimulus persons together, and were asked to rate perceived similarity and interpersonal attraction. Results showed that in familiar topic condition, contrast effect was not found for attitude similarity judgement, but it was found for interpersonal attraction. The finding suggested that presence of a background stimulus person immediately led to the contrast effect on interpersonal attraction.

  9. Gene-environment interaction effects on lung function- a genome-wide association study within the Framingham heart study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies in occupational exposure and lung function have focused only on the main effect of occupational exposure or genetics on lung function. Some disease-susceptible genes may be missed due to their low marginal effects, despite potential involvement in the disease process through interactions with the environment. Through comprehensive genome-wide gene-environment interaction studies, we can uncover these susceptibility genes. Our objective in this study was to explore gene by occupational exposure interaction effects on lung function using both the individual SNPs approach and the genetic network approach. Methods The study population comprised the Offspring Cohort and the Third Generation from the Framingham Heart Study. We used forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FVC) as outcomes. Occupational exposures were classified using a population-specific job exposure matrix. We performed genome-wide gene-environment interaction analysis, using the Affymetrix 550 K mapping array for genotyping. A linear regression-based generalized estimating equation was applied to account for within-family relatedness. Network analysis was conducted using results from single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-level analyses and from gene expression study results. Results There were 4,785 participants in total. SNP-level analysis and network analysis identified SNP rs9931086 (Pinteraction =1.16 × 10-7) in gene SLC38A8, which may significantly modify the effects of occupational exposure on FEV1. Genes identified from the network analysis included CTLA-4, HDAC, and PPAR-alpha. Conclusions Our study implies that SNP rs9931086 in SLC38A8 and genes CTLA-4, HDAC, and PPAR-alpha, which are related to inflammatory processes, may modify the effect of occupational exposure on lung function. PMID:24289273

  10. The Effects of Studying Abroad and Studying Sustainability on Students' Global Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Michael A.; Rubin, Donald L.; Stoner, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Study abroad has shifted from a marginal opportunity for higher education students to a core strategy of U.S. colleges and universities, considered integral in the mission to globalize the academic environment (Sutton, Miller & Rubin, 2007). The assumption is that a broad set of efforts to expose students to alternate ways of viewing the world…

  11. Effect of the Use of Multimedia on Students' Performance: A Case Study of Social Studies Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Genç Osman; Oruç, Sahin

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly changing technological developments have affected education as it does every other fields of human endeavor. The number of technology applications used in education increases every day. One of these tools is multimedia. In the studies about the use of multimedia in education, it has been reached that multimedia increases students'…

  12. Study of Magnetic Hysteresis Effects in a Storage Ring Using Precision Tune Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Wei; Mikhailov, Stepan F; Xu, Wei; Li, Jing-Yi; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Ying K

    2016-01-01

    With advances in accelerator science and technology in the recent decades, the accelerator community has focused on the development of next-generation light sources, for example the diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs), which requires precision control of the electron beam energy and betatron tunes. This work is aimed at understanding magnet hysteresis effects on the electron beam energy and lattice focusing in the circular accelerators, and developing new methods to gain better control of these effects. In this paper, we will report our recent experimental study of the magnetic hysteresis effects and their impacts on the Duke storage ring lattice using the transverse feedback based precision tune measurement system. The major magnet hysteresis effects associated with magnet normalization and lattice ramping are carefully studied to determine an effective procedure for lattice preparation while maintaining a high degree of reproducibility of lattice focusing. The local hysteresis effects are also studied...

  13. A study on effects of knowledge management on organizational entrepreneurship: A case study of educational system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Azad

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management plays an important role in business development specially in educational system. The proposed study designs and distributes a questionnaire among experts who are involved in education systems in province of Tehran, Iran. The population of this survey includes 1680 people who are enrolled in administration levels of this province and using a simple sapling technique is calculated as 313. The questionnaire consists of 30 questions in Likert scale and there are six categories for the proposed study of this paper including the concept of knowledge, management, knowledge tools, knowledge measurement, change management, knowledge content. We have used LISREL software package to find the relationship between entrepreneurship and knowledge management components. Based on the results of this survey, knowledge content is number one priority followed by knowledge tools and concept of knowledge. The other factors including management, knowledge measurement and change management are in lower levels of importance.

  14. Short-term regulation of hydro powerplants. Studies on the environmental effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinisalmi, T. [ed.; Forsius, J.; Muotka, J.; Soimakallio, H. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland); Riihimaeki, J. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Vehanen, T. [Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Inst. (Finland); Yrjaenae, T. [North Ostrobothnia Regional Environmental Centre, Oulu (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The publication is a final report on a project studying effects of short-term regulation of hydro power plants. The project consists of two parts: (1) examining and developing methods for evaluation, (2) applying methods in a case study at the Oulujoki River. The economic value of short-term regulation was studied with a model consisting of an optimization model and a river simulation model. Constraints on water level or discharge variations could be given to the power plants and their economical influence could be studied. Effects on shoreline recreation use due to water level fluctuation were studied with a model where various effects are made commensurable and expressed in monetary terms. A literature survey and field experiments were used to study the methods for assessing effects of short-term regulation on river habitats. The state and development needs of fish stocks and fisheries in large regulated rivers were studied and an environmental classification was made. Remedial measures for the short-term regulated rivers were studied with a literature survey and enquiries. A comprehensive picture of the various effects of short-term regulation was gained in the case study in Oulujoki River (110 km long, 7 power plants). Harmful effects can be reduced with the given recommendations of remedial measures on environment and the usage of the hydro power plants. (orig.) 52 refs.

  15. An interventional study (calcium supplementation & health education) on premenstrual syndrome - effect on premenstrual and menstrual symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Shailesh Sutariya, Nitiben Talsania, Chintul Shah

    2011-01-01

    The study was conducted to study the effect of calcium supplementation on Premenstrual and Menstrual Symptoms. It was a one year follow-up prospective, randomized controlled interventional study. After the initial 2-cycle screening phase, a total of 215 healthy premenopausal women were enrolled in the study group calcium supplementation(500 BD) of the trial and 140 subjects either the relatives or neighbors of the study population were enrolled as control group health, nutrition, hygiene educ...

  16. Alcohol email assessment and feedback study dismantling effectiveness for university students (AMADEUS-1: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCambridge Jim

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol causes huge problems for population health and for society, which require interventions with individuals as well as populations to prevent and reduce harms. Brief interventions can be effective and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk groups such as students. The research literature on the effectiveness of online interventions is developing rapidly and is confronted by methodological challenges common to other areas of e-health including attrition and assessment reactivity and in the design of control conditions. Methods/design The study aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, employing a randomized controlled trial (RCT design that takes account of baseline assessment reactivity, and other possible effects of the research process. Outcomes will be evaluated after 3 months both among student populations as a whole including for a randomized no contact control group and among those who are risky drinkers randomized to brief assessment and feedback (routine practice or to brief assessment only. A three-arm parallel groups trial will also allow exploration of the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The trial will be undertaken simultaneously in 2 universities randomizing approximately 15,300 students who will all be blinded to trial participation. All participants will be offered routine practice intervention at the end of the study. Discussion This trial informs the development of routine service delivery in Swedish universities and more broadly contributes a new approach to the study of the effectiveness of online interventions in student populations, with relevance to behaviors other than alcohol consumption. The use of blinding and deception in this study raise ethical issues that warrant further attention. Trial registration ISRCTN28328154

  17. A study on effect of outsourcing on cost reduction: A case study of tile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Shirzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past few decades, many organizations have attempted to reduce their costs through outsourcing of non-value added activities. This paper presents an empirical investigation to find important factors on reducing production expenses through outsourcing activities. The proposed study of this paper designs a questionnaire in Likert scale consists of 19 questions and distributes it among some experts. Using structural equation modeling, the study investigates different variables and the results indicate that outsourcing could reduce the production cost through time, inventory and human resources. The implementation of Freedman for ranking these factors indicate that time played the most influential factor followed by inventory and human resources. The results of structural equation modeling indicate that there are some positive and meaningful relationship between human capital and cost (β=0.78, t-value = 9.38, a positive and meaningful relationship between inventory and cost (β=0.81, t-value=10.54 and a positive and meaningful relationship between time and cost (β=0.89, t-value = 11.26.

  18. Effects of sponsorship disclosure timing on the processing of sponsored content: a study on the effectiveness of European disclosure regulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerman, S.C.; van Reijmersdal, E.A.; Neijens, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates whether the timing of sponsorship disclosure affects viewers’ processing of sponsored content, and whether a disclosure influences the persuasive effect of the sponsored content. A model is proposed in which sponsorship disclosure enhances the recognition of sponsored televis

  19. The Effect of Positive Verbal Reinforcement on the Study Behavior of Eighth Grade Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake-Jones, Felicia

    This study was conducted in order to investigate the effect of verbal reinforcement on the study behavior of eighth grade students. Twelve middle school students participated. The target students were observed fifteen minutes a day, three days per week. Study behavior was noted with a check or a zero. If the subject was participating in class the…

  20. The Effectiveness of Lecture-Integrated, Web-Supported Case Studies in Large Group Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzawi, May; Dawson, Maureen M.

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of lecture-integrated and web-supported case studies in supporting a large and academically diverse group of undergraduate students was evaluated in the present study. Case studies and resource (web)-based learning were incorporated as two complementary interactive learning strategies into the traditional curriculum. A truncated…

  1. Outdoor studies on the effects of solar UV-B on bryophytes : Overview and methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelen, P.; de Boer, M.K.; de Bakker, N.; Rozema, Jelte

    2006-01-01

    In this review all recent field studies on the effects of UV-B radiation on bryophytes are discussed. In most of the studies fluorescent UV-B tubes are used to expose the vegetation to enhanced levels of UV-B radiation to simulate stratospheric ozone depletion. Other studies use screens to filter th

  2. Patients with cluster A personality disorders in psychotherapy: an effectiveness study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bartak; H. Andrea; M.D. Spreeuwenberg; M. Thunnissen; U.M. Ziegler; J. Dekker; F. Bouvy; E.F.M. Hamers; A.M.M.A. Meerman; J.J.V. Busschbach; R. Verheul; T. Stijnen; P.M.G. Emmelkamp

    2011-01-01

    Background: While psychopharmacological studies are common in patients with cluster A personality disorders, the effects of psychotherapy have received little attention. The aim of this study is to explore whether psychotherapeutic treatment yields health gains for these patients. Methods: The study

  3. Estimating the effectiveness of screening for scoliosis : A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunge, Eveline M.; Juttmann, Rikard E.; van Biezen, Frans C.; Creemers, Huub; Hazebroek-Kampschreur, Alice A. J. M.; Luttmer, Bert C. F.; Wiegersma, P. Auke; de Koning, Harry J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that screening for scoliosis is effective in reducing the need for surgical treatment. METHODS. The study was a case-control study. A total of 125 consecutive patients who were treated surgically for idiopathic scoliosis between January 200

  4. The Relative Effectiveness of Integrated Reading Study Strategy and Conceptual Physics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taslidere, Erdal; Eryilmaz, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the combined and partial effects of the Integrated Reading/Study Strategy and Conceptual Physics Approach on ninth grade private high school students' achievement in and attitudes toward optics. The Integrated Reading/Study Strategy is a new strategy which was developed by integrating previously…

  5. The effect of a short integrated study skills programme for first-year

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegers-Jager, K.M.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.; Themmen, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is a need for outcome-based studies on strategies for supporting at-risk medical students that use long-term follow-up and contemporaneous controls. AIM: To measure the effect of a short integrated study skills programme (SSP) on the study progress of at-risk medical students. METH

  6. Effects of Lesson Study on Science Teacher Candidates' Teaching Efficacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pektas, Murat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the lesson study process on science teacher candidates' teaching in terms of lesson plan content, pedagogy and classroom management based on expert, peer and self-evaluations. The participants of this case study consisted of 16 teacher candidates in elementary science education in their…

  7. 21 CFR 314.610 - Approval based on evidence of effectiveness from studies in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUG Approval of New Drugs When Human Efficacy Studies Are Not Ethical or Feasible § 314.610 Approval based on evidence of effectiveness from studies in animals. (a) FDA may grant marketing approval for a... feasible and ethical. Such postmarketing studies would not be feasible until an exigency arises. When...

  8. 21 CFR 601.91 - Approval based on evidence of effectiveness from studies in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Efficacy Studies Are Not Ethical or Feasible § 601.91 Approval based on evidence of effectiveness from studies in animals. (a) FDA may grant marketing approval for a biological product for which safety has... and ethical. Such postmarketing studies would not be feasible until an exigency arises. When...

  9. Histopathological study into side-effect toxicity of some drugs used in treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Shazly, M O; Afify, M M; el-Dieb, M K

    1989-03-01

    The effect of cis-chlorodiamine platinum (cisplatin) on different tissues of rat was studied. Nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity were clearly observed both clinically and histologically. The minimising action of penicillamine as a chelating agent and/or lasix as a diuretic on the toxic side-effect of cisplatin was also studied. Both agents succeeded in reducing the toxic side-effect of cisplatin to some extent but failed to reduce mortality among the experimental animals. The study has also manifested liver and heart to be additional organs susceptible to damage, following cisplatin treatment.

  10. The effect size, study design, and development experience in commercially sponsored studies for new drug applications in approved drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Satoshi; Kusama, Makiko; Ono, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies incorporate different features into the trials for new drug applications (NDAs) to render them efficient, making use of their experience. The objective of this analysis was to examine the associations between outcome and features related to study design and clinical development experience in commercially sponsored clinical trials. We collected data of phase 2 and phase 3 trials of all the drugs that obtained approval for depression, schizophrenia, asthma, hypertension, and diabetes in Japan from 1970 to 2011. In total, 145 trials from 90 test drugs were eligible for our study. We calculated the effect size, the standard mean of differences between test drug and comparator therapeutic effects, as the objective variable for use in our analysis. A linear mixed effect model with nested and crossed random effects was used in the analysis including variety of therapeutic area, test drugs and clinical trials. The analysis showed that trial features including sample size, subjective endpoints and active comparator of the same mode of action were negatively associated with effect size. In addition, sponsors' domestic clinical development experience with similar drugs seemed to have a positive association, but prior development experience in foreign countries did not. The accumulation of skills and knowledge within sponsors, and accumulated experience in domestic professionals who implement clinical trials under study contracts with sponsors would be of great importance for yielding clear outcomes. This study provides additional evidence with respect to possible sizes and directions of the influence of study design features that must be considered when planning and implementing trials for new drug applications, and when retrospectively comparing outcomes from trials with different designs and environments.

  11. Benchmarking Controlled Trial--a novel concept covering all observational effectiveness studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmivaara, Antti

    2015-06-01

    The Benchmarking Controlled Trial (BCT) is a novel concept which covers all observational studies aiming to assess effectiveness. BCTs provide evidence of the comparative effectiveness between health service providers, and of effectiveness due to particular features of the health and social care systems. BCTs complement randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as the sources of evidence on effectiveness. This paper presents a definition of the BCT; compares the position of BCTs in assessing effectiveness with that of RCTs; presents a checklist for assessing methodological validity of a BCT; and pilot-tests the checklist with BCTs published recently in the leading medical journals.

  12. The Effects of Step-by-Step Self-regulation on Controlling Study Behavior, Attitude to Study and Academic Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Sharifiniya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Using personal potential is one of the key elements in behavior modification and the purpose of this research was to study the effects of a new method in changing human attitude and behavior in school context. Following this goal, in current research the authors have tried to examine the role of Step-by-Step Self-Regulation on studying behavior control, attitude to study and students' academic achievement. The total sample size was 120 high school male students in Hamedan. The subjects were divided into two groups: experimental group and control group. Then step-by-step self-regulation method were taught and carried out for eight sessions over the experimental group. Researcher made questionnaires were used for gathering data on study behavior control and students’ attitude to study and for evaluating students’ academic achievement their scholastic scores were used. In testing research hypotheses, a multivariate three-way ANOVA and independent and paired t tests were used. Comparing experimental and control groups data show that applying step-by-step self-regulation improves the personal ability to control study behavior while it does not have any meaningful effect on attitudes to study and students' academic achievement.

  13. [Study on Xinyueshu spray drying assisted with copovidone and its effect on powder property].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan-Rong; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Ding, Dong-Mei; Yan, Hong-Mei; Hu, Shao-Ying; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2013-12-01

    To study the application characteristics of copovidone (PVP-S630) in Xinyueshu extracts during the spray drying process, and its effect on such pharmaceutical properties as micromeritics and drug release behavior. PVP-S630 was added into Xinyueshu extracts to study on the spray drying, the effect of different dosages of PVP-S630 against the wall sticking effect of the spray drying, as well as the power property of Xinyueshu spray drying power and the dissolution in vitro behavior of the effective component of hyperoside. The results showed that PVP-S630 revealed a significant anti-wall sticking effect, with no notable change in the grain size of the spray drying power, increase in the fluidity, improvement in the moisture absorption and remarkable rise in the dissolution in vitro behavior of hyperoside. It was worth further studying the application of PVP-S630 in spray drying power of traditional Chinese medicine.

  14. Neurological effects of white spirit: Contribution of animal studies during a 30-year period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Damgård; Lund, Søren Peter; Ladefoged, Ole

    2006-01-01

    , but the neurophysiological tests showed adverse effects at this level. Fourth, neurophysiological methods may be more sensitive than histopathological, neurobehavioural and neurochemical methods. Overall, white spirit with a high and a low content of aromatics showed no overt difference in long-term effects in animals......Numerous studies have suggested that long-term occupational exposure to white spirit may cause chronic toxic encephalopathy (WHO 1996). This review summarizes the chronic nervous system effects of white spirit in animal studies during a 30-year period. First, routine histopathology was consistently...... unable to reveal adverse peripheral or central nervous system effects after inhalation of white spirit. Second, neurobehavioural studies in animals showed no adverse effect after inhalation of white spirit with a high content of aromatics in contrast to what was found with products with a low content...

  15. Road safety effects of porous asphalt: a systematic review of evaluation studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvik, R.; Greibe, Poul

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic review of studies that have evaluated the effects on road safety of porous asphalt. Porous asphalt is widely used on motorways in Europe, mainly in order to reduce traffic noise and increase road capacity. A meta-analysis was made of six studies, containing a total...... of eighteen estimates of the effect of porous asphalt on accident rates. No clear effect on road safety of porous asphalt was found. All summary estimates of effect indicated very small changes in accident rates and very few were statistically significant at conventional levels. Studies that have evaluated...... the effects of porous asphalt on nine different risk factors associated with accident occurrence were also reviewed. It was found that four of the risk factors were favourably influenced by porous asphalt, three were adversely influenced, and two were not influenced by porous asphalt. The net impact...

  16. A social work study on the effect of different factors on leadership style: A case study of educational system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Jannesari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Leadership style plays an important role on job satisfaction in educational systems. In this paper, we present a study among 180 school principals in city of Khomeinishahr, located in province of Esfahan, Iran. The study selects a sample of 123 principals and examines ten hypotheses including the effects of personality trait neuroticism, extroversion, resilience, participative, conscientiousness on job satisfaction. The study also investigates the impacts of transformational leadership style, transactional leadership style and Laissez – fair leadership style on job satisfaction. Finally, the study considers the relationship between personality trait neuroticism and transformational leadership style as well as personality trait extraversion and transformational leadership style. The study uses Pearson correlation test and verify that nine out of ten hypotheses have been confirmed and the relationship between Laissez – fair leadership style and job satisfaction is not confirmed.

  17. Effects of Study Design and Allocation on participant behaviour - ESDA: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeran Paschal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background What study participants think about the nature of a study has been hypothesised to affect subsequent behaviour and to potentially bias study findings. In this trial we examine the impact of awareness of study design and allocation on participant drinking behaviour. Methods/Design A three-arm parallel group randomised controlled trial design will be used. All recruitment, screening, randomisation, and follow-up will be conducted on-line among university students. Participants who indicate a hazardous level of alcohol consumption will be randomly assigned to one of three groups. Group A will be informed their drinking will be assessed at baseline and again in one month (as in a cohort study design. Group B will be told the study is an intervention trial and they are in the control group. Group C will be told the study is an intervention trial and they are in the intervention group. All will receive exactly the same brief educational material to read. After one month, alcohol intake for the past 4 weeks will be assessed. Discussion The experimental manipulations address subtle and previously unexplored ways in which participant behaviour may be unwittingly influenced by standard practice in trials. Given the necessity of relying on self-reported outcome, it will not be possible to distinguish true behaviour change from reporting artefact. This does not matter in the present study, as any effects of awareness of study design or allocation involve bias that is not well understood. There has been little research on awareness effects, and our outcomes will provide an indication of the possible value of further studies of this type and inform hypothesis generation. Trial Registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR: ACTRN12610000846022

  18. Design evaluation and optimisation in crossover pharmacokinetic studies analysed by nonlinear mixed effects models

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thu Thuy; Bazzoli, Caroline; Mentré, France

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Bioequivalence or interaction trials are commonly studied in crossover design and can be analysed by nonlinear mixed effects models as an alternative to noncompartmental approach. We propose an extension of the population Fisher information matrix in nonlinear mixed effects models to design crossover pharmacokinetic trials, using a linearisation of the model around the random effect expectation, including within-subject variability and discrete covariates fixed or chan...

  19. Health effects of selected microbiological control agents. A 3-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baelum, Jesper; Larsen, Preben; Doekes, Gert;

    2012-01-01

    Introduction and objectives: Microbiological control agents (MBCA) are widely used in greenhouses, replacing chemical pesticides. The presented study aims to describe health effects of exposure to three types commonly used: Bacillus thuringiensis, Verticillium lecanii, and Trichoderma harzenianum...... no effect on the occurrence of respiratory symptoms or lung function was observed. The persons had a relatively long exposure. Therefore, a healthy worker effect may have influenced the results....

  20. Bioavailability studies and the clinical pharmacologist: correlation of drug distribution with clinical effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, R I

    1975-06-01

    Bioavailability studies can be interpreted only when clinical information is available which correlates drug distribution with both efficacious and toxic clinical effects. The clinical pharmacologist should be instrumental in the development of safe and effective drug therapy by the systematic application of well designed clinical trials, the clear definition of therapeutically desirable clinical responses, and the development and application of improved techniques of measuring these effects.

  1. Methods for studying and criteria for evaluating the biological effects of electric fields of industrial frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savin, B.M.; Shandala, M.G.; Nikonova, K.V.; Morozov, Yu.A.

    1978-10-01

    Data are reviewed from a number of USSR research studies on the biological effects of electric power transmission lines of 1150 Kv and above. Effects on man, plants, animals, and terrestrial ecosystems are reported. Existing health standards in the USSR for the exposure of personnel working in electric fields are included. It is concluded that high-voltage electric fields have a harmful effect on man and his environment.

  2. The effect of skeletal pattern on determining articulator settings for prosthodontic rehabilitation: an in vivo study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Canning, Tom

    2011-01-01

    During extensive prosthodontic treatment, the use of an accurately adjusted articulator is recommended to simulate mandibular movements. This clinical study was undertaken to assess any possible effect of the underlying skeletal pattern on programming articulator settings.

  3. Long-Term Health Effects of Atom Bomb on Japan Not as Bad as Feared: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Long-Term Health Effects of Atom Bomb on Japan Not as Bad as Feared: Study Survivors of ... 2011 at a nuclear power plant in Fukushima, Japan, after an earthquake triggered a massive tsunami shows ...

  4. Study on Dispersion Properties of Photonic Crystal Fiber by Effective-Index Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The group-velocity-dispersion properties of photonic crystal fiber (PCF) were investigated by effective-index model. The relationship between waveguide dispersion and structure parameters: the pitch A and the relative hole size/was studied.

  5. Study on Dispersion Properties of Photonic Crystal Fiber by Effective-Index Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Guobin; Wang Zhi; Lou Shuqin; Jian Shuisheng

    2003-01-01

    The group-velocity-dispersion properties of photonic crystal fiber (PCF) were investigated by effective-index model. The relationship between waveguide dispersion and structure parameters: the pitch and the relative hole size f was studied.

  6. Does momentary accessibility influence metacomprehension judgments? The influence of study-judgment lags on accessibility effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Julie M C; Dunlosky, John

    2006-02-01

    In two experiments, we investigated momentary accessibility as a basis for metacomprehension judgments. Momentary accessibility has been cited as a major contributor to these judgments, yet the only previous investigation on the topic used judgments that were delayed a day after study, which have not been used in any other studies in the field and may be necessary for demonstrating accessibility-based effects. As expected, Experiment 1 demonstrated that the time between study and judgments moderates accessibility effects, with the relationship between judgments and access measures being substantially greater for delayed than for immediate judgments. Experiment 2 ruled out a plausible artifactual interpretation for accessibility effects on delayed judgments. In the discussion, we explore why study-judgment lags moderate accessibility effects.

  7. Study of the effects of cyclodextrins on the fluorescence detection of zearalenone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful applications of inclusion complexes to improve isolation and detection of small molecules have made cyclodextrins increasingly popular components in methods of detection. Studies of the effects of cyclodextrins on aflatoxins have advanced mycotoxin detection research. Recently, a capill...

  8. Study on Destructuring effect of trehalose on water by neutron diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Branca, C; Migliardo, F; Magazù, V; Soper, A K

    2002-01-01

    In this work results on trehalose/water solutions by neutron diffraction are reported. The study of the partial structure factors and spatial distribution functions gives evidence of a decreasing tetrahedrality degree of water and justifies its cryoprotectant effectiveness. (orig.)

  9. A Case-Control Study of Effect of Opium Addiction on Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Azimzade-Sarwar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD and Myocardial Infarction (MI are one of the most important disease which cause mortality and morbidity. Opioid peptides and exogenous opioid such as morphine are known to exert an important cardiovascular effect. To study effect of opium addiction to incidence of MI. A Case-Control study was designed in Kerman university. 150 patients with MI was admitted to CCU and 150 matched patients admitted in surgical wards evaluate from cardiovascular risk factor and opium addiction. Analysis of data suggested no difference between two groups (P>0.05. But smoking OR = 2.45, hypertension OR = 2.65, Diabetes mellitus OR = 1.82 and Hypercholesterolemia OR = 3.16 were a risk factor for MI. Effect of opium in IHD has controversial. But recent of study defined that opioid peptides have a cardioprotective effect. Many exact and longitudinal studies should design for this purpose.

  10. A study of effect of Nigella sativa oil in paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity in albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manik S. Ghadlinge

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrated that NS oil has hepatoprotective effect. NS oil administration can prevent or reverse the hepatotoxicity induced by paracetamol. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(3.000: 539-546

  11. Webinar Presentation: Epidemiologic Studies of the Effects of Toxic Exposures on Brain and Behavior: Neuropsychological Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation, Epidemiologic Studies of the Effects of Toxic Exposures on Brain and Behavior: Neuropsychological Assessment, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Neurodevelopment.

  12. 40 CFR 79.62 - Subchronic toxicity study with specific health effect assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... will provide screening information on target organ toxicities and on concentration levels useful for... through concentration range-finding trials prior to starting this study. This health effects screening... (if present); esophagus; stomach; duodenum; jejunum; ileum; cecum; colon; rectum; urinary...

  13. The position effect and gene theory in the studies of Soviet geneticists in the 1930s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panshin, I.B. [Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-01

    An overview of the studies performed by Soviet geneticists in the 1930s in the field of gene position effect is presented. Evidence of this phenomenon, the role of heterochromatin in the position effect, and the influence of gene position on mutability are discussed. 45 refs., 1 fig.

  14. The Causal Effect of Studying on Academic Performance. NBER Working Paper No. 13341

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinebrickner, Todd R.; Stinebrickner, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    Despite the large amount of attention that has been paid recently to understanding the determinants of educational outcomes, knowledge of the causal effect of the most fundamental input in the education production function--students' study time and effort--has remained virtually non-existent. In this paper, we examine the causal effect of studying…

  15. A Study of the Effectiveness of Prescriptive Teaching for Exceptional Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Lillian A.

    The study was designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of diagnostic teaching with 70 children (6 to 14 years old) with learning and behavioral disorders and to investigate the administrative plan which is most efficient and effective for implementing diagnostic teaching. Ss were divided into three experimental groups--Experimental Group I with…

  16. Insulin sensitizing effect of 3 Indian medicinal plants: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samidha A Kalekar

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The results suggest that one of the mechanisms for the anti-diabetic effect of Pe, Cl and Tc may be through an insulin sensitizing effect (stimulation of glucose uptake into adipocytes. Further studies using other target sites viz. skeletal muscle and hepatocytes models and in an insulin resistant state would help substantiate this conclusion.

  17. Effect of accreditation on the quality of chronic disease management: a comparative observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn-Klomberg, A.L. van; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Wolters, R.J.; Bouma, M.; Wensing, M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Practice accreditation is widely used to assess and improve quality of healthcare providers. Little is known about its effectiveness, particularly in primary care. In this study we examined the effect of accreditation on quality of care regarding diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary d

  18. A Longitudinal Twin Study of the Direction of Effects between Psychopathic Personality and Antisocial Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, Mats; Lichtenstein, Paul; Andershed, Henrik; Larsson, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Background: Antisocial behaviour may partly develop as a consequence of psychopathic personality. However, neither the direction of effects nor the aetiology of the association has previously been clarified. The aim in this study was to investigate the direction of effects between psychopathic personality and antisocial behaviour, and to…

  19. Effect of a clown's presence at botulinum toxin injections in children: a randomized, prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgaard; Kibaek, Maria; Martinussen, Torben;

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the presence of a hospital clown during pediatric procedures has rarely been evaluated. In a pediatric ward, botulinum toxin injection is a painful procedure and a stressful experience for the child. We undertook a study of the effect of the presence of a hospital clown on children...

  20. The Effectiveness of Coursework Assessment in Mathematics Service Courses--Studies at Two Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Susan; Goldfinch, Judy; Searl, John

    2001-01-01

    Describes the introduction and evaluation of the effectiveness of a single group project given at a new university, and 10 individual tasks at an ancient university, to devise appropriate and relevant assessments for first-year service mathematics courses for science and engineering. Studies the effects of these tasks on attitudes toward…

  1. THE MECHANISM STUDY OF EFFECT OF CALCIUM AND ALUMINIUM IONS ON FLOCCULATING PROCESS OF KAOLIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何绪文; 狄平宽; 单忠健

    1995-01-01

    The effects of Ca2+and Al3+ious on flocculating process of kaolin using ployacrylamide as flocculant was studied. Mechanism of the effects was investigated and discussed through molecularorbit (MO) theory, solution chemistry calculation and electronic probe examination in this article.

  2. Evaluating effectiveness and safety toward electronic cigarette among Malaysian vapers: One-month observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizur Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: A month follow-up showed a good smoking cessation rate among Malaysian vapers mainly in single users, whereas less number of quitters but the high reduction in tobacco cigarette consumption observed in dual users without any harmful effects. Furthermore, extended period studies are warranted to confirm its long-term safety and effectiveness among different Malaysian population.

  3. A Study on the Effects of the Rubric on Concurrent Discussion in Web-Based Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaewon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to research the effect of the rubric on the level of learners' cognitive engagement and to explore the effectiveness of Web-based concurrent discussions experienced by learners. The participants were 20 undergraduate students of D Women's University and they were divided into six groups for concurrent discussions in…

  4. Effects of the Virtual Environment on Online Faculty Perceptions of Leadership: A Grounded Theory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how faculty members, teaching in the virtual environment of higher education, perceived the effectiveness of leader actions to understand how principles of existing leadership theory in critical areas such as communication effectiveness, development of trust, and ability to motivate faculty…

  5. Statistical Learning Effects in Musicians and Non-Musicians: An MEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Kuchenbuch, Anja; Herholz, Sibylle C.; Pantev, Christo

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of musical training in statistical learning of tone sequences using Magnetoencephalography (MEG). Specifically, MEG recordings were used to investigate the neural and functional correlates of the pre-attentive ability for detection of deviance, from a statistically learned tone sequence. The effect of…

  6. Naturalistic Studies of the Long-Term Effects of Television Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Charles W.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Argues that field research can provide evidence about the long-term socialization and developmental effects of media violence on viewer's behavior. Summarizes findings from a number of quasi-experimental studies about the effects of naturally occurring media violence. Concludes that these findings are often consistent with the hypothesis that…

  7. The Effect of Context and Input Conditions on Oral and Written Development: A Study Abroad Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Vidal, Carmen; Juan-Garau, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This article aims at describing and explaining the effects of a period of Study Abroad spent in the target language country (SA) on foreign language development. Such effects are analysed in the short- and mid-term and in contrast with the impact of a period of formal instruction (FI) previously spent in the home country (AH). It is hypothesised…

  8. Gwinnett County Public Schools: A Systemic Approach to Scaling Effective School Leadership. Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    George W. Bush Institute, Education Reform Initiative, 2015

    2015-01-01

    There is growing awareness among educators and policymakers that effective school leaders are critical to school success and student achievement. Many studies illustrate the important benefits of effective school leadership for teachers, pointing to the significant influence on teacher satisfaction, development, and retention. This case study…

  9. Foreign language teaching: A study of teachers’ beliefs about effective teaching and learning methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    Farid Saydee

    2016-01-01

    This study reveals the beliefs of 25 foreign language teachers about effective teaching and learning practices and also evaluates the impact of a teacher training workshop on their beliefs. Teachers of Arabic, Chinese, Dari, Persian, and Turkish (five from each language) participated in the study. The data was analyzed quantitatively, using the lens of communicative teaching approaches. In general, the teachers demonstrated similar views about effective teaching and learning. The findings fur...

  10. A COMPARITIVE STUDY ON EFFECTIVENESS OF TAPING WITH IONTOPHORESIS AND TAPING ALONE IN CHRONIC PLANTAR FASCITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Biju Chetri, U.T. Ifthikar Ali, Madhusmita Koch, Abhijit Dutta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Plantar fasciitis is a painful condition caused by microtrauma to plantar fascia due to overuse. It is a most common cause of heel pain in runners. Various studies proved taping and Iontophoresis as effective in the treating plantar fasciitis. But there are no studies comparing the combined effect of iontophoresis with taping and taping alone in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods: 50 patients suffering from plantar fasciitis who met the inclusion criteria were selected...

  11. The effect of Kinesiotaping to the skin temperature – Pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Holma, Teemu

    2014-01-01

    Aim of this study was to research whether kinesiotape has effect to skin temperature. Subjects of this study were 32 asymptomatic students of Satakunta University of Applied Sciences, 20 females and 15 males. The exclusion criteria were: recent back pain or musculoskeletal diseases on back area skin irritations and diseases on taping site. To assess the effect of kinesiotape all the subjects were taped with 30 cm taped from Superios Posterios Iliac Spine(SPIS) upwards to the ribcage. Befo...

  12. Psychological effects of implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks. A review of study methods

    OpenAIRE

    Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Compare, Angelo; Pagnini, Francesco; Essebag, Vidal; Proietti, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Background: The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) saves lives but clinical experience suggests that it may have detrimental effects on mental health. The ICD shock has been largely blamed as the main offender but empirical evidence is not consistent, perhaps because of methodological differences across studies. Objective: To appraise methodologies of studies that assessed the psychological effects of ICD shock and explore associations between methods and results. Data Sources...

  13. Ping-pong effects study in PIC turbo joint detection for TDD CDMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Changjian; Zhong Zifa; Zhang Shuo

    2009-01-01

    A kind of turbo joint detection scheme based on parallel interference cancellation (PIC) is studied; then, the eigenvalues of iteration matrix is deeply analyzed for studying the ping-pong effects in PIC JD and the corresponding compensation approach is introduced. Finally, the proposed algorithm is validated through computer simulation in TDD CDMA uplink transmission. The result shows that the ping-pong effects are almost avoided completely in the presence of the compensation scheme, and system performance is greatly improved.

  14. Psychological effects of implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks. A review of study methods.

    OpenAIRE

    Gian Mauro eManzoni; Gianluca eCastelnuovo; Angelo eCompare; Francesco ePagnini; Vidal eEssebag; Riccardo eProietti

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundThe implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) saves lives but clinical experience suggests that it may have detrimental effects on mental health. The ICD shock has been largely blamed as the main offender but empirical evidence is not consistent, perhaps because of methodological differences across studies. ObjectiveTo appraise methodologies of studies that assessed the psychological effects of ICD shock and explore associations between methods and results. Data Sources A compreh...

  15. Case study for the assessment of the biogeophysical effects of a potential afforestation in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Gálos, B.; Hagemann, S.; Haensler, A.; Kindermann, G.; Rechid, D.; Sieck, K.; Teichmann, C.; Jacob, D

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A regional-scale sensitivity study has been carried out to investigate the climatic effects of forest cover change in Europe. Applying REMO (regional climate model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology), the projected temperature and precipitation tendencies have been analysed for summer, based on the results of the A2 IPCC-SRES emission scenario simulation. For the end of the 21st century it has been studied, whether the assumed forest cover increase could reduce the effect...

  16. Study on the Effects of Natural Factors on Water Conservation Capacity of Qilian Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective]The study aimed at analyzing the effects of natural factors on water conservation capacity of Qilian Mountain.[Method] Based on water conservation quantity,elevation data and SPOT-VEGETATION remote sensing data of Qilian Mountain in 2003,the relationship between water conservation quantity and influencing factors like elevation,slope,aspect and vegetation index varying greatly in the studied area was analyzed quantitatively by means of statistical method,and the effects of natural factors on wate...

  17. A Study on the Effect of the Strategic Intelligence on Decision Making and Strategic Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Reza Esmaili

    2014-01-01

    The present research aims to recognize not only the effective factors on the strategic intelligence, strategic decision making and strategic planning but also it studies the effect of the strategic intelligence on the strategic decision making and strategic planning in organization and companies using the intelligence system in the Khorram-abad city. According to the results, this study is an analytical-survey research. The statistical population for the research is the companies and organiza...

  18. Targeted Facebook Advertising is a Novel and Effective Method of Recruiting Participants into a Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Effectiveness Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wark, John D; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M

    2016-01-01

    Background Targeted advertising using social networking sites (SNS) as a recruitment strategy in health research is in its infancy. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of targeted Facebook advertisements to increase recruitment of unvaccinated women into a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectiveness study. Methods Between September 2011 and November 2013, females aged 18 to 25 years, residing in Victoria, Australia, were recruited through Facebook advertisements relating to general women’s health. From November 2013 to June 2015, targeted advertising campaigns were implemented to specifically recruit women who had not received the HPV vaccine. Consenting participants were invited to complete an online questionnaire and those who had ever had sexual intercourse were asked to provide a self-collected vaginal swab. The HPV vaccination status of participants was confirmed from the National HPV Vaccination Program Register (NHVPR). Results The campaign comprised 10 advertisements shown between September 2011 and June 2015 which generated 55,381,637 impressions, yielding 23,714 clicks, at an overall cost of AUD $22,078.85. A total of 919 participants were recruited. A greater proportion of unvaccinated women (50.4%, 131/260) were recruited into the study following targeted advertising, compared with those recruited (19.3%, 127/659) prior to showing the modified advertisement (PFacebook advertising is a rapid and cost-effective way of recruiting young unvaccinated women into a HPV vaccine effectiveness study. PMID:27450586

  19. Study of Sweep and Induced Dihedral Effects in Subsonic Axial Flow Compressor Passages—Part II: Detailed Study of the Effects on Tip Leakage Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Ramakrishna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the detailed study of rotor tip leakage related phenomena in a low speed axial compressor rotor passages for three sweep configurations [Unswept (UNS, Tip Chordline Swept (TCS and Axially Swept (AXS]. Fifteen domains are numerically studied with 5 sweep configurations (0°, 20° TCS, 30° TCS, 20° AXS, and 30° AXS and for 3 tip clearances (0.0%, 0.7% and 2.7% of the blade chord. Results were well validated with experimental data. Observations near the tip reveal that UNS rotor shows high sensitivity than the swept rotors in the blade pressure distribution with change in tip clearance. AXS rotor has high loading capability and less tip clearance effect on blade loading at the near stall mass flow. Downstream shift of the vortex rollup along the chord is observed with increased flow coefficient and increment in the tip gap height. In particular, the effect of flow coefficient is more predominant on this effect. Tip vortex-related flow blockage is less with the swept rotors. Among the rotors, the AXS rotor is found to incur low total pressure losses attributable to tip leakage. Effect of incidence is observed on the flow leakage direction.

  20. AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF STRATEGIES-BASED INSTRUCTION ON LISTENING COMPREHENSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports a typical interventionist learningstrategies study,aiming at investigating the effect of strategies-based study on listening comprehension.The study took the formof an experiment in which two parallel classes of eighty-five first-year non-English majors were assigned into an experimental anda control group.Both groups participated in the same 18-weeklistening program,the only difference being that theexperimental group students were trained systematically inthirteen listening strategies.Results of this study reveal thatadding explicit strategy training into the regular listeningclassroom instruction has produced significant effects in areasinvestigated.First,the experimental group outperformed thecontrol group on listening comprehension achievements.Second,the strategies-based instruction had more impact on studentswith average listening ability than students above or belowaverage.The primary objective of this study is to provideimplications for the effective teaching of listening in China andfor the development of language learners’learning and languageskills.

  1. Effects of mobile phone electromagnetic fields: critical evaluation of behavioral and neurophysiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Myoung Soo; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2011-05-01

    For the last two decades, a large number of studies have investigated the effects of mobile phone radiation on the human brain and cognition using behavioral or neurophysiological measurements. This review evaluated previous findings with respect to study design and data analysis. Provocation studies found no evidence of subjective symptoms attributed to mobile phone radiation, suggesting psychological reasons for inducing such symptoms in hypersensitive people. Behavioral studies previously reported improved cognitive performance under exposure, but it was likely to have occurred by chance due to multiple comparisons. Recent behavioral studies and replication studies with more conservative statistics found no significant effects compared with original studies. Neurophysiological studies found no significant effects on cochlear and brainstem auditory processing, but only inconsistent results on spontaneous and evoked brain electrical activity. The inconsistent findings suggest possible false positives due to multiple comparisons and thus replication is needed. Other approaches such as brain hemodynamic response measurements are promising but the findings are few and not yet conclusive. Rigorous study design and data analysis considering multiple comparisons and effect size are required to reduce controversy in this important field of research.

  2. A Comparative Study on Teaching Effects of Different Innovative Methods for Curriculum System: A Students' Self Evaluation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Lingling; Wang, Na; Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    . This study designs the randomly experimental targets in the two control groups for pretest and post-test. This study tests creative thinking and student self-evaluation questionnaire, and the result indicates that in terms of the pretest for the two groups of students the indicators have no significant...... difference. In light of the post-test, for the two groups of students, their creative thinking indicators have improved significantly. However, the differences between the experimental group and the control group are not significant. Finally, this study has discussed the value of TRIZ Course contained......In order to test the feasibility of the curriculum system of TRIZ used in humanities and social science majors, compared with the traditional creativity developing, this study will test whether it is effective to cultivate students' creativity and to train their ability to solve problems...

  3. [Advances in research of pharmacological effects and formulation studies of linalool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dong-mei; Zhu, Yuan; Yu, Jiang-nan; Xu, Xi-ming

    2015-09-01

    Linalool, as a major volatile compound, is widely distributed in natural plant essential oil. In addition, it can also be artificially synthesized. Linalool is used frequently as an important ingredient of perfumes and household detergents. It is still employed in food flavor and industries. Besides, linalool has some positive effect on healthcare. Many studies have showed that linalool exhibited a variety of pharmacological activities, including analgesic, anxiolytic, sedative, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and anti-bacterial effects. Therefore, linalool will be a promising agent for clinical application. This article reviews the pharmacological effects and formulation studies of linalool so as to provide a theoretical basis for its further development and utilization.

  4. A Study of Washback Effect on Nautical English for Second Mate and Third Mate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wei-xiu; SONG Zhi-ping

    2016-01-01

    The impacts of testing on teaching and learning are called backwash effect which can be divided into positive effect and negative one. Nautical English test aims to assess students’English competence by means of the Examination of Seafarers for Competency Certificate. This is an important nationwide testing and is bound to exert effects on nautical English teaching and learning. This study investigates nautical English teachers and examinees through questionnaire and interview to have a gen-eral understanding of how they evaluate it, as well as what effects the testing have on teaching and learning.

  5. Study on effects of environmental temperature on dynamic characteristics of Taizhou Yangtze River Bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Changqing; Chen Liang; Feng Zhaoxiang

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of three-tower and two-span suspension bridge are analyzed at different global temperatures. An equivalent cable inner force method is proposed to consider temperature effects and to study the effects of environmental temperature on dynamic characteristics of Taizhou Yangtze River Bridge. The result demonstrates that the effects of temperature can not be neglected in static or dynamic analysis of Taizhou Yangtze River Bridge. The relationship between temperature and frequency is negative. The effects of temperature should be taken into account in experimental modal analysis of long-span bridges and damage identification.

  6. Training and Job Satisfaction for Organizational Effectiveness: A Case Study from the Banking Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Hasebur Rahman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Every organization needs well-adjusted, trained, and experienced people to perform its activities effectively and efficiently. Today’s business environment has become complex; the training for employees’ education is becoming a diver for adjusting dynamic change in organizational interfaces. This survey reveals that employee training and job satisfactions have a significant positive relationship with organizational effectiveness. The survey also indicates that job dissatisfaction has an insignificant relationship with organizational effectiveness in commercial banks. The study indicates that to chase dynamic business environments, management should focus on building human resources through diverse training for promoting organizational effectiveness.

  7. Study of the bullwhip effect in Chinese coal supply chain under fuzzy environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Xiao Hong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Supply chain management is important for coal companies and organizations to improve their business and enhance competitiveness in the Chinese marketplace. The bullwhip effect problem of coal supply chain systems with all demands, lead times, and ordering quantities in an uncertain environment is addressed in this paper. To simulate the bullwhip effect, the Hong Fuzzy Time Series approach and Genetic Algorithm module are preferred as a superior forecasting model. And then a back propagation Neural Network module is added to defuzzify the output of the proposed model. So the bullwhip effect is calculated and analyzed here. The effectiveness and flexibility of proposed method is verified through simulation study.

  8. Study of the hormetic effect of disinfectants chlorhexidine, povidone iodine and benzalkonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Fernández, L; Fernández-Crehuet, M; Espigares, M; Moreno, E; Espigares, E

    2014-01-01

    The study of the dose-response relationship of disinfectants is of great importance in treating infection, the objective being to use concentrations above the minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC). Below these concentrations, the bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect may be insufficient. Moreover, at low concentrations, a hormetic effect may be observed, producing a stimulation of growth instead of inhibitory action. Hormesis is not well known in the context of antimicrobial substances. This study investigates the possible existence of a hormetic effect in three commonly used antiseptics-chlorhexidine digluconate, povidone iodine and benzalkonium chloride-on strains of reference of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Growth curves were determined for different concentrations of the disinfectants. The variables studied-concentration of disinfectant, instantaneous growth rate and number of generations-were analysed using linear, quadratic and cubic models to adjust for the variables. The three disinfectants tested show a significant hormetic effect with P. aeruginosa and a less significant effect with S. aureus. These findings point to a dose-response effect that is not linear at low concentrations, while hormetic effects observed at some low concentrations result in greater bacterial growth. In infected wounds, materials or surfaces where microorganisms may occupy zones of difficult access for a disinfectant, the hormetic effect may have important consequences.

  9. Thermodynamic Study on Antibacterial Effect of Different Extracts from Radix Isatis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study and analyze the antibacterial effects of different extracts from Radix Isatis. Methods: Staphylococcus aureus was used as the studied object in the experiment. Antibacterial effects of extracts from Radix Isatis were observed by thermocalrimetry on Staphylococcus aureus, together with common pharmacological experiments. Results: The total extract, ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extract, n-butylalcohol (nBuOH) extract, chloroform (CHCl3) extract and petroleum (P. E. ) extract had antiviral effects to some extent while the residue after extracting had no antibacterial activity. The potency of antiviral activity among them was as follows: nBuOH extract > EtOAc extract > CHCl3 extract> total extract >P. E. extract. Conclusion: The antibacteriall effects of Radix Isatis were not limited to any active portion, showing that Radix Isatis exerts its antibacterial effects by cooperation of different active fractions in varied ways.

  10. STUDIES ON ENERGY PENETRATION AND MARANGONI EFFECT DURING LASER MELTING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. ANTONY

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many additive manufacturing processes use energy from laser beam to melt powder particles to form layered objects. This paper mainly focused its attention on some of the major factors which plays a vital role during laser melting, namely energy penetration, shrinkage, absorptivity and marangoni effect. A study was performed to simulate and validate the effect of energy density on Marangoni effect and energy penetration. Analytical solutions to moving heat source problems were developed and their effects on process parameters viz. energy penetration through a layer of powder particles were validated. The numerical investigations demonstrated the significant effect of energy density on laser beam towards the laser track. Finally, experiments were performed to validate the simulations using Nd: YAG laser on SS316L powder particles. Thus this study would enable in optimizing the process parameters of the additive manufacturing process.

  11. Biological Studies On The Effect of Laser Radiation on Khapra Beetle Trogoderma granarium (Coleoptera : Dermestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nozahy, Adel M.; Ahmed, Salwa M. M. S.; Abdel-Kader, Mahomoud H.; Khalifa, Ibtesam A.

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the effect of Argon-ion laser and carbon dioxide laser radiation on Khapra beetle Trogoderma granarium and induced sterility. Radiobiological effects of irradiation were determined on adult stage of resulted 2-3 days-old pupae at LD30. The radiobiological studies induced determination of mortality, of, LD30, LD50 emergence, preovipositio period, fecundity, sterility, incubation period, larval duration, pupal duration and emergence of 1st generation. Experiments were carried out to determine the latent effect of irradiation on the wheat grains germination as well as the effects on the chemical constituents. In this respect irradiation of grains had no effect on the above ntioned parameters.

  12. An on-line modelling study of the direct effect of atmospheric aerosols over Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, L.; Baro, R.; Jimenez-Guerrero, P.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect human health, ecosystems, materials, visibility and Earths climate. Those effects are studied in this present work and depend mainly on the aerosol optical properties and how they influence the Earths radiation budget. Such properties can be divided on direct and semi-direct effect, produced by the scattering and absorption of radiation; and indirect effect, which influences the aerosols-cloud interactions. The aim of this work is to assess the direct effect through the study of the mean temperature; the radiation that reaches the Earths surface and at the top of the atmosphere; and the interaction of these meteorological variables with particulate matter (PM10). Results indicate decreases in temperature and radiation that reaches the Earth's surface, together with increases in the outgoing radiation at top of the atmosphere, and changes in the particulate matter, thus proving a colder climate due to the direct effect of atmospheric aerosols. (Author)

  13. In Vitro Study of Nitric Oxide Metabolites Effects on Human Hydatid of Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeghir-Bouteldja, Razika; Amri, Manel; Aitaissa, Saliha; Bouaziz, Samia; Mezioug, Dalila; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2009-01-01

    Hydatidosis is characterized by the long-term coexistence of larva Echinococcus granulosus and its host without effective rejection. Previous studies demonstrated nitric oxide (NO) production (in vivo and in vitro) during hydatidosis. In this study, we investigated the direct in vitro effects of NO species: nitrite (NO(2) (-)), nitrate (NO(3) (-)) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) on protoscolices (PSCs) viability and hydatid cyst layers integrity for 24 hours and 48 hours. Our results showed protoscolicidal activity of NO(2) (-) and ONOO(-) 24 hours and 3 hours after treatment with 320 muM and 80 muM respectively. Degenerative effects were observed on germinal and laminated layers. The comparison of the in vitro effects of NO species on the PSCs viability indicated that ONOO(-) is more cytotoxic than NO(2) (-). In contrast, NO(3) (-) has no effect. These results suggest possible involvement of NO(2) (-) and ONOO(-) in antihydatic action and point the efficacy of these metabolites as scolicidal agents.

  14. Liraglutide and DPP-4 inhibitors – side effects comparative clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    TIMOFTE, LUMINIŢA; STRATMANN, BERND; QUESTER, WULF; BOJIŢĂ, MARIUS TRAIAN; TSCHOEPE, DIETHELM

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to monitor the side effects of the GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in comparison to those of DPP-4 inhibitors (sitagliptin and vildagliptin), in order to determine their safety, tolerability and therapeutic efficiency. The study was carried out in the “Heart and Diabetes Center NRW” and included overweight patients with type 2 diabetes whose therapeutic regimen was switched to liraglutide or DPP-4 inhibitors. A validated questionnaire method was used to monitor the side effects during the hospitalization period, then again at 3, and 6 months after the beginning of the therapy. The therapy with liraglutide was associated with more side effects than the one with DPP-4 inhibitors. In general, side effects were declining with time, thus only few patients stopped therapy. The incretin therapy turned out to be a safe and effective therapeutic option for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26527929

  15. An experimental study on the effects of exhaust gas on spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hautala, E.L.; Holopainen, J.; Kaerenlampi, L. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science; Surakka, J.; Ruuskanen, J. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Motor vehicle exhausts are significant contributors to air pollution. Besides fine particles and inorganic gases, like CO, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}, exhaust gas contains a large group of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, many of which are phytotoxic. In field studies, exhausts are found to have both direct and indirect harmful effects on roadside plants. However, only few experimental studies have been made about the effects of exhaust gas emissions on coniferous trees. The aim of this study was to survey the effects of exhausts on spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) in standardized conditions. The concentrations of major exhaust gas components in the chamber atmosphere were detected simultaneously. The effects of exhaust on epistomatal waxes of first-year spruce needles are described. (author)

  16. A Review Study on the Effect of Iranian Herbal Medicines on Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimie, Marzieh; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Saki, Kourosh

    2015-10-01

    Addiction is a chronic and recurring disease that recurrence phenomenon is the most important challenge in treatment of this disease. Recent experiences have shown that synthetic drugs have undesirable side effects. Recent studies on medicinal plants have shown that they might be effective in treatment of different stages of addiction with lower side effects and costs. The aim of this study was to review the effects of medicinal plants in the treatment of morphine addiction in experimental animals. In this review article, by using keywords of morphine, withdrawal, and plants or herbal medicine in databases of indexing cites, desired articles were obtained since 1994. Inclusion criteria for selecting articles were the articles related to application of medicinal plants in decreasing symptoms resulting from morphine withdrawal were selected. Results of this study on experimental studies have shown that medicinal plants such as Trachyspermum copticum L and Melissa officinalis decrease the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome in a dose-dependent. Also, medicinal plants like Avena sativa, Hypericum perforatu, Passiflora incarnate, Valeriana officinalis, Satureja hortensis L, and Mentha piperita can have effects on behavior, emotions, and other problems of addicts, decreasing withdrawal symptoms. Results of this study showed that medicinal plants can be effective in controlling deprivation, decreasing dependency creation, and possibly DETOXIFICATION: of opioid addicts.

  17. Effectiveness and safety of natalizumab in real-world clinical practice: Review of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pesch, Vincent; Sindic, Christian J; Fernández, Oscar

    2016-10-01

    Clinical trials have shown that natalizumab is highly effective for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of this analysis was to conduct a targeted review of data from country-specific observational studies and registries of natalizumab-treated patients with relapsing MS in order to more fully investigate the longer-term effectiveness and safety of this disease-modifying therapy in real-world clinical practice settings. A PubMed search was conducted on March 13, 2014, using the terms (natalizumab AND multiple sclerosis) AND (observational OR registry OR post-marketing OR clinical practice). Only English-language papers that reported effectiveness (in terms of effects on relapses, disability progression, and magnetic resonance imaging findings) and/or safety results from studies were included. Data from 22 studies/registries were included. Annualized relapse rates decreased by 73%-94% from baseline across the studies, with improvement maintained for up to 5 years during natalizumab treatment. Natalizumab effectiveness was also demonstrated via assessment of disability progression (Expanded Disability Status Scale), radiological measures, and no-evidence-of-disease-activity measures (clinical, radiological, and overall). Results were similar among patient groups stratified by level of disease activity. Safety outcomes were consistent with natalizumab's known safety profile. Data from country-specific observational studies and registries varying in size and scope support the effectiveness and safety of natalizumab in a broad range of patients in clinical practice.

  18. Antidepressive and anxiolytic effects of ayahuasca: a systematic literature review of animal and human studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael G. dos Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To conduct a systematic literature review of animal and human studies reporting anxiolytic or antidepressive effects of ayahuasca or some of its isolated alkaloids (dimethyltryptamine, harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline. Methods: Papers published until 3 April 2015 were retrieved from the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases following a comprehensive search strategy and using a predetermined set of criteria for article selection. Results: Five hundred and fourteen studies were identified, of which 21 met the established criteria. Studies in animals have shown anxiolytic and antidepressive effects of ayahuasca, harmine, and harmaline, and experimental studies in humans and mental health assessments of experienced ayahuasca consumers also suggest that ayahuasca is associated with reductions in anxiety and depressive symptoms. A pilot study reported rapid antidepressive effects of a single ayahuasca dose in six patients with recurrent depression. Conclusion: Considering the need for new drugs that produce fewer adverse effects and are more effective in reducing anxiety and depression symptomatology, the described effects of ayahuasca and its alkaloids should be further investigated.

  19. Effects of education and race on cognitive decline: An integrative study of generalizability versus study-specific results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Alden L; Mungas, Dan M; Crane, Paul K; Gibbons, Laura E; MacKay-Brandt, Anna; Manly, Jennifer J; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Romero, Heather; Sachs, Bonnie; Thomas, Michael; Potter, Guy G; Jones, Richard N

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was to examine variability across multiple prospective cohort studies in level and rate of cognitive decline by race/ethnicity and years of education. We compare data across studies, we harmonized estimates of common latent factors representing overall or general cognitive performance, memory, and executive function derived from the: (a) Washington Heights, Hamilton Heights, Inwood Columbia Aging Project (N = 4,115), (b) Spanish and English Neuropsychological Assessment Scales (N = 525), (c) Duke Memory, Health, and Aging study (N = 578), and (d) Neurocognitive Outcomes of Depression in the Elderly (N = 585). We modeled cognitive change over age for cognitive outcomes by race, education, and study. We adjusted models for sex, dementia status, and study-specific characteristics. The results found that for baseline levels of overall cognitive performance, memory, and executive function, differences in race and education tended to be larger than between-study differences and consistent across studies. This pattern did not hold for rate of cognitive decline: effects of education and race/ethnicity on cognitive change were not consistently observed across studies, and when present were small, with racial/ethnic minorities and those with lower education declining at faster rates. In this diverse set of datasets, non-Hispanic Whites and those with higher education had substantially higher baseline cognitive test scores. However, differences in the rate of cognitive decline by race/ethnicity and education did not follow this pattern. This study suggests that baseline test scores and longitudinal change have different determinants, and future studies to examine similarities and differences of causes of cognitive decline in racially/ethnically and educationally diverse older groups is needed.

  20. Molecular structure, IR spectra, and chemical reactivity of cisplatin and transplatin: DFT studies, basis set effect and solvent effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Qingzhu; Qiu, Ling; Wang, Tengfei; Yuan, Haoliang; Lin, Jianguo; Luo, Shineng

    2015-01-01

    Three different density functional theory (DFT) methods were employed to study the molecular structures of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) and trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (TDDP). The basis set effect on the structure was also investigated. By comparing the optimized structures with the experimental data, a relatively more accurate method was chosen for further study of the IR spectra and other properties as well as the solvent effect. Nineteen characteristic vibrational bands of the title compounds were assigned and compared with available experimental data. The number of characteristic peaks for the asymmetric stretching and deformation vibrations of N-H can serve as a judgment for the isomer between CDDP and TDDP. Significant solvent effect was observed on the molecular structures and IR spectra. The reduced density gradient analysis was performed to study the intramolecular interactions of CDDP and TDDP, and the nature of changes in the structures caused by the solvent was illustrated. Several descriptors determined from the energies of frontier molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) were applied to describe the chemical reactivity of the title compounds. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) surfaces showed that the amino groups were the most favorable sites that nucleophilic reagents tend to attack, and CDDP was easier to be attacked by nucleophilic reagents than TDDP.

  1. The Causal Effect of Federal Work-Study Participation: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Clayton, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Since 1964, the Federal Work-Study (FWS) program has provided funds to subsidize the wages of student employees, but it has never been studied directly. I use an instrumental variables difference-in-difference framework with administrative data from West Virginia to identify causal effects, comparing eligible and ineligible students across…

  2. The contribution of observational studies to the knowledge of drug effectiveness in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, Daniela; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; deJongste, Mike J. L.; van Sonderen, Eric; Klungel, Olaf H.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.

    2007-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the golden standard for the assessment of drug efficacy. Little is known about the add-on value of observational studies in heart failure (HF). We aimed to assess the contribution of observational studies to actual knowledge regarding the effectiveness of angi

  3. The Effects of Social Networking Sites on Students' Studying and Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    Social media is important to communicate with people, share/ask information, and follow/evaluate/interpret the events, etc. for everyone at the present time. The positive and negative effects of social networking sites on students' studying and habits were examined in this research. The study was conducted on 220 students in vocational school of…

  4. Sustained Effects of Ecstasy on the Human Brain: A Prospective Neuroimaging Study in Novel Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Win, Maartje M. L.; Jager, Gerry; Booij, Jan; Reneman, Liesbeth; Schilt, Thelma; Lavini, Christina; Olabarriaga, Silvia D.; den Heeten, Gerard J.; van den Brink, Wim

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested toxic effects of recreational ecstasy use on the serotonin system of the brain. However, it cannot be excluded that observed differences between users and non-users are the cause rather than the consequence of ecstasy use. As part of the Netherlands XTC Toxicity (NeXT) study, we prospectively assessed sustained…

  5. Clinical effects of buspirone in social phobia : A double-blind placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    denBoer, JA; Westenberg, HGM; Pian, KLH

    1997-01-01

    Background: The results of open pilot studies suggest that the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor agonist buspirone might be effective in social phobia. Method: In the present study, the efficacy of buspirone was investigated in patients with social phobia using a 12-week double-blind placebo-controlled

  6. Effects of a 3-year intervention: The Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Anna; El-Naaman, Bianca; Dencker, Magnus;

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study assessed short and long term effects of a 3-year controlled school-based physical activity (PA) intervention on fatness, cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in children. METHODS: The study involved 18 schools (10 intervention...

  7. A Value-Added Study of Teacher Spillover Effects across Four Core Subjects in Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kun

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the existence, magnitude, and impact of teacher spillover effects (TSEs) across teachers of four subject areas (i.e., mathematics, English language arts [ELA], science, and social studies) on student achievement in each of the four subjects at the middle school level. The author conducted a series of value-added (VA) analyses,…

  8. Biomimetic studies of wood decay: Simulating the effect of low molecular weight compounds and fungal enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Anne Christine Steenkjær; Howell, Caitlin; Jellison, Jody

    The effect of FeCl3 (Fe3+), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a low molecular weight compound (2,3- Dihydroxybenzoic acid), and oxalic acid on wood were tested in a study designed to mimic wood degradation by brown rot fungi. Previous studies suggest that these components are involved in the early stages...

  9. Effectiveness Study of a CBT-Based Adolescent Coping with Depression Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvik, Margit; Idsoe, Thormod; Bru, Edvin

    2014-01-01

    Even though the efficacy of group-based cognitive behavioural interventions is well established both for adolescents diagnosed with major depressive disorders as well as for adolescents with depressive symptoms, in order to prevent further development, there has been a call for effectiveness studies in real world settings. This study investigated…

  10. An Educational Study of the Barometric Effect of Cosmic Rays with a Geiger Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famoso, Barbara; La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    An educational study of the barometric effect of cosmic rays was carried out using an inexpensive experimental set-up that allowed for long-term monitoring of atmospheric pressure and cosmic ray flux as measured in a Geiger counter. The investigation was intended as a pilot study in view of ongoing involvements of high-school teams operating…

  11. Spaceship Nigeria: A Topic Study for Global Warming, Greenhouse Effect and Ozone Layer Depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okebukola, Peter; Akpan, Ben B.

    1997-01-01

    Explains the concept of a topic study, how it meets the needs of teachers seeking to integrate their teaching, and how it is especially well suited for environmental education. Outlines curriculum for a topic study on the greenhouse effect and ozone layer depletion. (DDR)

  12. Patients with Cluster A Personality Disorders in Psychotherapy: An Effectiveness Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bartak (Anna); H. Andrea (Helene); M.D. Spreeuwenberg (Marieke); M.M. Thunnissen (Moniek); U.M. Ziegler (Uli); J.J.M. Dekker (Jack)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract BACKGROUND: While psychopharmacological studies are common in patients with cluster A personality disorders, the effects of psychotherapy have received little attention. The aim of this study is to explore whether psychotherapeutic treatment yields health gains for these patien

  13. The Effect of Compensation Studies on Disadvantaged Children's Self Concept Levels and Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadioglu, Ömür

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of "Bir Umut Ol Benim Için" (Be My Hope) project which was prepared for the children who were disadvantaged by being influenced from several risk factors as compared to their peers on the self-concepts and locus of controls of the children. The study group consisted of 33 children who were…

  14. The effect of prosody teaching on developing word recognition skills for interpreter trainees : An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yenkimaleki, M.; V.J., van Heuven

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of the explicit teaching of prosodic features on developing word recognition skills with interpreter trainees. Two groups of student interpreters were composed. All were native speakers of Farsi who studied English translation and interpreting at the BA leve

  15. The effect of prosody teaching on developing word recognition skills for interpreter trainees. An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yenkimaleki, M.; V.J., van Heuven

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of the explicit teaching of prosodic features on developing word recognition skills with interpreter trainees. Two groups of student interpreters were composed. All were native speakers of Farsi who studied English translation and interpreting at the BA leve

  16. A Grounded Theory Study of Effective Global Leadership Development Strategies: Perspectives from Brazil, India, and Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokkesmoe, Karen Jane

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative, grounded theory study focuses on global leadership and global leadership development strategies from the perspective of people from three developing countries, Brazil, India, and Nigeria. The study explores conceptualizations of global leadership, the skills required to lead effectively in global contexts, and recommended…

  17. A calorimetric study of solute effects on the kinetic stability of a-amylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Søren Nymand; Andersen, Kim Bruno; Øgendal, Lars Holm;

    2009-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the applications of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to Study solute effects on the kinetics of irreversible protein denaturation. More specifically, denaturation of Bacillus Halmapalus alpha-amylase (BHA) was initiated by addition of EDTA to the calorimetric cell...

  18. Study on the protective effect of grape procyanidins on DNA damage induced by irradiaton.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To study the protective effect of grape procyanidins (GPC) on the irradiated DNA damage. Methods: In vivo study: After orally administration of GPC, mice in different groups were exposed to whole-body 60Co γ-rays at a dose of 2.

  19. A Study of the Probe Effect on the Apparent Image of Biological Atomic Force Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The probe effect on the apparent image of biological atomic force microscopy was explored in this study, and the potential of AFM in conformational study of gene related biological processes was illustrated by the specific nanostructural information of a new antitumor drug binding to DNA.

  20. The Effect of English Language Learning on Creative Thinking Skills: A Mixed Methods Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehic, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this sequential explanatory mixed-methods case study was to investigate the effects of English language learning on creative thinking skills in the domains of fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration as measured with the Alternate Uses Test. Unlike the previous research studies that investigated the links between English…

  1. Differential effects of olanzapine and risperidone on cognition in schizophrenia? A saccadic eye movement study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broerse, A; Crawford, TJ; den Boer, JA

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that novel antipsychotics have positive effects on certain cognitive functions in schizophrenia. The present study investigated this claim by means of saccadic paradigms, which provide a selective index of cognitive function. Thirty-three first-episode schizophrenic patients w

  2. The Effects of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) on the Academic Achievement of Students Studying "Electrochemistry"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günter, Tugçe; Alpat, Sibel Kilinç

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) on students' academic achievements in studying "Electrochemistry" within a course on Analytical Chemistry. The research was of a pretest-posttest control group quasi-experimental design and it was conducted with second year students in the Chemistry Teaching Program at…

  3. Effects of Continued Care: A Study of Chronic Illness in the Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Sidney; And Others

    This study of chronic illness in the home originates in theoretical and practical questions posed by physicians, nurses, and biometricians. The study covers the following elements: The research plan, the patient sample, providing continued care, interviewing, classification of disease and mental status, effect of treatment program, classification…

  4. A Naturalistic Investigation of Media Multitasking While Studying and the Effects on Exam Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Michael C.

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the use of multiple digital media technologies, including social networking platforms, by students while preparing for an examination (media multitasking) and the subsequent effects on exam performance. The level of media multitasking (number of simultaneous media technologies) and duration of study were used as…

  5. A study on the effect of green marketing on consumers’ purchasing intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdy Fallah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During the past two decades, there have been significant damages on environment such as ozone layer depletion, global warming effects, etc. and people are getting more concerned about taking necessary actions to help environment. The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of green marketing on consumers’ purchasing intention in dairy industry. The proposed study designs a questionnaire and distributes it among 154 randomly selected people who purchase dairy products in four different regions of city of Babol, located in north region of Iran. Using structural equation modeling, the study has detected that green marketing influences on consumers’ purchasing intention, positively.

  6. A Study of the Effectiveness of Blackboard Collaborate for Conducting Synchronous Courses at Multiple Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Tonsmann, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the effectiveness of the videoconferencing software Blackboard Collaborate for carrying out instruction at college level to students attending classes synchronously at multiple locations. The paper describes the motivation for this study, a brief literature review on the subject, the methodology used, and the results obtained. The main conclusion of this study is the confirmation that synchronous instruction, in general, and Blackboard Collaborate, in particular, is an effective environment for tuition of students at a distance. Based on this study, several recommendations to be used in synchronous education are provided.

  7. A study of the radioprotection effect of guarana (Paullinia cupana) on the fetuses of ICR mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Yeun Hwa; Hasegawa, Takeo; Yamamoto, Youichi; Suzuki, Ikukatsu [Suzuka Univ. of Medical Science, Suzuka (Japan); Yoon, Yeog Byung [Shinheung college, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Soo Yong [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    Guarana, a tropical plant is found in powdered for in health food and is very popular soft drink in Brazil as an energy feaster with its high caffeine contents. We examined its radioprotection effects during organogenesis stages of ICR mice by malformations rate and cellular lead 8 the embryo by radiation and analyzed the mechanism of the radioprotection effects in the fetal of ICR mice. The results of this study showed that Guarana reduced clearly the embryonic death rate and teratogenesis rate by radiation. Its radioprotection effect inject be related with its radioprotection effect might be related with its antioxidant effect or free radical scavenger. We need to exposure the Guarana as a potential radioprotection agent. Therefore, we investigated about radiation effects by Guarana using to mice experiments in this paper.

  8. Study on modal characteristics of perforated shell using effective Young's modulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhung, Myung Jo, E-mail: mjj@kins.re.kr [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Seon Oh [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: > The effective Young's modulus of perforated shell is proposed for modal analysis. > The penetration pattern is almost negligible for effective elastic constants. > The frequency of perforated shell decreases significantly due to the hole effect. - Abstract: For the perforated cylindrical shell submerged in fluid, it is almost impossible to develop a finite element model due to the necessity of the fine meshing of the shell and the fluid at the same time. This necessitates the use of solid shell with effective material properties. Unfortunately the effective elastic constants are not found in any references even though the ASME code is suggesting those for perforated plate. Therefore in this study the effective material properties of perforated shell are suggested by performing several finite element analyses with respect to the ligament efficiencies.

  9. Testing for direct genetic effects using a screening step in family-based association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon M Lutz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In genome wide association studies (GWAS, families based studies tend to have less power to detect genetic associations than population based studies, such as case-control studies. This can be an issue when testing if genes in a family based GWAS have a direct effect on the phenotype of interest or if the genes act indirectly through a secondary phenotype. When multiple SNPs are tested for a direct effect in the family based study, a screening step can be used to minimize the burden of multiple comparisons in the causal analysis. We propose a 2-stage screening step that can be incorporated into the family based association test (FBAT approach similar to the conditional mean model approach in the VanSteen-algorithm [1]. Simulations demonstrate that the type 1 error is preserved and this method is advantageous when multiple markers are tested. This method is illustrated by an application to the Framingham Heart Study.

  10. Towards Effective International Work-Integrated Learning Practica in Development Studies: Reflections on the Australian Consortium for "In-Country" Indonesian Studies' Development Studies Professional Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, overseas work-integrated learning practica have become an increasingly important part of development studies curricula in "Northern" universities. This paper examines the factors that shape pedagogical effectiveness in the provision of such programmes, focusing on the case of the Australian Consortium for "In-Country" Indonesian…

  11. Studying abroad and the effect on international labour market mobility: evidence from the introduction of ERASMUS

    OpenAIRE

    Parey, Matthias; Waldinger, Fabian

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of studying abroad on international labour market mobility later in life for university graduates. We exploit the introduction and expansion of the European ERASMUS student exchange programme as an instrument for studying abroad. We find that studying abroad increases an individual's probability of working in a foreign country by about 15 percentage points. We investigate heterogeneity in returns according to parental education and the student's financial situation. ...

  12. A Qualitative Study of the Teaching Effectiveness of English Listening Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵张立

    2014-01-01

    English listening teaching and learning is an import field that has acquired scholars’ attention. With the development of technology, in today’s English listening class, teaching equipment has been changing, and the mental and emotional standards of English learners and teachers are different. Therefore, English listening teaching and learning still leave space for continuing study. The study reported in this article was designed as an interview-based, field observing study to investigate the effectiveness of English listening class.

  13. Study of magnetic hysteresis effects in a storage ring using precision tune measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Hao, Hao; Mikhailov, Stepan F.; Xu, Wei; Li, Jing-Yi; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Ying. K.

    2016-12-01

    With the advances in accelerator science and technology in recent decades, the accelerator community has focused on the development of next-generation light sources, for example diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs), which require precision control of the electron beam energy and betatron tunes. This work is aimed at understanding magnet hysteresis effects on the electron beam energy and lattice focusing in circular accelerators, and developing new methods to gain better control of these effects. In this paper, we will report our recent experimental study of the magnetic hysteresis effects and their impacts on the Duke storage ring lattice using the transverse feedback based precision tune measurement system. The major magnet hysteresis effects associated with magnet normalization and lattice ramping are carefully studied to determine an effective procedure for lattice preparation while maintaining a high degree of reproducibility of lattice focusing. The local hysteresis effects are also studied by measuring the betatron tune shifts which result from adjusting the setting of a quadrupole. A new technique has been developed to precisely recover the focusing strength of the quadrupole by returning it to a proper setting to overcome the local hysteresis effect. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175180, 11475167) and US DOE (DE-FG02-97ER41033)

  14. High Humidity Aerodynamic Effects Study on Offshore Wind Turbine Airfoil/Blade Performance through CFD Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weipeng Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Damp air with high humidity combined with foggy, rainy weather, and icing in winter weather often is found to cause turbine performance degradation, and it is more concerned with offshore wind farm development. To address and understand the high humidity effects on wind turbine performance, our study has been conducted with spread sheet analysis on damp air properties investigation for air density and viscosity; then CFD modeling study using Fluent was carried out on airfoil and blade aerodynamic performance effects due to water vapor partial pressure of mixing flow and water condensation around leading edge and trailing edge of airfoil. It is found that the high humidity effects with water vapor mixing flow and water condensation thin film around airfoil may have insignificant effect directly on airfoil/blade performance; however, the indirect effects such as blade contamination and icing due to the water condensation may have significant effects on turbine performance degradation. Also it is that found the foggy weather with microwater droplet (including rainy weather may cause higher drag that lead to turbine performance degradation. It is found that, at high temperature, the high humidity effect on air density cannot be ignored for annual energy production calculation. The blade contamination and icing phenomenon need to be further investigated in the next study.

  15. Effect Size (Cohen's d of Cognitive Screening Instruments Examined in Pragmatic Diagnostic Accuracy Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Larner

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Many cognitive screening instruments (CSI are available to clinicians to assess cognitive function. The optimal method comparing the diagnostic utility of such tests is uncertain. The effect size (Cohen's d, calculated as the difference of the means of two groups divided by the weighted pooled standard deviations of these groups, may permit such comparisons. Methods: Datasets from five pragmatic diagnostic accuracy studies, which examined the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, the Mini-Mental Parkinson (MMP, the Six-Item Cognitive Impairment Test (6CIT, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, the Test Your Memory test (TYM, and the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R, were analysed to calculate the effect size (Cohen's d for the diagnosis of dementia versus no dementia and for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment versus no dementia (subjective memory impairment. Results: The effect sizes for dementia versus no dementia diagnosis were large for all six CSI examined (range 1.59-1.87. For the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment versus no dementia, the effect sizes ranged from medium to large (range 0.48-1.45, with MoCA having the largest effect size. Conclusion: The calculation of the effect size (Cohen's d in diagnostic accuracy studies is straightforward. The routine incorporation of effect size calculations into diagnostic accuracy studies merits consideration in order to facilitate the comparison of the relative value of CSI.

  16. A study on the effects of human resource management on making change within organization: A case study of banking industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Eyvazi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study to find the effects of human resource management on empowering employees in banking industry. The proposed study designs a questionnaire and distributes it among 243 randomly selected employees of the first Iranian private banks called Saman. There are four hypotheses in this survey. The first hypothesis investigates whether employment type influences customer satisfaction or not. The second hypothesis of the survey studies whether training as well as empowering employees could increase organizational commitment or not. The third hypothesis of the survey investigates whether there is a positive relationship between creating motivation as well as job security and profitability. Finally, the last hypothesis of this survey tries to find out whether there is a positive and meaningful relationship between leadership style and supplier satisfaction. The implementation of some statistical tests confirms all four hypotheses of the survey.

  17. A Systematic Review of Cost-Effectiveness Studies Reporting Cost-per-DALY Averted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Peter J.; Thorat, Teja; Zhong, Yue; Anderson, Jordan; Farquhar, Megan; Salem, Mark; Sandberg, Eileen; Saret, Cayla J.; Wilkinson, Colby; Cohen, Joshua T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Calculating the cost per disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted associated with interventions is an increasing popular means of assessing the cost-effectiveness of strategies to improve population health. However, there has been no systematic attempt to characterize the literature and its evolution. Methods We conducted a systematic review of cost-effectiveness studies reporting cost-per-DALY averted from 2000 through 2015. We developed the Global Health Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (GHCEA) Registry, a repository of English-language cost-per-DALY averted studies indexed in PubMed. To identify candidate studies, we searched PubMed for articles with titles or abstracts containing the phrases “disability-adjusted” or “DALY”. Two reviewers with training in health economics independently reviewed each article selected in our abstract review, gathering information using a standardized data collection form. We summarized descriptive characteristics on study methodology: e.g., intervention type, country of study, study funder, study perspective, along with methodological and reporting practices over two time periods: 2000–2009 and 2010–2015. We analyzed the types of costs included in analyses, the study quality on a scale from 1 (low) to 7 (high), and examined the correlation between diseases researched and the burden of disease in different world regions. Results We identified 479 cost-per-DALY averted studies published from 2000 through 2015. Studies from Sub-Saharan Africa comprised the largest portion of published studies. The disease areas most commonly studied were communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional disorders (67%), followed by non-communicable diseases (28%). A high proportion of studies evaluated primary prevention strategies (59%). Pharmaceutical interventions were commonly assessed (32%) followed by immunizations (28%). Adherence to good practices for conducting and reporting cost-effectiveness analysis varied

  18. The Near-Road Exposures and Effects of Urban Air Pollutants Study (NEXUS): study design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vette, Alan; Burke, Janet; Norris, Gary; Landis, Matthew; Batterman, Stuart; Breen, Michael; Isakov, Vlad; Lewis, Toby; Gilmour, M Ian; Kamal, Ali; Hammond, Davyda; Vedantham, Ram; Bereznicki, Sarah; Tian, Nancy; Croghan, Carry

    2013-03-15

    The Near-Road Exposures and Effects of Urban Air Pollutants Study (NEXUS) was designed to examine the relationship between near-roadway exposures to air pollutants and respiratory outcomes in a cohort of asthmatic children who live close to major roadways in Detroit, Michigan USA. From September 2010 to December 2012 a total of 139 children with asthma, ages 6-14, were enrolled in the study on the basis of the proximity of their home to major roadways that carried different amounts of diesel traffic. The goal of the study was to investigate the effects of traffic-associated exposures on adverse respiratory outcomes, biomolecular markers of inflammatory and oxidative stress, and how these exposures affect the frequency and severity of respiratory viral infections in a cohort of children with asthma. An integrated measurement and modeling approach was used to quantitatively estimate the contribution of traffic sources to near-roadway air pollution and evaluate predictive models for assessing the impact of near-roadway pollution on children's exposures. Two intensive field campaigns were conducted in Fall 2010 and Spring 2011 to measure a suite of air pollutants including PM2.5 mass and composition, oxides of nitrogen (NO and NO2), carbon monoxide, and black carbon indoors and outdoors of 25 participants' homes, at two area schools, and along a spatial transect adjacent to I-96, a major highway in Detroit. These data were used to evaluate and refine models to estimate air quality and exposures for each child on a daily basis for the health analyses. The study design and methods are described, and selected measurement results from the Fall 2010 field intensive are presented to illustrate the design and successful implementation of the study. These data provide evidence of roadway impacts and exposure variability between study participants that will be further explored for associations with the health measures.

  19. Culture Studies of Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Effects Associated with Nitrate Assimilation and Denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, D. M.; Granger, J.; Lehmann, M. F.; Difiore, P. J.; Tortell, P. D.

    2007-12-01

    The isotope effects of nitrate-consuming reactions such as nitrate assimilation and denitrification are potential indicators of the physiological state of the organisms carrying out these reactions. Moreover, an understanding of these isotope effects is needed to use the stable isotopes to investigate the fluxes associated with these reactions in modern and ancient environments. We have used batch cultures to investigate the nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope effects of (1) nitrate assimilation by eukaryotic and prokaryotic algae and by heterotrophic bacteria, and (2) nitrate reduction by denitrifying bacteria. We observe intra- and inter-specific variation in isotope effect amplitudes and, in the case of denitrifiers, indications of isotope effect decreases during individual nitrate drawdown experiments. However, the measured N and O isotope effect ratio is close to 1 for all studied organisms, with the exception of an unusual denitrifier (Rhodobacter sphaeroides) that possesses only periplasmic (non-respiratory) nitrate reductase. This observation and other findings are consistent with nitrate reductase being the predominant source of isotope fractionation and with most isotope effect amplitude variability arising from variable degrees to which nitrate imported into the cell is reduced versus effluxed back into the environment; the more efflux, the more complete the expression of the fractionation imparted by nitrate reduction. If this is the case, then isotope effect amplitudes in the field should be related to physiological conditions in the environment, a prediction that, we argue, is supported by recent studies of (1) nitrate assimilation in the polar ocean and (2) denitrification in sediment porewaters.

  20. Prolonged repeated acupuncture stimulation induces habituation effects in pain-related brain areas: an FMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanfu; Yang, Jun; Park, Kyungmo; Wu, Hongli; Hu, Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Bu, Junjie; Xu, Chunsheng; Qiu, Bensheng; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2014-01-01

    Most previous studies of brain responses to acupuncture were designed to investigate the acupuncture instant effect while the cumulative effect that should be more important in clinical practice has seldom been discussed. In this study, the neural basis of the acupuncture cumulative effect was analyzed. For this experiment, forty healthy volunteers were recruited, in which more than 40 minutes of repeated acupuncture stimulation was implemented at acupoint Zhusanli (ST36). Three runs of acupuncture fMRI datasets were acquired, with each run consisting of two blocks of acupuncture stimulation. Besides general linear model (GLM) analysis, the cumulative effects of acupuncture were analyzed with analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) to find the association between the brain response and the cumulative duration of acupuncture stimulation in each stimulation block. The experimental results showed that the brain response in the initial stage was the strongest although the brain response to acupuncture was time-variant. In particular, the brain areas that were activated in the first block and the brain areas that demonstrated cumulative effects in the course of repeated acupuncture stimulation overlapped in the pain-related areas, including the bilateral middle cingulate cortex, the bilateral paracentral lobule, the SII, and the right thalamus. Furthermore, the cumulative effects demonstrated bimodal characteristics, i.e. the brain response was positive at the beginning, and became negative at the end. It was suggested that the cumulative effect of repeated acupuncture stimulation was consistent with the characteristic of habituation effects. This finding may explain the neurophysiologic mechanism underlying acupuncture analgesia.

  1. The effect of creative drama method on the attitude towards course: A meta-analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çetin TORAMAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is both to gather the experimental studies which investigate the effect of creative drama on the attitudes of students towards the courses and to synthesize the findings of these studies. The studies within the scope of this current research were obtained from various databases such as “ProQuest Citations, Council of Higher Education National Thesis Center, Google Scholar, EBSCO, Taylor & Francis Online, Ebscohost, ERIC and Science Direct” by using keywords like drama, creative drama, creative drama method, attitude and attitude towards course. From the database searches, a total of 30 studies (12 articles, 16 master’s theses and two doctoral dissertations which examined the effect of creative drama method on students’ attitudes towards different courses and which were in accordance with the criteria for the meta-analysis, were obtained. The data were analyzed by using the “Comprehensive Meta-Analysis (CMA” and “Data Analysis and Statistical Software (STATA” programs. As the studies included in the meta-analysis distributed heterogeneously, the effect size of the studies were calculated by applying random effects model. According to the results of this study, it was identified that creative drama method positively affected the attitudes of students towards the courses. In the experimental studies, the differences in students’ attitudes towards their courses were investigated in the direction of moderator variables. Among these moderator variables, not only the period of experimental process, but also the educational level of the participants who were implemented the experimental applications created a significant difference in the effect size, whereas the other variables did not have a significant difference.

  2. Confirmation studies of Soviet research on immunological effects of microwaves: Russian immunology results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Yury G; Grigoriev, Oleg A; Ivanov, Alexander A; Lyaginskaya, Antonina M; Merkulov, Anton V; Shagina, Natalia B; Maltsev, Vyacheslav N; Lévêque, Philippe; Ulanova, Alla M; Osipov, Vyacheslav A; Shafirkin, Alexander V

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a replication study performed to investigate earlier Soviet studies conducted between 1974 and 1991 that showed immunological and reproductive effects of long-term low-level exposure of rats to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields. The early studies were used, in part, for developing exposure standards for the USSR population and thus it was necessary to confirm the Russian findings. In the present study, the conditions of RF exposure were made as similar as possible to those in the earlier experiments: Wistar rats were exposed in the far field to 2450 MHz continuous wave RF fields with an incident power density in the cages of 5 W/m² for 7 h/day, 5 days/week for a total of 30 days, resulting in a whole-body SAR of 0.16 W/kg. Effects of the exposure on immunological parameters in the brain and liver of rats were evaluated using the complement fixation test (CFT), as in the original studies, and an additional test, the more modern ELISA test. Our results, using CFT and ELISA, partly confirmed the findings of the early studies and indicated possible effects from non-thermal RF exposure on autoimmune processes. The RF exposure resulted in minor increases in formation of antibodies in brain tissue extract and the exposure did not appear to be pathological. In addition, a study was conducted to replicate a previous Soviet study on effects from the injection of blood serum from RF-exposed rats on pregnancy and foetal and offspring development of rats, using a similar animal model and protocol. Our results showed the same general trends as the earlier study, suggesting possible adverse effects of the blood serum from exposed rats on pregnancy and foetal development of intact rats, however, application of these results in developing exposure standards is limited.

  3. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate.

  4. The effectiveness and adverse effects profile of "burst" ketamine in refractory cancer pain: The VCOG PM 1-00 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kate; Ashby, Michael; Howell, Deb; Petersen, Jennifer; Brumley, David; Good, Phillip; Pisasale, Maria; Wein, Simon; Woodruff, Roger

    2010-01-01

    This multi-centre study of adjuvant "burst" ketamine in palliative care in-patients documents its effectiveness, duration of pain relief, and adverse effects (AE) profile. Patients received a three-to-five day continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSCI) of ketamine escalated from 100 to 300 to 500 mg/24 hours if required. When the effective or maximum tolerated dose was attained, the infusion was continued for three days and each patient assessed as a responder or non-responder using strict criteria. The response rate was 22/44 (50 percent), with 4 (9 percent) becoming pain-free. Pain relief lasting two or more weeks was documented in 50 percent of responders. AEs were documented daily using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Toxicity Criteria 0-4 scales. There were 11 grade 3 and 4 neurological AEs. However, no responders elected to cease treatment early due to neurological AEs. We concluded that this protocol in the controlled environment of an in-patient PC unit is relatively safe and simple with reasonable effectiveness.

  5. Mining Molecular Pharmacological Effects from Biomedical Text: a Case Study for Eliciting Anti-Obesity/Diabetes Effects of Chemical Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura, Elzbieta; Muresan, Sorel; Engkvist, Ola; Blomberg, Niklas; Chen, Hongming

    2014-05-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry, efficiently mining pharmacological data from the rapidly increasing scientific literature is very crucial for many aspects of the drug discovery process such as target validation, tool compound selection etc. A quick and reliable way is needed to collect literature assertions of selected compounds' biological and pharmacological effects in order to assist the hypothesis generation and decision-making of drug developers. INFUSIS, the text mining system presented here, extracts data on chemical compounds from PubMed abstracts. It involves an extensive use of customized natural language processing besides a co-occurrence analysis. As a proof-of-concept study, INFUSIS was used to search in abstract texts for several obesity/diabetes related pharmacological effects of the compounds included in a compound dictionary. The system extracts assertions regarding the pharmacological effects of each given compound and scores them by the relevance. For each selected pharmacological effect, the highest scoring assertions in 100 abstracts were manually evaluated, i.e. 800 abstracts in total. The overall accuracy for the inferred assertions was over 90 percent.

  6. Mathematical study of probe arrangement and nanoparticle injection effects on heat transfer during cryosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkhalili, Seyyed Mostafa; Ramazani S A, Ahmad; Nazemidashtarjandi, Saeed

    2015-11-01

    Blood vessels, especially large vessels have a greater thermal effect on freezing tissue during cryosurgery. Vascular networks act as heat sources in tissue, and cause failure in cryosurgery and reappearance of cancer. The aim of this study is to numerically simulate the effect of probe location and multiprobe on heat transfer distribution. Furthermore, the effect of nanoparticles injection is studied. It is shown that the small probes location near large blood vessels could help to reduce the necessary time for tissue freezing. Nanoparticles injection shows that the thermal effect of blood vessel in tissue is improved. Using Au, Ag and diamond nanoparticles have the most growth of ice ball during cryosurgery. However, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) nanoparticle can be used to protect normal tissue around tumor cell due to its influence on reducing heat transfer in tissue. Introduction of Au, Ag and diamond nanoparticles combined with multicryoprobe in this model causes reduction of tissue average temperature about 50% compared to the one probe.

  7. Design evaluation and optimisation in crossover pharmacokinetic studies analysed by nonlinear mixed effects models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thu Thuy; Bazzoli, Caroline; Mentré, France

    2012-05-20

    Bioequivalence or interaction trials are commonly studied in crossover design and can be analysed by nonlinear mixed effects models as an alternative to noncompartmental approach. We propose an extension of the population Fisher information matrix in nonlinear mixed effects models to design crossover pharmacokinetic trials, using a linearisation of the model around the random effect expectation, including within-subject variability and discrete covariates fixed or changing between periods. We use the expected standard errors of treatment effect to compute the power for the Wald test of comparison or equivalence and the number of subjects needed for a given power. We perform various simulations mimicking crossover two-period trials to show the relevance of these developments. We then apply these developments to design a crossover pharmacokinetic study of amoxicillin in piglets and implement them in the new version 3.2 of the r function PFIM.

  8. Effect of dislocation blocking on fracture behavior of Al and {alpha}-Fe: a multiscale study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noronha, S.J.; Farkas, D

    2004-01-25

    We use a multiscale approach in which results from atomistic simulations are combined with discrete dislocation (DD) dynamics simulations of crack-tip plasticity. The method is used to study the effects of dislocation blocking on the fracture behavior of {alpha}-iron and aluminum. We studied the effects of blocking for distances ranging from 5 nm to 1 mm and find that the fracture resistance is increased with increasing blocking distance. The atomistic and dislocation dynamics simulations show that the blocking of dislocations causes a net decrease in the shear stress projected on the slip plane, preventing further dislocation emission. Semi-brittle cleavage occurs after a certain number of dislocations are emitted, explicitly demonstrating the embrittling effects of dislocation blocking. This effect can contribute to the brittle behavior observed in some nanocrystalline metals.

  9. Effective weight loss for overweight children: a meta-analysis of intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snethen, Julia A; Broome, Marion E; Cashin, Susan E

    2006-02-01

    Childhood overweight has increased in the United States. Success of weight-loss programs has been limited (Barlow, S.E., & Dietz, W.H. (1998). Obesity evaluation and treatment: Expert committee recomendations. Pediatrics, 102, e29.). The purpose of this investigation was to systematically examine the effectiveness of weight-loss interventions for children. For this meta-analysis, seven weight-loss intervention studies were coded and quality index scores calculated. The interventions had a significant positive effect on weight-loss average d = 0.95, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.79 to 1.11. Limited interventional studies with effective long-term maintenance of weight loss in children are available in the literature. However, there are effective methods for weight loss in children.

  10. A study to test the effectiveness of placebo Reiki standardization procedures developed for a planned Reiki efficacy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, A A; Beuche, M; Laing, G; Leis, A; Nurse, J

    1999-04-01

    Reiki is one type of alternative therapy that is increasing in popularity. It is advocated by its practitioners as a precise method for connecting universal life energy with the body's innate process of healing through hands-on techniques. The claim of Reiki practitioners is that Reiki reduces a variety of physical problems and improves psychospiritual well-being. There are abundant anecdotal records that support the previous claim, and a few pioneer scientific studies are starting to emerge. Although the Reiki research in totality supports the anecdotal records, the absence of randomized and placebo-controlled trials precludes the interpretation of the outcomes as resulting from specific effects as opposed to placebo effects plus natural history. Authorities in the field indicate that researchers interested in placebo-controlled studies should have the placebo treatment look exactly like the real intervention in every respect. Because no studies could be found in the literature that tested standardization procedures for real and placebo Reiki, the decision was made to conduct one. The purpose of this study was to test the standardization procedures developed by our research team for placebo Reiki, before going ahead and conducting our planned full-scale randomized and placebo-controlled Reiki efficacy study. This study used a 4-round, crossover experimental design in which 20 blinded subjects (12 students, 4 breast cancer survivors, and 4 observers) were exposed to a combination of 2 interventions (Reiki plus Reiki, or placebo plus placebo, or Reiki plus placebo, or placebo plus Reiki); and were then asked to evaluate the interventions using a self-administered questionnaire. The blinded observers were used in round number 4. Two real Reiki practitioners in the Usui system were chosen first, then 2 placebo practitioners who closely resembled them were recruited. The placebo practitioners were trained in Reiki by the study Reiki Master and the principal

  11. Psychological effects of implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks. A review of study methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Compare, Angelo; Pagnini, Francesco; Essebag, Vidal; Proietti, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Background: The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) saves lives but clinical experience suggests that it may have detrimental effects on mental health. The ICD shock has been largely blamed as the main offender but empirical evidence is not consistent, perhaps because of methodological differences across studies. Objective: To appraise methodologies of studies that assessed the psychological effects of ICD shock and explore associations between methods and results. Data Sources: A comprehensive search of English articles that were published between 1980 and 30 June 2013 was applied to the following electronic databases: PubMed, EMBASE, NHS HTA database, PsycINFO, Sciencedirect and CINAHL. Review Methods: Only studies testing the effects of ICD shock on psychological and quality of life outcomes were included. Data were extracted according to a PICOS pre-defined sheet including methods and study quality indicators. Results: Fifty-four observational studies and six randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. Multiple differences in methods that were used to test the psychological effects of ICD shock were found across them. No significant association with results was observed. Conclusions: Methodological heterogeneity of study methods is too wide and limits any quantitative attempt to account for the mixed findings. Well-built and standardized research is urgently needed. PMID:25698991

  12. A study on the effects of advertisement on brand equity: Evidence from mobile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Samiei Nasr

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the effects of advertisement on brand equity. The study has accomplished on two well-known brands in mobile providers in city of Tehran, Iran. The study uses Aaker’s model to examine the effects of advertisement on various factors such as brand awareness, quality perception, brand loyalty and brand associate. The study also investigates the effects of brand awareness, quality perception and brand associate on brand loyalty. The results of our survey have concluded that advertisement could influence on some of the components of brand equity, significantly. For the first case study of this survey, Irancell, advertisement influences on brand awareness, brand quality and brand associate, significantly. In addition, brand awareness and brand loyalty also influence on brand quality and brand equity, positively. For the second case study of this survey, Mobile Telecommunication Company of Iran, the effects of advertisement on brand equity, brand awareness and brand associate have been confirmed. Moreover, brand awareness and brand quality influence on brand loyalty, positively. In addition, brand loyalty influences positively on brand equity.

  13. An evaluation of edge effects in nutritional accessibility and availability measures: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Dwayne E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper addresses the statistical use of accessibility and availability indices and the effect of study boundaries on these measures. The measures are evaluated via an extensive simulation based on cluster models for local outlet density. We define outlet to mean either food retail store (convenience store, supermarket, gas station or restaurant (limited service or full service restaurants. We designed a simulation whereby a cluster outlet model is assumed in a large study window and an internal subset of that window is constructed. We performed simulations on various criteria including one scenario representing an urban area with 2000 outlets as well as a non-urban area simulated with only 300 outlets. A comparison is made between estimates obtained with the full study area and estimates using only the subset area. This allows the study of the effect of edge censoring on accessibility measures. Results The results suggest that considerable bias is found at the edges of study regions in particular for accessibility measures. Edge effects are smaller for availability measures (when not smoothed and also for short range accessibility Conclusions It is recommended that any study utilizing these measures should correct for edge effects. The use of edge correction via guard areas is recommended and the avoidance of large range distance-based accessibility measures is also proposed.

  14. Study on Effect of Plants in office on Human Physiological/Psychological Responses

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Some offices have indoor environmental quality (IEQ) related problems such as space, indoor air quality (IAQ), office workers' thermal comfort, productivity and mental stress. As is well known, some foliage plants have effects of humidity control and VOC removal from indoor air, improvement of productivity and reducing workers' mental stress as well. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of indoor plants on physiological/psychological responses, and to demonstrate the mental he...

  15. The Antibacterial Effects of Apacaries Gel on Streptococcus mutans: An in vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Juntavee, Apa; Peerapattana, Jomjai; Ratanathongkam, Ariya; Nualkaew, Nartsajee; Chatchiwiwattana, Supaporn; Treesuwan, Panta

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: New approaches for chemomechanical caries removal require effective materials with antibacterial properties for removal of infected dentin. Apacaries gel is a newly developed material comprised polyphenol from mangosteen extracts and papain mixed in gel preparation. Aim: This study evaluated the antibacterial effects of Apacaries gel on Streptococcus mutans in vitro. Materials and methods: Mangosteen pericarp powder was extracted. The amount of phenolic compounds was dete...

  16. Effects of inhaled acid aerosols on lung mechanics: an analysis of human exposure studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Utell, M J

    1985-01-01

    There exist significant gaps in our understanding of human health effects from inhalation of pollutants associated with acid precipitation. Controlled clinical studies examine effects of criteria pollutants almost exclusively by assessing changes in lung mechanics. One constituent of acid precipitation, sulfuric acid aerosols, has been shown to induce bronchoconstriction in exercising extrinsic asthmatics at near ambient levels. These asthmatics may be an order of magnitude more sensitive to ...

  17. COMPARATIVE STUDIES BETWEEN SPECIES THAT DO AND DO NOT EXHIBIT THE WASHOUT EFFECT

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Patrick A.; Overby, Darryl R.; Freddo, Thomas F.; Gong, Haiyan

    2006-01-01

    Ocular perfusion studies from all non-human species performed to date consistently demonstrate a perfusion-volume-dependent increase in aqueous outflow facility known as the “washout” effect. However, this “washout” effect does not occur in human eyes. We have recently documented that, in bovine eyes, the washout associated increase in facility correlates with the extent of physical separation between the juxtacanalicular connective tissue (JCT) and the inner wall endothelium lining the aqueo...

  18. Studying the Immunomodulatory Effects of Small Molecule Ras-Inhibitors in Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    on the severity of AIA in the therapeutic dosing model. Rats were immunized with CFA and then graded regularly for signs of arthritis by a clinical...inhibits their effective downstream signaling. In multiple preclinical animal studies it has been shown that FTS effectively inhibited in vivo tumor ...the adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rat model − a classical animal model for RA − imply that FTS attenuates disease manifestation, as assessed by

  19. Effectiveness of Internal Organizational Communication: A case study of BBR Construction Systems (M) Sdn Bhd

    OpenAIRE

    Bijou Baby, Mr

    2003-01-01

    This dissertation looks at the importance of internal Organizational communication to achieve Organizational Effectiveness. The dissertation seeks to determine if organizational communication in an organization is related to its effective performance. This research explains how a particular organization looks into the aspects of communication and the ways its employees communicate. The dissertation is a result of in-depth case study in a construction company, evaluating the critical aspects o...

  20. Preliminary Studies of the Immunomodulator Effect of the Bougainvillea xbuttiana Extract in a Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lluvia Arteaga Figueroa; Leticia Barbosa Navarro; Martin Patiño Vera; Vera L. Petricevich

    2015-01-01

    Bougainvillea xbuttiana is used as an analgesic in folk medicine in Mexico. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of the ethanolic extract from B. xbuttiana on macrophages activities. The phytochemical screening was performed for determine the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, triterpenes, and saponins. The effects of B. xbuttiana were analyzed using the macrophages activities as determined by the H2O2 release, spreading and phagocytic index, vacuoles formation percen...